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Sample records for protein quantitation based

  1. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  2. A CAPS-based binding assay provides semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongyao; Zhang, Yaling; Zhao, Xiucai; Liu, Yao-Guang; Chen, Letian

    2016-02-15

    Investigation of protein-DNA interactions provides crucial information for understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation. Current methods for studying protein-DNA interactions, such as DNaseI footprinting or gel shift assays, involve labeling DNA with radioactive or fluorescent tags, making these methods costly, laborious, and potentially damaging to the environment. Here, we describe a novel cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS)-based binding assay (CBA), which is a label-free method that can simplify the semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions. The CBA tests the interaction between a protein and its target DNA, based on the CAPS pattern produced due to differences in the accessibility of a restriction endonuclease site (intrinsic or artificial) in amplified DNA in the presence and absence of the protein of interest. Thus, the CBA can produce a semi-quantitative readout of the interaction strength based on the dose of the binding protein. We demonstrate the principle and feasibility of CBA using B3, MADS3 proteins and the corresponding RY or CArG-box containing DNAs.

  3. Development and characterization of the NanoOrange protein quantitation assay: a fluorescence-based assay of proteins in solution.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laurie J; Haugland, Richard P; Singer, Victoria L

    2003-04-01

    We developed a sensitive fluorescence assay for the quantitation of proteins in solution using the NanoOrange reagent, a merocyanine dye that produces a large increase in fluorescence quantum yield upon interaction with detergent-coated proteins. The NanoOrange assay allowed for the detection of 10 ng/mL to 10 micrograms/mL protein with a standard fluorometer, offering a broad, dynamic quantitation range and improved sensitivity relative to absorption-based protein solution assays. The protein-to-protein variability of the NanoOrange assay was comparable to those of standard assays, including Lowry, bicinchoninic acid, and Bradford procedures. We also found that the NanoOrange assay is useful for detecting relatively small proteins or large peptides, such as aprotinin and insulin. The assay was somewhat sensitive to the presence of several common contaminants found in protein preparations such as salts and detergents; however, it was insensitive to the presence of reducing agents, nucleic acids, and free amino acids. The simple assay protocol is suitable for automation. Samples are briefly heated in the presence of dye in a detergent-containing diluent, allowed to cool to room temperature, and fluorescence is measured using 485-nm excitation and 590-nm emission wavelengths. Therefore, the NanoOrange assay is well suited for use with standard fluorescence microplate readers, fluorometers, and some laser scanners.

  4. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test. PMID:26491289

  5. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Bao, Yan; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Lu, Huiqi; Liu, Chang; Han, Huanxing

    2015-01-01

    Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs) enable on-site "yes" or "no" determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs)-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP). CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test.

  6. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guiqin; Shi, Fengying; Liu, Aiqiao; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57) would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator), member 5 (SLC25A5) and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO) would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF). In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation. PMID:28006025

  7. Characterization of Native Protein Complexes and Protein Isoform Variation Using Size-fractionation-based Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, Kathryn J.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Larance, Mark; Lamond, Angus I.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins form a diverse array of complexes that mediate cellular function and regulation. A largely unexplored feature of such protein complexes is the selective participation of specific protein isoforms and/or post-translationally modified forms. In this study, we combined native size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with high-throughput proteomic analysis to characterize soluble protein complexes isolated from human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells. Using this approach, we have identified over 71,500 peptides and 1,600 phosphosites, corresponding to over 8,000 proteins, distributed across 40 SEC fractions. This represents >50% of the predicted U2OS cell proteome, identified with a mean peptide sequence coverage of 27% per protein. Three biological replicates were performed, allowing statistical evaluation of the data and demonstrating a high degree of reproducibility in the SEC fractionation procedure. Specific proteins were detected interacting with multiple independent complexes, as typified by the separation of distinct complexes for the MRFAP1-MORF4L1-MRGBP interaction network. The data also revealed protein isoforms and post-translational modifications that selectively associated with distinct subsets of protein complexes. Surprisingly, there was clear enrichment for specific Gene Ontology terms associated with differential size classes of protein complexes. This study demonstrates that combined SEC/MS analysis can be used for the system-wide annotation of protein complexes and to predict potential isoform-specific interactions. All of these SEC data on the native separation of protein complexes have been integrated within the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, an online, multidimensional data-sharing resource available to the community. PMID:24043423

  8. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  9. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features

    PubMed Central

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E.; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters. PMID:25767204

  10. Quantitative Description of a Protein Fitness Landscape Based on Molecular Features.

    PubMed

    Meini, María-Rocío; Tomatis, Pablo E; Weinreich, Daniel M; Vila, Alejandro J

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the driving forces behind protein evolution requires the ability to correlate the molecular impact of mutations with organismal fitness. To address this issue, we employ here metallo-β-lactamases as a model system, which are Zn(II) dependent enzymes that mediate antibiotic resistance. We present a study of all the possible evolutionary pathways leading to a metallo-β-lactamase variant optimized by directed evolution. By studying the activity, stability and Zn(II) binding capabilities of all mutants in the preferred evolutionary pathways, we show that this local fitness landscape is strongly conditioned by epistatic interactions arising from the pleiotropic effect of mutations in the different molecular features of the enzyme. Activity and stability assays in purified enzymes do not provide explanatory power. Instead, measurement of these molecular features in an environment resembling the native one provides an accurate description of the observed antibiotic resistance profile. We report that optimization of Zn(II) binding abilities of metallo-β-lactamases during evolution is more critical than stabilization of the protein to enhance fitness. A global analysis of these parameters allows us to connect genotype with fitness based on quantitative biochemical and biophysical parameters.

  11. Hybrid agent-based model for quantitative in-silico cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Semenchenko, Anton; Oliveira, Guilherme; Atman, A P F

    2016-12-01

    An advanced vision of the mRNA translation is presented through a hybrid modeling approach. The dynamics of the polysome formation was investigated by computer simulation that combined agent-based model and fine-grained Markov chain representation of the chemical kinetics. This approach allowed for the investigation of the polysome dynamics under non-steady-state and non-continuum conditions. The model is validated by the quantitative comparison of the simulation results and Luciferase protein production in cell-free system, as well as by testing of the hypothesis regarding the two possible mechanisms of the Edeine antibiotic. Calculation of the Hurst exponent demonstrated a relationship between the microscopic properties of amino acid elongation and the fractal dimension of the translation duration time series. The temporal properties of the amino acid elongation have indicated an anti-persistent behavior under low mRNA occupancy and evinced the appearance of long range interactions within the mRNA-ribosome system for high ribosome density. The dynamic and temporal characteristics of the polysomal system presented here can have a direct impact on the studies of the co-translation protein folding and provide a validated platform for cell-free system studies.

  12. Quantitative analysis of glycated proteins.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Ramírez-Boo, María; Finamore, Francesco; Gluck, Florent; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2014-02-07

    The proposed protocol presents a comprehensive approach for large-scale qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycated proteins (GP) in complex biological samples including biological fluids and cell lysates such as plasma and red blood cells. The method, named glycation isotopic labeling (GIL), is based on the differential labeling of proteins with isotopic [(13)C6]-glucose, which supports quantitation of the resulting glycated peptides after enzymatic digestion with endoproteinase Glu-C. The key principle of the GIL approach is the detection of doublet signals for each glycated peptide in MS precursor scanning (glycated peptide with in vivo [(12)C6]- and in vitro [(13)C6]-glucose). The mass shift of the doublet signals is +6, +3 or +2 Da depending on the peptide charge state and the number of glycation sites. The intensity ratio between doublet signals generates quantitative information of glycated proteins that can be related to the glycemic state of the studied samples. Tandem mass spectrometry with high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD-MS2) and data-dependent methods with collision-induced dissociation (CID-MS3 neutral loss scan) are used for qualitative analysis.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein-phosphoinositide interactions with liposome-based methods.

    PubMed

    Busse, Ricarda A; Scacioc, Andreea; Hernandez, Javier M; Krick, Roswitha; Stephan, Milena; Janshoff, Andreas; Thumm, Michael; Kühnel, Karin

    2013-05-01

    We characterized phosphoinositide binding of the S. cerevisiae PROPPIN Hsv2 qualitatively with density flotation assays and quantitatively through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements using liposomes. We discuss the design of these experiments and show with liposome flotation assays that Hsv2 binds with high specificity to both PtdIns3P and PtdIns(3,5)P 2. We propose liposome flotation assays as a more accurate alternative to the commonly used PIP strips for the characterization of phosphoinositide-binding specificities of proteins. We further quantitatively characterized PtdIns3P binding of Hsv2 with ITC measurements and determined a dissociation constant of 0.67 µM and a stoichiometry of 2:1 for PtdIns3P binding to Hsv2. PtdIns3P is crucial for the biogenesis of autophagosomes and their precursors. Besides the PROPPINs there are other PtdIns3P binding proteins with a link to autophagy, which includes the FYVE-domain containing proteins ZFYVE1/DFCP1 and WDFY3/ALFY and the PX-domain containing proteins Atg20 and Snx4/Atg24. The methods described could be useful tools for the characterization of these and other phosphoinositide-binding proteins.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of proteins with bicinchoninic acid (BCA): resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering-based methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Zhi; Lee, Youngju; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing; Jung, Young Mee

    2012-12-21

    A rapid and highly sensitive bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reagent-based protein quantitation tool was developed using competitive resonance Raman (RR) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) methods. A chelation reaction between BCA and Cu(+), which is reduced by protein in an alkaline environment, is exploited to create a BCA-Cu(+) complex that has strong RR and SERRS activities. Using these methods, protein concentrations in solutions can be quantitatively measured at concentrations as low as 50 μg mL(-1) and 10 pg mL(-1). There are many advantages of using RR and SERRS-based assays. These assays exhibit a much wider linear concentration range and provide an additional one (RR method) to four (SERRS method) orders of magnitude increase in detection limits relative to UV-based methods. Protein-to-protein variation is determined using a reference to a standard curve at concentrations of BSA that exhibits excellent recoveries. These novel methods are extremely accurate in detecting total protein concentrations in solution. This improvement in protein detection sensitivity could yield advances in the biological sciences and medical diagnostic field and extend the applications of reagent-based protein assay techniques.

  15. Analysis of protein complexes through model-based biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyungwon; Kim, Sinae; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2010-01-01

    Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS) has become a common approach for identifying protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and complexes. However, data analysis and visualization often rely on generic approaches that do not take advantage of the quantitative nature of AP-MS. We present a novel computational method, nested clustering, for biclustering of label-free quantitative AP-MS data. Our approach forms bait clusters based on the similarity of quantitative interaction profiles and identifies submatrices of prey proteins showing consistent quantitative association within bait clusters. In doing so, nested clustering effectively addresses the problem of overrepresentation of interactions involving baits proteins as compared with proteins only identified as preys. The method does not require specification of the number of bait clusters, which is an advantage against existing model-based clustering methods. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm using two published intermediate scale human PPI data sets, which are representative of the AP-MS data generated from mammalian cells. We also discuss general challenges of analyzing and interpreting clustering results in the context of AP-MS data. PMID:20571534

  16. Bence-Jones protein - quantitative

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003597.htm Quantitative Bence-Jones protein test To use the sharing ... Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare ...

  17. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P.; O’Donoghue, Anthony J.; Knudsen, Giselle M.; Craik, Charles S.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events. PMID:27006500

  18. Quantitative MS-based enzymology of caspases reveals distinct protein substrate specificities, hierarchies, and cellular roles.

    PubMed

    Julien, Olivier; Zhuang, Min; Wiita, Arun P; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Knudsen, Giselle M; Craik, Charles S; Wells, James A

    2016-04-05

    Proteases constitute the largest enzyme family, yet their biological roles are obscured by our rudimentary understanding of their cellular substrates. There are 12 human caspases that play crucial roles in inflammation and cell differentiation and drive the terminal stages of cell death. Recent N-terminomics technologies have begun to enumerate the diverse substrates individual caspases can cleave in complex cell lysates. It is clear that many caspases have shared substrates; however, few data exist about the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM) of these substrates, which is critical to understanding their true substrate preferences. In this study, we use quantitative MS to determine the catalytic efficiencies for hundreds of natural protease substrates in cellular lysate for two understudied members: caspase-2 and caspase-6. Most substrates are new, and the cleavage rates vary up to 500-fold. We compare the cleavage rates for common substrates with those found for caspase-3, caspase-7, and caspase-8, involved in apoptosis. There is little correlation in catalytic efficiencies among the five caspases, suggesting each has a unique set of preferred substrates, and thus more specialized roles than previously understood. We synthesized peptide substrates on the basis of protein cleavage sites and found similar catalytic efficiencies between the protein and peptide substrates. These data suggest the rates of proteolysis are dominated more by local primary sequence, and less by the tertiary protein fold. Our studies highlight that global quantitative rate analysis for posttranslational modification enzymes in complex milieus for native substrates is critical to better define their functions and relative sequence of events.

  19. Quantitative methods for structural characterization of proteins based on deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shashilov, Victor A; Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Popova, Ludmila A; Lednev, Igor K

    2010-09-01

    Here we report on novel quantitative approaches for protein structural characterization using deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy. Specifically, we propose a new method combining hydrogen-deuterium (HD) exchange and Bayesian source separation for extracting the DUVRR signatures of various structural elements of aggregated proteins including the cross-beta core and unordered parts of amyloid fibrils. The proposed method is demonstrated using the set of DUVRR spectra of hen egg white lysozyme acquired at various stages of HD exchange. Prior information about the concentration matrix and the spectral features of the individual components was incorporated into the Bayesian equation to eliminate the ill-conditioning of the problem caused by 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of protonated and deuterated species. Secondary structure fractions obtained by partial least squares (PLS) and least squares support vector machines (LS-SVMs) were used as the initial guess for the Bayessian source separation. Advantages of the PLS and LS-SVMs methods over the classical least squares calibration (CLSC) are discussed and illustrated using the DUVRR data of the prion protein in its native and aggregated forms.

  20. Strigolactone-regulated proteins revealed by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Czarnecki, Olaf; Chourey, Karuna; Yang, Jun; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hurst, Gregory B; Pan, Chongle; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-03-07

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. A quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found that SLs regulate the expression of about three dozen proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  1. Strigolactone-Regulated Proteins Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Czarnecki, Olaf; Chourey, Karuna; Yang, Jun; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Pan, Chongle; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a new class of plant hormones. In addition to acting as a key inhibitor of shoot branching, SLs stimulate seed germination of root parasitic plants and promote hyphal branching and root colonization of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. They also regulate many other aspects of plant growth and development. At the transcription level, SL-regulated genes have been reported. However, nothing is known about the proteome regulated by this new class of plant hormones. Here, a quantitative proteomics approach using an isobaric chemical labeling reagent, iTRAQ, to identify the proteome regulated by SLs in Arabidopsis seedlings is presented. It was found SLs regulate the expression of about three dozens of proteins that have not been previously assigned to SL pathways. These findings provide a new tool to investigate the molecular mechanism of action of SLs.

  2. Quantitative single-molecule detection of protein based on DNA tetrahedron fluorescent nanolabels.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongshun; Liu, Xingti; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2014-07-01

    A highly sensitive method for single-molecule quantitative detection of human IgG is presented by the employment of a new fluorescent nanolabel. In this method, fluorescent nanolabels were assembled by inserting SYBR Green I into DNA tetrahedron nanostructure. The bio-nanolabels were attached to the streptavidin-antihuman antibody by a specific reaction between biotin and streptavidin. The antibody was combined with the target antigen, human IgG, which was immobilized on the silanized glass subtrate surface. Finally, epi-fluorescence microscopy (EFM) coupled with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device was employed for fluorescence imaging. The fluorescent spots corresponding to single protein molecule on images were counted and further used for the quantitative detection. It was found that the new nanolabel shows good photostability, biocompatiblity and exhibits no blinking compared to traditional labels like fluorescence dyes and quantum dot (QDs). In addition, the number of fluorescence spots on the images has a linear relationship with the concentration of human IgG in the range of 3.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-12)mol L(-1). What is more, this method showed an excellent specificity and a low matrix effect.

  3. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy-based relative localization analysis (STORM-RLA) for quantitative nanoscale assessment of spatial protein organization.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Rengasayee; Gourdie, Robert G

    2016-11-07

    The spatial association between proteins is crucial to understanding how they function in biological systems. Colocalization analysis of fluorescence microscopy images is widely used to assess this. However, colocalization analysis performed on two-dimensional images with diffraction-limited resolution merely indicates that the proteins are within 200-300 nm of each other in the xy-plane and within 500-700 nm of each other along the z-axis. Here we demonstrate a novel three-dimensional quantitative analysis applicable to single-molecule positional data: stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy-based relative localization analysis (STORM-RLA). This method offers significant advantages: 1) STORM imaging affords 20-nm resolution in the xy-plane and <50 nm along the z-axis; 2) STORM-RLA provides a quantitative assessment of the frequency and degree of overlap between clusters of colabeled proteins; and 3) STORM-RLA also calculates the precise distances between both overlapping and nonoverlapping clusters in three dimensions. Thus STORM-RLA represents a significant advance in the high-throughput quantitative assessment of the spatial organization of proteins.

  4. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy–based relative localization analysis (STORM-RLA) for quantitative nanoscale assessment of spatial protein organization

    PubMed Central

    Veeraraghavan, Rengasayee; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial association between proteins is crucial to understanding how they function in biological systems. Colocalization analysis of fluorescence microscopy images is widely used to assess this. However, colocalization analysis performed on two-dimensional images with diffraction-limited resolution merely indicates that the proteins are within 200–300 nm of each other in the xy-plane and within 500–700 nm of each other along the z-axis. Here we demonstrate a novel three-dimensional quantitative analysis applicable to single-molecule positional data: stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy–based relative localization analysis (STORM-RLA). This method offers significant advantages: 1) STORM imaging affords 20-nm resolution in the xy-plane and <50 nm along the z-axis; 2) STORM-RLA provides a quantitative assessment of the frequency and degree of overlap between clusters of colabeled proteins; and 3) STORM-RLA also calculates the precise distances between both overlapping and nonoverlapping clusters in three dimensions. Thus STORM-RLA represents a significant advance in the high-throughput quantitative assessment of the spatial organization of proteins. PMID:27307586

  5. Applications of an Automated and Quantitative CE-Based Size and Charge Western Blot for Therapeutic Proteins and Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Hamm, Melissa; Lancaster, Catherine; Loughney, John W

    2016-01-01

    Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and indispensable analytical tool that can be applied to characterize proteins. In recent years, labor-intensive SDS-PAGE and IEF slab gels have been replaced with CE-SDS (CGE) and CE-IEF methods, respectively, in the biopharmaceutical industry. These two CE-based methods are now an industry standard and are an expectation of the regulatory agencies for biologics characterization. Another important and traditional slab gel technique is the western blot, which detects proteins using immuno-specific reagents after SDS-PAGE separation. This technique is widely used across industrial and academic laboratories, but it is very laborious, manual, time-consuming, and only semi-quantitative. Here, we describe the applications of a relatively new CE-based western blot technology which is automated, fast, and quantitative. We have used this technology for both charge- and size-based CE westerns to analyze biotherapeutic and vaccine products. The size-based capillary western can be used for fast antibody screening, clone selection, product titer, identity, and degradation while the charge-based capillary western can be used to study product charge heterogeneity. Examples using this technology for monoclonal antibody (mAb), Enbrel, CRM197, and Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) vaccine proteins are presented here to demonstrate the utility of the capillary western techniques. Details of sample preparation and experimental conditions for each capillary western mode are described in this chapter.

  6. Development of MRM-based assays for the absolute quantitation of plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuzyk, Michael A; Parker, Carol E; Domanski, Dominik; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-01-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), sometimes called selected reaction monitoring (SRM), is a directed tandem mass spectrometric technique performed on to triple quadrupole mass spectrometers. MRM assays can be used to sensitively and specifically quantify proteins based on peptides that are specific to the target protein. Stable-isotope-labeled standard peptide analogues (SIS peptides) of target peptides are added to enzymatic digests of samples, and quantified along with the native peptides during MRM analysis. Monitoring of the intact peptide and a collision-induced fragment of this peptide (an ion pair) can be used to provide information on the absolute peptide concentration of the peptide in the sample and, by inference, the concentration of the intact protein. This technique provides high specificity by selecting for biophysical parameters that are unique to the target peptides: (1) the molecular weight of the peptide, (2) the generation of a specific fragment from the peptide, and (3) the HPLC retention time during LC/MRM-MS analysis. MRM is a highly sensitive technique that has been shown to be capable of detecting attomole levels of target peptides in complex samples such as tryptic digests of human plasma. This chapter provides a detailed description of how to develop and use an MRM protein assay. It includes sections on the critical "first step" of selecting the target peptides, as well as optimization of MRM acquisition parameters for maximum sensitivity of the ion pairs that will be used in the final method, and characterization of the final MRM assay.

  7. pH dependent protein stability: A quantitative approach based on Kramer's barrier escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Debarati

    2015-01-01

    The folding-unfolding mechanism of a protein in a living cell is the result of its molecular response to various perturbations due to changes in the chemical environment such as pH, ion concentration, ligand binding and many other complex chemical reactions. In this letter, a theoretical scheme based on single molecule force spectroscopy experiments and related theories, has been followed to capture the effect of the change of pH for a slow protonation-coupled folding-unfolding process, and the free energy landscape has been quantified in terms of protonation numbers, barrier height and pH, following Kramer's barrier crossing formalism.

  8. The Development and Application of a Quantitative Peptide Microarray Based Approach to Protein Interaction Domain Specificity Space*

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Brett W.; Kim, Yohan; Wang, Miaoyan; Peters, Bjoern; Rock, Ronald S.; Nash, Piers D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein interaction domain (PID) linear peptide motif interactions direct diverse cellular processes in a specific and coordinated fashion. PID specificity, or the interaction selectivity derived from affinity preferences between possible PID-peptide pairs is the basis of this ability. Here, we develop an integrated experimental and computational cellulose peptide conjugate microarray (CPCMA) based approach for the high throughput analysis of PID specificity that provides unprecedented quantitative resolution and reproducibility. As a test system, we quantify the specificity preferences of four Src Homology 2 domains and 124 physiological phosphopeptides to produce a novel quantitative interactome. The quantitative data set covers a broad affinity range, is highly precise, and agrees well with orthogonal biophysical validation, in vivo interactions, and peptide library trained algorithm predictions. In contrast to preceding approaches, the CPCMAs proved capable of confidently assigning interactions into affinity categories, resolving the subtle affinity contributions of residue correlations, and yielded predictive peptide motif affinity matrices. Unique CPCMA enabled modes of systems level analysis reveal a physiological interactome with expected node degree value decreasing as a function of affinity, resulting in minimal high affinity binding overlap between domains; uncover that Src Homology 2 domains bind ligands with a similar average affinity yet strikingly different levels of promiscuity and binding dynamic range; and parse with unprecedented quantitative resolution contextual factors directing specificity. The CPCMA platform promises broad application within the fields of PID specificity, synthetic biology, specificity focused drug design, and network biology. PMID:25135669

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cranfill, Paula J.; Sell, Brittney R.; Baird, Michelle A.; Allen, John R.; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W.; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FP) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning the blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has its own unique photophysical properties. Thus, there is no single “best” fluorescent protein for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for any given application, we have characterized quantitatively over 40 different FPs for their brightness, photostability, pH stability, and monomeric properties, which permits easy apples-to-apples comparisons between these FPs. We report the values for all of the FPs measured, but focus the discussion on the more popular and/or best performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  10. Stoichiometry of chromatin-associated protein complexes revealed by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smits, Arne H; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2013-01-07

    Many cellular proteins assemble into macromolecular protein complexes. The identification of protein-protein interactions and quantification of their stoichiometry is therefore crucial to understand the molecular function of protein complexes. Determining the stoichiometry of protein complexes is usually achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that rely on introducing stable isotope-labeled reference peptides into the sample of interest. However, these approaches are laborious and not suitable for high-throughput screenings. Here, we describe a robust and easy to implement label-free relative quantification approach that combines the detection of high-confidence protein-protein interactions with an accurate determination of the stoichiometry of the identified protein-protein interactions in a single experiment. We applied this method to two chromatin-associated protein complexes for which the stoichiometry thus far remained elusive: the MBD3/NuRD and PRC2 complex. For each of these complexes, we accurately determined the stoichiometry of the core subunits while at the same time identifying novel interactors and their stoichiometry.

  11. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  12. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis on S100 Calcium Binding Protein A2 in Metastasis of Laryngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Cong; Jiang, Xue Hua; Peng, Shi Fang

    2015-01-01

    Laryngeal cancer is the most frequent neoplasm in the head and neck region, with the vast majority of tumors originating from squamous cells. The survival rate of patients with laryngeal cancer has not improved substantially over the past 25 years. To acquire further knowledge regarding the molecules responsible for laryngeal cancer oncogenesis and, in turn, to improve target therapy,iTRAQ and mass spectrometry analysis were utilized to detect differences in protein expression from 15 paired laryngeal cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissue samples. Using mass spectrometry analysis, the expression levels of 100 proteins in laryngeal cancer samples were distinct from the non-tumor, non-cancerous samples. Further validation of the differentially expressed proteins S100A2, KRT16, FGB and HSPB1 were carried out using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. Functional analysis of one of the highly expressed proteins, S100 calcium binding protein A2 (S100A2), was performed using RNA interference. As a consequence, attenuated S100A2 expression enhanced the ability of HEp-2 cell lines to migrate and invade in vitro. Our investigation complements the current understanding of laryngeal cancer progression. Furthermore, this study supports the concept that enhanced expression of S100A2 may be a promising strategy in developing novel cancer therapeutic drugs. PMID:25874882

  13. Targeted Quantitation of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement. PMID:23517332

  14. Immunofluorescent quantitation of chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Leech, R M; Marrison, J L

    1996-12-01

    Using scanning light microscopy software to detect and measure immunofluorescence in leaf sections Rubisco concentration in situ in chloroplasts has been accurately determined throughout development. The fluorescence measurements were calibrated by comparison with values for Rubisco accumulation obtained from rocket immuno-electrophoresis profiles of soluble protein from isolated cells and from chloroplasts using a purified sample of Rubisco as the standard. It has been shown that in situ immunofluorescence can be used for cytoquantitation of proteins within individual chloroplasts to a sensitivity of 1fg and also for the comparison of the protein levels in adjacent chloroplasts and cells. Several important applications of this new technique are discussed.

  15. Protein standardization III: Method optimization basic principles for quantitative determination of human serum proteins on automated instruments based on turbidimetry or nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Blirup-Jensen, S

    2001-11-01

    Quantitative protein determinations in routine laboratories are today most often carried out using automated instruments. However, slight variations in the assay principle, in the programming of the instrument or in the reagents may lead to different results. This has led to the prerequisite of method optimization and standardization. The basic principles of turbidimetry and nephelometry are discussed. The different reading principles are illustrated and investigated. Various problems are identified and a suggestion is made for an integrated, fast and convenient test system for the determination of a number of different proteins on the same instrument. An optimized test system for turbidimetry and nephelometry should comprise high-quality antibodies, calibrators, controls, and buffers and a protocol with detailed parameter settings in order to program the instrument correctly. A good user program takes full advantage of the optimal reading principles for the different instruments. This implies--for all suitable instruments--sample preincubation followed by real sample blanking, which automatically corrects for initial turbidity in the sample. Likewise it is recommended to measure the reagent blank, which represents any turbidity caused by the antibody itself. By correcting all signals with these two blank values the best possible signal is obtained for the specific analyte. An optimized test system should preferably offer a wide measuring range combined with a wide security range, which for the user means few re-runs and maximum security against antigen excess. A non-linear calibration curve based on six standards is obtained using a suitable mathematical fitting model, which normally is part of the instrument software.

  16. Considerations when quantitating protein abundance by immunoblot.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A; Veiras, Luciana C; Minas, Jacqueline N; Ralph, Donna Lee

    2015-03-15

    The development of the immunoblot to detect and characterize a protein with an antisera, even in a crude mixture, was a breakthrough with wide-ranging and unpredictable applications across physiology and medicine. Initially, this technique was viewed as a tool for qualitative, not quantitative, analyses of proteins because of the high number of variables between sample preparation and detection with antibodies. Nonetheless, as the immunoblot method was streamlined and improved, investigators pushed it to quantitate protein abundance in unpurified samples as a function of treatment, genotype, or pathology. This short review, geared at investigators, reviewers, and critical readers, presents a set of issues that are of critical importance for quantitative analysis of protein abundance: 1) Consider whether tissue samples are of equivalent integrity and assess how handling between collection and assay influences the apparent relative abundance. 2) Establish the specificity of the antiserum for the protein of interest by providing clear images, molecular weight markers, positive and negative controls, and vendor details. 3) Provide convincing evidence for linearity of the detection system by assessing signal density as a function of sample loaded. 4) Recognize that loading control proteins are rarely in the same linear range of detection as the protein of interest; consider protein staining of the gel or blot. In summary, with careful attention to sample integrity, antibody specificity, linearity of the detection system, and acceptable loading controls, investigators can implement quantitative immunoblots to convincingly assess protein abundance in their samples.

  17. A strategy for liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry based quantitation of pegylated protein drugs in plasma using plasma protein precipitation with water-miscible organic solvents and subsequent trypsin digestion to generate surrogate peptides for detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Steven T; Ouyang, Zheng; Olah, Timothy V; Jemal, Mohammed

    2011-01-30

    Recently, we have developed liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS)-based methods for the quantitation of pegylated therapeutic proteins in plasma. The methods are based on the LC/MS/MS detection of a surrogate peptide generated from trypsin digestion of the therapeutic protein. Various parameters related to the bioanalytical methods were evaluated and optimized, including the preparation of calibration standards and quality control samples, sample extraction, internal standard selection and its stage of addition, trypsin digestion, and non-specific binding. In this paper, we report the development of a method for a specific pegylated therapeutic protein and detail the various optimization steps undertaken. Simple extraction of the pegylated therapeutic protein from plasma was achieved via the precipitation of the endogenous proteins in plasma using acidic isopropanol and the resulting supernatant extract was subjected to trypsin digestion. A unique tryptic peptide arising from the pegylated therapeutic protein was used for LC/MS/MS-based detection and quantitation. A protein and a peptide were used as internal standards, with the former added before the sample extraction and the latter after the sample extraction. The method developed is simple, sensitive, specific and rugged, and has been implemented in a high throughput 96-well format to analyze plasma samples from in vivo studies. A required lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) of 10 ng/mL, expressed in terms of the concentration of the protein drug, was easily achieved.

  18. Protein Quantitation of the Developing Cochlea Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows for the measurement of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a biological system. Additionally, mass spectrometry can also be used to quantify proteins and peptides. However, observing quantitative differences between biological systems using mass spectrometry-based proteomics can be challenging because it is critical to have a method that is fast, reproducible, and accurate. Therefore, to study differential protein expression in biological samples labeling or label-free quantitative methods can be used. Labeling methods have been widely used in quantitative proteomics, however label-free methods have become equally as popular and more preferred because they produce faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Here, we describe the methods by which proteins are isolated and identified from cochlear sensory epithelia tissues at different ages and quantitatively differentiated using label-free mass spectrometry.

  19. Quantitation of protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The concentration of protein in a sample prepared for two dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic analysis is usually determined by protein assay. Reasons for this include the following. (1) Protein quantitation ensures that the amount of protein to be separated is appropriate for the gel size and visualization method. (2) Protein quantitation facilitates comparison among similar samples, as image-based analysis is simplified when equivalent quantities of proteins have been loaded on the gels to be compared. (3) Quantitation is necessary in cases where the protein sample is labeled with dye before separation (1,2). The labeling chemistry is affected by the dye to protein ratio so it is essential to know the protein concentration before setting up the labeling reaction.A primary consideration with quantitating protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis is interference by nonprotein substances that may be present in the sample. These samples generally contain chaotropic solubilizing agents, detergents, reductants, buffers or carrier ampholytes, all of which potentially interfere with protein quantitation. The most commonly used protein assays in proteomics research are colorimetric assays in which the presence of protein causes a color change that can be measured spectrophotometrically (3). All protein assays utilize standards, a dilution series of a known concentration of a known protein, to create a standard curve. Two methods will be considered that circumvent some of the problems associated with interfering substances and are well suited for samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis. The first method (4.1.1) relies on a color change that occurs upon binding of a dye to protein and the second (4.1.2) relies on binding and reduction of cupric ion (Cu2+) ion to cuprous ion (Cu+) by proteins.

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-04

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  1. A comparison of protein quantitation assays for biopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Noble, J E; Knight, A E; Reason, A J; Di Matola, A; Bailey, M J A

    2007-10-01

    Dye-based protein determination assays are widely used to estimate protein concentration, however various reports suggest that the response is dependent on the composition and sequence of the protein, limiting confidence in the resulting concentration estimates. In this study a diverse set of model proteins representing various sizes of protein and covalent modifications, some typical of biopharmaceuticals have been used to assess the utility of dye-based protein concentration assays. The protein concentration assays (Bicinchoninic acid (BCA), Bradford, 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA), DC, Fluorescamine and Quant-i) were compared to the 'gold standard' assay, quantitative amino acid analysis (AAA). The assays that displayed the lowest variability between proteins, BCA and DC, also generated improved estimates when BSA was used as a standard, when compared to AAA derived concentrations. Assays read out by absorbance tended to display enhanced robustness and repeatability, whereas the fluorescence based assays had wider quantitation ranges and lower limits of detection. Protein modification, in the form of glycosylation and PEGylation, and the addition of excipients, were found to affect the estimation of protein concentration for some of the assays when compared to the unmodified protein. We discuss the suitability and limitations of the selected assays for the estimation of protein concentration in biopharmaceutical applications.

  2. Global subcellular characterization of protein degradation using quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Larance, Mark; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Kirkwood, Kathryn J; Ly, Tony; Lamond, Angus I

    2013-03-01

    Protein degradation provides an important regulatory mechanism used to control cell cycle progression and many other cellular pathways. To comprehensively analyze the spatial control of protein degradation in U2OS osteosarcoma cells, we have combined drug treatment and SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry with subcellular and protein fractionation. The resulting data set analyzed more than 74,000 peptides, corresponding to ~5000 proteins, from nuclear, cytosolic, membrane, and cytoskeletal compartments. These data identified rapidly degraded proteasome targets, such as PRR11 and highlighted a feedback mechanism resulting in translation inhibition, induced by blocking the proteasome. We show this is mediated by activation of the unfolded protein response. We observed compartment-specific differences in protein degradation, including proteins that would not have been characterized as rapidly degraded through analysis of whole cell lysates. Bioinformatic analysis of the entire data set is presented in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics, a web-based resource, with proteins annotated for stability and subcellular distribution.

  3. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  4. Optimized conditions for a quantitative SELDI TOF MS protein assay.

    PubMed

    Lomas, Lee; Clarke, Charlotte H; Thulasiraman, Vanitha; Fung, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The development of peptide/protein analyte assays for the purpose of diagnostic tests is driven by multiple factors, including sample availability, required throughput, and quantitative reproducibility. Laser Desorption/ionization mass spectrometry methods (LDI-MS) are particularly well suited for both peptide and protein characterization, and combining chromatographic surfaces directly onto the MS probe in the form of surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI)-biochips has improved the reproducibility of analyte detection and provided effective relative quantitation. Here, we provide methods for developing reproducible SELDI-based assays by providing a complex artificial protein matrix background within the sample to be analyzed that allows for a common and reproducible ionization background as well as internal normalization standards. Using this approach, quantitative assays can be developed with CVs typically less than 10% across assays and days. Although the method has been extensively and successfully implemented in association with a protein matrix from E. coli, any other source for the complex protein matrix can be considered as long as it adheres to a set of conditions including the following: (1) the protein matrix must not provide interferences with the analyte to be detected, (2) the protein matrix must be sufficiently complex such that a majority of ion current generated from the desorption of the sample comes from the complex protein matrix, and (3) specific and well-resolved protein matrix peaks must be present within the mass range of the analyte of interest for appropriate normalization.

  5. Attomole quantitation of protein separations with accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J S; Grant, P G; Buccholz, B A; Dingley, K; Turteltaub, K W

    2000-12-15

    Quantification of specific proteins depends on separation by chromatography or electrophoresis followed by chemical detection schemes such as staining and fluorophore adhesion. Chemical exchange of short-lived isotopes, particularly sulfur, is also prevalent despite the inconveniences of counting radioactivity. Physical methods based on isotopic and elemental analyses offer highly sensitive protein quantitation that has linear response over wide dynamic ranges and is independent of protein conformation. Accelerator mass spectrometry quantifies long-lived isotopes such as 14C to sub-attomole sensitivity. We quantified protein interactions with small molecules such as toxins, vitamins, and natural biochemicals at precisions of 1-5% . Micro-proton-induced-xray-emission quantifies elemental abundances in separated metalloprotein samples to nanogram amounts and is capable of quantifying phosphorylated loci in gels. Accelerator-based quantitation is a possible tool for quantifying the genome translation into proteome.

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR)-Based Biosensor Technology for the Quantitative Characterization of Protein-Carotenoid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vachali, Preejith P; Li, Binxing; Bartschi, Alexis; Bernstein, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method is a highly sensitive, label-free technique to study the non-covalent interactions of biomolecules, especially protein-protein and protein-small molecule interactions. We have explored this robust biosensor platform to study the interactions of carotenoid-binding proteins and their carotenoid ligands to assess the specificity of interaction, kinetics, affinity, and stoichiometry. These characterizations are important to further study uptake and transport of carotenoids to targeted tissues such as the macula of the human eye. In this review, we present an overview of the SPR method and optimization of assay conditions, and we discuss the particular challenges in studying carotenoid-protein interactions using SPR. PMID:25513962

  7. Fish Muscle Proteins: Extraction, Quantitation, and Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Denise

    Electrophoresis can be used to separate and visualize proteins. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), proteins are separated based on size. When protein samples are applied to such gels, it is usually necessary to know the protein content of the sample. This makes it possible to apply a volume of sample to the gel such that samples have a comparable amount of total protein. While it is possible to use an official method of protein analysis (e.g., Kjeldahl, N combustion) for such an application, it often is convenient to use a rapid spectroscopic protein analysis that requires only a small amount of sample. The bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay method will be used for this purpose.

  8. The Development of Quantitative Structure-Binding Affinity Relationship (QSBR) Models Based on Novel Geometrical Chemical Descriptors of the Protein-Ligand Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuxing; Golbraikh, Alexander; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Novel geometrical chemical descriptors have been derived based on the computational geometry of protein-ligand interfaces and Pauling atomic electronegativities (EN). Delaunay tessellation has been applied to a diverse set of 517 X-ray characterized protein-ligand complexes yielding a unique collection of interfacial nearest neighbor atomic quadruplets for each complex. Each quadruplet composition was characterized by a single descriptor calculated as the sum of the EN values for the four participating atom types. We termed these simple descriptors generated from atomic EN values and derived with the Delaunay Tessellation the ENTess descriptors and used them in the variable selection k-Nearest Neighbor quantitative structure-binding affinity relationship (QSBR) studies of 264 diverse protein-ligand complexes with known binding constants. 24 complexes with chemically dissimilar ligands were set aside as an independent validation set, and the remaining dataset of 240 complexes was divided into multiple training and test sets. The best models were characterized by the leave-one-out cross-validated correlation coefficient q2 as high as 0.66 for the training set and the correlation coefficient R2 as high as 0.83 for the test set. High predictive power of these models was confirmed independently by applying them to the validation set of 24 complexes yielding R2 as high as 0.85. We conclude that QSBR models built with the ENTess descriptors can be instrumental for predicting the binding affinity of receptor-ligand complexes. PMID:16640331

  9. Quantitative determination of cellulose accessibility to cellulase based on adsorption of a nonhydrolytic fusion protein containing CBM and GFP with its applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiong; Ye, Xinhao; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2007-12-04

    Heterogeneous cellulose accessibility is an important substrate characteristic, but all methods for determining cellulose accessibility to the large-size cellulase molecule have some limitations. Characterization of cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC) is vital for better understanding of the enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis mechanism (Zhang and Lynd, Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2004, 88, 797-824; 2006, 94, 888-898). Quantitative determination of cellulose accessibility to cellulase (m2/g of cellulose) was established based on the Langmuir adsorption of the fusion protein containing a cellulose-binding module (CBM) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP). One molecule of the recombinant fusion protein occupied 21.2 cellobiose lattices on the 110 face of bacterial cellulose nanofibers. The CAC values of several cellulosic materials -- regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC), bacterial microcrystalline cellulose (BMCC), Whatman No. 1 filter paper, fibrous cellulose powder (CF1), and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) -- were 41.9, 33.5, 9.76, 4.53, and 2.38 m2/g, respectively. The CAC value of amorphous cellulose made from Avicel was 17.6-fold larger than that of crystalline cellulose - Avicel. Avicel enzymatic hydrolysis proceeded with a transition from substrate excess to substrate limited. The declining hydrolysis rates over conversion are mainly attributed to a combination of substrate consumption and a decrease in substrate reactivity. Declining heterogeneous cellulose reactivity is significantly attributed to a loss of CAC where the easily hydrolyzed cellulose fraction is digested first.

  10. Quantitative Proteomics-Based Reconstruction and Identification of Metabolic Pathways and Membrane Transport Proteins Related to Sugar Accumulation in Developing Fruits of Pear (Pyrus communis).

    PubMed

    Reuscher, Stefan; Fukao, Yoichiro; Morimoto, Reina; Otagaki, Shungo; Oikawa, Akira; Isuzugawa, Kanji; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    During their 6 month development, pear (Pyrus communis) fruits undergo drastic changes in their morphology and their chemical composition. To gain a better understanding of the metabolic pathways and transport processes active during fruit development, we performed a time-course analysis using mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein identification and quantification of fruit flesh tissues. After pre-fractionation of the samples, 2,841 proteins were identified. A principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples from seven developmental stages into three distinct clusters representing the early, mid and late developmental phase. Over-representation analysis of proteins characteristic of each developmental phase revealed both expected and novel biological processes relevant at each phase. A high abundance of aquaporins was detected in samples from fruits in the cell expansion stage. We were able quantitatively to reconstruct basic metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which indicates sufficient coverage to reconstruct other metabolic pathways. Most of the enzymes that presumably contribute to sugar accumulation in pear fruits could be identified. Our data indicate that invertases do not play a major role in the sugar conversions in developing pear fruits. Rather, sucrose might be broken down by sucrose synthases. Further focusing on sugar transporters, we identified several putative sugar transporters from diverse families which showed developmental regulation. In conclusion, our data set comprehensively describes the proteome of developing pear fruits and provides novel insights about sugar accumulation as well as candidate genes for key reactions and transport steps.

  11. The APEX Quantitative Proteomics Tool: Generating protein quantitation estimates from LC-MS/MS proteomics results

    PubMed Central

    Braisted, John C; Kuntumalla, Srilatha; Vogel, Christine; Marcotte, Edward M; Rodrigues, Alan R; Wang, Rong; Huang, Shih-Ting; Ferlanti, Erik S; Saeed, Alexander I; Fleischmann, Robert D; Peterson, Scott N; Pieper, Rembert

    2008-01-01

    Background Mass spectrometry (MS) based label-free protein quantitation has mainly focused on analysis of ion peak heights and peptide spectral counts. Most analyses of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data begin with an enzymatic digestion of a complex protein mixture to generate smaller peptides that can be separated and identified by an MS/MS instrument. Peptide spectral counting techniques attempt to quantify protein abundance by counting the number of detected tryptic peptides and their corresponding MS spectra. However, spectral counting is confounded by the fact that peptide physicochemical properties severely affect MS detection resulting in each peptide having a different detection probability. Lu et al. (2007) described a modified spectral counting technique, Absolute Protein Expression (APEX), which improves on basic spectral counting methods by including a correction factor for each protein (called Oi value) that accounts for variable peptide detection by MS techniques. The technique uses machine learning classification to derive peptide detection probabilities that are used to predict the number of tryptic peptides expected to be detected for one molecule of a particular protein (Oi). This predicted spectral count is compared to the protein's observed MS total spectral count during APEX computation of protein abundances. Results The APEX Quantitative Proteomics Tool, introduced here, is a free open source Java application that supports the APEX protein quantitation technique. The APEX tool uses data from standard tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments and provides computational support for APEX protein abundance quantitation through a set of graphical user interfaces that partition thparameter controls for the various processing tasks. The tool also provides a Z-score analysis for identification of significant differential protein expression, a utility to assess APEX classifier performance via cross validation, and a utility to merge multiple

  12. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  13. Quantitative Measurement of cAMP Concentration Using an Exchange Protein Directly Activated by a cAMP-Based FRET-Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salonikidis, Petrus S.; Zeug, André; Kobe, Fritz; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2008-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors for the quantitative analysis of intracellular signaling, including sensors for monitoring cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), are of increasing interest. The measurement of the donor/acceptor emission ratio in tandem biosensors excited at the donor excitation wavelength is a commonly used technique. A general problem, however, is that this ratio varies not only with the changes in cAMP concentration but also with the changes of the ionic environment or other factors affecting the folding probability of the fluorophores. Here, we use a spectral FRET analysis on the basis of two excitation wavelengths to obtain a reliable measure of the absolute cAMP concentrations with high temporal and spatial resolution by using an “exchange protein directly activated by cAMP”. In this approach, FRET analysis is simplified and does not require additional calibration routines. The change in FRET efficiency (E) of the biosensor caused by [cAMP] changes was determined as ΔE = 15%, whereas E varies between 35% at low and 20% at high [cAMP], allowing quantitative measurement of cAMP concentration in the range from 150 nM to 15 μM. The method described is also suitable for other FRET-based biosensors with a 1:1 donor/acceptor stoichiometry. As a proof of principle, we measured the specially resolved cAMP concentration within living cells and determined the dynamic changes of cAMP levels after stimulation of the Gs-coupled serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7). PMID:18708470

  14. Silver enhanced ratiometric nanosensor based on two adjustable Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer modes for quantitative protein sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Yaju; Chen, Zhu; Xu, Danke

    2017-01-15

    We developed a silver decahedral nanoparticles (Ag10NPs)-enhanced ratiometric Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) nanosensor based on two adjustable FRET modes. Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and Cyanine3 (Cy3)-aptamer-Black hole quencher-2 (BHQ-2) were bound with Ag10NPs to form the ratiometric FRET nanosensor (Ag-Alexa/Cy3/BHQ-2). Alexa act as donor and Cy3 as acceptor in the FRET mode 1 while Cy3 was donor and BHQ-2 was acceptor in the FRET mode 2. In the absence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB), the fluorescence intensity of Alexa was lowest while that of Cy3 was highest. Upon the addition of PDGF-BB, Cy3-aptamer-BHQ-2 binds with PDGF-BB resulting in the change of structure of aptamer. The fluorescence intensity of Alexa increased while that of Cy3 decreased. In addition, the fluorescence intensity ratio of Alexa to Cy3 increased remarkably with PDGF-BB concentration in the range of 0.4-400ng/mL. A good linear response was obtained when the PDGF-BB concentrations were in the range of 3.1-200ng/mL, with the limit of detection at 0.4ng/mL. When compared to sensors without Ag10NPs (Alexa/Cy3/BHQ-2) and one without BHQ-2 (Ag-Alexa/Cy3), the new nanosensor Ag-Alexa/Cy3/BHQ-2 showed remarkable increase in sensitivity.

  15. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  16. iTRAQ-based quantitative analysis of hippocampal postsynaptic density-associated proteins in a rat chronic mild stress model of depression.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Shao, W; Liu, Z; Fan, S; Yu, J; Chen, J; Qiao, R; Zhou, J; Xie, P

    2015-07-09

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent psychiatric mood illness and a major cause of disability and suicide worldwide. However, the underlying pathophysiology of MDD remains poorly understood due to its heterogenic nature. Extensive pre-clinical research suggests that many molecular alterations associated with MDD preferentially localize to the postsynaptic density (PSD). Here, we used a rodent chronic mild stress (CMS) model to generate susceptible and unsusceptible subpopulations. Proteomic analysis using an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in enriched PSD preparations from the hippocampi of different groups. More than 1500 proteins were identified and quantified, and 74 membrane proteins were differentially expressed. Of these membrane proteins, 51 (69%) were identified by SynaptomeDB search as having a predicted PSD localization. The unbiased profiles identified several PSD candidate proteins that may be related to CMS vulnerability or insusceptibility, and these two CMS phenotypes displayed differences in the abundance of several types of proteins. A detailed protein functional analysis pointed to a role for PSD-associated proteins involved in signaling and regulatory functions. Within the PSD, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR2A and its downstream targets contribute to CMS susceptibility. Further analysis of disease relevance indicated that the PSD contains a complex set of proteins of known relevance to mental illnesses including depression. In sum, these findings provide novel insights into the contribution of PSD-associated proteins to stress susceptibility and further advance our understanding of the role of hippocampal synaptic plasticity in MDD.

  17. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  18. Quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins with peptide affinity-based enrichment and pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hoe; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; An, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-07-02

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is commonly used for the quantitative analysis of proteins during mass pectrometry (MS), and has excellent specificity and sensitivity for an analyte in a complex sample. In this study, a pseudo-MRM method for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins was developed using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (hybrid Q-TOF) MS and peptide affinity-based enrichment. First, a pseudo-MRM-based analysis using hybrid Q-TOF MS was performed for synthetic peptides selected as targets and spiked into tryptic digests of human serum. By integrating multiple transition signals corresponding to fragment ions in the full scan MS/MS spectrum of a precursor ion of the target peptide, a pseudo-MRM MS analysis of the target peptide showed an increased signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sensitivity, as well as an improved reproducibility. The pseudo-MRM method was then used for the quantitative analysis of the tryptic peptides of two low-abundance serological proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPκ), which were prepared with peptide affinity-based enrichment from human serum. Finally, this method was used to detect femtomolar amounts of target peptides derived from TIMP1 and PTPκ, with good coefficients of variation (CV 2.7% and 9.8%, respectively), using a few microliters of human serum from colorectal cancer patients. The results suggest that pseudo-MRM using hybrid Q-TOF MS, combined with peptide affinity-based enrichment, could become a promising alternative for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance target proteins of interest in complex serum samples that avoids protein depletion.

  19. Overcoming the metabolic burden of protein secretion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe--a quantitative approach using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Lange, Sabrina; Wilhelm, Nadine; Bureik, Matthias; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Heinzle, Elmar; Schneider, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion in yeast is generally associated with a burden to cellular metabolism. To investigate this metabolic burden in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed a set of strains secreting the model protein maltase in different amounts. We quantified the influence of protein secretion on the metabolism applying (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis in chemostat cultures. Analysis of the macromolecular biomass composition revealed an increase in cellular lipid content at elevated levels of protein secretion and we observed altered metabolic fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway, the TCA cycle, and around the pyruvate node including mitochondrial NADPH supply. Supplementing acetate to glucose or glycerol minimal media was found to improve protein secretion, accompanied by an increased cellular lipid content and carbon flux through the TCA cycle as well as increased mitochondrial NADPH production. Thus, systematic metabolic analyses can assist in identifying factors limiting protein secretion and in deriving strategies to overcome these limitations.

  20. Quantitative Assays for RAS Pathway Proteins and Phosphorylation States

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI CPTAC program is applying its expertise in quantitative proteomics to develop assays for RAS pathway proteins. Targets include key phosphopeptides that should increase our understanding of how the RAS pathway is regulated.

