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Sample records for protein source effects

  1. Effect of protein level and protein source on zinc absorption in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.A.; Almgren, A.; Kivistoe, B.C.; Cederblad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing levels of various protein sources on zinc absorption from a legume-based meal was studied in humans with the use of a radionuclide technique. The meals were extrinsically labelled with 65Zn and absorption was determined from measurements of the whole-body retention of the isotope. The mean fractional zinc absorption for the 13 meals was 24.7 +/- 6.9% and was only influenced by the protein content of the meal to a limited extent (r = 0.45). However, the amount of zinc absorbed from the meals was strongly correlated with both the protein (r = 0.85) and zinc content (r = 0.86): 5.9 +/- 1.7 mumol of zinc was absorbed from the basal bean meal which had the lowest protein content; the addition of low zinc chicken doubled the protein content and increased zinc absorption to 10.3 +/- 2.0 mumol; the addition of zinc-rich beef also doubled the protein content, however, zinc absorption was increased to 15.9 +/- 4.7 mumol. It is concluded that the zinc content of the main protein source of the diet determines the amount of zinc absorbed to a large extent. However, relatively small amounts of animal protein can significantly improve the value of a legume-based meal as a source of zinc.

  2. Short term effects on bone quality associated with consumption of soy protein isolate and other dietary protein sources in rapidly growing female rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beneficial effects of soy protein consumption on bone quality have been reported. The effects of other dietary protein sources such as whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) and rice protein isolate (RPI) on bone growth has been less well examined. The current study compared effects of feeding soy protein i...

  3. Effects of grain source, grain processing, and protein degradability on rumen kinetics and microbial protein synthesis in Boer kids.

    PubMed

    Brassard, M-E; Chouinard, P Y; Berthiaume, R; Tremblay, G F; Gervais, R; Martineau, R; Cinq-Mars, D

    2015-11-01

    Microbial protein synthesis in the rumen would be optimized when dietary carbohydrates and proteins have synchronized rates and extent of degradation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of varying ruminal degradation rate of energy and nitrogen sources on intake, nitrogen balance, microbial protein yield, and kinetics of nutrients in the rumen of growing kids. Eight Boer goats (38.2 ± 3.0 kg) were used. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot Latin square design with grain sources (barley or corn) forming the main plots (squares). Grain processing methods and levels of protein degradability formed the subplots in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement for a total of 8 dietary treatments. The grain processing method was rolling for barley and cracking for corn. Levels of protein degradability were obtained by feeding untreated soybean meal (SBM) or heat-treated soybean meal (HSBM). Each experimental period lasted 21 d, consisting of a 10-d adaptation period, a 7-d digestibility determination period, and a 4-d rumen evacuation and sampling period. Kids fed with corn had higher purine derivatives (PD) excretion when coupled with SBM compared with HSBM and the opposite occurred with barley-fed kids ( ≤ 0.01). Unprocessed grain offered with SBM led to higher PD excretion than with HSBM whereas protein degradability had no effect when processed grain was fed ( ≤ 0.03). Results of the current experiment with high-concentrate diets showed that microbial N synthesis could be maximized in goat kids by combining slowly fermented grains (corn or unprocessed grains) with a highly degradable protein supplement (SBM). With barley, a more rapidly fermented grain, a greater microbial N synthesis was observed when supplementing a low-degradable protein (HSBM).

  4. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-02-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  5. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L. H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  6. Feed preference in pigs: effect of selected protein, fat, and fiber sources at different inclusion rates.

    PubMed

    Solà-Oriol, D; Roura, E; Torrallardona, D

    2011-10-01

    Three double-choice feeding experiments were conducted to study the effect of different feedstuffs on feed preference in pigs. Fifteen protein sources, 6 fat sources, and 3 fiber sources were evaluated in Exp. 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Pigs were offered a series of double choices between a common reference diet and the diet with the ingredient under evaluation. The reference diet contained a soybean meal product with 56% CP (SBM-56), sunflower oil, and wheat bran, which were considered as the feedstuffs of reference for the protein, fat, and fiber sources, respectively. Preference, expressed as percentage of the tested diet to total feed intake, was affected by feedstuff nature and by its inclusion rate. In Exp. 1, feeds with fish meal at 50 and 100 g·kg⁻¹, dried porcine hydrolyzed protein at 50 g·kg⁻¹, and lupine, soybean meal with 44% CP, and dried skim milk at 100 g·kg⁻¹ were preferred (P < 0.05) to the reference feed with SBM-56. On the contrary, relative to SBM-56, an avoidance (preference less than 50%) was observed for potato protein at all inclusion rates tested, rapeseed meal and acid milk whey at 100 and 200 g·kg⁻¹, and dried porcine hydrolyzed protein, soybean protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and sunflower meal at 200 g·kg(-1). The storage of dried skim milk, soybean protein concentrate, and potato protein for 10 mo resulted in a reduction (P < 0.001) of their preference values. In Exp. 2, the feed with palm oil (at 30 g·kg⁻¹) was preferred (P < 0.05), whereas feeds with linseed oil (at 30 and 100 g·kg⁻¹) and soybean oil (at 100 g·kg⁻¹) were avoided (P < 0.05) when contrasted with the reference feed with sunflower oil. Finally, in Exp. 3 diets with dehydrated alfalfa and sugar beet pulp at 130 g·kg⁻¹ had a reduced (P < 0.05) preference compared with the reference diet with wheat bran. It is concluded that feedstuff nature, inclusion rate, and freshness affect feed preference in pigs. Feedstuff preferences should be

  7. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (p<0.05). Study 2: the bioavailability from heme alone (10.3%) was reduced (p<0.05) when it was blended with fish (7.1%) and chicken (4.9%), however it was unaffected by beef. Study 3: casein, collagen, and albumin did not affect the bioavailability of Fe. Proteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption.

  8. Effect of Starch Sources and Protein Content on Extruded Aquaculture Feed Containing DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 3x3 completely randomized design was used to investigate the extrusion cooking and product characteristics of DDGS, protein levels, and various starch sources in a laboratory scale single screw extruder. Cassava, corn, and potato starches with varying levels of DDGS (20, 30, and 40% wb) were extru...

  9. Effect of dietary crude protein source on hormone and follicle characteristics in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Martin, J L; Larson, D M; Stroh, H L; Cupp, A S; Funston, R N

    2010-03-01

    Ground, raw soybeans (SB), or dried distillers grain plus solubles (DDGS) were utilized in heifer development diets to determine the effect of dietary fat and protein source on hormone and follicle characteristics and ADG. The experiment was conducted over 2 yr with 100 June-born heifers (199 +/- 2 kg initial BW, n = 50 per yr). The experimental periods were 157 and 207 d in yr 1 and 2, respectively. Heifers were provided a dietary supplement (DM basis) of 1.23 kg of SB and 0.40 kg of corn or 1.65 kg of DDGS between weaning and breeding. Estrus was synchronized with 2 injections of PGF(2alpha) 14 d apart. Dominant follicles were measured and aspirated via transvaginal ultrasonography 60 h after the second PGF(2alpha) injection. Heifers were exposed to bulls beginning 14 d after aspiration for 45 d. Heifer ADG was greater (P = 0.02) for DDGS heifers in yr 1, but was similar (P = 0.47) in yr 2. However, there was no difference (P = 0.35) in final BW in either year. There was no difference (P >or= 0.67) in follicle size, follicle hormone concentrations, or pregnancy rate (88%) between yr 1 and 2. Serum estrogen at 48 or 60 h after PGF(2alpha) injection were similar (P >or= 0.91); however, LH at 60 h in yr 2 tended to be greater (P = 0.07) for DDGS heifers. The percentage of heifers experiencing an LH surge 48 and 60 h after PGF(2alpha) injection was not affected (P >/= 0.40) by treatment. Calf production was not affected (P >or= 0.20) by developmental diet. In summary, DDGS and SB have similar effects on hormone and follicle characteristics at the inclusion rates used in these studies. PMID:19933430

  10. Effect of ileum segment and protein sources on net disappearance of crude protein and amino acids in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, M; Kluth, H; Elwert, C; Rodehutscord, M

    2008-01-01

    1. This study investigated the net disappearance of crude protein (CP) and amino acids (AA) from soybean meal and rapeseed meal in different sub-sections of the ileum of hens. A basal diet was used and in another 4 diets, maize starch contained in the basal diet was replaced with soybean meal or rapeseed meal at 140 and 280 g/kg so that changes in dietary AA concentrations resulted from the oilseed meals only. 2. A total of 250 Lohmann Brown pullets were used for this experiment at 20 weeks old and given one of the 5 diets for 7 d. The section between Meckel's diverticulum and 2 cm anterior to the ileo-caecal-colonic junction was taken after slaughtering the hens and cut into three sub-sections of equal length. Digesta were taken separately from each sub-section and then frozen. Net disappearance of AA and CP for the diets and the two protein sources was calculated based on standard equations and using a multiple linear regression approach. 3. Net disappearances of CP and all AA were significantly lower in the proximal sub-section than in the central and terminal sub-sections. Also, the net disappearance of CP and all AA from rapeseed meal was significantly lower in the proximal sub-section than in the central or terminal sub-sections. For soybean meal, only the net disappearances of arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and phenylalanine were significantly lower in the proximal than in the terminal sub-section. No significant differences in the net disappearance of CP and AA were detected between protein sources within the central and terminal sub-sections or between the central and terminal sub-section within each protein source. Soybean meal had a significantly higher net disappearance of CP and AA (with the exception of cystine and methionine) than rapeseed meal in the proximal sub-section but these differences were not statistically significant in the central and terminal sub-sections. 4. Amino acids disappeared from the proximal region of the ileum. This

  11. The effect of dietary protein and lipid source on dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, F.T.; Lellis, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary protein and lipid source on dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout. Seven diets were each fed to four replicate lots of 300 first-feeding fry cultured in 75 1 aluminum troughs for 8 weeks. Two basal diets were manufactured with approximately equal nutrient content, one using krill and squid meals and the other anchovy meal as the primary protein-containing ingredients. The meals used to manufacture the diets were separated into two fractions: lipid (ether-extractable); and protein/ash (non-ether-extractable) using a large soxhlet. The fractions were then recombined to create two additional diets; one containing anchovy protein/ash with krill/squid lipid, the other krill/squid protein/ash with fish lipid. A fifth diet recombined krill/squid protein/ash with krill/squid lipid to evaluate effects of the extraction process. Two additional treatments included a diet with a portion of the krill meal replaced by poultry by-product meal, and the basal anchovy meal diet supplemented with sodium, magnesium, and copper. Fish consuming diets containing anchovy meal as the primary protein source gained more weight (P < 0.05) than fish consuming krill/squid meal-based diets. Dorsal fin index (DFI, measured as mean dorsal fin height x 100/total fish length) was greater (P < 0.05) for fish consuming diets containing krill/squid meal protein/ash fraction (DFI = 9.9%-10.0%) than for fish consuming diets containing anchovy meal protein/ash fraction (DFI = 4.9%-5.3%), regardless of lipid source. Supplementation of the anchovy meal diet with sodium, magnesium, and copper improved (P < 0.05) DFI by approximately 20%, but not to the level supported by the krill/squid meal protein/ash fraction diets. The cost of the krill meal diet was reduced by inclusion of poultry by-product meal without affecting dorsal fin condition. These data indicate that the dietary agent contributing to dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout is not present in

  12. The effect of protein source on the diets selected by pigs given a choice between a low and high protein food.

    PubMed

    Kyriazakis, I; Emmans, G C

    1993-04-01

    To test the effect of the protein source on the diet selection of growing pigs, four foods of high protein concentration were made. Each food was based on a different protein meal: fish, soya bean, and two types of rape seed (with low and high glucosinolate contents), and was offered to growing pigs together with a food of low protein concentration (L), as a choice. Pigs given a choice between the fish or the soya bean meal-based food and L, selected a diet that met their protein requirements, as judged by their growth rates and food efficiency: the protein content of the selected diet declined systematically with pig weight. Pigs given a choice between the rape seed meal-based foods and L selected diets with a high proportion of L and, consequently, failed to meet their protein requirements. Given that the preference for L was more marked when the animals were given access to the rape seed meal higher in glucosinolates, it is suggested that their diet selection on these foodpairs was a tradeoff between minimising glucosinolate intake, which has potentially goitrogenic properties, and achieving a protein intake sufficient for maximum performance. This suggestion is supported by the fact that the fish meal-based food was preferred over the ones containing rape seed meal, and that the rape seed meal lower in glucosinolate content was preferred over the other when pigs were given a choice between them. PMID:8511173

  13. Effect of cottonseed oilcake as a protein source on production of breeding ostriches.

    PubMed

    Brand, T S; Tesselaar, G A; Hoffman, L C; Brand, Z

    2015-01-01

    1. South Africa currently produces 70% of the world's ostrich products. The profit margin of South African producers from the sale of ostrich meat, leather and feathers currently stands at 20%, 65% and 15%, respectively. 2. Local producers want to increase the production of ostrich products but keep production costs as low as possible. Maintaining optimal nutrition of breeding stock is necessary to increase the production of ostrich chicks, thereby decreasing the fixed costs per chick. 3. This research examined the impact on ostrich reproduction of replacing soya oilcake (SOC) as a protein supplement with cheaper cottonseed oilcake (CSOC). Although there are no data available on the impact of CSOC feed on ostrich reproduction, it is well known that gossypol, a naturally occurring toxin in cotton plants, negatively affects male reproduction in other monogastric species and that it may also reduce appetite. 4. Ninety-six breeding ostrich pairs were divided into two groups to compare the effects of diet (CSOC and SOC) during the breeding season on ostrich-breeding parameters. The replacement of SOC with CSOC had no significant effect on the number of total eggs produced (47.8 ± 5.3 versus 48.3 ± 5.1 per breeding pair, respectively) or infertile eggs (31.5 ± 3.9 versus 38.0 ± 5.2, respectively). Also, the number of dead-in-shell chicks did not differ significantly between groups (20.2 ± 3.3 versus 26.8 ± 3.8, respectively). 5. Even though none of these breeding parameters differed, the replacement of SOC with CSOC in the diets of breeding birds led to significantly more chicks hatching per hen from breeding birds fed on the SOC (36.1 ± 4.8) than the CSOC diet (17.2 ± 3.8). 6. Although it would thus seem that feeding breeding ostriches CSOC instead of SOC as a protein supplement will have a detrimental effect on chick production, more data are required to deliver a definitive answer. PMID:25735889

  14. Protective effect of soybeans as protein source in the diet against cadmium-aorta redox and morphological alteration.

    PubMed

    Pérez Díaz, Matías F F; Acosta, Mariano; Mohamed, Fabián H; Ferramola, Mariana L; Oliveros, Liliana B; Gimenez, María S

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of cadmium exposition on thoracic aorta redox status and morphology, and the putative protective effect of soybeans in the diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups: 3 fed with a diet containing casein and 3 containing soybeans, as protein source. Within each protein group, one was given tap water (control) and the other two tap water containing 15 and 100 ppm of Cd(2+), respectively, for two months. In rats fed with casein diet, 15 ppm of Cd induced an increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and of the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, which were even higher with 100 ppm of Cd(2+), in aorta. Also, 100 ppm Cd(2+) exposure increased superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) activity; CAT, GPX, SOD, Nrf2 and metallothioneine II mRNA expressions and CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein levels, compared with control. Aorta endothelial and cytoplasmic alterations were observed. However, with the soybeans diet, 15 and 100 ppm of Cd(2+) did not modify TBARS levels; CAT, GPX and Nrf2 mRNA expressions; CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein; and the aorta morphology, compared with control. The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes and protects against morphological alterations induced, in a dose-dependent way, by Cd in aorta.

  15. Protective effect of soybeans as protein source in the diet against cadmium-aorta redox and morphological alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez Díaz, Matías F.F.; Acosta, Mariano; Mohamed, Fabián H.; Ferramola, Mariana L.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gimenez, María S.

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of cadmium exposition on thoracic aorta redox status and morphology, and the putative protective effect of soybeans in the diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups: 3 fed with a diet containing casein and 3 containing soybeans, as protein source. Within each protein group, one was given tap water (control) and the other two tap water containing 15 and 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}, respectively, for two months. In rats fed with casein diet, 15 ppm of Cd induced an increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and of the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, which were even higher with 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}, in aorta. Also, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} exposure increased superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) activity; CAT, GPX, SOD, Nrf2 and metallothioneine II mRNA expressions and CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein levels, compared with control. Aorta endothelial and cytoplasmic alterations were observed. However, with the soybeans diet, 15 and 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+} did not modify TBARS levels; CAT, GPX and Nrf2 mRNA expressions; CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein; and the aorta morphology, compared with control. The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes and protects against morphological alterations induced, in a dose-dependent way, by Cd in aorta. - Highlights: • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} in drinking water induces oxidative stress in aorta. • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} increases Nrf2, MT II and NOX2 expressions in aorta. • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} induces morphological changes in rat aorta. • The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes induced by Cd in rat aorta. • The soybean diet attenuates morphological alterations induced by Cd in rat aorta.

  16. Effect of protein source on resistive-training-induced changes in body composition and muscle size in older men123

    PubMed Central

    Haub, Mark D; Wells, Amanda M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Campbell, Wayne W

    2008-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with reductions in muscle mass and strength, but nutrition and exercise interventions can delay this progression and enhance the quality of life. Objective We examined whether the predominant source of protein consumed by older men influenced measures of muscle size and strength, body composition, resting energy expenditure, and skeletal muscle creatine concentrations in response to 12 wk of resistive training. Design After consuming a lactoovovegetarian (LOV) diet for 2 wk, 21 men aged 65 ± 5 y were randomly assigned to either consume a beef-containing (BC) diet (n = 10) or to continue the LOV diet (n = 11) throughout resistive training. The BC diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from beef and the LOV diet included 0.6 g protein · kg−1 · d−1 from textured vegetable protein (soy) sources. The remaining protein in the diets came from self-selected LOV sources. Results The mean total protein intake for both groups ranged from 1.03 to 1.17 g · kg−1 · d−1 during the intervention. Men in both groups had improvements (14–38%) in maximal dynamic strength of all the muscle groups trained with no significant difference between groups. With resistive training, cross-sectional muscle area of the vastus lateralis increased in both groups (4.2 ± 3.0% and 6.0 ± 2.6% for the LOV and BC groups, respectively) with no significant difference between groups. Body composition, resting energy expenditure, and concentrations of muscle creatine, phosphocreatine, and total creatine did not differ significantly between groups or change over time. Conclusions These data suggest that increases in muscle strength and size were not influenced by the predominant source of protein consumed by older men with adequate total protein intake. PMID:12197993

  17. Effect of protein source on nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids in exercising horses.

    PubMed

    Graham-Thiers, P M; Bowen, L K

    2011-03-01

    Plasma AA in horses fed either an all-hay or a hay and grain diet in a traditional format have not been investigated. Eight horses were divided into 2 groups: a hay group fed only grass hay or a hay and a grain group (HG) fed in a crossover design for two 5-wk periods. After the first period, horses were fasted overnight, followed by feeding with blood sampling every hour for 6 h. A 4-d total fecal and urine collection to evaluate N balance followed. A 10-d washout period separated the 5-wk feeding periods, during which horses switched diets. The second period was also followed by fasting, feeding, blood sampling, and a 4-d collection period. Horses consumed 840 g of CP in the hay group and 865 g of CP in the HG group. Horses in the hay group had a 2.4 ± 2.4 g/d N balance, which was not different from 0 (P = 0.34), whereas horses in the HG group had 5.4 ± 2.4 g/d N balance, which was different from 0 (P = 0.045). Fecal N excretion was greater for the hay group compared with the HG group (hay = 51.1 ± 1.3 g/d and HG = 45.5 ± 1.3 g/d; P = 0.011), and urine N excretion was greater for the HG group compared with the hay group (hay = 79.3 ± 2.8 g/d and HG = 89.2 ± 2.8 g/d; P = 0.026). Plasma AA concentrations were greater in the HG group compared with the hay group for Met (P = 0.001), Lys (P = 0.001), Ile (P = 0.047), Arg (P < 0.001), Gln (P = 0.009), and Orn (P = 0.002). Plasma concentrations were less for the HG group compared with the hay group for Thr (P < 0.001) and Ala (P < 0.001). Plasma concentrations of urea were greater for the HG group compared with the hay group (P < 0.001), whereas 3-methyl-histidine concentrations were greater for the hay group compared with the HG group (P < 0.001). The effect of diet on the excretion of N via feces vs. urine in the hay and HG groups is typical. The early increases in the plasma concentrations of Met, Val, Ile, Leu, Phe, Lys, Arg, and Ala during the postfeeding phase are most likely due to increased foregut

  18. Effects of dietary nonstructural carbohydrates and protein sources on feeding behavior of tethered heifers fed high-concentrate diets.

    PubMed

    Rotger, A; Ferret, A; Manteca, X; Ruiz de la Torre, J L; Calsamiglia, S

    2006-05-01

    To describe the feeding behavior of growing heifers fed high-concentrate diets with different sources of protein and nonstructural carbohydrates, and to explain the ruminal fermentation pattern, 4 ruminally fistulated Holstein heifers (BW = 132.3 +/- 1.61 kg) were assigned to a 4 x 4 Latin square design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Two non-structural carbohydrate sources (barley and corn) and 2 protein sources [soybean meal (SBM) and sunflower meal (SFM)] that differ in their rate and extent of ruminal degradation were combined, resulting in a synchronized, rapid fermentation diet (barley-SFM), a synchronized, slow fermentation diet (corn-SBM), and 2 unsynchronized diets consisting of a rapidly and a slowly fermenting component (barley-SBM and corn-SFM). The corn-SFM diet resulted in a lower frequency of feeding (P < or = 0.05), longer meal length (P < or = 0.043), and larger meal size (P < or = 0.037) than the other 3 diets. Dietary treatment had no effect (P > or = 0.09) on the daily percentages of posture and behaviors. In general, heifers spent 9.97 +/- 0.83% of the day eating, 2.11 +/- 0.42% drinking, 25.13 +/- 1.36% ruminating, 16.97 +/- 1.42% in other activities such as social behavior and self-grooming, and the rest of the day (45.82 +/- 2.55%) resting or doing no chewing activities. Eating, drinking, and social behaviors were performed while standing (P < or = 0.01), whereas resting and ruminating occurred mainly while lying (P = 0.001). Eating took place mainly in the first 4 h after feeding (P = 0.001), whereas ruminating occurred mainly at night (P = 0.001). When chewing activities (eating and ruminating) were expressed per kilogram of DM or NDF from roughage intake, more time (P = 0.004) was spent chewing per kilogram of DMI for barley-based diets, and per kilogram of NDF from roughage intake for barley- (P = 0.01) and SFM- (P = 0.002) based diets. Tethered heifers fed the more fermentable and rapidly synchronized diet (barley

  19. Effect of dietary energy source and level on nutrient digestibility, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and milk performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Q; Zhang, Y D; Zhao, M; Zhang, T; Zhu, D; Bu, D P; Wang, J Q

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary energy source and level on intake, digestion, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and milk production in lactating dairy cows, using corn stover as a forage source. Eight multiparous Holstein cows, 4 of which were fitted with rumen cannulas, were evaluated in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design, with each period lasting 21 d. The cows were randomly assigned into 4 treatment groups: low-energy (LE) ground corn (GC), LE steam-flaked corn (SFC), high-energy (HE) GC, and HE SFC. Changes to ruminal energy degradation rates were induced by feeding the cows diets of either finely ground corn or SFC as components of diets with the same total energy level. Milk yield, milk protein content and yield, and milk lactose yield all increased in response to higher levels of dietary energy, whereas contents of milk fat and lactose were unaffected. Cows fed HE diets had a higher crude microbial protein yield and total-tract apparent digestibility than those receiving LE diets. Milk yield, milk protein yield, and microbial protein yield were also higher when SFC replaced GC as the main energy source for lactating cows fed LE diets. These results suggest that an increased dietary energy level and ruminal degradation rate are beneficial to milk protein production, which we suggest is due to increased yields of microbial proteins, when cows are fed corn stover as a dietary forage source.

  20. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Kevin B; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-07-23

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars-all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product's glucoregulatory effects.

  1. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Kevin B; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars-all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product's glucoregulatory effects. PMID:27455320

  2. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, Kevin B.; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with T2DM risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on T2DM risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or T2DM risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars—all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or T2DM risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product’s glucoregulatory effects. PMID:27455320

  3. The effects of inulin supplementation of diets with or without hydrolysed protein sources on digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and immunoglobulins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, A; Hesta, M; Hermans, J M; Janssens, G P J

    2006-11-01

    Dogs with food allergy are often treated by giving a diet with hydrolysed protein sources. Prebiotics might also be successful in prevention and treatment of allergic disease through their effect on the colonic microflora, analogous to studies on probiotics in allergic children. The present study was set up to investigate the effect of supplementing inulin (IN) to commercial hypoallergenic dog diets on apparent nutrient digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and Ig in dogs. Supplementation of 3 % IN did not affect faecal pH, food and water intake and urine production. Compared with the intact protein diet with a limited number of ingredients (L), the diet with a hydrolysed protein source (H) resulted in an increased water intake (P<0.001), which could be due to the osmotic effect of free amino acids. Faeces production was increased by IN due to increased faecal moisture content. Increased faeces production on the H diet was mainly due to a higher DM excretion. Subsequently, the apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of DM was lower in the H diet group. A similar result was noted for ADC of diethyl ether extract and crude ash. The ADC of crude protein was higher in the H diet group, whereas IN decreased the ADC of crude protein. Differences in the ADC of crude protein among the different diets disappeared after correction for a higher faecal biomass, except for the dogs fed the L+IN diet. Total faecal IgA concentrations were lower in the H group (P<0.05) because of lower antigenic stimulation of hydrolysed protein, which implies that hydrolysed protein is really hypoallergenic. The present study indicates that the use of hydrolysed protein diets for canine food allergy treatment can affect digestibility and that combination with IN affected apparent protein digestibility but not IgA response. PMID:17092385

  4. The effects of inulin supplementation of diets with or without hydrolysed protein sources on digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and immunoglobulins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, A; Hesta, M; Hermans, J M; Janssens, G P J

    2006-11-01

    Dogs with food allergy are often treated by giving a diet with hydrolysed protein sources. Prebiotics might also be successful in prevention and treatment of allergic disease through their effect on the colonic microflora, analogous to studies on probiotics in allergic children. The present study was set up to investigate the effect of supplementing inulin (IN) to commercial hypoallergenic dog diets on apparent nutrient digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and Ig in dogs. Supplementation of 3 % IN did not affect faecal pH, food and water intake and urine production. Compared with the intact protein diet with a limited number of ingredients (L), the diet with a hydrolysed protein source (H) resulted in an increased water intake (P<0.001), which could be due to the osmotic effect of free amino acids. Faeces production was increased by IN due to increased faecal moisture content. Increased faeces production on the H diet was mainly due to a higher DM excretion. Subsequently, the apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of DM was lower in the H diet group. A similar result was noted for ADC of diethyl ether extract and crude ash. The ADC of crude protein was higher in the H diet group, whereas IN decreased the ADC of crude protein. Differences in the ADC of crude protein among the different diets disappeared after correction for a higher faecal biomass, except for the dogs fed the L+IN diet. Total faecal IgA concentrations were lower in the H group (P<0.05) because of lower antigenic stimulation of hydrolysed protein, which implies that hydrolysed protein is really hypoallergenic. The present study indicates that the use of hydrolysed protein diets for canine food allergy treatment can affect digestibility and that combination with IN affected apparent protein digestibility but not IgA response.

  5. Effect of dietary mineral sources and oil content on calcium utilization and kidney calcification in female Fischer rats fed low-protein diets.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Shizuko; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Kajiwara, Tomoko; Azami, Shoji; Kitano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of dietary mineral source and oil intake on kidney calcification in 4-wk-old female Fischer rats after consuming the AIN-76 purified diet (AIN-76). A modified AIN-76 mineral mixture was used, although the original calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (P) molar ratio remained unchanged. Rats were fed the modified diets for a period of 40 d before their kidneys were removed on the last day. Ca balance tests were performed on days 31 to 36 and biochemical analysis of urine was also studied. Kidney Ca, P, and magnesium (Mg) in the standard diet group (20% protein and 5% oil) were not affected by the mineral source. Kidney Ca, P, and Mg in the low-protein (10% protein) diet group, were found to be influenced by the dietary oil content and mineral source. In particular, the different mineral sources differentially increased kidney mineral accumulation. Pathological examination of the kidney showed that the degree of kidney calcification was proportional to the dietary oil content in the 10% dietary protein group, reflecting the calcium content of the kidney. The information gathered on mineral sources in this study will help future researchers studying the influence of dietary Ca/P molar ratios, and histological changes in the kidney.

  6. Effects of cornmeal or molasses supplemented with different protein sources on milk production and nitrogen utilization of organic dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen lactating organic Jersey cows were assigned to four replicated 4 × 4 Latin squares with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to compare the effects of feeding cornmeal (CM) or molasses (MOL) with either flaxseed meal (Flax) or a protein mix [(PM = 11% soybean meal (SB) + 5% sunflower ...

  7. Effect of dietary protein source and cereal type on the incidence of sudden death syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Blair, R; Jacob, J P; Gardiner, E E

    1990-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the incidence of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in male Peterson by Arbor Acre broiler chickens fed diets with either corn or wheat as the grain type and meat meal or soybean meal as the main protein source. In the first two experiments, the broilers were raised in floor pens to 6 wk of age, and in the third experiment they were raised in battery-brooder cages to 4 wk of age. In both floor pen studies, total mortality and the incidence of SDS were significantly higher for wheat-fed birds, while SDS as a percentage of total mortality was not affected by cereal type. In the brooder study, neither total mortality nor mortality from SDS was significantly affected by cereal type. In the floor pen studies, the incidence of SDS as a percentage of the birds housed, was reduced by the inclusion of meat meal in the diet. In the brooder study, total mortality and the incidence of SDS were not affected by protein source, but SDS as a percentage of total mortality was reduced with the inclusion of meat meal in the diet. PMID:2235846

  8. Natural proteins: Sources, isolation, characterization and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Jitendra Y.; Bhambar, Rajendra S.; Narkhede, Minal R.; Gawali, Sonali R.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, plant protein contributes substantially as a food resource because it contains essential amino acids for meeting human physiological requirements. However, many versatile plant proteins are used as medicinal agents as they are produced by using molecular tools of biotechnology. Proteins can be obtained from plants, animals and microorganism cells. The abundant economical proteins can be obtained from plant seeds. These natural proteins are obtained by isolation procedures depending on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Isolation and purification of single protein from cells containing mixtures of unrelated proteins is achievable due to the physical and chemical attributes of proteins. The following characteristics are unique to each protein: Amino acid composition, sequence, subunit structures, size, shape, net charge, isoelectric point, solubility, heat stability and hydrophobicity. Based on these properties, various methods of isolation exist, like salting out and isoionic precipitation. Purification of proteins is quiet challenging and, therefore, several approaches like sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and chromatography are available. Characterization of proteins can be performed by mass spectrometry/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The amino acid sequence of a protein can be detected by using tandem mass spectrometry. In this article, a review has been made on the sources, isolation, purification and characterization of natural proteins. PMID:24347918

  9. Effect of supplementation of lysine producing microbes vis-a-vis source and level of dietary protein on performance and egg quality characteristics of post-peak layers

    PubMed Central

    Manju, G. U.; Reddy, B. S. V.; Gloridoss, Gideon; Prabhu, T. M.; Giridhar, K. S.; Suma, N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to study the effect of supplementation of lysine producing microbes (LPM) as an in vivo source of lysine on performance and egg quality characters of post-peak layers. Materials and Methods: BIS (1992) specified diets (except crude protein [CP] and lysine) were prepared using either soybean meal (SBM) or groundnut extractions (GNE) or sunflower extractions (SFE) with 16 and 15% CP resulting in six control diets. Further, each control diet was fortified with either synthetic lysine or LPM to meet BIS (1992) specified lysine requirement resulting in the set of 12 test diets. Each of the eighteen diets was offered to quadruplets groups of 4 post-peak (52 weeks) commercial laying hens in each. The trial lasted for 119 days. Result: The results revealed that the feed consumption and body weight changes and Roche yolk color and yolk index were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) different among different treatments. However, egg production, feed efficiency, egg weight, egg shape index, Haugh unit score, albumen index and shell thickness, and net returns remained non-significant (p ≤ 0.05) among different treatments. Among main factors, protein level (16% and 15% CP) made a significant (p ≤ 0.05) difference in egg production (79.6 and 75.1%) and feed efficiency (2.64 and 2.81 kg feed/kg egg mass, respectively). Among protein source GNE- and SFE-based diet fed groups showed significantly (p < 0.0%) higher feed consumption and body weight gain than SBM based diets fed birds. Yolk color (7.0, 7.3 and 7.3, respectively) and yolk index (0.40, 0.38 and 0.43, respectively) were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) different from the protein sources. CP level and Protein source interaction effects showed significant differences in albumen index and Haugh unit score. Conclusion: Optimum level of protein (16% CP) and GNE as a source of protein tended to be superior in increasing the performance and egg characteristics of post-peak layers and supplementation of lysine in either

  10. The Effect of Resistance Training and Different Sources of Postexercise Protein Supplementation on Muscle Mass and Physical Capacity in Sarcopenic Elderly Men.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Mathieu L; Ladouceur, Joëlle P; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2016-06-01

    Maltais, ML, Ladouceur, JP, and Dionne, IJ. The effect of resistance training and different sources of postexercise protein supplementation on muscle mass and physical capacity in sarcopenic elderly men. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1680-1687, 2016-The loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia) with aging is related to a progressive loss of muscle strength and physical capacity. Resistance exercise and milk-based protein supplementation have been demonstrated as significant countermeasures for sarcopenia and the loss of muscle strength. However, using high doses of proteins can act as a meal replacement in the elderly. Therefore, we sought to determine whether a standard supplementation (12 g per serving) of protein and resistance training could be an efficient strategy to promote muscle strength and physical capacity in sarcopenic men. Twenty-six participants were randomized in 3 groups in a double-blind control study. All the groups performed exercise and consumed a protein-rich supplement 12 g of protein, 7 g of essential amino acids from milk (n = 8), soy (n = 8), or rice milk (nonprotein control, n = 10). Body composition was measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Strength was measured by 1 repetition maximum with different exercises. Different physical capacity measurements were assessed (timed up and go test, chair stand, and walking speed). The results indicated a significant increase in fat-free mass in all groups and changes in muscle strength, with no differences between groups. This study indicates that resistance training is an effective way to increase muscle mass and strength, regardless of protein supplementation. Higher doses of protein-rich foods may have to be recommended to promote muscle mass gains when executing resistance exercise in elderly sarcopenic individuals.

  11. Effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity and antioxidant status of commercial broilers

    PubMed Central

    Chichilichi, Biswal; Mohanty, G. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Pradhan, C. R.; Behura, N. C.; Das, A.; Behera, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity of commercial broilers in coastal Odisha. Materials and Methods: A 180 day-old broiler chicks were distributed in six dietary treatments viz. C1: Basal diet, C2: Basal diet + enzyme, T1: Basal diet +5% protein from Azolla, T2: Basal diet + 5% protein from Azolla + enzyme, T3: Basal diet +10% protein from Azolla, and T4: Basal diet + 10% protein from Azolla + enzyme. Cutaneous basophilc hypersensitivity (CBH) and humoral immunity response were determined at the 38th day of age. At 42nd day, the weight of lymphoid organs, an antioxidant enzyme, and lipid peroxidation activity were determined. Results: The CBH response did not differ significantly among the treated groups, but the sheep red blood cells response was significantly higher in T4. The weight of lymphoid organs or immune organs of all the treated groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05). The erythrocyte catalase level of T4 group was found to be significantly higher than rest of the treated groups except T3. Conclusion: It may be concluded that supplementation of Azolla at 10% of dietary protein requirement along with enzyme supplementation in an isonitrogenous diet showed a better immune response in broilers. PMID:27047208

  12. Studies on weaning diets in Nigeria: 2 protein sources.

    PubMed

    Adewusi, S R; Orisadare, B O; Oke, O L

    1992-04-01

    Protein isolates were extracted from melon, groundnut, and soybean cakes in an aqueous system that could potentially yield both oil and protein from oilseeds quantitatively. Protein isolates obtained were 91.2, 78.6 and 79.5% of the total protein content of melon, groundnut and soybean cakes respectively. Both cakes and isolates were assessed in a rat bioassay while breadfruit, cassava, and corn starch were also investigated as sources of carbohydrate. Results showed that there were no significant differences between feed intake, weight gain and PER of rats fed the cake and the protein isolates except in soybean. Weight gain, PER and NPR were highest in cassava-soybean protein isolate diet followed by cassavacasein diet (control) while performance was only moderate with melon- and groundnut-cassava diets. With melon protein isolate, cassava and breadfruit were better carbohydrate sources than corn starch. In simulated weaning diets, cassava-sucrose-melon-soybean protein isolate based diet performed better (weight gain 33.4 g, PER 1.63, NPR 2.23) than a commercial weaning food (weight gain 30.6 g PER 1.57, NPR 2.18) while replacement of sucrose and cassava at 30% by breadfruit yielded a cost effective diet with good performance (weight gain 29.4 g, PER 1.51, NPR 2.12). Diets where soybean protein served as the sole source of protein or breadfruit, white and yellow maize 'ogi' served as the main source of carbohydrate performed only moderately.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of commercially available plant and animal protein sources in diets for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.): digestive and metabolic investigations.

    PubMed

    Hartviksen, Mali; Bakke, Anne Marie; Vecino, José G; Ringø, Einar; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of various alternative diet ingredients partially replacing fishmeal (FM) on digestive and metabolic parameters in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) post-smolts (initial body mass 305 ± 69 g) following 12 weeks of feeding. Experimental diets containing 20 % extracted sunflower (ESF), pea protein concentrate (PPC), soy protein concentrate (SPC), feather meal (FeM) and poultry by-product (PBY) were compared to a reference diet containing FM as the main protein source. For the different intestinal compartments trypsin, lipase, bile salts, dry matter and chyme-associated leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) were measured from the content and LAP was measured in the tissue. Selected metabolites were measured in plasma samples. In general, use of plant proteins resulted in low C-LAP activity, low plasma cholesterol and high plasma magnesium. The plasma levels of cholesterol and Mg reflecting were most likely reflections of the composition of the diet, while the LAP activity in chyme may indicate lower epithelial cell turnover. Other responses varied depending on the plant protein source. Results from the animal protein substitution also varied both between diets and compartments; however, both materials increased lipase activity in DI. FeM resulted in a significant increase in both total and specific LAP activities suggesting an attempt to increase the digestive capacity in response to low digestibility of the diet while PBY showed very little difference from the FM-fed control fish. The present trial indicates that 20 % PPC, SPC and PBY can partially replace FM in diets for Atlantic salmon. The qualities of ESF and FeM used in this trial show little promise as FM replacement at 20 % inclusion level.

  14. Developmental Block and Programmed Cell Death in Bos indicus Embryos: Effects of Protein Supplementation Source and Developmental Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  15. Developmental block and programmed cell death in Bos indicus embryos: effects of protein supplementation source and developmental kinetics.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  16. Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty; Broekman, Henrike; Knulst, André; Houben, Geert

    2016-08-01

    To solve the future food insecurity problem, alternative and sustainable protein sources (e.g. insects, rapeseed, fava bean and algae) are now being explored for the production of food and feed. To approve these novel protein sources for future food a comprehensive risk assessment is needed according to the European food legislation. Allergenicity risk assessment might pose some major difficulties, since detailed guidance on how to assess the allergenic potential of novel foods is not available. At present, the approach relies mostly on the guidance of allergenicity assessment for genetically modified (GM) plant foods. The most recent one was proposed by EFSA (2010 and 2011); "weight-of-evidence approach". However this guidance is difficult to interpret, not completely applicable or validated for novel foods and therefore needs some adjustments. In this paper we propose a conceptual strategy which is based on the "weight-of-evidence approach" for food derived from GM plants and other strategies that were previously published in the literature. This strategy will give more guidance on how to assess the allergenicity of novel food proteins and protein sources.

  17. Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty; Broekman, Henrike; Knulst, André; Houben, Geert

    2016-08-01

    To solve the future food insecurity problem, alternative and sustainable protein sources (e.g. insects, rapeseed, fava bean and algae) are now being explored for the production of food and feed. To approve these novel protein sources for future food a comprehensive risk assessment is needed according to the European food legislation. Allergenicity risk assessment might pose some major difficulties, since detailed guidance on how to assess the allergenic potential of novel foods is not available. At present, the approach relies mostly on the guidance of allergenicity assessment for genetically modified (GM) plant foods. The most recent one was proposed by EFSA (2010 and 2011); "weight-of-evidence approach". However this guidance is difficult to interpret, not completely applicable or validated for novel foods and therefore needs some adjustments. In this paper we propose a conceptual strategy which is based on the "weight-of-evidence approach" for food derived from GM plants and other strategies that were previously published in the literature. This strategy will give more guidance on how to assess the allergenicity of novel food proteins and protein sources. PMID:27012375

  18. Use of larvae meal as protein source in broiler diet: Effect on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits.

    PubMed

    Bovera, F; Loponte, R; Marono, S; Piccolo, G; Parisi, G; Iaconisi, V; Gasco, L; Nizza, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of insect meal from larvae ( larvae meal [TML]) as complete replacement of soybean meal (SBM) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits of broilers. A total of eighty 30-d-old male Shaver brown broilers were homogenously divided into 2 groups (each consisting of 8 replicates of 5 birds). Up to 62 d of age, the groups were fed 2 isoproteic and isoenergetic diets differing for the ingredient used as the main protein source: the control group was fed a corn-SBM-based diet, whereas in the TML group, the SBM was completely replaced by TML. Broiler growth performance was measured during the trial. At 62 d of age, 2 broilers per replicate (16 per group) were slaughtered and apparent ileal digestibility coefficients and carcass and meat traits were determined. The use of TML as the main protein source in the broiler diet had no significant effect on most growth performance and carcass traits and chemical and physical properties of meat, the latter being important for marketing purposes. The feed conversion ratio in the entire experimental period (from 30 to 62 d) was improved in the TML group compared with the SBM group ( < 0.05). The apparent ileal digestibility coefficients of DM, OM, and CP in broilers fed the SBM diet were greater ( < 0.01) than the other group. The full digestive system in broilers fed SBM had a lower ( < 0.05) absolute and relative weight than that of broilers fed TML. Also, the weight and the percentage of the spleen in the SBM group were lower ( < 0.05) than those in the TML group. The length of the entire intestine in the group fed TML was greater ( < 0.05) than the other group and the same happened when intestinal length was expressed as percentage of broiler BW ( < 0.05). Among the different intestinal tracts, the ileum and ceca of broilers fed TML had a greater ( < 0.05) length than that of broilers fed SBM. Also, ceca weight (as an absolute value or percentage on

  19. Use of larvae meal as protein source in broiler diet: Effect on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits.

    PubMed

    Bovera, F; Loponte, R; Marono, S; Piccolo, G; Parisi, G; Iaconisi, V; Gasco, L; Nizza, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of insect meal from larvae ( larvae meal [TML]) as complete replacement of soybean meal (SBM) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits of broilers. A total of eighty 30-d-old male Shaver brown broilers were homogenously divided into 2 groups (each consisting of 8 replicates of 5 birds). Up to 62 d of age, the groups were fed 2 isoproteic and isoenergetic diets differing for the ingredient used as the main protein source: the control group was fed a corn-SBM-based diet, whereas in the TML group, the SBM was completely replaced by TML. Broiler growth performance was measured during the trial. At 62 d of age, 2 broilers per replicate (16 per group) were slaughtered and apparent ileal digestibility coefficients and carcass and meat traits were determined. The use of TML as the main protein source in the broiler diet had no significant effect on most growth performance and carcass traits and chemical and physical properties of meat, the latter being important for marketing purposes. The feed conversion ratio in the entire experimental period (from 30 to 62 d) was improved in the TML group compared with the SBM group ( < 0.05). The apparent ileal digestibility coefficients of DM, OM, and CP in broilers fed the SBM diet were greater ( < 0.01) than the other group. The full digestive system in broilers fed SBM had a lower ( < 0.05) absolute and relative weight than that of broilers fed TML. Also, the weight and the percentage of the spleen in the SBM group were lower ( < 0.05) than those in the TML group. The length of the entire intestine in the group fed TML was greater ( < 0.05) than the other group and the same happened when intestinal length was expressed as percentage of broiler BW ( < 0.05). Among the different intestinal tracts, the ileum and ceca of broilers fed TML had a greater ( < 0.05) length than that of broilers fed SBM. Also, ceca weight (as an absolute value or percentage on

  20. EFFECT OF PROTEIN SOURCE DURING WEIGHT LOSS ON BODY COMPOSITION, CARDIOMETABOLIC RISK AND PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE IN ABDOMINALLY OBESE, OLDER ADULTS: A PILOT FEEDING STUDY

    PubMed Central

    BEAVERS, K.M.; GORDON, M.M.; EASTER, L.; BEAVERS, D.P.; HAIRSTON, K.G.; NICKLAS, B.J.; VITOLINS, M.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study was to begin to examine the effect of dietary protein source (soy protein versus non-soy protein) during weight loss on body composition, and cardiometabolic and functional decline risk factors in older, abdominally obese adults. Design Two-arm, single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Setting Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem NC 27157, USA. Participants 25 older (68.4±5.5 years, 88% female), abdominally obese (BMI: 35.1±4.3 kg/m2; WC: 101.4±13.1 cm) men and women were randomized to participate in the study. Intervention A 12-week weight loss intervention, with participants randomized to consume soy protein-based meal replacements (S; n=12) or non-soy protein-based meal replacements (NS; n=12), in addition to prepared meals, and all participants targeted to receive an individualized caloric deficit of 500 kcal/day. Measurements Body weight and composition (assessed via DXA and CT), conventional biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk, and physical performance measures were assessed pre- and post-intervention. Additional endpoints of feasibility (accrual, participation, retention, compliance, and safety) are reported. Results A total of 24 participants (87% female) completed the study (96% retention) and lost an average of 7.8±3.0 kg over the 12-week period, with no difference seen between groups (p=0.83). Although nearly all measures of global and regional body composition were significantly reduced following the 12-week intervention, differences were not observed between groups. Among cardiometabolic risk factors and physical performance measures, only diastolic blood pressure was significantly lower in the NS group compared to the S group (66.7±2.7 mmHg vs 73.5±2.7 mmHg, respectively; p=0.04). Interestingly, in groups combined, despite significant reductions in body weight and lean mass, no significant changes in 400-meter walk time (+5.3±43.4 s), short physical performance battery score (+0.1±1

  1. Developmental Genes Have Pleiotropic Effects on Plant Morphology and Source Capacity, Eventually Impacting on Seed Protein Content and Productivity in Pea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Burstin, Judith; Marget, Pascal; Huart, Myriam; Moessner, Annie; Mangin, Brigitte; Duchene, Christiane; Desprez, Bruno; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Duc, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Increasing pea (Pisum sativum) seed nutritional value and particularly seed protein content, while maintaining yield, is an important challenge for further development of this crop. Seed protein content and yield are complex and unstable traits, integrating all the processes occurring during the plant life cycle. During filling, seeds are the main sink to which assimilates are preferentially allocated at the expense of vegetative organs. Nitrogen seed demand is satisfied partly by nitrogen acquired by the roots, but also by nitrogen remobilized from vegetative organs. In this study, we evaluated the respective roles of nitrogen source capacity and sink strength in the genetic variability of seed protein content and yield. We showed in eight genotypes of diverse origins that both the maximal rate of nitrogen accumulation in the seeds and nitrogen source capacity varied among genotypes. Then, to identify the genetic factors responsible for seed protein content and yield variation, we searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed traits and for indicators of sink strength and source nitrogen capacity. We detected 261 QTL across five environments for all traits measured. Most QTL for seed and plant traits mapped in clusters, raising the possibility of common underlying processes and candidate genes. In most environments, the genes Le and Afila, which control internode length and the switch between leaflets and tendrils, respectively, determined plant nitrogen status. Depending on the environment, these genes were linked to QTL of seed protein content and yield, suggesting that source-sink adjustments depend on growing conditions. PMID:17449650

  2. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet retains effectiveness to reduce blood pressure when lean pork is substituted for chicken and fish as the predominant source of protein123

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, R Drew; Wright, Amy J; Chen, Ningning; Campbell, Wayne W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease and premature mortality that is improved by the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. The DASH diet emphasizes increased consumption of fruit and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, nuts, and poultry and fish and reduced intakes of fats, red meats (including pork), sodium, and added sugars. Objective: We sought to evaluate whether the consumption of lean pork compared with the consumption of chicken and fish as the predominant protein source in a DASH-style diet affected blood pressure (BP) control in men and women with elevated BP. Design: In a randomized crossover study, 13 women and 6 men [mean ± SEM age: 61 ± 2 y; BMI (in kg/m2): 31.2 ± 1.4] with elevated BP [systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure (DBP): 130 ± 2/85 ± 2 mm Hg] consumed a DASH-style diet for two 6-wk controlled dietary interventions (with a 4-wk diet washout between interventions) with either lean pork [DASH diet with pork (DASH-P)] or chicken and fish [DASH diet with chicken and fish (DASH-CF), the control diet] as the major protein source (55% of total protein intake). SBP and DBP were measured manually and with a 24-h BP monitoring system on 3 d before and 3 d at the end of each diet intervention. Results: Preintervention manual BP (DASH-P: 130/84 ± 2/1 mm Hg; DASH-CF: 129/84 ± 2/1 mg Hg) and postintervention manual BP (DASH-P: 122/79 ± 2/1 mm Hg; DASH-CF: 123/78 ± 3/1) were not different between the DASH-P and DASH-CF. Consumption of these DASH-style diets for 6 wk reduced all measures of BP (P < 0.05) with no differences in responses between the DASH-CF and DASH-P. Conclusion: The results indicate that adults with elevated BP may effectively incorporate lean pork into a DASH-style diet for BP reduction. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01696097. PMID:26063693

  3. An alternative animal protein source: cultured beef.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Alternative sources of animal proteins are needed that can be produced efficiently, thereby providing food security with diminished ecological burden. It is feasible to culture beef from bovine skeletal muscle stem cells, but the technology is still under development. The aim is to create a beef mimic with equivalent taste, texture, and appearance and with the same nutritional value as livestock-produced beef. More specifically, there is a need for optimization of protein content and fat content. In addition, scalability of production requires modification of current small-scale bioreactors to the largest possible scale. The necessary steps and current progress suggest that this aim is achievable, but formal evidence is still required. Similarly, we can be optimistic about consumer acceptance based on initial data, but detailed studies are needed to gain more insight into potential psychological obstacles that could lead to rejection. These challenges are formidable but likely surmountable. The severity of upcoming food-security threats warrants serious research and development efforts to address the challenges that come with bringing cultured beef to the market.

  4. An alternative animal protein source: cultured beef.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Alternative sources of animal proteins are needed that can be produced efficiently, thereby providing food security with diminished ecological burden. It is feasible to culture beef from bovine skeletal muscle stem cells, but the technology is still under development. The aim is to create a beef mimic with equivalent taste, texture, and appearance and with the same nutritional value as livestock-produced beef. More specifically, there is a need for optimization of protein content and fat content. In addition, scalability of production requires modification of current small-scale bioreactors to the largest possible scale. The necessary steps and current progress suggest that this aim is achievable, but formal evidence is still required. Similarly, we can be optimistic about consumer acceptance based on initial data, but detailed studies are needed to gain more insight into potential psychological obstacles that could lead to rejection. These challenges are formidable but likely surmountable. The severity of upcoming food-security threats warrants serious research and development efforts to address the challenges that come with bringing cultured beef to the market. PMID:25376889

  5. Effect of palm kernel cake as protein source in a concentrate diet on intake, digestibility and live weight gain of goats fed Napier grass.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mijanur; Abdullah, Ramli Bin; Wan Embong, Wan Khadijah; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Akashi, Ryo

    2013-03-01

    The effects of palm kernel cake (PKC) as a protein source in a concentrate diet (comprising 35 % crushed maize, 30 % rice bran, 32 % PKC, 2 % vitamin mineral premix and 1 % salt) were examined on intake, live weight (LW) gain and digestibility in female goats (average LW of 12.4 ± 2.6 kg). Four goats were randomly allocated to each of the four treatment diets: (a) Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) offered ad libitum (T1), (b) T1 + concentrate at 0.5 % of LW (T2), (c) T1 + concentrate at 1.0 % of LW (T3) and (d) T1 + concentrate at 2.0 % of LW (T4). A 7-day digestibility trial and an 82-day growth experiment were conducted. No differences were observed among diets for intakes of roughage dry matter (DM), total DM, organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF). The crude protein (CP) intake increased (P < 0.05) as the level of concentrate in the diets increased. Goats fed the T2, T3 and T4 diets gained 10.2, 34.1 and 52.5 g/head/day, respectively, while the control group (T1) lost weight (-12.7 g/head/day). The apparent digestibilities of DM, OM and CP were similar (P > 0.05) among treatments. The digestibility of dietary NDF decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of concentrate, but there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference between T2 and T3 diets. Supplementing a basal diet of Napier grass with PKC-based concentrate improved CP intake and LW gain. The PKC-based concentrate diet can therefore be exploited for the use of local feed resources for goat production; however, further research is required to achieve the best growth response.

  6. [The effect of the main protein source in rations of ewes and the time of blood collection on the glucose and triacylglycerol levels in blood at the beginning of lactation].

    PubMed

    Hatzipanagiotou, A; Liamadis, D; Hatzikas, A

    1994-01-01

    The effect of the protein source of the ration (soybean meal, cottonseed cake, corn gluten and fish meal) and the time (period) of blood sample taking was examined on the content of glucose and triacylglycerols in the blood during the initial lactation period. Thirty-six ewes of the Thessaloniki crossbred type were randomly allocated to 4 groups. The ewes of each group were fed ad libitum with one of the 4 different rations, respectively. From each ewe 4 blood samples were taken in different times. The experimental design was factorial 4x4 with 9 replicates with main factors the main protein source (ration), as well as the time of blood sample taking. The protein source effect on glucose and triacylglycerol concentration in blood was not significant, while that of time of blood sample taking was significant. The interaction "ration" X "time" of sampling for the glucose and TGC concentration was not significant. PMID:7487483

  7. Effects of replacing canola meal as the major protein source with wheat dried distillers grains with solubles on ruminal function, microbial protein synthesis, omasal flow, and milk production in cows.