  1. Muscadine Grape Skin Extract Induces an Unfolded Protein Response-Mediated Autophagy in Prostate Cancer Cells: A TMT-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Liza J.; Rivera, Mariela; Hawsawi, Ohuod; Zou, Jin; Hudson, Tamaro; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Qiang; Cubano, Luis; Boukli, Nawal; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Muscadine grape skin extract (MSKE) is derived from muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia), a common red grape used to produce red wine. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the unfolded protein response (UPR) that serves as a survival mechanism to relieve ER stress and restore ER homeostasis. However, when persistent, ER stress can alter the cytoprotective functions of the UPR to promote autophagy and cell death. Although MSKE has been documented to induce apoptosis, it has not been linked to ER stress/UPR/autophagy. We hypothesized that MSKE may induce a severe ER stress response-mediated autophagy leading to apoptosis. As a model, we treated C4-2 prostate cancer cells with MSKE and performed a quantitative Tandem Mass Tag Isobaric Labeling proteomic analysis. ER stress response, autophagy and apoptosis were analyzed by western blot, acridine orange and TUNEL/Annexin V staining, respectively. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that ER stress response proteins, such as GRP78 were greatly elevated following treatment with MSKE. The up-regulation of pro-apoptotic markers PARP, caspase-12, cleaved caspase-3, -7, BAX and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic marker BCL2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis and apoptosis was visualized by increased TUNEL/Annexin V staining upon MSKE treatment. Moreover, increased acridine orange, and LC3B staining was detected in MSKE-treated cells, suggesting an ER stress/autophagy response. Finally, MSKE-mediated autophagy and apoptosis was antagonized by co-treatment with chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor. Our results indicate that MSKE can elicit an UPR that can eventually lead to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27755556

  2. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  3. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Manuel; Mittag, Judith J; Herling, Therese W; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K

    2016-03-17

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson's disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates.

  4. Beyond hairballs: the use of quantitative mass spectrometry data to understand protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The past 10 years have witnessed a dramatic proliferation in the availability of protein interaction data. However, for interaction mapping based on affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS), there is a wealth of information present in the datasets that often goes unrecorded in public repositories, and as such remains largely unexplored. Further, how this type of data is represented and used by bioinformaticians has not been well established. Here, we point out some common mistakes in how AP-MS data are handled, and describe how protein complex organization and interaction dynamics can be inferred using quantitative AP-MS approaches. PMID:22710165

  5. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  6. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; Yang, Lee Lisheng; Choi, Megan; Singer, Mary; Geller, Jil; Fisher, Susan; Hall, Steven; Hazen, Terry C.; Brenner, Steven; Butland, Gareth; Jin, Jian; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Chandonia, John-Marc; Biggin, Mark D.

    2016-04-20

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification of endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR.

  7. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; Yang, Lee Lisheng; Choi, Megan; Singer, Mary E.; Geller, Jil T.; Fisher, Susan J.; Hall, Steven C.; Hazen, Terry C.; Brenner, Steven E.; Butland, Gareth; Jin, Jian; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Chandonia, John-Marc; Biggin, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification of endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR. PMID:27099342

  8. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; ...

    2016-04-20

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris. These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification ofmore » endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR.« less

  9. Quartz crystal microbalances for quantitative biosensing and characterizing protein multilayers.

    PubMed

    Rickert, J; Brecht, A; Göpel, W

    1997-01-01

    The use of quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs) for quantitative biosensing and characterization of protein multilayers is demonstrated in three case studies. Monolayers of QCM-based affinity biosensors were investigated first. Layers of a thiol-containing synthetic peptide constituting an epitope of the foot-and-mouse-disease virus were formed on gold electrodes via self-assembly. The binding of specific antibodies to epitope-modified gold electrodes was detected for different concentrations of antibody solutions. Oligolayers were studied in a second set of experiments. Dextran hydrogels were modified by thrombin inhibitors. The QCM response was used in a competitive binding assay to identify inhibitors for thrombin at different concentrations. Multilayers of proteins formed by self-assembly of a biotin-conjugate and streptavidin were investigated next. The QCM frequency response was monitored as a function of layer thickness up to 20 protein layers. A linear frequency decay was observed with increasing thickness. The decay per layer remained constant, thus indicating perfect mass coupling to the substrate. Frequency changes a factor of four higher were obtained in buffer solution as compared to measurements in dry air. This indicates a significant incorporation of water (75% weight) in the protein layers. This water behaves like a solid concerning the shear mode coupling to the substrate. The outlook discusses briefly the need for controlled molecular engineering of overlayers for subsequent QCM analysis, and the importance of an additional multiparameter analysis with other transducer principles and with additional techniques of interface analysis to characterize the mechanical coupling of overlayers as biosensor coatings. A promising trend concerns the use of QCM-arrays for screening experiments.

  10. A comparison of nLC-ESI-MS/MS and nLC-MALDI-MS/MS for GeLC-based protein identification and iTRAQ-based shotgun quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Zhang, Sheng; Howe, Kevin; Wilson, David B; Moser, Felix; Irwin, Diana; Thannhauser, Theodore W

    2007-09-01

    The use of nLC-ESI-MS/MS in shotgun proteomics experiments and GeLC-MS/MS analysis is well accepted and routinely available in most proteomics laboratories. However, the same cannot be said for nLC-MALDI MS/MS, which has yet to experience such widespread acceptance, despite the fact that the MALDI technology offers several critical advantages over ESI. As an illustration, in an analysis of moderately complex sample of E. coli proteins, the use MALDI in addition to ESI in GeLC-MS/MS resulted in a 16% average increase in protein identifications, while with more complex samples the number of additional protein identifications increased by an average of 45%. The size of the unique peptides identified by MALDI was, on average, 25% larger than the unique peptides identified by ESI, and they were found to be slightly more hydrophilic. The insensitivity of MALDI to the presence of ionization suppression agents was shown to be a significant advantage, suggesting it be used as a complement to ESI when ion suppression is a possibility. Furthermore, the higher resolution of the TOF/TOF instrument improved the sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the data over that obtained using only ESI-based iTRAQ experiments using a linear ion trap. Nevertheless, accurate data can be generated with either instrument. These results demonstrate that coupling nanoLC with both ESI and MALDI ionization interfaces improves proteome coverage, reduces the deleterious effects of ionization suppression agents, and improves quantitation, particularly in complex samples.

  11. Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry: Insights for Protein Quantitation with this Technology.

    PubMed

    Kam, Richard Kin Ting; Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael Ho Ming

    2016-12-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a widely used technique in the clinical laboratory, especially for small molecule quantitation in biological specimens, for example, steroid hormones and therapeutic drugs. Analysis of circulating macromolecules, including proteins and peptides, is largely dominated by traditional enzymatic, spectrophotometric, or immunological assays in clinical laboratories. However, these methodologies are known to be subjected to interfering substances, for example heterophilic antibodies, as well as subjected to non-specificity issues. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using LC-MS platforms for protein analysis in the clinical setting, due to the superior specificity compared to immunoassay, and the possibility of simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteins. Different analytical approaches are possible using LC-MS-based methodology, including accurate mass measurement of intact molecules, protein digestion followed by detection of proteolytic peptides, and in combination with immunoaffinity purification. Proteins with different complexity, isoforms, variants, or chemical alteration can be simultaneously analysed by LC-MS, either by targeted or non-targeted approaches. While the LC-MS platform offers a more specific determination of proteins, there remain issues of LC-MS assay harmonization, correlation with current existing platforms, and the potential impact in making clinical decision. In this review, the clinical utility, historical aspect, and challenges in using LC-MS for protein analysis in the clinical setting will be discussed, using insulin-like growth factor (IGF) as an example.

  12. Serum Insulin-like Growth Factor I Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry: Insights for Protein Quantitation with this Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael Ho Ming

    2016-01-01

    Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a widely used technique in the clinical laboratory, especially for small molecule quantitation in biological specimens, for example, steroid hormones and therapeutic drugs. Analysis of circulating macromolecules, including proteins and peptides, is largely dominated by traditional enzymatic, spectrophotometric, or immunological assays in clinical laboratories. However, these methodologies are known to be subjected to interfering substances, for example heterophilic antibodies, as well as subjected to non-specificity issues. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in using LC-MS platforms for protein analysis in the clinical setting, due to the superior specificity compared to immunoassay, and the possibility of simultaneous quantitation of multiple proteins. Different analytical approaches are possible using LC-MS-based methodology, including accurate mass measurement of intact molecules, protein digestion followed by detection of proteolytic peptides, and in combination with immunoaffinity purification. Proteins with different complexity, isoforms, variants, or chemical alteration can be simultaneously analysed by LC-MS, either by targeted or non-targeted approaches. While the LC-MS platform offers a more specific determination of proteins, there remain issues of LC-MS assay harmonization, correlation with current existing platforms, and the potential impact in making clinical decision. In this review, the clinical utility, historical aspect, and challenges in using LC-MS for protein analysis in the clinical setting will be discussed, using insulin-like growth factor (IGF) as an example. PMID:28149264

  13. The TissueNet v.2 database: A quantitative view of protein-protein interactions across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Omer; Barshir, Ruth; Sharon, Moran; Lerman, Eugene; Kirson, Binyamin F.; Hekselman, Idan; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular interactions of human proteins within tissues is important for identifying their tissue-specific roles and for shedding light on tissue phenotypes. However, many protein–protein interactions (PPIs) have no tissue-contexts. The TissueNet database bridges this gap by associating experimentally-identified PPIs with human tissues that were shown to express both pair-mates. Users can select a protein and a tissue, and obtain a network view of the query protein and its tissue-associated PPIs. TissueNet v.2 is an updated version of the TissueNet database previously featured in NAR. It includes over 40 human tissues profiled via RNA-sequencing or protein-based assays. Users can select their preferred expression data source and interactively set the expression threshold for determining tissue-association. The output of TissueNet v.2 emphasizes qualitative and quantitative features of query proteins and their PPIs. The tissue-specificity view highlights tissue-specific and globally-expressed proteins, and the quantitative view highlights proteins that were differentially expressed in the selected tissue relative to all other tissues. Together, these views allow users to quickly assess the unique versus global functionality of query proteins. Thus, TissueNet v.2 offers an extensive, quantitative and user-friendly interface to study the roles of human proteins across tissues. TissueNet v.2 is available at http://netbio.bgu.ac.il/tissuenet. PMID:27899616

  14. Quantitation of carcinogen bound protein adducts by fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Liang-Shang; Otteson, Michael S.; Doxtader, Mark M.; Skipper, Paul L.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    A highly significant correlation of aflatoxin B 1 serum albumin adduct level with daily aflatoxin B 1 intake was observed in a molecular epidemiological study of aflatoxin carcinogenesis which used conventional fluorescence spectroscopy methods for adduct quantitation. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence techniques have been employed to quantitate antibenzo[ a]pyrene diol epoxide derived globin peptide adducts. Fast and efficient methods to isolate the peptide adducts as well as eliminate protein fluorescence background are described. A detection limit of several femtomoles has been achieved. Experimental and technical considerations of low temperature synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence line narrowing to improve the detection sensitivities are also presented.

  15. Global, quantitative and dynamic mapping of protein subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Itzhak, Daniel N; Tyanova, Stefka; Cox, Jürgen; Borner, Georg HH

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular localization critically influences protein function, and cells control protein localization to regulate biological processes. We have developed and applied Dynamic Organellar Maps, a proteomic method that allows global mapping of protein translocation events. We initially used maps statically to generate a database with localization and absolute copy number information for over 8700 proteins from HeLa cells, approaching comprehensive coverage. All major organelles were resolved, with exceptional prediction accuracy (estimated at >92%). Combining spatial and abundance information yielded an unprecedented quantitative view of HeLa cell anatomy and organellar composition, at the protein level. We subsequently demonstrated the dynamic capabilities of the approach by capturing translocation events following EGF stimulation, which we integrated into a quantitative model. Dynamic Organellar Maps enable the proteome-wide analysis of physiological protein movements, without requiring any reagents specific to the investigated process, and will thus be widely applicable in cell biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16950.001 PMID:27278775

  16. A wide range of protein isoforms in serum and plasma uncovered by a quantitative intact protein analysis system.

    PubMed

    Misek, David E; Kuick, Rork; Wang, Hong; Galchev, Vladimir; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Rong; Tra, John; Pisano, Michael R; Amunugama, Ravi; Allen, David; Walker, Angela K; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hanash, Samir M

    2005-08-01

    We have implemented an orthogonal 3-D intact protein analysis system (IPAS) to quantitatively profile protein differences between human serum and plasma. Reference specimens consisting of pooled Caucasian-American serum, citrate-anticoagulated plasma, and EDTA-anticoagulated plasma were each depleted of six highly abundant proteins, concentrated, and labeled with a different Cy dye (Cy5, Cy3, or Cy2). A mixture consisting of each of the labeled samples was subjected to three dimensions of separation based on charge, hydrophobicity, and molecular mass. Differences in the abundance of proteins between each of the three samples were determined. More than 5000 bands were found to have greater than two-fold difference in intensity between any pair of labeled specimens by quantitative imaging. As expected, some of the differences in band intensities between serum and plasma were attributable to proteins related to coagulation. Interestingly, many proteins were identified in multiple fractions, each exhibiting different pI, hydrophobicity, or molecular mass. This is likely reflective of the expression of different protein isoforms or specific protein cleavage products, as illustrated by complement component 3 precursor and clusterin. IPAS provides a high resolution, high sensitivity, and quantitative approach for the analysis of serum and plasma proteins, and allows assessment of PTMs as a potential source of biomarkers.

  17. Click-MS: Tagless Protein Enrichment Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry for Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smits, Arne H; Borrmann, Annika; Roosjen, Mark; van Hest, Jan C M; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-12-16

    Epitope-tagging is an effective tool to facilitate protein enrichment from crude cell extracts. Traditionally, N- or C-terminal fused tags are employed, which, however, can perturb protein function. Unnatural amino acids (UAAs) harboring small reactive handles can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins, thus serving as a potential alternative for conventional protein tags. Here, we introduce Click-MS, which combines the power of site-specific UAA incorporation, bioorthogonal chemistry, and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to specifically enrich a single protein of interest from crude mammalian cell extracts. By genetic encoding of p-azido-l-phenylalanine, the protein of interest can be selectively captured using copper-free click chemistry. We use Click-MS to enrich proteins that function in different cellular compartments, and we identify protein-protein interactions, showing the great potential of Click-MS for interaction proteomics workflows.

  18. Insights from quantitative metaproteomics and protein-stable isotope probing into microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Taubert, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bastida, Felipe; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Schmidt, Frank; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Jana

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of metaproteomics has enabled the direct identification and quantification of expressed proteins from microbial communities in situ, without the need for microbial enrichment. This became possible by (1) significant increases in quality and quantity of metagenome data and by improvements of (2) accuracy and (3) sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers (MS). The identification of physiologically relevant enzymes can help to understand the role of specific species within a community or an ecological niche. Beside identification, relative and absolute quantitation is also crucial. We will review label-free and label-based methods of quantitation in MS-based proteome analysis and the contribution of quantitative proteome data to microbial ecology. Additionally, approaches of protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) for deciphering community structures are reviewed. Information on the species-specific metabolic activity can be obtained when substrates or nutrients are labeled with stable isotopes in a protein-SIP approach. The stable isotopes ((13)C, (15)N, (36)S) are incorporated into proteins and the rate of incorporation can be used for assessing the metabolic activity of the corresponding species. We will focus on the relevance of the metabolic and phylogenetic information retrieved with protein-SIP studies and for detecting and quantifying the carbon flux within microbial consortia. Furthermore, the combination of protein-SIP with established tools in microbial ecology such as other stable isotope probing techniques are discussed.

  19. Quantitative Immunofluorescent Blotting of the Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (MRP2)

    PubMed Central

    Gerk, Phillip M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Quantitation of the expression levels of proteins involved in drug transport and disposition is needed to overcome limitations of film-based detection of chemiluminescent immunoblots. Purpose The purpose was to describe and validate a quantitative immunofluorescent blotting method for detection of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Isoform C2/Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 2 (ABCC2/MRP2). Methods Western blotting was performed by electrophoresis of membrane vesicle protein isolated from Sf9 cells overexpressing MRP2 subsequently blotting with infrared labeled secondary antibody. The bound complex was detected using the Odyssey Infrared Imaging System (Li-Cor; Lincoln, NE). The images were analyzed using the Odyssey Application Software to obtain the integrated intensities, followed by linear regression of the intensity data. Results The limits of quantitation for the time-insensitive technique described here were from 0.001μg to 0.5μg of total membrane protein, the coefficient of variation of the slope was 8.9%; r2 values were 0.986 ± 0.012. The utility and sensitivity of this technique was demonstrated in quantitating expression of MRP2 in human placental tissue samples, in which MRP2 was present in low abundance. Discussion The immunofluorescent blotting technique described provides sensitive, reproducible, and quantitative determinations of large, integral membrane proteins such as MRP2, all with potential long-term cost savings. PMID:21277982

  20. Study on the plasma protein binding rate of Schisandra lignans based on the LC-IT-TOF/MS technique with relative quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Yan-Na; Guan, Tian-Ye; Zheng, Xiao; Dai, Chen; Xing, Lu; Rao, Tai; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guang-Ji

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of the current study was to develop a universal method for a protein binding assay of complicated herbal components, and to investigate the possible relationship between compound polarity and protein binding using Schisadra lignans as an example. Firstly, the rat, dog and human plasma were spiked with three different concentrations of Schisandra chinensis extract (SLE), and ultramicrofiltration was used to obtain the unbound ingredients. Secondly, thirty-one Schisandra lignans in total plasma and ultrafiltered fluid were measured by LC-IT-TOFMS. Lastly, a relative exposure approach, which entailed calculating the relative concentrations of each Schisandra lignan from the corresponding calibration equation created from the calibration samples spiked with the stock solution of SLE, was applied in order to overcome the absence of authentic standards. The results showed that Schisandra lignans exhibited a high capability to bind with plasma protein, furthermore, the protein binding ratio of the lignan components increased proportionally with their individual chromatographic retention time, which indicated that the ratio of protein binding of lignans might increase accordingly with decreasing polarity. This study suggested that the compound polarity might be an important factor affecting the plasma protein binding of herbal components.

  1. Protein-based identification of quantitative trait loci associated with malignant transformation in two HER2+ cellular models of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A contemporary view of the cancer genome reveals extensive rearrangement compared to normal cells. Yet how these genetic alterations translate into specific proteomic changes that underpin acquiring the hallmarks of cancer remains unresolved. The objectives of this study were to quantify alterations in protein expression in two HER2+ cellular models of breast cancer and to infer differentially regulated signaling pathways in these models associated with the hallmarks of cancer. Results A proteomic workflow was used to identify proteins in two HER2 positive tumorigenic cell lines (BT474 and SKBR3) that were differentially expressed relative to a normal human mammary epithelial cell line (184A1). A total of 64 (BT474-184A1) and 69 (SKBR3-184A1) proteins were uniquely identified that were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold. Pathway inference tools were used to interpret these proteins in terms of functionally enriched pathways in the tumor cell lines. We observed "protein ubiquitination" and "apoptosis signaling" pathways were both enriched in the two breast cancer models while "IGF signaling" and "cell motility" pathways were enriched in BT474 and "amino acid metabolism" were enriched in the SKBR3 cell line. Conclusion While "protein ubiquitination" and "apoptosis signaling" pathways were common to both the cell lines, the observed patterns of protein expression suggest that the evasion of apoptosis in each tumorigenic cell line occurs via different mechanisms. Evidently, apoptosis is regulated in BT474 via down regulation of Bid and in SKBR3 via up regulation of Calpain-11 as compared to 184A1. PMID:22357162

  2. Multiple Reaction Monitoring for Direct Quantitation of Intact Proteins Using a Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Evelyn H.; Combe, Peter C.; Schug, Kevin A.

    2016-05-01

    Methods that can efficiently and effectively quantify proteins are needed to support increasing demand in many bioanalytical fields. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) is sensitive and specific, and it is routinely used to quantify small molecules. However, low resolution fragmentation-dependent MS detection can pose inherent difficulties for intact proteins. In this research, we investigated variables that affect protein and fragment ion signals to enable protein quantitation using QQQ-MS. Collision induced dissociation gas pressure and collision energy were found to be the most crucial variables for optimization. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions for seven standard proteins, including lysozyme, ubiquitin, cytochrome c from both equine and bovine, lactalbumin, myoglobin, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were determined. Assuming the eventual goal of applying such methodology is to analyze protein in biological fluids, a liquid chromatography method was developed. Calibration curves of six standard proteins (excluding PSA) were obtained to show the feasibility of intact protein quantification using QQQ-MS. Linearity (2-3 orders), limits of detection (0.5-50 μg/mL), accuracy (<5% error), and precision (1%-12% CV) were determined for each model protein. Sensitivities for different proteins varied considerably. Biological fluids, including human urine, equine plasma, and bovine plasma were used to demonstrate the specificity of the approach. The purpose of this model study was to identify, study, and demonstrate the advantages and challenges for QQQ-MS-based intact protein quantitation, a largely underutilized approach to date.

  3. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  4. Quantitative and sensitive detection of the SARS-CoV spike protein using bispecific monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Hoon H; Palaniyappan, Arivazhagan; Ganguly, Advaita; Bhatnagar, Pravin K; Das, Dipankar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2013-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike protein is known to mediate receptor interaction and immune recognition and thus it is considered as a major target for vaccine design. The spike protein plays an important role in virus entry, virus receptor interactions, and virus tropism. Sensitive diagnosis of SARS is essential for the control of the disease in humans. Recombinant SARS-CoV S1 antigen was produced and purified for the development of monoclonal and bi-specific monoclonal antibodies. The hybridomas secreting anti-S1 antibodies, F26G18 and P136.8D12, were fused respectively with the YP4 hybridoma to generate quadromas. The sandwich ELISA was formed by using F26G18 as a coating antibody and biotinylated F26G18 as a detection antibody with a detection limit of 0.037μg/ml (p<0.02). The same detection limit was found with P136.8D12 as a coating antibody and biotinylated F26G18 as a detection antibody. The sensitivity was improved (detection limit of 0.019μg/ml), however, when using bi-specific monoclonal antibody (F157) as the detection antibody. In conclusion, the method described in this study allows sensitive detection of a recombinant SARS spike protein by sandwich ELISA with bi-specific monoclonal antibody and could be used for the diagnosis of patients suspected with SARS.

  5. From quantitative protein complex analysis to disease mechanism.

    PubMed

    Texier, Y; Kinkl, N; Boldt, K; Ueffing, M

    2012-12-15

    Interest in the field of cilia biology and cilia-associated diseases - ciliopathies - has strongly increased over the last few years. Proteomic technologies, especially protein complex analysis by affinity purification-based methods, have been used to decipher various basic but also disease-associated mechanisms. This review focusses on some selected recent studies using affinity purification-based protein complex analysis, thereby exemplifying the great possibilities this technology offers.

  6. Isotope coded protein labeling coupled immunoprecipitation (ICPL-IP): a novel approach for quantitative protein complex analysis from native tissue.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Andreas; Fuerholzner, Bettina; Kinkl, Norbert; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius

    2013-05-01

    High confidence definition of protein interactions is an important objective toward the understanding of biological systems. Isotope labeling in combination with affinity-based isolation of protein complexes has increased in accuracy and reproducibility, yet, larger organisms--including humans--are hardly accessible to metabolic labeling and thus, a major limitation has been its restriction to small animals, cell lines, and yeast. As composition as well as the stoichiometry of protein complexes can significantly differ in primary tissues, there is a great demand for methods capable to combine the selectivity of affinity-based isolation as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of isotope-based labeling with its application toward analysis of protein interactions from intact tissue. Toward this goal, we combined isotope coded protein labeling (ICPL)(1) with immunoprecipitation (IP) and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). ICPL-IP allows sensitive and accurate analysis of protein interactions from primary tissue. We applied ICPL-IP to immuno-isolate protein complexes from bovine retinal tissue. Protein complexes of immunoprecipitated β-tubulin, a highly abundant protein with known interactors as well as the lowly expressed small GTPase RhoA were analyzed. The results of both analyses demonstrate sensitive and selective identification of known as well as new protein interactions by our method.

  7. Absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins in transgenic organism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaojun; Shu, Yiwei; Peng, Changchao; Zhu, Lin; Guo, Guangyu; Li, Ning

    2012-08-01

    Post-translational modification isoforms of a protein are known to play versatile biological functions in diverse cellular processes. To measure the molar amount of each post-translational modification isoform (P(isf)) of a target protein present in the total protein extract using mass spectrometry, a quantitative proteomic protocol, absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins (AQUIP), was developed. A recombinant ERF110 gene overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis plant was used as the model organism for demonstration of the proof of concept. Both Ser-62-independent (14)N-coded synthetic peptide standards and (15)N-coded ERF110 protein standard isolated from the heavy nitrogen-labeled transgenic plants were employed simultaneously to determine the concentration of all isoforms (T(isf)) of ERF110 in the whole plant cell lysate, whereas a pair of Ser-62-dependent synthetic peptide standards were used to quantitate the Ser-62 phosphosite occupancy (R(aqu)). The P(isf) was finally determined by integrating the two empirically measured variables using the following equation: P(isf) = T(isf) · R(aqu). The absolute amount of Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform of ERF110 determined using AQUIP was substantiated with a stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis-based relative and accurate quantitative proteomic approach. The biological role of the Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform was demonstrated in transgenic plants.

  8. The Role of Extracellular Binding Proteins in the Cellular Uptake of Drugs: Impact on Quantitative In Vitro-to-In Vivo Extrapolations of Toxicity and Efficacy in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Research.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Burczynski, Frank J; Haddad, Sami

    2016-02-01

    A critical component in the development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models for estimating target organ dosimetry in pharmacology and toxicology studies is the understanding of the uptake kinetics and accumulation of drugs and chemicals at the cellular level. Therefore, predicting free drug concentrations in intracellular fluid will contribute to our understanding of concentrations at the site of action in cells in PBPK/PD research. Some investigators believe that uptake of drugs in cells is solely driven by the unbound fraction; conversely, others argue that the protein-bound fraction contributes a significant portion of the total amount delivered to cells. Accordingly, the current literature suggests the existence of a so-called albumin-mediated uptake mechanism(s) for the protein-bound fraction (i.e., extracellular protein-facilitated uptake mechanisms) at least in hepatocytes and cardiac myocytes; however, such mechanism(s) and cells from other organs deserve further exploration. Therefore, the main objective of this present study was to discuss further the implication of potential protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s) on drug distribution in cells under in vivo conditions. The interplay between the protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s) and the effects of a pH gradient, metabolism, transport, and permeation limitation potentially occurring in cells was also discussed, as this should violate the basic assumption on similar free drug concentration in cells and plasma. This was made because the published equations used to calculate drug concentrations in cells in a PBPK/PD model did not consider potential protein-facilitated uptake mechanism(s). Consequently, we corrected some published equations for calculating the free drug concentrations in cells compared with plasma in PBPK/PD modeling studies, and we proposed a refined strategy for potentially performing more accurate quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolations

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Molecule RNA-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Schoening, Jan C.; Anselmetti, Dario; Staiger, Dorothee; Ros, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA-binding proteins impact gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by interacting with cognate cis elements within the transcripts. Here, we apply dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the interaction of the Arabidopsis glycine-rich RNA-binding protein AtGRP8 with its RNA target. A dwell-time-dependent analysis of the single-molecule data in combination with competition assays and site-directed mutagenesis of both the RNA target and the RNA-binding domain of the protein allowed us to distinguish and quantify two different binding modes. For dwell times <0.21 s an unspecific complex with a lifetime of 0.56 s is observed, whereas dwell times >0.33 s result in a specific interaction with a lifetime of 208 s. The corresponding reaction lengths are 0.28 nm for the unspecific and 0.55 nm for the specific AtGRP8-RNA interactions, indicating formation of a tighter complex with increasing dwell time. These two binding modes cannot be dissected in ensemble experiments. Quantitative titration in RNA bandshift experiments yields an ensemble-averaged equilibrium constant of dissociation of KD = 2 × 10−7 M. Assuming comparable on-rates for the specific and nonspecific binding modes allows us to estimate their free energies as ΔG0 = −42 kJ/mol and ΔG0 = −28 kJ/mol for the specific and nonspecific binding modes, respectively. Thus, we show that single-molecule force spectroscopy with a refined statistical analysis is a potent tool for the analysis of protein-RNA interactions without the drawback of ensemble averaging. This makes it possible to discriminate between different binding modes or sites and to analyze them quantitatively. We propose that this method could be applied to complex interactions of biomolecules in general, and be of particular interest for the investigation of multivalent binding reactions. PMID:19527663

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Protein Complex Prediction Through Proteome-Wide Simulations.

    PubMed

    Rizzetto, Simone; Priami, Corrado; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent progress in proteomics most protein complexes are still unknown. Identification of these complexes will help us understand cellular regulatory mechanisms and support development of new drugs. Therefore it is really important to establish detailed information about the composition and the abundance of protein complexes but existing algorithms can only give qualitative predictions. Herein, we propose a new approach based on stochastic simulations of protein complex formation that integrates multi-source data--such as protein abundances, domain-domain interactions and functional annotations--to predict alternative forms of protein complexes together with their abundances. This method, called SiComPre (Simulation based Complex Prediction), achieves better qualitative prediction of yeast and human protein complexes than existing methods and is the first to predict protein complex abundances. Furthermore, we show that SiComPre can be used to predict complexome changes upon drug treatment with the example of bortezomib. SiComPre is the first method to produce quantitative predictions on the abundance of molecular complexes while performing the best qualitative predictions. With new data on tissue specific protein complexes becoming available SiComPre will be able to predict qualitative and quantitative differences in the complexome in various tissue types and under various conditions.

  11. Flow Cytometric Single-Cell Analysis for Quantitative in Vivo Detection of Protein-Protein Interactions via Relative Reporter Protein Expression Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Jianqiang; Luan, Tian; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-03-07

    Cell-based two-hybrid assays have been key players in identifying pairwise interactions, yet quantitative measurement of protein-protein interactions in vivo remains challenging. Here, we show that by using relative reporter protein expression (RRPE), defined as the level of reporter expression normalized to that of the interacting protein, quantitative analysis of protein interactions in a bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) system can be achieved. A multicolor flow cytometer was used to measure simultaneously the expression levels of one of the two putative interacting proteins and the β-galactosidase (β-gal) reporter protein upon dual immunofluorescence staining. Single-cell analysis revealed that there exists bistability in the BACTH system and the RRPE is an intrinsic characteristic associated with the binding strength between the two interacting proteins. The RRPE-BACTH method provides an efficient tool to confirm interacting pairs of proteins, investigate determinant residues in protein-protein interaction, and compare interaction strength of different pairs.

  12. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A; Bradford, William D; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S; Li, Rong

    2015-03-30

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein-based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation.

  13. Quantitative Measurement of Protein Relocalization in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Alan; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Microscope cytometry provides a powerful means to study signaling in live cells. Here we present a quantitative method to measure protein relocalization over time, which reports the absolute fraction of a tagged protein in each compartment. Using this method, we studied an essential step in the early propagation of the pheromone signal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: recruitment to the membrane of the scaffold Ste5 by activated Gβγ dimers. We found that the dose response of Ste5 recruitment is graded (EC50 = 0.44 ± 0.08 nM, Hill coefficient = 0.8 ± 0.1). Then, we determined the effective dissociation constant (Kde) between Ste5 and membrane sites during the first few minutes when the negative feedback from the MAPK Fus3 is first activated. Kde changed during the first minutes from a high affinity of <0.65 nM to a steady-state value of 17 ± 9 nM. During the same period, the total number of binding sites decreased slightly, from 1940 ± 150 to 1400 ± 200. This work shows how careful quantification of a protein relocalization dynamic can give insight into the regulation mechanisms of a biological system. PMID:23442923

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Local Protein Solvation To Predict Solvent Effects on Protein Structure

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of solvent preferences of proteins is essential to the understanding of solvent effects on protein structure and stability. Although it is generally believed that solvent preferences at distinct loci of a protein surface may differ, quantitative characterization of local protein solvation has remained elusive. In this study, we show that local solvation preferences can be quantified over the entire protein surface from extended molecular dynamics simulations. By subjecting microsecond trajectories of two proteins (lysozyme and antibody fragment D1.3) in 4 M glycerol to rigorous statistical analyses, solvent preferences of individual protein residues are quantified by local preferential interaction coefficients. Local solvent preferences for glycerol vary widely from residue to residue and may change as a result of protein side-chain motions that are slower than the longest intrinsic solvation timescale of ∼10 ns. Differences of local solvent preferences between distinct protein side-chain conformations predict solvent effects on local protein structure in good agreement with experiment. This study extends the application scope of preferential interaction theory and enables molecular understanding of solvent effects on protein structure through comprehensive characterization of local protein solvation. PMID:22995508

  15. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/).

  16. LC-MS/MS Based Quantitation of ABC and SLC Transporter Proteins in Plasma Membranes of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Immortalized ARPE19 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, Laura; Sato, Kazuki; Reinisalo, Mika; Kidron, Heidi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Uchida, Yasuo; Urtti, Arto; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-02-14

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) forms the outer blood-retinal barrier between neural retina and choroid. The RPE has several important vision supporting functions, such as transport mechanisms that may also modify pharmacokinetics in the posterior eye segment. Expression of plasma membrane transporters in the RPE cells has not been quantitated. The aim of this study was to characterize and compare transporter protein expression in the ARPE19 cell line and hfRPE (human fetal RPE) cells by using quantitative targeted absolute proteomics (QTAP). Among 41 studied transporters, 16 proteins were expressed in hfRPE and 13 in ARPE19 cells. MRP1, MRP5, GLUT1, 4F2hc, TAUT, CAT1, LAT1, and MATE1 proteins were detected in both cell lines within 4-fold differences. MPR7, OAT2 and RFC1 were detected in the hfRPE cells, but their expression levels were below the limit of quantification in ARPE19 cells. PCFT was detected in both studied cell lines, but the expression was over 4-fold higher in hfRPE cells. MCT1, MCT4, MRP4, and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were upregulated in the ARPE19 cell line showing over 4-fold differences in the quantitative expression values. Expression levels of 25 transporters were below the limit of quantification in both cell models. In conclusion, we present the first systematic and quantitative study on transporter protein expression in the plasma membranes of ARPE19 and hfRPE cells. Overall, transporter expression in the ARPE19 and hfRPE cells correlated well and the absolute expression levels were similar, but not identical. The presented quantitative expression levels could be a useful basis for further studies on drug permeation in the outer blood-retinal barrier.

  17. Interpretation of protein quantitation using the Bradford assay: comparison with two calculation models.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hyung-Keun; Lim, Hyuk-Min; Oh, Kyong-Hwa; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Kim, Sook-Kyung

    2013-03-01

    The Bradford assay is a simple method for protein quantitation, but variation in the results between proteins is a matter of concern. In this study, we compared and normalized quantitative values from two models for protein quantitation, where the residues in the protein that bind to anionic Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 comprise either Arg and Lys (Method 1, M1) or Arg, Lys, and His (Method 2, M2). Use of the M2 model yielded much more consistent quantitation values compared with use of the M1 model, which exhibited marked overestimations against protein standards.

  18. Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Identification through Quantitative Proteomics at Both the Protein and Peptide Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kimberly A.; Hammerle, Lisa P.; Andrews, Paul S.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Mustelin, Tomas; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Black, Roy A.; Doedens, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a key regulatory process essential to life at a cellular level; significant efforts have been made to identify ubiquitinated proteins through proteomics studies, but the level of success has not reached that of heavily studied post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. HRD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis, but no disease-relevant substrates have been identified. To identify these substrates, we have taken both peptide and protein level approaches to enrich for ubiquitinated proteins in the presence and absence of HRD1. At the protein level, a two-step strategy was taken using cells expressing His6-tagged ubiquitin, enriching proteins first based on their ubiquitination and second based on the His tag with protein identification by LC-MS/MS. Application of this method resulted in identification and quantification of more than 400 ubiquitinated proteins, a fraction of which were found to be sensitive to HRD1 and were therefore deemed candidate substrates. In a second approach, ubiquitinated peptides were enriched after tryptic digestion by peptide immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for the diglycine-labeled internal lysine residue indicative of protein ubiquitination, with peptides and ubiquitination sites identified by LC-MS/MS. Peptide immunoprecipitation resulted in identification of over 1800 ubiquitinated peptides on over 900 proteins in each study, with several proteins emerging as sensitive to HRD1 levels. Notably, significant overlap exists between the HRD1 substrates identified by the protein-based and the peptide-based strategies, with clear cross-validation apparent both qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating the effectiveness of both strategies and furthering our understanding of HRD1 biology. PMID:21987572

  19. Map-based quantitative trait locus identification.

    PubMed

    Hillel, J

    1997-08-01

    Poultry gene mappers chose microsatellites as the main source of genetic markers for poultry genome mapping, similar to the marker type used for other farm animals, laboratory animals, and humans. Optimal strategies for applying DNA markers in poultry populations are discussed, including the number of markers to be used, genome representation, population structure, choice of markers, population size, statistical stringency for association between markers and quantitative trait loci (QTL), and biological verification of a linkage. It is shown that an efficient strategy should be based on a combination of a low stringent statistical test for the existence of linkage between a marker and QTL and an appropriate genetic test for the discrimination between true and false linkage. The source of the genetic variation to be used is discussed and, as an illustration, three types of resource populations are presented. The informativeness of different matings using various genotypes of the parents are considered and it appears that selection of markers based on the heterozygosity of the sire is the most efficient marker screening approach.

  20. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications.

  1. Quantitative measurement of intracellular protein dynamics using photobleaching or photoactivation of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomoki; Nagai, Takeharu

    2014-12-01

    Unlike in vitro protein dynamics, intracellular protein dynamics are intricately regulated by protein-protein interactions or interactions between proteins and other cellular components, including nucleic acids, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Alteration of these dynamics plays a crucial role in physiological phenomena such as gene expression and cell division. Live-cell imaging via microscopy with the inherent properties of fluorescent proteins, i.e. photobleaching and photoconversion, or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, provides insight into the movement of proteins and their interactions with cellular components. This article reviews techniques based on photo-induced changes in the physicochemical properties of fluorescent proteins to measure protein dynamics inside living cells, and it also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques.

  2. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  3. Investigation and prediction of protein precipitation by polyethylene glycol using quantitative structure-activity relationship models.

    PubMed

    Hämmerling, Frank; Ladd Effio, Christopher; Andris, Sebastian; Kittelmann, Jörg; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2017-01-10

    Precipitation of proteins is considered to be an effective purification method for proteins and has proven its potential to replace costly chromatography processes. Besides salts and polyelectrolytes, polymers, such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), are commonly used for precipitation applications under mild conditions. Process development, however, for protein precipitation steps still is based mainly on heuristic approaches and high-throughput experimentation due to a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this work we apply quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) to model two parameters, the discontinuity point m* and the β-value, that describe the complete precipitation curve of a protein under defined conditions. The generated QSAR models are sensitive to the protein type, pH, and ionic strength. It was found that the discontinuity point m* is mainly dependent on protein molecular structure properties and electrostatic surface properties, whereas the β-value is influenced by the variance in electrostatics and hydrophobicity on the protein surface. The models for m* and the β-value exhibit a good correlation between observed and predicted data with a coefficient of determination of R(2)≥0.90 and, hence, are able to accurately predict precipitation curves for proteins. The predictive capabilities were demonstrated for a set of combinations of protein type, pH, and ionic strength not included in the generation of the models and good agreement between predicted and experimental data was achieved.

  4. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    PubMed Central

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ~100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ~200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ~90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the pheromone receptor model proposed by Laughlin et al. (Cell 133: 1255–65, 2008) are discussed. PMID:23121132

  5. The Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag Method for Quantitative Protein Profile Comparison and Relative Quantitation of Cysteine Redox Modifications.

    PubMed

    Chan, James Chun Yip; Zhou, Lei; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2015-11-02

    The isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) technique has been applied to measure pairwise changes in protein expression through differential stable isotopic labeling of proteins or peptides followed by identification and quantification using a mass spectrometer. Changes in protein expression are observed when the identical peptide from each of two biological conditions is identified and a difference is detected in the measurements comparing the peptide labeled with the heavy isotope to the one with a normal isotopic distribution. This approach allows the simultaneous comparison of the expression of many proteins between two different biological states (e.g., yeast grown on galactose versus glucose, or normal versus cancer cells). Due to the cysteine-specificity of the ICAT reagents, the ICAT technique has also been applied to perform relative quantitation of cysteine redox modifications such as oxidation and nitrosylation. This unit describes both protein quantitation and profiling of cysteine redox modifications using the ICAT technique.

  6. Quantitative variability of 342 plasma proteins in a human twin population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Buil, Alfonso; Collins, Ben C; Gillet, Ludovic CJ; Blum, Lorenz C; Cheng, Lin-Yang; Vitek, Olga; Mouritsen, Jeppe; Lachance, Genevieve; Spector, Tim D; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2015-01-01

    The degree and the origins of quantitative variability of most human plasma proteins are largely unknown. Because the twin study design provides a natural opportunity to estimate the relative contribution of heritability and environment to different traits in human population, we applied here the highly accurate and reproducible SWATH mass spectrometry technique to quantify 1,904 peptides defining 342 unique plasma proteins in 232 plasma samples collected longitudinally from pairs of monozygotic and dizygotic twins at intervals of 2–7 years, and proportioned the observed total quantitative variability to its root causes, genes, and environmental and longitudinal factors. The data indicate that different proteins show vastly different patterns of abundance variability among humans and that genetic control and longitudinal variation affect protein levels and biological processes to different degrees. The data further strongly suggest that the plasma concentrations of clinical biomarkers need to be calibrated against genetic and temporal factors. Moreover, we identified 13 cis-SNPs significantly influencing the level of specific plasma proteins. These results therefore have immediate implications for the effective design of blood-based biomarker studies. PMID:25652787

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Protein Profiles Involved in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Chiu, Chiang-Yen; Liang, Shih-Shin; Huang, Chun-Hao; Chi, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsi, Edward; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Chiou, Shyh-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify differentially expressed proteins among various stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) by shotgun proteomics using nano-liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry and stable isotope dimethyl labeling. Methods Differentially expressed proteins were identified and compared based on the mass spectral differences of their isotope-labeled peptide fragments generated from protease digestion. Results Our quantitative proteomic analysis of the differentially expressed proteins with stable isotope (deuterium/hydrogen ratio, ≥2) identified a total of 353 proteins, with at least 5 protein biomarker proteins that were significantly differentially expressed between cancer and normal mice by at least a 2-fold alteration. These 5 protein biomarker candidates include α-enolase, α-catenin, 14-3-3 β, VDAC1, and calmodulin with high confidence levels. The expression levels were also found to be in agreement with those examined by Western blot and histochemical staining. Conclusions The systematic decrease or increase of these identified marker proteins may potentially reflect the morphological aberrations and diseased stages of pancreas carcinoma throughout progressive developments leading to PDAC. The results would form a firm foundation for future work concerning validation and clinical translation of some identified biomarkers into targeted diagnosis and therapy for various stages of PDAC. PMID:26262590

  8. Mobile app-based quantitative scanometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessica X H; Liu, Frank S F; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-16

    The feasibility of using smartphones and other mobile devices as the detection platform for quantitative scanometric assays is demonstrated. The different scanning modes (color, grayscale, black/white) and grayscale converting protocols (average, weighted average/luminosity, and software specific) have been compared in determining the optical darkness ratio (ODR) values, a conventional quantitation measure for scanometric assays. A mobile app was developed to image and analyze scanometric assays, as demonstrated by paper-printed tests and a biotin-streptavidin assay on a plastic substrate. Primarily for ODR analysis, the app has been shown to perform as well as a traditional desktop scanner, augmenting that smartphones (and other mobile devices) promise to be a practical platform for accurate, quantitative chemical analysis and medical diagnostics.

  9. Rapid method for protein quantitation by Bradford assay after elimination of the interference of polysorbate 80.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongfeng; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Bradford assay is one of the most common methods for measuring protein concentrations. However, some pharmaceutical excipients, such as detergents, interfere with Bradford assay even at low concentrations. Protein precipitation can be used to overcome sample incompatibility with protein quantitation. But the rate of protein recovery caused by acetone precipitation is only about 70%. In this study, we found that sucrose not only could increase the rate of protein recovery after 1 h acetone precipitation, but also did not interfere with Bradford assay. So we developed a method for rapid protein quantitation in protein drugs even if they contained interfering substances.

  10. Development of a Model Protein Interaction Pair as a Benchmarking Tool for the Quantitative Analysis of 2-Site Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Newitt, John A; Doyle, Michael L; Arisaka, Fumio; Giannetti, Anthony M; Hensley, Preston; Myszka, David G; Schwarz, Fred P; Thomson, James A; Eisenstein, Edward

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the molecular interaction field is to accurately determine the stoichiometry and stepwise binding affinity constants for macromolecules having >1 binding site. The mission of the Molecular Interactions Research Group (MIRG) of the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) is to show how biophysical technologies are used to quantitatively characterize molecular interactions, and to educate the ABRF members and scientific community on the utility and limitations of core technologies [such as biosensor, microcalorimetry, or analytic ultracentrifugation (AUC)]. In the present work, the MIRG has developed a robust model protein interaction pair consisting of a bivalent variant of the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens extracellular RNase barnase and a variant of its natural monovalent intracellular inhibitor protein barstar. It is demonstrated that this system can serve as a benchmarking tool for the quantitative analysis of 2-site protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction pair enables determination of precise binding constants for the barstar protein binding to 2 distinct sites on the bivalent barnase binding partner (termed binase), where the 2 binding sites were engineered to possess affinities that differed by 2 orders of magnitude. Multiple MIRG laboratories characterized the interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), AUC, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods to evaluate the feasibility of the system as a benchmarking model. Although general agreement was seen for the binding constants measured using solution-based ITC and AUC approaches, weaker affinity was seen for surface-based method SPR, with protein immobilization likely affecting affinity. An analysis of the results from multiple MIRG laboratories suggests that the bivalent barnase-barstar system is a suitable model for benchmarking new approaches for the quantitative characterization of complex biomolecular interactions.

  11. Towards quantitative classification of folded proteins in terms of elementary functions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuangwei; Krokhotin, Andrei; Niemi, Antti J; Peng, Xubiao

    2011-04-01

    A comparative classification scheme provides a good basis for several approaches to understand proteins, including prediction of relations between their structure and biological function. But it remains a challenge to combine a classification scheme that describes a protein starting from its well-organized secondary structures and often involves direct human involvement, with an atomary-level physics-based approach where a protein is fundamentally nothing more than an ensemble of mutually interacting carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms. In order to bridge these two complementary approaches to proteins, conceptually novel tools need to be introduced. Here we explain how an approach toward geometric characterization of entire folded proteins can be based on a single explicit elementary function that is familiar from nonlinear physical systems where it is known as the kink soliton. Our approach enables the conversion of hierarchical structural information into a quantitative form that allows for a folded protein to be characterized in terms of a small number of global parameters that are in principle computable from atomary-level considerations. As an example we describe in detail how the native fold of the myoglobin 1M6C emerges from a combination of kink solitons with a very high atomary-level accuracy. We also verify that our approach describes longer loops and loops connecting α helices with β strands, with the same overall accuracy.

  12. Quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry reveals subtle protein conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry (QCLMS) probes protein structural dynamics in solution by quantitatively comparing the yields of cross-links between different conformational statuses. We have used QCLMS to understand the final maturation step of the proteasome lid and also to elucidate the structure of complement C3(H2O). Here we benchmark our workflow using a structurally well-described reference system, the human complement protein C3 and its activated cleavage product C3b. We found that small local conformational changes affect the yields of cross-linking residues that are near in space while larger conformational changes affect the detectability of cross-links. Distinguishing between minor and major changes required robust analysis based on replica analysis and a label-swapping procedure. By providing workflow, code of practice and a framework for semi-automated data processing, we lay the foundation for QCLMS as a tool to monitor the domain choreography that drives binary switching in many protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:27976756

  13. The colorimetric detection and quantitation of total protein.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Randall I

    2011-09-01

    Protein quantification is an important step for handling protein samples for isolation and characterization; it is a prerequisite step before submitting proteins for chromatographic, electrophoretic, or immunochemical analysis and separation. Colorimetric methods are fast, simple, and not laborious. This unit describes a number of assays able to detect protein concentrations in the low microgram to milligram per milliliter ranges in a variety of formats.

  14. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  15. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range ( 1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  16. Free flow electrophoresis separation and AMS quantitation of 14C-naphthalene-protein adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Bruce A.; Haack, Kurt W.; Sporty, Jennifer L.; Buckpitt, Alan R.; Morin, Dexter

    2010-04-01

    Naphthalene is a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon to which humans are exposed from a variety of sources including mobile air sources and cigarette smoke. Naphthalene produces dose-(concentration)dependent injury to airway epithelial cells of murine lung which is observed at concentrations well below the current occupational exposure standard. Toxicity is dependent upon the cytochrome P450 mediated metabolic activation of the parent substrate to unstable metabolites which become bound covalently to tissue proteins. Nearly 70 proteins have been identified as forming adducts with reactive naphthalene metabolites using in vitro systems but very little work has been conducted in vivo because reasonably large amounts (100 μCi) of 14C labeled parent compound must be administered to generate detectable adduct levels on storage phosphor screens following separation of labeled proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis. The work described here was done to provide proof of concept that protein separation by free flow electrophoresis followed by AMS detection of protein fractions containing protein bound reactive metabolites would provide adducted protein profiles in animals dosed with trace quantities of labeled naphthalene. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg naphthalene intraperitoneally at a calculated specific activity of 2 DPM/nmol (1 pCi/nmol) and respiratory epithelial tissue was obtained by lysis lavage 4 h post injection. Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) separates proteins in the liquid phase over a large pH range (2.5-11.5) using low molecular weight acids and bases to modify the pH. The apparatus separates fractions into standard 96-well plates that can be used in other protein analysis techniques. The buffers of the fractions have very high carbon content, however, and need to be dialyzed to yield buffers compatible with 14C-AMS. We describe the processing techniques required to couple FFE to AMS for quantitation of protein adducts.

  17. Free flow electrophoresis separation and AMS quantitation of C-naphthalene-protein adducts.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Bruce A; Haack, Kurt W; Sporty, Jennifer L; Buckpitt, Alan R; Morin, Dexter

    2010-04-01

    Naphthalene is a volatile aromatic hydrocarbon to which humans are exposed from a variety of sources including mobile air sources and cigarette smoke. Naphthalene produces dose- (concentration) dependent injury to airway epithelial cells of murine lung which is observed at concentrations well below the current occupational exposure standard. Toxicity is dependent upon the cytochrome P450 mediated metabolic activation of the parent substrate to unstable metabolites which become bound covalently to tissue proteins. Nearly 70 proteins have been identified as forming adducts with reactive naphthalene metabolites using in vitro systems but very little work has been conducted in vivo because reasonably large amounts (100 μCi) of (14)C labeled parent compound must be administered to generate detectable adduct levels on storage phosphor screens following separation of labeled proteins by 2 D gel electrophoresis. The work described here was done to provide proof of concept that protein separation by free flow electrophoresis followed by AMS detection of protein fractions containing protein bound reactive metabolites would provide adducted protein profiles in animals dosed with trace quantities of labeled naphthalene. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg naphthalene intraperitoneally at a calculated specific activity of 2 DPM/nmol (1 pCi/nmol) and respiratory epithelial tissue was obtained by lysis lavage 4 hr post injection. Free flow electrophoresis (FFE) separates proteins in the liquid phase over a large pH range (2.5-11.5) using low molecular weight acids and bases to modify the pH. The apparatus separates fractions into standard 96-well plates that can be used in other protein analysis techniques. The buffers of the fractions have very high carbon content, however, and need to be dialyzed to yield buffers compatible with (14)C-AMS. We describe the processing techniques required to couple FFE to AMS for quantitation of protein adducts.