    PubMed

    Chibisa, G E; Christensen, D A; Mutsvangwa, T

    2012-02-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of replacing canola meal (CM) as the major protein source with wheat-based dried distillers grains with solubles (W-DDGS) on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein production, omasal nutrient flow and animal performance. Eight lactating dairy cows were fed in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods (20 d of dietary adaptation and 8 d of measurements). Four cows in one Latin square were ruminally cannulated for measurements of ruminal fermentation characteristics and flow of nutrients at the omasal canal. Cows were fed either a standard barley silage-based total mixed ration containing CM as the major protein supplement (0% W-DDGS, control) or diets formulated to contain 10, 15, and 20% W-DDGS (dry matter basis), with W-DDGS replacing primarily CM. Diets were isonitrogenous (18.9% crude protein) and contained 3.0, 3.2, 3.5, and 3.7% ether extract for 0, 10, 15, and 20% W-DDGS, respectively. Diets contained 50% forage and 50% concentrate. Inclusion of W-DDGS linearly increased dry matter intake (29.5, 31.2, 30.2, and 31.9 kg/d for 0, 10, 15, and 20% W-DDGS, respectively). The addition of W-DDGS in place of CM resulted in a 1.2- to 1.8-kg increase in milk yield (42.9, 44.7, 44.1, and 44.5 kg/d for 0, 10, 15, and 20% W-DDGS); however, a quadratic change in feed efficiency (i.e., milk yield/DM intake) occurred as the dietary level of W-DDGS increased. Treatments did not differ for milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations; however, quadratic changes were observed in milk yields of fat (1.48, 1.56, 1.62, and 1.55 kg/d for 0, 10, 15, and 20% W-DDGS, respectively), protein (1.44, 1.46, 1.49, and 1.42 kg/d) and lactose (1.96, 2.02, 2.09, and 1.93 kg/d). Ruminal fermentation characteristics did not change except that the inclusion of 20% W-DDGS resulted in a decrease and a tendency for a decrease in molar concentrations of isobutyrate and total volatile fatty acids, respectively. Omasal flow of total

  8. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  9. Short communication: Effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture on feeding behavior and performance of calves during the weaning transition.

    PubMed

    Hadam, D; Kański, J; Burakowska, K; Penner, G B; Kowalski, Z M; Górka, P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture (SM) on feeding behavior and performance of calves during weaning transition. A total of 36 female Holstein calves of a mean age 14.9±1.6 d and body weight 40.1±4.2 kg (mean ± SD) were allocated to 1 of 3 treatments differing in the main source of protein for the SM (12 calves per treatment): (1) soybean meal (TSBM); (2) soybean meal and canola meal (TSBM/TCM); and (3) canola meal (TCM). The SM was offered for ad libitum consumption beginning on the first day of the study, whereas milk replacer (MR) was fed in amounts equal to 900 g (as fed) per day from d 1 to 35 and 450 g/d from d 36 to 42 of the study. Calves were completely weaned on d 43 of the study (57.9±1.6 d of age; mean ± SD), and their performance was monitored for an additional 2 wk. Calf body weight was recorded weekly, and MR and SM intake and fecal fluidity were recorded daily. Feeding behavior of calves during weaning transition, including frequency (no./d), time (min/d), and rate (g/min) of eating the SM as well as frequency and time of drinking water, was monitored on 6 calves per treatment for 2 consecutive days before MR step-down (d 34-35), at MR step-down (d 41-42), and after weaning (d 48-49 of study). Starter mixture intake tended to be higher for TSBM calves as compared with TSBM/TCM calves from d 1 to 35 of the study but was not different between TSBM and TCM calves and was not different between treatments in the whole study period. Calves from TCM treatment had reduced average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency (g of ADG/kg of dry matter intake) and a higher fecal score in the period from d 1 to 35 of the study and had lower feed efficiency and tended to have lower ADG in the whole study period as compared with TSBM calves. Average daily gain and feed efficiency did not differ between TSBM and TSBM/TCM calves. Frequency of eating the SM and drinking water as well as time

  10. Effects of corn-based diet starch content and neutral detergent fiber source on lactation performance, digestibility, and bacterial protein flow in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fredin, S M; Akins, M S; Ferraretto, L F; Shaver, R D

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of corn-based dietary starch content and source of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on lactation performance, nutrient digestion, bacterial protein flow, and ruminal parameters in lactating dairy cows. Eight ruminally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows averaging 193±11d in milk were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatment diets were high corn grain (HCG; 38% corn silage, 19% dry ground corn, and 4% soy hulls), high soy hulls (HSH; 38% corn silage, 11% dry ground corn, and 13% soy hulls), high corn silage (HCS; 50% corn silage, 6% dry ground corn, and 4% soy hulls), and low corn silage (LCS; 29% corn silage, 15% corn, and 19% soy hulls). The HCG, HSH, HCS, and LCS diets contained 29, 23, 24, and 22% starch; 27, 32, 30, and 32% total NDF; and 21, 21, 25, and 17% forage NDF (dry matter basis), respectively. Mean dry matter intake and milk yield were unaffected by treatment. Cows fed LCS had reduced milk fat content compared with HSH and HCS. The concentration of milk urea nitrogen was greater for cows fed HCS compared with the other treatments. Total-tract digestion of NDF was reduced for cows fed the HCG diet. Total-tract starch digestion was increased for cows fed the HSH and HCS compared with HCG and LCS diets. Bacterial protein flow was unaffected by treatment. Ruminal ammonia concentration was reduced in cows fed the HCG and LCS diets compared with the HCS diet. Ruminal propionate increased and the acetate:propionate ratio decreased in cows fed the LCS diet compared with the HCS diet. Ruminal pH was greater for cows fed the HCS diet compared with cows fed the LCS diet. Diet digestibility and performance of mid- to late-lactation cows fed reduced-starch diets by partially replacing corn grain with soy hulls or corn silage was similar to or improved compared with cows fed a normal-starch diet. PMID:25465633

  11. Effect of medium variations (zinc supplementation during oocyte maturation, perifertilization pH, and embryo culture protein source) on equine embryo development after intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ho; Gibbons, John R; Canesin, Heloísa S; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2016-10-15

    Prospective studies were conducted to help define procedural factors affecting in vitro embryo production via intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of equine oocytes. In experiment 1, use of 10% fetal bovine serum as a protein source in embryo culture medium resulted in a higher blastocyst rate than did use of a combination of 3% fetal bovine serum, 3% equine preovulatory follicular fluid, and 4% human serum substitute (37% vs. 15%, respectively, P < 0.05). In experiment 2, the effect of zinc supplementation (0, 0.5, 1, or 1.5 μg/mL) during IVM was examined. There were no significant differences in rates of cleavage or blastocyst development (20%-31%). However, the proportion of blastocysts that developed on Day 7 for the added-zinc treatments was significantly higher than that for the control treatment (45% vs. 8%). In experiment 3, we tested whether use of high-pH medium (pH 8.0-8.4) during ICSI procedures would improve blastocyst rate when sperm with low cleavage rates after ICSI was used. When high-pH conditions were used for sperm preparation and also for the first 2 hours of incubation of injected oocytes after ICSI, the cleavage rate was unaffected but no blastocysts developed (0% vs. 24% for control). When high-pH conditions were used for sperm preparation only, the blastocyst rate was 37%. This was repeated using sperm from a second stallion; there was no significant difference in cleavage or blastocyst rates between sperm preparation in high pH vs. control medium. These findings add to our knowledge of factors affecting in vitro production of equine embryos.

  12. Effect of bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) seeds as a replacement protein source of soybean meal on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing Awassi lambs.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Abdullah Y; Muwalla, Marwan M; Qudsieh, Rasha I; Titi, Hosam H

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing the protein source of soybean meal (SBM) with different levels of bitter vetch seeds (BVS) in the diets of finishing Awassi ram lambs on performance, and carcass characteristics. Diets were designed based on replacing SBM with BVS as a percentage of the diet. Diets were: control (0% BVS), substituting 5% of SBM (5% BVS), 10% of SBM (10% BVS) and the entire SBM in the ration with BVS (15% BVS). Forty eight lambs (18.74 +/- 3.95 kg initial body weight and 70 days of age) were randomly assigned to 4 treatment diets (12 lambs/treatment). Lambs were given an adaptation period of 10 days and the experiment lasted for 84 days. At the end of the trial, a digestibility experiment was performed and 6 lambs from each treatment were slaughtered to evaluate carcass characteristics. Average daily gain tended (P = 0.07) to be higher for lambs fed 10% BVS when compared to the other diets. Neutral detergent fiber digestibility was higher (P < 0.01) in control diet compared to the other diets. Fat depth (C) and leg fat depth (L3) tended (0.05 < P < 0.1) to be affected by BVS levels in the diet. Leg total lean % was the highest (P < 0.05) in 5% BVS and 10% BVS diets. These results suggest that substituting SBM with BVS in the diets did not influence performance or carcass characteristics of lambs. However, the cost of ration formulation decreases since SBM is a very expensive component of the ration.

  13. Differential Effects of Dietary Fat Content and Protein Source on Bone Phenotype and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Female C57Bl/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sawin, Emily A.; Stroup, Bridget M.; Murali, Sangita G.; O’Neill, Lucas M.; Ntambi, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a 64-amino acid glycophosphopeptide released from κ-casein during cheesemaking that promotes satiety, reduces body fat, increases bone mass and infers prebiotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The impact of adiposity and gender on bone health is unclear. Objective To determine how feeding female mice diets providing 60% Fat Kcal (high-fat) or 13% Fat Kcal (control) with either GMP or casein as the protein source impacts: body composition, ex vivo fatty acid oxidation, bone (femoral) biomechanical performance, and the relationship between body composition and bone. Methods Weanling female C57Bl/6 mice were fed high-fat (60% Fat Kcal) or control diets (13% Fat Kcal) with GMP or casein from 3 to 32 weeks of age with assessment of body weight and food intake. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fatty acid oxidation was measured in liver, muscle, and fat tissues using 14C-palmitate. Plasma concentrations of hormones and cytokines were determined. Bone biomechanical performance was assessed by the 3-point bending test. Results Female mice fed high-fat diets showed increased fatty acid oxidation capacity in both gastrocnemius muscle and brown adipose tissue compared to mice fed the control diets with a lower fat content. Despite increased fat mass in mice fed the high-fat diets, there was little evidence of glucose impairment or inflammation. Mice fed the high-fat diets had significantly greater total body bone mineral density (BMD), femoral BMD, and femoral cross-sectional area than mice fed the control diets. Femora of mice fed the high-fat diets had increased yield load and maximum load before fracture, consistent with greater bone strength, but reduced post-yield displacement or ductility, consistent with bone brittleness. Female mice fed a high-fat GMP diet displayed increased fat oxidation capacity in subcutaneous fat relative to mice fed the high-fat casein diet. Regardless of dietary fat

  14. Studies on the development of infant foods from plant protein sources. Part II. Effect of processing conditions on the chemical and nutritive properties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Khaleque, A; Elías, L G; Braham, J E; Bressani, R

    1985-09-01

    In order to improve the taste, flavor and nutritional quality of chickpea (Cicer arietinum), various processing conditions were studied. The decorticated samples were processed under various conditions, either by presoaking or non-soaking in water or sodium carbonate solution. The proteins were also isolated from water or carbonate-presoaked chickpea and subjected to various processing. Carbonate-presoaked samples gave slightly lower protein and ash values. No major changes in other constituents were observed. Subjective analysis of the intensity of characteristic chickpea flavor in processed samples was carried out, indicating some improvement in the carbonate-presoaked samples. Carbonate-treated samples exhibited a lighter color. The carbonate presoaking procedure had no adverse effect on the availability of lysine and nitrogen solubility index (NSI), as compared to the water-presoaking procedure. The time required to inactivate trypsin inhibitors in carbonate-presoaked chickpea at boiling temperature, was half that required in the case of water-presoaked ones. Under the conditions used in treating chickpea with sodium carbonate, no beneficial effect was observed in reducing the tannin content. No significant differences were observed in net protein ratio (NPR) among the various processed chickpea samples, even though in some cases isolated protein gave significantly lower NPR values. Digestibility values were higher for isolated protein than for whole chickpea samples.

  15. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  16. Factors influencing dietary protein sources in the PREMIER trial population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hwa; Miwa, Saki; Li, Yi-Ju; Wang, Yanfang; Levy, Erma; Lastor, Katherine; Champagne, Catherine

    2010-02-01

    Previous research suggests that protein intake, particularly plant protein, may benefit blood pressure control. However, very little has been published regarding protein sources in diets of US adults and factors influencing these choices. The purpose of this report is to describe specific sources of animal and plant proteins in diets of PREMIER clinical trial participants at baseline and how the PREMIER intervention, along with participant demographics, affected protein sources. Adult participants (n=809) who completed the 18-month PREMIER lifestyle intervention trial and had at least one diet recall at each of three study visits were included. Participants were recruited from four clinical centers in the Eastern, Southern, and Northeastern regions of United States. The PREMIER trial, conducted from 1999 to 2002, compared the impact on blood pressure of two structured behavioral interventions focusing on the traditional lifestyle modifications for blood pressure control with or without the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary pattern. Protein sources were assessed by two unannounced 24-hour recalls at each of three study visits. Differences in protein sources were mainly related to participant demographics, with relatively moderate impact of the intervention. The top four protein sources for all the study participants were poultry, dairy, refined grains and beef, each contributing approximately 10% to 17% in descending order to the total protein intake at baseline. Animal and plant protein each comprised approximately 66% and 34%, respectively, to the total daily protein intake at baseline, and such overall contribution pattern remained relatively constant over time. However, sex, race, age, and body weight status all influenced contribution patterns from different food groups significantly. These influences significantly impact choice and are essential elements to consider when designing intervention programs to alter protein contributions from animal

  17. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration. PMID:27074290

  18. Effects of diets differing in protein source and technical treatment on digestibility, performance and visceral and biochemical parameters of fattening pigs.

    PubMed

    Liermann, Wendy; Berk, Andreas; Böschen, Verena; Dänicke, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the experiment on 100 cross-bred barrows was to compare commercial diets for fattening pigs based on either soya bean meal (SBM) imported from non-European countries with diets based on a mixture of locally produced rape seed meal, distillers' dried grains with solubles and soya beans as main protein sources. In addition, these both types of diets were processed by two different technical feed treatments, i.e. coarse grinding without hydrothermal treatment or fine grinding and pelleting. With only few exceptions, nutrients of the diet without SBM were more digestible (p < 0.05) resulting in a higher metabolisable energy (ME) content. Fine grinding and pelleting increased also the ME content and the nutrient digestibility with the exception of crude fibre. Higher feed intake of animals that fed diets without SBM (p < 0.01) resulted in higher average daily gain (p < 0.01). However feeding this diet, the higher digestibility was not reflected in a decreased feed-to-gain ratio (FGR), but fine grinding and pelleting reduced FGR (p < 0.001). A higher pH value and a lower DM content of caecal chymus were detected in animals that received coarsely ground feed (p < 0.05). Animals that fed finely ground and pelleted feed had higher slaughter and relative liver weights and higher blood cholesterol concentrations (p = 0.040). The urea concentrations of blood were lower (p = 0.019) after feeding diets without SBM. In conclusion, SBM imported from non-European countries can be replaced by alternative local protein sources without compromising digestibility or performances of animals. Although fine grinding and thermal treatment particularly seemed to be advantageous for digestibility and performance, the possible risk of development of stomach lesions should be considered. PMID:27032030

  19. Brain protein deciphered at Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This computer-generated model of a rat glutamate receptor is the first complete portrait of this important link in the nervous system. At the top of the Y-shaped protein, a pair of molecules splay outward like diverging prongs. The bottom section, which is embedded in a neuronal membrane, houses the ion channel. The resolution of this image is 3.6 angstroms per pixel, or just under four ten-billionths of a meter per image unit. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/01/21/glutamate-receptor/

  20. Effect of heat shock on the fatty acid and protein profiles of Cronobacter sakazakii BCRC 13988 as well as its growth and survival in the presence of various carbon, nitrogen sources and disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Li, Po-Ting; Hsiao, Wan-Ling; Yu, Roch-Chui; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Cronobacter sakazakii, a foodborne pathogen, was first subjected to heat shock at 47 °C for 15 min. Effect of heat shock on the fatty acid and protein profiles, carbon and nitrogen source requirements as well as the susceptibilities of C. sakazakii to Clidox-S, a chlorine-containing disinfectant and Quatricide, a quaternary ammonium compound were investigated. Results revealed that heat shock increased the proportion of myristic acid (14:0), palmitic acid (16:0) and the ratio of saturated fatty acid to unsaturated fatty acid, while reducing the proportion of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and cis-vacceric acid (18:1). In addition, eleven proteins showed enhanced expression, while one protein showed decreased expression in the heat-shocked compared to the non-heat-shocked cells. Non-heat-shocked cells in the medium supplemented with beef extract exhibited the highest maximum population. On the contrary, the highest maximum population of heat-shocked C. sakazakii was noted in the medium having either tryptone or yeast extract as the nitrogen source. Among the various carbon sources examined, the growth of the test organism, regardless of heat shock, was greatest in the medium having glucose as the carbon source. Furthermore, heat shock enhanced the resistance of C. sakazakii to Clidox-S or Quatricide.

  1. Protein nutrition in fish: protein/energy ratio and alternative protein sources to fish meal.

    PubMed

    Sanz, A; García Gallego, M; De la Higuera, M

    2000-09-01

    Those interested in the design and manufacture of feeds for intensive fish farming face the basic concern of formulating mixtures for the best yield at the lowest costs. Of the macronutrients in the feed, protein has and continues to receive special consideration because fish present high and specific needs for this constituent. Traditionally, protein has been supplied primarily by fish meals. This paper presents a synthesis of the efforts made and the lines explored to achieve an effective reduction of the amount of fish meal in the feeds for fish, following two strategies: reduction of the protein in the feeds and the use of new raw materials to replace fish meal.

  2. Exotic protein sources to meet all needs.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Louwrens C; Cawthorn, Donna

    2013-12-01

    Venison from farmed deer has by now become common on the market. This follows the application of animal husbandry techniques to ensure a controlled supply of quality meat. Numerous studies discussed in this presentation have elucidated some of the factors that influence the meat composition and quality derived from various deer species. On the other hand, meat from wild, free-roaming animals has not yet reached a similar position in the industry and in the mind of the consumer. Yet these species show great potential, especially as pertaining to their meat production when discussed under the global warming scenario. In particular, the rodent species that are currently utilized in the bushmeat trade show potential for meat production. This presentation will endeavor to discuss the positive and negative aspects of these species as potential meat sources.

  3. Long-term use of corn coproducts as a source of protein in beef finishing diets and the effects on carcass characteristics and round muscle quality.

    PubMed

    Stelzleni, A M; Segers, J R; Stewart, R L

    2016-03-01

    A finishing trial was conducted during the late spring and summer of 2 consecutive years to evaluate long-term feeding of corn gluten feed and dried distillers' grains with solubles in finishing rations in the southeastern United States on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality attributes. Each year, 36 steers (yr 1 BW = 396 ± 18 kg; yr 2 BW = 436 ± 23 kg) were assigned to 1 of 3 finishing diets that contained 1) 25% dried corn gluten feed (CGF), 2) 25% dried distillers' grains plus solubles (DDGS), or 3) 10% soybean meal and 15% ground corn (SBM) and evaluated over a 100-d feedlot period. All steers were previously fed their respective diets at 25% of DM in a corn silage-based stockering system for 84 d. During the 100-d feedlot trial, weights were recorded and carcass traits were estimated via ultrasound on d -0, 50, and 100. All steers were subsequently harvested under federal inspection and had carcass data collected for quality and yield traits. At 48 h postmortem, the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and semimembranosus (SM) were collected for proximate analysis and aged for 7, 14, and 21 d for Warner-Bratzler shear and sensory analysis. Diet did not affect ( ≥ 0.14) BW, DMI, or ultrasound composition traits; however, DDGS steers had greater ADG ( = 0.05) than SBM steers and had greater ( = 0.04) G:F than CGF or SBM steers. There were no differences in carcass characteristics due to diet except the CGF carcasses had greater LM area and marbling scores ( ≤ 0.05). Protein source did not affect proximate composition, but the RF had greater percent moisture and lower percent protein compared with the VL and SM and greater percent lipid than the SM ( ≤ 0.01). Shear force analysis revealed a diet × aging period interaction ( = 0.04) where DDGS steaks were similar across all aging periods; however, steaks from SBM and CGF carcasses became more tender after 14 and 21 d of aging, respectively. Sensory panel results indicate

  4. Protein source and nutrient density in the diets of male broilers from 8 to 21 d of age: Effects on small intestine morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Peebles, E D; Morgan, T W; Harkess, R L; Zhai, W

    2015-01-01

    In a companion study, high amino acid (AA) or apparent metabolizable energy (AME) densities in the diets of broilers from 8 to 21 d of age were found to improve feed conversion. A total of 1,120 male Ross×Ross 708 chicks were randomly allocated to 80 pens (8 treatments, 10 replications per treatment, 14 chicks per pen). A 2×2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to investigate the interaction among the protein source (high distillers dried grains with solubles diet [hDDGS] or high meat and bone meal diet [hMBM]), AA density (moderate or high), and AME density (2,998 or 3,100 kcal/kg) of diets on small intestine morphology. Duodenum, jejunum, and ileum samples from 2 chicks per pen were collected and measured individually at 21 d. Jejunum sections were processed for histological analysis. Chicks fed hDDGS diets exhibited longer small intestines than did chicks fed hMBM diets. Particularly, when chicks were fed high AA density diets, jejuna were longer in groups fed hDDGS diets than groups fed hMBM diets. Dietary treatments did not affect jejunum villus height, width, area, crypt depth, villus to crypt ratio, goblet cell size, or cell density. In birds fed diets containing a moderate AA and a high AME density, jejunum muscle layers of chicks fed hDDGS diets were thicker than those fed hMBM diets. Chicks exhibited a lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) and a higher BW gain when their crypts were shorter. In conclusion, an hDDGS diet may facilitate small intestine longitudinal growth in broilers, which may subsequently improve dietary nutrient absorption. In addition, broiler chicks with shallow intestinal crypts exhibited better growth performance. PMID:25542197

  5. Protein source and nutrient density in the diets of male broilers from 8 to 21 d of age: Effects on small intestine morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Peebles, E D; Morgan, T W; Harkess, R L; Zhai, W

    2015-01-01

    In a companion study, high amino acid (AA) or apparent metabolizable energy (AME) densities in the diets of broilers from 8 to 21 d of age were found to improve feed conversion. A total of 1,120 male Ross×Ross 708 chicks were randomly allocated to 80 pens (8 treatments, 10 replications per treatment, 14 chicks per pen). A 2×2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to investigate the interaction among the protein source (high distillers dried grains with solubles diet [hDDGS] or high meat and bone meal diet [hMBM]), AA density (moderate or high), and AME density (2,998 or 3,100 kcal/kg) of diets on small intestine morphology. Duodenum, jejunum, and ileum samples from 2 chicks per pen were collected and measured individually at 21 d. Jejunum sections were processed for histological analysis. Chicks fed hDDGS diets exhibited longer small intestines than did chicks fed hMBM diets. Particularly, when chicks were fed high AA density diets, jejuna were longer in groups fed hDDGS diets than groups fed hMBM diets. Dietary treatments did not affect jejunum villus height, width, area, crypt depth, villus to crypt ratio, goblet cell size, or cell density. In birds fed diets containing a moderate AA and a high AME density, jejunum muscle layers of chicks fed hDDGS diets were thicker than those fed hMBM diets. Chicks exhibited a lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) and a higher BW gain when their crypts were shorter. In conclusion, an hDDGS diet may facilitate small intestine longitudinal growth in broilers, which may subsequently improve dietary nutrient absorption. In addition, broiler chicks with shallow intestinal crypts exhibited better growth performance.

  6. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  7. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    SciTech Connect

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  8. Effect of dietary inclusion of toasted guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) meal as a source of protein on performance of White Leghorn layers.

    PubMed

    Rao, S V Rama; Raju, M V L N; Prakash, B; Reddy, E Pradeep Kumar; Panda, A K

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of including toasted (120°C/35 min) guar meal (GM, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) in the diet on performance and egg shell quality of White Leghorn (WL) layers. Totals of 2376 and 2816 layer chickens (Babcock, BV 300) were randomly distributed into 27 and 32 replicates with 88 birds each in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Three diets in Experiment 1 (0, 50 and 100 g GM) and 4 diets in Experiment 2 (0, 50, 100 and 150 g GM/kg) were prepared having similar concentrations of energy and protein. Each diet was fed ad libitum to 9 and 8 replicates, respectively, in Experiments 1 (from 53 to 68 weeks) and 2 (35 to 46 weeks of age). Compared to soya bean meal (SBM) GM contained similar concentrations of protein, but was deficient in all essential amino acids except arginine, which was 70% higher than in SBM. Total non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) content in GM (166 g/kg) was lower than that of SBM (179 g/kg). Amongst different NSP fractions, GM contained higher levels of arabans, xylans, mannans and glucans compared to SBM. The galactomannan gum content in GM was 46 g/kg. Egg production (EP), body weight (BW), food intake (FI), food efficiency (FE) and egg quality (shell weight, shell per cent, shell thickness, Haugh unit score, egg density and egg breaking strength) parameters were not affected by incorporating GM up to 100 g/kg diet in Experiment 1. However, egg weight (EW) and egg mass (EM) were reduced significantly in groups fed on 100 g/kg diet. In Experiment 2, EP and FE were not affected by incorporating GM up to 100 g/kg, but were reduced at 150 g/kg diet. FI, EW, BW and egg quality parameters were not affected by incorporating toasted GM up to 150 g/kg diet. Based on the results of both experiments, it is concluded that toasted GM can be included in WL layer diets up to 100 g/kg without affecting EP, FE, EW, EM, Haugh unit score, BW and egg shell quality parameters.

  9. Secreted proteins as a fundamental source for biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Stastna, Miroslava; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2012-01-01

    The proteins secreted by various cells (the secretomes) are a potential rich source of biomarkers since they reflect various states of the cells at real time and at given conditions. To have accessible, sufficient and reliable protein markers is desirable since they mark various stages of disease development and their presence/absence can be used for diagnosis, prognosis, risk stratification and therapeutic monitoring. As direct analysis of blood/plasma, a common and noninvasive patient screening method, can be difficult for candidate protein biomarker identification, the alternative/complementary approaches are required, one of them is the analysis of secretomes in cell conditioned media in vitro. Since the proteins secreted by cells as a response to various stimuli are most likely secreted into blood/plasma, the identification and preselection of candidate protein biomarkers from cell secretomes with subsequent validation of their presence at higher levels in serum/plasma is a promising approach. In this review, we discuss the proteins secreted by three progenitor cell types (smooth muscle, endothelial and cardiac progenitor cells) and two adult cell types (neonatal rat ventrical myocytes and smooth muscle cells) which can be relevant to cardiovascular research and which have been recently published in the literature. We found, at least for secretome studies included in this review, that secretomes of progenitor and adult cells overlap by 48% but the secretomes are very distinct among progenitor cell themselves as well as between adult cells. In addition, we compared secreted proteins to protein identifications listed in the Human Plasma PeptideAtlas and in two reports with cardiovascular-related proteins and we performed the extensive literature search to find if any of these secreted proteins were identified in a biomarker study. As expected, many proteins have been identified as biomarkers in cancer but 18 proteins (out of 62) have been tested as biomarkers in

  10. Biochemical studies of some non-conventional sources of proteins. Part 7. Effect of detoxification treatments on the nutritional quality of apricot kernels.

    PubMed

    el-Adawy, T A; Rahma, E H; el-Badawey, A A; Gomaa, M A; Lásztity, R; Sarkadi, L

    1994-01-01

    Detoxification of apricot kernels by soaking in distilled water and ammonium hydroxide for 30 h at 47 degrees C decreased the total protein, non-protein nitrogen, total ash, glucose, sucrose, minerals, non-essential amino acids, polar amino acids, acidic amino acids, aromatic amino acids, antinutritional factors, hydrocyanic acid, tannins and phytic acid. On the other hand, removal of toxic and bitter compounds from apricot kernels increased the relative content of crude fibre, starch, total essential amino acids. Higher in-vitro protein digestibility and biological value was also observed. Generally, the detoxified apricot kernels were nutritionally well balanced. Utilization and incorporation of detoxified apricot kernel flours in food products is completely safe from the toxicity point of view. PMID:8145802

  11. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  12. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  13. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  14. [Plants as an alternative source of therapeutic proteins].

    PubMed

    Łucka, Marta; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Szemraj, Janusz; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest of researchers in developing efficient plant heterologous expression systems of proteins for a wide range of applications. It represents an alternative to the traditional strategy utilizing bacterial, yeast, insect or mammalian cells. New techniques of identification and characterization and effective methods of plant genetic transformation allow the range of recombinant protein products to be expanded. Great expectations are associated with the use of plants as bioreactors for the production of specific proteins of therapeutic interest. This strategy offers a number of advantages, the most important being: the possibility of a significant reduction in production costs, the safety of the products obtained and full eukaryotic post-translational modifications of proteins. A group of proteins of special interest is pharmaceuticals, and a number of successful experiments have confirmed the possibility of obtaining heterogeneous proteins with therapeutic potential: monoclonal antibodies, vaccine antigens, and a variety of cytokines. This work is focused on selected recombinant proteins belonging to those groups expression of which was achieved in plant cells. These proteins may be used in the future for therapy or prevention of viral, bacterial or cancer diseases. PMID:25811472

  15. Proteins of Brassicaceae oilseeds and their potential as a plant protein source.

    PubMed

    Wanasundara, Janitha P D

    2011-08-01

    Among the commercially cultivated Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) plants, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Brassica rapa, and Sinapis alba store significant amounts of oil and protein in the seed. At present, Brassica seed proteins are primarily used for livestock feeding based on the nutritional value. The point of curiosity is whether the present knowledge on the protein structure, biochemical characteristics, nutritive value, and the recovery processes are inadequate to develop Brassica proteins into a usable plant protein source or these proteins are of substandard for uses beyond animal nutrition applications. Cruciferin (11S) and napin (2S) are the predominant storage proteins of Brassicaceae seeds that contribute to different properties and functions. A gamut of information is available on the chemistry, nutritional value, as well as the functionality in foods, and associated non-protein components of canola/rapeseed storage proteins. The intention of this article is to critically review what is known about the predominant storage proteins of commercially produced Brassicaceae seeds relative to the above aspects and identify the knowledge gaps.

  16. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σS. Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and

  17. Protein sources for finishing calves as affected by management system.

    PubMed

    Sindt, M H; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Vieselmeyer, B A

    1993-03-01

    Two beef production systems were evaluated in conjunction with an evaluation of escape protein sources for finishing calves. Two hundred forty crossbred steers and 80 crossbred heifer calves (BW = 267 +/- 2 kg) were split into two groups: 1) control, finished (207 d) after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period and 2) grazing cornstalks for 74 d after a 3-wk feedlot adjustment period, then finished (164 d). Finishing treatments were sources and proportions of supplemental CP: 1) urea 100%; 2) soybean meal (SBM) 100%; 3) blood meal (BM) 50%, urea 50%; 4) feather meal (FTH) 50%, urea 50%; 5) SBM 50%, FTH 25%, urea 25%; 6) SBM 25%, FTH 38%, urea 37%; 7) FTH 25%, BM 25%, urea 50%, and 8) FTH 38%, BM 13%, urea 50%. Treatments 1 to 8 were fed in dry-rolled corn (DRC)-based diets. Treatments 9 and 10 were supplement Treatments 1 and 7 fed in diets based on high-moisture corn. Calves finished after a 74-d period of grazing cornstalks consumed more feed (P < .01) and gained faster (P < .01) but were less efficient (P < .05) than calves finished directly after weaning. Although not statistically different, calves finished after grazing cornstalks and supplemented with natural protein in the feedlot were 7% more efficient than calves supplemented with urea alone. Efficiency of calves finished directly after weaning was similar for calves supplemented with natural protein or urea alone. Supplementing SBM/FTH/urea or BM/FTH/urea improved feed efficiency compared with supplementing FTH/urea alone. These data suggest that allowing calves to graze cornstalks before finishing is a possible management option, but this system may require more metabolizable protein in the finishing diet to maximize feed efficiency if the calves are expressing compensatory growth. PMID:8463161

  18. The protein source determines the potential of high protein diets to attenuate obesity development in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Liisberg, Ulrike; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even; Rønnevik, Alexander K; Bjelland, Susanne; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Holm, Jacob Bak; Basse, Astrid Linde; Hansen, Jacob B; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2016-01-01

    The notion that the obesogenic potential of high fat diets in rodents is attenuated when the protein:carbohydrate ratio is increased is largely based on studies using casein or whey as the protein source. We fed C57BL/6J mice high fat-high protein diets using casein, soy, cod, beef, chicken or pork as protein sources. Casein stood out as the most efficient in preventing weight gain and accretion of adipose mass. By contrast, mice fed diets based on pork or chicken, and to a lesser extent mice fed cod or beef protein, had increased adipose tissue mass gain relative to casein fed mice. Decreasing the protein:carbohydrate ratio in diets with casein or pork as protein sources led to accentuated fat mass accumulation. Pork fed mice were more obese than casein fed mice, and relative to casein, the pork-based feed induced substantial accumulation of fat in classic interscapular brown adipose tissue accompanied by decreased UCP1 expression. Furthermore, intake of a low fat diet with casein, but not pork, as a protein source reversed diet-induced obesity. Compared to pork, casein seems unique in maintaining the classical brown morphology in interscapular brown adipose tissue with high UCP1 expression. This was accompanied by increased expression of genes involved in a futile cycling of fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that intake of high protein diets based on other protein sources may not have similar effects, and hence, the obesity protective effect of high protein diets is clearly modulated by protein source. PMID:27386160

  19. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  20. Dietary Protein Sources and the Risk of Stroke in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Adam M.; Pan, An; Rexrode, Kathryn M.; Stampfer, Meir; Hu, Frank B.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Willett, Walter C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few dietary protein sources have been studied prospectively in relation to stroke. We examined the relation between foods that are major protein sources and risk of stroke. Methods We prospectively followed 84,010 women aged 30–55 years at baseline and 43,150 men aged 40–75 years at baseline without diagnosed cancer, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Diet was assessed repeatedly by a standardized and validated questionnaire. We examined the association between protein sources and incidence of stroke using a proportional hazard model adjusted for stroke risk factors. Results During 26 and 22 years of follow-up in women and men, respectively, we documented 2,633 and 1,397 strokes, respectively. In multivariable analyses, higher intake of red meat was associated with an elevated risk of stroke, while a higher intake of poultry was associated with lower risk. In models estimating the effects of exchanging different protein sources, compared to one serving/day of red meat, one serving/day of poultry was associated with a 27% (95% CI: 12% to 39%) lower risk of stroke, nuts with a 17% (95% CI: 4% to 27%) lower risk, fish with a 17% (95% CI: 0% to 30%) lower risk, low-fat dairy with an 11% (95% CI: 5% to 17%) lower risk, and whole-fat dairy with a 10% (95% CI: 4% to 16%) lower risk. We did not see significant associations with exchanging legumes or eggs for red meat. Conclusions These data suggest that stroke risk may be reduced by replacing red meat with other dietary sources of protein. PMID:22207512

  1. Solvent effects in the slow dynamics of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hinsen, Konrad; Kneller, Gerald R

    2008-03-01

    The influence of solvent on the slow internal dynamics of proteins is studied by comparing molecular dynamics simulations of solvated and unsolvated lysozyme. The dynamical trajectories are projected onto the protein's normal modes in order to obtain a separate analysis for each of the associated time scales. The results show that solvent effects are important for the slowest motions (below approximately 1 ps(-1)) but negligible for faster motions. The damping effects seen in the latter show that the principal source of friction in protein dynamics is not the solvent, but the protein itself. PMID:17853448

  2. Influence of the protein status of piglets on their ability to select and prefer protein sources.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Pino, Sergio A; Solà-Oriol, David; Figueroa, Jaime; Pérez, José F

    2014-04-22

    Pigs may have retained the capacity to choose feeds based on their nutritional requirements, even after decades in which they are not allowed to select their diet composition due to the common feeding systems of the intensive pig industry. We used 480 early-weaned piglets in two experiments to assess their ability to select and prefer protein-related sources, depending on their protein status. Piglets were fed after weaning with two isoenergetic diets formulated to contain an optimal or sub-optimal crude-protein (CP) content, a high-protein (HP, 204g CP/kg as-fed) or a low-protein diet (LP, 142g CP/kg), respectively. In Experiment 1, the preference of piglets was assessed by using a choice test between protein (porcine digestible peptides [PDP] 40g/L) and carbohydrate (sucrose 40g/L) water-based solutions for a period of 3min. Piglets showed higher intake and preference for the sucrose 40g/L than for the PDP 40g/L solution, independently of the dietary CP content (9.8mL/kg body weight [BW] vs. 3.7mL/kg BW and 10.4mL/kg BW vs. 4.3mL/kg BW in HP and LP pigs, respectively). In Experiment 2, piglets were given eight training sessions in which two equally preferred flavors were mixed with protein (porcine animal plasma 60g/L, CSp) or carbohydrate (maltodextrin 60g/L, CSc) solutions. In the subsequent choice test, piglets fed the HP diet showed a tendency to a higher intake of CSc than of CSp (6.5mL/kg BW vs. 5.4mL/kg BW). On the other hand, piglets fed the LP diet showed a higher intake and preference for CSp than for CSc (15.5mL/kg BW vs. 10.2mL/kg BW), differences being higher for medium and low BW piglets than for heavy ones. The results show that piglets are unable to express a specific appetite for protein to correct previous underfeeding with it; however, they may show an appropriate dietary selection pattern in order to overcome protein deficiency through associative learning.

  3. A carnivorous sundew plant prefers protein over chitin as a source of nitrogen from its traps.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Krausko, Miroslav; Adamec, Lubomír

    2016-07-01

    Carnivorous plants have evolved in nutrient-poor wetland habitats. They capture arthropod prey, which is an additional source of plant growth limiting nutrients. One of them is nitrogen, which occurs in the form of chitin and proteins in prey carcasses. In this study, the nutritional value of chitin and protein and their digestion traits in the carnivorous sundew Drosera capensis L. were estimated using stable nitrogen isotope abundance. Plants fed on chitin derived 49% of the leaf nitrogen from chitin, while those fed on the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) derived 70% of its leaf nitrogen from this. Moreover, leaf nitrogen content doubled in protein-fed in comparison to chitin-fed plants indicating that the proteins were digested more effectively in comparison to chitin and resulted in significantly higher chlorophyll contents. The surplus chlorophyll and absorbed nitrogen from the protein digestion were incorporated into photosynthetic proteins - the light harvesting antennae of photosystem II. The incorporation of insect nitrogen into the plant photosynthetic apparatus may explain the increased rate of photosynthesis and plant growth after feeding. This general response in many genera of carnivorous plants has been reported in many previous studies.

  4. A carnivorous sundew plant prefers protein over chitin as a source of nitrogen from its traps.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Krausko, Miroslav; Adamec, Lubomír

    2016-07-01

    Carnivorous plants have evolved in nutrient-poor wetland habitats. They capture arthropod prey, which is an additional source of plant growth limiting nutrients. One of them is nitrogen, which occurs in the form of chitin and proteins in prey carcasses. In this study, the nutritional value of chitin and protein and their digestion traits in the carnivorous sundew Drosera capensis L. were estimated using stable nitrogen isotope abundance. Plants fed on chitin derived 49% of the leaf nitrogen from chitin, while those fed on the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) derived 70% of its leaf nitrogen from this. Moreover, leaf nitrogen content doubled in protein-fed in comparison to chitin-fed plants indicating that the proteins were digested more effectively in comparison to chitin and resulted in significantly higher chlorophyll contents. The surplus chlorophyll and absorbed nitrogen from the protein digestion were incorporated into photosynthetic proteins - the light harvesting antennae of photosystem II. The incorporation of insect nitrogen into the plant photosynthetic apparatus may explain the increased rate of photosynthesis and plant growth after feeding. This general response in many genera of carnivorous plants has been reported in many previous studies. PMID:26998942

  5. Variations in Protein Concentration and Nitrogen Sources in Different Positions of Grain in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Zhou, Longjing; Liu, Fulai; Zhou, Qin; Cai, Jian; Wang, Xiao; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The distribution patterns of total protein and protein components in different layers of wheat grain were investigated using the pearling technique, and the sources of different protein components and pearling fractions were identified using 15N isotope tracing methods. It was found that N absorbed from jointing to anthesis (JA) and remobilized to the grain after anthesis was the principal source of grain N, especially in the outer layer. For albumin and globulin, the amount of N absorbed during different stages all showed a decreasing trend from the surface layer to the center part. Whereas, for globulin and glutenin, the N absorbed after anthesis accounted for the main part indicating that for storage protein, the utilization of N assimilated after anthesis is greater than that of the stored N assimilated before anthesis. It is concluded that manipulation of the N application rate during different growth stages could be an effective approach to modulate the distribution of protein fractions in pearled grains for specific end-uses. PMID:27446169

  6. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-08-01

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public. PMID:26308049

  7. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-08-21

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public.

  8. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Pasiakos, Stefan M.; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R.; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public. PMID:26308049

  9. Effects of Supplementation of Mulberry (Morus alba) Foliage and Urea-rice Bran as Fermentable Energy and Protein Sources in Sheep Fed Urea-treated Rice Straw Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Yulistiani, Dwi; Jelan, Z A; Liang, J B; Yaakub, H; Abdullah, N

    2015-04-01

    A digestibility study was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplementing mulberry foliage and urea rice-bran as a source of fermentable energy and protein to 12 sheep fed diets based on urea-treated rice straw (TRS). The three dietary treatments were: T1, TRS with mulberry; T2, TRS with 50% mulberry replaced with rice bran and urea; and T3, TRS with rice bran and urea. The study was arranged in a completely randomized design with four replications for each treatment. The sheep were fed one of the three diets and the supplements were offered at 1.2% of the body weight (BW) and the TRS was provided ad libitum. There were no differences (p>0.05) among the three treatment groups with respect to dry matter (DM) intake (76.8±4.2 g/kg BW(0.75)) and DM, organic matter (OM), and crude protein (CP) digestibility (55.3±1.22; 69.9±0.85; 46.3±1.65% respectively for DM, OM, and CP). The digestibility of fiber (neutral detergent fiber [NDF] and acid detergent fiber) was significantly lower (p<0.05) for T3 (46.2 and 46.6 respectively) compared to T1 (55.8 and 53.7 respectively) and T2 (54.1 and 52.8 respectively). Nitrogen (N) intake by sheep on diet T3 was significantly (p<0.05) higher than sheep fed diet T1. However, N balance did not differ among the three diets (3.0±0.32 g/d). In contrast, the rumen ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations in sheep fed T2 and T3 were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in sheep fed T1. The NH3-N concentrations for all three diets were above the critical value required for optimum rumen microbial growth and synthesis. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations were highest (p<0.05) in T1 (120.3 mM), whilst the molar proportion of propionic acid was highest in T3 (36.9%). However, the microbial N supply in sheep fed T1 and T3 was similar but was significantly (p<0.05) higher than for sheep fed T2. It was concluded that mulberry foliage is a potential supplement of fermentable energy and protein for sheep fed TRS based diet. The suggested level of

  10. GIS: a comprehensive source for protein structure similarities.

    PubMed

    Guerler, Aysam; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2010-07-01

    A web service for analysis of protein structures that are sequentially or non-sequentially similar was generated. Recently, the non-sequential structure alignment algorithm GANGSTA+ was introduced. GANGSTA+ can detect non-sequential structural analogs for proteins stated to possess novel folds. Since GANGSTA+ ignores the polypeptide chain connectivity of secondary structure elements (i.e. alpha-helices and beta-strands), it is able to detect structural similarities also between proteins whose sequences were reshuffled during evolution. GANGSTA+ was applied in an all-against-all comparison on the ASTRAL40 database (SCOP version 1.75), which consists of >10,000 protein domains yielding about 55 x 10(6) possible protein structure alignments. Here, we provide the resulting protein structure alignments as a public web-based service, named GANGSTA+ Internet Services (GIS). We also allow to browse the ASTRAL40 database of protein structures with GANGSTA+ relative to an externally given protein structure using different constraints to select specific results. GIS allows us to analyze protein structure families according to the SCOP classification scheme. Additionally, users can upload their own protein structures for pairwise protein structure comparison, alignment against all protein structures of the ASTRAL40 database (SCOP version 1.75) or symmetry analysis. GIS is publicly available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/gplus.

  11. Continuous cell-free protein synthesis using glycolytic intermediates as energy sources.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Chang-Gil; Oh, In-Seok; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2008-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that glycolytic intermediates can serve as efficient energy sources to regenerate ATP during continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) protein synthesis reactions. Through the use of an optimal energy source, approximately 10 mg/ml of protein was generated from CECF protein synthesis reaction at greatly reduced reagent costs. Compared with the conventional reactions utilizing phosphoenol pyruvate as an energy source, the described method yields 10-fold higher productivity per unit reagent cost, making the techniques of CECF protein synthesis more realistic alternative for rapid protein production.

  12. Nutrient digestibility and energy value of sheep rations differing in protein level, main protein source and non-forage fibre source.

    PubMed

    Milis, Ch; Liamadis, D

    2008-02-01

    Two in vivo digestion trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of diet's crude protein (CP) level, N degradability, and non-forage fibre source (NFFS) on nutrient digestibility and energy value of sheep rations. In each trial, rams were fed four isocaloric and isofibrous rations, differing in main protein and/or NFFS source. At the first trial, mean CP/metabolizable energy (ME) ratio of the diets was 17 g/MJ ME and at the second trial, 13 g/MJ ME. At both trials, the first ration contained cotton seed cake (CSC) and wheat bran (WB), the second CSC and corn gluten feed (CGF), the third corn gluten meal (CGM) and WB and the fourth CGM and CGF. Data of both trials were analysed in common as 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experimental design. Low N degradability (CGM) had positive effect on CP, neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF) digestibility of the ration. Those results suggest that an increase in rumen undegradable protein (RUP) content does not negatively affect nutrient digestibility of sheep rations. Corn gluten feed significantly elevated crude fibre (CF) digestibility, in comparison with WB. Rations having high CP/ME ratio had higher digestibility of CP in comparison with those having low CP/ME ratio; the opposite was true for ether extract, CF, NDF and ADF digestibilities. CP level x N degradability interaction negatively affected energy value of the rations that had high CP level and high N degradability. Former suggest that when CP content is high then N degradability should be low otherwise ration's ME is negatively affected. CP digestibility and coefficient q of the rations containing WB and having high N degradability (N degradability x NFFS interaction) were the lowest suggesting that the combination of CSC and WB negatively affected CP digestibility and energy value of the ration. This could be explained by a reduced microbial CP synthesis, or lower RUP digestibility or both. PMID:18184379

  13. [In vitro availability of minerals in infant foods with different protein source].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Larqué, E; Marín, J F; Zamora, S

    2001-01-01

    As the result of the digestion process, it is produced at gastrointestinal level interactions between proteins-minerals and minerals-minerals that might modify the bioavailability of the nutrients initially designed for an adequate nutrition in infant formulas. The aim of the present study is to compare the in vitro availability of some minerals and trace elements (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and zinc) in infant formulas of initiation elaborated with different protein sources: formulas based on cow milk protein (whey-casein) versus vegetal protein (soy-based infant formulas). Also, for evaluating the effects of the different mineral supplementation in the availability of minerals, it was used infant formulas from two different manufacturers. Milk-protein based infant formulas showed for both manufacturers higher dialysis percentage (%) of phosphorus and zinc than the soy-protein based formulas. The availability of iron in the soy formula of the manufacturer A lowered significantly (P < 0.05) respect to the whey-casein based formula (9.6 +/- 2.3 versus 4.6 +/- 0.8), but not respect to the whey-casein formula of manufacturer B (9.6 +/- 1.1 versus 9.0 +/- 0.7), which might be due to the lowest proportion of phytic acid in this last commercial formula. Dialysability of all the minerals analysed from soy-protein based formulas showed significant differences depending on the manufacturer. The purification processes of the soy protein have a high repercussion in the mineral availability of soy-based infant formulas. It could be more interesting to use soy proteins more purified, with low level of phytic acid, in the elaboration of soy infants formulas, than the supplementation them with high amounts of minerals.

  14. Replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets.

    PubMed

    Khalaji, S; Manafi, M; Olfati, Z; Hedyati, M; Latifi, M; Veysi, A

    2016-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets. Experiments were carried out as a completely randomized design where each experiment involved 4 treatments of 6 replicates and 10 chicks in each pen. Soybean meal proteins in a corn-soy control diet were replaced with 15, 30, and 45% of cow skin gelatin (CSG) or corn protein concentrate (CPC), respectively, in experiments 1 and 2. BW and cumulative feed intake were measured at 7, 21, and 42 d of age. Blood characteristics, relative organs weight and length, ileal digesta viscosity, ileal morphology, and cecal coliform and Salmonella population were measured at 42 d of age. Apparent total tract digestibility of protein was determined during 35 to 42 d of age. Replacement of soybean meal with CSG severely inhibited BW gain, decreased feed intake, and increased FCR in broilers during the experimental period (P ≤ 0.01). The inclusion of CPC reduced BW and increased FCR significantly (P ≤ 0.05) at 21 and 42 d of age without any consequence in feed intake. Protein digestibility was reduced and ileal digesta viscosity was increased linearly by increasing the amount of CSG and CPC in the control diet (P ≤ 0.01). Replacement of soybean meal with CSG and CPC did not significantly alter blood cell profile and plasma phosphorus, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, Aspartate transaminase, and HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration. The inclusion of CSG linearly (P ≤ 0.05) increased plasma uric acid concentration and alkaline phosphatase activity. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels were decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) when the amount of CSG replacement was 15%. The results of this experiment showed that using CSG and CPC negatively affects broiler performance and therefore is not a suitable alternative to soybean meal in commercial diets.

  15. Replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets.

    PubMed

    Khalaji, S; Manafi, M; Olfati, Z; Hedyati, M; Latifi, M; Veysi, A

    2016-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets. Experiments were carried out as a completely randomized design where each experiment involved 4 treatments of 6 replicates and 10 chicks in each pen. Soybean meal proteins in a corn-soy control diet were replaced with 15, 30, and 45% of cow skin gelatin (CSG) or corn protein concentrate (CPC), respectively, in experiments 1 and 2. BW and cumulative feed intake were measured at 7, 21, and 42 d of age. Blood characteristics, relative organs weight and length, ileal digesta viscosity, ileal morphology, and cecal coliform and Salmonella population were measured at 42 d of age. Apparent total tract digestibility of protein was determined during 35 to 42 d of age. Replacement of soybean meal with CSG severely inhibited BW gain, decreased feed intake, and increased FCR in broilers during the experimental period (P ≤ 0.01). The inclusion of CPC reduced BW and increased FCR significantly (P ≤ 0.05) at 21 and 42 d of age without any consequence in feed intake. Protein digestibility was reduced and ileal digesta viscosity was increased linearly by increasing the amount of CSG and CPC in the control diet (P ≤ 0.01). Replacement of soybean meal with CSG and CPC did not significantly alter blood cell profile and plasma phosphorus, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, Aspartate transaminase, and HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration. The inclusion of CSG linearly (P ≤ 0.05) increased plasma uric acid concentration and alkaline phosphatase activity. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels were decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) when the amount of CSG replacement was 15%. The results of this experiment showed that using CSG and CPC negatively affects broiler performance and therefore is not a suitable alternative to soybean meal in commercial diets. PMID:26574036

  16. High-lysine corn as a source of protein and energy for finishing calves.

    PubMed

    Ladely, S R; Stock, R A; Klopfenstein, T J; Sindt, M H

    1995-01-01

    Three trials evaluated the protein and energy value of high-lysine corn for finishing calves. In Trial 1, 60 finishing steer calves were used to evaluate corn source (high-lysine vs control) and protein source (urea, blood meal [BM], corn gluten meal [CGM]) and level (BM and CGM addition; low, medium, high). Calves were individually fed using Calan gates for 102 d, and then were pen-fed (two pens per corn treatment) the remaining 83 d. During the initial 102 d, calves fed high-lysine corn had similar gains but were 6% more efficient (P < .10) compared with calves fed control corn. Performance did not differ (P > .10) among sources or levels of protein supplementation. Over the entire feeding period (185 d), calves fed high-lysine corn were 10% more efficient (P < .10) than calves fed control corn. In the second study, in situ starch disappearance was faster (P < .10) and the proportion of CP degraded by 12 h was 27% greater (P < .10) for high-lysine corn than for control corn. In a metabolism trial, five steers fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were used in a randomized block design to evaluate the effect of corn source on site and extent of digestion. Intake and ruminal and total tract digestibility of OM and N did not differ (P > .10) between corn sources. Steers fed high-lysine corn tended to have greater ruminal (P = .23) and postruminal (P = .18) starch digestion, resulting in greater (P < .10) total tract starch digestibility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7601739

  17. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  18. Fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Crickenberger, R.G.; Henderson, H.E.; Reddy, C.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four feeding trials were conducted to evaluate fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein supplement for finishing cattle fed corn silage or corn - corn silage diets. Feed efficiencies and daily gains with protein treatments were noted. The trials indicate that fermented ammoniated condensed whey is comparable to soybean meal as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle. (Refs. 18).

  19. ASSOCIATIONS OF PROTEIN INTAKE AND PROTEIN SOURCE WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND FRACTURE RISK: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    LANGSETMO, L.; BARR, S.I.; BERGER, C.; KREIGER, N.; RAHME, E.; ADACHI, J.D.; PAPAIOANNOU, A.; KAISER, S. M; PRIOR, J.C.; HANLEY, D.A.; KOVACS, C.S.; JOSSE, R.G.; GOLTZMAN, D.

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein has been hypothesized to cause lower bone mineral density (BMD) and greater fracture risk. Previous results are conflicting and few studies have assessed potential differences related to differing protein sources. Objective To determine associations between total protein intake, and protein intake by source (dairy, non-dairy animal, plant) with BMD, BMD change, and incident osteoporotic fracture. Design/Setting Prospective cohort study (Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study). Participants/Measures Protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) at Year 2 (1997–99) using a food frequency questionnaire (N=6510). Participants were contacted annually to ascertain incident fracture. Total hip and lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and Year 5. Analyses were stratified by group (men 25–49 y, men 50+ y, premenopausal women 25–49 y, and postmenopausal women 50+ y) and adjusted for major confounders. Fracture analyses were limited to those 50+ y. Results Intakes of dairy protein (with adjustment for BMI) were positively associated with total hip BMD among men and women aged 50+ y, and in men aged 25–49. Among adults aged 50+ y, those with protein intakes of <12% TEI (women) and <11% TEI (men) had increased fracture risk compared to those with intakes of 15% TEI. Fracture risk did not significantly change as intake increased above 15% TEI, and was not significantly associated with protein source. Conclusions In contrast to hypothesized risk of high protein, we found that for adults 50+ y, low protein intake (below 15% TEI) may lead to increased fracture risk. Source of protein was a determinant of BMD, but not fracture risk. PMID:26412291

  20. Cosolvent Effects on Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canchi, Deepak R.; García, Angel E.

    2013-04-01

    Proteins are marginally stable, and the folding/unfolding equilibrium of proteins in aqueous solution can easily be altered by the addition of small organic molecules known as cosolvents. Cosolvents that shift the equilibrium toward the unfolded ensemble are termed denaturants, whereas those that favor the folded ensemble are known as protecting osmolytes. Urea is a widely used denaturant in protein folding studies, and the molecular mechanism of its action has been vigorously debated in the literature. Here we review recent experimental as well as computational studies that show an emerging consensus in this problem. Urea has been shown to denature proteins through a direct mechanism, by interacting favorably with the peptide backbone as well as the amino acid side chains. In contrast, the molecular mechanism by which the naturally occurring protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes proteins is not clear. Recent studies have established the strong interaction of TMAO with water. Detailed molecular simulations, when used with force fields that incorporate these interactions, can provide insight into this problem. We present the development of a model for TMAO that is consistent with experimental observations and that provides physical insight into the role of cosolvent-cosolvent interaction in determining its preferential interaction with proteins.