  18. Quantitation of specific proteins in polyacrylamide gels by the elution of Fast Green FCF.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L B; Hook, G E

    1981-07-01

    The quantitation of proteins in polyacrylamide gels stained with Fast green FCF has been investigated using a modification of the elution technique originally described by Fenner et al. (Fenner, C., Traut, R.R., Mason, D.T. and Wikman-Coffelt, J. (1975) Anal. Biochem. 63, 595--602) for Coomassie Blue and adapted by Medugorac (Medugorac, I. (1979) Basic Res. Cardiol. 74, 406--416) for use with proteins stained with Fast Green FCF. The elution of dye from stained protein was accomplished using 1.0 M NaOH instead of aqueous pyridine as required by the original method. The primary advantages of our modification are that the time required for protein quantitation has been considerably reduced and the use of toxic organic solvents has been eliminated. We have investigated the applicability of the method of several different proteins and our results indicate: (a) The quantity of Fast Green FCF eluted from specific proteins is proportional to the quantity of protein applied to the gel, but varies for each individual protein. (b) The method allows quantitation over a very wide range of protein (1--800 micrograms). (c) Quantitation of protein is independent of the width of the stained bands as well as acrylamide concentration. (d) The method is applicable to gels of many types including disc, slab and continuous gradient gels. (e) Protein can be estimated from the patterns obtained by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. (f) The presence of Triton X-100 in gel and protein sample does not affect quantitation; the method is applicable to gels containing SDS provided that SDS is removed prior to staining. (g) Precipitation of protein with 12.5% TCA following electrophoresis does not interfere with quantitation. (h) The reproducibility of the technique is excellent, with standard deviations being less than 10% of the mean in all cases. This method appears highly versatile but requires appropriate standards for the quantitation of individual proteins.

  19. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveal proteins enriched in tubular endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinbo; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Haicheng; Shui, Wenqing; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    The tubular network is a critical part of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The network is shaped by the reticulons and REEPs/Yop1p that generate tubules by inducing high membrane curvature, and the dynamin-like GTPases atlastin and Sey1p/RHD3 that connect tubules via membrane fusion. However, the specific functions of this ER domain are not clear. Here, we isolated tubule-based microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae via classical cell fractionation and detergent-free immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged Yop1p, which specifically localizes to ER tubules. In quantitative comparisons of tubule-derived and total microsomes, we identified a total of 79 proteins that were enriched in the ER tubules, including known proteins that organize the tubular ER network. Functional categorization of the list of proteins revealed that the tubular ER network may be involved in membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, organelle contact, and stress sensing. We propose that affinity isolation coupled with quantitative proteomics is a useful tool for investigating ER functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23816.001 PMID:28287394

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Meningiomas for the Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Samridhi; Ray, Sandipan; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Sridhar, Epari; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common non-glial tumors of the brain and spine. Pathophysiology and definite histological grading of meningiomas are frequently found to be deceptive due to their unusual morphological features and locations. Here for the first time we report a comprehensive serum proteomic analysis of different grades of meningiomas by using multiple quantitative proteomic and immunoassay-based approaches to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and identify grade specific protein signatures. In silico functional analysis revealed modulation of different vital physiological pathways including complement and coagulation cascades, metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins, immune signaling, cell growth and apoptosis and integrin signaling in meningiomas. ROC curve analysis demonstrated apolipoprotein E and A-I and hemopexin as efficient predictors for meningiomas. Identified proteins like vimentin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein B and A-I and antithrombin-III, which exhibited a sequential increase in different malignancy grades of meningiomas, could serve as potential predictive markers. PMID:25413266

  2. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography based on the radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Sun, Yao; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-06-15

    We describe a method for quantitative photoacoustic tomography (PAT) based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) coupled with the Helmholtz photoacoustic wave equation. This RTE-based quantitative PAT allows for accurate recovery of absolute absorption coefficient images of heterogeneous media and provides significantly improved image reconstruction for the cases where the photon diffusion approximation may fail. The method and associated finite element reconstruction algorithm are validated using a series of tissuelike phantom experiments.

  3. Neurodegenerative diseases: quantitative predictions of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Davide; Agostini, Federico; Klus, Petr; Marchese, Domenica; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2013-02-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that RNA plays an active role in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We recently introduced a theoretical framework, catRAPID, to predict the binding ability of protein and RNA molecules. Here, we use catRAPID to investigate ribonucleoprotein interactions linked to inherited intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Creutzfeuld-Jakob, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. We specifically focus on (1) RNA interactions with fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP; (2) protein sequestration caused by CGG repeats; (3) noncoding transcripts regulated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43 TDP-43; (4) autogenous regulation of TDP-43 and FMRP; (5) iron-mediated expression of amyloid precursor protein APP and α-synuclein; (6) interactions between prions and RNA aptamers. Our results are in striking agreement with experimental evidence and provide new insights in processes associated with neuronal function and misfunction.

  4. The effects of shared peptides on protein quantitation in label-free proteomics by LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Miller, John H.

    2008-01-02

    Assessment of differential protein abundance from the observed properties of detected peptides is an essential part of protein profiling based on shotgun proteomics. However, the abundance observed for degenerate peptides may be due to contributions from multiple proteins that are affected differently by a given treatment. Excluding degenerate peptides eliminates this ambiguity but may significantly decrease the number of proteins for which abundance estimates can be obtained. Peptide degeneracy within a family of biologically related proteins does not cause ambiguity if family members have a common response to treatment. Based on this concept, we have developed an approach for including degenerate peptides in the analysis of differential protein abundance in protein profiling. Data from a recent proteomics study of lung tissue from mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide, cigarette smoke, and a combination of these agents is used to illustrate our method. Starting from data where about half of the protein identifications involved degenerate peptides, 82% of the affected proteins were grouped into families, based on FASTA annotation, with closure on peptide degeneracy. In many cases, a common abundance relative to control was sufficient to explain ion-current peak areas for peptides, both unique and degenerate, that identified biologically-related proteins in a peptide-degeneracy closure group. Based on these results, we propose that peptide-degeneracy closure groups provide a way to include abundance data for degenerate-peptides in quantitative protein profiling by high throughput mass spectrometry.

  5. Plasma Biomarker Discovery Using 3D Protein Profiling Coupled with Label-Free Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Lynn A.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Barnhart, Kurt T.; Speicher, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In-depth quantitative profiling of human plasma samples for biomarker discovery remains quite challenging. One promising alternative to chemical derivatization with stable isotope labels for quantitative comparisons is direct, label-free, quantitative comparison of raw LC–MS data. But, in order to achieve high-sensitivity detection of low-abundance proteins, plasma proteins must be extensively pre-fractionated, and results from LC–MS runs of all fractions must be integrated efficiently in order to avoid misidentification of variations in fractionation from sample to sample as “apparent” biomarkers. This protocol describes a powerful 3D protein profiling method for comprehensive analysis of human serum or plasma proteomes, which combines abundant protein depletion and high-sensitivity GeLC–MS/MS with label-free quantitation of candidate biomarkers. PMID:21468938

  6. Classification of cassava genotypes based on qualitative and quantitative data.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E J; Oliveira Filho, O S; Santos, V S

    2015-02-02

    We evaluated the genetic variation of cassava accessions based on qualitative (binomial and multicategorical) and quantitative traits (continuous). We characterized 95 accessions obtained from the Cassava Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Mandioca e Fruticultura; we evaluated these accessions for 13 continuous, 10 binary, and 25 multicategorical traits. First, we analyzed the accessions based only on quantitative traits; next, we conducted joint analysis (qualitative and quantitative traits) based on the Ward-MLM method, which performs clustering in two stages. According to the pseudo-F, pseudo-t2, and maximum likelihood criteria, we identified five and four groups based on quantitative trait and joint analysis, respectively. The smaller number of groups identified based on joint analysis may be related to the nature of the data. On the other hand, quantitative data are more subject to environmental effects in the phenotype expression; this results in the absence of genetic differences, thereby contributing to greater differentiation among accessions. For most of the accessions, the maximum probability of classification was >0.90, independent of the trait analyzed, indicating a good fit of the clustering method. Differences in clustering according to the type of data implied that analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in cassava germplasm might explore different genomic regions. On the other hand, when joint analysis was used, the means and ranges of genetic distances were high, indicating that the Ward-MLM method is very useful for clustering genotypes when there are several phenotypic traits, such as in the case of genetic resources and breeding programs.

  7. Detection, characterization and quantitation of coxsackievirus A16 using polyclonal antibodies against recombinant capsid subunit proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwei; Ku, Zhiqiang; Cai, Yicun; Sun, Bing; Leng, Qibin; Huang, Zhong

    2011-04-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), together with enterovirus type 71 (EV71), is responsible for most cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide. Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71, and co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years. Thus, for CVA16, further understanding of its virology, epidemiology and development of diagnostic tests and vaccines are of importance. The present study aimed to develop reagents and protocols for the detection, characterization and quantitation of CVA16. Recombinant CVA16 capsid subunit proteins VP0, VP3 and truncated VP1, were produced in Escherichia coli and used to immunize guinea pigs to generate polyclonal antibodies. The resultant three antisera detected specifically CVA16 propagated in Vero cells by immunostaining, ELISA and Western blotting. The antisera was used to show that CVA16 capsids were composed of correctly processed VP0, VP1 and VP3 subunits, and were present in the form of efficiently assembled particles. A method for the quantitation of the yield of CVA16 in Vero cells was established based on a Western blotting protocol using the recombinant VP0 as a reference standard and anti-VP0 as the detection antibody. This study shows the development and validation of reagents and methods, for qualitative and quantitative determination of CVA16, which are essential for the development of vaccines.

  8. Quantitative proteomic analysis of protein complexes: concurrent identification of interactors and their state of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Delphine; Jünger, Martin A; Müller, Markus; Rinner, Oliver; Lee, Hookeun; Gehrig, Peter M; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2008-02-01

    Protein complexes have largely been studied by immunoaffinity purification and (mass spectrometric) analysis. Although this approach has been widely and successfully used it is limited because it has difficulties reliably discriminating true from false protein complex components, identifying post-translational modifications, and detecting quantitative changes in complex composition or state of modification of complex components. We have developed a protocol that enables us to determine, in a single LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis, the true protein constituents of a complex, to detect changes in the complex composition, and to localize phosphorylation sites and estimate their respective stoichiometry. The method is based on the combination of fourplex iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) isobaric labeling and protein phosphatase treatment of substrates. It was evaluated on model peptides and proteins and on the complex Ccl1-Kin28-Tfb3 isolated by tandem affinity purification from yeast cells. The two known phosphosites in Kin28 and Tfb3 could be reproducibly shown to be fully modified. The protocol was then applied to the analysis of samples immunopurified from Drosophila melanogaster cells expressing an epitope-tagged form of the insulin receptor substrate homologue Chico. These experiments allowed us to identify 14-3-3epsilon, 14-3-3zeta, and the insulin receptor as specific Chico interactors. In a further experiment, we compared the immunopurified materials obtained from tagged Chico-expressing cells that were either treated with insulin or left unstimulated. This analysis showed that hormone stimulation increases the association of 14-3-3 proteins with Chico and modulates several phosphorylation sites of the bait, some of which are located within predicted recognition motives of 14-3-3 proteins.

  9. Unbiased identification of protein-bait interactions using biochemical enrichment and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ong, Shao-En

    2010-03-01

    The use of recombinant proteins, antibodies, small molecules, or nucleic acids as affinity reagents is a simple yet powerful strategy to study the protein-bait interactions that drive biological processes. However, such experiments are often analyzed by Western blotting, limiting the ability to detect novel protein interactors. Unbiased protein identification by mass spectrometry (MS) extends these experiments beyond the study of pairwise interactions, allowing analyses of whole networks of protein-bait interactions. With the latest advances in MS, it is not uncommon to identify thousands of proteins from complex mixtures. Paradoxically, the improved sensitivity of proteomic analyses can make it more difficult to distinguish bait-specific interactions from the large background of identified proteins. In quantitative proteomics, MS signals from protein populations labeled with stable isotopes such as (13)C and (15)N can be identified and quantified relative to unlabeled counterparts. Using quantitative proteomics to compare biochemical enrichments with the bait of interest against those obtained with control baits allows sensitive detection and discrimination of specific protein-bait interactions among the large number of nonspecific interactions with beads. Ad hoc optimization of enrichment conditions is minimized, and mild purification conditions preserve secondary or high-order protein-protein interactions. The combination of biochemical enrichment and quantitative proteomics allows rapid characterization of molecular baits with their interacting proteins, providing tremendous insight into their biological mechanisms of action.

  10. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients’ saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects (p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:28326926

  11. Potential protein biomarkers for burning mouth syndrome discovered by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eoon Hye; Diep, Cynthia; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Merrill, Robert; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by severe burning sensation in normal looking oral mucosa. Diagnosis of BMS remains to be a challenge to oral healthcare professionals because the method for definite diagnosis is still uncertain. In this study, a quantitative saliva proteomic analysis was performed in order to identify target proteins in BMS patients' saliva that may be used as biomarkers for simple, non-invasive detection of the disease. By using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to quantify 1130 saliva proteins between BMS patients and healthy control subjects, we found that 50 proteins were significantly changed in the BMS patients when compared to the healthy control subjects ( p ≤ 0.05, 39 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated). Four candidates, alpha-enolase, interleukin-18 (IL-18), kallikrein-13 (KLK13), and cathepsin G, were selected for further validation. Based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, three potential biomarkers, alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13, were successfully validated. The fold changes for alpha-enolase, IL-18, and KLK13 were determined as 3.6, 2.9, and 2.2 (burning mouth syndrome vs. control), and corresponding receiver operating characteristic values were determined as 0.78, 0.83, and 0.68, respectively. Our findings indicate that testing of the identified protein biomarkers in saliva might be a valuable clinical tool for BMS detection. Further validation studies of the identified biomarkers or additional candidate biomarkers are needed to achieve a multi-marker prediction model for improved detection of BMS with high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. An evaluation of protein assays for quantitative determination of drugs.

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine M; Arthur, Sarah J; Burrell, Gillian; Kelly, Fionnuala; Phillips, Darren W; Marshall, Thomas

    2003-07-31

    We have evaluated the response of six protein assays [the biuret, Lowry, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), Pyrogallol Red-Molybdate (PRM), and benzethonium chloride (BEC)] to 21 pharmaceutical drugs. The drugs evaluated were analgesics (acetaminophen, aspirin, codeine, methadone, morphine and pethidine), antibiotics (amoxicillin, ampicillin, gentamicin, neomycin, penicillin G and vancomycin), antipsychotics (chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, prochlorperazine, promazine and thioridazine) and water-soluble vitamins (ascorbic acid, niacinamide, pantothenic acid and pyridoxine). The biuret, Lowry and BCA assays responded strongly to most of the drugs tested. The PRM assay gave a sensitive response to the aminoglycoside antibiotics (gentamicin and neomycin) and the antipsychotic drugs. In contrast, the CBB assay showed little response to the aminoglycosides and gave a relatively poor response with the antipsychotics. The BEC assay did not respond significantly to the drugs tested. The response of the protein assays to the drugs was further evaluated by investigating the linearity of the response and the combined response of drug plus protein. The results are discussed with reference to drug interference in protein assays and the development of new methods for the quantification of drugs in protein-free solution.

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rusin, Scott F.; Schlosser, Kate A.; Adamo, Mark E.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry–based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c–dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2–dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. PMID:26462736

  14. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  15. Systems nanobiology: from quantitative single molecule biophysics to microfluidic-based single cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joerg; Hellmich, Wibke; Greif, Dominik; Becker, Anke; Merkle, Thomas; Ros, Robert; Ros, Alexandra; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2007-01-01

    Detailed and quantitative information about structure-function relation, concentrations and interaction kinetics of biological molecules and subcellular components is a key prerequisite to understand and model cellular organisation and temporal dynamics. In systems nanobi-ology, cellular processes are quantitatively investigated at the sensitivity level of single molecules and cells. This approach provides direct access to biomolecular information without being statistically ensemble-averaged, their associated distribution functions, and possible subpopulations. Moreover at the single cell level, the interplay of regulated genomic information and proteomic variabilities can be investigated and attributed to functional peculiarities. These requirements necessitate the development of novel and ultrasensitive methods and instruments for single molecule detection, microscopy and spectroscopy for analysis without the need of amplification and preconcentration. In this chapter, we present three methodological applications that demonstrate how quantitative informations can be accessed that are representative for cellular processes or single cell analysis like gene expression regulation, intracellular protein translocation dynamics, and single cell protein fingerprinting. First, the interaction kinetics of transcriptionally regulated DNA-protein interaction can be quantitatively investigated with single molecule force spectroscopy allowing a molecular affinity ranking. Second, intracellular protein dynamics for a transcription regulator migrating form the nucleus to the cytoplasm can be quantitatively monitored by photoactivable GFP and two-photon laser scanning microscopy. And third, a microfluidic-based method for label-free single cell proteomics and fingerprinting and first label-free single cell electropherograms are presented which include the manipulation and steering of single cells in a microfluidic device.

  16. Shotgun Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Proteins Responding to Drought Stress in Brassica rapa L. (Inbred Line “Chiifu”)

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Through a comparative shotgun quantitative proteomics analysis in Brassica rapa (inbred line Chiifu), total of 3,009 nonredundant proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of 0.01 in 3-week-old plants subjected to dehydration treatment for 0, 24, and 48 h, plants subjected to drought stress. Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylases, chlorophyll a/b-binding protein, and light harvesting complex in photosystem II were highly abundant proteins in the leaves and accounted for 9%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, of the total identified proteins. Comparative analysis of the treatments enabled detection of 440 differentially expressed proteins during dehydration. The results of clustering analysis, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, and analysis of composite expression profiles of functional categories for the differentially expressed proteins indicated that drought stress reduced the levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis and increased the levels of proteins involved in catabolic processes and stress responses. We observed enhanced expression of many proteins involved in osmotic stress responses and proteins with antioxidant activities. Based on previously reported molecular functions, we propose that the following five differentially expressed proteins could provide target genes for engineering drought resistance in plants: annexin, phospholipase D delta, sDNA-binding transcriptional regulator, auxin-responsive GH3 family protein, and TRAF-like family protein. PMID:27419125

  17. High-Throughput Multiplexed Quantitation of Protein Aggregation and Cytotoxicity in a Huntington’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington’s disease is the presence of a large polyglutamine expansion in the first exon of the Huntingtin protein and the propensity of protein aggregation by the mutant proteins. Aberrant protein aggregation also occurs in other polyglutamine expansion disorders, as well as in other neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and prion diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of these aggregates in the cell death that characterizes the diseases remains unclear. Identification of small molecule probes that modulate protein aggregation and cytotoxicity caused by aggregated proteins may greatly facilitate the studies on pathogenesis of these diseases and potentially lead to development of new therapies. Based on a detergent insoluble property of the Huntingtin protein aggregates, we have developed a homogenous assay to rapidly quantitate the levels of protein aggregates in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease. The protein aggregation assay has also been multiplexed with a protease release assay for the measurement of cytotoxicity resulting from aggregated proteins in the same cells. Through a testing screen of a compound library, we have demonstrated that this multiplexed cytotoxicity and protein aggregation assay has ability to identify active compounds that prevent cell death and/or modulate protein aggregation in cells of the Huntington’s disease model. Therefore, this multiplexed screening approach is also useful for development of high-throughput screening assays for other neurodegenerative diseases involving protein aggregation. PMID:23346268

  18. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  19. Quantitative analysis of aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma by AAL-enrichment and MRM mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Shin, Park Min; Kim, Yong-Sam; Oh, Na Ree; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Lee, Yeon Jung; Kim, Sung Ho; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2013-11-07

    A lectin-coupled mass spectrometry (MS) approach was employed to quantitatively monitor aberrant protein glycosylation in liver cancer plasma. To do this, we compared the difference in the total protein abundance of a target glycoprotein between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) plasmas and hepatitis B virus (HBV) plasmas, as well as the difference in lectin-specific protein glycoform abundance of the target glycoprotein. Capturing the lectin-specific protein glycoforms from a plasma sample was accomplished by using a fucose-specific aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) immobilized onto magnetic beads via a biotin-streptavidin conjugate. Following tryptic digestion of both the total plasma and its AAL-captured fraction of each HCC and HBV sample, targeted proteomic mass spectrometry was conducted quantitatively by a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) technique. From the MRM-based analysis of the total plasmas and AAL-captured fractions, differences between HCC and HBV plasma groups in fucosylated glycoform levels of target glycoproteins were confirmed to arise from both the change in the total protein abundance of the target proteins and the change incurred by aberrant fucosylation on target glycoproteins in HCC plasma, even when no significant change occurs in the total protein abundance level. Combining the MRM-based analysis method with the lectin-capturing technique proved to be a successful means of quantitatively investigating aberrant protein glycosylation in cancer plasma samples. Additionally, it was elucidated that the differences between HCC and control groups in fucosylated biomarker candidates A1AT and FETUA mainly originated from an increase in fucosylation levels on these target glycoproteins, rather than an increase in the total protein abundance of the target glycoproteins.

  20. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  1. Comprehensive multiplexed protein quantitation delineates eosinophilic and neutrophilic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improvements in asthma diagnosis and management require deeper understanding of the heterogeneity of the complex airway inflammation. We hypothesise that differences in the two major inflammatory phenotypes of asthma; eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma, will be reflected in the lung protein expression profile of murine asthma models and can be delineated using proteomics of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Methods BAL from mice challenged with ovalbumin (OVA/OVA) alone (standard model of asthma, here considered eosinophilic) or OVA in combination with endotoxin (OVA/LPS, model of neutrophilic asthma) was analysed using liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry, and compared with steroid-treated animals and healthy controls. In addition, conventional inflammatory markers were analysed using multiplexed ELISA (Bio-Plex™ assay). Multivariate statistics was performed on integrative proteomic fingerprints using principal component analysis. Proteomic data were complemented with lung mechanics and BAL cell counts. Results Several of the analysed proteins displayed significant differences between the controls and either or both of the two models reflecting eosinophilic and neutrophilic asthma. Most of the proteins found with mass spectrometry analysis displayed a considerable increase in neutrophilic asthma compared with the other groups. Conversely, the larger number of the inflammatory markers analysed with Bio-Plex™ analysis were found to be increased in the eosinophilic model. In addition, major inflammation markers were correlated to peripheral airway closure, while commonly used asthma biomarkers only reflect central inflammation. Conclusion Our data suggest that the commercial markers we are currently relying on to diagnose asthma subtypes are not giving us comprehensive or specific enough information. The analysed protein profiles allowed to discriminate the two models and may add useful information for characterization of

  2. Secondary Reactions and Strategies to Improve Quantitative Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Kiselar, J.; He, Q.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical-mediated footprinting permits detailed examination of structure and dynamic processes of proteins and large biological assemblies, as changes in the rate of reaction of radicals with target peptides are governed by changes in the solvent accessibility of the side-chain probe residues. The precise and accurate determination of peptide reaction rates is essential to successfully probing protein structure using footprinting. In this study, we specifically examine the magnitude and mechanisms of secondary oxidation occurring after radiolytic exposure and prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Secondary oxidation results from hydrogen peroxide and other oxidative species generated during radiolysis, significantly impacting the oxidation of Met and Cys but not aromatic or other reactive residues. Secondary oxidation of Met with formation of sulfoxide degrades data reproducibility and inflates the perceived solvent accessibility of Met-containing peptides. It can be suppressed by adding trace amounts of catalase or millimolar Met-NH{sub 2} (or Met-OH) buffer immediately after irradiation; this leads to greatly improved adherence to first-order kinetics and more precise observed oxidation rates. The strategy is shown to suppress secondary oxidation in model peptides and improve data quality in examining the reactivity of peptides within the Arp2/3 protein complex. Cysteine is also subject to secondary oxidation generating disulfide as the principal product. The disulfides can be reduced before mass spectrometric analysis by reducing agents such as TCEP, while methionine sulfoxide is refractory to reduction by this reagent under typical reducing conditions.

  3. Quantitative assessment of protein function prediction from metagenomics shotgun sequences.

    PubMed

    Harrington, E D; Singh, A H; Doerks, T; Letunic, I; von Mering, C; Jensen, L J; Raes, J; Bork, P

    2007-08-28

    To assess the potential of protein function prediction in environmental genomics data, we analyzed shotgun sequences from four diverse and complex habitats. Using homology searches as well as customized gene neighborhood methods that incorporate intergenic and evolutionary distances, we inferred specific functions for 76% of the 1.4 million predicted ORFs in these samples (83% when nonspecific functions are considered). Surprisingly, these fractions are only slightly smaller than the corresponding ones in completely sequenced genomes (83% and 86%, respectively, by using the same methodology) and considerably higher than previously thought. For as many as 75,448 ORFs (5% of the total), only neighborhood methods can assign functions, illustrated here by a previously undescribed gene associated with the well characterized heme biosynthesis operon and a potential transcription factor that might regulate a coupling between fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation. Our results further suggest that, although functions can be inferred for most proteins on earth, many functions remain to be discovered in numerous small, rare protein families.

  4. Characterization of a Highly Conserved Histone Related Protein, Ydl156w, and Its Functional Associations Using Quantitative Proteomic Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Joshua M.; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Stutzman, Brent; Peak, Allison; Seidel, Chris W.; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge in biology is to functionally annotate novel and uncharacterized proteins. Several approaches are available for deducing the function of proteins in silico based upon sequence homology and physical or genetic interaction, yet this approach is limited to proteins with well-characterized domains, paralogs and/or orthologs in other species, as well as on the availability of suitable large-scale data sets. Here, we present a quantitative proteomics approach extending the protein network of core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, among which a novel associated protein, the previously uncharacterized Ydl156w, was identified. In order to predict the role of Ydl156w, we designed and applied integrative bioinformatics, quantitative proteomics and biochemistry approaches aiming to infer its function. Reciprocal analysis of Ydl156w protein interactions demonstrated a strong association with all four histones and also to proteins strongly associated with histones including Rim1, Rfa2 and 3, Yku70, and Yku80. Through a subsequent combination of the focused quantitative proteomics experiments with available large-scale genetic interaction data and Gene Ontology functional associations, we provided sufficient evidence to associate Ydl156w with multiple processes including chromatin remodeling, transcription and DNA repair/replication. To gain deeper insights into the role of Ydl156w in histone biology we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of ydl156w on H4 associated proteins, which lead to a dramatic decrease in the association of H4 with RNA polymerase III proteins. The implication of a role for Ydl156w in RNA Polymerase III mediated transcription was consequently verified by RNA-Seq experiments. Finally, using these approaches we generated a refined network of Ydl156w-associated proteins. PMID:22199229

  5. Quantitative Control of Protein and Cell Interaction with Nanostructured Surfaces by Cluster Assembling.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten; Podestà, Alessandro; Lenardi, Cristina; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Milani, Paolo

    2017-02-21

    The development of smart prosthetics, scaffolds, and biomaterials for tissue engineering and organ-on-a-chip devices heavily depends on the understanding and control of biotic/abiotic interfaces. In recent years, the nanometer scale emerged as the predominant dimension for processes impacting on protein adsorption and cellular responses on surfaces. In this context, the extracellular matrix (ECM) can be seen as the prototype for an intricate natural structure assembled by nanoscale building blocks forming highly variable nanoscale configurations, dictating cellular behavior and fate. How exactly the ECM nanotopography influences mechanotransduction, that is, the cellular capacity to convert information received from the ECM into appropriate responses, remains partially understood due to the complexity of the involved biological structures, limiting also the attempts to artificially reproduce the nanoscale complexity of the ECM. In this Account, we describe and discuss our strategies for the development of an efficient and large-scale bottom-up approach to fabricate surfaces with multiscale controlled disorder as substrates to study quantitatively the effect of nanoscale topography on biological entities. Our method is based on the use of supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) to assemble, on a substrate, neutral clusters produced in the gas phase and accelerated by a supersonic expansion. The assembling of clusters in the ballistic deposition regime follows simple scaling laws, allowing the quantitative control of surface roughness and asperity layout over large areas. Due to their biocompatibility, we focused on transition metal oxide nanostructured surfaces assembled by titania and zirconia clusters. We demonstrated the engineering of structural and functional properties of the cluster-assembled surfaces with high relevance for interactions at the biotic/abiotic interface. We observed that isoelectric point and wettability, crucial parameters for the adhesion

  6. Quantitative protein composition and baking quality of winter wheat as affected by late sulfur fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zörb, Christian; Steinfurth, Dorothee; Seling, Simone; Langenkämper, Georg; Koehler, Peter; Wieser, Herbert; Lindhauer, Meinolf G; Mühling, Karl H

    2009-05-13

    Increasing prices for wheat products and fertilizers, as well as reduced sulfur (S) contributions from the atmosphere, call for an improvement of product quality and agricultural management. To detect the impact of a time-dependent S fertilization, the quantitative protein composition and the baking quality of two different wheat cultivars, Batis and Turkis, were evaluated. The glutathione concentration in grains serves as a reliable marker of the need for added S fertilizer. The quantitation of gliadins and glutenin subunits by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography confirmed that S-rich proteins significantly increased with S fertilization, whereas the S-poor proteins significantly decreased. Proteome analysis by means of high-resolution protein profiles detected 55 and 37 proteins from Batis and Turkis changed by late S fertilization. A microscale baking test using wholemeal flour was implemented for the evaluation of baking quality, and late S fertilization was found to improve the composition of gluten proteins and baking quality.

  7. A quantitative recipe for engineering protein polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Janib, S. Mohd; Pastuszka, M.; Aluri, S.; Folchman-Wagner, Z.; Hsueh, P-Y; Shi, P.; Yi-an; Cui, H.; MacKay, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein polymers can assemble switchable nanostructures with emerging applications as biomaterials and nanomedicines. For example, above a critical micelle temperature (CMT) some elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) diblock copolymers assemble spherical nanoparticles, which may modulate cellular internalization and in vivo biodistribution. To achieve engineering-level control over their properties, this report explores a comprehensive library of ELP monoblock and diblock polymers. For the first time, we report that a surprisingly high core molecular weight is required for stable nanoparticle formation; furthermore, nanoparticle size depends on polymer molecular weight. A mathematical model was developed to characterize four ELP monoblock libraries and to predict the phase behavior of corresponding diblock copolymers. The CMT was almost entirely dependent on the hydrophobic core ELP, while the bulk phase transition temperature (Tt,bulk) depends predominantly on the hydrophilic block. Nanoparticle assembly was accompanied by a conversion in secondary structure of the hydrophobic block from random coil and beta-sheets to type-2 β turns. For the first time, this report enables the rational design of ELP protein polymer nanoparticles with physico-chemico properties that will be suitable for biological applications. PMID:24511327

  8. [Reconstituting evaluation methods based on both qualitative and quantitative paradigms].

    PubMed

    Miyata, Hiroaki; Okubo, Suguru; Yoshie, Satoru; Kai, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Debate about the relationship between quantitative and qualitative paradigms is often muddled and confusing and the clutter of terms and arguments has resulted in the concepts becoming obscure and unrecognizable. In this study we conducted content analysis regarding evaluation methods of qualitative healthcare research. We extracted descriptions on four types of evaluation paradigm (validity/credibility, reliability/credibility, objectivity/confirmability, and generalizability/transferability), and classified them into subcategories. In quantitative research, there has been many evaluation methods based on qualitative paradigms, and vice versa. Thus, it might not be useful to consider evaluation methods of qualitative paradigm are isolated from those of quantitative methods. Choosing practical evaluation methods based on the situation and prior conditions of each study is an important approach for researchers.

  9. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data

    PubMed Central

    Gritsenko, Alexey A.; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-01-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates. PMID:26275099

  10. Unbiased Quantitative Models of Protein Translation Derived from Ribosome Profiling Data.

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, Alexey A; Hulsman, Marc; Reinders, Marcel J T; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-08-01

    Translation of RNA to protein is a core process for any living organism. While for some steps of this process the effect on protein production is understood, a holistic understanding of translation still remains elusive. In silico modelling is a promising approach for elucidating the process of protein synthesis. Although a number of computational models of the process have been proposed, their application is limited by the assumptions they make. Ribosome profiling (RP), a relatively new sequencing-based technique capable of recording snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes, is a promising source of information for deriving unbiased data-driven translation models. However, quantitative analysis of RP data is challenging due to high measurement variance and the inability to discriminate between the number of ribosomes measured on a gene and their speed of translation. We propose a solution in the form of a novel multi-scale interpretation of RP data that allows for deriving models with translation dynamics extracted from the snapshots. We demonstrate the usefulness of this approach by simultaneously determining for the first time per-codon translation elongation and per-gene translation initiation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from RP data for two versions of the Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) model of translation. We do this in an unbiased fashion, by fitting the models using only RP data with a novel optimization scheme based on Monte Carlo simulation to keep the problem tractable. The fitted models match the data significantly better than existing models and their predictions show better agreement with several independent protein abundance datasets than existing models. Results additionally indicate that the tRNA pool adaptation hypothesis is incomplete, with evidence suggesting that tRNA post-transcriptional modifications and codon context may play a role in determining codon elongation rates.

  11. Quantitative proteomics analysis integrated with microarray data reveals that extracellular matrix proteins, catenins, and p53 binding protein 1 are important for chemotherapy response in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Cheng, Lihua; White, James T; Lu, Wei; Utleg, Angelita G; Yan, Xiaowei; Urban, Nicole D; Drescher, Charles W; Hood, Leroy; Lin, Biaoyang

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel is the standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients. Although most patients initially respond to this treatment, few are cured. Resistance to chemotherapy is the major cause of treatment failure. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on ICAT/MS/MS technology to analyze tissues harvested at primary debulking surgery before the initiation of combination chemotherapy in order to identify potential naive or intrinsic chemotherapy response proteins in ovarian cancers. We identified 44 proteins that are overexpressed, and 34 proteins that are underexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue compared to the chemoresistant tissue. The overexpressed proteins identified in the chemoresistant tissue include 10 proteins (25.6%) belonging to the extracellular matrix (ECM), including decorin, versican, basigin (CD147), fibulin-1, extracellular matrix protein 1, biglycan, fibronectin 1, dermatopontin, alpha-cardiac actin (smooth muscle actin), and an EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1. Interesting proteins identified as overexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue include gamma-catenin (junction plakoglobin) and delta-catenin, tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), annexin A11, and 53 kDa selenium binding protein 1. Integrative analysis with expression profiling data of eight chemoresistant tissues and 13 chemosensitive tissues revealed that 16 proteins showed consistent changes at both the protein and the RNA levels. These include P53 binding protein 1, catenin delta 1 and plakoglobin, EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1. Our results suggest that chemotherapy response may be determined by multiple and complex system properties involving extracellular-matrix, cell adhesion and junction proteins.

  12. Stress Responsive Proteins Are Actively Regulated during Rice (Oryza sativa) Embryogenesis as Indicated by Quantitative Proteomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Jin; Zhang, Jiyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Zhou, Baojin; Zhong, Junyan; Zhang, Chaoliang; Qiu, Xuemei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Shenyan; Fu, Xiqin; Lin, Liang; Liu, Siqi

    2013-01-01

    Embryogenesis is the initial step in a plant’s life, and the molecular changes that occur during embryonic development are largely unknown. To explore the relevant molecular events, we used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) coupled with the shotgun proteomics technique (iTRAQ/Shotgun) to study the proteomic changes of rice embryos during embryogenesis. For the first time, a total of 2 165 unique proteins were identified in rice embryos, and the abundances of 867 proteins were actively changed based on the statistical evaluation of the quantitative MS/MS signals. The quantitative data were then confirmed using multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) and were also supported by our previous study based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2 DE). Using the proteome at 6 days after pollination (DAP) as a reference, cluster analysis of these differential proteins throughout rice embryogenesis revealed that 25% were up-regulated and 75% were down-regulated. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis implicated that most of the up-regulated proteins were functionally categorized as stress responsive, mainly including heat shock-, lipid transfer-, and reactive oxygen species-related proteins. The stress-responsive proteins were thus postulated to play an important role during seed maturation. PMID:24058531

  13. Quantitative Fluorescence Quenching on Antibody-conjugated Graphene Oxide as a Platform for Protein Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ao; Li, Weiwei; Shi, Shuo; Yao, Tianming

    2017-01-01

    We created an immunosensing platform for the detection of proteins in a buffer solution. Our sensing platform relies on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets conjugated with antibodies to provide quantitative binding sites for analyte proteins. When analyte proteins and standard fluorescein-labelled proteins are competing for the binding sites, the assay exhibits quantitative fluorescence quenching by GO for the fluorescein-labelled proteins as determined by the analyte protein concentration. Because of this mechanism, measured fluorescence intensity from unquenched fluorescein-labelled protein was shown to increase with an increasing analyte protein concentration. As an alternative to the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), our method does not require an enzyme-linked second antibody for protein recognition and the enzyme for optical signal measurement. Thus, it is beneficial with its low cost and fewer systematic errors caused by the series of antigen-antibody recognition steps in ELISA. Immune globulin G (IgG) was introduced as a model protein to test our method and our results showed that the limit of detection for IgG was 4.67 pmol mL−1 in the buffer solution. This sensing mechanism could be developed into a promising biosensor for the detection of proteins, which would broaden the spectrum of GO applications in both analytical biochemistry and clinical diagnosis. PMID:28084438

  14. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rüetschi, Ulla; Stenson, Martin; Hasselblom, Sverker; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Hansson, Ulrika; Fagman, Henrik; Andersson, Per-Ola

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS) quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i) early relapsed or refractory and (ii) long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy. PMID:26060582

  15. Quantitative Synthesis: An Actuarial Base for Planning Impact Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordray, David S.; Sonnefeld, L. Joseph

    1985-01-01

    There are numerous micro-level methods decisions associated with planning an impact evaluation. Quantitative synthesis methods can be used to construct an actuarial data base for establishing the likelihood of achieving desired sample sizes, statistical power, and measurement characteristics. (Author/BS)

  16. High-speed quantitative interferometric microscopy based phase imaging cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposed a simple large scale bio-sample phase detecting equipment called gravity driven phase detecting cytometer, which is based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to realize flowing red blood cells phase distribution detection. The method has advantages on high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real-time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells are useful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is shedding more light on quantitatively measurement of the phase distribution of bio-samples.

  17. Quantitative genetic bases of anthocyanin variation in grape (Vitis vinifera L. ssp. sativa) berry: a quantitative trait locus to quantitative trait nucleotide integrated study.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Le Cunff, Loïc; Gomez, Camila; Doligez, Agnès; Ageorges, Agnès; Roux, Catherine; Bertrand, Yves; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Cheynier, Véronique; This, Patrice

    2009-11-01

    The combination of QTL mapping studies of synthetic lines and association mapping studies of natural diversity represents an opportunity to throw light on the genetically based variation of quantitative traits. With the positional information provided through quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, which often leads to wide intervals encompassing numerous genes, it is now feasible to directly target candidate genes that are likely to be responsible for the observed variation in completely sequenced genomes and to test their effects through association genetics. This approach was performed in grape, a newly sequenced genome, to decipher the genetic architecture of anthocyanin content. Grapes may be either white or colored, ranging from the lightest pink to the darkest purple tones according to the amount of anthocyanin accumulated in the berry skin, which is a crucial trait for both wine quality and human nutrition. Although the determinism of the white phenotype has been fully identified, the genetic bases of the quantitative variation of anthocyanin content in berry skin remain unclear. A single QTL responsible for up to 62% of the variation in the anthocyanin content was mapped on a Syrah x Grenache F(1) pseudo-testcross. Among the 68 unigenes identified in the grape genome within the QTL interval, a cluster of four Myb-type genes was selected on the basis of physiological evidence (VvMybA1, VvMybA2, VvMybA3, and VvMybA4). From a core collection of natural resources (141 individuals), 32 polymorphisms revealed significant association, and extended linkage disequilibrium was observed. Using a multivariate regression method, we demonstrated that five polymorphisms in VvMybA genes except VvMybA4 (one retrotransposon, three single nucleotide polymorphisms and one 2-bp insertion/deletion) accounted for 84% of the observed variation. All these polymorphisms led to either structural changes in the MYB proteins or differences in the VvMybAs promoters. We concluded that

  18. Statistical design of quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomic experiments.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Ann L; Vitek, Olga

    2009-05-01

    We review the fundamental principles of statistical experimental design, and their application to quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We focus on class comparison using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and discuss how randomization, replication and blocking help avoid systematic biases due to the experimental procedure, and help optimize our ability to detect true quantitative changes between groups. We also discuss the issues of pooling multiple biological specimens for a single mass analysis, and calculation of the number of replicates in a future study. When applicable, we emphasize the parallels between designing quantitative proteomic experiments and experiments with gene expression microarrays, and give examples from that area of research. We illustrate the discussion using theoretical considerations, and using real-data examples of profiling of disease.

  19. Mass spectrometry-based, label-free quantitative proteomics of round spermatids in mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAILONG; LI, YAN; YANG, LIJUAN; YU, BAOFENG; YAN, PING; PANG, MIN; LI, XIAOBING; YANG, HONG; ZHENG, GUOPING; XIE, JUN; GUO, RUI

    2014-01-01

    Round haploid spermatids are formed at the completion of meiosis. These spermatids then undergo morphological and cytological changes during spermiogenesis. Although sperm proteomes have been extensively studied, relatively few studies have specifically investigated the proteome of round spermatids. We developed a label-free quantitative method in combination with 2D-nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS to investigate the proteome of round spermatids in mice. Analysis of the proteomic data identified 2,331 proteins in the round spermatids. Functional classification of the proteins based on Gene Ontology terms and enrichment analysis further revealed the following: 504 of the identified proteins are predicted to be involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy; 343 proteins in translation and protein targeting; 298 proteins in nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism; 275 and 289 proteins in transport and cellular component organization, respectively. A number of the identified proteins were associated with cytoskeleton organization (183), protein degradation (116) and response to stimulus (115). KEGG pathway analysis identified 68 proteins that are annotated as components of the ribosomal pathway and 17 proteins were related to aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. The round spermatids also contained 28 proteins involved in the proteasome pathway and 40 proteins in the lysosome pathway. A total of 60 proteins were annotated as parts of the spliceosome pathway, in which heterogeneous nuclear RNA is converted to mRNA. Approximately 94 proteins were identified as actin-binding proteins, involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, using a label-free shotgun proteomic approach, we identified numerous proteins associated with spermiogenesis in round spermatids. PMID:25109358

  20. Ultrasensitive proteomic quantitation of cellular signaling by digitized nanoparticle-protein counting

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Thomas; Agarwal, Anupriya; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; O’Hare, Thomas; Gönen, Mehmet; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2016-01-01

    Many important signaling and regulatory proteins are expressed at low abundance and are difficult to measure in single cells. We report a molecular imaging approach to quantitate protein levels by digitized, discrete counting of nanoparticle-tagged proteins. Digitized protein counting provides ultrasensitive molecular detection of proteins in single cells that surpasses conventional methods of quantitating total diffuse fluorescence, and offers a substantial improvement in protein quantitation. We implement this digitized proteomic approach in an integrated imaging platform, the single cell-quantum dot platform (SC-QDP), to execute sensitive single cell phosphoquantitation in response to multiple drug treatment conditions and using limited primary patient material. The SC-QDP: 1) identified pAKT and pERK phospho-heterogeneity and insensitivity in individual leukemia cells treated with a multi-drug panel of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors, and 2) revealed subpopulations of drug-insensitive CD34+ stem cells with high pCRKL and pSTAT5 signaling in chronic myeloid leukemia patient blood samples. This ultrasensitive digitized protein detection approach is valuable for uncovering subtle but important differences in signaling, drug insensitivity, and other key cellular processes amongst single cells. PMID:27320899

  1. Development and validation of a novel protein extraction methodology for quantitation of protein expression in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using western blotting.

    PubMed

    Nirmalan, Niroshini J; Harnden, Patricia; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2009-03-01

    The development of efficient formaldehyde cross-link reversal strategies will make the vast diagnostic tissue archives of pathology departments amenable to prospective and retrospective translational research, particularly in biomarker-driven proteomic investigations. Heat-induced antigen retrieval strategies (HIARs) have achieved varying degrees of cross-link reversal, potentially enabling archival tissue usage for proteomic applications outside its current remit of immunohistochemistry (IHC). While most successes achieved so far have been based on retrieving tryptic peptide fragments using shot-gun proteomic approaches, attempts at extracting full-length, non-degraded, immunoreactive proteins from archival tissue have proved challenging. We have developed a novel heat-induced antigen retrieval strategy using SDS-containing Laemmli buffer for efficient intact protein recovery from formalin-fixed tissues for subsequent analysis by western blotting. Protocol optimization and comparison of extraction efficacies with frozen tissues and current leader methodology is presented. Quantitative validation of methodology was carried out in a cohort of matched tumour/normal, frozen/FFPE renal tissue samples from 10 patients, probed by western blotting for a selected panel of seven proteins known to be differentially expressed in renal cancer. Our data show that the protocol enables efficient extraction of non-degraded, full-length, immunoreactive protein, with tumour versus normal differential expression profiles for a majority of the panel of proteins tested being comparable to matched frozen tissue controls (rank correlation, r = 0.7292, p < 1.825e-09). However, the variability observed in extraction efficacies for some membrane proteins emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of quantitative data from this subset of proteins. The method provides a viable, cost-effective quantitative option for the validation of potential biomarker panels through a range of clinical

  2. Deep proteomics of mouse skeletal muscle enables quantitation of protein isoforms, metabolic pathways, and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Atul S; Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Treebak, Jonas T; Cox, Jürgen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes 40% of individual body mass and plays vital roles in locomotion and whole-body metabolism. Proteomics of skeletal muscle is challenging because of highly abundant contractile proteins that interfere with detection of regulatory proteins. Using a state-of-the art MS workflow and a strategy to map identifications from the C2C12 cell line model to tissues, we identified a total of 10,218 proteins, including skeletal muscle specific transcription factors like myod1 and myogenin and circadian clock proteins. We obtain absolute abundances for proteins expressed in a muscle cell line and skeletal muscle, which should serve as a valuable resource. Quantitation of protein isoforms of glucose uptake signaling pathways and in glucose and lipid metabolic pathways provides a detailed metabolic map of the cell line compared with tissue. This revealed unexpectedly complex regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin signaling in muscle tissue at the level of enzyme isoforms.

  3. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  4. A universal, high recovery assay for protein quantitation through temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC).

    PubMed

    Orton, Dennis J; Doucette, Alan A

    2013-03-15

    As an alternative to direct UV absorbance measurements, estimation of total protein concentration is typically conducted through colorimetric reagent assays. However, for protein-limited applications, the proportion of the sample sacrificed to the assay becomes increasingly significant. This work demonstrates a method for quantitation of protein samples with high recovery. Temperature programmed liquid chromatography (TPLC) with absorbance detection at 214nm permits accurate estimation of total protein concentration from samples containing as little as 0.75μg. The method incorporates a temperature gradient from 25 to 80°C to facilitate elution of total protein into a single fraction. Analyte recovery, as measured from 1 and 10μg protein extracts of Escherichia coli, is shown to exceed 93%. Extinction coefficients at 214nm were calculated across the human proteome, providing a relative standard deviation of 21% (versus 42% at 280nm), suggesting absorbance values at 214nm provide a more consistent measure of protein concentration. These results translate to a universal protein detection strategy exhibiting a coefficient of variation below 10%. Together with the sensitivity and tolerance to contaminants, TPLC with UV detection is a favorable alternative to colorimetric assay for total protein quantitation, particularly in sample-limited applications.

  5. Protein turnover analysis in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by dynamic SILAC, Topograph, and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Han, Qiang-Qiang; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Xi; Guo, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein turnover affects protein abundance and phenotypes. Comprehensive investigation of protein turnover dynamics has the potential to provide substantial information about gene expression. Here we report a large-scale protein turnover study in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by quantitative proteomics. Murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were infected with SILAC labeled Salmonella. Bacterial cells were extracted after 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Mass spectrometry analyses yielded information about Salmonella protein turnover dynamics and a software program named Topograph was used for the calculation of protein half lives. The half lives of 311 proteins from intracellular Salmonella were obtained. For bacteria cultured in control medium (DMEM), the half lives for 870 proteins were obtained. The calculated median of protein half lives was 69.13 and 99.30 min for the infection group and the DMEM group, respectively, indicating an elevated protein turnover at the initial stage of infection. Gene ontology analyses revealed that a number of protein functional groups were significantly regulated by infection, including proteins involved in ribosome, periplasmic space, cellular amino acid metabolic process, ion binding, and catalytic activity. The half lives of proteins involved in purine metabolism pathway were found to be significantly shortened during infection.

  6. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians.

  7. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians. PMID:26131905

  8. Quantitative imaging of protein targets in the human brain with PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Roger N.; Slifstein, Mark; Searle, Graham E.; Price, Julie C.

    2015-11-01

    PET imaging of proteins in the human brain with high affinity radiolabelled molecules has a history stretching back over 30 years. During this period the portfolio of protein targets that can be imaged has increased significantly through successes in radioligand discovery and development. This portfolio now spans six major categories of proteins; G-protein coupled receptors, membrane transporters, ligand gated ion channels, enzymes, misfolded proteins and tryptophan-rich sensory proteins. In parallel to these achievements in radiochemical sciences there have also been significant advances in the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the imaging data including the development of methods for image registration, image segmentation, tracer compartmental modeling, reference tissue kinetic analysis and partial volume correction. In this review, we analyze the activity of the field around each of the protein targets in order to give a perspective on the historical focus and the possible future trajectory of the field. The important neurobiology and pharmacology is introduced for each of the six protein classes and we present established radioligands for each that have successfully transitioned to quantitative imaging in humans. We present a standard quantitative analysis workflow for these radioligands which takes the dynamic PET data, associated blood and anatomical MRI data as the inputs to a series of image processing and bio-mathematical modeling steps before outputting the outcome measure of interest on either a regional or parametric image basis. The quantitative outcome measures are then used in a range of different imaging studies including tracer discovery and development studies, cross sectional studies, classification studies, intervention studies and longitudinal studies. Finally we consider some of the confounds, challenges and subtleties that arise in practice when trying to quantify and interpret PET neuroimaging data including motion artifacts

  9. Proteomics: bases for protein complexity understanding.

    PubMed

    Rotilio, Domenico; Della Corte, Anna; D'Imperio, Marco; Coletta, Walter; Marcone, Simone; Silvestri, Cristian; Giordano, Lucia; Di Michele, Michela; Donati, Maria Benedetta

    2012-03-01

    In the post genomic era we became aware that the genomic sequence and protein functions cannot be correlated. One gene can encode multiple protein functions mainly because of mRNA splice variants, post translational modifications (PTM) and moonlighting functions. To study the whole population of proteins present in a cell to a specific time point and under defined conditions it is necessary to investigate the proteome. Comprehensive analysis of the proteome requires the use of emerging high technologies because of the complexity and wide dynamic range of protein concentrations. Proteomics provides the tools to study protein identification and quantitation, protein-protein interactions, protein modifications and localization. The most widespread strategy for studying global protein expression employs two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) allowing thousands of proteins to be resolved and their expression quantified. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has emerged as a high throughput technique for protein identification and characterization because of its high sensitivity, precision and accuracy. LC-MS/MS is well suited for accurate quantitation of protein expression levels, post-translational modifications and comparative and absolute quantitative analysis of peptides. Bioinformatic tools are required to elaborate the growing number of proteomic data. Here, we give an overview of the current status of the wide range of technologies that define and characterize the modern proteomics.

  10. Time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy: a quantitative method to follow transient protein-protein interactions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging studies of protein-protein interactions within live cells is still a challenging issue. Many cellular biology applications aim at the determination of the space and time variations of the relative amount of interacting fluorescently tagged proteins occurring in cells. This relevant quantitative parameter can be, at least partially, obtained at a pixel-level resolution by using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Indeed, fluorescence decay analysis of a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), leads to the intrinsic FRET efficiency value (E) and the fraction of the donor-tagged protein that undergoes FRET (fD). To simultaneously obtain fD and E values from a two-exponential fit, data must be acquired with a high number of photons, so that the statistics are robust enough to reduce fitting ambiguities. This is a time-consuming procedure. However, when fast-FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are unreliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), obtained from the mathematical minimization of fD. Here, we discuss different FLIM techniques and the compromises that must be made between precision and time invested in acquiring FLIM measurements. We show that mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for fast FLIM because it gives quantitative information about transient interactions in live cells.