  1. Influence of dietary protein type and iron source on the absorption of amino acids and minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Garaulet, M; Martínez, J A; Marín, J F; Larqué, E; Zamora, S

    2001-12-01

    The apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of amino acids and the balance of minerals (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron) has been determined in rats fed four diets differing in the protein type (casein or soy protein) and iron source (ferrous sulphate or lactate) in order to study the possible interactions of these nutrients. The availability of amino acids, especially essential amino acids, was greater in the diet made with animal protein (casein). The iron source also affected the absorption of most amino acids in all the diets assayed with ferrous sulphate being greater. The balance of iron, magnesium and phosphorus was higher in the diets containing animal protein. The retention of calcium and magnesium was significantly greater when ferrous sulphate was used as iron source. These results demonstrate the important interaction between amino acids and minerals and between the minerals themselves, which must be carefully studied when selecting different types of protein or mineral sources in human or animal nutrition.

  2. Hyperglycemic effect of low protein cassava diet.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, V G; Leelamma, S

    1998-03-01

    Hyperglycemic effect of cassava diet in presence of varying amounts of protein has been carried out. The rats fed a low protein high cyanide diet showed an increase in the blood glucose and a decrease in the liver glycogen. The activity of glycogen phosphorylase, glucose 6-phosphatase and phosphoglucomutase showed higher levels in the liver of low protein high cyanide group compared to the control group. Also, the activity of hexokinase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase activity in the liver of high cyanide low protein were significantly low. The results suggests that cassava diet with the low protein can induce hyperglycemia. PMID:9754064

  3. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Proteins as a Source of Bioactive Peptides - An In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Montoya, Carlos A.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.; Moughan, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein. PMID:24901416

  4. Effects of protein concentration and heat treatment on concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy and on amino acid digestibility in four sources of canola meal fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Maison, T; Stein, H H

    2014-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine DE and ME and the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA in 4 sources of canola meal (high-protein [CM-HP], high-temperature-processed [CM-HT], low-temperature-processed [CM-LT], and conventional [CM-CV] canola meal) and in conventional soybean meal (SBM) fed to growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 48 growing barrows (initial BW: 39.7 ± 1.58 kg) were individually housed in metabolism cages and randomly assigned to 6 treatments in a randomized complete block design with 2 blocks of 24 pigs and 8 replicate pigs per treatment. The 6 diets included a corn-based basal diet and 5 diets that were formulated by mixing corn and 1 of the sources of canola meal (39.0% inclusion) or SBM (28.5% inclusion). Feces and urine were collected for 5 d following a 5-d adaptation period. The DE and ME in each source of canola meal and in SBM were calculated using the difference procedure. The DE and ME in the 4 sources of canola meal were less (P < 0.05) than in corn and SBM (DE: 2,854, 2,680, 2,892, and 2,883 vs. 3,324 and 3,784 kcal/kg, respectively; ME: 2,540, 2,251, 2,681, and 2,637 vs. 3,213 and 3,523 kcal/kg, respectively). No differences in the concentrations of DE and ME were observed among the 4 sources of canola meal. In Exp. 2, 12 growing barrows (initial BW: 34.0 ± 1.41 kg) that had a T-cannula installed in the distal ileum were randomly allotted to a repeated 6 × 6 Latin square design with 6 diets and 6 periods in each square. Five diets that contained 35% SBM or 45% of 1 of the 4 sources of canola meal as the sole source of CP and AA were formulated, and a N-free diet was also used. Each period lasted 7 d and ileal digesta were collected on d 6 and 7 of each period. The AID and SID of CP and all AA in SBM were greater (P < 0.05) than in the 4 sources of canola meal. Compared with CM-CV, CM-HP had greater (P < 0.05) AID of Ile, Lys, Asp, Cys, and Pro and greater (P < 0.05) SID of Lys

  5. Dietary Protein Sources Affect Internal Quality of Raw and Cooked Shell Eggs under Refrigerated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. C.; Zhang, H. J.; Wu, S. G.; Yue, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Li, J.; Qi, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; cottonseed protein, CSP; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on the internal quality of refrigerated eggs. A total of 360 laying hens (32 wk of age) were randomly allotted to six treatment groups (five replicates per treatment) and fed diets containing SBM, CSP, or DRM individually or in combination with equal crude protein content (SBM-CSP, SBM-DRM, and CSP-DRM) as the protein ingredient(s). A 6×3 factorial arrangement was employed with dietary types and storage time (0 d, 2 wk, and 4 wk) as the main effects. After 12 wk of diet feeding, a total of 270 eggs were collected for egg quality determination. The egg Haugh unit (HU) in the CSP, SBM-DRM, and DRM groups were significantly lower than those in the SBM and SBM-CSP groups. The hardness and springiness of the cooked yolk in the CSP group were significantly higher than those in the other treatment groups. A lower HU, lower yolk index and higher albumen pH were observed in the DRM group compared to the SBM and SBM-CSP groups when the eggs were stored to 4 wk, and the HU was improved in the CSP-DRM group compared to the DRM group (p<0.05). Higher yolk hardness was observed in the CSP group compared to the other groups during storage (p<0.05), but the hardness of the cooked yolk in the SBM-CSP and CSP-DRM groups showed no difference in comparison to the SBM group. In conclusion, CSP may ameliorate the negative effects of DRM on the HU of refrigerated eggs, and SBM or DRM may alleviate the adverse effects of CSP on yolk hardness. PMID:26580286

  6. Combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions to identify biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

    PubMed

    Kuromitsu, Sadao; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Hiramoto, Masashi; Yuri, Masatoshi; Naitou, Masanori; Nakamura, Naoto; Kawabata, Shigeki; Kobori, Masato; Katoh, Masao; Furuchi, Kiyoshi; Mita, Haruhisa; Yamada, Tetsuo

    2009-06-01

    Purification of biologically active proteins from complex biological sources is a difficult task, usually requiring large amounts of sample and many separation steps. We found an active substance in a serum response element-dependent luciferase reporter gene bioassay in interstitial cystitis urine that we attempted to purify with column chromatography and the bioassay. With anion-exchange Mono Q and C4 reversed-phase columns, apparently sharp active peaks were obtained. However, more than 20 kinds of proteins were identified from the active fractions with MS, indicating that the purification was not complete. As further purification was difficult, we chose a candidate molecule by means of studying the correlation between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses of chromatographic fractions near the active peaks. As a result, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was nominated as a candidate molecule among the identified proteins because the elution profile of EGF was consistent with that of the bioassay, and the correlation coefficient of EGF between MS protein identification scores and bioassay responses was the highest among all the identified proteins. With recombinant EGF and anti-EGF and anti-EGF receptor antibodies, EGF was confirmed to be the desired substance in interstitial cystitis urine. This approach required only 20 ml of urine sample and two column chromatographic steps. The combination of MS protein identification and bioassay of chromatographic fractions may be useful for identifying biologically active substances from complex protein sources.

  7. Helical Cerenkov effect, a novel radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Soln, J. )

    1994-10-01

    The observability of the helical Cerenkov effect as a novel radiation source is discussed. Depending on the value of the index of refraction of the medium, the strength of the uniform magnetic field, and the electron beam energy, helical Cerenkov radiation can occur in the same spectral regions as the ordinary Cerenkov effect, that is, from microwave to visible wavelengths. From the kinematics point of view, the author argues that for a microwave wavelength of 10[sup [minus]1] cm this effect should be observable in a medium with an index of refraction of 1.4, with a beam energy of 3 MeV, and a uniform magnetic field of 4 T. On the specific level, however, for the sake of simplicity, he discusses the observability of this effect for visible light with the central wavelength of 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] cm which can be achieved with 2 MeV in beam energy, silica aerogel as a medium (with an index of refraction of 1.075), and uniform magnetic fields from 5 to 10 T. For a 10-T magnetic field, he calculates that in the visible region of 250 to 750 nm an electron will produce a photon per 10 cm of traveled length. As to the stimulated helical Cerenkov emission, the author estimates that respectable gains are possible even if the beam passes close to the dielectric rather than through it. In addition to being potentially a new radiation source, the helical Cerenkov effect could possibly be used as a detector of radiation by energetic electrons that are trapped in a medium by strong magnetic fields.

  8. Effect of additives on protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2009-06-01

    This paper overviews solution additives that affect protein stability and aggregation during refolding, heating, and freezing processes. Solution additives are mainly grouped into two classes, i.e., protein denaturants and stabilizers. The former includes guanidine, urea, strong ionic detergents, and certain chaotropic salts; the latter includes certain amino acids, sugars, polyhydric alcohols, osmolytes, and kosmotropic salts. However, there are solution additives that are not unambiguously placed into these two classes, including arginine, certain divalent cation salts (e.g., MgCl(2)) and certain polyhydric alcohols (e.g., ethylene glycol). Certain non-ionic or non-detergent surfactants, ionic liquids, amino acid derivatives, polyamines, and certain amphiphilic polymers may belong to this class. They have marginal effects on protein structure and stability, but are able to disrupt protein interactions. Information on additives that do not catalyze chemical reactions nor affect protein functions helps us to design protein solutions for increased stability or reduced aggregation. PMID:19519415

  9. Feasibility of partial replacement of fishmeal with proteins from different sources in diets of Korean rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Quangen; Zhu, Xiaoming; Yang, Yunxia; Han, Dong; Xie, Shouqi

    2014-12-01

    An 8-week feeding experiment was conducted in an indoor recirculation seawater system to investigate the effects of partial replacement of dietary fishmeal with proteins from five sources on the growth performance and feed utilization of Sebastes schlegeli. Six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated using fishmeal (FM, the control) as sole protein source, or proteins from five sources including poultry by-product meal (PBM), meat and bone meal (MBM), soybean meal (SBM), cottonseed meal (CSM) and canola meal (CNM). Fifteen percent of the crude protein provided by fish meal was replaced, respectively. The results showed that the differences in specific growth rate (SGR) and survival rate (SR) among fish fed PBM, MBM, SBM, CSM and whole FM diets were not significant. However, SGR and SR of fish fed CNM diet was significantly lower than that of other treatments. Feeding rate, feed conversion, nutrient retention showed similar patterns to that of growth. Fish fed CSM and CNM showed significantly lower apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of dry matter and gross energy than those fed others while fish fed CNM showed lower ADC of crude protein than those fed others ( P<0.05). These results suggested that it was feasible to substitute 15% dietary protein provided by fishmeal with PBM, MBM, SBM and CSM, respectively, but not with CNM as the replacement with CNM reduced fish growth and feed utilization.

  10. Effects of confinement on protein folding and protein stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, G.; Yuan, J. M.; Vallieres, M.; Dong, H.; Sun, Z.; Wei, Y.; Li, F. Y.; Lin, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    In a cell, proteins exist in crowded environments; these environments influence their stability and dynamics. Similarly, for an enzyme molecule encapsulated in an inorganic cavity as in biosensors or biocatalysts, confinement and even surface effects play important roles in its stability and dynamics. Using a minimalist model (two-dimensional HP lattice model), we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations to study confinement effects on protein stability. We have calculated heat capacity as a function of temperature using the histogram method and results obtained show that confinement tends to stabilize the folded conformations, consistent with experimental results (some reported here) and previous theoretical analyses. Furthermore, for a protein molecule tethered to a solid surface the stabilization effect can be even greater. We have also investigated the effects of confinement on the kinetics of the refolding and unfolding processes as functions of temperature and box size. As expected, unfolding time increases as box size decreases, however, confinement affects folding times in a more complicated way. Our theoretical results agree with our experimentally observed trends that thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase, encapsulated in mesoporous silica, increases as the pore size of the silica matrix decreases.

  11. Distillers dried grains with solubles as alternative protein sources in diets of tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research efforts by nutritionist to reduce feed costs have resulted in increased use of lower cost alternative plant proteins in fish feed formulations as replacements of fish meal and other more expensive protein sources. Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a dried residue that remains af...

  12. Distillers dried grains with solubles as alternative protein source in diets of tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research efforts by nutritionists to reduce feed costs have resulted in increased use of lower cost alternative plant proteins in fish feed formulations as replacements of fish meal and other expensive protein sources. Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a dried residue that remains after ...

  13. Palatability of water-soluble extracts of protein sources and replacement of fishmeal by a selected mixture of protein sources for juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chun; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Poor palatability is a limiting factor for replacing fishmeal with other protein sources in aquaculture. The water-soluble molecules with low molecular weights are the major determinants of the palatability of diets. The present study was conducted to investigate the palatability of water-soluble extracts from single protein source (single extract pellets) and the mixture of these extracts with different proportions (blended extract pellets) in juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus). Then according to the palatability of blended extract pellets, an optimal mixture proportion was selected, and a new protein source made from raw protein materials with the selected proportion was formulated to replace fishmeal. Summarily, the palatability of single extract pellets for turbot was descendent from fishmeal to pet-food grade poultry by-product meal, wheat gluten meal, soybean meal, peanut meal, meat and bone meal, and corn gluten meal. Subsequently, according to the palatability of single extract pellets, 52 kinds of blended extract pellets were designed to test their palatability. The results showed that the pellets presented remarkably different palatability, and the optimal one was diet 52 (wheat gluten meal: pet-food grade poultry by-product meal: meat and bone meal: corn gluten meal = 1:6:1:2). The highest ingestion ratio (the number of pellets ingested/the number of pellets fed) was 0.73 ± 0.03, which was observed in Diet 52. Then five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (20 kJ g-1 gross energy) diets were formulated by replacing 0 (control), 35%, 50%, 65% and 80% of fishmeal with No.52 blending proportion. After a 10-weeks feeding trial, a consistent feed intake was found among all replacement treatments. Replacement level of fishmeal up to 35% did not significantly influence final body weight, specific growth rate, feed efficiency ratio, and protein efficiency ratio of turbot. Therefore, the water-soluble extracts of protein sources play an

  14. Effects of synchronicity of carbohydrate and protein degradation on rumen fermentation characteristics and microbial protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Seo, J K; Kim, M H; Yang, J Y; Kim, H J; Lee, C H; Kim, K H; Ha, Jong K

    2013-03-01

    A series of in vitro studies were carried out to determine i) the effects of enzyme and formaldehyde treatment on the degradation characteristics of carbohydrate and protein sources and on the synchronicity of these processes, and ii) the effects of synchronizing carbohydrate and protein supply on rumen fermentation and microbial protein synthesis (MPS) in in vitro experiments. Untreated corn (C) and enzyme-treated corn (EC) were combined with soy bean meal with (ES) and without (S) enzyme treatment or formaldehyde treatment (FS). Six experimental feeds (CS, CES, CFS, ECS, ECES and ECFS) with different synchrony indices were prepared. Highly synchronous diets had the greatest dry matter (DM) digestibility when untreated corn was used. However, the degree of synchronicity did not influence DM digestibility when EC was mixed with various soybean meals. At time points of 12 h and 24 h of incubation, EC-containing diets showed lower ammonia-N concentrations than those of C-containing diets, irrespective of the degree of synchronicity, indicating that more efficient utilization of ammonia-N for MPS was achieved by ruminal microorganisms when EC was offered as a carbohydrate source. Within C-containing treatments, the purine base concentration increased as the diets were more synchronized. This effect was not observed when EC was offered. There were significant effects on VFA concentration of both C and S treatments and their interactions. Similar to purine concentrations, total VFA production and individual VFA concentration in the groups containing EC as an energy source was higher than those of other groups (CS, CES and CFS). The results of the present study suggested that the availability of energy or the protein source are the most limiting factors for rumen fermentation and MPS, rather than the degree of synchronicity.

  15. Taurine supplemented plant protein based diets with alternative lipid sources for juvenile sea bream, sparus aurata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two lipid sources were evaluated as fish oil replacements in fishmeal free, plant protein based diets for juvenile gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata. A twelve week feeding study was undertaken to examine the performance of fish fed the diets with different sources of essential fatty acids (canola o...

  16. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  17. The effect of denaturants on protein structure.

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, J.; Yennawar, H. P.; Banerjee, S.; Luo, J.; Farber, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    Virtually all studies of the protein-folding reaction add either heat, acid, or a chemical denaturant to an aqueous protein solution in order to perturb the protein structure. When chemical denaturants are used, very high concentrations are usually necessary to observe any change in protein structure. In a solution with such high denaturant concentrations, both the structure of the protein and the structure of the solvent around the protein can be altered. X-ray crystallography is the obvious experimental technique to probe both types of changes. In this paper, we report the crystal structures of dihydrofolate reductase with urea and of ribonuclease A with guanidinium chloride. These two classic denaturants have similar effects on the native structure of the protein. The most important change that occurs is a reduction in the overall thermal factor. These structures offer a molecular explanation for the reduction in mobility. Although the reduction is observed only with the native enzyme in the crystal, a similar decrease in mobility has also been observed in the unfolded state in solution (Makhatadze G, Privalov PL. 1992. Protein interactions with urea and guanidinium chloride: A calorimetric study. PMID:9260285

  18. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  19. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production.

  20. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  1. ATTRACT and PTools: open source programs for protein-protein docking.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Saladin, Adrien; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Prévost, Chantal; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of the structure of protein-protein complexes based on structures or structural models of isolated partners is of increasing importance for structural biology and bioinformatics. The ATTRACT program can be used to perform systematic docking searches based on docking energy minimization. It is part of the object-oriented PTools library written in Python and C++. The library contains various routines to manipulate protein structures, to prepare and perform docking searches as well as analyzing docking results. It also intended to facilitate further methodological developments in the area of macromolecular docking that can be easily integrated. Here, we describe the application of PTools to perform systematic docking searches and to analyze the results. In addition, the possibility to perform multi-component docking will also be presented.

  2. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  3. In Silico Characterization of Pectate Lyase Protein Sequences from Different Source Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Sangeeta; Kumar, Manish; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Sarangi, Bijaya Ketan; Yadav, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    A total of 121 protein sequences of pectate lyases were subjected to homology search, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, and motif analysis. The phylogenetic tree constructed revealed different clusters based on different source organisms representing bacterial, fungal, plant, and nematode pectate lyases. The multiple accessions of bacterial, fungal, nematode, and plant pectate lyase protein sequences were placed closely revealing a sequence level similarity. The multiple sequence alignment of these pectate lyase protein sequences from different source organisms showed conserved regions at different stretches with maximum homology from amino acid residues 439–467, 715–816, and 829–910 which could be used for designing degenerate primers or probes specific for pectate lyases. The motif analysis revealed a conserved Pec_Lyase_C domain uniformly observed in all pectate lyases irrespective of variable sources suggesting its possible role in structural and enzymatic functions. PMID:21048874

  4. Effects of metabolic rate on protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; McCoy, Michael W; Allen, Andrew P

    2007-12-22

    Since the modern evolutionary synthesis was first proposed early in the twentieth century, attention has focused on assessing the relative contribution of mutation versus natural selection on protein evolution. Here we test a model that yields general quantitative predictions on rates of protein evolution by combining principles of individual energetics with Kimura's neutral theory. The model successfully predicts much of the heterogeneity in rates of protein evolution for diverse eukaryotes (i.e. fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals) from different thermal environments. Data also show that the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitution is independent of body size, and thus presumably of effective population size. These findings indicate that rates of protein evolution are largely controlled by mutation rates, which in turn are strongly influenced by individual metabolic rate.

  5. A graph-based integrative method of detecting consistent protein functional modules from multiple data sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Cheng, Yue; Ge, Liang; Du, Nan; Jia, Kebin; Zhang, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Many clustering methods have been developed to identify functional modules in Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks but the results are far from satisfaction. To overcome the noise and incomplete problems of PPI networks and find more accurate and stable functional modules, we propose an integrative method, bipartite graph-based Non-negative Matrix Factorisation method (BiNMF), in which we adopt multiple biological data sources as different views that describe PPIs. Specifically, traditional clustering models are adopted as preliminary analysis of different views of protein functional similarity. Then the intermediate clustering results are represented by a bipartite graph which can comprehensively represent the relationships between proteins and intermediate clusters and finally overlapping clustering results are achieved. Through extensive experiments, we see that our method is superior to baseline methods and detailed analysis has demonstrated the benefits of integrating diverse clustering methods and multiple biological information sources. PMID:26547971

  6. Potential sources of mouth drying in beverages fortified with dairy proteins: A comparison of casein- and whey-rich ingredients.

    PubMed

    Withers, C A; Lewis, M J; Gosney, M A; Methven, L

    2014-03-01

    Oral nutritional supplement drinks (ONS) are beverages high in dairy proteins that are prescribed to individuals at risk of malnutrition. Consumption of ONS is poor in elderly care facilities, with patients commenting that the sensory attributes of these drinks reduce their enjoyment and willingness to consume. Mouth drying is an attribute of ONS found to build with repeated consumption, which may further limit liking of these products. This study investigated the sources of drying sensations by sequential profiling, with a trained sensory panel rating a range of model milk systems and ONS over repeated sips and during after-effects. Sequential profiling found that fortification of milk with both caseinate and whey protein concentrate significantly increased the perception of mouth drying over repeated consumption, increasing by between 35 and 85% over consumption of 40mL. Enrichment of ONS with either whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate to a total protein content of 8.7% (wt/wt) resulted in whey and casein levels of 4.3:4.4% and 1.7:7.0% respectively. The product higher in whey protein was substantially more mouth drying, implying that whey proteins may be the most important contributor to mouth drying in ONS. However, efforts to mask mouth drying of protein-fortified milk by increasing sweetness or fat level were unsuccessful at the levels tested. Increasing the viscosity of protein-fortified milk led to a small but significant reduction in mouth drying. However, this approach was not successful when tested within complete ONS. Further analysis is required into the mechanism of protein-derived mouth drying to mask negative sensations and improve the enjoyment and consumption of protein-rich ONS.

  7. Lipid extracted algae as a source for protein and reduced sugar: a step closer to the biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Rawat, Ismail; Guldhe, Abhishek; Bux, Faizal

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using lipid extracted algae (LEA) as a source for protein and reduced sugar, and the effects of various procedural treatments on their yields. LEA provided comparable yields of protein and reduced sugars to those from total algae. Oven drying provided highest yields of all products followed by freeze drying, while sun drying significantly lowered their yields. Effective cell disruption by microwave and autoclave increased the lipid yields from algae, but resulted in increased loss of other compounds with lipid extracting solvents lowering their yields during sequential extraction. Relatively inefficient cell disruption by ultrasonication and osmotic shock lowered the amount of cell protein lost to the lipid extracting solvents. These results highlight the complexity of concurrent extraction of all value added products from algae, and the need for proper selection of the processes to achieve the objectives of integrated biorefinery.

  8. Source memory in rats is impaired by an NMDA receptor antagonist but not by PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexandra E; Xu, Zhili; Lai, Yvonne Y; Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Thakur, Ganesh A; Hohmann, Andrea G; Crystal, Jonathon D

    2016-05-15

    Limitations of preclinical models of human memory contribute to the pervasive view that rodent models do not adequately predict therapeutic efficacy in producing cognitive impairments or improvements in humans. We used a source-memory model (i.e., a representation of the origin of information) we developed for use in rats to evaluate possible drug-induced impairments of both spatial memory and higher order memory functions in the same task. Memory impairment represents a major barrier to use of NMDAR antagonists as pharmacotherapies. The scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDa (PSD95) links NMDARs to the neuronal enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which catalyzes production of the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, interrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions downstream of NMDARs represents a novel therapeutic strategy to interrupt NMDAR-dependent NO signaling while bypassing unwanted side effects of NMDAR antagonists. We hypothesized that the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 would impair source memory. We also hypothesized that PSD95-nNOS inhibitors (IC87201 and ZL006) would lack the profile of cognitive impairment associated with global NMDAR antagonists. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed NMDA-stimulated formation of cGMP, a marker of NO production, in cultured hippocampal neurons. MK-801, at doses that did not impair motor function, impaired source memory under conditions in which spatial memory was spared. Thus, source memory was more vulnerable than spatial memory to impairment. By contrast, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors, IC87201 and ZL006, administered at doses that are behaviorally effective in rats, spared source memory, spatial memory, and motor function. Thus, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors are likely to exhibit favorable therapeutic ratios compared to NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26909849

  9. The effective degeneracy of protein normal modes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Normal modes are frequently computed and used to portray protein dynamics and interpret protein conformational changes. In this work, we investigate the nature of normal modes and find that the normal modes of proteins, especially those at the low frequency range (0-600 cm(-1)), are highly susceptible to degeneracy. Two or more modes are degenerate if they have the same frequency and consequently any orthogonal transformation of them also is a valid representation of the mode subspace. Thus, degenerate modes can no longer characterize unique directions of motions as regular modes do. Though the normal modes of proteins are usually of different frequencies, the difference in frequency between neighboring modes is so small that, under even slight structural uncertainty that unavoidably exists in structure determination, it can easily vanish and as a result, a mode becomes effectively degenerate with its neighboring modes. This can be easily observed in that some modes seem to disappear and their matching modes cannot be found when the structure used to compute the modes is modified only slightly. We term this degeneracy the effective degeneracy of normal modes. This work is built upon our recent discovery that the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal. The high density of modes observed in the vibrational frequency spectra of proteins renders their normal modes highly susceptible to degeneracy, under even the smallest structural uncertainty. Indeed, we find the degree of degeneracy of modes is proportional to the density of modes in the vibrational spectrum. This means that for modes at the same frequency, degeneracy is more severe for larger proteins. Degeneracy exists also in the modes of coarse-grained models, but to a much lesser extent than those of all-atom models. In closing, we discuss the implications of the effective degeneracy of normal modes: how it may significantly affect the ways in which normal modes are used in various normal modes

  10. Glyceollin-elicited soy protein consumption induces distinct transcriptional effects as compared to standard soy protein.

    PubMed

    Wood, Charles E; Boue, Stephen M; Collins-Burow, Bridgette M; Rhodes, Lyndsay V; Register, Thomas C; Cline, J Mark; Dewi, Fitriya N; Burow, Matthew E

    2012-01-11

    Glyceollins are stress-induced compounds in soybeans with bioactive properties distinct from parent soy isoflavones. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of dietary glyceollin-enriched and standard soy protein isolates and identify candidate target pathways of glyceollins on transcriptional profiles within mammary gland tissue. Thirty female postmenopausal cynomolgus monkeys were randomized to diets containing one of three protein sources for 3 weeks: (1) control casein/lactalbumin (C/L), (2) standard soy protein containing 194 mg/day isoflavones (SOY), and (3) glyceollin-enriched soy protein containing 189 mg/day isoflavones + 134 mg/day glyceollins (GLY). All diets contained a physiologic dose of estradiol (E2) (1 mg/day). All doses are expressed in human equivalents scaled by caloric intake. Relative to the control C/L diet, the GLY diet resulted in greater numbers of differentially regulated genes, which showed minimal overlap with those of SOY. Effects of GLY related primarily to pathways involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, adipocytokine expression, triglyceride synthesis, and lipase activity. Notable genes upregulated by the GLY diet included PPAR-γ, adiponectin, leptin, lipin 1, and lipoprotein lipase. The GLY diet also resulted in lower serum total cholesterol, specifically nonhigh-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased serum triglycerides as compared to the C/L diet. No effects of GLY or SOY were seen on serum insulin, adipocytokines, or vascular and bone turnover markers. These preliminary findings suggest that glyceollin-enriched soy protein has divergent effects from standard soy with some specificity for adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism.

  11. Silkworms culture as a source of protein for humans in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunan; Tang, Liman; Tong, Ling; Liu, Hong

    2009-04-01

    This paper focuses on the problem about a configuration with complete nutrition for humans in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) applied in the spacebases. The possibility of feeding silkworms to provide edible animal protein with high quality for taikonauts during long-term spaceflights and lunar-based missions was investigated from several aspects, including the nutrition structure of silkworms, feeding method, processing methods, feeding equipment, growing conditions and the influences on the space environmental condition changes caused by the silkworms. The originally inedible silk is also regarded as a protein source. A possible process of edible silk protein was brought forward in this paper. After being processed, the silk can be converted to edible protein for humans. The conclusion provides a promising approach to solving the protein supply problem for the taikonauts living in space during an extended exploration period.

  12. Production of antigens in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: green microalgae as a novel source of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Markus

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant small-scale proteins are produced in a number of systems, from bacteria like Escherichia coli, through lower eukaryotes like baker's yeast, up to mammalian cell cultures. However, the need for safe and cheap sources of large amounts of recombinant proteins for different purposes, including material sciences, diagnostics, and, of course, medical therapy, has forced the development of alternative production systems. Green microalgae are cheap and easily grown and offer a high protein content, which would seem to make them ideal hosts for the large-scale sustainable production of recombinant proteins in the future. In selected species, recombinant DNA can be introduced into the genomes of the nucleus, the chloroplast, and even the mitochondria, and thus the system offers both prokaryotic (chloroplast, mitochondria) and eukaryotic translation systems for a tailored expression of virtually any protein.

  13. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  14. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur. PMID:26468660

  15. The effects of dietary protein and amino acids on skeletal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bihuniak, Jessica D; Insogna, Karl L

    2015-07-15

    Dietary protein is required for optimal skeletal growth and maturation. Although Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) exist for global dietary protein intake, the level and sources of dietary protein that are optimal for skeletal health over the life continuum have not been established. This is partly due to the difficulty in quantifying the effects of variable levels of a nutrient's intake over a lifetime as well as the complex nature of the relationships between dietary protein and calcium economy. Areas of current uncertainty include the precise source and amount of dietary protein required for optimal skeletal accretion and maintenance of skeletal mass, as well as the site-specific effects of dietary protein. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin the actions of dietary protein on mineral metabolism and skeletal homeostasis remain unclear. This review attempts to summarize recent data bearing on these questions. PMID:25843057

  16. Impact of dietary carbohydrate and protein source and content on swine manure foaming properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diet ingredients are thought to contribute to foaming problems associated with swine deep-pit systems. Two experiments explored the impact of protein and carbohydrate sources in swine diets on the physicochemical properties, methane production potential, and foaming characteristics of swine manure. ...

  17. Nitrogen Metabolism in Lactating Goats Fed with Diets Containing Different Protein Sources

    PubMed Central

    Santos, A. B.; Pereira, M. L. A.; Silva, H. G. O.; Pedreira, M. S.; Carvalho, G. G. P.; Ribeiro, L. S. O.; Almeida, P. J. P.; Pereira, T. C. J.; Moreira, J. V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate urea excretion, nitrogen balance and microbial protein synthesis in lactating goats fed with diets containing different protein sources in the concentrate (soybean meal, cottonseed meal, aerial part of cassava hay and leucaena hay). Four Alpine goats whose mean body weight was 42.6±6.1 kg at the beginning of the experiment, a mean lactation period of 94.0±9.0 days and a production of 1.7±0.4 kg of milk were distributed in a 4×4 Latin square with four periods of 15 days. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous, containing 103.0 g/kg of CP, 400 g/kg of Tifton 85 hay and 600 g/kg of concentrate. Diet containing cottonseed meal provided (p<0.05) increased excretion of urea and urea nitrogen in the urine (g/d and mg/kg of BW) when compared with leucaena hay. The diets affected the concentrations of urea nitrogen in plasma (p<0.05) and excretion of urea nitrogen in milk, being that soybean meal and cottonseed meal showed (p<0.05) higher than the average aerial part of the cassava hay. The use of diets with cottonseed meal as protein source in the concentrate in feeding of lactating goats provides greater nitrogen excretion in urine and negative nitrogen balance, while the concentrate with leucaena hay as a source of protein, provides greater ruminal microbial protein synthesis. PMID:25050000

  18. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  19. Meat quality of buffalo young bulls fed faba bean as protein source.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, S; Cutrignelli, M I; Gonzalez, O J; Chiofalo, B; Grossi, M; Tudisco, R; Panetta, C; Infascelli, F

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen Italian Mediterranean Buffalo young bulls were divided into two groups fed isoprotein and isoenergy diets and only differing for protein source of concentrate: faba bean (FB) vs soybean (SB). Animals were slaughtered at 350 kg BW. Meat from FB group showed significantly lower fat, protein, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids than SB group. Significant differences were also found between the three muscles analysed [Longissimus thoracis (LT), Semitendinosus (ST) and Iliopsoas plus Psoas minor (IP)]. ST showed the most favourable fatty acids profile: lower SFA, higher PUFA, MUFA, ω-3, ω-6, CLA and, consequently, lower values for both atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes. Results showed that faba bean can be used as a protein source alternative to soybean in the diet of young buffalo bulls for the production of high quality meat. PMID:24018277

  20. Supplemental protein sources for steers fed corn-based diets: II. Growth and estimated metabolizable amino acid supply.

    PubMed

    Ludden, P A; Jones, J M; Cecava, M J; Hendrix, K S

    1995-05-01

    Seventy Simmental-cross steers (average initial weight 301 +/- 24 kg) were individually fed in a 175-d completely randomized design experiment to evaluate the effects of source and level of protein in the diet on gain and feed efficiency. Steers were allotted to 1 of 10 treatments (seven steers per treatment) in a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement of treatments plus a urea-supplemented control diet. Main factors were source of supplemental protein (soybean meal [SBM], a high ruminal escape soybean meal [SP; SoyPLUS], or a combination of corn gluten meal and blood meal [CB; 50:50 on a nitrogen basis]) and level of each protein source (20, 30, or 40% of total dietary CP). Based on 18-h in situ ruminal incubation, escape N content of the protein sources was 66.0, 82.5, and 90.8% of total N and metabolizable amino acid (MAA) content was 29.1, 33.4, and 67.8 g/100 g of DM for SBM, SP, and CB respectively. The steers were fed 12.5% CP diets based on cracked corn (70%) on d 0 through 70 and were switched to a common 11.5% CP urea-supplemented cracked corn diet (80%) on d 71. The steers were housed in individual confinement stalls and had ad libitum access to feed. Replacing urea with SBM or SP increased (P < .05) 28- and 70-d ADG and DMI and increased (P < .05) 28-d efficiency (kg of gain/100 kg of feed). Replacing urea with CB did not improve (P > .05) 28- or 70-d ADG or DMI but did increase (P < .05) 28-d efficiency. The growth rate of steers at 28 and 70 d was correlated to a greater degree with ME intake (r2 = .83 and .85, respectively) rather than MAA supply, suggesting that the MAA supply was not first-limiting for growth. The source of supplemental protein fed during d 0 through 70 had no effect (P > .05) on 175-d DMI or efficiency; however, feeding SBM increased (P < .05) 175-d ADG compared with feeding urea, SP, or CB. Increasing supplemental true protein tended to linearly increase ADG and DMI at 28 and 70 d, but overall, ADG, DMI, and efficiency were not affected (P

  1. Convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystals for X-ray diffraction study are usually grown resting on the bottom of a hanging drop of a saturated protein solution, with slow evaporation to the air in a small enclosed cell. The evaporation rate is controlled by hanging the drop above a reservoir of water, with its saturation vapor pressure decreased by a low concentration of a passive solute. The drop has a lower solute concentration, and its volume shrinks by evaporation until the molecular concentrations match. Protein crystals can also be grown from a seed crystal suspended or supported in the interior of a supersaturated solution. The main analysis of this report concerns this case because it is less complicated than hanging-drop growth. Convection effects have been suggested as the reason for the apparent cessation of growth at a certain rather small crystal size. It seeems that as the crystal grows, the number of dislocations increases to a point where further growth is hindered. Growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle has been proposed as a method for obtaining larger crystals. Experimental observations of convection effects during the growth of protein crystals have been reported.

  2. A Protein-derived Oxygen Is the Source of the Amide Oxygen of Nitrile Hydratases.

    PubMed

    Nelp, Micah T; Song, Yang; Wysocki, Vicki H; Bandarian, Vahe

    2016-04-01

    Nitrile hydratase metalloenzymes are unique and important biocatalysts that are used industrially to produce high value amides from their corresponding nitriles. After more than three decades since their discovery, the mechanism of this class of enzymes is becoming clear with evidence from multiple recent studies that the cysteine-derived sulfenato ligand of the active site metal serves as the nucleophile that initially attacks the nitrile. Herein we describe the first direct evidence from solution phase catalysis that the source of the product carboxamido oxygen is the protein. Using(18)O-labeled water under single turnover conditions and native high resolution protein mass spectrometry, we show that the incorporation of labeled oxygen into both product and protein is turnover-dependent and that only a single oxygen is exchanged into the protein even under multiple turnover conditions, lending significant support to proposals that the post-translationally modified sulfenato group serves as the nucleophile to initiate hydration of nitriles.

  3. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees.

  4. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees. PMID:27075256

  5. Dynamically polarized samples for neutron protein crystallography at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Standaert, Bob; Cuneo, Matt; Li, Le; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-09-01

    To prepare for the next generation neutron scattering instruments for the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and to broaden the scientific impact of neutron protein crystallography at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have recently ramped up our efforts to develop a dynamically polarized target for neutron protein crystallography at the SNS. Proteins contain a large amount of hydrogen which contributes to incoherent diffraction background and limits the sensitivity of neutron protein crystallography. This incoherent background can be suppressed by using polarized neutron diffraction, which in the same time also improves the coherent diffraction signal. Our plan is to develop a custom Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) setup tailored to neutron protein diffraction instruments. Protein crystals will be polarized at a magnetic field of 5 T and temperatures of below 1 K. After the dynamic polarization process, the sample will be brought to a frozen-spin mode in a 0.5 T holding field and at temperatures below 100 mK. In a parallel effort, we are also investigating various ways of incorporating polarization agents needed for DNP, such as site specific spin labels, into protein crystals.

  6. Changes in the protein expression of yeast as a function of carbon source.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ji; Opiteck, Gregory J; Friedrichs, Mark S; Dongre, Ashok R; Hefta, Stanley A

    2003-01-01

    Protein expression trends in yeast were monitored as a function of carbon source (glucose versus galactose) using multidimensional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to gas-phase fractionation, using relative intensity triggering (GPFri). Size exclusion HPLC was used to separate whole cell lysates, and following proteolysis of these fractions, each was separated by reversed phase HPLC, which was coupled on-line via electrospray to an ion trap mass spectrometer. The GPFri technique increased the dynamic range of proteins detected by increasing the number of peptide ions subjected to low energy collision induced dissociation to the 24 most intense ions in each of the survey scans. No protein or peptide labeling was used; instead, the number of SEQUEST identifications for each peptide (previously termed "hits") were used as a semiquantitative means of assessing both the direction (increase vs decrease) and significance of change in protein abundance. None of the traditional SEQUEST filters, e.g., Xcorr, DelCn, Sp, Rsp, etc., were employed in this study. Instead, a Student's t-test was used to distinguish those proteins that significantly and reproducibly changed between carbon sources from those that did not. This relied on the SEQUEST misassignments occurring in equal proportion between treatments and thereby negating each other; statistically significant changes in SEQUEST assignments were nonrandom events by definition and therefore reflective of correct identifications. This method of data analysis showed a large degree of concordance with results reported by other groups in similar transcriptional profiling and proteomic experiments. In all, 176 and 231 (fold-change > or = 1.1; p < or = 0.05) proteins were identified as being increased in peptide hit number when the yeast cells' source of carbon was changed between glucose and galactose, respectively.

  7. Transient changes in intercellular protein variability identify sources of noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhyudai

    2014-11-01

    Protein levels differ considerably between otherwise identical cells, and these differences significantly affect biological function and phenotype. Previous work implicated various noise mechanisms that drive variability in protein copy numbers across an isogenic cell population. For example, transcriptional bursting of mRNAs has been shown to be a major source of noise in the expression of many genes. Additional expression variability, referred to as extrinsic noise, arises from intercellular variations in mRNA transcription and protein translation rates attributed to cell-to-cell differences in cell size, abundance of ribosomes, etc. We propose a method to determine the magnitude of different noise sources in a given gene of interest. The method relies on blocking transcription and measuring changes in protein copy number variability over time. Our results show that this signal has sufficient information to quantify both the extent of extrinsic noise and transcription bursting in gene expression. Moreover, if the mean mRNA count is known, then the relative contributions of transcription versus translation rate fluctuations to extrinsic noise can also be determined. In summary, our study provides an easy-to-implement method for characterizing noisy protein expression that complements existing techniques for studying stochastic dynamics of genetic circuits.

  8. Effects of Knots on Protein Folding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Miguel A.; Faísca, Patrícia F. N.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the impact of knots, knot depth and motif of the threading terminus in protein folding properties (kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism) via extensive Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models. A knotted backbone has no effect on protein thermodynamic stability but it may affect key aspects of folding kinetics. In this regard, we found clear evidence for a functional advantage of knots: knots enhance kinetic stability because a knotted protein unfolds at a distinctively slower rate than its unknotted counterpart. However, an increase in knot deepness does not necessarily lead to more effective changes in folding properties. In this regard, a terminus with a non-trivial conformation (e.g. hairpin) can have a more dramatic effect in enhancing kinetic stability than knot depth. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the probability of the denatured ensemble to keep knotted is higher for proteins with deeper knots, indicating that knot depth plays a role in determining the topology of the denatured state. Refolding simulations starting from denatured knotted conformations show that not every knot is able to nucleate folding and further indicate that the formation of the knotting loop is a key event in the folding of knotted trefoils. They also show that there are specific native contacts within the knotted core that are crucial to keep a native knotting loop in denatured conformations which otherwise have no detectable structure. The study of the knotting mechanism reveals that the threading of the knotting loop generally occurs towards late folding in conformations that exhibit a significant degree of structural consolidation. PMID:24023962

  9. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  10. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

  11. Dietary sources and antioxidant effects of ergothioneine.

    PubMed

    Ey, Janine; Schömig, Edgar; Taubert, Dirk

    2007-08-01

    Ergothioneine is a native membrane-impermeable thiol compound that is specifically accumulated in cells via the organic cation transporter OCTN1. In humans, OCTN1 and ergothioneine have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. However, available evidence about dietary sources and the functional role of ergothioneine in human physiology is scarce. Here, we analyzed the ergothioneine content in common foods using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. Additionally, we assessed the protective potency of ergothioneine against various oxidative stressors in OCTN1-expressing cells in comparison with the main intracellular thiol antioxidant glutathione by evaluating cell viability with the MTT reduction assay. Only some food contained ergothioneine with highest concentrations detected in specialty mushrooms, kidney, liver, black and red beans, and oat bran. Ergothioneine exhibited cell protection only against copper(II)-induced toxicity but was far less potent than glutathione, indicting that ergothioneine is not involved in the intracellular antioxidant thiol defense system. PMID:17616140

  12. Direct comparison of linear and macrocyclic compound libraries as a source of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    There has been much discussion of the potential desirability of macrocyclic molecules for the development of tool compounds and drug leads. But there is little experimental data comparing otherwise equivalent macrocyclic and linear compound libraries as a source of protein ligands. In this Letter, we probe this point in the context of peptoid libraries. Bead-displayed libraries of macrocyclic and linear peptoids containing four variable positions and 0-2 fixed residues, to vary the ring size, were screened against streptavidin and the affinity of every hit for the target was measured. The data show that macrocyclization is advantageous, but only when the ring contains 17 atoms, not 20 or 23 atoms. This technology will be useful for conducting direct comparisons between many different types of chemical libraries to determine their relative utility as a source of protein ligands.

  13. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale. PMID:24971962

  14. Suite of three protein crystallography beamlines with single superconducting bend magnet as the source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Howells, Malcolm; McKinney, Wayne; Krupnick, James; Cambie, Daniella; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Cork, Carl W.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Dickert, Jeffery; Meigs, George; Ralston, Corie; Holton, James M.; Alber, Thomas; Berger, James M.; Agard, David A.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-08-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), three protein crystallography (PX) beamlines have been built that use as a source one of the three 6 Tesla single pole superconducting bending magnets (superbends) that were recently installed in the ring. The use of such single pole superconducting bend magnets enables the development of a hard x-ray program on a relatively low energy 1.9 GeV ring without taking up insertion device straight sections. The source is of relatively low power, but due to the small electron beam emittance, it has high brightness. X-ray optics are required to preserve the brightness and to match the illumination requirements for protein crystallography. This was achieved by means of a collimating premirror bent to a plane parabola, a double crystal monochromator followed by a toroidal mirror that focuses in the horizontal direction with a 2:1 demagnification. This optical arrangement partially balances aberrations from the collimating and toroidal mirrors such that a tight focused spot size is achieved. The optical properties of the beamline are an excellent match to those required by the small protein crystals that are typically measured. The design and performance of these new beamlines are described.

  15. No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chih-Ching; Barr, R. Graham; Powell, Charles A.; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Wang, Yuanjia; Hamade, Nada K.; Austin, John H.M.; Santella, Regina M.

    2008-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major source of oxidative stress. Protein carbonyls have been used as a biomarker of oxidative stress because of the relative stability of carbonylated proteins and the high protein concentration in blood. Increased levels of carbonyl groups have been found in serum proteins of smokers compared to nonsmokers. However, neither the dose effect of current cigarette smoke nor other predictors of oxidative stress have been studied. Hence, we used an ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) to evaluate plasma protein carbonyls in smokers recruited in the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP) program. The lung cancer screening program enrolled current and former smokers age 60 years and over without a prior cancer diagnosis. A total of 542 participants (282 men and 260 women) completed a baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples for the biomarker study. Protein oxidation was measured by derivatization of the carbonyl groups with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and ELISA quantitation of the DNPH group. Current smoking status was confirmed with urinary cotinine. The mean (± SD) protein carbonyl level was 17.9 ± 2.9 nmol carbonyls/ml plasma. Protein carbonyls did not differ significantly by gender. Carbonyl levels were higher among current than former smokers, but these differences did not attain statistical significance, nor did differences by urine cotinine levels, pack-years, pack/day among current smokers, and smoking duration. In a multiple regression analysis, higher protein carbonyl levels were independently associated with increasing age (0.59 nmol/ml increase per 10 years, 95% CI 0.14, 1.05, p = 0.01), African-American vs. white race/ethnicity, (1.30 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.4, 2.19, p =0.008), and lower educational attainment (0.75 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.12, 1.38, p = 0.02). Although we found no significant difference between current versus past cigarette smoking and protein carbonyls in this older group of smokers, associations were

  16. No effect of cigarette smoking dose on oxidized plasma proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chih-Ching; Barr, R Graham; Powell, Charles A; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Wang, Yuanjia; Hamade, Nada K; Austin, John H M; Santella, Regina M

    2008-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major source of oxidative stress. Protein carbonyls have been used as a biomarker of oxidative stress because of the relative stability of carbonylated proteins and the high protein concentration in blood. Increased levels of carbonyl groups have been found in serum proteins of smokers compared to nonsmokers. However, neither the dose effect of current cigarette smoke nor other predictors of oxidative stress have been studied. Hence, we used an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to evaluate plasma protein carbonyls in smokers recruited in the Early Lung Cancer Action Project (ELCAP) program. The lung cancer screening program enrolled current and former smokers age 60 years and over without a prior cancer diagnosis. A total of 542 participants (282 men and 260 women) completed a baseline questionnaire and provided blood samples for the biomarker study. Protein oxidation was measured by derivatization of the carbonyl groups with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and ELISA quantitation of the DNPH group. Current smoking status was confirmed with urinary cotinine. The mean (+/-S.D.) protein carbonyl level was 17.9+/-2.9 nmol carbonyl/ml plasma. Protein carbonyls did not differ significantly by gender. Carbonyl levels were higher among current than former smokers, but these differences did not attain statistical significance, nor did differences by urine cotinine levels, pack-years, pack/day among current smokers, and smoking duration. In a multiple regression analysis, higher protein carbonyl levels were independently associated with increasing age (0.59 nmol/ml increase per 10 years, 95% CI 0.14, 1.05, p=0.01), African-American vs. white race/ethnicity, (1.30 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.4, 2.19, p=0.008), and lower educational attainment (0.75 nmol/ml, 95% CI 0.12, 1.38, p=0.02). Although we found no significant difference between current vs. past cigarette smoking and protein carbonyls in this older group of smokers, associations were found for

  17. Sources of Fading Effects of Prekindergarten Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Arthur J.

    This study investigated factors that play a role in the fading effects of prekindergarten programs for economically disadvantaged children. The school adjustment of 1,284 low-income, minority children in prekindergarten and kindergarten programs funded by the government (i.e., Child Parent Center; Head Start) was traced through the third year of…

  18. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  19. Hypocholesterolemic and Anticarcinogenic Effect of Vicia faba Protein Hydrolyzates.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Erika B; Sánchez-Chino, Xariss; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Álvarez-González, Rosa I; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Téllez-Medina, Darío I; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the consumption of vegetal-source proteins has been studied to determine their preventing effect on the development of several chronic diseases. The initial purpose of this report was to determine the effect of a hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) given to mice, alone or with azoxymethane (AOM), on various obesity biochemical biomarkers, as well as on the induction of colon aberrant crypts (aberrant crypt foci; ACF). At the end of the 5-week assay, animals fed the HCD showed alterations in the level of total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoproteins, and in the Atherogenic Index; besides, a significant elevation was observed in the number of ACF. Our second aim was to examine the effect of a Faba Protein Hydrolyzate (FPH) on mice fed the HCD. We first obtained protein hydrolyzates from the seeds of Vicia faba, determined the in vitro antioxidant potential with two tests, and, subsequently, evaluated the effect on obesity biomarkers and on the number of ACF. In the first case, we found that, generally, the best protective effect was obtained with the low dose of FPH (10 mg/kg) administered to animals fed the HCD, and injected AOM. With respect to the number of ACF, we observed that this dose was more effective, inhibiting such lesions to almost the level determined for the normocholesterolemic diet (NCD). Therefore, our results demonstrated the relevance of a HCD to develop anomalies in obesity biomarkers in mouse, as well as to increase the number of precarcinogenic lesions. Our results also showed a protective response with the administration of FPH, particularly with a specific dose, suggesting the need for extending research on the matter by widening the spectra of doses, in order to clearly define its potential to counteract the damage induced by the HCD, as well as to confirm if antioxidation in mice was involved in such an effect. PMID:27282923

  20. Rapeseed and soybean products as protein sources for growing turkeys of different ages.

    PubMed

    Palander, S; Näsi, M; Ala-Fossi, I

    2004-10-01

    (1) Apparent ileal and total tract protein digestibilities of rapeseed meal and cake and soybean meal and cake were assayed in growing turkeys at 4, 8 and 12 weeks of age. (2) In addition, the effect of killing technique on apparent ileal protein digestibility values obtained by a slaughter method and effect of rapeseed feeding on size of specific organs were studied. (3) Protein digestibility coefficients of rapeseed products were mostly 0.10 to 0.15 units lower than those of soybean products. Ileal digestibility of protein increased slightly or remained unchanged from 4 to 8 weeks and decreased thereafter. No effect of feed processing method (meal vs cake) on ileal digestibility was observed. (4) Killing the birds by carbon dioxide inhalation and bleeding led to slightly lower ileal digestibility values than mechanical stunning and neck dislocation. (5) Total tract digestibility of protein decreased from 4 to 8 weeks of age for soybean meal and rapeseed meal but increased for soybean cake and rapeseed cake. From 8 to 12 weeks of age total tract digestibility of protein decreased for all the products tested. (6) Feed containing rapeseed led to enlargement of thyroid glands and hearts, but did not affect liver size or mortality.

  1. Recruiting Source Effects: A Test of Two Alternative Explanations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaugh, James A.; Mann, Rebecca B.

    The source of employee recruitment has been related to numerous important work outcomes (e.g., turnover, performance), but reasons for this relationship are not known. To test the viability of two possible explanations for recruiting source effects, i.e., employee level of realistic expectation, or individual differences, information was gathered…

  2. Neutrophils as a Source of Chitinases and Chitinase-Like Proteins in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Żurawska-Płaksej, Ewa; Ługowska, Agnieszka; Hetmańczyk, Katarzyna; Knapik-Kordecka, Maria; Piwowar, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pathophysiological role of human chitinases and chitinase-like proteins (CLPs) is not fully understood. We aimed to determine the levels of neutrophil-derived chitotriosidase (CHIT1), acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and verify their association with metabolic and clinical conditions of these patients. Methods Neutrophils were obtained from the whole blood by gradient density centrifugation from 94 T2D patients and 40 control subjects. The activities of CHIT1 and AMCase as well as leukocyte elastase (LE) were measured fluorometrically and concentration of YKL-40 immunoenzymatically. Also, routine laboratory parameters in serum/plasma were determined by standard methods. Results The levels of all three examined proteins were about 2-times higher in diabetic patients in comparison to control subjects. They were significantly correlated with the activity of LE and increased progressively across tertiles of LE activity. Moreover, the activities of CHIT1 and AMCase were significantly correlated with each other. Metabolic compensation of diabetes did not influence the levels of these proteins. In the subgroup of patients with inflammatory evidence only YKL-40 concentration was significantly higher compared to those without inflammation. The highest levels of all three proteins were observed in patients with macroangiopathies. Insulin therapy was associated with lower levels of examined proteins. Conclusions We revealed that neutrophils may be an important source of the increased levels of chitinases and CLPs in T2D, and these proteins may participate in inflammatory mechanisms in the course of the disease and consequent development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:26517273

  3. Source of amino acids for tRNA acylation. Implications for measurement of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D M; Calvert, C C; Klasing, K C

    1992-01-01

    Estimates of protein-synthesis rates using radioisotopes require accurate measurement of the specific radioactivity of the label in protein and in the precursor pool over time. Although the extracellular and intracellular pools of amino acids are easiest to sample, the tRNA pool is the direct precursor and is the appropriate pool for sampling. To test if the intracellular or extracellular pools reflect the tRNA specific radioactivity, a chicken macrophage cell line was incubated in medium containing either 0.23 mM-leucine and 14.5 microCi of [3H]leucine (tracer dose) or 2.3 microM-leucine plus 145.0 microCi of [3H]leucine (flooding dose). At both leucine levels, the tRNA specific radioactivity reached a plateau quickly, but did not equilibrate with either the extracellular or intracellular specific radioactivity within 30 min, and remained closer to that of protein. In a second experiment, proteins in chicken macrophages were labelled with [3H]leucine for 2 days. Labelling medium was removed, and the cells were washed free of residual free [3H]leucine and incubated with medium containing either 0.23 mM- or 2.3 mM-leucine (unlabelled). The specific radioactivity of leucyl-tRNA leucine reached a plateau within 2 min and remained considerably closer to that in the protein than that in intracellular or extracellular pools for at least 60 min. These results suggest that amino acids from protein degradation are a primary source for charging tRNA. When protein-synthesis rates are estimated by label incorporation, use of extracellular or intracellular specific-radioactivity values result in a marked underestimation. PMID:1575701

  4. Biological Effects on the Source of Geoneutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.; Bird, Dennis K.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2013-11-01

    Detection of antineutrinos from U and Th series decay within the Earth (geoneutrinos) constrains the absolute abundance of these elements. Marine detectors will measure the ratio over the mantle beneath the site and provide spatial averaging. The measured mantle Th/U may well be significantly below its bulk earth value of 4; Pb isotope measurements on mantle-derived rocks yield low Th/U values, effectively averaged over geological time. The physics of the modern biological process is complicated, but the net effect is that much of the U in the mantle comes from subducted marine sediments and subducted upper oceanic crust. That is, U subducts preferentially relative to Th. Oxygen ultimately from photosynthesis oxidizes U(IV) to U(VI), which is soluble during weathering and sediment transport. Dissolved U(VI) reacts with FeO in the oceanic crust and organic carbon within sediments to become immobile U(IV). These deep marine rocks are preferentially subducted relative to Th(IV)-bearing continental margin rocks. Ferric iron from anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen in local oases likely mobilized some U during the Archean Era when there was very little O2 in the air. Conversely, these elements behave similarly in the absence of life, where the elements occur as U(IV) and Th(IV), which do not significantly fractionate during igneous processes. Neither do they fractionate during weathering, as they are essentially insoluble in water in surface environments. Th(IV) and U(IV) remain in solid clay-sized material. Overall, geoneutrino data constrain the masses of mantle chemical and isotopic domains recognized by studies of mantle-derived rocks and show the extent of recycling into the mantle over geological time.