  11. Quantitation of human milk proteins and their glycoforms using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM).

    PubMed

    Huang, Jincui; Kailemia, Muchena J; Goonatilleke, Elisha; Parker, Evan A; Hong, Qiuting; Sabia, Rocchina; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-01-01

    Human milk plays a substantial role in the child growth, development and determines their nutritional and health status. Despite the importance of the proteins and glycoproteins in human milk, very little quantitative information especially on their site-specific glycosylation is known. As more functions of milk proteins and other components continue to emerge, their fine-detailed quantitative information is becoming a key factor in milk research efforts. The present work utilizes a sensitive label-free MRM method to quantify seven milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, α1-antitrypsin, and lysozyme) using their unique peptides while at the same time, quantifying their site-specific N-glycosylation relative to the protein abundance. The method is highly reproducible, has low limit of quantitation, and accounts for differences in glycosylation due to variations in protein amounts. The method described here expands our knowledge about human milk proteins and provides vital details that could be used in monitoring the health of the infant and even the mother. Graphical Abstract The glycopeptides EICs generated from QQQ.

  12. ReAsH as a Quantitative Probe of In-Cell Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Hannah; Wirth, Anna Jean; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-04-05

    The tetracysteine (tc) tag/biarsenical dye system (FlAsH or ReAsH) promises to combine the flexibility of fluorescent protein tags with the small size of dye labels, allowing in-cell study of target proteins that are perturbed by large protein tags. Quantitative thermodynamic and kinetic studies in-cell using FlAsH and ReAsH have been hampered by methodological complexities presented by the fluorescence properties of the tag-dye complex probed by either Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or direct excitation. We label the model protein phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) with AcGFP1 and ReAsH for direct comparison with AcGFP1/mCherry-labeled PGK. We find that fast relaxation imaging (FReI), combining millisecond temperature jump kinetics with fluorescence microscopy detection, circumvents many of the difficulties encountered working with the ReAsH system, allowing us to obtain quantitative FRET measurements of protein stability and kinetics both in vitro and in cells. We also demonstrate the to us surprising result that fluorescence from directly excited, unburied ReAsH at the C-terminus of the model protein also reports on folding in vitro and in cells. Comparing the ReAsH-labeled protein to a construct labeled with two fluorescent protein tags allows us to evaluate how a bulkier protein tag affects protein dynamics in cells and in vitro. We find that the average folding rate in the cell is closer to the in vitro rate with the smaller tag, highlighting the effect of tags on quantitative in-cell measurements.

  13. Determining Protein Complex Connectivity Using a Probabilistic Deletion Network Derived from Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Carrozza, Michael J.; Li, Bing; Workman, Jerry L.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Protein complexes are key molecular machines executing a variety of essential cellular processes. Despite the availability of genome-wide protein-protein interaction studies, determining the connectivity between proteins within a complex remains a major challenge. Here we demonstrate a method that is able to predict the relationship of proteins within a stable protein complex. We employed a combination of computational approaches and a systematic collection of quantitative proteomics data from wild-type and deletion strain purifications to build a quantitative deletion-interaction network map and subsequently convert the resulting data into an interdependency-interaction model of a complex. We applied this approach to a data set generated from components of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rpd3 histone deacetylase complexes, which consists of two distinct small and large complexes that are held together by a module consisting of Rpd3, Sin3 and Ume1. The resulting representation reveals new protein-protein interactions and new submodule relationships, providing novel information for mapping the functional organization of a complex. PMID:19806189

  14. Label-free quantitative analysis for studying the interactions between nanoparticles and plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caracciolo, Giulio; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Pozzi, Daniela; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    A shotgun proteomics approach was used to compare human plasma protein binding capability with cationic liposomes, DNA-cationic lipid complexes (lipoplexes), and lipid-polycation-DNA (LPD) complexes. Nano-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution LTQ Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer was used to characterize and compare their protein corona. Spectral counting and area under curve methods were used to perform label-free quantification. Substantial qualitative and quantitative differences were found among proteins bound to the three different systems investigated. Protein variety found on lipoplexes and LPD complexes was richer than that found on cationic liposomes. There were also significant differences between the amounts of protein. Such results could help in the design of gene-delivery systems, because some proteins could be more selectively bound rather than others, and their bio-distribution could be driven in vivo for more efficient and effective gene therapy.

  15. Targeted Enlargement of Aptamer Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Quantitative Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Li, Jingjing; Tang, Yanan; Wang, Chuan; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X. Chris

    2016-01-01

    The ability to selectively amplify the detection signals for targets over interferences is crucial when analyzing proteins in a complicated sample matrix. Here, we describe a targeted enlargement strategy that can amplify the light-scattering signal from aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Apt-AuNP) with high specificity for quantitative protein analysis. This strategy is achieved by labeling target proteins with competitively protected Apt-AuNP probes and enlarging the probes with gold enhancement. This competitive protection strategy could effectively eliminate nonspecific protein adsorptions from a sample matrix, leading to a highly specific labeling of the target protein. As a result, the subsequent amplification of the light-scattering signal by gold enhancement only occurs in the presence of the target protein. This strategy was successfully demonstrated by analyzing human α-thrombin in human serum samples in a Western blot format. PMID:28248252

  16. Identification of protein interaction partners in mammalian cells using SILAC-immunoprecipitation quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Emmott, Edward; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-07-06

    Quantitative proteomics combined with immuno-affinity purification, SILAC immunoprecipitation, represent a powerful means for the discovery of novel protein:protein interactions. By allowing the accurate relative quantification of protein abundance in both control and test samples, true interactions may be easily distinguished from experimental contaminants. Low affinity interactions can be preserved through the use of less-stringent buffer conditions and remain readily identifiable. This protocol discusses the labeling of tissue culture cells with stable isotope labeled amino acids, transfection and immunoprecipitation of an affinity tagged protein of interest, followed by the preparation for submission to a mass spectrometry facility. This protocol then discusses how to analyze and interpret the data returned from the mass spectrometer in order to identify cellular partners interacting with a protein of interest. As an example this technique is applied to identify proteins binding to the eukaryotic translation initiation factors: eIF4AI and eIF4AII.

  17. Quantitative proteomic view on secreted, cell surface-associated, and cytoplasmic proteins of the methicillin-resistant human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Kristina; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Moche, Martin; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Dörte

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is capable of colonizing and infecting humans by its arsenal of surface-exposed and secreted proteins. Iron-limited conditions in mammalian body fluids serve as a major environmental signal to bacteria to express virulence determinants. Here we present a comprehensive, gel-free, and GeLC-MS/MS-based quantitative proteome profiling of S. aureus under this infection-relevant situation. (14)N(15)N metabolic labeling and three complementing approaches were combined for relative quantitative analyses of surface-associated proteins. The surface-exposed and secreted proteome profiling approaches comprise trypsin shaving, biotinylation, and precipitation of the supernatant. By analysis of the outer subproteomic and cytoplasmic protein fraction, 1210 proteins could be identified including 221 surface-associated proteins. Thus, access was enabled to 70% of the predicted cell wall-associated proteins, 80% of the predicted sortase substrates, two/thirds of lipoproteins and more than 50% of secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. For iron-deficiency, 158 surface-associated proteins were quantified. Twenty-nine proteins were found in altered amounts showing particularly surface-exposed proteins strongly induced, such as the iron-regulated surface determinant proteins IsdA, IsdB, IsdC and IsdD as well as lipid-anchored iron compound-binding proteins. The work presents a crucial subject for understanding S. aureus pathophysiology by the use of methods that allow quantitative surface proteome profiling.

  18. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  19. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  20. Identification of stromal differentially expressed proteins in the colon carcinoma by quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yibing; Chen, Yongheng; Zhang, Guiying; Zhan, Xianquan; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Guoqing; Li, Maoyu; Xiao, Zhefeng; Gong, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zhuchu

    2013-06-01

    Tumor microenvironment plays very important roles in the carcinogenesis. A variety of stromal cells in the microenvironment have been modified to support the unique needs of the malignant state. This study was to discover stromal differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that were involved in colon carcinoma carcinogenesis. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was captured and isolated the stromal cells from colon adenocarcinoma (CAC) and non-neoplastic colon mucosa (NNCM) tissues, respectively. Seventy DEPs were identified between the pooled LCM-enriched CAC and NNCM stroma samples by iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics. Gene Ontology (GO) relationship analysis revealed that DEPs were hierarchically grouped into 10 clusters, and were involved in multiple biological functions that were altered during carcinogenesis, including extracellular matrix organization, cytoskeleton, transport, metabolism, inflammatory response, protein polymerization, and cell motility. Pathway network analysis revealed 6 networks and 56 network eligible proteins with Ingenuity pathway analysis. Four significant networks functioned in digestive system development and its function, inflammatory disease, and developmental disorder. Eight DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ) were validated by Western blotting, and four DEPs (DCN, FN1, PKM2, and HSP90B1) were validated by immunohistochemical analysis. It is the first report of stromal DEPs between CAC and NNCM tissues. It will be helpful to recognize the roles of stromas in the colon carcinoma microenvironment, and improve the understanding of carcinogenesis in colon carcinoma. The present data suggest that DCN, FN1, PKM2, HSP90B1, S100A9, MYH9, TUBB, and YWHAZ might be the potential targets for colon cancer prevention and therapy.

  1. Quantitative atlas of blood-brain barrier transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in rats and common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Yutaro; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Inoue, Takashi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the protein amounts of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability-related transporters, receptors, and tight junction proteins in Sprague Dawley and Wistar rats and common marmoset, and also to investigate inter-species and inter-strain differences across rodents and primates. Quantification of target proteins in isolated brain capillaries was conducted by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative targeted absolute proteomics, with in silico peptide selection. Most target proteins showed inter-rodent, inter-primate species, and inter-rat strain differences of less than 2-fold. Comparison of rat and human BBB showed that P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 4, monocarboxylate transporter 1, l-type amino acid transporter, and organic anion transporter 3 exhibited differences of more than two-fold in protein abundance, whereas the amounts of breast cancer resistance protein, glucose transporter 1, and insulin receptor were similar in rat and human. In contrast, the differences between marmoset and human BBB were less than 2-fold for almost all measured proteins. Thus, the molecular basis of BBB functions may be similar in marmoset and human, whereas that of rats shows significant differences. The marmoset may be a good model to access in vivo human BBB permeability characteristics, as an alternative to rat and macaque monkey.

  2. A Guided Materials Screening Approach for Developing Quantitative Sol-gel Derived Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Helka, Blake-Joseph; Brennan, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have found use in the development of high-throughput assays for new materials and discovery of small-molecule drug leads. Herein we describe a guided material screening approach to identify sol-gel based materials that are suitable for producing three-dimensional protein microarrays. The approach first identifies materials that can be printed as microarrays, narrows down the number of materials by identifying those that are compatible with a given enzyme assay, and then hones in on optimal materials based on retention of maximum enzyme activity. This approach is applied to develop microarrays suitable for two different enzyme assays, one using acetylcholinesterase and the other using a set of four key kinases involved in cancer. In each case, it was possible to produce microarrays that could be used for quantitative small-molecule screening assays and production of dose-dependent inhibitor response curves. Importantly, the ability to screen many materials produced information on the types of materials that best suited both microarray production and retention of enzyme activity. The materials data provide insight into basic material requirements necessary for tailoring optimal, high-density sol-gel derived microarrays. PMID:24022739

  3. Gel-Based and Gel-Free Quantitative Proteomics Approaches at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Cosette; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) is widely applied and remains the method of choice in proteomics; however, pervasive 2-DE-related concerns undermine its prospects as a dominant separation technique in proteome research. Consequently, the state-of-the-art shotgun techniques are slowly taking over and utilising the rapid expansion and advancement of mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a new toolbox of gel-free quantitative techniques. When coupled to MS, the shotgun proteomic pipeline can fuel new routes in sensitive and high-throughput profiling of proteins, leading to a high accuracy in quantification. Although label-based approaches, either chemical or metabolic, gained popularity in quantitative proteomics because of the multiplexing capacity, these approaches are not without drawbacks. The burgeoning label-free methods are tag independent and suitable for all kinds of samples. The challenges in quantitative proteomics are more prominent in plants due to difficulties in protein extraction, some protein abundance in green tissue, and the absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences. The goal of this perspective assay is to present the balance between the strengths and weaknesses of the available gel-based and -free methods and their application to plants. The latest trends in peptide fractionation amenable to MS analysis are as well discussed. PMID:23213324

  4. Haplotype-based quantitative trait mapping using a clustering algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Yingyao; Elston, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Background With the availability of large-scale, high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, substantial effort has been made in identifying disease-causing genes using linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping by haplotype analysis of unrelated individuals. In addition to complex diseases, many continuously distributed quantitative traits are of primary clinical and health significance. However the development of association mapping methods using unrelated individuals for quantitative traits has received relatively less attention. Results We recently developed an association mapping method for complex diseases by mining the sharing of haplotype segments (i.e., phased genotype pairs) in affected individuals that are rarely present in normal individuals. In this paper, we extend our previous work to address the problem of quantitative trait mapping from unrelated individuals. The method is non-parametric in nature, and statistical significance can be obtained by a permutation test. It can also be incorporated into the one-way ANCOVA (analysis of covariance) framework so that other factors and covariates can be easily incorporated. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by extensive experimental studies using both simulated and real data sets. The results show that our haplotype-based approach is more robust than two statistical methods based on single markers: a single SNP association test (SSA) and the Mann-Whitney U-test (MWU). The algorithm has been incorporated into our existing software package called HapMiner, which is available from our website at . Conclusion For QTL (quantitative trait loci) fine mapping, to identify QTNs (quantitative trait nucleotides) with realistic effects (the contribution of each QTN less than 10% of total variance of the trait), large samples sizes (≥ 500) are needed for all the methods. The overall performance of HapMiner is better than that of the other two methods. Its effectiveness further depends on other

  5. Quantitative Protein Profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis Growth Forms Reveals Defense Strategies Against Tryptophan Starvation*

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Ole; Follmann, Frank; Olsen, Anja W.; Heegaard, Niels H.; Andersen, Peter; Rosenkrands, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogens in humans. The infection is often asymptomatic and can lead to chronic manifestations. The infectious elementary body and the replicating reticulate body are the two growth forms in the normal developmental cycle. Under the influence of interferon-γ, the normal cycle is disrupted because of tryptophan degradation, leading to a third persistent form, the aberrant reticulate body. For the genital strain C. trachomatis D/UW-3/CX we established a quantitative, label-free proteomic approach, and identified in total 655 out of 903 (73%) predicted proteins, allowing the first quantitative comparison of all three growth forms. Inclusion membrane proteins and proteins involved in translation were more abundant in the reticulate body (RB)1 and aberrant reticulate body (ARB) forms, whereas proteins of the type III Secretion System and the cell envelope were more abundant in the elementary body (EB) form, reflecting the need for these proteins to establish infection and for host interactions. In the interferon-γ induced ARB proteome, the tryptophan synthase subunits were identified as biomarkers with a strong increase from less than 0.05% to 9% of the total protein content, reflecting an inherent defense strategy for the pathogen to escape interferon-γ mediated immune pressure. Furthermore, the total tryptophan content in the ARB form was 1.9-fold lower compared with the EB form, and we demonstrate that modulation of the protein repertoire toward lower abundance of proteins with high tryptophan content, is a mechanism which contributes to establish and maintain chlamydial persistence. Thus, quantitative proteomics provides insights in the Chlamydia defense mechanisms to escape interferon-γ mediated immune pressure. PMID:27784728

  6. Fully automated software solution for protein quantitation by global metabolic labeling with stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, L V; Cramer, R

    2011-06-15

    Metabolic stable isotope labeling is increasingly employed for accurate protein (and metabolite) quantitation using mass spectrometry (MS). It provides sample-specific isotopologues that can be used to facilitate comparative analysis of two or more samples. Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) has been used for almost a decade in proteomic research and analytical software solutions have been established that provide an easy and integrated workflow for elucidating sample abundance ratios for most MS data formats. While SILAC is a discrete labeling method using specific amino acids, global metabolic stable isotope labeling using isotopes such as (15)N labels the entire element content of the sample, i.e. for (15)N the entire peptide backbone in addition to all nitrogen-containing side chains. Although global metabolic labeling can deliver advantages with regard to isotope incorporation and costs, the requirements for data analysis are more demanding because, for instance for polypeptides, the mass difference introduced by the label depends on the amino acid composition. Consequently, there has been less progress on the automation of the data processing and mining steps for this type of protein quantitation. Here, we present a new integrated software solution for the quantitative analysis of protein expression in differential samples and show the benefits of high-resolution MS data in quantitative proteomic analyses.

  7. Quantitative proteomics: assessing the spectrum of in-gel protein detection methods

    PubMed Central

    Gauci, Victoria J.; Wright, Elise P.

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics research relies heavily on visualization methods for detection of proteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Commonly used staining approaches involve colorimetric dyes such as Coomassie Brilliant Blue, fluorescent dyes including Sypro Ruby, newly developed reactive fluorophores, as well as a plethora of others. The most desired characteristic in selecting one stain over another is sensitivity, but this is far from the only important parameter. This review evaluates protein detection methods in terms of their quantitative attributes, including limit of detection (i.e., sensitivity), linear dynamic range, inter-protein variability, capacity for spot detection after 2D gel electrophoresis, and compatibility with subsequent mass spectrometric analyses. Unfortunately, many of these quantitative criteria are not routinely or consistently addressed by most of the studies published to date. We would urge more rigorous routine characterization of stains and detection methodologies as a critical approach to systematically improving these critically important tools for quantitative proteomics. In addition, substantial improvements in detection technology, particularly over the last decade or so, emphasize the need to consider renewed characterization of existing stains; the quantitative stains we need, or at least the chemistries required for their future development, may well already exist. PMID:21686332

  8. A quantitative immunopolymerase chain reaction method for detection of vegetative insecticidal protein in genetically modified crops.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2011-10-12

    Vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip) is being employed for transgenic expression in selected crops such as cotton, brinjal, and corn. For regulatory compliance, there is a need for a sensitive and reliable detection method, which can distinguish between approved and nonapproved genetically modified (GM) events and quantify GM contents as well. A quantitative immunopolymerase chain reaction (IPCR) method has been developed for the detection and quantification of Vip protein in GM crops. The developed assay displayed a detection limit of 1 ng/mL (1 ppb) and linear quantification range between 10 and 1000 ng/mL of Vip-S protein. The sensitivity of the assay was found to be 10 times higher than an analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for Vip-S protein. The results suggest that IPCR has the potential to become a standard method to quantify GM proteins.

  9. [Quantitative determination of the protein content of milk by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. 3. Determination of proteins in preserved milk samples].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, W; Schüler, E; Sieber, L; Schüler, E

    1987-01-01

    It is reported upon the results of the quantitative estimation of protein content from preserved milk by means of ultraviolet spectrophotometry. In addition to the preservation by boric acid, bronopol, copper sulphate, potassium dichromate and ammonium peroxodisulphate storage at temperatures below 0 degrees C and freeze drying were tested. Besides bronopol and copper sulphate especially physical preservation methods proves fit for the protein estimation by measurements of absorbance at 210 nm, 235 and 280 nm or 210 and 220 nm. It is recommended to use solutions and filters of quartz with evaluated absorbance in daily calibrating of the spectrophotometer.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Age Specific Variation in the Abundance of Human Female Parotid Salivary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Lu, Bingwen; Hagen, Fred K; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human saliva is a protein-rich, easily accessible source of potential local and systemic biomarkers to monitor changes that occur under pathological conditions; however little is known about the changes in abundance associated with normal aging. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic profiling of pooled saliva collected from the parotid glands of healthy female subjects, divided into two age groups 1 and 2 (20–30 and 55–65 years old, respectively). Hydrophobic charge interaction chromatography was used to separate high from low abundant proteins prior to characterization of the parotid saliva using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Collectively, 532 proteins were identified in the two age groups. Of these proteins, 266 were identified exclusively in one age group, while 266 proteins were common to both groups. The majority of the proteins identified in the two age groups belonged to the defense and immune response category. Of note, several defense related proteins (e.g. lysozyme, lactoferrin and histatin-1) were significantly more abundant in group 2 as determined by G-test. Selected representative mass spectrometric findings were validated by western blot analysis. Our study reports the first quantitative analysis of differentially regulated proteins in ductal saliva collected from young and older female subjects. This study supports the use of high-throughput proteomics as a robust discovery tool. Such results provide a foundation for future studies to identify specific salivary proteins which may be linked to age-related diseases specific to women. PMID:19764810

  11. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J.; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function. PMID:26033914

  12. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  13. Toward a quantitative theory of intrinsically disordered proteins and their function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jintao; Faeder, James R; Camacho, Carlos J

    2009-11-24

    A large number of proteins are sufficiently unstable that their full 3D structure cannot be resolved. The origins of this intrinsic disorder are not well understood, but its ubiquitous presence undercuts the principle that a protein's structure determines its function. Here we present a quantitative theory that makes predictions regarding the role of intrinsic disorder in protein structure and function. In particular, we discuss the implications of analytical solutions of a series of fundamental thermodynamic models of protein interactions in which disordered proteins are characterized by positive folding free energies. We validate our predictions by assigning protein function by using the gene ontology classification--in which "protein binding", "catalytic activity", and "transcription regulator activity" are the three largest functional categories--and by performing genome-wide surveys of both the amount of disorder in these functional classes and binding affinities for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Specifically, without assuming any a priori structure-function relationship, the theory predicts that both catalytic and low-affinity binding (K(d) greater, >or= 0(-7) M) proteins prefer ordered structures, whereas only high-affinity binding proteins (found mostly in eukaryotes) can tolerate disorder. Relevant to both transcription and signal transduction, the theory also explains how increasing disorder can tune the binding affinity to maximize the specificity of promiscuous interactions. Collectively, these studies provide insight into how natural selection acts on folding stability to optimize protein function.

  14. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  15. Quantitative Proteomics of Sleep-Deprived Mouse Brains Reveals Global Changes in Mitochondrial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tie-Mei; Zhang, Ju-en; Lin, Rui; Chen, She; Luo, Minmin; Dong, Meng-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is a ubiquitous, tightly regulated, and evolutionarily conserved behavior observed in almost all animals. Prolonged sleep deprivation can be fatal, indicating that sleep is a physiological necessity. However, little is known about its core function. To gain insight into this mystery, we used advanced quantitative proteomics technology to survey the global changes in brain protein abundance. Aiming to gain a comprehensive profile, our proteomics workflow included filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), which increased the coverage of membrane proteins; tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, for relative quantitation; and high resolution, high mass accuracy, high throughput mass spectrometry (MS). In total, we obtained the relative abundance ratios of 9888 proteins encoded by 6070 genes. Interestingly, we observed significant enrichment for mitochondrial proteins among the differentially expressed proteins. This finding suggests that sleep deprivation strongly affects signaling pathways that govern either energy metabolism or responses to mitochondrial stress. Additionally, the differentially-expressed proteins are enriched in pathways implicated in age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Alzheimer’s, hinting at possible connections between sleep loss, mitochondrial stress, and neurodegeneration. PMID:27684481

  16. Colostrum protein uptake in neonatal lambs examined by descriptive and quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Argüello, Anastasio; Almeida, André M; Castro, Noemí; Bendixen, Emøke

    2015-01-01

    Colostrum intake is a key factor for newborn ruminant survival because the placenta does not allow the transfer of immune components. Therefore, newborn ruminants depend entirely on passive immunity transfer from the mother to the neonate, through the suckling of colostrum. Understanding the importance of specific colostrum proteins has gained significant attention in recent years. However, proteomics studies of sheep colostrum and their uptake in neonate lambs has not yet been presented. The aim of this study was to describe the proteomes of sheep colostrum and lamb blood plasma, using sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE for protein separation and in-gel digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of resulting tryptic peptides for protein identification. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomics approach was subsequently used to provide relative quantification of how neonatal plasma protein concentrations change as an effect of colostrum intake. The results of this study describe the presence of 70 proteins in the ovine colostrum proteome. Furthermore, colostrum intake resulted in an increase of 8 proteins with important immune functions in the blood plasma of lambs. Further proteomic studies will be necessary, particularly using the selected reaction monitoring approach, to describe in detail the role of specific colostrum proteins for immune transfer to the neonate.

  17. A miniaturized technique for assessing protein thermodynamics and function using fast determination of quantitative cysteine reactivity.

    PubMed

    Isom, Daniel G; Marguet, Philippe R; Oas, Terrence G; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-04-01

    Protein thermodynamic stability is a fundamental physical characteristic that determines biological function. Furthermore, alteration of thermodynamic stability by macromolecular interactions or biochemical modifications is a powerful tool for assessing the relationship between protein structure, stability, and biological function. High-throughput approaches for quantifying protein stability are beginning to emerge that enable thermodynamic measurements on small amounts of material, in short periods of time, and using readily accessible instrumentation. Here we present such a method, fast quantitative cysteine reactivity, which exploits the linkage between protein stability, sidechain protection by protein structure, and structural dynamics to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins. In this approach, the reaction of a protected cysteine and thiol-reactive fluorogenic indicator is monitored over a gradient of temperatures after a short incubation time. These labeling data can be used to determine the midpoint of thermal unfolding, measure the temperature dependence of protein stability, quantify ligand-binding affinity, and, under certain conditions, estimate folding rate constants. Here, we demonstrate the fQCR method by characterizing these thermodynamic and kinetic properties for variants of Staphylococcal nuclease and E. coli ribose-binding protein engineered to contain single, protected cysteines. These straightforward, information-rich experiments are likely to find applications in protein engineering and functional genomics.

  18. Quantitative AOP-based predictions for two aromatase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework can be used to support the use of mechanistic toxicology data as a basis for risk assessment. For certain risk contexts this includes defining, quantitative linkages between the molecular initiating event (MIE) and subsequent key events (KEs) within an AOP. One AOP for which strong, quantitative linkages have been established is aromatase inhibition leading to reproductive dysfunction in fish. A series of computational models have been linked to develop a quantitative AOP (Q-AOP). A measure of aromatase inhibition is used as the model input to estimate circulating plasma estradiol (E2) concentration and resultant circulating plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentration. To evaluate model predictions, two aromatase inhibitors, letrozole and epoxiconazole, were selected based upon their relative aromatase inhibition potency in US EPA ToxCast assays. Reproductively mature female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to varying concentrations of either letrozole (0.5, 7.5, 25, 75, 250 µg/L) or epoxiconazole (8, 25, 80, 250, 800 µg/L) in 24h flow through exposures. One additional consideration for model predictions was bioaccumulation of exposure chemicals and resultant circulating plasma concentration. To identify this, plasma from exposed minnows was extracted by supported liquid extraction (SLE) and concentrations of letrozole or epoxiconazole determined by LC-MS/MS. Plasma bioaccumulation factors (BAFplasma)

  19. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance.

  20. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Spirulina platensis in Response to Low Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingye; Chang, Rong; Sun, Yijun; Li, Bosheng

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important abiotic stresses that can significantly reduce crop yield. To gain insight into how Spirulina responds to LT stress, comprehensive physiological and proteomic analyses were conducted in this study. Significant decreases in growth and pigment levels as well as excessive accumulation of compatible osmolytes were observed in response to LT stress. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics approach was used to identify changes in protein abundance in Spirulina under LT. A total of 3,782 proteins were identified, of which 1,062 showed differential expression. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and translation are important for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and metabolic balance in Spirulina when subjected to LT stress. The up-regulation of proteins involved in gluconeogenesis, starch and sucrose metabolism, and amino acid biosynthesis served as coping mechanisms of Spirulina in response to LT stress. Moreover, the down-regulated expression of proteins involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, photosynthesis, and translation were associated with reduced energy consumption. The findings of the present study allow a better understanding of the response of Spirulina to LT stress and may facilitate in the elucidation of mechanisms underlying LT tolerance. PMID:27902743

  1. Non Linear Programming (NLP) Formulation for Quantitative Modeling of Protein Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Melody K.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms. PMID:23226239

  2. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  3. A quantitative proteomics-based signature of platinum sensitivity in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Wrzeszczynski, Kazimierz O.; Fu, Cexiong; Pappin, Darryl J.; Lucito, Robert; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Su, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Although DNA encodes the molecular instructions that underlie control of cell function, it is the proteins that are primarily responsible for implementing those instructions. Therefore, quantitative analyses of the proteome would be expected to yield insights into important candidates for the detection and treatment of disease. We present an iTRAQ (Isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute Quantification)-based proteomic analysis of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines and 2 normal ovarian surface epithelial cell lines. We profiled the abundance of 2659 cellular proteins, of which 1273 were common to all 12 cell lines. Of the 1273, 75 proteins exhibited elevated expression, and 164 proteins had diminished expression in the cancerous cells compared to the normal cell lines. The iTRAQ expression profiles allowed us to segregate cell lines based upon sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin. Importantly, we observed no substantial correlation between protein abundance and RNA expression or epigenetic, DNA methylation data. Furthermore, we could not discriminate between sensitivity and resistance to carboplatin on the basis of RNA expression and DNA methylation data alone. This study illustrates the importance of proteomics-based discovery for defining the basis for the carboplatin response in ovarian cancer and highlights candidate proteins, particularly involved in cellular redox regulation, homologous recombination and DNA damage repair, that otherwise could not have been predicted from whole genome and expression data sources alone. PMID:25406946

  4. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays for Detection and Characterization of Protein Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Farris, M. Heath; Ford, Kara A.; Doyle, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Initial evaluations of large microbial libraries for potential producers of novel antimicrobial proteins require both qualitative and quantitative methods to screen for target enzymes prior to investing greater research effort and resources. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate two complementary assays for conducting these initial evaluations. The microslide diffusion assay provides an initial or simple detection screen to enable the qualitative and rapid assessment of proteolytic activity against an array of both viable and heat-killed bacterial target substrates. As a counterpart, the increased sensitivity and reproducibility of the dye-release assay provides a quantitative platform for evaluating and comparing environmental influences affecting the hydrolytic activity of protein antimicrobials. The ability to label specific heat-killed cell culture substrates with Remazol brilliant blue R dye expands this capability to tailor the dye-release assay to characterize enzymatic activity of interest. PMID:27166738

  5. Detection and quantitation of pea and soy-derived proteins in calf milk replacers.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwoerd, M; Misra, V

    1989-01-01

    Preruminant calves on several farms had diarrhea nonresponsive to treatment and were doing poorly, despite being fed a high quality calf milk replacer. Because these reconstituted milk replacers always had a sediment, they were suspected of containing insoluble nonmilk-derived proteins. Microscopic examination of the milk replacer, however, did not show any evidence of starch granules. We therefore analyzed the samples by SDS PAGE. We were able to identify and quantitate pea protein in calf milk replacers in which all the protein was supposedly milk-derived. We were also able to differentiate polypeptides derived from pea and soy. We concluded that PAGE is a sensitive technique for detecting nonmilk-derived proteins in calf milk replacers.

  6. Identification of hypoxia-regulated proteins using MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging combined with quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas; Schmich, Fabian; Sinclair, John; Mršnik, Martina; Schoof, Erwin M; Barker, Holly E; Linding, Rune; Jørgensen, Claus; Erler, Janine T

    2014-05-02

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using quantitative proteomics combined with MALDI-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI). Here we present a comprehensive hypoxic proteome study and are the first to investigate changes in situ using tumor samples. In vitro quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of the hypoxic proteome was performed on breast cancer cells using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). MS analyses were performed on laser-capture microdissected samples isolated from normoxic and hypoxic regions from tumors derived from the same cells used in vitro. MALDI-MSI was used in combination to investigate hypoxia-regulated protein localization within tumor sections. Here we identified more than 100 proteins, both novel and previously reported, that were associated with hypoxia. Several proteins were localized in hypoxic regions, as identified by MALDI-MSI. Visualization and data extrapolation methods for the in vitro SILAC data were also developed, and computational mapping of MALDI-MSI data to IHC results was applied for data validation. The results and limitations of the methodologies described are discussed.

  7. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of Simon™, a new CE-based automated Western blot system as applied to vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Rustandi, Richard R; Loughney, John W; Hamm, Melissa; Hamm, Christopher; Lancaster, Catherine; Mach, Anna; Ha, Sha

    2012-09-01

    Many CE-based technologies such as imaged capillary IEF, CE-SDS, CZE, and MEKC are well established for analyzing proteins, viruses, or other biomolecules such as polysaccharides. For example, imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (charge-based protein separation) and CE-SDS (size-based protein separation) are standard replacement methods in biopharmaceutical industries for tedious and labor intensive IEF and SDS-PAGE methods, respectively. Another important analytical tool for protein characterization is a Western blot, where after size-based separation in SDS-PAGE the proteins are transferred to a membrane and blotted with specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. Western blotting analysis is applied in many areas such as biomarker research, therapeutic target identification, and vaccine development. Currently, the procedure is very manual, laborious, and time consuming. Here, we evaluate a new technology called Simple Western™ (or Simon™) for performing automated Western analysis. This new technology is based on CE-SDS where the separated proteins are attached to the wall of capillary by a proprietary photo activated chemical crosslink. Subsequent blotting is done automatically by incubating and washing the capillary with primary and secondary antibodies conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and detected with chemiluminescence. Typically, Western blots are not quantitative, hence we also evaluated the quantitative aspect of this new technology. We demonstrate that Simon™ can quantitate specific components in one of our vaccine candidates and it provides good reproducibility and intermediate precision with CV <10%.

  8. A Hybrid Approach to Protein Differential Expression in Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuan; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Dabney, Alan R.

    2012-04-19

    Motivation: Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics involves statistical inference on protein abundance, based on the intensities of each protein's associated spectral peaks. However, typical MS-based proteomics data sets have substantial proportions of missing observations, due at least in part to censoring of low intensities. This complicates intensity-based differential expression analysis. Results: We outline a statistical method for protein differential expression, based on a simple Binomial likelihood. By modeling peak intensities as binary, in terms of 'presence/ absence,' we enable the selection of proteins not typically amendable to quantitative analysis; e.g., 'one-state' proteins that are present in one condition but absent in another. In addition, we present an analysis protocol that combines quantitative and presence/ absence analysis of a given data set in a principled way, resulting in a single list of selected proteins with a single associated FDR.

  9. Development of a Quantitative BRET Affinity Assay for Nucleic Acid-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Timothy A.; Crooke, Stanley T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions play a crucial role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Elucidating the roles that protein-nucleic acid complexes play in the regulation of transcription, translation, DNA replication, repair and recombination, and RNA processing continues to be a crucial aspect of understanding of cell biology and the mechanisms of disease. In addition, proteins have been demonstrated to interact with antisense oligonucleotide therapeutics in a sequence and chemistry dependent manner, influencing ASO potency and distribution in cells and in vivo. While many assays have been developed to measure protein-nucleic acid interactions, many suffer from lack of throughput and sensitivity, or challenges with protein purification and scalability. In this report we present a new BRET assay for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions which makes use of an extremely bright luciferase as a tag for the binding protein, along with a long-wavelength fluorophore conjugated to the nucleic acid. The resulting assay is high throughput, sensitive, does not require protein purification, and even allows for quantitative characterization of these interactions within the biologically relevant context of whole cells. PMID:27571227

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Roles of Peroxisome-associated Proteins in Antiviral Innate Immune Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mao-Tian; Qin, Yue; Li, Mi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Xi; Shu, Hong-Bing; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Compared with whole-cell proteomic analysis, subcellular proteomic analysis is advantageous not only for the increased coverage of low abundance proteins but also for generating organelle-specific data containing information regarding dynamic protein movement. In the present study, peroxisome-enriched fractions from Sendai virus (SeV)-infected or uninfected HepG2 cells were obtained and subjected to quantitative proteomics analysis. We identified 311 proteins that were significantly changed by SeV infection. Among these altered proteins, 25 are immune response-related proteins. Further bioinformatic analysis indicated that SeV infection inhibits cell cycle-related proteins and membrane attack complex-related proteins, all of which are beneficial for the survival and replication of SeV within host cells. Using Luciferase reporter assays on several innate immune-related reporters, we performed functional analysis on 11 candidate proteins. We identified LGALS3BP and CALU as potential negative regulators of the virus-induced activation of the type I interferons. PMID:26124285

  11. Quantitative characterization of the lateral distribution of membrane proteins within the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Freire, E; Snyder, B

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of the lateral distribution of membrane proteins on the size, protein/lipoid molar ratio, and the magnitude of the interaction potentials has been investigated by computer modeling protein-lipid distributions with Monte Carlo calculations. These results have allowed us to develop a quantitative characterization of the distribution of membrane proteins and to correlate these distributions with experimental observables. The topological arrangement of protein domains, protein plus annular lipid domains, and free lipid domains is described in terms of radial distribution, pair connectedness, and cluster distribution functions. The radial distribution functions are used to measure the distribution of intermolecular distances between protein molecules, whereas the pair connectedness functions are used to estimate the physical extension of compositional domains. It is shown that, at characteristic protein/lipid molar ratios, previously isolated domains become connected, forming domain networks that extend over the entire membrane surface. These changes in the lateral connectivity of compositional domains are paralleled by changes in the calculated lateral diffusion coefficients and might have important implications for the regulation of diffusion controlled processes within the membrane. PMID:7074188

  12. Techniques for quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of protein therapeutics: advances in enzyme digestion and immunocapture.

    PubMed

    Fung, Eliza N; Bryan, Peter; Kozhich, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    LC-MS/MS has been investigated to quantify protein therapeutics in biological matrices. The protein therapeutics is digested by an enzyme to generate surrogate peptide(s) before LC-MS/MS analysis. One challenge is isolating protein therapeutics in the presence of large number of endogenous proteins in biological matrices. Immunocapture, in which a capture agent is used to preferentially bind the protein therapeutics over other proteins, is gaining traction. The protein therapeutics is eluted for digestion and LC-MS/MS analysis. One area of tremendous potential for immunocapture-LC-MS/MS is to obtain quantitative data where ligand-binding assay alone is not sufficient, for example, quantitation of antidrug antibody complexes. Herein, we present an overview of recent advance in enzyme digestion and immunocapture applicable to protein quantitation.

  13. Towards structure-based protein drug design.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lai, Luhua

    2011-10-01

    Structure-based drug design for chemical molecules has been widely used in drug discovery in the last 30 years. Many successful applications have been reported, especially in the field of virtual screening based on molecular docking. Recently, there has been much progress in fragment-based as well as de novo drug discovery. As many protein-protein interactions can be used as key targets for drug design, one of the solutions is to design protein drugs based directly on the protein complexes or the target structure. Compared with protein-ligand interactions, protein-protein interactions are more complicated and present more challenges for design. Over the last decade, both sampling efficiency and scoring accuracy of protein-protein docking have increased significantly. We have developed several strategies for structure-based protein drug design. A grafting strategy for key interaction residues has been developed and successfully applied in designing erythropoietin receptor-binding proteins. Similarly to small-molecule design, we also tested de novo protein-binder design and a virtual screen of protein binders using protein-protein docking calculations. In comparison with the development of structure-based small-molecule drug design, we believe that structure-based protein drug design has come of age.

  14. Quantitation of protein–protein interactions by thermal stability shift analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Curtis J; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability shift analysis is a powerful method for examining binding interactions in proteins. We demonstrate that under certain circumstances, protein–protein interactions can be quantitated by monitoring shifts in thermal stability using thermodynamic models and data analysis methods presented in this work. This method relies on the determination of protein stabilities from thermal unfolding experiments using fluorescent dyes such as SYPRO Orange that report on protein denaturation. Data collection is rapid and straightforward using readily available real-time polymerase chain reaction instrumentation. We present an approach for the analysis of the unfolding transitions corresponding to each partner to extract the affinity of the interaction between the proteins. This method does not require the construction of a titration series that brackets the dissociation constant. In thermal shift experiments, protein stability data are obtained at different temperatures according to the affinity- and concentration-dependent shifts in unfolding transition midpoints. Treatment of the temperature dependence of affinity is, therefore, intrinsic to this method and is developed in this study. We used the interaction between maltose-binding protein (MBP) and a thermostable synthetic ankyrin repeat protein (Off7) as an experimental test case because their unfolding transitions overlap minimally. We found that MBP is significantly stabilized by Off7. High experimental throughput is enabled by sample parallelization, and the ability to extract quantitative binding information at a single partner concentration. In a single experiment, we were able to quantify the affinities of a series of alanine mutants, covering a wide range of affinities (∼ 100 nM to ∼ 100 μM). PMID:21674662

  15. Integrated isolation and quantitative analysis of exosome shuttled proteins and nucleic acids using immunocapture approaches.

    PubMed

    Zarovni, Natasa; Corrado, Antonietta; Guazzi, Paolo; Zocco, Davide; Lari, Elisa; Radano, Giorgia; Muhhina, Jekatarina; Fondelli, Costanza; Gavrilova, Julia; Chiesi, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Clinical implementation of exosome based diagnostic and therapeutic applications is still limited by the lack of standardized technologies that integrate efficient isolation of exosomes with comprehensive detection of relevant biomarkers. Conventional methods for exosome isolation based on their physical properties such as size and density (filtration, ultracentrifugation or density gradient), or relying on their differential solubility (chemical precipitation) are established primarily for processing of cell supernatants and later adjusted to complex biological samples such as plasma. Though still representing gold standard in the field, these methods are clearly suboptimal for processing of routine clinical samples and have intrinsic limits that impair their use in biomarker discovery and development of novel diagnostics. Immunoisolation (IA) offers unique advantages for the recovery of exosomes from complex and viscous fluids, in terms of increased efficiency and specificity of exosome capture, integrity and selective origin of isolated vesicles. We have evaluated several commercially available solutions for immunoplate- and immunobead-based affinity isolation and have further optimized protocols to decrease non-specific binding due to exosomes complexity and matrix contaminants. In order to identify best molecular targets for total exosome capture from diverse biological sources, as well as for selective enrichment in populations of interest (e.g. tumor derived exosomes) several exosome displayed proteins and respective antibodies have been evaluated for plate and bead functionalisation. Moreover, we have optimized and directly implemented downstream steps allowing on-line quantification and characterization of bound exosome markers, namely proteins and RNAs. Thus assembled assays enabled rapid overall quantification and validation of specific exosome associated targets in/on plasma exosomes, with multifold increased yield and enrichment ratio over benchmarking

  16. Smartphone based visual and quantitative assays on upconversional paper sensor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Qingsong; Jing, Huarong; Li, You; Yisibashaer, Wuerzha; Chen, Jian; Nan Li, Bing; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The integration of smartphone with paper sensors recently has been gain increasing attentions because of the achievement of quantitative and rapid analysis. However, smartphone based upconversional paper sensors have been restricted by the lack of effective methods to acquire luminescence signals on test paper. Herein, by the virtue of 3D printing technology, we exploited an auxiliary reusable device, which orderly assembled a 980nm mini-laser, optical filter and mini-cavity together, for digitally imaging the luminescence variations on test paper and quantitative analyzing pesticide thiram by smartphone. In detail, copper ions decorated NaYF4:Yb/Tm upconversion nanoparticles were fixed onto filter paper to form test paper, and the blue luminescence on it would be quenched after additions of thiram through luminescence resonance energy transfer mechanism. These variations could be monitored by the smartphone camera, and then the blue channel intensities of obtained colored images were calculated to quantify amounts of thiram through a self-written Android program installed on the smartphone, offering a reliable and accurate detection limit of 0.1μM for the system. This work provides an initial demonstration of integrating upconversion nanosensors with smartphone digital imaging for point-of-care analysis on a paper-based platform.

  17. Quantitative methods to direct exploration based on hydrogeologic information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graettinger, A.J.; Lee, J.; Reeves, H.W.; Dethan, D.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitatively Directed Exploration (QDE) approaches based on information such as model sensitivity, input data covariance and model output covariance are presented. Seven approaches for directing exploration are developed, applied, and evaluated on a synthetic hydrogeologic site. The QDE approaches evaluate input information uncertainty, subsurface model sensitivity and, most importantly, output covariance to identify the next location to sample. Spatial input parameter values and covariances are calculated with the multivariate conditional probability calculation from a limited number of samples. A variogram structure is used during data extrapolation to describe the spatial continuity, or correlation, of subsurface information. Model sensitivity can be determined by perturbing input data and evaluating output response or, as in this work, sensitivities can be programmed directly into an analysis model. Output covariance is calculated by the First-Order Second Moment (FOSM) method, which combines the covariance of input information with model sensitivity. A groundwater flow example, modeled in MODFLOW-2000, is chosen to demonstrate the seven QDE approaches. MODFLOW-2000 is used to obtain the piezometric head and the model sensitivity simultaneously. The seven QDE approaches are evaluated based on the accuracy of the modeled piezometric head after information from a QDE sample is added. For the synthetic site used in this study, the QDE approach that identifies the location of hydraulic conductivity that contributes the most to the overall piezometric head variance proved to be the best method to quantitatively direct exploration. ?? IWA Publishing 2006.

  18. Improved Protein Arrays for Quantitative Systems Analysis of the Dynamics of Signaling Pathway Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    YANG, CHIN-RANG

    2013-12-11

    Astronauts and workers in nuclear plants who repeatedly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR, <10 cGy) are likely to incur specific changes in signal transduction and gene expression in various tissues of their body. Remarkable advances in high throughput genomics and proteomics technologies enable researchers to broaden their focus from examining single gene/protein kinetics to better understanding global gene/protein expression profiling and biological pathway analyses, namely Systems Biology. An ultimate goal of systems biology is to develop dynamic mathematical models of interacting biological systems capable of simulating living systems in a computer. This Glue Grant is to complement Dr. Boothman’s existing DOE grant (No. DE-FG02-06ER64186) entitled “The IGF1/IGF-1R-MAPK-Secretory Clusterin (sCLU) Pathway: Mediator of a Low Dose IR-Inducible Bystander Effect” to develop sensitive and quantitative proteomic technology that suitable for low dose radiobiology researches. An improved version of quantitative protein array platform utilizing linear Quantum dot signaling for systematically measuring protein levels and phosphorylation states for systems biology modeling is presented. The signals are amplified by a confocal laser Quantum dot scanner resulting in ~1000-fold more sensitivity than traditional Western blots and show the good linearity that is impossible for the signals of HRP-amplification. Therefore this improved protein array technology is suitable to detect weak responses of low dose radiation. Software is developed to facilitate the quantitative readout of signaling network activities. Kinetics of EGFRvIII mutant signaling was analyzed to quantify cross-talks between EGFR and other signaling pathways.

  19. Comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analyses of zebrafish plasma reveals conserved protein profiles between genders and between zebrafish and human.

    PubMed

    Li, Caixia; Tan, Xing Fei; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-13

    Omic approaches have been increasingly used in the zebrafish model for holistic understanding of molecular events and mechanisms of tissue functions. However, plasma is rarely used for omic profiling because of the technical challenges in collecting sufficient blood. In this study, we employed two mass spectrometric (MS) approaches for a comprehensive characterization of zebrafish plasma proteome, i.e. conventional shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for an overview study and quantitative SWATH (Sequential Window Acquisition of all THeoretical fragment-ion spectra) for comparison between genders. 959 proteins were identified in the shotgun profiling with estimated concentrations spanning almost five orders of magnitudes. Other than the presence of a few highly abundant female egg yolk precursor proteins (vitellogenins), the proteomic profiles of male and female plasmas were very similar in both number and abundance and there were basically no other highly gender-biased proteins. The types of plasma proteins based on IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) classification and tissue sources of production were also very similar. Furthermore, the zebrafish plasma proteome shares significant similarities with human plasma proteome, in particular in top abundant proteins including apolipoproteins and complements. Thus, the current study provided a valuable dataset for future evaluation of plasma proteins in zebrafish.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  1. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of derivatization reagents for different types of protein-bound carbonyl groups.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2013-09-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) of 'carbonylated proteins' often involves derivatization of reactive carbonyl groups to facilitate their enrichment, identification and quantification. Among the many reported reagents, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), biotin hydrazide (BHZ) and O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl) hydroxylamine (ARP) are the most frequently used. Despite their common use in carbonylation research, their reactivity towards protein-bound carbonyls has not been quantitatively evaluated in detail, to the best of our knowledge. Thus we studied the reactivity and specificity of these reagents towards different classes of reactive carbonyl groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones and lactams), each being represented by a synthetic peptide carrying an accordingly modified residue. All three tagging reagents were selective for aliphatic aldehydes and ketones. Lactams and carbonyl-containing tryptophan oxidation products, however, were labelled only at low levels or not at all. Whereas DNPH derivatization was efficient under the published standard conditions, the derivatization conditions for BHZ and ARP had to be altered. Acidic conditions provided quantitative labelling yields for ARP. Peptides derivatized with DNPH, BHZ and ARP fragmented efficiently in tandem mass spectrometry, when the experimental conditions were chosen carefully for each reagent. Importantly, the tested carbonylated peptides did not cross-react with amino groups in other proteins present during sample preparations or enzymatic digestion. Thus, it appears favourable to digest proteins first and then derivatise the reactive carbonyl groups more efficiently at the peptide level under acidic conditions. The carbonylated model peptides used in this study might be valid internal standards for carbonylation proteomics.

  3. High Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Serum Proteins Using Glycopeptide Capture and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Yi, Eugene C.; Li, Xiao-jun; Mallick, Parag; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Aebersold, Reudi

    2005-02-01

    It is expected that the composition of the serum proteome can provide valuable information about the state of the human body in health and disease and that this information can be extracted via quantitative proteomic measurements. Suitable proteomic techniques need to be sensitive, reproducible, and robust to detect potential biomarkers below the level of highly expressed proteins, generate data sets that are comparable between experiments and laboratories, and have high throughput to support statistical studies. Here we report a method for high throughput quantitative analysis of serum proteins. It consists of the selective isolation of peptides that are N-linked glycosylated in the intact protein, the analysis of these now deglycosylated peptides by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and the comparative analysis of the resulting patterns. By focusing selectively on a few formerly N-linked glycopeptides per serum protein, the complexity of the analyte sample is significantly reduced and the sensitivity and throughput of serum proteome analysis are increased compared with the analysis of total tryptic peptides from unfractionated samples. We provide data that document the performance of the method and show that sera from untreated normal mice and genetically identical mice with carcinogen-induced skin cancer can be unambiguously discriminated using unsupervised clustering of the resulting peptide patterns. We further identify, by tandem mass spectrometry, some of the peptides that were consistently elevated in cancer mice compared with their control littermates.

  4. Micromorphological characterization and label-free quantitation of small rubber particle protein in natural rubber latex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sai; Liu, Jiahui; Wu, Yanxia; You, Yawen; He, Jingyi; Zhang, Jichuan; Zhang, Liqun; Dong, Yiyang

    2016-04-15

    Commercial natural rubber is traditionally supplied by Hevea brasiliensis, but now there is a big energy problem because of the limited resource and increasing demand. Intensive study of key rubber-related substances is urgently needed for further research of in vitro biosynthesis of natural rubber. Natural rubber is biosynthesized on the surface of rubber particles. A membrane protein called small rubber particle protein (SRPP) is a key protein associated closely with rubber biosynthesis; however, SRPP in different plants has been only qualitatively studied, and there are no quantitative reports so far. In this work, H. brasiliensis was chosen as a model plant. The microscopic distribution of SRPP on the rubber particles during the washing process was investigated by transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labeling. A label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor was developed to quantify SRPP in H. brasiliensis for the first time. The immunosensor was then used to rapidly detect and analyze SRPP in dandelions and prickly lettuce latex samples. The label-free SPR immunosensor can be a desirable tool for rapid quantitation of the membrane protein SRPP, with excellent assay efficiency, high sensitivity, and high specificity. The method lays the foundation for further study of the functional relationship between SRPP and natural rubber content.