  5. Exploring experimental sources of multiple protein conformations in structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Damm, Kelly L; Carlson, Heather A

    2007-07-01

    Receptor flexibility must be incorporated into structure-based drug design in order to portray a more accurate representation of a protein in solution. Our approach is to generate pharmacophore models based on multiple conformations of a protein and is very similar to solvent mapping of hot spots. Previously, we had success using computer-generated conformations of apo human immunodeficiency virus-1 protease (HIV-1p). Here, we examine the use of an NMR ensemble versus a collection of crystal structures, and we compare back to our previous study based on computer-generated conformations. To our knowledge, this is the first direct comparison of an NMR ensemble and a collection of crystal structures to incorporate protein flexibility in structure-based drug design. To provide an accurate comparison between the experimental sources, we used bound structures for our multiple protein structure (MPS) pharmacophore models. The models from an NMR ensemble and a collection of crystal structures were both able to discriminate known HIV-1p inhibitors from decoy molecules and displayed superior performance over models created from single conformations of the protein. Although the active-site conformations were already predefined by bound ligands, the use of MPS allows us to overcome the cross-docking problem and generate a model that does not simply reproduce the chemical characteristics of a specific ligand class. We show that there is more structural variation between 28 structures in an NMR ensemble than 90 crystal structures bound to a variety of ligands. MPS models from both sources performed well, but the model determined using the NMR ensemble appeared to be the most general yet accurate representation of the active site. This work encourages the use of NMR models in structure-based design.

  6. High whey protein intake delayed the loss of lean body mass in healthy old rats, whereas protein type and polyphenol/antioxidant supplementation had no effects.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, Laurent; Gatineau, Eva; Gatellier, Philippe; Migné, Carole; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Rémond, Didier; Rocher, Emilie; Dardevet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to compare and combine 3 nutritional strategies to slow down the age-related loss of muscle mass in healthy old rats: 1) increase protein intake, which is likely to stimulate muscle protein anabolism; 2) use leucine rich, rapidly digested whey proteins as protein source (whey proteins are recognized as the most effective proteins to stimulate muscle protein anabolism). 3) Supplement animals with a mixture of chamomile extract, vitamin E, vitamin D (reducing inflammation and oxidative stress is also effective to improve muscle anabolism). Such comparisons and combinations were never tested before. Nutritional groups were: casein 12% protein, whey 12% protein, whey 18% protein and each of these groups were supplemented or not with polyphenols/antioxidants. During 6 months, we followed changes of weight, food intake, inflammation (plasma fibrinogen and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and body composition (DXA). After 6 months, we measured muscle mass, in vivo and ex-vivo fed and post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis, ex-vivo muscle proteolysis, and oxidative stress parameters (liver and muscle glutathione, SOD and total antioxidant activities, muscle carbonyls and TBARS). We showed that although micronutrient supplementation reduced inflammation and oxidative stress, the only factor that significantly reduced the loss of lean body mass was the increase in whey protein intake, with no detectable effect on muscle protein synthesis, and a tendency to reduce muscle proteolysis. We conclude that in healthy rats, increasing protein intake is an effective way to delay sarcopenia.

  7. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  8. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics. PMID:27323846

  9. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-06-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics.

  10. Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A feeding trial was conducted in a closed system with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) juveniles (mean weight, 2.84 g) to examine the effects of total replacement of fish meal (FM), with and without supplementation of DL-methionine (Met) and L-lysine (Lys), by plant protein sources. Fish were f...

  11. Doppler effect for an optical discharge source of shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tishchenko, V N

    2005-11-30

    The Doppler effect for a moving pulsating optical discharge producing periodic shock waves is considered. The manifestations of the effect are limited by the wave merging mechanism. The validity conditions were found for the effect in the case of a pulsating source of shock waves. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Are viruses a source of new protein folds for organisms? - Virosphere structure space and evolution.

    PubMed

    Abroi, Aare; Gough, Julian

    2011-08-01

    A crucially important part of the biosphere - the virosphere - is too often overlooked. Inclusion of the virosphere into the global picture of protein structure space reveals that 63 protein domain superfamilies in viruses do not have any structural and evolutionary relatives in modern cellular organisms. More than half of these have functions which are not virus-specific and thus might be a source of new folds and functions for cellular life. The number of viruses on the planet exceeds that of cells by an order of magnitude and viruses evolve up to six orders of magnitude faster. As a result, cellular species are subject to a constitutive 'flow-through' of new viral genetic material. Due to this and the relaxed evolutionary constraints in viruses, the transfer of domains between host-to-virus could be a mechanism for accelerated protein evolution. The virosphere could be an engine for the genesis of protein structures, and may even have been so before the last universal common ancestor of cellular life.

  13. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) -- sources and applications in molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Kur, Józef; Olszewski, Marcin; Długołecka, Anna; Filipkowski, Paweł

    2005-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play essential roles in DNA replication, recombination, and repair in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. The SSBs share a common core ssDNA-binding domain with a conserved OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold. This ssDNA-binding domain was presumably present in the common ancestor to all three major branches of life. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in SSBs because they are useful for molecular biology methods and for analytical purposes. In this review, we concentrate on recent advances in the discovery of new sources of SSBs as well as certain aspects of their applications in analytical sciences.

  14. Effects of tannin source and concentration from tree leaves on two species of tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Earl, Julia E; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation in and around freshwater ecosystems can affect aquatic organisms through the production of secondary compounds, which are retained in leaves after senescence and are biologically active. Tannins can be toxic to tadpoles, but the plant source of tannins and tannin concentration have been confounded in experimental designs in previous studies. To examine the effects of the concentration and source of tannins (tree species), we examined the effects of 4 factors on tadpole survival, growth, and development: tannin source (red oak [Quercus rubra], white oak [Quercus alba], or sugar maple [Acer saccharum]); tannin concentration (including a control); diet protein level; and tadpole species (American toad [Anaxyrus americanus] and spring peepers [Pseudacris crucifer]). Tannin source and concentration affected spring peeper survival, but American toads had uniformly high survival. Spring peepers had a lower survival rate in high tannin concentrations of oak leachate but a high survival rate in both concentrations of sugar maple leachate. These differences in survival did not correspond with changes in dissolved oxygen, and no effect of dietary protein level on tadpole performance was observed. The presence of plant leachate resulted in increased tadpole growth in both species, but the mechanism for this finding is unclear. The results of the present study show that tannin concentration and source are important factors for tadpole performance, adding further evidence that plant chemistry can affect aquatic organisms. PMID:25319714

  15. Low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Adel; Zapata, Rizaldy C.; Singh, Arashdeep; Yee, Nicholas J.; Chelikani, Prasanth K.

    2016-01-01

    Diets deficient in protein often increase food consumption, body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We compared the effects of diets varying in protein concentrations on energy balance in obesity-prone rats. We demonstrate that protein-free (0% protein calories) diets decreased energy intake and increased energy expenditure, very low protein (5% protein) diets increased energy intake and expenditure, whereas moderately low protein (10% protein) diets increased energy intake without altering expenditure, relative to control diet (15% protein). These diet-induced alterations in energy expenditure are in part mediated through enhanced serotonergic and β-adrenergic signaling coupled with upregulation of key thermogenic markers in brown fat and skeletal muscle. The protein-free and very low protein diets decreased plasma concentrations of multiple essential amino acids, anorexigenic and metabolic hormones, but these diets increased the tissue expression and plasma concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-21. Protein-free and very low protein diets induced fatty liver, reduced energy digestibility, and decreased lean mass and body weight that persisted beyond the restriction period. In contrast, moderately low protein diets promoted gain in body weight and adiposity following the period of protein restriction. Together, our findings demonstrate that low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance. PMID:27122299

  16. Elderberries: a source of ribosome-inactivating proteins with lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Jiménez, Pilar; Quinto, Emiliano J; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Garrosa, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Gayoso, Manuel J; Girbés, Tomás

    2015-01-30

    Sambucus (Adoxaceae) species have been used for both food and medicine purposes. Among these, Sambucus nigra L. (black elder), Sambucus ebulus L. (dwarf elder), and Sambucus sieboldiana L. are the most relevant species studied. Their use has been somewhat restricted due to the presence of bioactive proteins or/and low molecular weight compounds whose ingestion could trigger deleterious effects. Over the last few years, the chemical and pharmacological characteristics of Sambucus species have been investigated. Among the proteins present in Sambucus species both type 1, and type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), and hololectins have been reported. The biological role played by these proteins remains unknown, although they are conjectured to be involved in defending plants against insect predators and viruses. These proteins might have an important impact on the nutritional characteristics and food safety of elderberries. Type 2 RIPs are able to interact with gut cells of insects and mammals triggering a number of specific and mostly unknown cell signals in the gut mucosa that could significantly affect animal physiology. In this paper, we describe all known RIPs that have been isolated to date from Sambucus species, and comment on their antiviral and entomotoxic effects, as well as their potential uses.

  17. The effects of high protein diets on thermogenesis, satiety and weight loss: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Halton, Thomas L; Hu, Frank B

    2004-10-01

    For years, proponents of some fad diets have claimed that higher amounts of protein facilitate weight loss. Only in recent years have studies begun to examine the effects of high protein diets on energy expenditure, subsequent energy intake and weight loss as compared to lower protein diets. In this study, we conducted a systematic review of randomized investigations on the effects of high protein diets on dietary thermogenesis, satiety, body weight and fat loss. There is convincing evidence that a higher protein intake increases thermogenesis and satiety compared to diets of lower protein content. The weight of evidence also suggests that high protein meals lead to a reduced subsequent energy intake. Some evidence suggests that diets higher in protein result in an increased weight loss and fat loss as compared to diets lower in protein, but findings have not been consistent. In dietary practice, it may be beneficial to partially replace refined carbohydrate with protein sources that are low in saturated fat. Although recent evidence supports potential benefit, rigorous longer-term studies are needed to investigate the effects of high protein diets on weight loss and weight maintenance.

  18. Heat- and lignosulfonate-treated canola meal as a source of ruminal undegradable protein for lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wright, C F; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Swift, M L; Fisher, L J; Shelford, J A; Dinn, N E

    2005-01-01

    This experiment used 18 lactating Holstein cows in a 3 x 3 Latin square replicated 6 times to determine the effectiveness of processing with moist heat or moist heat combined with lignosulfonate (LSO3) for increasing the ruminal undegradable fraction of canola meal for use as a protein supplement for lactating dairy cows. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and contained one of 3 forms of canola meal; untreated canola meal (UCM), heat-treated canola meal (HTCM) or heat-and LSO3-treated canola meal (LSO3CM). Total collection of urine and feces was taken from each cow during the last 5 d of each 42-d experimental period. Milk production was greater for cows fed the LSO3CM diet (36.6 kg/d) than for cows fed the UCM diet (34.8 kg/d) but did not differ from cows fed the HTCM diet (35.3 kg/d). Digestibility of crude protein was lower for cows supplemented with LSO3CM and they had reduced concentrations of ruminal ammonia N, blood urea N, and milk urea N compared with cows supplemented with UCM or HTCM. Dry matter intake and apparent digestibilities of neutral and acid detergent fiber were increased in cows fed the LSO3CM diet. Urinary N excretion (as % of N intake) was reduced in cows fed the LSO3CM diet. These results indicate that moist heat combined with LSO3 treatment of canola meal was effective in increasing the proportion of crude protein digested in the lower digestive tract of lactating cows and was therefore used more effectively as a source of protein than UCM or HTCM.

  19. Environmental impact of the production of mealworms as a protein source for humans - a life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, Dennis G A B; de Boer, Imke J M

    2012-01-01

    The demand for animal protein is expected to rise by 70-80% between 2012 and 2050, while the current animal production sector already causes major environmental degradation. Edible insects are suggested as a more sustainable source of animal protein. However, few experimental data regarding environmental impact of insect production are available. Therefore, a lifecycle assessment for mealworm production was conducted, in which greenhouse gas production, energy use and land use were quantified and compared to conventional sources of animal protein. Production of one kg of edible protein from milk, chicken, pork or beef result in higher greenhouse gas emissions, require similar amounts of energy and require much more land. This study demonstrates that mealworms should be considered a more sustainable source of edible protein.

  20. Depositional controls, distribution, and effectiveness of world's petroleum source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D.; Ulmishek, G.F.

    1989-03-01

    Six stratigraphic intervals representing one-third of Phanerozoic time contain source rocks that have provided more than 90% of the world's discovered oil and gas reserves (in barrels of oil equivalent). The six intervals include (1) Silurian (generated 9% of the world's reserves); (2) Upper Devonian-Tournaisian (8% of reserves); (3) Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian (8% of reserves); (4) Upper Jurassic (25% of reserves); (5) middle Cretaceous (29% of reserves); and (6) Oligocene-Miocene (12.5% of reserves). This uneven distribution of source rocks in time has no immediately obvious cyclicity, nor are the intervals exactly repeatable in the commonality of factors that controlled the formation of source rocks. In this study, source rocks of the six intervals have been mapped worldwide together with oil and gas reserves generated by these rocks. Analysis of the maps shows that the main factors affecting deposition of these source rocks and their spatial distribution and effectiveness in generating hydrocarbon reserves are geologic age, global and regional tectonics, paleogeography, climate, and biologic evolution. The effect of each of the factors on geologic setting and quality of source rocks has been analyzed. Compilation of data on maturation time for these source rocks demonstrated that the majority of discovered oil and gas is very young, more than 80% of the world's oil and gas reserves have been generated since Aptian time, and nearly half of the world's hydrocarbons have been generated and trapped since the Oligocene.

  1. Effect of Carbon and Energy Source on Bacterial Chromate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William Aaron; Apel, William Arnold; Petersen, J. N.; Peyton, Brent Michael

    2002-07-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate carbon and energy sources suitable to support hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction by a bacterial consortium enriched from dichromate-contaminated aquifer sediments. The consortium was cultured under denitrifying conditions in a minimal, synthetic groundwater medium that was amended with various individual potential carbon and energy sources. The effects of these individual carbon and energy sources on Cr(VI) reduction and growth were measured. The consortium was found to readily reduce Cr(VI) with sucrose, acetate, L-asparagine, hydrogen plus carbon dioxide, ethanol, glycerol, glycolate, propylene glycol, or D-xylose as a carbon and energy source. Minimal Cr(VI) reduction was observed when the consortium was cultured with citrate, 2-ketoglutarate, L-lactate, pyruvate, succinate, or thiosulfate plus carbon dioxide as a carbon and energy source when compared with abiotic controls. The consortium grew on all of the above carbon and energy sources, with the highest cell densities reached using D-xylose and sucrose, demonstrating that the consortium is metabolically diverse and can reduce Cr(VI) using a variety of different carbon and energy sources. The results suggest that the potential exists for the enrichment of Cr(VI)-reducing microbial populations in situ by the addition of a sucrose-containing feedstock such as molasses, which is an economical and readily available carbon and energy source.

  2. The influence of electrospray ion source design on matrix effects.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Helen; Kittlaus, Stefan; Kempe, Günther; Hemmerling, Christlieb; Alder, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates to which extent the design of electrospray ion sources influences the susceptibility to matrix effects (MEs) in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For this purpose, MEs were measured under comparable conditions (identical sample extracts, identical LC column, same chromatographic method and always positive ion mode) on four LC-MS/MS instrument platforms. The instruments were combined with five electrospray ion sources, viz. Turbo Ion Spray, Turbo V(TM) Source, Standard ESI, Jet Stream ESI and Standard Z-Spray Source. The comparison of MEs could be made at all retention times because the method of permanent postcolumn infusion was applied. The MEs ascertained for 45 pesticides showed for each electrospray ion source the same pattern, i.e. the same number of characteristic signal suppressions at equivalent retention times in the chromatogram. The Turbo Ion Spray (off-axis geometry), Turbo V(TM) Source (orthogonal geometry) and the Standard Z-Spray Source (double orthogonal geometry) did not differ much in their susceptibility to MEs. The Jet Stream ESI (orthogonal geometry) reaches a higher sensitivity by an additional heated sheath gas, but suffers at the same time from significantly stronger signal suppressions than the comparable Standard ESI (orthogonal geometry) without sheath gas. No relation between source geometry and extent of signal suppression was found in this study.

  3. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  4. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  5. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  6. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a “fast” protein and caseinate (CA) as a “slow” protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  7. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-03

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP.

  8. Breakfast Protein Source Does Not Influence Postprandial Appetite Response and Food Intake in Normal Weight and Overweight Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Christina M.; Neumann, Brianna L.; Baum, Jamie I.

    2016-01-01

    Breakfasts higher in protein lead to a greater reduction in hunger compared to breakfasts higher in carbohydrate. However, few studies have examined the impact of higher protein breakfasts with differing protein sources. Our objective was to determine if protein source (animal protein (AP) versus plant protein (PP)) influences postprandial metabolic response in participants consuming a high protein breakfast (~30% energy from protein). Normal weight (NW; n = 12) and overweight women (OW; n = 8) aging 18–36 were recruited to participate. Participants completed two visits in a randomized, cross-over design with one week between visits. Subjects had 15 minutes to consume each breakfast. Blood glucose and appetite were assessed at baseline, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 120 minutes postprandial. Participants kept a 24-hour dietary record for the duration of each test day. No difference was found between NW and OW participants or breakfasts for postprandial appetite responses. AP had a significantly lower glucose response at 30 minutes compared with PP (−11.6%; 127 ± 4 versus 112 ± 4 mg/dL; P < 0.05) and a slower return to baseline. There was no difference in daily energy intake between breakfasts. These data suggest that protein source may influence postprandial glucose response without significantly impacting appetite response in breakfast consumers. PMID:26885386

  9. Light Source for Scanning Method of Size-of-Source Effect Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmadi, Aditya; Juliastuti, Endang; Handojo, Andrianto; Zaid, Ghufron; Wiriadinata, Hidayat; Park, Seung-Nam

    2015-12-01

    A high-power light-emitting diode (HPLED) is proposed as a new light source for the measurement of the size-of-source effect (SSE) in radiation thermometers. The HPLED is a more compact, simple, and inexpensive light source and is suitable for SSE measurement by the scanning method. An experiment has been done using a 3 W HPLED with a hemispherical front lens and a peak emission wavelength of 660 nm. A linear pyrometer (Model LP4 manufactured by KE) was used for the measurements. The scanning process was carried out by using a computerized linear translation stage spanning 500 mm. To confirm the measurement result, the SSE of the LP4 was also measured by the conventional indirect method using an integrating sphere with a 65 mm diameter exit port. The same trends of the SSE value of the scanning and indirect method were found in all ranges of the indirect method measurement. The results show that the light source has enough brightness and a sufficiently wide angular distribution to provide a dynamic measurement range of up to 108 and allow the measurement of the SSE up to a radius of 500 mm. These results support the application of HPLED as an alternative light source for SSE measurements by the scanning method.

  10. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-01

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  11. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-01

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  12. Flavor and Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Isolates from Different Whey Sources.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated flavor and functional characteristics of whey protein isolates (WPIs) from Cheddar, Mozzarella, Cottage cheese, and rennet casein whey. WPIs were manufactured in triplicate. Powders were rehydrated and evaluated in duplicate by descriptive sensory analysis. Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Functional properties were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, heat stability, and protein solubility. WPI from Cheddar and Cottage cheese whey had the highest cardboard flavor, whereas sweet aromatic flavor was highest in Mozzarella WPI, and rennet casein WPI had the lowest overall flavor and aroma. Distinct sour taste and brothy/potato flavor were also noted in WPI from Cottage cheese whey. Consistent with sensory results, aldehyde concentrations were also highest in Cheddar and Cottage cheese WPI. Overrun, yield stress, and foam stability were not different (P > 0.05) among Cheddar, Mozzarella, and rennet casein WPI, but WPI foams from Cottage cheese whey had a lower overrun and air-phase fraction (P < 0.05). Cottage cheese WPI was more heat stable at pH 7 (P < 0.05) than other WPI in 4% protein solutions, and was the only WPI to not gel at 10% protein. Cottage cheese WPI was less soluble at pH 4.6 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05) and also exhibited higher turbidity loss at pH 3 to 7 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05). This study suggests that WPI produced from nontraditional whey sources could be used in new applications due to distinct functional and flavor characteristics. PMID:26910294

  13. Selected protein monitoring in histological sections by targeted MALDI-FTICR in-source decay imaging.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, David; Longuespée, Rémi; Debois, Delphine; Asakawa, Daiki; Turtoi, Andrei; Castronovo, Vincent; Noël, Agnès; Bertrand, Virginie; De Pauw-Gillet, Marie-Claire; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-02-19

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a rapidly growing method in biomedical research allowing molecular mapping of proteins on histological sections. The images can be analyzed in terms of spectral pattern to define regions of interest. However, the identification and the differential quantitative analysis of proteins require off line or in situ proteomic methods using enzymatic digestion. The rapid identification of biomarkers holds great promise for diagnostic research, but the major obstacle is the absence of a rapid and direct method to detect and identify with a sufficient dynamic range a set of specific biomarkers. In the current work, we present a proof of concept for a method allowing one to identify simultaneously a set of selected biomarkers on histological slices with minimal sample treatment using in-source decay (ISD) MSI and MALDI-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR). In the proposed method, known biomarkers are spotted next to the tissue of interest, the whole MALDI plate being coated with 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) matrix. The latter enhances MALDI radical-induced ISD, providing large tags of the amino acid sequences. Comparative analysis of ISD fragments between the reference spots and the specimen in imaging mode allows for unambiguous identification of the selected biomarker while preserving full spatial resolution. Moreover, the high resolution/high mass accuracy provided by FTICR mass spectrometry allows the identification of proteins. Well-resolved peaks and precise measurements of masses and mass differences allow the construction of reliable sequence tags for protein identification. The method will allow the use of MALDI-FTICR MSI as a method for rapid targeted biomarker detection in complement to classical histology.

  14. Race of source effects in the elaboration likelihood model.

    PubMed

    White, P H; Harkins, S G

    1994-11-01

    In a series of experiments, we investigated the effect of race of source on persuasive communications in the Elaboration Likelihood Model (R.E. Petty & J.T. Cacioppo, 1981, 1986). In Experiment 1, we found no evidence that White participants responded to a Black source as a simple negative cue. Experiment 2 suggested the possibility that exposure to a Black source led to low-involvement message processing. In Experiments 3 and 4, a distraction paradigm was used to test this possibility, and it was found that participants under low involvement were highly motivated to process a message presented by a Black source. In Experiment 5, we found that attitudes toward the source's ethnic group, rather than violations of expectancies, accounted for this processing effect. Taken together, the results of these experiments are consistent with S.L. Gaertner and J.F. Dovidio's (1986) theory of aversive racism, which suggests that Whites, because of a combination of egalitarian values and underlying negative racial attitudes, are very concerned about not appearing unfavorable toward Blacks, leading them to be highly motivated to process messages presented by a source from this group.

  15. Parallax and Orbital Effects in Astrometric Microlensing with Binary Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.; Giordano, M.; Manni, L.

    2016-06-01

    In gravitational microlensing, binary systems may act as lenses or sources. Identifying lens binarity is generally easy, in particular in events characterized by caustic crossing since the resulting light curve exhibits strong deviations from a smooth single-lensing light curve. In contrast, light curves with minor deviations from a Paczyński behavior do not allow one to identify the source binarity. A consequence of gravitational microlensing is the shift of the position of the multiple image centroid with respect to the source star location — the so-called astrometric microlensing signal. When the astrometric signal is considered, the presence of a binary source manifests with a path that largely differs from that expected for single source events. Here, we investigate the astrometric signatures of binary sources taking into account their orbital motion and the parallax effect due to the Earth’s motion, which turn out not to be negligible in most cases. We also show that considering the above-mentioned effects is important in the analysis of astrometric data in order to correctly estimate the lens-event parameters.

  16. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod).

  17. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  18. Protein traffic disorders: an effective high-throughput fluorescence microscopy pipeline for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Hugo M; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T; Proença, Maria C; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking - Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts.

  19. Food Sources of Protein and Risk of Incident Gout in the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Gim Gee; Pan, An; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prospective studies evaluating diet in relation to the risk of gout in Asian populations are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the consumption of dietary protein from each of its major sources and the risk of gout in a Chinese population. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults who were 45–74 years old at recruitment during the years 1993–1998. Habitual diet information was collected via a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and physician-diagnosed gout was self-reported during 2 followup interviews up to the year 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, among 51,114 eligible study participants who were free of gout at baseline and responded to our followup interviews. Results A total of 2,167 participants reported physician-diagnosed gout during the followup period. The multivariate-adjusted HRs (with 95% CIs) of gout, comparing the first quartile with the fourth quartile, were as follows: 1.27 (1.12–1.44; P for trend < 0.001) for total protein, 1.27 (1.11–1.45; P for trend < 0.001) for poultry, 1.16 (1.02–1.32; P for trend = 0.006) for fish and shellfish, 0.86 (0.75–0.98; P for trend = 0.018) for soy food, and 0.83 (0.73–0.95; P for trend = 0.012) for nonsoy legumes. No statistically significant associations were found with protein intake from other sources (red meat, eggs, dairy products, grains, or nuts and seeds). Conclusion In this Chinese population living in Singapore, higher total dietary protein intake from mainly poultry and fish/shellfish was associated with an increased risk of gout, while dietary intake of soy and nonsoy legumes was associated with a reduced risk of gout. PMID:25808549

  20. Effects of influenza A virus NS1 protein on protein expression: the NS1 protein enhances translation and is not required for shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Mirella; Basler, Christopher F; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M; Bourmakina, Svetlana; Zheng, Hongyong; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-02-01

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein, a virus-encoded alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) antagonist, appears to be a key regulator of protein expression in infected cells. We now show that NS1 protein expression results in enhancement of reporter gene activity from transfected plasmids. This effect appears to be mediated at the translational level, and it is reminiscent of the activity of the adenoviral virus-associated I (VAI) RNA, a known inhibitor of the antiviral, IFN-induced, PKR protein. To study the effects of the NS1 protein on viral and cellular protein synthesis during influenza A virus infection, we used recombinant influenza viruses lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1) or expressing truncated NS1 proteins. Our results demonstrate that the NS1 protein is required for efficient viral protein synthesis in COS-7 cells. This activity maps to the amino-terminal domain of the NS1 protein, since cells infected with wild-type virus or with a mutant virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein-lacking approximately half of its carboxy-terminal end-showed similar kinetics of viral and cellular protein expression. Interestingly, no major differences in host cell protein synthesis shutoff or in viral protein expression were found among NS1 mutant viruses in Vero cells. Thus, another viral component(s) different from the NS1 protein is responsible for the inhibition of host protein synthesis during viral infection. In contrast to the earlier proposal suggesting that the NS1 protein regulates the levels of spliced M2 mRNA, no effects on M2 protein accumulation were seen in Vero cells infected with delNS1 virus.