  5. A quantitative ELISA assay for the fragile x mental retardation 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Christine; Tassone, Flora; Hagerman, Randi J; Yasui, Dag; Parrott, George; Nguyen, Danh; Mayeur, Greg; Hagerman, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    Non-coding (CGG-repeat) expansions in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene result in a spectrum of disorders involving altered neurodevelopment (fragile X syndrome), neurodegeneration (late-onset fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome), or primary ovarian insufficiency. While reliable and quantitative assays for the number of CGG repeats and FMR1 mRNA levels are now available, there has been no scalable, quantitative assay for the FMR1 protein (FMRP) in non-transformed cells. Using a combination of avian and murine antibodies to FMRP, we developed a sensitive and highly specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for FMRP in peripheral blood lymphocytes. This ELISA method is capable of quantifying FMRP levels throughout the biologically relevant range of protein concentrations and is specific for the intact FMRP protein. Moreover, the ELISA is well-suited for replicate protein determinations across serial dilutions in non-transformed cells and is readily scalable for large sample numbers. The FMRP ELISA is potentially a powerful tool in expanding our understanding of the relationship between FMRP levels and the various FMR1-associated clinical phenotypes.

  6. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  7. FRET-based genetically-encoded sensors for quantitative monitoring of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mohd; Ahmad, Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states of dynamic activities. After genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, fluxomics is now equally important for generating accurate quantitative information on the cellular and sub-cellular dynamics of ions and metabolite, which is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Various spectrometry techniques are used for monitoring ions and metabolites, although their temporal and spatial resolutions are limited. Discovery of the fluorescent proteins and their variants has revolutionized cell biology. Therefore, novel tools and methods targeting sub-cellular compartments need to be deployed in specific cells and targeted to sub-cellular compartments in order to quantify the target-molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure cellular activities and protein dynamics with sub-cellular resolution. Biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are genetically encoded and hence can specifically target sub-cellular organelles by fusion to proteins or targetted sequences. Since last decade, FRET-based genetically encoded sensors for molecules involved in energy production, reactive oxygen species and secondary messengers have helped to unravel key aspects of cellular physiology. This review, describing the design and principles of sensors, presents a database of sensors for different analytes/processes, and illustrate examples of application in quantitative live cell imaging.

  8. Quantitation of pH-induced aggregation in binary protein mixtures by dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Brett L; Wood, Stephen J; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a quantitative approach for measuring pH-controlled protein aggregation using dielectric spectroscopy. The technique is demonstrated through two aggregation experiments, the first between β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and hen lysozyme (HENL) and the second between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and HENL. In both experiments, the formation of aggregates is strongly dependent on the solution pH and is clearly indicated by a decrease in the measured permittivity when the second protein is added. A quantifiable lower-bound on the ratio of proteins involved in the aggregation process is obtained from the permittivity spectra. Lower-bound aggregation ratios of 83 % for β-Lg/HENL at pH 6.0 and 48 % for BSA/HENL at pH 9.2 were consistent with turbidity measurements made on the same solutions.

  9. Quantitation of proteins by electroimmunoassay using a digitizer connected with a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Andersen, I

    1979-04-16

    A system is described which considerably facilitates the reading and the subsequent conversion of measured values to protein concentrations, when proteins are quantitated by the electroimmunoassay a.m. Laurell (1972). The rocket heights of calibration samples and unknown samples are read by a cursor on a magnetic table (Digitizer, Hewlett Packard) and the values are automatically transferred to a programmable calculator (HP 9830 A, Hewlett Packard). It is programmed to calculate the protein concentration of samples by interpolation on a calibration curve fitted to the best polynomium of second degree by the method of least squares. The results and sequence numbers are automatically printed out from a printer (HP 9866 A, Hewlett, Packard), Reading and calculation of the results from one plate with 5 calibration samples (in duplicate) and 20 unknown samples are completed in less than 2 min. This is 10--15 times faster compared with a manual procedure where a hand-drawn calibration curve is used for interpolation.

  10. Quantitative LC-MS/MS Analysis of Proteins Involved in Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Rieko; Nakamura, Yasushi; Takami, Tomonori; Sanke, Tokio; Tozuka, Zenzaburo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods for the analysis of proteins involved in metastasis of breast cancer for diagnosis and determining disease prognosis, as well as to further our understand of metastatic mechanisms. We have previously demonstrated that the protein type XIV collagen may be specifically expressed in metastatic tissues by two dimensional LC-MS/MS. In this study, we developed quantitative LC-MS/MS methods for type XIV collagen. Type XIV collagen was quantified by analyzing 2 peptides generated by digesting type XIV collagen using stable isotope-labeled peptides. The individual concentrations were equivalent between 2 different peptides of type XIV collagen by evaluation of imprecise transitions and using the best transition for the peptide concentration. The results indicated that type XIV collagen is highly expressed in metastatic tissues of patients with massive lymph node involvement compared to non-metastatic tissues. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Further studies on type XIV collagen are desired to verify its role as a prognostic factor and diagnosis marker for metastasis. PMID:26176947

  11. A quantitative strategy to detect changes in accessibility of protein regions to chemical modification on heterodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Dreger, Mathias; Leung, Bo Wah; Brownlee, George G; Deng, Tao

    2009-01-01

    We describe a method for studying quantitative changes in accessibility of surface lysine residues of the PB1 subunit of the influenza RNA polymerase as a result of association with the PA subunit to form a PB1-PA heterodimer. Our method combines two established methods: (i) the chemical modification of surface lysine residues of native proteins by N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin (NHS-biotin) and (ii) the stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) followed by tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. By linking the chemical modification with the SILAC methodology for the first time, we obtain quantitative data on chemical modification allowing subtle changes in accessibility to be described. Five regions in the PB1 monomer showed altered reactivity to NHS-biotin when compared with the [PB1-PA] heterodimer. Mutational analysis of residues in two such regions—at K265 and K481 of PB1, which were about three- and twofold, respectively, less accessible to biotinylation in the PB1-PA heterodimer compared with the PB1 monomer, demonstrated that both K265 and K481 were crucial for polymerase function. This novel assay of quantitative profiling of biotinylation patterns (Q-POP assay) highlights likely conformational changes at important functional sites, as observed here for PB1, and may provide information on protein–protein interaction interfaces. The Q-POP assay should be a generally applicable approach and may detect novel functional sites suitable for targeting by drugs. PMID:19517532

  12. Highly sensitive color-indicating and quantitative biosensor based on cholesteric liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Sung, Yu-Chien; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensors employ highly sensitive interfaces between the alignment layers and LCs to detect biomolecules and their interactions. Present techniques based on optical texture observation of the homeotropic-to-planar response of nematic LCs are limited by their quantitative reproducibility of results, indicating that both the accuracy and reliability of LC-based detection require further improvements. Here we show that cholesteric LC (CLC) can be used as a novel sensing element in the design of an alternative LC-based biosensing device. The chirality of the vertically anchored (VA) CLC was exploited in the detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a protein standard commonly used in protein quantitation. The color appearance and the corresponding transmission spectrum of the cholesteric phase changed with the concentration of BSA, by which a detection limit of 1 fg/ml was observed. The optical response of the VA CLC interface offers a simple and inexpensive platform for highly sensitive and naked-eye color-indicating detection of biomolecules, and, thus, may facilitate the development of point-of-care devices for the detection of disease-related biomarkers. PMID:26713215

  13. [Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence].

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Mi, Zhiqiang; An, Xiaoping; Zhou, Yusen; Tong, Yigang

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus is based on recombinant lysostaphin and ATP bioluminescence. To produce recombinant lysostaphin, the lysostaphin gene was chemically synthesized and inserted it into prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and the resulting expression plasmid pQE30-Lys was transformed into E. coli M15 for expressing lysostaphin with IPTG induction. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Staphylococcus aureus was detected by the recombinant lysostaphin with ATP bioluminescence, and plate count method. The results of the two methods were compared. The recombinant lysostaphin was successfully expressed, and a method of quantitative specific detection of S. aureus has been established, which showed a significant linear correlation with the colony counting. The detection method developed has good perspective to quantify S. aureus.

  14. Biomacromolecular quantitative structure-activity relationship (BioQSAR): a proof-of-concept study on the modeling, prediction and interpretation of protein-protein binding affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peng; Wang, Congcong; Tian, Feifei; Ren, Yanrong; Yang, Chao; Huang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a regression modeling methodology that establishes statistical correlation between structure feature and apparent behavior for a series of congeneric molecules quantitatively, has been widely used to evaluate the activity, toxicity and property of various small-molecule compounds such as drugs, toxicants and surfactants. However, it is surprising to see that such useful technique has only very limited applications to biomacromolecules, albeit the solved 3D atom-resolution structures of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes have accumulated rapidly in past decades. Here, we present a proof-of-concept paradigm for the modeling, prediction and interpretation of the binding affinity of 144 sequence-nonredundant, structure-available and affinity-known protein complexes (Kastritis et al. Protein Sci 20:482-491, 2011) using a biomacromolecular QSAR (BioQSAR) scheme. We demonstrate that the modeling performance and predictive power of BioQSAR are comparable to or even better than that of traditional knowledge-based strategies, mechanism-type methods and empirical scoring algorithms, while BioQSAR possesses certain additional features compared to the traditional methods, such as adaptability, interpretability, deep-validation and high-efficiency. The BioQSAR scheme could be readily modified to infer the biological behavior and functions of other biomacromolecules, if their X-ray crystal structures, NMR conformation assemblies or computationally modeled structures are available.

  15. Quantitative iTRAQ Proteomics Revealed Possible Roles for Antioxidant Proteins in Sorghum Aluminum Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dangwei; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Jinbiao; Jiang, Fei; Craft, Eric; Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Kochian, Leon V.; Liu, Jiping

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity inhibits root growth and limits crop yields on acid soils worldwide. However, quantitative information is scarce on protein expression profiles under Al stress in crops. In this study, we report on the identification of potential Al responsive proteins from root tips of Al sensitive BR007 and Al tolerant SC566 sorghum lines using a strategy employing iTRAQ and 2D-liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to MS/MS (2D-LC-MS/MS). A total of 771 and 329 unique proteins with abundance changes of >1.5 or <0.67-fold were identified in BR007 and SC566, respectively. Protein interaction and pathway analyses indicated that proteins involved in the antioxidant system were more abundant in the tolerant line than in the sensitive one after Al treatment, while opposite trends were observed for proteins involved in lignin biosynthesis. Higher levels of ROS accumulation in root tips of the sensitive line due to decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes could lead to higher lignin production and hyper-accumulation of toxic Al in cell walls. These results indicated that activities of peroxidases and the balance between production and consumption of ROS could be important for Al tolerance and lignin biosynthesis in sorghum. PMID:28119720

  16. Detection and Quantitation of Succinimide in Intact Protein via Hydrazine Trapping and Chemical Derivatization

    PubMed Central

    KLAENE, JOSHUA J.; NI, WENQIN; ALFARO, JOSHUA F.; ZHOU, ZHAOHUI SUNNY

    2014-01-01

    Formation of aspartyl succinimide (Asu) is a common post-translational modification (PTM) of protein pharmaceuticals under acidic conditions. We present a method to detect and quantitate succinimide in intact protein via hydrazine trapping and chemical derivatization. Succinimide, which is labile under typical analytical conditions, is first trapped with hydrazine to form stable hydrazide and can be directly analyzed by mass spectrometry. The resulting aspartyl hydrazide can be selectively derivatized by various tags, such as fluorescent rhodamine sulfonyl chloride that absorbs strongly in the visible region (570 nm). Our tagging strategy allows the labeled protein to be analyzed by orthogonal methods, including HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and SDS-PAGE coupled with fluorescence imaging. A unique advantage of our method is that variants containing succinimide, after derivatization, can be readily resolved via either affinity enrichment or chromatographic separation. This allows further investigation of individual factors in a complex protein mixture that affect succinimide formation. Some additional advantages imparted by fluorescence labeling include, the facile detection of the intact protein without proteolytic digestion to peptides; and high sensitivity, e.g. without optimization 0.41% succinimide was readily detected. As such, our method should be useful for rapid screening, optimization of formulation conditions and related processes relevant to protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:25043726

  17. Quantitative changes in sets of proteins as markers of biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Taylor, J.; Gemmell, M.A.; Tollaksen, S.L. ); Lalwani, N.D.; Reddy, J.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to either physical or chemical insults triggers a cascade of bio-chemical events within the target cell. This response requires adjustment within the protein population of the cell, some proteins becoming more abundant (those involved in the cellular response), others less abundant (those not required or counterproductive to the response). Thus, quantitative changes in the global protein population of an exposed biological system may well serve as an indicator of exposure, provided the alterations observed are selective and dose-dependent. In this paper we present results from a study in which liver protein changes induced by exposure of mice to chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma where monitored. Clofibrate, and its chemical analog ciprofibrate, are hypolipidemic drugs. Di-(ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a plasticizer used widely in disposable containers for blood products. WY-14643 is a chemical shown to cause hypolipidemic and peroxisome proliferation, similar to clofibrate, ciprofibrate and DEHP, but structurally different from these three chemicals. Thus, two of the four chemicals are structurally similar while the remaining two are very distinct, although all four chemicals cause the same gross biological response. Our results show that although common protein effects are observed in mice exposed to these chemicals, each chemical also causes specific alterations in selective subsets of proteins that could serve as markers of a particular exposure. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Complex mixture analysis using protein expression as a qualitative and quantitative tool

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, B.P.; Gonzalez, C.M.; Bond, J.A. . Dept. of Biological Sciences); Tepper, B.E. . Paper Products Division)

    1994-07-01

    Some proteins in organisms exposed to chemicals in stressful amounts or toxic concentrations show increased expression; others show decreased expression. These inducible and repressible proteins together potentially provide qualitative and quantitative diagnoses of components in complex mixtures of chemicals. The authors examined sets of proteins synthesized by Daphnia magna after exposure to mixtures of a cationic polyamide epichlorhydrin adduct (Kymene) and a combined assortment of water-extractable substances from chemi-thermal-mechanical pulp (CTMP) in lab water. Proteins were identified, after extracting from Daphnia magna, by gel filtration and silver staining, or by radiolabeling and then gel separation. Patterns of proteins induced by Kymene[reg sign] and by CTMP extracts were distinguishable in lab water, but there was interaction between them. The method of identifying and quantifying Kymene, however, was successful using lab simulations of mixtures. The method was tested using wastewater samples from a paper manufacturing plant. Kymene could be detected against variable levels and types of additional substances. But, again, there was interference, perhaps due to Kymene binding to other anionic polymers sometimes present in the samples. Interpretation from analyses of protein expression were consistent with results from sublethal Ceriodaphnia dubia assays.

  19. Conformational analysis by quantitative NOE measurements of the β-proton pairs across individual disulfide bonds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Mitsuhiro; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Kainosho, Masatsune

    2012-02-01

    NOEs between the β-protons of cysteine residues across disulfide bonds in proteins provide direct information on the connectivities and conformations of these important cross-links, which are otherwise difficult to investigate. With conventional [U-(13)C, (15)N]-proteins, however, fast spin diffusion processes mediated by strong dipolar interactions between geminal β-protons prohibit the quantitative measurements and thus the analyses of long-range NOEs across disulfide bonds. We describe a robust approach for alleviating such difficulties, by using proteins selectively labeled with an equimolar mixture of (2R, 3S)-[β-(13)C; α,β-(2)H(2)] Cys and (2R, 3R)-[β-(13)C; α,β-(2)H(2)] Cys, but otherwise fully deuterated. Since either one of the prochiral methylene protons, namely β2 (proS) or β3 (proR), is always replaced with a deuteron and no other protons remain in proteins prepared by this labeling scheme, all four of the expected NOEs for the β-protons across disulfide bonds could be measured without any spin diffusion interference, even with long mixing times. Therefore, the NOEs for the β2 and β3 pairs across each of the disulfide bonds could be observed at high sensitivity, even though they are 25% of the theoretical maximum for each pair. With the NOE information, the disulfide bond connectivities can be unambiguously established for proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. In addition, the conformations around disulfide bonds, namely χ(2) and χ(3), can be determined based on the precise proton distances of the four β-proton pairs, by quantitative measurements of the NOEs across the disulfide bonds. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated for bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, which has three disulfide bonds.

  20. Toward quantitatively fluorescent carbon-based "quantum" dots.

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Parambath; Wang, Xin; Cao, Li; Sahu, Sushant; Liu, Jia-Hui; Wang, Ping; Korch, Katerina; Tackett, Kenneth N; Parenzan, Alexander; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2011-05-01

    Carbon-based "quantum" dots (or "carbon dots") are generally defined as surface-passivated small carbon nanoparticles that are brightly fluorescent. Apparently, the carbon particle surface passivation in carbon dots is critical to their fluorescence performance. An effective way to improve the surface passivation is to dope the surface of the precursor carbon nanoparticles with an inorganic salt, followed by the typical functionalization with organic molecules. In this work we passivated small carbon nanoparticles by a combination of the surface-doping with nanoscale semiconductors and the organic functionalization, coupled with gel column fractionation to harvest the most fluorescent carbon dots, which exhibited fluorescence emission quantum yields of up to 78%. Experimental and mechanistic issues relevant to potentially further improve the performance of carbon dots toward their being quantitatively fluorescent are discussed.

  1. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  2. SWATH-MS Quantitative Analysis of Proteins in the Rice Inferior and Superior Spikelets during Grain Filling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fu-Yuan; Chen, Mo-Xian; Su, Yu-Wen; Xu, Xuezhong; Ye, Neng-Hui; Cao, Yun-Ying; Lin, Sheng; Liu, Tie-Yuan; Li, Hao-Xuan; Wang, Guan-Qun; Jin, Yu; Gu, Yong-Hai; Chan, Wai-Lung; Lo, Clive; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhu, Guohui; Zhang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Modern rice cultivars have large panicle but their yield potential is often not fully achieved due to poor grain-filling of late-flowering inferior spikelets (IS). Our earlier work suggested a broad transcriptional reprogramming during grain filling and showed a difference in gene expression between IS and earlier-flowering superior spikelets (SS). However, the links between the abundances of transcripts and their corresponding proteins are unclear. In this study, a SWATH-MS (sequential window acquisition of all theoretical spectra-mass spectrometry) -based quantitative proteomic analysis has been applied to investigate SS and IS proteomes. A total of 304 proteins of widely differing functionality were observed to be differentially expressed between IS and SS. Detailed gene ontology analysis indicated that several biological processes including photosynthesis, protein metabolism, and energy metabolism are differentially regulated. Further correlation analysis revealed that abundances of most of the differentially expressed proteins are not correlated to the respective transcript levels, indicating that an extra layer of gene regulation which may exist during rice grain filling. Our findings raised an intriguing possibility that these candidate proteins may be crucial in determining the poor grain-filling of IS. Therefore, we hypothesize that the regulation of proteome changes not only occurs at the transcriptional, but also at the post-transcriptional level, during grain filling in rice. PMID:28066479

  3. Wavelet-based verification of the quantitative precipitation forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Jakubiak, Bogumil

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores the use of wavelets for spatial verification of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF), and especially the capacity of wavelets to provide both localization and scale information. Two 24-h forecast experiments using the two versions of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) on 22 August 2010 over Poland are used to illustrate the method. Strong spatial localizations and associated intermittency of the precipitation field make verification of QPF difficult using standard statistical methods. The wavelet becomes an attractive alternative, because it is specifically designed to extract spatially localized features. The wavelet modes are characterized by the two indices for the scale and the localization. Thus, these indices can simply be employed for characterizing the performance of QPF in scale and localization without any further elaboration or tunable parameters. Furthermore, spatially-localized features can be extracted in wavelet space in a relatively straightforward manner with only a weak dependence on a threshold. Such a feature may be considered an advantage of the wavelet-based method over more conventional "object" oriented verification methods, as the latter tend to represent strong threshold sensitivities. The present paper also points out limits of the so-called "scale separation" methods based on wavelets. Our study demonstrates how these wavelet-based QPF verifications can be performed straightforwardly. Possibilities for further developments of the wavelet-based methods, especially towards a goal of identifying a weak physical process contributing to forecast error, are also pointed out.

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics after auxin-stimulated lateral root induction identifies an SNX1 protein phosphorylation site required for growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Houjiang; Berke, Lidija; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz; Scheres, Ben; Menke, Frank L H

    2013-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation is instrumental to early signaling events. Studying system-wide phosphorylation in relation to processes under investigation requires a quantitative proteomics approach. In Arabidopsis, auxin application can induce pericycle cell divisions and lateral root formation. Initiation of lateral root formation requires transcriptional reprogramming following auxin-mediated degradation of transcriptional repressors. The immediate early signaling events prior to this derepression are virtually uncharacterized. To identify the signal molecules responding to auxin application, we used a lateral root-inducible system that was previously developed to trigger synchronous division of pericycle cells. To identify and quantify the early signaling events following this induction, we combined (15)N-based metabolic labeling and phosphopeptide enrichment and applied a mass spectrometry-based approach. In total, 3068 phosphopeptides were identified from auxin-treated root tissue. This root proteome dataset contains largely phosphopeptides not previously reported and represents one of the largest quantitative phosphoprotein datasets from Arabidopsis to date. Key proteins responding to auxin treatment included the multidrug resistance-like and PIN2 auxin carriers, auxin response factor2 (ARF2), suppressor of auxin resistance 3 (SAR3), and sorting nexin1 (SNX1). Mutational analysis of serine 16 of SNX1 showed that overexpression of the mutated forms of SNX1 led to retarded growth and reduction of lateral root formation due to the reduced outgrowth of the primordium, showing proof of principle for our approach.

  5. A quantitative dimming method for LED based on PWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiyong; Mou, Tongsheng; Wang, Jianping; Tian, Xiaoqing

    2012-10-01

    Traditional light sources were required to provide stable and uniform illumination for a living or working environment considering performance of visual function of human being. The requirement was always reasonable until non-visual functions of the ganglion cells in the retina photosensitive layer were found. New generation of lighting technology, however, is emerging based on novel lighting materials such as LED and photobiological effects on human physiology and behavior. To realize dynamic lighting of LED whose intensity and color were adjustable to the need of photobiological effects, a quantitative dimming method based on Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) and light-mixing technology was presented. Beginning with two channels' PWM, this paper demonstrated the determinacy and limitation of PWM dimming for realizing Expected Photometric and Colorimetric Quantities (EPCQ), in accordance with the analysis on geometrical, photometric, colorimetric and electrodynamic constraints. A quantitative model which mapped the EPCQ into duty cycles was finally established. The deduced model suggested that the determinacy was a unique individuality only for two channels' and three channels' PWM, but the limitation was an inevitable commonness for multiple channels'. To examine the model, a light-mixing experiment with two kinds of white LED simulated variations of illuminance and Correlation Color Temperature (CCT) from dawn to midday. Mean deviations between theoretical values and measured values were obtained, which were 15lx and 23K respectively. Result shows that this method can effectively realize the light spectrum which has a specific requirement of EPCQ, and provides a theoretical basis and a practical way for dynamic lighting of LED.

  6. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng-Lung; Tsay, Yu-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid.

  7. Quantitative mass spectrometry measurements reveal stoichiometry of principal postsynaptic density proteins.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, Mark S; Markey, Sanford P; Dosemeci, Ayse

    2015-06-05

    Quantitative studies are presented of postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from rat cerebral cortex with the ultimate goal of defining the average copy numbers of proteins in the PSD complex. Highly specific and selective isotope dilution mass spectrometry assays were developed using isotopically labeled polypeptide concatemer internal standards. Interpretation of PSD protein stoichiometry was achieved as a molar ratio with respect to PSD-95 (SAP-90, DLG4), and subsequently, copy numbers were estimated using a consensus literature value for PSD-95. Average copy numbers for several proteins at the PSD were estimated for the first time, including those for AIDA-1, BRAGs, and densin. Major findings include evidence for the high copy number of AIDA-1 in the PSD (144 ± 30)-equivalent to that of the total GKAP family of proteins (150 ± 27)-suggesting that AIDA-1 is an element of the PSD scaffold. The average copy numbers for NMDA receptor sub-units were estimated to be 66 ± 18, 27 ± 9, and 45 ± 15, respectively, for GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, yielding a total of 34 ± 10 NMDA channels. Estimated average copy numbers for AMPA channels and their auxiliary sub-units TARPs were 68 ± 36 and 144 ± 38, respectively, with a stoichiometry of ∼1:2, supporting the assertion that most AMPA receptors anchor to the PSD via TARP sub-units. This robust, quantitative analysis of PSD proteins improves upon and extends the list of major PSD components with assigned average copy numbers in the ongoing effort to unravel the complex molecular architecture of the PSD.

  8. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  9. Comparison of surface and hydrogel-based protein microchips.

    PubMed

    Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Rubina, A Yu; Pan'kov, S V; Konovalova, E V; Moiseeva, O V; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2007-09-15

    Protein microchips are designed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. The rapid advance in microchip technology and a wide variety of existing techniques pose the problem of unified approach to the assessment and comparison of different platforms. Here we compare the characteristics of protein microchips developed for quantitative immunoassay with those of antibodies immobilized on glass surfaces and in hemispherical gel pads. Spotting concentrations of antibodies used for manufacturing of microchips of both types and concentrations of antigen in analyte solution were identical. We compared the efficiency of antibody immobilization, the intensity of fluorescence signals for both direct and sandwich-type immunoassays, and the reaction-diffusion kinetics of the formation of antibody-antigen complexes for surface and gel-based microchips. Our results demonstrate higher capacity and sensitivity for the hydrogel-based protein microchips, while fluorescence saturation kinetics for the two types of microarrays was comparable.

  10. Method for collecting and immobilizing individual cumulus cells enabling quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, R; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2015-07-01

    Most immunofluorescence methods rely on techniques dealing with a very large number of cells. However, when the number of cells in a sample is low (e.g., when cumulus cells must be analyzed from individual cumulus-oocyte complexes), specific techniques are required to conserve, fix, and analyze cells individually. We established and validated a simple and effective method for collecting and immobilizing low numbers of cumulus cells that enables easy and quick quantitative immunofluorescence analysis of proteins from individual cells. To illustrate this technique, we stained proprotein of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin-like repeats-1 (proADAMTS-1) and analyzed its levels in individual porcine cumulus cells.

  11. Quantitative in vivo solubility and reconstitution of truncated circular permutants of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Ming; Nayak, Sasmita; Bystroff, Christopher

    2011-11-01

    Several versions of split green fluorescent protein (GFP) fold and reconstitute fluorescence, as do many circular permutants, but little is known about the dependence of reconstitution on circular permutation. Explored here is the capacity of GFP to fold and reconstitute fluorescence from various truncated circular permutants, herein called "leave-one-outs" using a quantitative in vivo solubility assay and in vivo reconstitution of fluorescence. Twelve leave-one-out permutants are discussed, one for each of the 12 secondary structure elements. The results expand the outlook for the use of permuted split GFPs as specific and self-reporting gene encoded affinity reagents.

  12. PCA-based groupwise image registration for quantitative MRI.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, W; Poot, D H J; Guyader, J-M; Klaassen, R; Coolen, B F; van Kranenburg, M; van Geuns, R J M; Uitterdijk, A; Polfliet, M; Vandemeulebroucke, J; Leemans, A; Niessen, W J; Klein, S

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) is a technique for estimating quantitative tissue properties, such as the T1 and T2 relaxation times, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and various perfusion measures. This estimation is achieved by acquiring multiple images with different acquisition parameters (or at multiple time points after injection of a contrast agent) and by fitting a qMRI signal model to the image intensities. Image registration is often necessary to compensate for misalignments due to subject motion and/or geometric distortions caused by the acquisition. However, large differences in image appearance make accurate image registration challenging. In this work, we propose a groupwise image registration method for compensating misalignment in qMRI. The groupwise formulation of the method eliminates the requirement of choosing a reference image, thus avoiding a registration bias. The method minimizes a cost function that is based on principal component analysis (PCA), exploiting the fact that intensity changes in qMRI can be described by a low-dimensional signal model, but not requiring knowledge on the specific acquisition model. The method was evaluated on 4D CT data of the lungs, and both real and synthetic images of five different qMRI applications: T1 mapping in a porcine heart, combined T1 and T2 mapping in carotid arteries, ADC mapping in the abdomen, diffusion tensor mapping in the brain, and dynamic contrast-enhanced mapping in the abdomen. Each application is based on a different acquisition model. The method is compared to a mutual information-based pairwise registration method and four other state-of-the-art groupwise registration methods. Registration accuracy is evaluated in terms of the precision of the estimated qMRI parameters, overlap of segmented structures, distance between corresponding landmarks, and smoothness of the deformation. In all qMRI applications the proposed method performed better than or equally well as

  13. A quantitative chaperone interaction network reveals the architecture of cellular protein homeostasis pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Mikko; Tucker, George; Peng, Jian; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Larsen, Brett; Choi, Hyungwon; Berger, Bonnie; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Lindquist, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Chaperones are abundant cellular proteins that promote the folding and function of their substrate proteins (clients). In vivo, chaperones also associate with a large and diverse set of co-factors (co-chaperones) that regulate their specificity and function. However, how these co-chaperones regulate protein folding and whether they have chaperone-independent biological functions is largely unknown. We have combined mass spectrometry and quantitative high-throughput LUMIER assays to systematically characterize the chaperone/co-chaperone/client interaction network in human cells. We uncover hundreds of novel chaperone clients, delineate their participation in specific co-chaperone complexes, and establish a surprisingly distinct network of protein/protein interactions for co-chaperones. As a salient example of the power of such analysis, we establish that NUDC family co-chaperones specifically associate with structurally related but evolutionarily distinct β-propeller folds. We provide a framework for deciphering the proteostasis network, its regulation in development and disease, and expand the use of chaperones as sensors for drug/target engagement. PMID:25036637

  14. Identification of cypermethrin induced protein changes in green algae by iTRAQ quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Lim, Teck Kwang; Lin, Qingsong; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2016-04-29

    Cypermethrin (CYP) is one of the most widely used pesticides in large scale for agricultural and domestic purpose and the residue often seriously affects aquatic system. Environmental pollutant-induced protein changes in organisms could be detected by proteomics, leading to discovery of potential biomarkers and understanding of mode of action. While proteomics investigations of CYP stress in some animal models have been well studied, few reports about the effects of exposure to CYP on algae proteome were published. To determine CYP effect in algae, the impact of various dosages (0.001μg/L, 0.01μg/L and 1μg/L) of CYP on green algae Chlorella vulgaris for 24h and 96h was investigated by using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics technique. A total of 162 and 198 proteins were significantly altered after CYP exposure for 24h and 96h, respectively. Overview of iTRAQ results indicated that the influence of CYP on algae protein might be dosage-dependent. Functional analysis of differentially expressed proteins showed that CYP could induce protein alterations related to photosynthesis, stress responses and carbohydrate metabolism. This study provides a comprehensive view of complex mode of action of algae under CYP stress and highlights several potential biomarkers for further investigation of pesticide-exposed plant and algae.

  15. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of Thermobifida fusca reveals metabolic pathways of cellulose utilization.

    PubMed

    Adav, Sunil S; Ng, Chee Sheng; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2011-09-06

    Thermobifida fusca is an aerobic, thermophilic, cellulose degrading bacterium identified in heated organic materials. This study applied iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis to the cellular and membrane proteomes of T. fusca grown in presence and absence of cellulose to elucidate the cellular processes induced by cellulose nutrient. Using an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic approach, 783 cytosolic and 181 membrane proteins expressed during cellulose hydrolysis were quantified with ≤1% false discovery rate. The comparative iTRAQ quantification revealed considerable induction in the expression levels and up-regulation of specific proteins in cellulosic medium than non-cellulosic medium. The regulated proteins in cellulosic medium were grouped under central carbohydrate metabolism such as glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathways, citric acid cycle, starch, sugars, pyruvate, propanoate and butanoate metabolism; energy metabolism that includes oxidative phosphorylation, nitrogen, methane and sulfur metabolism; fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolic pathways, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and main cellular genetic information processing functions like replication, transcription, translation, and cell wall synthesis; and environmental information processing (membrane transport and signal transduction). The results demonstrated cellulose induced several metabolic pathways during cellulose utilization.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Identify ABA-Related Proteins and Signal Pathways in Maize Leaves under Drought Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Yankai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianyu; Hu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of major factors resulting in maize yield loss. The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) have been widely studied in crops in response to drought stress. However, more attention is needed to identify key ABA-related proteins and also gain deeper molecular insights about drought stress in maize. Based on this need, the physiology and proteomics of the ABA-deficient maize mutant vp5 and its wild-type Vp5 under drought stress were examined and analyzed. Malondialdehyde content increased and quantum efficiency of photosystem II decreased under drought stress in both genotypes. However, the magnitude of the increase or decrease was significantly higher in vp5 than in Vp5. A total of 7051 proteins with overlapping expression patterns among three replicates in the two genotypes were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods, of which the expression of only 150 proteins (130 in Vp5, 27 in vp5) showed changes of at least 1.5-fold under drought stress. Among the 150 proteins, 67 and 60 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated by drought stress in an ABA-dependent way, respectively. ABA was found to play active roles in regulating signaling pathways related to photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation (mainly related to ATP synthesis), and glutathione metabolism (involved in antioxidative reaction) in the maize response to drought stress. Our results provide an extensive dataset of ABA-dependent, drought-regulated proteins in maize plants, which may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ABA-enhanced tolerance to drought stress in maize.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses Identify ABA-Related Proteins and Signal Pathways in Maize Leaves under Drought Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Yankai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianyu; Hu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of major factors resulting in maize yield loss. The roles of abscisic acid (ABA) have been widely studied in crops in response to drought stress. However, more attention is needed to identify key ABA-related proteins and also gain deeper molecular insights about drought stress in maize. Based on this need, the physiology and proteomics of the ABA-deficient maize mutant vp5 and its wild-type Vp5 under drought stress were examined and analyzed. Malondialdehyde content increased and quantum efficiency of photosystem II decreased under drought stress in both genotypes. However, the magnitude of the increase or decrease was significantly higher in vp5 than in Vp5. A total of 7051 proteins with overlapping expression patterns among three replicates in the two genotypes were identified by Multiplex run iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods, of which the expression of only 150 proteins (130 in Vp5, 27 in vp5) showed changes of at least 1.5-fold under drought stress. Among the 150 proteins, 67 and 60 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated by drought stress in an ABA-dependent way, respectively. ABA was found to play active roles in regulating signaling pathways related to photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation (mainly related to ATP synthesis), and glutathione metabolism (involved in antioxidative reaction) in the maize response to drought stress. Our results provide an extensive dataset of ABA-dependent, drought-regulated proteins in maize plants, which may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of ABA-enhanced tolerance to drought stress in maize. PMID:28008332

  18. Standardisation of the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum.

    PubMed

    Godenir, N L; Jeenah, M S; Coetzee, G A; Van der Westhuyzen, D R; Strachan, A F; De Beer, F C

    1985-11-07

    An adequate method for standardising the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum was developed. Acute phase high density lipoprotein3 (HDL3) was used as a standard. The concentration of the SAA in the standard was determined by the use of purified SAA. After protein determination, various concentrations of purified SAA were run on SDS-polyacrylamide gel together with the HDL3 standard containing an unknown amount of SAA amongst the apolipoproteins. From the standard curve obtained by pyridine extraction (Coomassie blue colour yield at A605 nm) the concentration of SAA in the HDL3 standard was determined. An established immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for SAA was standardised with the HDL3. SAA concentrations in normal and acute phase sera were determined.

  19. Systematic and quantitative analysis of G protein-coupled receptor trafficking motifs.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Carl M; Ho, Vincent K; Angelotti, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane expression of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a dynamic process balancing anterograde and retrograde trafficking. Multiple interrelated cellular processes determine the final level of cell surface expression, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export/retention, receptor internalization, recycling, and degradation. These processes are highly regulated to achieve specific localization to subcellular domains (e.g., dendrites or basolateral membranes) and to affect receptor signaling. Analysis of potential ER trafficking motifs within GPCRs requires careful consideration of intracellular dynamics, such as protein folding, ER export and retention, and glycosylation. This chapter presents an approach and methods for qualitative and quantitative assessment of these processes to aid in accurate identification of GPCR trafficking motifs, utilizing the analysis of a hydrophobic extracellular trafficking motif in α2C adrenergic receptors as a model system.

  20. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  1. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  2. Synthesizing Quantitative Evidence for Evidence-based Nursing: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eui Geum

    2016-06-01

    As evidence-based practice has become an important issue in healthcare settings, the educational needs for knowledge and skills for the generation and utilization of healthcare evidence are increasing. Systematic review (SR), a way of evidence generation, is a synthesis of primary scientific evidence, which summarizes the best evidence on a specific clinical question using a transparent, a priori protocol driven approach. SR methodology requires a critical appraisal of primary studies, data extraction in a reliable and repeatable way, and examination for validity of the results. SRs are considered hierarchically as the highest form of evidence as they are a systematic search, identification, and summarization of the available evidence to answer a focused clinical question with particular attention to the methodological quality of studies or the credibility of opinion and text. The purpose of this paper is to introduce an overview of the fundamental knowledge, principals and processes in SR. The focus of this paper is on SR especially for the synthesis of quantitative data from primary research studies that examines the effectiveness of healthcare interventions. To activate evidence-based nursing care in various healthcare settings, the best and available scientific evidence are essential components. This paper will include some examples to promote understandings.

  3. Quantitative and Selective Analysis of Feline Growth Related Proteins Using Parallel Reaction Monitoring High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Mårten; Strage, Emma M.; Bergquist, Jonas; Holst, Bodil S.

    2016-01-01

    Today immunoassays are widely used in veterinary medicine, but lack of species specific assays often necessitates the use of assays developed for human applications. Mass spectrometry (MS) is an attractive alternative due to high specificity and versatility, allowing for species-independent analysis. Targeted MS-based quantification methods are valuable complements to large scale shotgun analysis. A method referred to as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), implemented on Orbitrap MS, has lately been presented as an excellent alternative to more traditional selected reaction monitoring/multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) methods. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-system is not well described in the cat but there are indications of important differences between cats and humans. In feline medicine IGF–I is mainly analyzed for diagnosis of growth hormone disorders but also for research, while the other proteins in the IGF-system are not routinely analyzed within clinical practice. Here, a PRM method for quantification of IGF–I, IGF–II, IGF binding protein (BP) –3 and IGFBP–5 in feline serum is presented. Selective quantification was supported by the use of a newly launched internal standard named QPrEST™. Homology searches demonstrated the possibility to use this standard of human origin for quantification of the targeted feline proteins. Excellent quantitative sensitivity at the attomol/μL (pM) level and selectivity were obtained. As the presented approach is very generic we show that high resolution mass spectrometry in combination with PRM and QPrEST™ internal standards is a versatile tool for protein quantitation across multispecies. PMID:27907059

  4. Online quantitative proteomics p-value calculator for permutation-based statistical testing of peptide ratios.

    PubMed

    Chen, David; Shah, Anup; Nguyen, Hien; Loo, Dorothy; Inder, Kerry L; Hill, Michelle M

    2014-09-05

    The utility of high-throughput quantitative proteomics to identify differentially abundant proteins en-masse relies on suitable and accessible statistical methodology, which remains mostly an unmet need. We present a free web-based tool, called Quantitative Proteomics p-value Calculator (QPPC), designed for accessibility and usability by proteomics scientists and biologists. Being an online tool, there is no requirement for software installation. Furthermore, QPPC accepts generic peptide ratio data generated by any mass spectrometer and database search engine. Importantly, QPPC utilizes the permutation test that we recently found to be superior to other methods for analysis of peptide ratios because it does not assume normal distributions.1 QPPC assists the user in selecting significantly altered proteins based on numerical fold change, or standard deviation from the mean or median, together with the permutation p-value. Output is in the form of comma separated values files, along with graphical visualization using volcano plots and histograms. We evaluate the optimal parameters for use of QPPC, including the permutation level and the effect of outlier and contaminant peptides on p-value variability. The optimal parameters defined are deployed as default for the web-tool at http://qppc.di.uq.edu.au/ .

  5. Probabilistic assembly of human protein interaction networks from label-free quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji; Swanson, Selene K.; Conaway, Ronald C.; Conaway, Joan W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale affinity purification and mass spectrometry studies have played important roles in the assembly and analysis of comprehensive protein interaction networks for lower eukaryotes. However, the development of such networks for human proteins has been slowed by the high cost and significant technical challenges associated with systematic studies of protein interactions. To address this challenge, we have developed a method for building local and focused networks. This approach couples vector algebra and statistical methods with normalized spectral counting (NSAF) derived from the analysis of affinity purifications via chromatography-based proteomics. After mathematical removal of contaminant proteins, the core components of multiprotein complexes are determined by singular value decomposition analysis and clustering. The probability of interactions within and between complexes is computed solely based upon NSAFs using Bayes' approach. To demonstrate the application of this method to small-scale datasets, we analyzed an expanded human TIP49a and TIP49b dataset. This dataset contained proteins affinity-purified with 27 different epitope-tagged components of the chromatin remodeling SRCAP, hINO80, and TRRAP/TIP60 complexes, and the nutrient sensing complex Uri/Prefoldin. Within a core network of 65 unique proteins, we captured all known components of these complexes and novel protein associations, especially in the Uri/Prefoldin complex. Finally, we constructed a probabilistic human interaction network composed of 557 protein pairs. PMID:18218781

  6. Quantitative assay of diphtherial toxin and of immunologically cross-reacting proteins by reversed passive hemagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, R K; Perlow, R B

    1975-01-01

    A reversed passive hemagglutination (RPHA) assay for diptherial toxin has been developed. Antitoxic antibodies were isolated from commercially available equine diptherial antitoxin by immunoabsorption using highly purified diphtherial toxin covalently linked to Sepharose 4B. Formalinized, tanned sheep erythrocytes sensitized with the purified antitoxic antibodies are specifically agglutinated by diphtherial toxin but are not agglutinated by extracellular antigens of Corynebacterium diptheriae that are unrelated to toxin. The RPHA assay described can detect less than 20 pg of diphtherial toxin and is comparable in sensitivity to intracutaneous tests for toxin. The RPHA assay was shown to be at least 1,000 times more sensitive than quantitative immunological assays for diptherial toxin performed by single radial immunodiffusion or by one-dimensional double diffusion in agar gels. Fragment A prepared from purified diphtherial toxin and nontoxic mutant proteins that cross-react immunologically with toxin can be assayed directly by RPHA, but the sensitivity of the assay for these proteins is less than for native diphtherial toxin. Inhibition of RPHA was also shown to be a sensitive quantitative method for measuring diptherial antitoxin in vitro. Images PMID:54339

  7. Quantitative proteomic analysis of age-related subventricular zone proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianli; Dong, Chuanming; Sun, Lixin; Zhu, Liang; Sun, Chenxi; Ma, Rongjie; Ning, ke; Lu, Bing; Zhang, Jinfu; Xu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in the function of adult tissues which can lead to neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known about the correlation between protein changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and neurodegenerative diseases with age. In the present study, neural stem cells (NSCs) were derived from the SVZ on postnatal 7 d, 1 m, and 12 m-old mice. With age, NSCs exhibited increased SA-β-gal activity and decreased proliferation and pool size in the SVZ zone, and were associated with elevated inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Furthermore, quantitative proteomics and ingenuity pathway analysis were used to evaluate the significant age-related alterations in proteins and their functions. Some downregulated proteins such as DPYSL2, TPI1, ALDH, and UCHL1 were found to play critical roles in the neurological disease and PSMA1, PSMA3, PSMC2, PSMD11, and UCHL1 in protein homeostasis. Taken together, we have provided valuable insight into the cellular and molecular processes that underlie aging-associated declines in SVZ neurogenesis for the early detection of differences in gene expression and the potential risk of neurological disease, which is beneficial in the prevention of the diseases. PMID:27857231

  8. Identification and validation of differentially expressed proteins in epithelial ovarian cancers using quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guangming; Liu, Chongdong; Xu, Jiatong; Deng, Haiteng; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignant tumor because of its high recurrence rate. In the present work, in order to find new therapeutic targets, we identified 8480 proteins in thirteen pairs of ovarian cancer tissues and normal ovary tissues through quantitative proteomics. 498 proteins were found to be differentially expressed in ovarian cancer, which involved in various cellular processes, including metabolism, response to stimulus and biosynthetic process. The expression levels of chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) and lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) in epithelial ovarian cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in normal ovary tissues as confirmed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The knockdown of CLIC1 in A2780 cell line downregulated expression of CTPS1, leading to the decrease of CTP and an arrest of cell cycle G1 phase, which results into a slower proliferation. CLIC1-knockdown can also slow down the tumor growth in vivo. Besides, CLIC1-knockdown cells showed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and cisplatin, suggesting that CLIC1 was involved in regulation of redox and drug resistance in ovarian cancer cells. These results indicate CLIC1 promotes tumorgenesis, and is a potential therapeutic target in epithelial ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27825122

  9. Slow erosion of a quantitative apple resistance to Venturia inaequalis based on an isolate-specific Quantitative Trait Locus.

    PubMed

    Caffier, Valérie; Le Cam, Bruno; Al Rifaï, Mehdi; Bellanger, Marie-Noëlle; Comby, Morgane; Denancé, Caroline; Didelot, Frédérique; Expert, Pascale; Kerdraon, Tifenn; Lemarquand, Arnaud; Ravon, Elisa; Durel, Charles-Eric

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative plant resistance affects the aggressiveness of pathogens and is usually considered more durable than qualitative resistance. However, the efficiency of a quantitative resistance based on an isolate-specific Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) is expected to decrease over time due to the selection of isolates with a high level of aggressiveness on resistant plants. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed scab incidence over an eight-year period in an orchard planted with susceptible and quantitatively resistant apple genotypes. We sampled 79 Venturia inaequalis isolates from this orchard at three dates and we tested their level of aggressiveness under controlled conditions. Isolates sampled on resistant genotypes triggered higher lesion density and exhibited a higher sporulation rate on apple carrying the resistance allele of the QTL T1 compared to isolates sampled on susceptible genotypes. Due to this ability to select aggressive isolates, we expected the QTL T1 to be non-durable. However, our results showed that the quantitative resistance based on the QTL T1 remained efficient in orchard over an eight-year period, with only a slow decrease in efficiency and no detectable increase of the aggressiveness of fungal isolates over time. We conclude that knowledge on the specificity of a QTL is not sufficient to evaluate its durability. Deciphering molecular mechanisms associated with resistance QTLs, genetic determinants of aggressiveness and putative trade-offs within pathogen populations is needed to help in understanding the erosion processes.

  10. Energetics-Based Methods for Protein Folding and Stability Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geer, M. Ariel; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, a series of energetics-based techniques have been developed for the thermodynamic analysis of protein folding and stability. These techniques include Stability of Unpurified Proteins from Rates of amide H/D Exchange (SUPREX), pulse proteolysis, Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX), slow histidine H/D exchange, lysine amidination, and quantitative cysteine reactivity (QCR). The above techniques, which are the subject of this review, all utilize chemical or enzymatic modification reactions to probe the chemical denaturant- or temperature-induced equilibrium unfolding properties of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. They employ various mass spectrometry-, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-, and optical spectroscopy-based readouts that are particularly advantageous for high-throughput and in some cases multiplexed analyses. This has created the opportunity to use protein folding and stability measurements in new applications such as in high-throughput screening projects to identify novel protein ligands and in mode-of-action studies to identify protein targets of a particular ligand.

  11. Quantitative Expression and Co-Localization of Wnt Signalling Related Proteins in Feline Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marote, Georgina; Abramo, Francesca; McKay, Jenny; Thomson, Calum; Beltran, Mariana; Millar, Michael; Priestnall, Simon; Dobson, Jane; Costantino-Casas, Fernando; Petrou, Terry; McGonnell, Imelda M.; Davies, Anthony J.; Weetman, Malcolm; Garden, Oliver A.; Masters, John R.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Ahmed, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) is an aggressive neoplasm in cats. Little is known about the possible molecular mechanisms that may be involved in the initiation, maintenance and progression of FOSCC. Wnt signalling is critical in development and disease, including many mammalian cancers. In this study, we have investigated the expression of Wnt signalling related proteins using quantitative immunohistochemical techniques on tissue arrays. We constructed tissue arrays with 58 individual replicate tissue samples. We tested for the expression of four key Wnt/ß-catenin transcription targets, namely Cyclin D1 (CCND1 or CD1), FRA1, c-Myc and MMP7. All antibodies showed cross reactivity in feline tissue except MMP7. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of single proteins (expressed as area fraction / amount of tissue for normal vs tumor, mean ± SE) showed that the expression of CD1 (3.9 ± 0.5 vs 12.2 ± 0.9), FRA1 (5.5 ± 0.6 vs 16.8 ± 1.1) and c-Myc (5.4 ± 0.5 vs 12.5 ± 0.9) was increased in FOSCC tissue by 2.3 to 3 fold compared to normal controls (p<0.0001). By using a multilabel, quantitative fluorophore technique we further investigated if the co-localization of these proteins (all transcription factors) with each other and in the nucleus (stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, DAPI) was altered in FOSCC compared to normal tissue. The global intersection coefficients, a measure of the proximity of two fluorophore labeled entities, showed that there was a significant change (p < 0.01) in the co-localization for all permutations (e.g. CD1/FRA1 etc), except for the nuclear localization of CD1. Our results show that putative targets of Wnt signalling transcription are up-regulated in FOSCC with alterations in the co-localization of these proteins and could serve as a useful marker for the disease. PMID:27559731

  12. Quantitative sandwich ELISA for determination of traces of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) protein in complex food matrixes.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, T; Vieths, S

    1999-10-01

    A hazelnut-specific sandwich-type ELISA based on polyclonal antisera was developed for detection of hidden hazelnut protein residues in complex food matrixes. In the absence of a food matrix, extractable protein from different native and toasted hazelnuts was detected at rates of 94 +/- 13 and 96 +/- 7% applying standards prepared from native and toasted hazelnuts, respectively. From complex food matrixes, 0.001-10% of hazelnut was recovered between 67 and 132%, in average by 106 +/- 17%. Depending on the food matrix, hazelnut protein could be detected down to the ppb (ng/g) level. Intraassay precision was <6% for hazelnut >/= 0.001% and interassay precision was <15% for hazelnut >/= 0.01%. In 12 of 28 commercial food products without labeling or declaration of hazelnut components, between 2 and 421 ppm of hazelnut protein was detected, demonstrating a remarkable presence of potentially allergenic hazelnut protein "hidden" in commercial food products.

  13. Model-based quantitative laser Doppler flowmetry in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Ingemar; Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2010-09-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) can be used for assessing the microcirculatory perfusion. However, conventional LDF (cLDF) gives only a relative perfusion estimate for an unknown measurement volume, with no information about the blood flow speed distribution. To overcome these limitations, a model-based analysis method for quantitative LDF (qLDF) is proposed. The method uses inverse Monte Carlo technique with an adaptive three-layer skin model. By analyzing the optimal model where measured and simulated LDF spectra detected at two different source-detector separations match, the absolute microcirculatory perfusion for a specified speed region in a predefined volume is determined. qLDF displayed errors <12% when evaluated using simulations of physiologically relevant variations in the layer structure, in the optical properties of static tissue, and in blood absorption. Inhomogeneous models containing small blood vessels, hair, and sweat glands displayed errors <5%. Evaluation models containing single larger blood vessels displayed significant errors but could be dismissed by residual analysis. In vivo measurements using local heat provocation displayed a higher perfusion increase with qLDF than cLDF, due to nonlinear effects in the latter. The qLDF showed that the perfusion increase occurred due to an increased amount of red blood cells with a speed >1 mm/s.

  14. Genetic mapping and confirmation of quantitative trait loci for seed protein and oil contents and seed weight in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] meal has increased worldwide and soybean importers often offer premiums for soybean containing higher contents of protein and oil. Objectives were to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with soybean seed protein, oil, and seed weight in a soyb...

  15. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling protein, oil, and five major fatty acids’ contents in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved seed composition in soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) for protein and oil quality is one of the major goals of soybean breeders. A group of genes that act as quantitative traits with their effects can alter protein, oil, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids percentage in soy...

  16. Quantitative evaluation of his-tag purification and immunoprecipitation of tristetraprolin and its mutant proteins from transfected human cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Histidine (His)-tag is widely used for affinity purification of recombinant proteins, but the yield and purity of expressed proteins are quite different. Little information is available about quantitative evaluation of this procedure. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the His-tag pr...

  17. Quantitative proteomic analysis of wheat grain proteins reveals differential effects of silencing of omega-5 gliadin genes in transgenic lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel wheat lines with altered flour compositions can be used to decipher the roles of specific gluten proteins in flour quality. Grain proteins from transgenic wheat lines in which genes encoding the omega-5 gliadins were silenced by RNA interference (RNAi) were analyzed in detail by quantitative 2...

  18. Protein composition of wheat gluten polymer fractions determined by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour proteins from the US bread wheat Butte 86 were extracted in 0.5% SDS using a two-step procedure with and without sonication and further separated by size exclusion chromatography into monomeric and polymeric fractions. Proteins in each fraction were analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel...

  19. Quantitative colorimetric assay for total protein applied to the red wine Pinot noir.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark R; Penner, Mike H; Bennett, Samuel E; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2011-07-13

    A standard method for assaying protein in red wine is currently lacking. The method described here is based on protein precipitation followed by dye binding quantification. Improvements over existing approaches include minimal sample processing prior to protein precipitation with cold trichloroacetic acid/acetone and quantification based on absorbance relative to a commercially available standard representative of proteins likely to be found in wine, the yeast mannoprotein invertase. The precipitation method shortened preparation time relative to currently published methods and the mannoprotein standard yielded values comparable to those obtained by micro-Kjeldahl analysis. The assay was used to measure protein in 48 Pinot noir wines from 6 to 32 years old. The protein content of these wines was found to range from 50 to 102 mg/L with a mean value of 70 mg/L. The availability of a simple and relatively rapid procedure for assaying protein provides a practical tool to quantify a wine component that has been overlooked in routine analyses of red wines.

  20. Identification of novel 14-3-3ζ interacting proteins by quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK).

    PubMed

    Ge, Feng; Li, Wen-Liang; Bi, Li-Jun; Tao, Sheng-Ce; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En

    2010-11-05

    The family of 14-3-3 proteins has emerged as critical regulators of diverse cellular responses under both physiological and pathological conditions. To gain insight into the molecular action of 14-3-3ζ in multiple myeloma (MM), we performed a systematic proteomic analysis of 14-3-3ζ-associated proteins. This analysis, recently developed by Matthias Mann, termed quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK), integrates RNAi, SILAC, immunoprecipitation, and quantitative MS technologies. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis allowed us to distinguish 14-3-3ζ-interacting proteins from background proteins, resulting in the identification of 292 proteins in total with 95 novel interactions. Three 14-3-3ζ-interacting proteins-BAX, HSP70, and BAG3-were further confirmed by reciprocal coimmunoprecipitations and colocalization analysis. Our results therefore not only uncover a large number of novel 14-3-3ζ-associated proteins that possess a variety of cellular functions, but also provide new research directions for the study of the functions of 14-3-3ζ. This study also demonstrated that QUICK is a useful approach to detect specific protein-protein interactions with very high confidence and may have a wide range of applications in the investigation of protein complex interaction networks.

  1. Resistive Switching Memory Devices Based on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Fanben; Zhu, Bowen; Leow, Wan Ru; Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Xiaodong

    2015-12-09

    Resistive switching memory constitutes a prospective candidate for next-generation data storage devices. Meanwhile, naturally occurring biomaterials are promising building blocks for a new generation of environmentally friendly, biocompatible, and biodegradable electronic devices. Recent progress in using proteins to construct resistive switching memory devices is highlighted. The protein materials selection, device engineering, and mechanism of such protein-based resistive switching memory are discussed in detail. Finally, the critical challenges associated with protein-based resistive switching memory devices are presented, as well as insights into the future development of resistive switching memory based on natural biomaterials.

  2. Multifunctional reagents for quantitative proteome-wide analysis of protein modification in human cells and dynamic profiling of protein lipidation during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Ciepla, Paulina; Krause, Eberhard; Dallman, Margaret J; Magee, Anthony I; Tate, Edward W

    2015-05-11

    Novel multifunctional reagents were applied in combination with a lipid probe for affinity enrichment of myristoylated proteins and direct detection of lipid-modified tryptic peptides by mass spectrometry. This method enables high-confidence identification of the myristoylated proteome on an unprecedented scale in cell culture, and allowed the first quantitative analysis of dynamic changes in protein lipidation during vertebrate embryonic development.

  3. Quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer based on regularized optical flow algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Vargas, Javier; Wang, Shouyu; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Fei

    2015-09-01

    Cell detections and analysis are important in various fields, such as medical observations and disease diagnoses. In order to analyze the cell parameters as well as observe the samples directly, in this paper, we present an improved quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer, which can monitor the quantitative phase distributions of bio-samples and realize cellular parameter statistics. The proposed system is able to recover the phase imaging of biological samples in the expanded field of view via a regularized optical flow demodulation algorithm. This algorithm reconstructs the phase distribution with high accuracy with only two interferograms acquired at different time points simplifying the scanning system. Additionally, the method is totally automatic, and therefore it is convenient for establishing a quantitative phase cytometer. Moreover, the phase retrieval approach is robust against noise and background. Excitingly, red blood cells are readily investigated with the quantitative interferometric microscopy cytometer system.

  4. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  5. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. Mechanistic insights.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Rodrigue, Garry R; Fitch, J Patrick; Wilson, David M

    2002-04-15

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polbeta-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polbeta-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity.

  6. A quantitative model of human DNA base excision repair. I. mechanistic insights

    PubMed Central

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A.; Rodrigue, Garry R.; Fitch, J. Patrick; Wilson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a multistep process involving the sequential activity of several proteins that cope with spontaneous and environmentally induced mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA damage. Quantitative kinetic data on single proteins of BER have been used here to develop a mathematical model of the BER pathway. This model was then employed to evaluate mechanistic issues and to determine the sensitivity of pathway throughput to altered enzyme kinetics. Notably, the model predicts considerably less pathway throughput than observed in experimental in vitro assays. This finding, in combination with the effects of pathway cooperativity on model throughput, supports the hypothesis of cooperation during abasic site repair and between the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease, Ape1, and the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, Ogg1. The quantitative model also predicts that for 8-oxoguanine and hydrolytic AP site damage, short-patch Polβ-mediated BER dominates, with minimal switching to the long-patch subpathway. Sensitivity analysis of the model indicates that the Polβ-catalyzed reactions have the most control over pathway throughput, although other BER reactions contribute to pathway efficiency as well. The studies within represent a first step in a developing effort to create a predictive model for BER cellular capacity. PMID:11937636

  7. A SILAC-Based Method for Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Intestinal Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Jones, Christine; Turgeon, Naomie; Lévesque, Dominique; Asselin, Claude; Boudreau, François; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Organoids have the potential to bridge 3D cell culture to tissue physiology by providing a model resembling in vivo organs. Long-term growing organoids were first isolated from intestinal crypt cells and recreated the renewing intestinal epithelial niche. Since then, this technical breakthrough was applied to many other organs, including prostate, liver, kidney and pancreas. We describe here how to apply a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach to measure protein expression changes in intestinal organoids under different experimental conditions. We generated SILAC organoid media that allow organoids to grow and differentiate normally, and confirmed the incorporation of isotopically labelled amino acids. Furthermore, we used a treatment reported to affect organoid differentiation to demonstrate the reproducibility of the quantification using this approach and to validate the identification of proteins that correlate with the inhibition of cellular growth and development. With the combined use of quantitative mass spectrometry, SILAC and organoid culture, we validated this approach and showed that large-scale proteome variations can be measured in an “organ-like” system. PMID:27901089

  8. A SILAC-Based Method for Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Jones, Christine; Turgeon, Naomie; Lévesque, Dominique; Asselin, Claude; Boudreau, François; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2016-11-30

    Organoids have the potential to bridge 3D cell culture to tissue physiology by providing a model resembling in vivo organs. Long-term growing organoids were first isolated from intestinal crypt cells and recreated the renewing intestinal epithelial niche. Since then, this technical breakthrough was applied to many other organs, including prostate, liver, kidney and pancreas. We describe here how to apply a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach to measure protein expression changes in intestinal organoids under different experimental conditions. We generated SILAC organoid media that allow organoids to grow and differentiate normally, and confirmed the incorporation of isotopically labelled amino acids. Furthermore, we used a treatment reported to affect organoid differentiation to demonstrate the reproducibility of the quantification using this approach and to validate the identification of proteins that correlate with the inhibition of cellular growth and development. With the combined use of quantitative mass spectrometry, SILAC and organoid culture, we validated this approach and showed that large-scale proteome variations can be measured in an "organ-like" system.

  9. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mosquito C6/36 cells reveals host proteins involved in Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-04-12

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae During replication processes, flavivirus will manipulate host cell systems to facilitate their replication, while the host cells will activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. Mosquito Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effective restrictions of ZIKV replication in mosquitoes will be vital in controlling the spread of virus. In this study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of ZIKV infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells was performed to investigate host proteins involved in ZIKV infection process. A total of 3,544 host proteins were quantified, with 200 being differentially regulated, among which, CHCHD2 can be up-regulated by ZIKV infection in both mosquito C6/36 and human HeLa cells. Our further study indicated CHCHD2 can promote ZIKV replication and inhibit IFN-β production in HeLa cells, suggesting ZIKV infection may up-regulate CHCHD2 to inhibit IFN-I production and thus promote virus replication. Bioinformatics analysis on regulated host proteins highlights several ZIKV infection regulated biological processes. Further study indicated ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) play roles in ZIKV entry process, and an FDA approved inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, Bortezomib, can inhibit ZIKV infection in vivo Our study illustrates how host cell responds to ZIKV infection, and also provides a candidate drug for the control of ZIKV infection in mosquitoes and treatment of ZIKV infection in patients.IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection poses great threats to human health, while there is no FDA approved drug available for the treatment of ZIKV infection. During replication, ZIKV will manipulate host cell systems to facilitate their replication, while host cells will activate antiviral responses

  10. Protein Self-Association Induced by Macromolecular Crowding: A Quantitative Analysis by Magnetic Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Snoussi, Karim; Halle, Bertil

    2005-01-01

    In the presence of high concentrations of inert macromolecules, the self-association of proteins is strongly enhanced through an entropic, excluded-volume effect variously called macromolecular crowding or depletion attraction. Despite the predicted large magnitude of this universal effect and its far-reaching biological implications, few experimental studies of macromolecular crowding have been reported. Here, we introduce a powerful new technique, fast field-cycling magnetic relaxation dispersion, for investigating crowding effects on protein self-association equilibria. By recording the solvent proton spin relaxation rate over a wide range of magnetic field strengths, we determine the populations of coexisting monomers and decamers of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in the presence of dextran up to a macromolecular volume fraction of 27%. Already at a dextran volume fraction of 14%, we find a 30-fold increase of the decamer population and 5105-fold increase of the association constant. The analysis of these results, in terms of a statistical-mechanical model that incorporates polymer flexibility as well as the excluded volume of the protein, shows that the dramatic enhancement of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor self-association can be quantitatively rationalized in terms of hard repulsive interactions. PMID:15665132

  11. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  12. Quantitative ToF-SIMS studies of protein drug release from biodegradable polymer drug delivery membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Sarah A.; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2008-12-01

    Biodegradable polymers are of interest in developing strategies to control protein drug delivery. The protein that was used in this study is Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) which is a protein involved in the re-epithelialization process. The protein is stabilized in the biodegradable polymer matrix during formulation and over the course of polymer degradation with the use of an ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) which will encapsulate the protein in an aqueous environment. The release kinetics of the protein from the surface of these materials requires precise timing which is a crucial factor in the efficacy of this drug delivery system. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used in the same capacity to identify the molecular ion peak of the surfactant and polymer and use this to determine surface concentration. In the polymer matrix, the surfactant molecular ion peak was observed in the positive and negative mode at m/ z 467 and 421, respectively. These peaks were determined to be [AOT + Na +] and [AOT - Na +]. These methods are used to identify the surfactant and protein from the polymer matrix and are used to measure the rate of surface accumulation. The second step was to compare this accumulation rate with the release rate of the protein into an aqueous solution during the degradation of the biodegradable film. This rate is compared to that from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements using the protein autofluorescence from that released into aqueous solution [C.M. Mahoney, J. Yu, A. Fahey, J.A.J. Gardella, SIMS depth profiling of polymer blends with protein based drugs, Appl. Surf. Sci. 252 (2006), 6609-6614.].

  13. A droplet-based, optofluidic device for high-throughput, quantitative bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Lapsley, Michael Ian; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhao, Yanhui; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Chen, Yuchao; Yang, Shikuan; Zhao, Xing-Zhong; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-12-18

    Analysis of chemical or biomolecular contents in a tiny amount of specimen presents a significant challenge in many biochemical studies and diagnostic applications. In this work, we present a single-layer, optofluidic device for real-time, high-throughput, quantitative analysis of droplet contents. Our device integrates an optical fiber-based, on-chip detection unit with a droplet-based microfluidic unit. It can quantitatively analyze the contents of individual droplets in real-time. It also achieves a detection throughput of 2000 droplets per second, a detection limit of 20 nM, and an excellent reproducibility in its detection results. In a proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that our device can be used to perform detection of DNA and its mutations by monitoring the fluorescent signal changes of the target DNA/molecular beacon complex in single droplets. Our approach can be immediately extended to a real-time, high-throughput detection of other biomolecules (such as proteins and viruses) in droplets. With its advantages in throughput, functionality, cost, size, and reliability, the droplet-based optofluidic device presented here can be a valuable tool for many medical diagnostic applications.

  14. Dissection of brassinosteroid-regulated proteins in rice embryos during germination by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian-Feng; Xiong, Min; Xu, Peng; Huang, Li-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs), essential plant-specific steroidal hormones, function in a wide spectrum of plant growth and development events, including seed germination. Rice is not only a monocotyledonous model plant but also one of the most important staple food crops of human beings. Rice seed germination is a decisive event for the next-generation of plant growth and successful seed germination is critical for rice yield. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms on how BR modulates seed germination in rice. In the present study, we used isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach to study BR-regulated proteome during the early stage of seed germination. The results showed that more than 800 BR-responsive proteins were identified, including 88 reliable target proteins responsive to stimuli of both BR-deficiency and BR-insensitivity. Moreover, 90% of the 88 target proteins shared a similar expression change pattern. Gene ontology and string analysis indicated that ribosomal structural proteins, as well as proteins involved in protein biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolisms were highly clustered. These findings not only enrich BR-regulated protein database in rice seeds, but also allow us to gain novel insights into the molecular mechanism of BR regulated seed germination. PMID:27703189

  15. Ultrarapid quantitation of maize proteins by perfusion and monolithic reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Nogales, J M; del Alamo, M; García, M C; Cifuentes, A; Marina, M L

    2009-04-22

    The main objective of this study was to develop a new methodology alternative to the classical Kjeldahl analysis for determining maize proteins in maize products and seeds. For that purpose, two different chromatographic methodologies using perfusion and monolithic stationary phases, both enabling rapid separations of maize proteins, were investigated. Due to the difficulty to find suitable standards for this type of analysis, three different maize products were initially tested as proteins standards: zein F4000, corn gluten meal, and maize flour. Different figures of merit (i.e., linearity, correlation coefficient, precision, limits of detection and quantitation), as well as the presence of matrix inferences, were investigated. The results obtained for the different chromatographic stationary phases and protein standards were compared in order to select the most suitable analytical conditions. Despite both perfusion and monolithic methodologies resulting, in general, as appropriate for the quantitation of maize proteins, the highest reduction of analysis time and lowest detection and determination limits provided by perfusion methodology enabled to select this one as the method of choice for the quantitation of maize proteins. Regarding the different protein standards studied in this work, in general the best results were obtained using the zein standard. Compared to Kjeldahl methodology, perfusion chromatography yields total protein contents in shorter analysis time while enabling the separation of the different kinds of proteins. Due to the high diversity and complexity of industrial maize products, the proposed chromatographic method could be a very useful tool for their routine analysis.

  16. Analysis of disease-associated protein expression using quantitative proteomics—fibulin-5 is expressed in association with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bracht, Thilo; Schweinsberg, Vincent; Trippler, Martin; Kohl, Michael; Ahrens, Maike; Padden, Juliet; Naboulsi, Wael; Barkovits, Katalin; Megger, Dominik A; Eisenacher, Martin; Borchers, Christoph H; Schlaak, Jörg F; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Weber, Frank; Baba, Hideo A; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis are major health problems worldwide. Until now, highly invasive biopsy remains the diagnostic gold standard despite many disadvantages. To develop noninvasive diagnostic assays for the assessment of liver fibrosis, it is urgently necessary to identify molecules that are robustly expressed in association with the disease. We analyzed biopsied tissue samples from 95 patients with HBV/HCV-associated hepatic fibrosis using three different quantification methods. We performed a label-free proteomics discovery study to identify novel disease-associated proteins using a subset of the cohort (n = 27). Subsequently, gene expression data from all available clinical samples were analyzed (n = 77). Finally, we performed a targeted proteomics approach, multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), to verify the disease-associated expression in samples independent from the discovery approach (n = 68). We identified fibulin-5 (FBLN5) as a novel protein expressed in relation to hepatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we confirmed the altered expression of microfibril-associated glycoprotein 4 (MFAP4), lumican (LUM), and collagen alpha-1(XIV) chain (COL14A1) in association to hepatic fibrosis. To our knowledge, no tissue-based quantitative proteomics study for hepatic fibrosis has been performed using a cohort of comparable size. By this means, we add substantial evidence for the disease-related expression of the proteins examined in this study.

  17. Quantitative Determination of Lethal Toxin Proteins in Culture Supernatant of Human Live Anthrax Vaccine Bacillus anthracis A16R.

    PubMed

    Zai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ju; Liu, Jie; Li, Liangliang; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-25

    Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis) is the etiological agent of anthrax affecting both humans and animals. Anthrax toxin (AT) plays a major role in pathogenesis. It includes lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET), which are formed by the combination of protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF) or edema factor (EF), respectively. The currently used human anthrax vaccine in China utilizes live-attenuated B. anthracis spores (A16R; pXO1+, pXO2-) that produce anthrax toxin but cannot produce the capsule. Anthrax toxins, especially LT, have key effects on both the immunogenicity and toxicity of human anthrax vaccines. Thus, determining quantities and biological activities of LT proteins expressed by the A16R strain is meaningful. Here, we explored LT expression patterns of the A16R strain in culture conditions using another vaccine strain Sterne as a control. We developed a sandwich ELISA and cytotoxicity-based method for quantitative detection of PA and LF. Expression and degradation of LT proteins were observed in culture supernatants over time. Additionally, LT proteins expressed by the A16R and Sterne strains were found to be monomeric and showed cytotoxic activity, which may be the main reason for side effects of live anthrax vaccines. Our work facilitates the characterization of anthrax vaccines components and establishment of a quality control standard for vaccine production which may ultimately help to ensure the efficacy and safety of the human anthrax vaccine A16R.

  18. Comprehensive and quantitative mapping of RNA-protein interactions across a transcribed eukaryotic genome.

    PubMed

    She, Richard; Chakravarty, Anupam K; Layton, Curtis J; Chircus, Lauren M; Andreasson, Johan O L; Damaraju, Nandita; McMahon, Peter L; Buenrostro, Jason D; Jarosz, Daniel F; Greenleaf, William J

    2017-04-04

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) control the fate of nearly every transcript in a cell. However, no existing approach for studying these posttranscriptional gene regulators combines transcriptome-wide throughput and biophysical precision. Here, we describe an assay that accomplishes this. Using commonly available hardware, we built a customizable, open-source platform that leverages the inherent throughput of Illumina technology for direct biophysical measurements. We used the platform to quantitatively measure the binding affinity of the prototypical RBP Vts1 for every transcript in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. The scale and precision of these measurements revealed many previously unknown features of this well-studied RBP. Our transcribed genome array (TGA) assayed both rare and abundant transcripts with equivalent proficiency, revealing hundreds of low-abundance targets missed by previous approaches. These targets regulated diverse biological processes including nutrient sensing and the DNA damage response, and implicated Vts1 in de novo gene "birth." TGA provided single-nucleotide resolution for each binding site and delineated a highly specific sequence and structure motif for Vts1 binding. Changes in transcript levels in vts1Δ cells established the regulatory function of these binding sites. The impact of Vts1 on transcript abundance was largely independent of where it bound within an mRNA, challenging prevailing assumptions about how this RBP drives RNA degradation. TGA thus enables a quantitative description of the relationship between variant RNA structures, affinity, and in vivo phenotype on a transcriptome-wide scale. We anticipate that TGA will provide similarly comprehensive and quantitative insights into the function of virtually any RBP.

  19. Identifying and quantitating conformational exchange in membrane proteins using site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Cafiso, David S

    2014-10-21

    Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, BtuB, the energy

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Protein Expression to Study Lineage Specification in Mouse Preimplantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Nestor; Kang, Minjung; Schrode, Nadine; Lou, Xinghua; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This protocol presents a method to perform quantitative, single-cell in situ analyses of protein expression to study lineage specificationin mouse preimplantation embryos. The procedures necessary for embryo collection, immunofluorescence, imaging on a confocal microscope, and image segmentation and analysis are described. This method allows quantitation of the expression of multiple nuclear markers and the spatial (XYZ) coordinates of all cells in the embryo. It takes advantage of MINS, an image segmentation software tool specifically developed for the analysis of confocal images of preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies. MINS carries out unsupervised nuclear segmentation across the X, Y and Z dimensions, and produces information on cell position in three-dimensional space, as well as nuclear fluorescence levels for all channels with minimal user input. While this protocol has been optimized for the analysis of images of preimplantation stage mouse embryos, it can easily be adapted to the analysis of any other samples exhibiting a good signal-to-noise ratio and where high nuclear density poses a hurdle to image segmentation (e.g., expression analysis of embryonic stem cell (ESC) colonies, differentiating cells in culture, embryos of other species or stages, etc.). PMID:26967230

  1. A comparative study of three approaches to the routine quantitation of human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Bruver, R M; Salkie, M L

    1978-06-01

    The Laser Nephelometer PDQTM (Hyland Division, Travenol Laboratories Inc.) and the Abbott Bichromatic Analyser 100 (Abbott Laboratories) were compared with a radial immunodiffusion method. Seventy-eight serum specimens collected during routine blood testing were aliquoted and quantitated by the three procedures described. The nephelometric system was used as described by Hyland in their instruction accompanying the LAS-R Nephelometric test kits. The ABA-100 was used with a filter unit transmitting at 340 and 650 nm and at a water bath temperature of 30 degrees C. The Laser Nephelometer correlated well with the RID system giving a correlation coefficient varying from 0.94 for IgA to 0.79 for C3. It was not possible to quantitate IgA by the turbidometric method using the ABA-100. Results obtained for the other proteins were satisfactory and the correlation coefficient with the RID method varied from 0.88 for IgG to 0.90 for C3. The RID procedure in routine use takes 5 hours technologist time and a 16-hour incubation period to produce results for IgG, IgA and IgM on nine patient specimens. Using the Laser Nephelometer to obtain the same results on 20 patient specimens took two to three technologist hours. Nephelometry, therefore, appears to be a satisfactory alternative to RID with a comparable precision and a great saving in technologist time.

  2. Quantitative analysis of protein complex constituents and their phosphorylation states on a LTQ-Orbitrap instrument.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Cédric; Jünger, Martin A; Aubertin, Johannes; Radvanyi, François; Aebersold, Ruedi; Pflieger, Delphine

    2010-10-01

    Cellular functions are largely carried out by noncovalent protein complexes that may exist within the cell as stable modules or as assemblies of dynamically changing composition, whose formation and decomposition are triggered in response to extracellular stimuli. The protein constituents of complexes often exhibit post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation that can impact their ability to interact with other proteins and thus to form multicomponent complexes. A complete characterization of a particular protein complex thus requires determining both, the identity of interacting proteins and their covalent modifications, in terms of attachment sites and stoichiometry. We have previously developed a protocol which identifies genuine constituents of partially purified protein complexes and concurrently determines their phosphorylation sites and levels in a single LC-MS/MS analysis performed on a MALDI-TOF/TOF instrument (Pflieger, D.; Junger, M. A.; Muller, M.; Rinner, O.; Lee, H.; Gehrig, P. M.; Gstaiger, M.; Aebersold, R. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 2008 , 7 , 326 - 346). The method combines fourplex iTRAQ labeling (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) and phosphatase treatment of peptide samples derived from the tryptic digestion of isolated complexes. To test the performances of this method with nanoESI and different peptide fragmentation modes, possibly better suited for the identification of phosphorylated sequences than MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, we have implemented it on the nanoESI-LTQ-Orbitrap instrument. The model protein beta-casein was used to optimize the conditions with respect to sensitivity and quantitative accuracy: a combination of CID fragmentation in the linear ion trap and Higher energy Collision Dissociation (HCD) appeared optimal to obtain reliable and robust identification and quantification data. The optimized conditions were then applied to identify and estimate the respective levels of phosphorylation sites on the purified

  3. Improved corn protein based articles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developing higher value uses for zein (corn protein), a potential major co-product of the bio-ethanol industry, will improve the economics of this business. Historically, zein was predominantly used in the textile fiber industry. Unfortunately the techniques used at that time to modify the zein cann...

  4. Quantitation of Protein Expression and Co-localization Using Multiplexed Immuno-histochemical Staining and Multispectral Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Tyler M; Ricke, Emily A; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2016-04-08

    Immunohistochemistry is a commonly used clinical and research lab detection technique for investigating protein expression and localization within tissues. Many semi-quantitative systems have been developed for scoring expression using immunohistochemistry, but inherent subjectivity limits reproducibility and accuracy of results. Furthermore, the investigation of spatially overlapping biomarkers such as nuclear transcription factors is difficult with current immunohistochemistry techniques. We have developed and optimized a system for simultaneous investigation of multiple proteins using high throughput methods of multiplexed immunohistochemistry and multispectral imaging. Multiplexed immunohistochemistry is performed by sequential application of primary antibodies with secondary antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase or alkaline phosphatase. Different chromogens are used to detect each protein of interest. Stained slides are loaded into an automated slide scanner and a protocol is created for automated image acquisition. A spectral library is created by staining a set of slides with a single chromogen on each. A subset of representative stained images are imported into multispectral imaging software and an algorithm for distinguishing tissue type is created by defining tissue compartments on images. Subcellular compartments are segmented by using hematoxylin counterstain and adjusting the intrinsic algorithm. Thresholding is applied to determine positivity and protein co-localization. The final algorithm is then applied to the entire set of tissues. Resulting data allows the user to evaluate protein expression based on tissue type (ex. epithelia vs. stroma) and subcellular compartment (nucleus vs. cytoplasm vs. plasma membrane). Co-localization analysis allows for investigation of double-positive, double-negative, and single-positive cell types. Combining multispectral imaging with multiplexed immunohistochemistry and automated image acquisition is an

  5. CANDU in-reactor quantitative visual-based inspection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochefort, P. A.

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes two separate visual-based inspection procedures used at CANDU nuclear power generating stations. The techniques are quantitative in nature and are delivered and operated in highly radioactive environments with access that is restrictive, and in one case is submerged. Visual-based inspections at stations are typically qualitative in nature. For example a video system will be used to search for a missing component, inspect for a broken fixture, or locate areas of excessive corrosion in a pipe. In contrast, the methods described here are used to measure characteristic component dimensions that in one case ensure ongoing safe operation of the reactor and in the other support reactor refurbishment. CANDU reactors are Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). The reactor vessel is a horizontal cylindrical low-pressure calandria tank approximately 6 m in diameter and length, containing heavy water as a neutron moderator. Inside the calandria, 380 horizontal fuel channels (FC) are supported at each end by integral end-shields. Each FC holds 12 fuel bundles. The heavy water primary heat transport water flows through the FC pressure tube, removing the heat from the fuel bundles and delivering it to the steam generator. The general design of the reactor governs both the type of measurements that are required and the methods to perform the measurements. The first inspection procedure is a method to remotely measure the gap between FC and other in-core horizontal components. The technique involves delivering vertically a module with a high-radiation-resistant camera and lighting into the core of a shutdown but fuelled reactor. The measurement is done using a line-of-sight technique between the components. Compensation for image perspective and viewing elevation to the measurement is required. The second inspection procedure measures flaws within the reactor's end shield FC calandria tube rolled joint area. The FC calandria tube (the outer shell of the FC) is

  6. Quantitative evaluation of morpholino-mediated protein knockdown of GFP, MSX1, and PAX7 during tail regeneration in Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Schnapp, Esther; Tanaka, Elly M; Tamaka, Elly M

    2005-01-01

    Vertebrate regeneration is a fascinating but poorly understood biological phenomena. Urodele amphibians such as Ambystoma mexicanum (the axolotl) can functionally regenerate complex body structures such as the limb and tail, including the spinal cord, throughout life. So far, molecular studies on regeneration have been limited due to the paucity of tools for knocking-down gene and protein function. In this article, we quantitatively assessed the ability of morpholinos to specifically down-regulate protein expression in both cultured urodele cells and in vivo. We focused on the down-regulation of green fluorescent protein and two axolotl proteins, MSX1 and PAX7. Our data show that the expression of these proteins can be efficiently reduced by morpholinos. MSX1 has been hypothesized to be involved in muscle dedifferentiation based on experiments using cultured myotubes. Our studies in in vivo muscle fibers so far have shown no influence of overexpressing or down-regulating MSX1 on the dedifferentiation process.

  7. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  8. Quantitation of yeast total proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer for uniform loading.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Hyukho

    2016-04-01

    Proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) sample buffer are difficult to quantitate due to SDS and reducing agents being in the buffer. Although acetone precipitation has long been used to clean up proteins from detergents and salts, previous studies showed that protein recovery from acetone precipitation varies from 50 to 100% depending on the samples tested. Here, this article shows that acetone precipitates proteins highly efficiently from SDS-PAGE sample buffer and that quantitative recovery is achieved in 5 min at room temperature. Moreover, precipitated proteins are resolubilized with urea/guanidine, rather than with SDS. Thus, the resolubilized samples are readily quantifiable with Bradford reagent without using SDS-compatible assays.

  9. Identifying and Quantitating Conformational Exchange in Membrane Proteins Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Protein structures are not static but sample different conformations over a range of amplitudes and time scales. These fluctuations may involve relatively small changes in bond angles or quite large rearrangements in secondary structure and tertiary fold. The equilibrium between discrete structural substates on the microsecond to millisecond time scale is sometimes termed conformational exchange. Protein dynamics and conformational exchange are believed to provide the basis for many important activities, such as protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions, enzymatic activity and protein allostery; however, for many proteins, the dynamics and conformational exchange that lead to function are poorly defined. Spectroscopic methods, such as NMR, are among the most important methods to explore protein dynamics and conformational exchange; however, they are difficult to implement in some systems and with some types of exchange events. Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) is an EPR based approach that is particularly well-suited to high molecular-weight systems such as membrane proteins. Because of the relatively fast time scale for EPR spectroscopy, it is an excellent method to examine exchange. Conformations that are in exchange are captured as distinct populations in the EPR spectrum, and this feature when combined with the use of methods that can shift the free energy of conformational substates allows one to identify regions of proteins that are in dynamic exchange. In addition, modern pulse EPR methods have the ability to examine conformational heterogeneity, resolve discrete protein states, and identify the substates in exchange. Protein crystallography has provided high-resolution models for a number of membrane proteins; but because of conformational exchange, these models do not always reflect the structures that are present when the protein is in a native bilayer environment. In the case of the Escherichia coli vitamin B12 transporter, Btu

  10. Quantitative expression patterns of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} (PPAR{beta}/{delta}) protein in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Girroir, Elizabeth E.; Hollingshead, Holly E.; He Pengfei; Zhu Bokai; Perdew, Gary H.; Peters, Jeffrey M.

    2008-07-04

    The expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta} have been described, but the majority of these data are based on mRNA data. To date, there are no reports that have quantitatively examined the expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein in mouse tissues. In the present study, a highly specific PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibody was developed, characterized, and used to examine tissue expression patterns of PPAR{beta}/{delta}. As compared to commercially available anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies, one of six polyclonal anti-PPAR{beta}/{delta} antibodies developed was significantly more effective for immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated PPAR{beta}/{delta}. This antibody was used for quantitative Western blot analysis using radioactive detection methods. Expression of PPAR{beta}/{delta} was highest in colon, small intestine, liver, and keratinocytes as compared to other tissues including heart, spleen, skeletal muscle, lung, brain, and thymus. Interestingly, PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression was localized in the nucleus and RXR{alpha} can be co-immunoprecipitated with nuclear PPAR{beta}/{delta}. Results from these studies demonstrate that PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression is highest in intestinal epithelium, liver, and keratinocytes, consistent with significant biological roles in these tissues.

  11. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  12. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-05

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production.

  13. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  14. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  15. Quantitative protein topography analysis and high-resolution structure prediction using hydroxyl radical labeling and tandem-ion mass spectrometry (MS).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder; Kiselar, Janna; Yang, Sichun; Chance, Mark R

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting based MS for protein structure assessment has the goal of understanding ligand induced conformational changes and macromolecular interactions, for example, protein tertiary and quaternary structure, but the structural resolution provided by typical peptide-level quantification is limiting. In this work, we present experimental strategies using tandem-MS fragmentation to increase the spatial resolution of the technique to the single residue level to provide a high precision tool for molecular biophysics research. Overall, in this study we demonstrated an eightfold increase in structural resolution compared with peptide level assessments. In addition, to provide a quantitative analysis of residue based solvent accessibility and protein topography as a basis for high-resolution structure prediction; we illustrate strategies of data transformation using the relative reactivity of side chains as a normalization strategy and predict side-chain surface area from the footprinting data. We tested the methods by examination of Ca(+2)-calmodulin showing highly significant correlations between surface area and side-chain contact predictions for individual side chains and the crystal structure. Tandem ion based hydroxyl radical footprinting-MS provides quantitative high-resolution protein topology information in solution that can fill existing gaps in structure determination for large proteins and macromolecular complexes.

  16. Quantitative predictions on auxin-induced polar distribution of PIN proteins during vein formation in leaves.

    PubMed

    Alim, K; Frey, E

    2010-10-01

    The dynamic patterning of the plant hormone auxin and its efflux facilitator the PIN protein are the key regulators for the spatial and temporal organization of plant development. In particular auxin induces the polar localization of its own efflux facilitator. Due to this positive feedback, auxin flow is directed and patterns of auxin and PIN arise. During the earliest stage of vein initiation in leaves auxin accumulates in a single cell in a rim of epidermal cells from which it flows into the ground meristem tissue of the leaf blade. There the localized auxin supply yields the successive polarization of PIN distribution along a strand of cells. We model the auxin and PIN dynamics within cells with a minimal canalization model. Solving the model analytically we uncover an excitable polarization front that triggers a polar distribution of PIN proteins in cells. As polarization fronts may extend to opposing directions from their initiation site, we suggest a possible resolution to the puzzling occurrence of bipolar cells, thus we offer an explanation for the development of closed, looped veins. Employing non-linear analysis, we identify the role of the contributing microscopic processes during polarization. Furthermore, we deduce quantitative predictions on polarization fronts establishing a route to determine the up to now largely unknown kinetic rates of auxin and PIN dynamics.

  17. A Quantitative ADME-base Tool for Exploring Human ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure to a wide range of chemicals through our daily habits and routines is ubiquitous and largely unavoidable within modern society. The potential for human exposure, however, has not been quantified for the vast majority of chemicals with wide commercial use. Creative advances in exposure science are needed to support efficient and effective evaluation and management of chemical risks, particularly for chemicals in consumer products. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development is developing, or collaborating in the development of, scientifically-defensible methods for making quantitative or semi-quantitative exposure predictions. The Exposure Prioritization (Ex Priori) model is a simplified, quantitative visual dashboard that provides a rank-ordered internalized dose metric to simultaneously explore exposures across chemical space (not chemical by chemical). Diverse data streams are integrated within the interface such that different exposure scenarios for “individual,” “population,” or “professional” time-use profiles can be interchanged to tailor exposure and quantitatively explore multi-chemical signatures of exposure, internalized dose (uptake), body burden, and elimination. Ex Priori has been designed as an adaptable systems framework that synthesizes knowledge from various domains and is amenable to new knowledge/information. As such, it algorithmically captures the totality of exposure across pathways. It

  18. Quantitative protein expression profiling reveals extensive post-transcriptional regulation and post-translational modifications in schizont-stage malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Foth, Bernardo J; Zhang, Neng; Mok, Sachel; Preiser, Peter R; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2008-01-01

    Background Malaria is a one of the most important infectious diseases and is caused by parasitic protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Previously, quantitative characterization of the P. falciparum transcriptome demonstrated that the strictly controlled progression of these parasites through their intra-erythrocytic developmental cycle is accompanied by a continuous cascade of gene expression. Although such analyses have proven immensely useful, the correlations between abundance of transcripts and their cognate proteins remain poorly characterized. Results Here, we present a quantitative time-course analysis of relative protein abundance for schizont-stage parasites (34 to 46 hours after invasion) based on two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis of protein samples labeled with fluorescent dyes. For this purpose we analyzed parasite samples taken at 4-hour intervals from a tightly synchronized culture and established more than 500 individual protein abundance profiles with high temporal resolution and quantitative reproducibility. Approximately half of all profiles exhibit a significant change in abundance and 12% display an expression peak during the observed 12-hour time interval. Intriguingly, identification of 54 protein spots by mass spectrometry revealed that 58% of the corresponding proteins - including actin-I, enolase, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4A, eIF5A, and several heat shock proteins - are represented by more than one isoform, presumably caused by post-translational modifications, with the various isoforms of a given protein frequently showing different expression patterns. Furthermore, comparisons with transcriptome data generated from the same parasite samples reveal evidence of significant post-transcriptional gene expression regulation. Conclusions Together, our data indicate that both post-transcriptional and post-translational events are widespread and of presumably great biological significance during the intra

  19. Streptococcus mutans Protein Synthesis during Mixed-Species Biofilm Development by High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (P<0.05). Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the

  20. An instantaneous colorimetric protein assay based on spontaneous formation of a protein corona on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yan Teck; Poinard, Barbara; Yeo, Eugenia Li Ling; Kah, James Chen Yong

    2015-02-21

    Commercial protein assays used ubiquitously in laboratories typically require long incubation times due to the inherently slow protein-reagent reactions. In this study, we report a novel facile technique for the instantaneous measurement of total protein concentration by exploiting the rapid aggregation dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs). By adsorbing different amounts of proteins on their surface to form a protein corona, these NPs can be sterically stabilized to different degrees by aggregation, thus exhibiting a spectrum of color change which can be quantitatively characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We evaluated this technique on four model proteins with different structures: bovine serum albumin (BSA), normal mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG), fibrinogen (FBG) and apolipoprotein A-I (Apo-A1) using two approaches, sequential and simultaneous. We obtained an approach-dependent linear concentration range up to 80 μg mL(-1) and 400 μg mL(-1) for sequential and simultaneous approaches, respectively. This linear working range was wider than that of the commercial Bradford assay and comparable to the Micro BCA assay. The simultaneous approach was also able to produce a linear working range of 200 to 1000 μg mL(-1) (R(2) = 0.995) in human urine, while the sequential approach was non-functional in urine. Similar to Micro BCA, the NP-based protein assay was able to elicit a linear response (R(2) > 0.87) for all four proteins with different structures. However, unlike Micro BCA which requires up to 120 min of incubation, we were able to obtain the read-out almost instantaneously without the need for incubation. The NP-based technique using the simultaneous approach can thus be exploited as a novel assay for instantaneous protein quantification to increase the productivity of laboratory processes.

  1. Quantitation and Identification of Intact Major Milk Proteins for High-Throughput LC-ESI-Q-TOF MS Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Delphine; Elkins, Aaron; Condina, Mark R.; Ezernieks, Vilnis; Rochfort, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Cow’s milk is an important source of proteins in human nutrition. On average, cow’s milk contains 3.5% protein. The most abundant proteins in bovine milk are caseins and some of the whey proteins, namely beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, and serum albumin. A number of allelic variants and post-translationally modified forms of these proteins have been identified. Their occurrence varies with breed, individuality, stage of lactation, and health and nutritional status of the animal. It is therefore essential to have reliable methods of detection and quantitation of these proteins. Traditionally, major milk proteins are quantified using liquid chromatography (LC) and ultra violet detection method. However, as these protein variants co-elute to some degree, another dimension of separation is beneficial to accurately measure their amounts. Mass spectrometry (MS) offers such a tool. In this study, we tested several RP-HPLC and MS parameters to optimise the analysis of intact bovine proteins from milk. From our tests, we developed an optimum method that includes a 20-28-40% phase B gradient with 0.02% TFA in both mobile phases, at 0.2 mL/min flow rate, using 75°C for the C8 column temperature, scanning every 3 sec over a 600–3000 m/z window. The optimisations were performed using external standards commercially purchased for which ionisation efficiency, linearity of calibration, LOD, LOQ, sensitivity, selectivity, precision, reproducibility, and mass accuracy were demonstrated. From the MS analysis, we can use extracted ion chromatograms (EICs) of specific ion series of known proteins and integrate peaks at defined retention time (RT) window for quantitation purposes. This optimum quantitative method was successfully applied to two bulk milk samples from different breeds, Holstein-Friesian and Jersey, to assess differences in protein variant levels. PMID:27749892

  2. Quantitative phase imaging of Breast cancer cell based on SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Wu, Shulian

    2016-02-01

    We illustrated a novel optical microscopy technique to observe cell dynamics via spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). SLIM combines Zemike's phase contrast microscopy and Gabor's holography. When the light passes through the transparent specimens, it could render high contrast intensity and record the phase information from the object. We reconstructed the Breast cancer cell phase image by SLIM and the reconstruction algorithm. Our investigation showed that SLIM has the ability to achieve the quantitative phase imaging (QPI).

  3. Quantitation of protein particles in parenteral solutions using micro-flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ting; Sharma, Deepak; Oma, Peter; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. and European Pharmacopeias require subvisible (> or =10 and > or =25 microm) and visible particulate testing of therapeutics to ensure their safety and suitability for clinical use. The objective of this article is to compare the sizing and counting accuracies of light obscuration, which is the standard technique used to measure subvisible particulate matter, and Micro-Flow Imaging (MFI), a new imaging-based technology. An immunoconjugate was selected as the model protein for this study since it could be induced to form particulate matter in PBS. Light obscuration was performed as described in USP chapter <788> while MFI measurements were conducted per the manufacturer's procedures. The two techniques yielded similar results when polystyrene standards were analyzed. However, the MFI measurements indicated the presence of significantly more particles in the protein-containing solution compared to the light obscuration measurements. The presence of nonspherical protein particles as well as particles that possess a refractive index similar to the solvent that they are in appear to be detected by MFI, but not by light obscuration, leading to the difference in the results. Imaging-based technologies could aid in developing formulations and processes that would minimize the formation of protein particulates.

  4. The workflow for quantitative proteome analysis of chloroplast development and differentiation, chloroplast mutants, and protein interactions by spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Friso, Giulia; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines a quantitative proteomics workflow using a label-free spectral counting technique. The workflow has been tested on different aspects of chloroplast biology in maize and Arabidopsis, including chloroplast mutant analysis, cell-type specific chloroplast differentiation, and the proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. The workflow involves one-dimensional SDS-PAGE of the proteomes of leaves or chloroplast subfractions, tryptic digestions, online LC-MS/MS using a mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy and duty cycle, followed by semiautomatic data processing. The bioinformatics analysis can effectively select best gene models and deals with quantification of closely related proteins; the workflow avoids overidentification of proteins and results in more accurate protein quantification. The final output includes pairwise comparative quantitative analysis, as well as hierarchical clustering for discovery of temporal and spatial patterns of protein accumulation. A brief discussion about potential pitfalls, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of spectral counting, is provided.

  5. Quantitative analysis of modified proteins and their positional isomers by tandem mass spectrometry: human histone H4.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, James J; Mizzen, Craig A; Kelleher, Neil L

    2006-07-01

    Here we show that fragment ion abundances from dissociation of ions created from mixtures of multiply modified histone H4 (11 kDa) or of N-terminal synthetic peptides (2 kDa) correspond to their respective intact ion abundances measured by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Isomeric mixtures of modified forms of the same protein are resolved and quantitated with a precision of protein ions created by electrospray greatly easing many of the systematic biases that more strongly affect small peptides (e.g., differences in ionization efficiency and ion m/z values). The ion fragmentation methods validated here are directly extensible to intact human proteins to derive quantitative information on the highly related and often isomeric protein forms created by combinatorial arrays of posttranslational modifications.

  6. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Subin R C K; Udenigwe, Chibuike C; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  7. Nanochemistry of Protein-Based Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Subin R. C. K.; Udenigwe, Chibuike C.; Yada, Rickey Y.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior. PMID:27489854

  8. Nanochemistry of protein-based delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Subin; Udenigwe, Chibuike; Yada, Rickey

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has seen an increased interest in the conversion of food proteins into functional biomaterials, including their use for loading and delivery of physiologically active compounds such as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Proteins possess a competitive advantage over other platforms for the development of nanodelivery systems since they are biocompatible, amphipathic, and widely available. Proteins also have unique molecular structures and diverse functional groups that can be selectively modified to alter encapsulation and release properties. A number of physical and chemical methods have been used for preparing protein nanoformulations, each based on different underlying protein chemistry. This review focuses on the chemistry of the reorganization and/or modification of proteins into functional nanostructures for delivery, from the perspective of their preparation, functionality, stability and physiological behavior.

  9. Exploring skyline for both MS(E) -based label-free proteomics and HRMS quantitation of small molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Chen, Xin; Yan, Zhihui; Qin, Shanshan; Xu, Jinhua; Lin, Jianping; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2014-02-01

    The MS(E) (where MS(E) is low energy (MS) and elevated energy (E) mode of acquisition) acquisition method commercialized by Waters on its Q-TOF instruments is regarded as a unique data-independent fragmentation approach that improves the accuracy and dynamic range of label-free proteomic quantitation. Due to its special format, MS(E) acquisition files cannot be independently analyzed with most widely used open-source proteomic software specialized for processing data-dependent acquisition files. In this study, we established a workflow integrating Skyline, a popular and versatile peptide-centric quantitation program, and a statistical tool DiffProt to fulfill MS(E) -based proteomic quantitation. Comparison with the vendor software package for analyzing targeted phosphopeptides and global proteomic datasets reveals distinct advantages of Skyline in MS(E) data mining, including sensitive peak detection, flexible peptide filtering, and transparent step-by-step workflow. Moreover, we developed a new procedure such that Skyline MS1 filtering was extended to small molecule quantitation for the first time. This new utility of Skyline was examined in a protein-ligand interaction experiment to identify multiple chemical compounds specifically bound to NDM-1 (where NDM is New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1), an antibiotics-resistance target. Further improvement of the current weaknesses in Skyline MS1 filtering is expected to enhance the reliability of this powerful program in full scan-based quantitation of both peptides and small molecules.

  10. A Quantitative Tool for Producing DNA-Based Diagnostic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tom J. Whitaker

    2008-07-11

    The purpose of this project was to develop a precise, quantitative method to analyze oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on an array to enable a systematic approach to quality control issues affecting DNA microarrays. Two types of ODN's were tested; ODN's formed by photolithography and ODN's printed onto microarrays. Initial work in Phase I, performed in conjunction with Affymetrix, Inc. who has a patent on a photolithographic in situ technique for creating DNA arrays, was very promising but did seem to indicate that the atomization process was not complete. Soon after Phase II work was under way, Affymetrix had further developed fluorescent methods and indicated they were no longer interested in our resonance ionization technique. This was communicated to the program manager and it was decided that the project would continue and be focused on printed ODNs. The method being tested is called SIRIS, Sputter-Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. SIRIS has been shown to be a highly sensitive, selective, and quantitative tool for atomic species. This project was aimed at determining if an ODN could be labeled in such a way that SIRIS could be used to measure the label and thus provide quantitative measurements of the ODN on an array. One of the largest problems in this study has been developing a method that allows us to know the amount of an ODN on a surface independent of the SIRIS measurement. Even though we could accurately determine the amount of ODN deposited on a surface, the amount that actually attached to the surface is very difficult to measure (hence the need for a quantitative tool). A double-labeling procedure was developed in which 33P and Pt were both used to label ODNs. The radioactive 33P could be measured by a proportional counter that maps the counts in one dimension. This gave a good measurement of the amount of ODN remaining on a surface after immobilization and washing. A second label, Pt, was attached to guanine nucleotides in the ODN. Studies

  11. Quantitative proteomic dissection of a native 14-3-3ε interacting protein complex associated with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chen; Tang, Siwei; Bai, Chen; Chen, Xian

    2014-04-01

    The 14-3-3 proteins regulate diverse biological processes that are implicated in cancer development, and seven 14-3-3 isoforms were identified with isoform-specific roles in different human tumors. In our previous work, we dissected the interactome of 14-3-3ε formed during the DNA damage response in a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell using an AACT/SILAC-based quantitative proteomic approach. In this study, we used a similar proteomic approach to profile/identify the 14-3-3ε interactome formed in native HCC cells. Functional categorization and data-dependent network analysis of the native HCC-specific 14-3-3ε interactome revealed that 14-3-3ε is involved in the regulation of multiple biological processes (BPs)/pathways, including cell cycle control, apoptosis, signal transduction, transport, cell adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, and nucleic acid metabolism. Biological validation further supports that 14-3-3ε, via association with multiple BP/pathway-specific proteins, coordinates the regulation of proliferation, survival, and metastasis of HCC. The findings in this study, together with those of our previous study, provide an extensive profile of the 14-3-3ε interaction network in HCC cells, which should be valuable for understanding the pathology of HCC and HCC therapy.

  12. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  13. Multiple reaction monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring cubed based assays for the quantitation of apolipoprotein F.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Abhinav; Gangadharan, Bevin; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-10-15

    Apolipoprotein F (APO-F) is a novel low abundance liver fibrosis biomarker and its concentration decreases in human serum and plasma across liver fibrosis stages. Current antibody based assays for APO-F suffer from limitations such as unspecific binding, antibody availability and undetectable target if the protein is degraded; and so an antibody-free assay has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic tool. We report an antibody-free, rapid, sensitive, selective and robust LC-MS/MS (MRM and MRM(3)) method for the detection and quantitation of APO-F in healthy human plasma. With further analysis of clinical samples, this LC-MS based method could be established as the first ever antibody-free biomarker assay for liver fibrosis. We explain the use of Skyline software for peptide selection and the creation of a reference library to aid in true peak identification of endogenous APO-F peptides in digests of human plasma without protein or peptide enrichment. Detection of a glycopeptide using MRM-EPI mode and reduction of interferences using MRM3 are explained. The amount of APO-F in human plasma from a healthy volunteer was determined to be 445.2ng/mL, the coefficient of variation (CV) of precision for 20 injections was <12% and the percentage error of each point along the calibration curve was calculated to be <8%, which is in line with the assay requirements for clinical samples.

  14. Quantitative definition and monitoring of the host cell protein proteome using iTRAQ - a study of an industrial mAb producing CHO-S cell line.

    PubMed

    Chiverton, Lesley M; Evans, Caroline; Pandhal, Jagroop; Landels, Andrew R; Rees, Byron J; Levison, Peter R; Wright, Phillip C; Smales, C Mark

    2016-08-01

    There are few studies defining CHO host cell proteins (HCPs) and the flux of these throughout a downstream purification process. Here we have applied quantitative iTRAQ proteomics to follow the HCP profile of an antibody (mAb) producing CHO-S cell line throughout a standard downstream purification procedure consisting of a Protein A, cation and anion exchange process. We used both 6 sample iTRAQ experiment to analyze technical replicates of three samples, which were culture harvest (HCCF), Protein A flow through and Protein A eluate and an 8 sample format to analyze technical replicates of four sample types; HCCF compared to Protein A eluate and subsequent cation and anion exchange purification. In the 6 sample iTRAQ experiment, 8781 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 819 proteins (including the mAb chains). Across both the 6 and 8 sample experiments 936 proteins were identified. In the 8 sample comparison, 4187 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 219 proteins. We then used the iTRAQ data to enable estimation of the relative change of individual proteins across the purification steps. These data provide the basis for application of iTRAQ for process development based upon knowledge of critical HCPs.

  15. A self-powered, one-step chip for rapid, quantitative and multiplexed detection of proteins from pinpricks of whole blood†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Ahmad, Habib; Ma, Chao; Shi, Qihui; Vermesh, Ophir; Vermesh, Udi; Heath, James

    2012-01-01

    We describe an automated, self-powered chip based on lateral flow immunoassay for rapid, quantitative, and multiplex protein detection from pinpricks of whole blood. The device incorporates on-chip purification of blood plasma by employing inertial forces to focus blood cells away from the assay surface, where plasma proteins are captured and detected on antibody “barcode” arrays. Power is supplied from the capillary action of a piece of adsorbent paper, and sequentially drives, over a 40 minute period, the four steps required to capture serum proteins and then develop a multiplex immunoassay. An 11 protein panel is assayed from whole blood, with high sensitivity and high reproducibility. This inexpensive, self-contained, and easy to operate chip provides a useful platform for point-of-care diagnoses, particularly in resource-limited settings. PMID:20924527

  16. Quantitative Profiling of Protein Tyrosine Kinases in Human Cancer Cell Lines by Multiplexed Parallel Reaction Monitoring Assays*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Lin, De; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Li, Ming; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, cell division, and cell differentiation. Dysregulation of PTK-activated pathways, often by receptor overexpression, gene amplification, or genetic mutation, is a causal factor underlying numerous cancers. In this study, we have developed a parallel reaction monitoring-based assay for quantitative profiling of 83 PTKs. The assay detects 308 proteotypic peptides from 54 receptor tyrosine kinases and 29 nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in a single run. Quantitative comparisons were based on the labeled reference peptide method. We implemented the assay in four cell models: 1) a comparison of proliferating versus epidermal growth factor-stimulated A431 cells, 2) a comparison of SW480Null (mutant APC) and SW480APC (APC restored) colon tumor cell lines, and 3) a comparison of 10 colorectal cancer cell lines with different genomic abnormalities, and 4) lung cancer cell lines with either susceptibility (11–18) or acquired resistance (11–18R) to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. We observed distinct PTK expression changes that were induced by stimuli, genomic features or drug resistance, which were consistent with previous reports. However, most of the measured expression differences were novel observations. For example, acquired resistance to erlotinib in the 11–18 cell model was associated not only with previously reported up-regulation of MET, but also with up-regulation of FLK2 and down-regulation of LYN and PTK7. Immunoblot analyses and shotgun proteomics data were highly consistent with parallel reaction monitoring data. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring assays provide a targeted, systems-level profiling approach to evaluate cancer-related proteotypes and adaptations. Data are available through Proteome eXchange Accession PXD002706. PMID:26631510

  17. Total protein quantitation using the bicinchoninic acid assay and gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Jason G; Munson, Matthew S; Ross, David

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the ability of gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis (GEMBE) with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4) D) to assay total protein concentration using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) reaction. We chose this format because GEMBE-C(4) D behaves as a concentration dependent detection system, unlike optical methods that also rely on pathlength (due to Beer's law). This system tolerates proteins well compared with other capillary electrophoretic methods, allowing the capillary to be reused without coatings or additional hydroxide wash steps. The typical reaction protocol was modified by reducing the pH slightly from 11.25 to 9.4, which enabled elimination of tartrate from the reagents. We estimated that copper (I) could be detected at approximately 3.0 μmol/L, which agrees with similar GEMBE and CZE systems utilizing C(4) D. Under conditions similar to the BCA "micro method" assay, we determined the LOD for three common proteins (insulin, BSA, and bovine gamma globulin) and found that they agree well with the existing spectroscopic detection methods. Further, we investigated how long reaction times impact the LOD and found that the conversion was proportional to log(time). This indicated that little sensitivity is gained by extending the reaction past 1 h. Hence, GEMBE provides an alternative platform for total protein assays while maintaining the excellent sensitivity of the optical-based methods.

  18. Comparison of radial immunodiffusion and laser nephelometry for quantitating some serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R L

    1980-02-01

    After quantitating immunoglobulins G, A, and M and complement C3c and C4 in serum by using a laser nephelometer coupled with a data processor, I compared these results with values obtained by an early-readout radial immunodiffusion method. Day-to-day precision was better for nephelometry than for radial immunodiffusion for all proteins analyzed. The average coefficient of variation was 6.0% for nephelometry and 9.9% for radial immunodiffusion. Comparison of these methods gave ranked correlation coefficients of 0.945, 0.981, 0.932, 0.803, and 0.792 for IgG, IgA, IgM, C3c, and C4, respectively. Nephelometry gave significantly higher values than radial immunodiffusion for IgG, IgA, IgM, and C3c, and significantly lower values for C4 (p less than 0.001). Part of this bias was found to be due to the equation programmed in the data processor for calculating the standard curves. Within 95% limits, nephelometry gave higher normal ranges than radial immunodiffusion for IgG, IgA, and IgM. Other possible factors that can produce this bias are discussed.

  19. Next generation protein based Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E; Khan, M Nadeem; Xu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    All currently available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) vaccines have limitations due to their capsular serotype composition. Both the 23-valent Spn polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and 7, 10, or 13-valent Spn conjugate vaccines (PCV-7, 10, -13) are serotype-based vaccines and therefore they elicit only serotype-specific immunity. Emergence of replacement Spn strains expressing other serotypes has consistently occurred following introduction of capsular serotype based Spn vaccines. Furthermore, capsular polysaccharide vaccines are less effective in protection against non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM) than against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). These shortcomings of capsular polysaccharide-based Spn vaccines have created high interest in development of non-serotype specific protein-based vaccines that could be effective in preventing both IPD and non-IPD infections. This review discusses the progress to date on development of Spn protein vaccine candidates that are highly conserved by all Spn strains, are highly conserved, exhibit maximal antigenicity and minimal reactogenicity to replace or complement the current capsule-based vaccines. Key to development of a protein based Spn vaccine is an understanding of Spn pathogenesis. Based on pathogenesis, a protein-based Spn vaccine should include one or more ingredients that reduce NP colonization below a pathogenic inoculum. Elimination of all Spn colonization may not be achievable or even advisable. The level of expression of a target protein antigen during pathogenesis is another key to the success of protein based vaccines.. As with virtually all currently licensed vaccines, production of a serum antibody response in response to protein based vaccines is anticipated to provide protection from Spn infections. A significant advantage that protein vaccine formulations can offer over capsule based vaccination is their potential benefits associated with natural priming and boosting to all strains of

  20. Next generation protein based Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pichichero, Michael E; Khan, M Nadeem; Xu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    All currently available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) vaccines have limitations due to their capsular serotype composition. Both the 23-valent Spn polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) and 7, 10, or 13-valent Spn conjugate vaccines (PCV-7, 10, -13) are serotype-based vaccines and therefore they elicit only serotype-specific immunity. Emergence of replacement Spn strains expressing other serotypes has consistently occurred following introduction of capsular serotype based Spn vaccines. Furthermore, capsular polysaccharide vaccines are less effective in protection against non-bacteremic pneumonia and acute otitis media (AOM) than against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). These shortcomings of capsular polysaccharide-based Spn vaccines have created high interest in development of non-serotype specific protein-based vaccines that could be effective in preventing both IPD and non-IPD infections. This review discusses the progress to date on development of Spn protein vaccine candidates that are highly conserved by all Spn strains, are highly conserved, exhibit maximal antigenicity and minimal reactogenicity to replace or complement the current capsule-based vaccines. Key to development of a protein based Spn vaccine is an understanding of Spn pathogenesis. Based on pathogenesis, a protein-based Spn vaccine should include one or more ingredients that reduce NP colonization below a pathogenic inoculum. Elimination of all Spn colonization may not be achievable or even advisable. The level of expression of a target protein antigen during pathogenesis is another key to the success of protein based vaccines.. As with virtually all currently licensed vaccines, production of a serum antibody response in response to protein based vaccines is anticipated to provide protection from Spn infections. A significant advantage that protein vaccine formulations can offer over capsule based vaccination is their potential benefits associated with natural priming and boosting to all strains of

  1. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Potentiated and Dormant Antler Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhen; Ba, Hengxing; Zhang, Wei; Coates, Dawn; Li, Chunyi

    2016-01-01

    As the only known organ that can completely regenerate in mammals, deer antler is of real significance in the field of regenerative medicine. Recent studies have shown that the regenerative capacity of the antlers comes from the pedicle periosteum and the cells resident in the periosteum possess the attributes of stem cells. Currently, the molecular mechanism of antler regeneration remains unclear. In the present study, we compared the potentiated and dormant antler stem cells using isobaric tags for the relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling of the peptides, coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare the proteome profiles. Proteins were identified by searching against the NCBI nr database and our own Cervine transcriptome database, and bioinformatics analysis was conducted to identify the differentially expressed proteins. Based on this searching strategy, we identified 169 differentially expressed proteins in total, consisting of 70 up- and 99 down-regulated in the potentiated vs. dormant antler stem cells. Reliability of the iTRAQ was confirmed via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to measure the expression of selected genes. We identified transduction pathways through the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database, such as HIF-1 and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways that play important roles in regulating the regeneration of antlers. In summary, the initiation stage of antler regeneration, a process from dormant to potentiated states in antler stem cells, is regulated by multiple proteins and complicated signal networks. PMID:27792145

  2. Quantitative immunoelectrophoretic analysis of the plasma proteins in the sol phase of sputum from patients with chronic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Ryley, H. C.; Brogan, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the plasma proteins in the sol phase of sputum was carried out using quantitative cross immunoelectrophoresis. The average concentrations of nine plasma proteins were estimated in the sol phase of sputum specimens from 30 patients with chronic bronchitis and the values were compared with the concentrations of these proteins in saliva and serum specimens from the same group of patients. The results showed that alpha1 antichymotrypsin and IgA concentrations were higher in the sol phase of sputum than would be expected if their presence were due entirely to passive transudation. Images PMID:4128930

  3. Multiparametric high-resolution imaging of native proteins by force-distance curve-based AFM.

    PubMed

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Martinez-Martin, David; Mulvihill, Estefania; Wegmann, Susanne; Muller, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    A current challenge in the life sciences is to understand how the properties of individual molecular machines adjust in order to meet the functional requirements of the cell. Recent developments in force-distance (FD) curve-based atomic force microscopy (FD-based AFM) enable researchers to combine sub-nanometer imaging with quantitative mapping of physical, chemical and biological properties. Here we present a protocol to apply FD-based AFM to the multiparametric imaging of native proteins under physiological conditions. We describe procedures for experimental FD-based AFM setup, high-resolution imaging of proteins in the native unperturbed state with simultaneous quantitative mapping of multiple parameters, and data interpretation and analysis. The protocol, which can be completed in 1-3 d, enables researchers to image proteins and protein complexes in the native unperturbed state and to simultaneously map their biophysical and biochemical properties at sub-nanometer resolution.

  4. Graphics processing unit-based quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Jonayat, ASM; Patel, Sanjay; Toussaint, Kimani C., Jr.

    2014-09-01

    We adapt a graphics processing unit (GPU) to dynamic quantitative second-harmonic generation imaging. We demonstrate the temporal advantage of the GPU-based approach by computing the number of frames analyzed per second from SHG image videos showing varying fiber orientations. In comparison to our previously reported CPU-based approach, our GPU-based image analysis results in ˜10× improvement in computational time. This work can be adapted to other quantitative, nonlinear imaging techniques and provides a significant step toward obtaining quantitative information from fast in vivo biological processes.

  5. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  6. Field-based multiplex and quantitative assay platforms for diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa; Dixon, C. Edward; Chipman, Russell; Scherer, Axel; Beshay, Manal; Kempen, Lothar U.; Chandra Sekhar, Jai Ganesh; Yan, Hong; Puccio, Ava; Okonkwo, David; McClain, Stephen; Gilbert, Noah; Vyawahare, Saurabh

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. military has a continued interest in the development of handheld, field-usable sensors and test kits for a variety of diagnostic applications, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI) and infectious diseases. Field-use presents unique challenges for biosensor design, both for the readout unit and for the biological assay platform. We have developed robust biosensor devices that offer ultra-high sensitivity and also meet field-use needs. The systems under development include a multiplexed quantitative lateral flow test strip for TBI diagnostics, a field test kit for the diagnosis of pathogens endemic to the Middle East, and a microfluidic assay platform with a label-free reader for performing complex biological automated assays in the field.

  7. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identified HSC71 as a Novel Serum Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Cai, Yi; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most lethal urologic cancers and about 80% of RCC are of the clear-cell type (ccRCC). However, there are no serum biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis of RCC. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis on serum samples from ccRCC patients and control group by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Overall, 16 proteins were significantly upregulated (ratio > 1.5) and 14 proteins were significantly downregulated (ratio < 0.67) in early-stage ccRCC compared to control group. HSC71 was selected and subsequently validated by Western blot in six independent sets of patients. ELISA subsequently confirmed HSC71 as a potential serum biomarker for distinguishing RCC from benign urologic disease with an operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76~0.96), achieving sensitivity of 87% (95% CI 69%~96%) at a specificity of 80% (95% CI 61~92%) with a threshold of 15 ng/mL. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis led to identification of serum HSC71 as a novel serum biomarker of RCC, particularly useful in early diagnosis of ccRCC. PMID:26425554

  8. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    PubMed

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent.

  9. Quantitative Atlas of Cytochrome P450, UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase, and Transporter Proteins in Jejunum of Morbidly Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Eisuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Declèves, Xavier; Uchida, Yasuo; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-08-01

    Protein expression levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in human jejunal tissues excised from morbidly obese subjects during gastric bypass surgery were evaluated using quantitative targeted absolute proteomics. Protein expression levels of 15 cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, 10 UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes, and NADPH-P450 reductase (P450R) in microsomal fractions from 28 subjects and 49 transporters in plasma membrane fractions from 24 of the same subjects were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Based on average values, UGT1A1, UGT2B15, UGT2B17, SGLT1, and GLUT2 exhibited high expression levels (over 10 fmol/μg protein), though UGT2B15 expression was detected at a high level in only one subject. CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, UGT1A6, P450R, ABCG2, GLUT5, PEPT1, MCT1, 4F2 cell-surface antigen heavy chain (4F2hc), LAT2, OSTα, and OSTβ showed intermediate levels (1-10 fmol/μg protein), and CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C18, CYP2C19, CYP2J2, CYP3A7, CYP4A11, CYP51A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A8, UGT2B4, ABCC1, ABCC4, ABCC5, ABCC6, ABCG8, TAUT, OATP2A1, OATP2B1, OATP3A1, OATP4A1, OCTN1, CNT2, PCFT, MCT4, GLUT4, and SLC22A18 showed low levels (less than 1 fmol/μg protein). The greatest interindividual difference (364-fold) was detected for UGT2B17. However, differences in expression levels of other quantified UGTs (except UGT2B15 and UGT2B17), CYPs (except CYP1A1 and CYP3A5), and P450R, and all quantified transporters, were within 10-fold. Expression levels of CYP1A2 and GLUT4 were significantly correlated with body-mass index. The levels of 4F2hc showed significant gender differences. Smokers showed increased levels of UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. These findings provide a basis for understanding the changes in molecular mechanisms of jejunal metabolism and transport, as well as their interindividual variability, in morbidly obese patients.

  10. Neurofilament protein defines regional patterns of cortical organization in the macaque monkey visual system: a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Visual function in monkeys is subserved at the cortical level by a large number of areas defined by their specific physiological properties and connectivity patterns. For most of these cortical fields, a precise index of their degree of anatomical specialization has not yet been defined, although many regional patterns have been described using Nissl or myelin stains. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate the regional characteristics, and to varying degrees boundaries, of several visual cortical areas in the macaque monkey using an antibody to neurofilament protein (SMI32). This antibody labels a subset of pyramidal neurons with highly specific regional and laminar distribution patterns in the cerebral cortex. Based on the staining patterns and regional quantitative analysis, as many as 28 cortical fields were reliably identified. Each field had a homogeneous distribution of labeled neurons, except area V1, where increases in layer IVB cell and in Meynert cell counts paralleled the increase in the degree of eccentricity in the visual field representation. Within the occipitotemporal pathway, areas V3 and V4 and fields in the inferior temporal cortex were characterized by a distinct population of neurofilament-rich neurons in layers II-IIIa, whereas areas located in the parietal cortex and part of the occipitoparietal pathway had a consistent population of large labeled neurons in layer Va. The mediotemporal areas MT and MST displayed a distinct population of densely labeled neurons in layer VI. Quantitative analysis of the laminar distribution of the labeled neurons demonstrated that the visual cortical areas could be grouped in four hierarchical levels based on the ratio of neuron counts between infragranular and supragranular layers, with the first (areas V1, V2, V3, and V3A) and third (temporal and parietal regions) levels characterized by low ratios and the second (areas MT, MST, and V4) and fourth (frontal regions) levels characterized by

  11. Simultaneous extraction of nucleic acids and proteins from tissue specimens by ultracentrifugation: A protocol using the high-salt protein fraction for quantitative proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Grzendowski, Michael; Riemenschneider, Markus J; Hawranke, Eva; Stefanski, Anja; Meyer, Helmut E; Reifenberger, Guido; Stühler, Kai

    2009-11-01

    Comprehensive molecular profiling of human tumor tissue specimens at the DNA, mRNA and protein level is often obstructed by a limited amount of available material. Homogenization of frozen tissue samples in guanidine isothiocyanate followed by ultracentrifugation over cesium chloride allows the simultaneous extraction of high-molecular weight DNA and RNA. Here, we present a protocol for quantitative proteome analysis using the high-salt protein fraction obtained as supernatant after ultracentrifugation for nucleic acid extraction. We applied this method to extracts from primary human brain tumors and demonstrate its successful application for protein expression profiling in these tumors using 2-D DIGE, MS and Western blotting.

  12. Quantitation of midazolam in human plasma by automated chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kapron, James T; Pace, Ellen; Van Pelt, Colleen K; Henion, Jack

    2003-01-01

    An automated chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) platform was used to demonstrate reproducible quantitation of drug molecules from biological matrices. Three sample preparation strategies were explored including protein precipitation of plasma with acetonitrile, de-salting of the plasma, and a combination of protein precipitation with subsequent de-salting of the dried and reconstituted extract. The best results were obtained when fortified human plasma samples containing midazolam were precipitated with acetonitrile containing alprazolam as the internal standard (IS). The supernatant was concentrated to dryness, reconstituted in aqueous acid, and de-salted by automated reversed-phase solid-phase extraction (SPE) prior to infusion nanoESI-MS/MS. Analyses employed a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Each sample was infused for approximately 10 s and the resulting ion current profiles were integrated. Area ratios were used for regression analysis of standard samples (1.5-500 ng/mL). Quality control samples (3, 250, and 400 ng/mL) in five replicates from three different analysis days demonstrated intra-assay precision (< or =16%), inter-assay precision (< or =5%), and overall accuracy (+/-9% deviation). Infusion reproducibility of the assay was established by analyzing extracts after storage for 24 h at ambient temperature. Control plasma samples from six different sources probed the potential utility of this technique for the analysis of clinical samples. At the lower limit of quantitation (LLQ), variability and mean overall accuracy were < or =13% CV and +/-3% deviation, respectively, while at the upper limit of quantitation (ULQ) variability and mean overall accuracy were < or =9% CV and +/-9% deviation, respectively. Inter-chip variability was established by determining standard sample extracts across five different chips (< or =12% CV). Throughput for the assay was 55 s per sample

  13. Resilin: protein-based elastomeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Su, Renay S-C; Kim, Yeji; Liu, Julie C

    2014-04-01

    Resilin is an elastomeric protein found in insect cuticles and is remarkable for its high strain, low stiffness, and high resilience. Since the first resilin sequence was identified in Drosophilia melanogaster (fruit fly), researchers have utilized molecular cloning techniques to construct resilin-based proteins for a number of different applications. In addition to exhibiting the superior mechanical properties of resilin, resilin-based proteins are autofluorescent, display self-assembly properties, and undergo phase transitions in response to temperature. These properties have potential application in designing biosensors or environmentally responsive materials for use in tissue engineering or drug delivery. Furthermore, the capability of resilin-based biomaterials has been expanded by designing proteins that include both resilin-based sequences and bioactive domains such as cell-adhesion or matrix metalloproteinase sequences. These new materials maintain the superior mechanical and physical properties of resilin and also have the added benefit of controlling cell response. Because the mechanical and biological properties can be tuned through protein engineering, a wide range of properties can be achieved for tissue engineering applications including muscles, vocal folds, cardiovascular tissues, and cartilage.

  14. Integrated quantitative analysis of nitrogen stress response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using metabolite and protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Wase, Nishikant; Black, Paul N; Stanley, Bruce A; DiRusso, Concetta C

    2014-03-07

    Nitrogen starvation induces a global stress response in microalgae that results in the accumulation of lipids as a potential source of biofuel. Using GC-MS-based metabolite and iTRAQ-labeled protein profiling, we examined and correlated the metabolic and proteomic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under nitrogen stress. Key amino acids and metabolites involved in nitrogen sparing pathways, methyl group transfer reactions, and energy production were decreased in abundance, whereas certain fatty acids, citric acid, methionine, citramalic acid, triethanolamine, nicotianamine, trehalose, and sorbitol were increased in abundance. Proteins involved in nitrogen assimilation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, starch, and lipid metabolism were elevated compared with nonstressed cultures. In contrast, the enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, one carbon metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, the Calvin cycle, photosynthetic and light harvesting complex, and ribosomes were reduced. A noteworthy observation was that citrate accumulated during nitrogen stress coordinate with alterations in the enzymes that produce or utilize this metabolite, demonstrating the value of comparing protein and metabolite profiles to understand complex patterns of metabolic flow. Thus, the current study provides unique insight into the global metabolic adjustments leading to lipid storage during N starvation for application toward advanced biofuel production technologies.

  15. Robust quantitation of basic-protein higher-order aggregates using size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gervais, David; Downer, Andrew; King, Darryl; Kanda, Patrick; Foote, Nicholas; Smith, Stuart

    2017-05-30

    Detection of higher-order aggregates (HOA) using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was found to be variable for a basic protein, using exposed-silanol or diol-silica-based SEC columns. Preparations of the tetrameric biopharmaceutical enzyme Erwinia chrysanthemil-asparaginase (ErA), which has an isoelectric point of 8.6, were analysed using a diol-silica SEC column. Although the proportions of ErA main peak and octamer species were unaffected, HOA recovery and detection were extremely variable and had poor agreement with an orthogonal measurement technique, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC). The observation that only HOA was selectively affected by non-specific silanol interactions was unexpected, so alternatives were sought. Coated-silica SEC columns improved the resolution and reproducibility of HOA detection for this alkaline-pI protein, and improved the agreement of HOA with the AUC method. Basic proteins, such as ErA, should be thoroughly evaluated in SEC method development, to ensure that resolution of larger aggregate species is not compromised.

  16. DISQOVER the Landcover - R based tools for quantitative vegetation reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Couwenberg, John; Kuparinen, Anna; Liebscher, Volkmar

    2016-04-01

    Quantitative methods have gained increasing attention in the field of vegetation reconstruction over the past decade. The DISQOVER package implements key tools in the R programming environment for statistical computing. This implementation has three main goals: 1) Provide a user-friendly, transparent, and open implementation of the methods 2) Provide full flexibility in all parameters (including the underlying pollen dispersal model) 3) Provide a sandbox for testing the sensitivity of the methods. We illustrate the possibilities of the package with tests of the REVEALS model and of the extended downscaling approach (EDA). REVEALS (Sugita 2007) is designed to translate pollen data from large lakes into regional vegetation composition. We applied REVEALSinR on pollen data from Lake Tiefer See (NE-Germany) and validated the results with historic landcover data. The results clearly show that REVEALS is sensitive to the underlying pollen dispersal model; REVEALS performs best when applied with the state of the art Lagrangian stochastic dispersal model. REVEALS applications with the conventional Gauss model can produce realistic results, but only if unrealistic pollen productivity estimates are used. The EDA (Theuerkauf et al. 2014) employs pollen data from many sites across a landscape to explore whether species distributions in the past were related to know stable patterns in the landscape, e.g. the distribution of soil types. The approach had so far only been implemented in simple settings with few taxa. Tests with EDAinR show that it produces sharp results in complex settings with many taxa as well. The DISQOVER package is open source software, available from disqover.uni-greifswald.de. This website can be used as a platform to discuss and improve quantitative methods in vegetation reconstruction. To introduce the tool we plan a short course in autumn of this year. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution

  17. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of avian eggshell matrix and uterine fluid proteins associated with eggshell mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Eggshell strength is a crucial economic trait for table egg production. During the process of eggshell formation, uncalcified eggs are bathed in uterine fluid that plays regulatory roles in eggshell calcification. In this study, a label-free MS-based protein quantification technology was used to detect differences in protein abundance between eggshell matrix from strong and weak eggs (shell matrix protein from strong eggshells and shell matrix protein from weak eggshells) and between the corresponding uterine fluids bathing strong and weak eggs (uterine fluid bathing strong eggs and uterine fluid bathing weak eggs) in a chicken population. Here, we reported the first global proteomic analysis of uterine fluid. A total of 577 and 466 proteins were identified in uterine fluid and eggshell matrix, respectively. Of 447 identified proteins in uterine fluid bathing strong eggs, up to 357 (80%) proteins were in common with proteins in uterine fluid bathing weak eggs. Similarly, up to 83% (328/396) of the proteins in shell matrix protein from strong eggshells were in common with the proteins in shell matrix protein from weak eggshells. The large amount of common proteins indicated that the difference in protein abundance should play essential roles in influencing eggshell strength. Ultimately, 15 proteins mainly relating to eggshell matrix specific proteins, calcium binding and transportation, protein folding and sorting, bone development or diseases, and thyroid hormone activity were considered to have closer association with the formation of strong eggshell.

  18. Protein patterning on silicon-based surface using background hydrophobic thin film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2003-04-01

    A new and convenient protein patterning method on silicon-based surface was developed for protein array by spin coating of hydrophobic thin film (CYTOP). Photolithographic lift-off process was used to display two-dimensional patterns of spatially hydrophilic region. The background hydrophobic thin film was used to suppress nonspecific protein binding, and the hydrophilic target protein binding region was chemically modified to introduce aldehyde group after removal of the photoresist layer. The difference in surface energy between the hydrophilic pattern and background hydrophobic film would induce easier covalent binding of proteins onto defined hydrophilic areas having physical and chemical constraints. Below 1 microg/ml of total protein concentration, the CYTOP hydrophobic film effectively suppressed nonspecific binding of the protein. During the process of protein patterning, inherent property of the hydrophobic thin film was not changed judging from static and dynamic contact angle survey. Quantitative analysis of the protein binding was demonstrated by streptavidin-biotin system.

  19. A quantitative risk-based model for reasoning over critical system properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    This position paper suggests the use of a quantitative risk-based model to help support reeasoning and decision making that spans many of the critical properties such as security, safety, survivability, fault tolerance, and real-time.

  20. Evolution-Based Functional Decomposition of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Rivoire, Olivier; Reynolds, Kimberly A; Ranganathan, Rama

    2016-06-01

    The essential biological properties of proteins-folding, biochemical activities, and the capacity to adapt-arise from the global pattern of interactions between amino acid residues. The statistical coupling analysis (SCA) is an approach to defining this pattern that involves the study of amino acid coevolution in an ensemble of sequences comprising a protein family. This approach indicates a functional architecture within proteins in which the basic units are coupled networks of amino acids termed sectors. This evolution-based decomposition has potential for new understandings of the structural basis for protein function. To facilitate its usage, we present here the principles and practice of the SCA and introduce new methods for sector analysis in a python-based software package (pySCA). We show that the pattern of amino acid interactions within sectors is linked to the divergence of functional lineages in a multiple sequence alignment-a model for how sector properties might be differentially tuned in members of a protein family. This work provides new tools for studying proteins and for generally testing the concept of sectors as the principal units of function and adaptive variation.

  1. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  2. Quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Cramer, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    Quantitation is an inherent requirement in comparative proteomics and there is no exception to this for plant proteomics. Quantitative proteomics has high demands on the experimental workflow, requiring a thorough design and often a complex multi-step structure. It has to include sufficient numbers of biological and technical replicates and methods that are able to facilitate a quantitative signal read-out. Quantitative plant proteomics in particular poses many additional challenges but because of the nature of plants it also offers some potential advantages. In general, analysis of plants has been less prominent in proteomics. Low protein concentration, difficulties in protein extraction, genome multiploidy, high Rubisco abundance in green tissue, and an absence of well-annotated and completed genome sequences are some of the main challenges in plant proteomics. However, the latter is now changing with several genomes emerging for model plants and crops such as potato, tomato, soybean, rice, maize and barley. This review discusses the current status in quantitative plant proteomics (MS-based and non-MS-based) and its challenges and potentials. Both relative and absolute quantitation methods in plant proteomics from DIGE to MS-based analysis after isotope labeling and label-free quantitation are described and illustrated by published studies. In particular, we describe plant-specific quantitative methods such as metabolic labeling methods that can take full advantage of plant metabolism and culture practices, and discuss other potential advantages and challenges that may arise from the unique properties of plants.

  3. Bovine serum albumin detection and quantitation based on capacitance measurements of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Hao; Lee, Mon-Juan; Lee, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biosensing is generally limited by the lack of accurate quantitative strategies. This study exploits the unique electric capacitance properties of LCs to establish quantitative assay methods for bovine serum albumin (BSA) biomolecules. By measuring the voltage-dependent electric capacitance of LCs under an alternating-current field with increasing amplitude, positive correlations were derived between the BSA concentration and the electric capacitance parameters of LCs. This study demonstrates that quantitative analysis can be achieved in LC-based biosensing through electric capacitance measurements extensively employed in LCD research and development.

  4. Gold-coated graphene field-effect transistors for quantitative analysis of protein-antibody interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexey; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Flynn, Erin M.; Joiner, Corey A.; Taylor, Robert C.; Vogel, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on large-area graphene and other 2D materials can potentially be used as low-cost and flexible potentiometric biological sensors. However, there have been few attempts to use these devices for quantifying molecular interactions and to compare their performance to established sensor technology. Here, gold-coated graphene FETs are used to measure the binding affinity of a specific protein-antibody interaction. Having a gold surface gives access to well-known thiol chemistry for the self-assembly of linker molecules. The results are compared with potentiometric silicon-based extended-gate sensors and a surface plasmon resonance system. The estimated dissociation constants are in excellent agreement for all sensor types as long as the active surfaces are the same (gold). The role of the graphene transducer is to simply amplify surface potential changes caused by adsorption of molecules on the gold surface.

  5. Network-Based Protein Biomarker Discovery Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minhyung

    2016-01-01

    The advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies have enabled the generation of global proteome data from tissue or body fluid samples collected from a broad spectrum of human diseases. Comparative proteomic analysis of global proteome data identifies and prioritizes the proteins showing altered abundances, called differentially expressed proteins (DEPs), in disease samples, compared to control samples. Protein biomarker candidates that can serve as indicators of disease states are then selected as key molecules among these proteins. Recently, it has been addressed that cellular pathways can provide better indications of disease states than individual molecules and also network analysis of the DEPs enables effective identification of cellular pathways altered in disease conditions and key molecules representing the altered cellular pathways. Accordingly, a number of network-based approaches to identify disease-related pathways and representative molecules of such pathways have been developed. In this review, we summarize analytical platforms for network-based protein biomarker discovery and key components in the platforms. PMID:27103885

  6. ICan: an optimized ion-current-based quantification procedure with enhanced quantitative accuracy and sensitivity in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Sheng, Quanhu; Li, Jun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Ming; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rapidly expanding availability of high-resolution mass spectrometry has substantially enhanced the ion-current-based relative quantification techniques. Despite the increasing interest in ion-current-based methods, quantitative sensitivity, accuracy, and false discovery rate remain the major concerns; consequently, comprehensive evaluation and development in these regards are urgently needed. Here we describe an integrated, new procedure for data normalization and protein ratio estimation, termed ICan, for improved ion-current-based analysis of data generated by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). ICan achieved significantly better accuracy and precision, and lower false-positive rate for discovering altered proteins, over current popular pipelines. A spiked-in experiment was used to evaluate the performance of ICan to detect small changes. In this study E. coli extracts were spiked with moderate-abundance proteins from human plasma (MAP, enriched by IgY14-SuperMix procedure) at two different levels to set a small change of 1.5-fold. Forty-five (92%, with an average ratio of 1.71 ± 0.13) of 49 identified MAP protein (i.e., the true positives) and none of the reference proteins (1.0-fold) were determined as significantly altered proteins, with cutoff thresholds of ≥ 1.3-fold change and p ≤ 0.05. This is the first study to evaluate and prove competitive performance of the ion-current-based approach for assigning significance to proteins with small changes. By comparison, other methods showed remarkably inferior performance. ICan can be broadly applicable to reliable and sensitive proteomic survey of multiple biological samples with the use of high-resolution MS. Moreover, many key features evaluated and optimized here such as normalization, protein ratio determination, and statistical analyses are also valuable for data analysis by isotope-labeling methods.

  7. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html.

  8. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals new metabolic pathways of wheat seedling growth under hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Ge, Pei; Hao, Pengchao; Cao, Min; Guo, Guangfang; Lv, Dongwen; Subburaj, Saminathan; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Xing; Xiao, Jitian; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yueming

    2013-10-01

    As an abundant ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In this work, we conducted for the first time an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of wheat seedling growth under different exogenous H2 O2 treatments. The growth of seedlings and roots was significantly restrained by increased H2 O2 concentration stress. Malondialdehyde, soluble sugar, and proline contents as well as peroxidase activity increased with increasing H2 O2 levels. A total of 3,425 proteins were identified by iTRAQ, of which 157 showed differential expression and 44 were newly identified H2 O2 -responsive proteins. H2 O2 -responsive proteins were mainly involved in stress/defense/detoxification, signal transduction, and carbohydrate metabolism. It is clear that up-regulated expression of signal transduction and stress/defence/detoxification-related proteins under H2 O2 stress, such as plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1, fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein, and superoxide dismutase, could contribute to H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. Increased gluconeogenesis (phosphoenol-pyruvate carboxykinase) and decreased pyruvate kinase proteins are potentially related to the higher H2 O2 tolerance of wheat seedlings. A metabolic pathway of wheat seedling growth under H2 O2 stress is presented.

  9. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Ponce, Francisco A; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials.

  10. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Ponce, Francisco A.; Little, Andrew S.; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  11. Monitoring with Trackers Based on Semi-Quantitative Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    1997-01-01

    In three years of NASA-sponsored research preceding this project, we successfully developed a technology for: (1) building qualitative and semi-quantitative models from libraries of model-fragments, (2) simulating these models to predict future behaviors with the guarantee that all possible behaviors are covered, (3) assimilating observations into behaviors, shrinking uncertainty so that incorrect models are eventually refuted and correct models make stronger predictions for the future. In our object-oriented framework, a tracker is an object which embodies the hypothesis that the available observation stream is consistent with a particular behavior of a particular model. The tracker maintains its own status (consistent, superceded, or refuted), and answers questions about its explanation for past observations and its predictions for the future. In the MIMIC approach to monitoring of continuous systems, a number of trackers are active in parallel, representing alternate hypotheses about the behavior of a system. This approach is motivated by the need to avoid 'system accidents' [Perrow, 1985] due to operator fixation on a single hypothesis, as for example at Three Mile Island. As we began to address these issues, we focused on three major research directions that we planned to pursue over a three-year project: (1) tractable qualitative simulation, (2) semiquantitative inference, and (3) tracking set management. Unfortunately, funding limitations made it impossible to continue past year one. Nonetheless, we made major progress in the first two of these areas. Progress in the third area as slower because the graduate student working on that aspect of the project decided to leave school and take a job in industry. I enclosed a set of abstract of selected papers on the work describe below. Several papers that draw on the research supported during this period appeared in print after the grant period ended.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative changes in exoskeletal proteins synthesized throughout the molt cycle of the Bermuda land crab

    SciTech Connect

    Stringfellow, L.A.; Skinner, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    During the premolt period in Crustacea, a single layer of epidermal cells that underlies the exoskeleton is thought to be responsible for the degradation of the old exoskeleton and synthesis of a new one. In order to identify molt-specific proteins and their temporal appearance, they cultured epidermis and associated integumentary tissue from the gill chambers of crab in vitro in the presence of one of three radiolabeled amino acids. Autoradiographs of (/sup 35/S)Met-labeled tissues indicate a low level of synthesis in epidermal cells of intermolt animals; synthesis increases during premolt and stage B of postmolt. Label is also found in the innermost layer of the old exoskeleton while it is being degraded and in new exoskeletal layers during their synthesis. Fluorographs of gels of integumentary proteins show marked quantitative changes in 44 and 56 kD proteins late in premolt. Qualitative changes include synthesis of 46 and 48 kD proteins during late premolt and three proteins (all of approx. 170 kD) detectable only in postmolt. Solubilized gel slices of (/sup 3/H)Leu-labeled proteins indicate maximum synthesis at an earlier premolt stage than seen in Met-labeled proteins. Other proteins of 20, 24, 29, 32, and 96 kD are synthesized in a stage-dependent manner while (/sup 3/H)Tyr labels small proteins that appear only in late premolt.

  13. In vivo quantitative proteomics of somatosensory cortical synapses shows which protein levels are modulated by sensory deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Butko, Margaret T.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Friedman, Beth; Delahunty, Claire; Ebner, Ford; Yates, John R.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal bilateral whisker trimming was used as a model system to test how synaptic proteomes are altered in barrel cortex by sensory deprivation during synaptogenesis. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we quantified more than 7,000 synaptic proteins and identified 89 significantly reduced and 161 significantly elevated proteins in sensory-deprived synapses, 22 of which were validated by immunoblotting. More than 95% of quantified proteins, including abundant synaptic proteins such as PSD-95 and gephyrin, exhibited no significant difference under high- and low-activity rearing conditions, suggesting no tissue-wide changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic density. In contrast, several proteins that promote mature spine morphology and synaptic strength, such as excitatory glutamate receptors and known accessory factors, were reduced significantly in deprived synapses. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the reduction in SynGAP1, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, was restricted largely to layer I of barrel cortex in sensory-deprived rats. In addition, protein-degradation machinery such as proteasome subunits, E2 ligases, and E3 ligases, accumulated significantly in deprived synapses, suggesting targeted synaptic protein degradation under sensory deprivation. Importantly, this screen identified synaptic proteins whose levels were affected by sensory deprivation but whose synaptic roles have not yet been characterized in mammalian neurons. These data demonstrate the feasibility of defining synaptic proteomes under different sensory rearing conditions and could be applied to elucidate further molecular mechanisms of sensory development. PMID:23382246

  14. In vivo quantitative proteomics of somatosensory cortical synapses shows which protein levels are modulated by sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Butko, Margaret T; Savas, Jeffrey N; Friedman, Beth; Delahunty, Claire; Ebner, Ford; Yates, John R; Tsien, Roger Y

    2013-02-19

    Postnatal bilateral whisker trimming was used as a model system to test how synaptic proteomes are altered in barrel cortex by sensory deprivation during synaptogenesis. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we quantified more than 7,000 synaptic proteins and identified 89 significantly reduced and 161 significantly elevated proteins in sensory-deprived synapses, 22 of which were validated by immunoblotting. More than 95% of quantified proteins, including abundant synaptic proteins such as PSD-95 and gephyrin, exhibited no significant difference under high- and low-activity rearing conditions, suggesting no tissue-wide changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic density. In contrast, several proteins that promote mature spine morphology and synaptic strength, such as excitatory glutamate receptors and known accessory factors, were reduced significantly in deprived synapses. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the reduction in SynGAP1, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, was restricted largely to layer I of barrel cortex in sensory-deprived rats. In addition, protein-degradation machinery such as proteasome subunits, E2 ligases, and E3 ligases, accumulated significantly in deprived synapses, suggesting targeted synaptic protein degradation under sensory deprivation. Importantly, this screen identified synaptic proteins whose levels were affected by sensory deprivation but whose synaptic roles have not yet been characterized in mammalian neurons. These data demonstrate the feasibility of defining synaptic proteomes under different sensory rearing conditions and could be applied to elucidate further molecular mechanisms of sensory development.

  15. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals potential virulence factors of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Li, Jingtao; Zhang, Anding; Zhu, Weifeng; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Zhongmin; Yan, Shuxian; Sun, Xiaomei; Chen, Huanchun; Jin, Meilin

    2017-03-08

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a ubiquitous pathogen that has caused considerable economic losses to pig farmers. However, the mechanisms of E. rhusiopathiae pathogenesis remain unclear. To identify new virulence-associated factors, the differentially abundant cell wall-associated proteins (CWPs) between high- and low-virulence strains were investigated through isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) combined with liquid chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In total, 100 CWPs showed significant differences in abundance. Selected differences were verified by western blotting to support the iTRAQ data. Among the differential proteins, the proteins with higher abundance in the high-virulence strain were mostly ABC transporter proteins and adhesion proteins, and the proteins with lower abundance in the high-virulence strain were mainly stress-response proteins. The more abundant proteins in the high-virulence strain may be related to bacterial virulence. The iTRAQ results showed that the abundance of the sugar ABC transporter substrate-binding protein Sbp (No. 5) was higher by 1.73-fold. We further constructed an sbp-deletion mutant. Experiments in animal models showed that the sbp-deletion mutant caused decreased mortality. Together, our data indicated that transporter proteins and adhesion proteins may play important roles in E. rhusiopathiae virulence and confirmed that sbp contributed to the virulence of E. rhusiopathiae.

  16. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J.; Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A.; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  17. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-04

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options.

  18. Development and Validation of a Multiplexed Protein Quantitation Assay for the Determination of Three Recombinant Proteins in Soybean Tissues by Liquid Chromatography with Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hill, Ryan C; Oman, Trent J; Shan, Guomin; Schafer, Barry; Eble, Julie; Chen, Cynthia

    2015-08-26

    Currently, traditional immunochemistry technologies such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are the predominant analytical tool used to measure levels of recombinant proteins expressed in genetically engineered (GE) plants. Recent advances in agricultural biotechnology have created a need to develop methods capable of selectively detecting and quantifying multiple proteins in complex matrices because of increasing numbers of transgenic proteins being coexpressed or "stacked" to achieve tolerance to multiple herbicides or to provide multiple modes of action for insect control. A multiplexing analytical method utilizing liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed and validated to quantify three herbicide-tolerant proteins in soybean tissues: aryloxyalkanoate dioxygenase (AAD-12), 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS), and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT). Results from the validation showed high recovery and precision over multiple analysts and laboratories. Results from this method were comparable to those obtained with ELISA with respect to protein quantitation, and the described method was demonstrated to be suitable for multiplex quantitation of transgenic proteins in GE crops.

  19. Quantitation of TGF-β proteins in mouse tissues shows reciprocal changes in TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal vs neoplastic mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Flanders, Kathleen C; Yang, Yu-An; Herrmann, Michelle; Chen, JinQiu; Mendoza, Nerissa; Mirza, Amer M; Wakefield, Lalage M

    2016-06-21

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate tissue homeostasis, and their expression is perturbed in many diseases. The three isoforms (TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3) have similar bioactivities in vitro but show distinct activities in vivo. Little quantitative information exists for expression of TGF-β isoform proteins in physiology or disease. We developed an optimized method to quantitate protein levels of the three isoforms, using a Luminex® xMAP®-based multianalyte assay following acid-ethanol extraction of tissues. Analysis of multiple tissues and plasma from four strains of adult mice showed that TGF-β1 is the predominant isoform with TGF-β2 being ~10-fold lower. There were no sex-specific differences in isoform expression, but some tissues showed inter-strain variation, particularly for TGF-β2. The only adult tissue expressing appreciable TGF-β3 was the mammary gland, where its levels were comparable to TGF-β1. In situ hybridization showed the luminal epithelium as the major source of all TGF-β isoforms in the normal mammary gland. TGF-β1 protein was 3-8-fold higher in three murine mammary tumor models than in normal mammary gland, while TGF-β3 protein was 2-3-fold lower in tumors than normal tissue, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these isoforms in mammary tumorigenesis.

  20. Quantitation of TGF-β proteins in mouse tissues shows reciprocal changes in TGF-β1 and TGF-β3 in normal vs neoplastic mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Michelle; Chen, JinQiu; Mendoza, Nerissa; Mirza, Amer M.; Wakefield, Lalage M.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) regulate tissue homeostasis, and their expression is perturbed in many diseases. The three isoforms (TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3) have similar bioactivities in vitro but show distinct activities in vivo. Little quantitative information exists for expression of TGF-β isoform proteins in physiology or disease. We developed an optimized method to quantitate protein levels of the three isoforms, using a Luminex® xMAP®-based multianalyte assay following acid-ethanol extraction of tissues. Analysis of multiple tissues and plasma from four strains of adult mice showed that TGF-β1 is the predominant isoform with TGF-β2 being ~10-fold lower. There were no sex-specific differences in isoform expression, but some tissues showed inter-strain variation, particularly for TGF-β2. The only adult tissue expressing appreciable TGF-β3 was the mammary gland, where its levels were comparable to TGF-β1. In situ hybridization showed the luminal epithelium as the major source of all TGF-β isoforms in the normal mammary gland. TGF-β1 protein was 3-8-fold higher in three murine mammary tumor models than in normal mammary gland, while TGF-β3 protein was 2-3-fold lower in tumors than normal tissue, suggesting reciprocal regulation of these isoforms in mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:27203217

  1. Organic Substances Interfere with Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR-Based Virus Detection in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroyuki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-based virus detection from water samples is occasionally hampered by organic substances that are coconcentrated during virus concentration procedures. To characterize these organic substances, samples containing commercially available humic acid, which is known to inhibit RT-PCR, and river water samples were subjected to adsorption-elution-based virus concentration using an electronegative membrane. In this study, the samples before, during, and after the concentration were analyzed in terms of organic properties and virus detection efficiencies. Two out of the three humic acid solutions resulted in RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR) inhibition that caused >3-log10-unit underestimation of spiked poliovirus. Over 60% of the organics contained in the two solutions were recovered in the concentrate, while over 60% of the organics in the uninhibited solution were lost during the concentration process. River water concentrates also caused inhibition of RT-qPCR. Organic concentrations in the river water samples increased by 2.3 to 3.9 times after the virus concentration procedure. The inhibitory samples contained organic fractions in the 10- to 100-kDa size range, which are suspected to be RT-PCR inhibitors. According to excitation-emission matrices, humic acid-like and protein-like fractions were also recovered from river water concentrates, but these fractions did not seem to affect virus detection. Our findings reveal that detailed organic analyses are effective in characterizing inhibitory substances. PMID:25527552

  2. MSQuant, an open source platform for mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Peter; Gouw, Joost W; Olsen, Jesper V; Ong, Shao-En; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Cox, Jürgen; Foster, Leonard J; Heck, Albert J R; Blagoev, Blagoy; Andersen, Jens S; Mann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics critically depends on algorithms for data interpretation. A current bottleneck in the rapid advance of proteomics technology is the closed nature and slow development cycle of vendor-supplied software solutions. We have created an open source software environment, called MSQuant, which allows visualization and validation of peptide identification results directly on the raw mass spectrometric data. MSQuant iteratively recalibrates MS data thereby significantly increasing mass accuracy leading to fewer false positive peptide identifications. Algorithms to increase data quality include an MS(3) score for peptide identification and a post-translational modification (PTM) score that determines the probability that a modification such as phosphorylation is placed at a specific residue in an identified peptide. MSQuant supports relative protein quantitation based on precursor ion intensities, including element labels (e.g., (15)N), residue labels (e.g., SILAC and ICAT), termini labels (e.g., (18)O), functional group labels (e.g., mTRAQ), and label-free ion intensity approaches. MSQuant is available, including an installer and supporting scripts, at http://msquant.sourceforge.net .

  3. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  4. Proteome-wide measurement of non-canonical bacterial mistranslation by quantitative mass spectrometry of protein modifications

    PubMed Central

    Cvetesic, Nevena; Semanjski, Maja; Soufi, Boumediene; Krug, Karsten; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita; Macek, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The genetic code is virtually universal in biology and was likely established before the advent of cellular life. The extent to which mistranslation occurs is poorly understood and presents a fundamental question in basic research and production of recombinant proteins. Here we used shotgun proteomics combined with unbiased protein modification analysis to quantitatively analyze in vivo mistranslation in an E. coli strain with a defect in the editing mechanism of leucyl-tRNA synthetase. We detected the misincorporation of a non-proteinogenic amino acid norvaline on 10% of all measured leucine residues under microaerobic conditions and revealed preferential deployment of a tRNALeu(CAG) isoacceptor during norvaline misincorporation. The strain with the norvalylated proteome demonstrated a substantial reduction in cell fitness under both prolonged aerobic and microaerobic cultivation. Unlike norvaline, isoleucine did not substitute for leucine even under harsh error-prone conditions. Our study introduces shotgun proteomics as a powerful tool in quantitative analysis of mistranslation. PMID:27377007

  5. Relative quantitation of protein nitration by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry using isotope-coded dimethyl labeling and chemoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Prokai, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Protein nitration has been recognized as an important biomarker for nitroxidative stress associated with various diseases. While identification of protein targets for nitration is important, its quantitative profiling also is necessary to understand the biological impact of this low-abundance posttranslational modification. We have previously reported an efficient and straightforward enrichment method for nitropeptides to reduce sample complexity and permit unambiguous site-specific identifications by LC–MS analyses. This approach relies on two chemical derivatization steps: specifically reductive methylation of aliphatic amines and, then, conversion of nitrotyrosines to the corresponding aminotyrosines before their selective capture by a solid-phase reagent we introduced previously. Hence, the method inherently offers the opportunity for relative quantitation of nitropeptides by using isotopic variants of formaldehyde for reductive methylation. This simple method was tested via LC–MS analyses of differently N-methylated nitropeptides and nitroubiquitin as a model nitroprotein enriched from human serum albumin digest and from human plasma, respectively. PMID:22285050

  6. S-linked protein homocysteinylation: identifying targets based on structural, physicochemical and protein-protein interactions of homocysteinylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Silla, Yumnam; Sundaramoorthy, Elayanambi; Talwar, Puneet; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2013-05-01

    An elevated level of homocysteine, a thiol-containing amino acid is associated with a wide spectrum of disease conditions. A majority (>80 %) of the circulating homocysteine exist in protein-bound form. Homocysteine can bind to free cysteine residues in the protein or could cleave accessible cysteine disulfide bonds via thiol disulfide exchange reaction. Binding of homocysteine to proteins could potentially alter the structure and/or function of the protein. To date only 21 proteins have been experimentally shown to bind homocysteine. In this study we attempted to identify other proteins that could potentially bind to homocysteine based on the criteria that such proteins will have significant 3D structural homology with the proteins that have been experimentally validated and have solvent accessible cysteine residues either with high dihedral strain energy (for cysteine-cysteine disulfide bonds) or low pKa (for free cysteine residues). This analysis led us to the identification of 78 such proteins of which 68 proteins had 154 solvent accessible disulfide cysteine pairs with high dihedral strain energy and 10 proteins had free cysteine residues with low pKa that could potentially bind to homocysteine. Further, protein-protein interaction network was built to identify the interacting partners of these putative homocysteine binding proteins. We found that the 21 experimentally validated proteins had 174 interacting partners while the 78 proteins identified in our analysis had 445 first interacting partners. These proteins are mainly involved in biological activities such as complement and coagulation pathway, focal adhesion, ECM-receptor, ErbB signalling and cancer pathways, etc. paralleling the disease-specific attributes associated with hyperhomocysteinemia.

  7. Quantitative Intensity-Based FRET Approaches—A Comparative Snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Zeug, André; Woehler, Andrew; Neher, Erwin; Ponimaskin, Evgeni G.

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become an important tool for analyzing different aspects of interactions among biological macromolecules in their native environments. FRET analysis has also been successfully applied to study the spatiotemporal regulation of various cellular processes using genetically encoded FRET-based biosensors. A variety of procedures have been described for measuring FRET efficiency or the relative abundance of donor-acceptor complexes, based on analysis of the donor fluorescence lifetime or the spectrally resolved fluorescence intensity. The latter methods are preferable if one wants to not only quantify the apparent FRET efficiencies but also calculate donor-acceptor stoichiometry and observe fast dynamic changes in the interactions among donor and acceptor molecules in live cells. This review focuses on a comparison of the available intensity-based approaches used to measure FRET. We discuss their strengths and weaknesses in terms of FRET quantification, and provide several examples of biological applications. PMID:23199910

  8. Quantitation of fluorescence energy transfer between cell surface proteins via fluorescence donor photobleaching kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R M; Arnette, J K; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1994-01-01

    We describe practical aspects of photobleaching fluorescence energy transfer measurements on individual living cells. The method introduced by T. M. Jovin and co-workers (see, most recently, Kubitscheck et al. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:110) is based on the reduced rate of irreversible photobleaching of donor fluorophores when acceptor fluorophores are present. Measuring differences in donor photobleaching rates on cells labeled with donor only (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated proteins) and with both donor and acceptor (tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated proteins) allows calculation of the fluorescence energy transfer efficiency. We assess possible methods of data analysis in light of the underlying processes of photobleaching and energy transfer and suggest optimum strategies for this purpose. Single murine B lymphocytes binding various ratios of donor and acceptor conjugates of tetravalent concanavalin A (Con A) and divalent succinyl Con A were examined for interlectin energy transfer by these methods. For Con A, a maximum transfer efficiency of 0.49 +/- 0.02 was observed. Under similar conditions flow cytometric measurements of donor quenching yielded a value of 0.54 +/- 0.03. For succinyl Con A, the maximum transfer efficiency was 0.36. To provide concrete examples of quantities arising in such energy transfer determinations, we present examples of individual cell data and kinetic analyses, population rate constant distributions, and error estimates for the various quantities involved. PMID:7948701

  9. iTRAQ-based quantitative subcellular proteomic analysis of Avibirnavirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanting; Hu, Boli; Fan, Chengfei; Jia, Lu; Zhang, Yina; Du, Aifang; Zheng, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Jiyong

    2015-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) enters the host cells via endocytic pathway to achieve viral replication in the cytoplasm. Here, we performed LC-MS/MS coupled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification labeling of differentially abundant proteins of IBDV-infected cells using a subcellular fractionation strategy. We show that the viral infection regulates the abundance and/or subcellular localization of 3211 proteins during early infection. In total, 23 cellular proteins in the cytoplasmic proteome and 34 in the nuclear proteome were significantly altered after virus infection. These differentially abundant proteins are involved in such biological processes as immune response, signal transduction, RNA processing, macromolecular biosynthesis, energy metabolism, virus binding, and cellular apoptosis. Moreover, transcriptional profiles of the 25 genes corresponding to the identified proteins were analyzed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis clustered the differentially abundant proteins primarily into the mTOR pathway, PI3K/Akt pathway, and interferon-β signaling cascades. Confocal microscopy showed colocalization of the viral protein VP3 with host proteins heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1, nuclear factor 45, apoptosis inhibitor 5, nuclear protein localization protein 4 and DEAD-box RNA helicase 42 during the virus infection. Together, these identified subcellular constituents provide important information for understanding host-IBDV interactions and underlying mechanisms of IBDV infection and pathogenesis.

  10. Comparison of colorimetric assays with quantitative amino acid analysis for protein quantification of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA).

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Maggiore, Luana; Necchi, Francesca; Koeberling, Oliver; MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Genetically induced outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria, called Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA), are being investigated as vaccines. Rapid methods are required for estimating the protein content for in-process assays during production. Since GMMA are complex biological structures containing lipid and polysaccharide as well as protein, protein determinations are not necessarily straightforward. We compared protein quantification by Bradford, Lowry, and Non-Interfering assays using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as standard with quantitative amino acid (AA) analysis, the most accurate currently available method for protein quantification. The Lowry assay has the lowest inter- and intra-assay variation and gives the best linearity between protein amount and absorbance. In all three assays, the color yield (optical density per mass of protein) of GMMA was markedly different from that of BSA with a ratio of approximately 4 for the Bradford assay, and highly variable between different GMMA; and approximately 0.7 for the Lowry and Non-Interfering assays, highlighting the need for calibrating the standard used in the colorimetric assay against GMMA quantified by AA analysis. In terms of a combination of ease, reproducibility, and proportionality of protein measurement, and comparability between samples, the Lowry assay was superior to Bradford and Non-Interfering assays for GMMA quantification.

  11. Quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of the influence of protein dose on monoclonal antibody distribution in human ovarian adenocarcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yang, F E; Brown, R S; Koral, K F; Clavo, A C; Jackson, G A; Wahl, R L

    1992-01-01

    We studied the effect of monoclonal antibody protein dose on the uniformity of radioiodinated antibody distribution within tumor masses using quantitative autoradiography. Groups (n = 11-13/group) of athymic nude mice with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were injected intraperitoneally with an 125I-labeled anticarcinoma-associated antigen murine monoclonal antibody, 5G6.4 using a high or a low protein dose (500 micrograms or 5 micrograms). At 6 days post-injection the macroscopic and microscopic intratumoral biodistribution of radiolabeled antibody was determined. The degree of heterogeneity of the labeled antibody distribution within each tumor was quantified and expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) of the activity levels in serial histological sections. Tumors from mice given the 500-micrograms protein doses had substantially lower CV values, 0.327 +/- 0.027, than did tumors from animals given 5-micrograms protein doses, 0.458 +/- 0.041, (P = 0.0078), indicating that the higher protein dose resulted in more homogeneous distribution of radioactivity in tumors than did the lower dose. While the percentage of the injected dose reaching the tumor was comparable between groups, injecting the higher dose of protein resulted in significantly lower tumor to non-tumor uptake ratios than those obtained for the lower protein dose. These data indicate, in this system, that to achieve more uniform intratumoral antibody (and radiation for radioimmunotherapy) delivery, a relatively high protein dose must be administered. However, to obtain this increased uniformity, a substantial drop in tumor/background uptake ratios was seen. Quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of human tumor xenografts is a useful method to assess the intratumoral distribution of antibodies.

  12. The first comprehensive and quantitative analysis of human platelet protein composition allows the comparative analysis of structural and functional pathways.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Julia M; Vaudel, Marc; Gambaryan, Stepan; Radau, Sonja; Walter, Ulrich; Martens, Lennart; Geiger, Jörg; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2012-10-11

    Antiplatelet treatment is of fundamental importance in combatting functions/dysfunction of platelets in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Dysfunction of anucleate platelets is likely to be completely attributable to alterations in posttranslational modifications and protein expression. We therefore examined the proteome of platelets highly purified from fresh blood donations, using elaborate protocols to ensure negligible contamination by leukocytes, erythrocytes, and plasma. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we created the first comprehensive and quantitative human platelet proteome, comprising almost 4000 unique proteins, estimated copy numbers for ∼ 3700 of those, and assessed intersubject (4 donors) as well as intrasubject (3 different blood samples from 1 donor) variations of the proteome. For the first time, our data allow for a systematic and weighted appraisal of protein networks and pathways in human platelets, and indicate the feasibility of differential and comprehensive proteome analyses from small blood donations. Because 85% of the platelet proteome shows no variation between healthy donors, this study represents the starting point for disease-oriented platelet proteomics. In the near future, comprehensive and quantitative comparisons between normal and well-defined dysfunctional platelets, or between platelets obtained from donors at various stages of chronic cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases will be feasible.

  13. Quantitative feature extraction reveals the status quo of protein fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnhold, Florian; von Mikecz, Anna

    2011-07-01

    Stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding diseases including Alzheimer's, polyglutamine diseases, and the prion encephalopathies. Investigation of protein aggregation mechanisms has considerably advanced in vitro due to recent technical innovation, whereas the development of analyses tools for intracellular protein fibrillation remains a major challenge. Here, we introduce a method that enables monitoring of the protein fibrillation status in the cell nucleus. We show that the amyloid indicator Congo red can be induced to bind to distinct nucleoplasmic microdomains that are describable by application of discrete mathematics on the image information. Since formation of Congo red-binding nuclear microdomains (CRBDs) correlates with increased amyloid formation and decreased solubility of endogenous proteins with homopolymeric polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches we introduce the idea that different protein fibrillation steps can be characterized intracellularly by graph theory-aided pattern recognition.

  14. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Peptide F1 against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Chen, Feilong; Duan, Shan; Gao, Xiangyang; Liu, Guo; Chen, Yunjiao; Dixon, William; Xiao, Hang; Cao, Yong

    2015-08-19

    Antimicrobial peptides have received increasing attention in the agricultural and food industries due to their potential to control pathogens. However, to facilitate the development of novel peptide-based antimicrobial agents, details regarding the molecular mechanisms of these peptides need to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial mechanism of peptide F1, a bacteriocin found in Tibetan kefir, against Escherichia coli at protein levels using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis. In response to treatment with peptide F1, 31 of the 280 identified proteins in E. coli showed alterations in their expression, including 10 down-regulated proteins and 21 up-regulated proteins. These 31 proteins all possess different molecular functions and are involved in different molecular pathways, as is evident in referencing the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Specifically, pathways that were significantly altered in E. coli in response to peptide F1 treatment include the tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and the cell cycle-caulobacter pathways, which was also associated with inhibition of the cell growth, induction of morphological changes, and cell death. The results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides.

  15. Quantitative proteomics analysis of differential protein expression and oxidative modification of specific proteins in the brains of old mice.

    PubMed

    Poon, H Fai; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Butterfield, D Allan

    2006-07-01

    The brain is susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with age-related brain dysfunction, because of its high content of peroxidizable unsaturated fatty acids, high oxygen consumption per unit weight, high content of key components for oxidative damage, and the relative scarcity of antioxidant defense systems. Protein oxidation, which results in functional disruption, is not random but appears to be associated with increased oxidation in specific proteins. By using a proteomics approach, we have compared the protein levels and specific protein carbonyl levels, an index of oxidative damage in the brains of old mice, to these parameters in the brains of young mice and have identified specific proteins that are altered as a function of aging. We show here that the expression levels of dihydropyrimidinase-like 2 (DRP2), alpha-enolase (ENO1), dynamin-1 (DNM1), and lactate dehydrogenase 2 (LDH2) were significantly increased in the brains of old versus young mice; the expression levels of three unidentified proteins were significantly decreased. The specific carbonyl levels of beta-actin (ACTB), glutamine synthase (GS), and neurofilament 66 (NF-66) as well as a novel protein were significantly increased, indicating protein oxidation, in the brains of old versus young mice. These results were validated by immunochemistry. In addition, enzyme activity assays demonstrated that oxidation was associated with decreased GS activity, while the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was unchanged in spite of an up-regulation of LDH2 levels. Several of the up-regulated and oxidized proteins in the brains of old mice identified in this report are known to be oxidized in neurodegenerative diseases as well, suggesting that these proteins may be particularly susceptible to processes associated with neurodegeneration. Our results establish an initial basis for understanding protein alterations that may lead to age-related cellular dysfunction in the brain.

  16. Protein Structure Network-based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongjie; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although structure-based drug design (SBDD) has become an indispensable tool in drug discovery for a long time, it continues to pose major challenges to date. With the advancement of "omics" techniques, systems biology has enriched SBDD into a new era, called polypharmacology, in which multi-targets drug or drug combination is designed to fight complex diseases. As a preliminary tool in systems biology, protein structure networks (PSNs) treat a protein as a set of residues linked by edges corresponding to the intramolecular interactions existing in folded structures between the residues. The PSN offers a computationally efficient tool to study the structure and function of proteins, and thus may facilitate structurebased drug design. Herein, we provide an overview of recent advances in PSNs, from predicting functionally important residues, to charactering protein-protein interactions and allosteric communication paths. Furthermore, we discuss potential pharmacological applications of PSN concepts and tools, and highlight the application to two families of drug targets, GPCRs and Hsp90. Although the application of PSNs as a framework for computer-aided drug discovery has been limited to date, we put forward the potential utility value in the near future and propose the PSNs could also serve as a new tool for polypharmacology research.

  17. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajian; Stormo, Gary D

    2005-01-01

    Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data. PMID:16014175

  18. Plasma proteome response to severe burn injury revealed by 18O-labeled "universal" reference-based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Petritis, Brianne O; Kaushal, Amit; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Schepmoes, Athena A; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2010-09-03

    A burn injury represents one of the most severe forms of human trauma and is responsible for significant mortality worldwide. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomics investigation of the blood plasma proteome response to severe burn injury by comparing the plasma protein concentrations of 10 healthy control subjects with those of 15 severe burn patients at two time-points following the injury. The overall analytical strategy for this work integrated immunoaffinity depletion of the 12 most abundant plasma proteins with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation prior to LC-MS analyses of individual patient samples. Incorporation of an 18O-labeled "universal" reference among the sample sets enabled precise relative quantification across samples. In total, 313 plasma proteins confidently identified with two or more unique peptides were quantified. Following statistical analysis, 110 proteins exhibited significant abundance changes in response to the burn injury. The observed changes in protein concentrations suggest significant inflammatory and hypermetabolic response to the injury, which is supported by the fact that many of the identified proteins are associated with acute phase response signaling, the complement system, and coagulation system pathways. The regulation of approximately 35 proteins observed in this study is in agreement with previous results reported for inflammatory or burn response, but approximately 50 potentially novel proteins previously not known to be associated with burn response or inflammation are also found. Elucidating proteins involved in the response to severe burn injury may reveal novel targets for therapeutic interventions as well as potential predictive biomarkers for patient outcomes such as multiple organ failure.

  19. A comparison of traditional and quantitative analysis of acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marga; Monreal, Luis; Segura, Dídac; Armengou, Lara; Añor, Sònia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare traditional and quantitative approaches in analysis of the acid-base and electrolyte imbalances in horses with acute gastrointestinal disorders. Venous blood samples were collected from 115 colic horses, and from 45 control animals. Horses with colic were grouped according to the clinical diagnosis into 4 categories: obstructive, ischemic, inflammatory, and diarrheic problems. Plasma electrolytes, total protein, albumin, pH, pCO2, tCO2, HCO3-, base excess, anion gap, measured strong ion difference (SIDm), nonvolatile weak buffers (A(tot)), and strong ion gap were determined in all samples. All colic horses revealed a mild but statistically significant decrease in iCa2+ concentration. Potassium levels were mildly but significantly decreased in horses with colic, except in those within the inflammatory group. Additionally, the diarrheic group revealed a mild but significant decrease in Na+, tCa, tMg, total protein, albumin, SIDm, and A(tot). Although pH was not severely altered in any colic group, 26% of the horses in the obstructive group, 74% in the ischemic group, 87% in the inflammatory group, and 22% in the diarrheic group had a metabolic imbalance. In contrast, when using the quantitative approach, 78% of the diarrheic horses revealed a metabolic imbalance consisting mainly of a strong ion acidosis and nonvolatile buffer ion alkalosis. In conclusion, mild acid-base and electrolyte disturbances were observed in horses with gastrointestinal disorders. However, the quantitative approach should be used in these animals, especially when strong ion imbalances and hypoproteinemia are detected, so that abnormalities in acid-base status are evident.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of RNA-Protein Interactions with High Throughput Sequencing - RNA Affinity Profiling (HiTS-RAP)

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Abdullah; Tome, Jacob M.; Friedman, Robin C.; Gheba, Dan; Schroth, Gary P.; Lis, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Because RNA-protein interactions play a central role in a wide-array of biological processes, methods that enable a quantitative assessment of these interactions in a high-throughput manner are in great demand. Recently, we developed the High Throughput Sequencing-RNA Affinity Profiling (HiTS-RAP) assay, which couples sequencing on an Illumina GAIIx with the quantitative assessment of one or several proteins’ interactions with millions of different RNAs in a single experiment. We have successfully used HiTS-RAP to analyze interactions of EGFP and NELF-E proteins with their corresponding canonical and mutant RNA aptamers. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for HiTS-RAP, which can be completed in about a month (8 days hands-on time) including the preparation and testing of recombinant proteins and DNA templates, clustering DNA templates on a flowcell, high-throughput sequencing and protein binding with GAIIx, and finally data analysis. We also highlight aspects of HiTS-RAP that can be further improved and points of comparison between HiTS-RAP and two other recently developed methods, RNA-MaP and RBNS. A successful HiTS-RAP experiment provides the sequence and binding curves for approximately 200 million RNAs in a single experiment. PMID:26182240

  1. Quantitative and sensitive RNA based detection of Bacillus spores

    PubMed Central

    Osmekhina, Ekaterina; Shvetsova, Antonina; Ruottinen, Maria; Neubauer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The fast and reliable detection of bacterial spores is of great importance and still remains a challenge. Here we describe a direct RNA-based diagnostic method for the specific detection of viable bacterial spores which does not depends on an enzymatic amplification step and therefore is directly appropriate for quantification. The procedure includes the following steps: (i) heat activation of spores, (ii) germination and enrichment cultivation, (iii) cell lysis, and (iv) analysis of 16S rRNA in crude cell lysates using a sandwich hybridization assay. The sensitivity of the method is dependent on the cultivation time and the detection limit; it is possible to detect 10 spores per ml when the RNA analysis is performed after 6 h of enrichment cultivation. At spore concentrations above 106 spores per ml the cultivation time can be shortened to 30 min. Total analysis times are in the range of 2–8 h depending on the spore concentration in samples. The developed procedure is optimized at the example of Bacillus subtilis spores but should be applicable to other organisms. The new method can easily be modified for other target RNAs and is suitable for specific detection of spores from known groups of organisms. PMID:24653718

  2. Quantitative tectonic reconstructions of Zealandia based on crustal thickness estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobys, Jan W. G.; Gohl, Karsten; Eagles, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Zealandia is a key piece in the plate reconstruction of Gondwana. The positions of its submarine plateaus are major constraints on the best fit and breakup involving New Zealand, Australia, Antarctica, and associated microplates. As the submarine plateaus surrounding New Zealand consist of extended and highly extended continental crust, classic plate tectonic reconstructions assuming rigid plates and narrow plate boundaries fail to reconstruct these areas correctly. However, if the early breakup history shall be reconstructed, it is crucial to consider crustal stretching in a plate-tectonic reconstruction. We present a reconstruction of the basins around New Zealand (Great South Basin, Bounty Trough, and New Caledonia Basin) based on crustal balancing, an approach that takes into account the rifting and thinning processes affecting continental crust. In a first step, we computed a crustal thickness map of Zealandia using seismic, seismological, and gravity data. The crustal thickness map shows the submarine plateaus to have a uniform crustal thickness of 20-24 km and the basins to have a thickness of 12-16 km. We assumed that a reconstruction of Zealandia should close the basins and lead to a most uniform crustal thickness. We used the standard deviation of the reconstructed crustal thickness as a measure of uniformity. The reconstruction of the Campbell Plateau area shows that the amount of extension in the Bounty Trough and the Great South Basin is far smaller than previously thought. Our results indicate that the extension of the Bounty Trough and Great South Basin occurred simultaneously.

  3. Quantitative validation of different protein precipitation methods in proteome analysis of blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Maria; Winkler, Wolfgang; Hayden, Hubert; Diestinger, Michael; Eliasen, Maja; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Miller, Ingrid; Chang, Martina; Kungl, Andreas; Roth, Erich; Oehler, Rudolf

    2005-06-01

    For the preparation of proteins for proteome analysis, precipitation is frequently used to concentrate proteins and to remove interfering compounds. Various methods for protein precipitation are applied, which rely on different chemical principles. This study compares the changes in the protein composition of human blood platelet extracts after precipitation with ethanol (EtOH) or trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Both methods yielded the same amount of proteins from the platelet preparations. However, the EtOH-precipitated samples had to be dialyzed because of the considerable salt content. To characterize single platelet proteins, samples were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence differential gel electrophoresis. More than 90% of all the spots were equally present in the EtOH- and TCA-precipitated samples. However, both precipitation methods showed a smaller correlation with nonprecipitated samples (EtOH 74.9%, TCA 79.2%). Several proteins were either reduced or relatively enriched in the precipitated samples. The proteins varied randomly in molecular weight and isoelectric point. This study shows that protein precipitation leads to specific changes in the protein composition of proteomics samples. This depends more on the specific structure of the protein than on the precipitating agent used in the experiment.

  4. Putative Alginate Assimilation Process of the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Based on Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Morisaka, Hironobu; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Tatsukami, Yohei; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted to assess the assimilation processes of Saccharophagus degradans cultured with glucose, pectin, and alginate as carbon sources. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach was used, employing our unique, long monolithic silica capillary column. In an attempt to select candidate proteins that correlated to alginate assimilation, the production of 23 alginate-specific proteins was identified by statistical analyses of the quantitative proteomic data. Based on the analysis, we propose that S. degradans has an alginate-specific gene cluster for efficient alginate utilization. The alginate-specific proteins of S. degradans were comprised of alginate lyases, enzymes related to carbohydrate metabolism, membrane transporters, and transcription factors. Among them, the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase Sde_3281 annotated in the alginate-specific cluster showed 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid reductase (DehR) activity. Furthermore, we found two different genes (Sde_3280 and Sde_0939) encoding 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconic acid (KDG) kinases (KdgK) that metabolize the KDG derived from alginate and pectin in S. degradans. S. degradans used Sde_3280 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from alginate and Sde_0939 to phosphorylate the KDG derived from pectin. The distinct selection of KdgKs provides an important clue toward the elucidation of how S. degradans recognizes and processes polysaccharides.

  5. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  6. A Quantitative Corpus-Based Approach to English Spatial Particles: Conceptual Symmetry and Its Pedagogical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Alvin Cheng-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate how conceptual symmetry plays a role in the use of spatial particles in English and to further examine its pedagogical implications via a corpus-based evaluation of the course books in senior high schools in Taiwan. More specifically, we adopt a quantitative corpus-based approach to investigate whether bipolar…

  7. Comprehensive and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Metamorphosis-Related Proteins in the Veined Rapa Whelk, Rapana venosa

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hao; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Larval metamorphosis of the veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) is a pelagic to benthic transition that involves considerable structural and physiological changes. Because metamorphosis plays a pivotal role in R. venosa commercial breeding and natural populations, the endogenous proteins that drive this transition attract considerable interest. This study is the first to perform a comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analysis related to metamorphosis in a marine gastropod. We analyzed the proteomes of competent R. venosa larvae and post-larvae, resulting in the identification of 5312 proteins, including 470 that were downregulated and 668 that were upregulated after metamorphosis. The differentially expressed proteins reflected multiple processes involved in metamorphosis, including cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, ingestion and digestion, stress response and immunity, as well as specific tissue development. Our data improve understanding of the physiological traits controlling R. venosa metamorphosis and provide a solid basis for further study. PMID:27314339

  8. Comprehensive and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Metamorphosis-Related Proteins in the Veined Rapa Whelk, Rapana venosa.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Tao

    2016-06-15

    Larval metamorphosis of the veined rapa whelk (Rapana venosa) is a pelagic to benthic transition that involves considerable structural and physiological changes. Because metamorphosis plays a pivotal role in R. venosa commercial breeding and natural populations, the endogenous proteins that drive this transition attract considerable interest. This study is the first to perform a comprehensive and quantitative proteomic analysis related to metamorphosis in a marine gastropod. We analyzed the proteomes of competent R. venosa larvae and post-larvae, resulting in the identification of 5312 proteins, including 470 that were downregulated and 668 that were upregulated after metamorphosis. The differentially expressed proteins reflected multiple processes involved in metamorphosis, including cytoskeleton and cell adhesion, ingestion and digestion, stress response and immunity, as well as specific tissue development. Our data improve understanding of the physiological traits controlling R. venosa metamorphosis and provide a solid basis for further study.

  9. A Critical Appraisal of Quantitative Studies of Protein Degradation in the Framework of Cellular Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Ruiz-Rivas, Carmen; Castaño, José G.

    2012-01-01

    Protein homeostasis, proteostasis, is essential to understand cell function. Protein degradation is a crucial component of the proteostatic mechanisms of the cell. Experiments on protein degradation are nowadays present in many investigations in the field of molecular and cell biology. In the present paper, we focus on the different experimental approaches to study protein degradation and present a critical appraisal of the results derived from steady-state and kinetic experiments using detection of unlabelled and labelled protein methodologies with a proteostatic perspective. This perspective allows pinpointing the limitations in interpretation of results and the need of further experiments and/or controls to establish “definitive evidence” for the role of protein degradation in the proteostasis of a given protein or the entire proteome. We also provide a spreadsheet for simple calculations of mRNA and protein decays for mimicking different experimental conditions and a checklist for the analysis of experiments dealing with protein degradation studies that may be useful for researchers interested in the area of protein turnover. PMID:23119163

  10. Comparative quantitation for the protein content of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids by DC protein assay and Kjeldahl method.

    PubMed

    Doshi, J B; Ravetkar, S D; Ghole, V S; Rehani, K

    2003-09-01

    DPT, a combination vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis is available since many years and still continued in the national immunisation schedule of many countries. Although highly potent, reactions to DPT vaccine are well known, mainly attributed to the factors like Pertussis component, aluminum adjuvant and lower purity of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids. The latter most important aspect has become a matter of concern, specially for the preparation of next generation combination vaccines with more number of antigens in combination with DPT. Purity of toxoid is expressed as Lf (Limes flocculation) per mg of protein nitrogen. The Kjeldahl method (KM) of protein nitrogen estimation suggested by WHO and British Pharmacopoeia is time consuming and less specific. Need has been felt to explore an alternative method which is quick and more specific for toxoid protein determination. DC (detergent compatible) protein assay, an improved Lowry's method, has been found to be much more advantageous than Kjeldahl method.

  11. Quantitative determination of protein molecular weight with an acoustic sensor; significance of specific versus non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2014-08-21

    Surface acoustic wave sensors with integrated microfluidics for multi-sample sensing have been implemented in this work towards the quantitative correlation of the acoustic signal with the molecular weight of surface bound proteins investigating different interaction/binding conditions. The results are presented for: (i) four different biotinylated molecules (30 ≤ Mw ≤ 150 kDa) specifically binding to neutravidin; (ii) the same four non-biotinylated molecules, as well as neutravidin, adsorbing onto gold; and (iii) four cardiac marker proteins (86 ≤ Mw ≤ 540 kDa) specifically binding to their homologous antibodies. Surface plasmon resonance was employed as an independent optical mass sensor. A linear relationship was found to exist between the phase change of the acoustic signal and the molecular weight of the proteins in both cases of specific binding. In contrast, non-specific binding of proteins directly onto gold exhibited no such linear relationship. In all three cases phase change was correlated with the bound mass per area. The underlying mechanism behind the different behavior between specific and non-specific binding is discussed by taking into account the geometrical restrictions imposed by the size of the specific biorecognition molecule and the corresponding bound protein. Our results emphasize the quantitative nature of the phase of the acoustic signal in determining the Mw (in the case of specific binding) with a resolution of 15% and the mass of the bound proteins (in all cases), as well as the significance of the biorecognition molecules in deriving the molecular weight from acoustic or optical detectors.

  12. Identification of Autophagosome-associated Proteins and Regulators by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis and Genetic Screens*

    PubMed Central

    Dengjel, Jörn; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Nielsen, Maria O.; Eisenberg, Tobias; Harder, Lea M.; Schandorff, Søren; Farkas, Thomas; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Becker, Andrea C.; Schroeder, Sabrina; Vanselow, Katja; Lundberg, Emma; Nielsen, Mogens M.; Kristensen, Anders R.; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Madeo, Frank; Jäättelä, Marja; Andersen, Jens S.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the major intracellular catabolic pathways, but little is known about the composition of autophagosomes. To study the associated proteins, we isolated autophagosomes from human breast cancer cells using two different biochemical methods and three stimulus types: amino acid deprivation or rapamycin or concanamycin A treatment. The autophagosome-associated proteins were dependent on stimulus, but a core set of proteins was stimulus-independent. Remarkably, proteasomal proteins were abundant among the stimulus-independent common autophagosome-associated proteins, and the activation of autophagy significantly decreased the cellular proteasome level and activity supporting interplay between the two degradation pathways. A screen of yeast strains defective in the orthologs of the human genes encoding for a common set of autophagosome-associated proteins revealed several regulators of autophagy, including subunits of the retromer complex. The combined spatiotemporal proteomic and genetic data sets presented here provide a basis for further characterization of autophagosome biogenesis and cargo selection. PMID:22311637

  13. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  14. Quantitative ToF-SIMS Studies of Protein Drug Release from Biodegradable Polymer Drug Delivery Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Sarah A.; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers are of interest in developing strategies to control protein drug delivery. The protein that was used in this study is Keratinocyte Growth Factor (KGF) which is a protein involved in the re-epithelialization process. The protein is stabilized in the biodegradable polymer matrix during formulation and over the course of polymer degradation with the use of an ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT) which will encapsulate the protein in an aqueous environment. The release kinetics of the protein from the surface of these materials requires precise timing which is a crucial factor in the efficacy of this drug delivery system. Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used in the same capacity to identify the molecular ion peak of the surfactant and polymer and use this to determine surface concentration. In the polymer matrix, the surfactant molecular ion peak was observed in the positive and negative mode at m/z 467 and 421, respectively. These peaks were determined to be [AOT + Na+] and [AOT−Na+]-. These methods are used to identify the surfactant and protein from the polymer matrix and are used to measure the rate of surface accumulation. The second step was to compare this accumulation rate with the release rate of the protein into an aqueous solution during the degradation of the biodegradable film. This rate is compared to that from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements using the protein autofluorescence from that released into aqueous solution. PMID:20016666

  15. Protein markers of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus Steiner & Buhrer, 1934 (Nickle, 1970) populations using quantitative proteomics and character compatibility.

    PubMed

    Ciordia, Sergio; Robertson, Lee; Arcos, Susana C; González, María Rosa; Mena, María Del Carmen; Zamora, Paula; Vieira, Paulo; Abrantes, Isabel; Mota, Manuel; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Navas, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The Pine Wood Nematode (PWN) Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is a severe forest pathogen in countries where it has been introduced and is considered a worldwide quarantine organism. In this study, protein markers for differentiating populations of this nematode were identified by studying differences among four selected Iberian and one American population. These populations were compared by quantitative proteomics (iTRAQ). From a total of 2860 proteins identified using the public database from the B. xylophilus genome project, 216 were unambiguous and significantly differentially regulated in the studied populations. Comparisons of their pairwise ratio were statistically treated and supported in order to convert them into discrete character states, suggesting that 141 proteins were not informative as population specific markers. Application of the Character Compatibility methodology on the remaining 75 proteins (belonging to families with different biological functions) excludes 27 which are incompatible among them. Considering only the compatible proteins, the method selects a subset of 30 specific unique protein markers which allowed the compared classification of the Iberian isolates. This approach makes it easier search for diagnostic tools and phylogenetic inference within species and populations of a pathogen exhibiting a high level of genetic diversity.

  16. Quantification of the HIV transcriptional activator complex in live cells by image-based protein-protein interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Asamitsu, Kaori; Omagari, Katsumi; Okuda, Tomoya; Hibi, Yurina; Okamoto, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    The virus-encoded Tat protein is essential for HIV transcription in infected cells. The interaction of Tat with the cellular transcription elongation factor P-TEFb (positive transcriptional elongation factor b) containing cyclin T1 (CycT1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) is critical for its activity. In this study, we use the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) system, which enables the quantification of interactions between biomolecules, such as proteins, in live cells. Quantitative measurement of the molecular interactions among Tat, CycT1 and CDK9 has showed that any third molecule enhances the binding between the other two molecules. These findings suggest that each component of the Tat:P-TEFb complex stabilizes the overall complex, thereby supporting the efficient transcriptional elongation during viral RNA synthesis. These interactions may serve as appropriate targets for novel anti-HIV therapy.

  17. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and liver proteins of acetaminophen-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Potter, D W; Rowland, K L; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1989-01-01

    Using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts we have quantitated the formation of these specific adducts in liver and serum protein of B6C3F1 male mice dosed with acetaminophen. Administration of acetaminophen at doses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg to mice resulted in evidence of hepatotoxicity (increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) at 4 hr in the 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg treatment groups only. The formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein was not observed in the groups receiving 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses, but was observed in the groups receiving doses above 300 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Greater levels of adduct formation were observed at the higher doses. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were also observed in serum of mice receiving hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. After a 400 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the liver protein reached peak levels 2 hr after dosing. By 12 hr the levels decreased to approximately 10% of the peak level. In contrast, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein were delayed, reaching a sustained peak 6 to 12 hr after dosing. The dose-response correlation between the appearance of serum aminotransferases and 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein and the temporal correlation between the decrease in 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein and the appearance of adducts in serum protein are consistent with a hepatic origin of the adducts detected in serum protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of protein extraction protocols for apple and strawberry fruit suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qifa; Song, Jun; Doncaster, Kristen; Rowland, Elden; Byers, David M

    2007-03-07

    A modified phenol-based protocol and a phenol-free protocol that involves hot SDS extraction followed by TCA precipitation in acetone were qualitatively and quantitatively compared and evaluated on apple peel and strawberry fruit. The phenol protocol resulted in significantly higher protein yields of 2.35 +/- 0.1 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 mg/g of FW from apple and strawberry fruit, respectively, compared to the SDS protocol, which produced 0.74 +/- 0.1 and 0.27 +/- 0.02 mg/g of FW, respectively. 2-DE analysis of apple protein extracts revealed 1422 protein spots associated with the phenol protocol and 849 spots associated with the SDS protocol. Of these, 761 were present only in phenol gels, whereas 23 were exclusive to SDS samples. For strawberry, SDS extraction produced poor-quality spots with a high degree of streaking, indicating possible contamination. The application of a cleanup procedure resulted in a purified protein extract with high-quality spots. 2-DE analysis of strawberry protein extracts revealed 1368 spots for the phenol protocol and 956 spots for the SDS protocol accompanied by the cleanup procedure. Of these, 599 spots were present only in phenol gels, whereas 109 were present only in SDS samples. Spots from each fruit tissue and extraction procedure were selected, and a total of 26 were identified by LC-MS/MS. Overall, this study demonstrates the complexity of protein extraction of fruit tissues and suggests that a phenol-based protein extraction protocol should be used as a standard procedure for recalcitrant fruit tissues, whereas a SDS protocol with or without a cleanup procedure may be used as an alternative protocol.

  19. System-specific periodicity in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data questions threshold-based quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Rödiger, Stefan; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Volksdorf, Thomas; Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) data are found to display periodic patterns in the fluorescence intensity as a function of sample number for fixed cycle number. This behavior is seen for technical replicate datasets recorded on several different commercial instruments; it occurs in the baseline region and typically increases with increasing cycle number in the growth and plateau regions. Autocorrelation analysis reveals periodicities of 12 for 96-well systems and 24 for a 384-well system, indicating a correlation with block architecture. Passive dye experiments show that the effect may be from optical detector bias. Importantly, the signal periodicity manifests as periodicity in quantification cycle (Cq) values when these are estimated by the widely applied fixed threshold approach, but not when scale-insensitive markers like first- and second-derivative maxima are used. Accordingly, any scale variability in the growth curves will lead to bias in constant-threshold-based Cqs, making it mandatory that workers should either use scale-insensitive Cqs or normalize their growth curves to constant amplitude before applying the constant threshold method. PMID:27958340

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis to decipher the differential apoptotic response of bortezomib-treated APL cells before and after retinoic acid differentiation reveals involvement of protein toxicity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Uttenweiler-Joseph, Sandrine; Bouyssié, David; Calligaris, David; Lutz, Pierre G; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system allows the targeted degradation of proteins and plays a critical role in the regulation of many cellular processes. Proteasome inhibition is a recent antitumor therapeutic strategy and bortezomib was the first proteasome inhibitor approved for clinical use. In this study, we used the NB4 cell line to investigate the effects of bortezomib toward acute promyelocytic leukemia cells before and after retinoic acid-induced differentiation. We showed that apoptosis level after bortezomib treatment is higher in NB4 cells than in differentiated NB4 cells. To compare early protein variations upon bortezomib treatment in both NB4 cell populations, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis based on iTRAQ peptide labeling followed by data analysis with in-house developed scripts. This strategy revealed the regulation of 14 proteins principally involved in protein stress response and apoptosis in NB4 cells after proteasome inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that the differential level of apoptosis induced by bortezomib treatment in both NB4 cell populations could result from distinct protein toxicity level.

  1. Quantitative proteomics reveals the effect of protein glycosylation in soybean root under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding stress has a negative impact on soybean cultivation because it severely impairs growth and development. To understand the flooding responsive mechanism in early stage soybeans, a glycoproteomic technique was used. Two-day-old soybeans were treated with flooding for 2 days and roots were collected. Globally, the accumulation level of glycoproteins, as revealed by cross-reaction with concanavalin A decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. Glycoproteins were enriched from total protein extracts using concanavalin A lectin resin and analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. One-hundred eleven and 69 glycoproteins were identified without and with 2 days of flooding stress, respectively. Functional categorization of these identified glycoproteins indicated that the accumulation level of proteins related to protein degradation, cell wall, and glycolysis increased, while stress-related proteins decreased under flooding stress. Also the accumulation level of glycoproteins localized in the secretory pathway decreased under flooding stress. Out of 23 common glycoproteins between control and flooding conditions, peroxidases and glycosyl hydrolases were decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. mRNA expression levels of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and N-glycosylation related proteins were downregulated by flooding stress. These results suggest that flooding might negatively affect the process of N-glycosylation of proteins related to stress and protein degradation; however glycoproteins involved in glycolysis are activated. PMID:25477889

  2. A MALDI-MS-based quantitative analytical method for endogenous estrone in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jin; Park, Han-Gyu; Hwang, Cheol-Hwan; Sung, Changmin; Jang, Kyoung-Soon; Park, Sung-Hee; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; Yang, Yung-Hun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yun-Gon

    2016-01-01

    The level of endogenous estrone, one of the three major naturally occurring estrogens, has a significant correlation with the incidence of post-menopausal breast cancer. However, it is challenging to quantitatively monitor it owing to its low abundance. Here, we develop a robust and highly sensitive mass-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based quantitative platform to identify the absolute quantities of endogenous estrones in a variety of clinical specimens. The one-step modification of endogenous estrone provided good linearity (R2 > 0.99) and significantly increased the sensitivity of the platform (limit of quantitation: 11 fmol). In addition, we could identify the absolute amount of endogenous estrones in cells of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 (34 fmol/106 cells) by using a deuterated estrone as an internal standard. Finally, by applying the MALDI-MS-based quantitative method to endogenous estrones, we successfully monitored changes in the metabolic expression level of estrones (17.7 fmol/106 letrozole-treated cells) in MCF-7 cells resulting from treatment with an aromatase inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggest that this MALDI-MS-based quantitative approach may be a general method for the targeted metabolomics of ketone-containing metabolites, which can reflect clinical conditions and pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:27091422

  3. A Quantitative Microscopy Technique for Determining the Number of Specific Proteins in Cellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, Sarah A.; Gadd, Jennifer C.; Fujimoto, Bryant S.; Kensel-Hammes, Patricia; Schiro, Perry G.; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes a method to determine both the average number and variance of proteins in the few to tens of copies in isolated cellular compartments, such as organelles and protein complexes. Other currently available protein quantification techniques either provide an average number but lack information on the variance or are not suitable for reliably counting proteins present in the few to tens of copies. This protocol entails labeling the cellular compartment with fluorescent primary-secondary antibody complexes, TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) microscopy imaging of the cellular compartment, digital image analysis, and deconvolution of the fluorescence intensity data. A minimum of 2.5 days is required to complete the labeling, imaging, and analysis of a set of samples. As an illustrative example, we describe in detail the procedure used to determine the copy number of proteins in synaptic vesicles. The same procedure can be applied to other organelles or signaling complexes. PMID:22094731

  4. Gene expression profile and immunological evaluation of unique hypothetical unknown proteins of Mycobacterium leprae by using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Prithiviraj, Kalyani; Groathouse, Nathan; Brennan, Patrick J; Spencer, John S

    2013-02-01

    The cell-mediated immunity (CMI)-based in vitro gamma interferon release assay (IGRA) of Mycobacterium leprae-specific antigens has potential as a promising diagnostic means to detect those individuals in the early stages of M. leprae infection. Diagnosis of leprosy is a major obstacle toward ultimate disease control and has been compromised in the past by the lack of specific markers. Comparative bioinformatic analysis among mycobacterial genomes identified potential M. leprae-specific proteins called "hypothetical unknowns." Due to massive gene decay and the prevalence of pseudogenes, it is unclear whether any of these proteins are expressed or are immunologically relevant. In this study, we performed cDNA-based quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the expression status of 131 putative open reading frames (ORFs) encoding hypothetical unknowns. Twenty-six of the M. leprae-specific antigen candidates showed significant levels of gene expression compared to that of ESAT-6 (ML0049), which is an important T cell antigen of low abundance in M. leprae. Fifteen of 26 selected antigen candidates were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. The seroreactivity to these proteins of pooled sera from lepromatous leprosy patients and cavitary tuberculosis patients revealed that 9 of 15 recombinant hypothetical unknowns elicited M. leprae-specific immune responses. These nine proteins may be good diagnostic reagents to improve both the sensitivity and specificity of detection of individuals with asymptomatic leprosy.

  5. Quantitative Chemoproteomics for Site-Specific Analysis of Protein Alkylation by 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous lipid derived electrophile, contributes to stress signaling and cellular toxicity. Although previous work has identified protein targets for HNE alkylation, the sequence specificity of alkylation and dynamics in a cellular context remain largely unexplored. We developed a new quantitative chemoproteomic platform, which uses isotopically tagged, photocleavable azido-biotin reagents to selectively capture and quantify the cellular targets labeled by the alkynyl analogue of HNE (aHNE). Our analyses site-specifically identified and quantified 398 aHNE protein alkylation events (386 cysteine sites and 12 histidine sites) in intact cells. This data set expands by at least an order of magnitude the number of such modification sites previously reported. Although adducts formed by Michael addition are thought to be largely irreversible, we found that most aHNE modifications are lost rapidly in situ. Moreover, aHNE adduct turnover occurs only in intact cells and loss rates are site-selective. This quantitative chemoproteomics platform provides a versatile general approach to map bioorthogonal-chemically engineered post-translational modifications and their cellular dynamics in a site-specific and unbiased manner. PMID:25654326

  6. Quantitative chemoproteomics for site-specific analysis of protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Porter, Ned A; Liebler, Daniel C

    2015-03-03

    Protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous lipid derived electrophile, contributes to stress signaling and cellular toxicity. Although previous work has identified protein targets for HNE alkylation, the sequence specificity of alkylation and dynamics in a cellular context remain largely unexplored. We developed a new quantitative chemoproteomic platform, which uses isotopically tagged, photocleavable azido-biotin reagents to selectively capture and quantify the cellular targets labeled by the alkynyl analogue of HNE (aHNE). Our analyses site-specifically identified and quantified 398 aHNE protein alkylation events (386 cysteine sites and 12 histidine sites) in intact cells. This data set expands by at least an order of magnitude the number of such modification sites previously reported. Although adducts formed by Michael addition are thought to be largely irreversible, we found that most aHNE modifications are lost rapidly in situ. Moreover, aHNE adduct turnover occurs only in intact cells and loss rates are site-selective. This quantitative chemoproteomics platform provides a versatile general approach to map bioorthogonal-chemically engineered post-translational modifications and their cellular dynamics in a site-specific and unbiased manner.

  7. Protein Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Ksendzov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Prototype transducers based on integrated optical ring resonators have been demonstrated to be useful for detecting the protein avidin in extremely dilute solutions. In an experiment, one of the transducers proved to be capable of indicating the presence of avidin at a concentration of as little as 300 pM in a buffer solution a detection sensitivity comparable to that achievable by previously reported protein-detection techniques. These transducers are serving as models for the further development of integrated-optics sensors for detecting small quantities of other proteins and protein-like substances. The basic principle of these transducers was described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. The differences between the present transducers and the ones described in the cited prior article lie in details of implementation of the basic principle. As before, the resonator in a transducer of the present type is a closed-circuit dielectric optical waveguide. The outermost layer of this waveguide, analogous to the optical cladding layer on an optical fiber, consists of a layer comprising sublayers having indices of refraction lower than that of the waveguide core. The outermost sublayer absorbs the chemical of interest (in this case, avidin). The index of refraction of the outermost sublayer changes with the concentration of absorbed avidin. The resonator is designed to operate with relatively strong evanescent-wave coupling between the outer sublayer and the electromagnetic field propagating along the waveguide core. By virtue of this coupling, the chemically induced change in the index of refraction of the outermost sublayer causes a measurable change in the spectrum of the resonator output.

  8. Quantitative analysis of human cerebrospinal fluid proteins using a combination of cysteine tagging and amine-reactive isobaric labeling.

    PubMed

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Turck, Natacha; Hoogland, Christine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2011-01-07

    Highly complex and dynamic protein mixtures are hardly comprehensively resolved by direct shotgun proteomic analysis. As many proteins of biological interest are of low abundance, numerous analytical methodologies have been developed to reduce sample complexity and go deeper into proteomes. The present work describes an analytical strategy to perform cysteinyl-peptide subset enrichment and relative quantification through successive cysteine and amine-isobaric tagging. A cysteine-reactive covalent capture tag (C³T) allowed derivatization of cysteines and specific isolation on a covalent capture (CC) resin. The 6-plex amine-reactive tandem mass tags (TMT) served for relative quantification of the targeted peptides. The strategy was first evaluated on a model protein mixture with increasing concentrations to assess the specificity of the enrichment and the quantitative performances of the workflow. It was then applied to human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from post-mortem and ante-mortem samples. These studies confirmed the specificity of the C³T and the CC technique to cysteine-containing peptides. The model protein mixture analysis showed high precision and accuracy of the quantification with coefficients of variation and mean absolute errors of less than 10% on average. The CSF experiments demonstrated the potential of the strategy to study complex biological samples and identify differential brain-related proteins. In addition, the quantification data were highly correlated with a classical TMT experiment (i.e., without C³T cysteine-tagging and enrichment steps). Altogether, these results legitimate the use of this quantitative C³T strategy to enrich and relatively quantify cysteine-containing peptides in complex mixtures.

  9. Quantitative assessment of the impact of the gut microbiota on lysine epsilon-acetylation of host proteins using gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Gabriel M; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2012-07-10

    The gut microbiota influences numerous aspects of human biology. One facet that has not been thoroughly explored is its impact on the host proteome. We hypothesized that the microbiota may produce certain of its effects through covalent modification of host proteins. We focused on protein lysine ε-acetylation because of its recently discovered roles in regulation of cell metabolism, and the potential for products of microbial fermentation to interact with the lysine acetylation machinery of host cells. Germ-free mice, fed a (15)N-labeled diet for two generations, were colonized as adults with a microbiota harvested from conventionally raised mouse donors. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we quantified 3,891 liver and proximal colonic proteins, 558 of which contained 1,602 sites of lysine acetylation, 43% not previously described. Multiple proteins from multiple subcellular compartments underwent microbiota-associated increases in their levels of lysine acetylation at one or more residues, in one or both tissues. Acetylated proteins were enriched in functions related to energy production, respiration, and primary metabolism. A number of the acetylation events affect lysine residues at or near the active sites of enzymes, whereas others occur at locations that may affect other facets of protein function. One of these modifications, affecting Lys292 in mouse α-1-antitrypsin, was detected in the corresponding lysine of the human serum protein. Methods described in this report can be applied to other co- or posttranslational modifications, and add quantitation of protein expression and covalent modification to the arsenal of techniques for characterizing the dynamic, important interactions between gut symbionts and their hosts.

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics identifies SnRK2 protein kinase substrates and reveals the effectors of abscisic acid action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Xue, Liang; Batelli, Giorgia; Lee, Shinyoung; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Van Oosten, Michael J.; Zhang, Huiming; Tao, W. Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s) are central components of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathways. The snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple-mutant plants are nearly completely insensitive to ABA, suggesting that most of the molecular actions of ABA are triggered by the SnRK2s-mediated phosphorylation of substrate proteins. Only a few substrate proteins of the SnRK2s are known. To identify additional substrate proteins of the SnRK2s and provide insight into the molecular actions of ABA, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to compare the global changes in phosphopeptides in WT and snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant seedlings in response to ABA treatment. Among the 5,386 unique phosphorylated peptides identified in this study, we found that ABA can increase the phosphorylation of 166 peptides and decrease the phosphorylation of 117 peptides in WT seedlings. In the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant, 84 of the 166 peptides, representing 58 proteins, could not be phosphorylated, or phosphorylation was not increased under ABA treatment. In vitro kinase assays suggest that most of the 58 proteins can serve as substrates of the SnRK2s. The SnRK2 substrates include proteins involved in flowering time regulation, RNA and DNA binding, miRNA and epigenetic regulation, signal transduction, chloroplast function, and many other cellular processes. Consistent with the SnRK2 phosphorylation of flowering time regulators, the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant flowered significantly earlier than WT. These results shed new light on the role of the SnRK2 protein kinases and on the downstream effectors of ABA action, and improve our understanding of plant responses to adverse environments. PMID:23776212

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Approach for MicroRNA Target Prediction Based on 18O/16O Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuepo; Zhu, Ying; Huang, Yufei; Tegeler, Tony; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    MOTIVATION Among many large-scale proteomic quantification methods, 18O/16O labeling requires neither specific amino acid in peptides nor label incorporation through several cell cycles, as in metabolic labeling; it does not cause significant elution time shifts between heavy- and light-labeled peptides, and its dynamic range of quantification is larger than that of tandem mass spectrometry-based quantification methods. These properties offer 18O/16O labeling the maximum flexibility in application. However, 18O/16O labeling introduces large quantification variations due to varying labeling efficiency. There lacks a processing pipeline that warrants the reliable identification of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). This motivates us to develop a quantitative proteomic approach based on 18O/16O labeling and apply it on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) microRNA (miR) target prediction. KSHV is a human pathogenic γ-herpesvirus strongly associated with the development of B-cell proliferative disorders, including primary effusion lymphoma. Recent studies suggest that miRs have evolved a highly complex network of interactions with the cellular and viral transcriptomes, and relatively few KSHV miR targets have been characterized at the functional level. While the new miR target prediction method, photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP), allows the identification of thousands of miR targets, the link between miRs and their targets still cannot be determined. We propose to apply the developed proteomic approach to establish such links. METHOD We integrate several 18O/16O data processing algorithms that we published recently and identify the messenger RNAs of downregulated proteins as potential targets in KSHV miR-transfected human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Various statistical tests are employed for picking DEPs, and we select the best test by examining the enrichment of PAR-CLIP-reported targets with

  12. Protein-nanoparticle interactions evaluation by immunomethods: Surfactants can disturb quantitative determinations.

    PubMed

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-08-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticle surface is one of the first events that occur when nanoparticles enter in the blood stream, which influences nanoparticles lifetime and further biodistribution. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in serum and which has been deeply characterized, is an interesting model protein to in