  1. Identification of Streptomyces lividans proteins secreted by the twin-arginine translocation pathway following growth with different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Julien; Morosoli, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    Genome-based signal peptide predictions classified Streptomyces coelicolor as the microorganism that secretes the most proteins through the twin-arginine translocation (Tat)-dependent secretion pathway. Availability of a DeltatatC mutant of the closely related strain Streptomyces lividans impaired Tat-dependent protein secretion and enabled identification of many extracellular proteins that are secreted via the Tat pathway. Proteomic techniques were applied to analyze proteins from the supernatants of log-phase cultures. Since the bacterial secretome depends mainly on the carbon sources available during growth, xylose, glucose, chitin, and soil extracts were used. A total of 63 proteins were identified, among which 7 were predicted by the TATscan program, and 20 were not predicted but contained a potential Tat signal motif. Thirteen proteins having no signal sequence could be co-transported by Tat-dependent proteins because the genes that encode these proteins are in close proximity in the genome. Finally, the presence of 23 proteins lacking signal peptides was difficult to explain. More secreted proteins could be identified as Tat substrates in varying carbon sources.

  2. Protein timing and its effects on muscular hypertrophy and strength in individuals engaged in weight-training.

    PubMed

    Stark, Matthew; Lukaszuk, Judith; Prawitz, Aimee; Salacinski, Amanda

    2012-12-14

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether past research provides conclusive evidence about the effects of type and timing of ingestion of specific sources of protein by those engaged in resistance weight training. Two essential, nutrition-related, tenets need to be followed by weightlifters to maximize muscle hypertrophy: the consumption of 1.2-2.0 g protein.kg -1 of body weight, and ≥44-50 kcal.kg-1 of body weight. Researchers have tested the effects of timing of protein supplement ingestion on various physical changes in weightlifters. In general, protein supplementation pre- and post-workout increases physical performance, training session recovery, lean body mass, muscle hypertrophy, and strength. Specific gains, differ however based on protein type and amounts. Studies on timing of consumption of milk have indicated that fat-free milk post-workout was effective in promoting increases in lean body mass, strength, muscle hypertrophy and decreases in body fat. The leucine content of a protein source has an impact on protein synthesis, and affects muscle hypertrophy. Consumption of 3-4 g of leucine is needed to promote maximum protein synthesis. An ideal supplement following resistance exercise should contain whey protein that provides at least 3 g of leucine per serving. A combination of a fast-acting carbohydrate source such as maltodextrin or glucose should be consumed with the protein source, as leucine cannot modulate protein synthesis as effectively without the presence of insulin. Such a supplement post-workout would be most effective in increasing muscle protein synthesis, resulting in greater muscle hypertrophy and strength. In contrast, the consumption of essential amino acids and dextrose appears to be most effective at evoking protein synthesis prior to rather than following resistance exercise. To further enhance muscle hypertrophy and strength, a resistance weight- training program of at least 10-12 weeks with compound movements for both

  3. Protein encapsulation in mesoporous silicate: the effects of confinement on protein stability, hydration, and volumetric properties.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Revanur; Zhao, Shuang; Gies, Hermann; Winter, Roland

    2004-10-01

    On the basis of the predictions of statistical-thermodynamic models, it is postulated that excluded volume effects may play a significant role in the stability, interaction, and function of proteins. We studied the effects of confinement on protein un/refolding and stability. Our approach was to encapsulate a model protein, RNase A, in a mesoporous silica, MCM-48, with glasslike wall structure and with well-defined pores to create a crowded microenvironment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where pressure perturbation and differential scanning calorimetric techniques are employed to evaluate the stability, hydration, and volumetric properties of the confined protein. A drastic increase in protein stability ( approximately 30 degrees C increase in unfolding temperature) is observed. The increase in stability is probably not only due to a restriction in conformational space (excluded volume effect due to nonspecific interactions) but also due to an increased strength of hydration of the protein within the narrow silica pores.

  4. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    SciTech Connect

    Nedoma, J.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  5. Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Anwar, Farooq; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC) for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain). Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH) of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1%) and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25%) compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent) hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI) have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential. PMID:22942692

  6. Effects of high-energy ultrasound on the functional properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Barraza, O A; Del Toro-Sanchez, C L; Ruiz-Cruz, S; Márquez-Ríos, E

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high-energy ultrasound has been used as an alternative to improve the functional properties of various proteins, such as from milk, eggs, soy and poultry. The benefits of implementing this technology depend on the inherent characteristics of the protein source and the intensity and amplitude of the ultrasound, as well as on the pH, temperature, ionic strength, time, and all of the variables that have an effect on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Therefore, it is necessary to establish the optimal conditions for each type of food. The use of ultrasound is a promising technique in food technology with a low impact on the environment, and it has thus become known as a green technology. Therefore, this review focuses on the application of high-energy ultrasound to food; its effects on the functional properties of proteins; and how different conditions such as the frequency, time, amplitude, temperature, and protein concentration affect the functional properties.

  7. Effect of starch sources on extruded aquaculture feed containing DDGS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquaculture is one of the most rapidly growing sectors of agriculture, and is a reliable growth market for the prepared feeds. A Brabender laboratory-scale single screw extruder was used to study the effect of various starch sources (cassava, corn, and potato), DDGS levels (20, 30, and 40% (wb)), an...

  8. Fraunhofer Diffraction Effects on Total Power for a Planckian Source.

    PubMed

    Shirley, E L

    2001-01-01

    An algorithm for computing diffraction effects on total power in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is derived. The result for Fraunhofer diffraction of monochromatic radiation is well known, and this work reports the result for radiation from a Planckian source. The result obtained is valid at all temperatures.

  9. Comparison of spray-dried egg and albumen powder with conventional animal protein sources as feed ingredients in diets fed to weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Piao, Xiangshu; Ma, Xiaokang; Xu, Xiao; Zeng, Zhikai; Tian, Qiyu; Li, Yao

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the apparent (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids (AA) in spray-dried egg (SPE) and albumen powder (AP) compared with spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP), dried porcine solubles (DPS) and fish meal (FM). Additionally, the effects of these egg byproducts as a replacement for conventional animal proteins on the performance and nutrient digestibility of piglets were studied. In Exp. 1, six barrows fitted with ileal T-cannulas were allotted to a 6 × 6 Latin Square design and fed six diets. The AID and SID of AA were generally higher in AP and FM (P < 0.01) than in the other protein sources. In Exp. 2, 150 piglets weaned at 21 days, were fed diets containing the five protein sources for 3 weeks. Weight gain of piglets fed SDPP was the highest among the treatments. Dry matter and protein digestibility for pigs offered SDPP were higher (P < 0.01) than those offered FM and DPS. AP decreased (P < 0.05) Escherichia coli counts in the cecum. DPS decreased (P < 0.05) serum diamine oxidase compared with SPE. In conclusion, AP and SPE are competitive with traditional animal protein sources and can be successfully fed to piglets without compromising performance.

  10. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    Digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala, and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94%). The presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fiber, and high concentrations of antinutritional factors in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, are responsible for poor digestibility of protein. The effects of the presence of some of the important antinutritional factors on protein and amino digestibilities of food and feed products are reviewed in this chapter. Food and feed products may contain a number of antinutritional factors that may adversely affect protein digestibility and amino acid availability. Antinutritional factors may occur naturally, such as glucosinolates in mustard and rapeseed protein products, trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, phytates in cereals and oilseeds, and gossypol in cottonseed protein products. Antinutritional factors may also be formed during heat/alkaline processing of protein products, yielding Maillard compounds, oxidized forms of sulfur amino acids, D-amino acids, and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative). The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soybeans, kidney beans, or other grain legumes can cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 50%) in rats and pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in cereals, such as sorghum, and grain legumes, such as fababean (Vicia faba L.), can result in significantly reduced protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 23%) in rats, poultry, and pigs. Studies involving phytase supplementation of production rations for swine or poultry have provided indirect evidence that normally encountered levels of phytates in cereals and legumes

  11. Source polarization and OPC effects on illumination optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brist, Travis; Bailey, George E.; Drozdov, Alexander; Torres, Andres; Estroff, Andrew; Hendrickx, Eric

    2005-11-01

    To perform a thorough source optimization during process development is becoming more critical as we move to leading edge-technology nodes. With each new node the acceptable process margin continues to shrink as a result of lowering k1 factors. This drives the need for thorough source optimization prior to locking down a process in order to attain the maximum common depth of focus (DOF) the process will allow. Optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a process-enabling tool in lithography by providing a common process window for structures that would otherwise not have overlapping windows. But what effect does this have on the source optimization? With the introduction of immersion lithography there is yet another parameter, namely source polarization, that may need to be included in an illumination optimization process. This paper explored the effect polarization and OPC have on illumination optimization. The Calibre ILO (Illumination Optimization) tool was used to perform the illumination optimization and provided plots of DOF vs. various parametric illumination settings. This was used to screen the various illumination settings for the one with optimum process margins. The resulting illumination conditions were then implemented and analyzed at a full chip level. Based on these results, a conclusion was made on the impact source polarization and OPC would have on the illumination optimization process.

  12. The effect of water on protein dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Zaccai, G

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and spectroscopy were applied to describe the hydration and dynamics of a soluble protein and a natural membrane from extreme halophilic Archaea. The quantitative dependence of protein motions on water activity was clearly illustrated, and it was established that a minimum hydration shell is required for the systems to access their functional resilience, i.e. a dynamics state that allows biological activity. PMID:15306381

  13. Natural Photoreceptors as a Source of Fluorescent Proteins, Biosensors, and Optogenetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Shemetov, Anton A.; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical tools have revolutionized modern biology by allowing detection and control of biological processes with exceptional spatiotemporal precision and sensitivity. Natural photoreceptors provide researchers with a vast source of molecular templates for engineering of fluorescent proteins, biosensors, and optogenetic tools. Here, we give a brief overview of natural photoreceptors and their mechanisms of action. We then discuss fluorescent proteins and biosensors developed from light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) domains and phytochromes, as well as their properties and applications. These fluorescent tools possess unique characteristics not achievable with green fluorescent protein–like probes, including near-infrared fluorescence, independence of oxygen, small size, and photo-sensitizer activity. We next provide an overview of available optogenetic tools of various origins, such as LOV and BLUF (blue-light-utilizing flavin adenine dinucleotide) domains, cryptochromes, and phytochromes, enabling control of versatile cellular processes. We analyze the principles of their function and practical requirements for use. We focus mainly on optical tools with demonstrated use beyond bacteria, with a specific emphasis on their applications in mammalian cells. PMID:25706899

  14. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  15. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces.

  16. MALDI In-Source Decay of Protein: The Mechanism of c-Ion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The in-source decay (ISD) phenomenon, the fragmentation at an N–Cα bond of a peptide backbone that occurs within several tens of nanoseconds in the ion-source in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS), is discussed from the standpoints of the discovery and early publications dealing with MALDI-ISD, the formation of c-ions in energy-sudden desorption/ionization methods, the formation of radical species in a MALDI, model construction for ISD, and matrix materials that are suitable for use in MALDI-ISD. The formation of c-ions derived from peptides and proteins in MALDI-ISD can be rationalized by a mechanism involving intermolecular hydrogen transfer, denoted as the “Takayama’s model” by De Pauw’s group (Anal. Chem. 79: 8678–8685, 2007). It should be emphasized that the model for MALDI-ISD was constructed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analyses of matrix crystals, as well as the use of isotopically-labelled peptides. PMID:27162707

  17. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety.

  18. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety. PMID:24698990

  19. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased ({sup 35}S)-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M{sub r}) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M{sub r} protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M{sub r}. A second hippocampal protein with an M{sub r} of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M{sub r} of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration.

  20. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Teresi, we give an example of how the external sources can be used to preserve global symmetries in truncations of the 2PI effective action. Specifically, in the context of an O (2) model with spontaneous symmetry breaking, we show that this approach allows the Hartree-Fock approximation to be re-organized, such that the Goldstone boson remains massless algebraically in the symmetry-broken phase and we obtain the correct second-order thermal phase transition.

  1. Estimate of tsunami source using optimized unit sources and including dispersion effects during tsunami propagation: The 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Mulia, Iyan Eka; Satake, Kenji; Watada, Shingo; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Sheehan, Anne F.

    2016-09-01

    We apply a genetic algorithm to find the optimized unit sources using dispersive tsunami synthetics to estimate the tsunami source of the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake. The optimal number and distribution of unit sources gives the sea surface elevation similar to that from our previous slip distribution on a fault using tsunami data, but different from that using seismic data. The difference is possibly due to submarine mass failure in the source region. Dispersion effects during tsunami propagation reduce the maximum amplitudes by up to 20% of conventional linear longwave propagation model. Dispersion effects also increase tsunami travel time by approximately 1 min per 1300 km on average. The dispersion effects on amplitudes depend on the azimuth from the tsunami source reflecting the directivity of tsunami source, while the effects on travel times depend only on the distance from the source.

  2. Effect of whey and soy protein supplementation combined with resistance training in young adults.

    PubMed

    Candow, Darren G; Burke, Natalie C; Smith-Palmer, T; Burke, Darren G

    2006-06-01

    The purpose was to compare changes in lean tissue mass, strength, and myofibrillar protein catabolism resulting from combining whey protein or soy protein with resistance training. Twenty-seven untrained healthy subjects (18 female, 9 male) age 18 to 35 y were randomly assigned (double blind) to supplement with whey protein (W; 1.2 g/kg body mass whey protein + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose power, N = 9: 6 female, 3 male), soy protein (S; 1.2 g/kg body mass soy protein + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose powder, N= 9: 6 female, 3 male) or placebo (P; 1.2 g/kg body mass maltodextrine + 0.3 g/kg body mass sucrose powder, N = 9: 6 female, 3 male) for 6 wk. Before and after training, measurements were taken for lean tissue mass (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), strength (1-RM for bench press and hack squat), and an indicator of myofibrillar protein catabolism (urinary 3-methylhistidine). Results showed that protein supplementation during resistance training, independent of source, increased lean tissue mass and strength over isocaloric placebo and resistance training (P < 0.05). We conclude that young adults who supplement with protein during a structured resistance training program experience minimal beneficial effects in lean tissue mass and strength.

  3. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases. PMID:26989481

  4. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T.

    2013-09-11

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  5. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  6. Effect of trehalose on protein structure

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nishant Kumar; Roy, Ipsita

    2009-01-01

    Trehalose is a ubiquitous molecule that occurs in lower and higher life forms but not in mammals. Till about 40 years ago, trehalose was visualized as a storage molecule, aiding the release of glucose for carrying out cellular functions. This perception has now changed dramatically. The role of trehalose has expanded, and this molecule has now been implicated in a variety of situations. Trehalose is synthesized as a stress-responsive factor when cells are exposed to environmental stresses like heat, cold, oxidation, desiccation, and so forth. When unicellular organisms are exposed to stress, they adapt by synthesizing huge amounts of trehalose, which helps them in retaining cellular integrity. This is thought to occur by prevention of denaturation of proteins by trehalose, which would otherwise degrade under stress. This explanation may be rational, since recently, trehalose has been shown to slow down the rate of polyglutamine-mediated protein aggregation and the resultant pathogenesis by stabilizing an aggregation-prone model protein. In recent years, trehalose has also proved useful in the cryopreservation of sperm and stem cells and in the development of a highly reliable organ preservation solution. This review aims to highlight the changing perception of the role of trehalose over the last 10 years and to propose common mechanisms that may be involved in all the myriad ways in which trehalose stabilizes protein structures. These will take into account the structure of trehalose molecule and its interactions with its environment, and the explanations will focus on the role of trehalose in preventing protein denaturation. PMID:19177348

  7. Macromolecular crowding effects on protein-protein binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young C.; Best, Robert B.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2010-11-01

    Macromolecular crowding in cells is recognized to have a significant impact on biological function, yet quantitative models for its effects are relatively undeveloped. The influence of crowding on protein-protein interactions is of particular interest, since these mediate many processes in the cell, including the self-assembly of larger complexes, recognition, and signaling. We use a residue-level coarse-grained model to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on the assembly of protein-protein complexes. Interactions between the proteins are treated using a fully transferable energy function, and interactions of protein residues with the spherical crowders are repulsive. We show that the binding free energy for two protein complexes, ubiquitin/UIM1 and cytochrome c/cytochrome c peroxidase, decreases modestly as the concentration of crowding agents increases. To obtain a quantitative description of the stabilizing effect, we map the aspherical individual proteins and protein complexes onto spheres whose radii are calculated from the crowder-excluded protein volumes. With this correspondence, we find that the change in the binding free energy due to crowding can be quantitatively described by the scaled particle theory model without any fitting parameters. The effects of a mixture of different-size crowders—as would be found in a real cell—are predicted by the same model with an additivity ansatz. We also obtain the remarkable result that crowding increases the fraction of specific complexes at the expense of nonspecific transient encounter complexes in a crowded environment. This result, due to the greater excluded volume of the nonspecific complexes, demonstrates that macromolecular crowding can have subtle functional effects beyond the relative stability of bound and unbound complexes.

  8. Interactive effects of boron, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth and physiology in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    High concentrations of boron (B) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, is sometimes diminished in agricultural drainwater ponds contaminated with Se and B. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm (microgram/g) Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 1,000 ppm B (as boric acid), 15 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B, or 60 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B. In a concurrent experiment, the above sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After four weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and histopathological lesions of the liver occurred. Boron alone caused some reduction in growth. Several interactive effects occurred between B and Se, including further reduction in growth, and increases in plasma glutathione reductase activity, hematocrit, hemoglobin and plasma protein concentrations. With 7% protein, the growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, 60 ppm Se caused 100% mortality, and growth effects of 15 ppm Se and 1,000 ppm B alone were more pronounced than with 22% protein. Selenium accumulation increased in the liver with 7% protein. Interactive effects were greater for Se and B with 7% protein than with 22% protein and included significant mortality and enhanced accumulation of Se in the liver. These findings suggest the potential for more severe toxicological effects of Se and B independently and interactively on duckling survival and development when dietary protein is diminished.

  9. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  10. Effect of resonant microwave power on a PIG ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; Gavin, B.F.; MacGill, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    We have investigated the effect of applying microwave power at the electron cyclotron frequency on the characteristics of the ion beam extracted from a hot-cathode PIG ion source. No change was seen in the ion charge state distribution. A small but significant reduction in the beam noise level was seen, and it is possible that the technique may find application in situations where beam quiescence is important. 29 references, 2 figures.

  11. Genetic and nongenetic sources of variation in phospholipid transfer protein activity.

    PubMed

    Jarvik, Gail P; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Wolfbauer, Gertrud; McKinstry, Laura; Vaze, Aditya; Brunzell, John; Motulsky, Arno G; Nickerson, Deborah A; Heagerty, Patrick J; Wijsman, Ellen M; Albers, John J

    2010-05-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) belongs to the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein gene family. Expression of PLTP has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We evaluated the effects of PLTP region tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the prediction of both carotid artery disease (CAAD) and PLTP activity. CAAD effects were evaluated in 442 Caucasian male subjects with severe CAAD and 497 vascular disease-free controls. SNP prediction of PLTP transfer activity was evaluated in both a subsample of 87 subjects enriched for an allele of interest and in a confirmation sample of 210 Caucasian males and females. Hemoglobin A1c or insulin level predicted 11-14% of age- and sex-adjusted PLTP activity. PLTP SNPs that predicted approximately 11-30% of adjusted PLTP activity variance were identified in the two cohorts. For rs6065904, the allele that was associated with CAAD was also associated with elevated PLTP activity in both cohorts. SNPs associated with PLTP activity also predicted variation in LDL-cholesterol and LDL-B level only in the replication cohort. These results demonstrate that PLTP activity is strongly influenced by PLTP region polymorphisms and metabolic factors.

  12. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Karolina; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Sindrewicz, Krzysztof; Bober, Joanna; Domański, Leszek; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Maciej; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Skrzypczak, Wiesław; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents’ toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins’ synthesis. Very slight differences were observed between the group receiving cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (CMG) and the control group. In contrast, compared to the control group, animals receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (TMG) exhibited higher expression of proteins responsible for renal drug metabolism and lower expression levels of cytoplasmic actin and the major urinary protein. In the TMG group, we observed higher expression of proteins responsible for drug metabolism and a decrease in the expression of respiratory chain enzymes (thioredoxin-2) and markers of distal renal tubular damage (heart fatty acid-binding protein) compared to expression in the CMG

  13. Bile salts act as effective protein-unfolding agents and instigators of disulfide stress in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Claudia M.; Knoefler, Daniela; Vitvitsky, Victor; Banerjee, Ruma; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Commensal and pathogenic bacteria must deal with many different stress conditions to survive in and colonize the human gastrointestinal tract. One major challenge that bacteria encounter in the gut is the high concentration of bile salts, which not only aid in food absorption but also act as effective physiological antimicrobials. The mechanism by which bile salts limit bacterial growth is still largely unknown. Here, we show that bile salts cause widespread protein unfolding and aggregation, affecting many essential proteins. Simultaneously, the bacterial cytosol becomes highly oxidizing, indicative of disulfide stress. Strains defective in reducing oxidative thiol modifications, restoring redox homeostasis, or preventing irreversible protein aggregation under disulfide stress conditions are sensitive to bile salt treatment. Surprisingly, cholate and deoxycholate, two of the most abundant and very closely related physiological bile salts, vary substantially in their destabilizing effects on proteins in vitro and cause protein unfolding of different subsets of proteins in vivo. Our results provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the antimicrobial effects of bile salts, help explain the beneficial effects of bile salt mixtures, and suggest that we have identified a physiological source of protein-unfolding disulfide stress conditions in bacteria. PMID:24706920

  14. Interactive effects of arsenate, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth, and physiology in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, may vary in environments that are contaminated with selenium. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 200 ppm As (as sodium arsenate), 15 ppm Se with 200 ppm As, or 60 ppm Se with 200 ppm As. In a concurrent experiment, the same sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After 4 weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and livers had histopathological lesions. Arsenic alone caused some reduction in growth. Antagonistic interactive effects occurred between As and Se, including complete to partial alleviation of the following Se effects: mortality, impaired growth, hepatic lesions and lipid peroxidation, and altered glutathione and thiol status. With 7% protein, survival and growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, Se (60 ppm) caused 100% mortality, and As (200 ppm) caused mortality, decreased growth, and liver histopathology. These findings suggest the potential for antagonistic effects of Se and As on duckling survival, growth, and physiology with adequate dietary protein but more severe toxicological effects when dietary protein is diminished.

  15. Applied proteomics: mitochondrial proteins and effect on function.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Mary F; Melov, Simon

    2002-03-01

    The identification of a majority of the polypeptides in mitochondria would be invaluable because they play crucial and diverse roles in many cellular processes and diseases. The endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major limiter of life as illustrated by studies in which the transgenic overexpression in invertebrates of catalytic antioxidant enzymes results in increased lifespans. Mitochondria have received considerable attention as a principal source---and target---of ROS. Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been implicated in heart disease including myocardial preconditioning, ischemia/reperfusion, and other pathologies. In addition, oxidative stress in the mitochondria is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as aging itself. The rapidly emerging field of proteomics can provide powerful strategies for the characterization of mitochondrial proteins. Current approaches to mitochondrial proteomics include the creation of detailed catalogues of the protein components in a single sample or the identification of differentially expressed proteins in diseased or physiologically altered samples versus a reference control. It is clear that for any proteomics approach prefractionation of complex protein mixtures is essential to facilitate the identification of low-abundance proteins because the dynamic range of protein abundance within cells has been estimated to be as high as 10(7). The opportunities for identification of proteins directly involved in diseases associated with or caused by mitochondrial dysfunction are compelling. Future efforts will focus on linking genomic array information to actual protein levels in mitochondria. PMID:11884366

  16. Feeding value of field pea as a protein source in forage-based diets fed to beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Soto-Navarro, S A; Encinias, A M; Bauer, M L; Lardy, G P; Caton, J S

    2012-02-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of field peas as a protein source in diets for beef cattle. In the first study, 4 cultivars of field pea were incubated in situ to determine rate and extent of CP disappearance. Results indicate that field pea cultivars vary in CP content (22.6, 26.1, 22.6, and 19.4%, DM basis for Profi, Arvika, Carneval, and Trapper, respectively). Soluble protein fraction ranged from 34.9% for Trapper to 54.9% for Profi. Degradable CP fraction was greater (P = 0.01) for Trapper compared with the other cultivars, and no differences (P ≥ 0.25) were observed among Profi, Arvika, and Carneval. Rate of CP degradation differed (P ≤ 0.03) for all cultivars, with Profi being the greatest and Trapper the smallest (10.8, 10.0, 8.1, and 6.3 ± 1.4%/h for Profi, Carneval, Arvika, and Trapper, respectively). Estimated RDP was not different (P = 0.21) for all 4 cultivars. In the second study, 30 crossbred beef steers (301 ± 15 kg) were individually fed and used to evaluate effects of field pea processing (whole, rolled, or ground) on steer performance. Diets contained 40% field pea grain. Growing steers consuming whole field pea had greater ADG (P = 0.08) than those consuming processed field pea (1.69, 1.52, and 1.63 ± 0.05 kg/d, for whole, rolled, and ground, respectively). However, DMI (kg/d and as % of BW) and G:F were not different (P ≥ 0.24). In the third study, 35 individually fed gestating beef cows (694 ± 17 kg) were used to evaluate the use of field pea as a protein supplement for medium quality grass hay (9.3% CP). Treatments consisted of whole field peas at 1) 0 g (CON), 2) 680 g (FP680), 3) 1,360 g (FP1360), and 4) 2,040 g (FP2040), and 5) 1,360 g of 74% barley and 26% canola meal (BCM). Total intake (forage + supplement) of gestating beef cows increased with increasing field pea level (linear, P = 0.01; supplemented vs. nonsupplemented, P = 0.01). In summary, protein quantity and rate of ruminal protein degradation

  17. Effect of temperature stress on protein methyl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, W.; Kracaw, K.

    1986-05-01

    Protein methyl esters have been implicated in a number of physiological processes. They have measured the effect of temperature stress on the levels of protein methyl esters in the mesophilic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (PCPS) and the thermophilic fungus P. duponti (PD). PD and PCPS were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine. The mycelia were collected by filtration, frozen in liquid nitrogen and ground to a fine powder. The nitrogen powder was extracted with either phosphate buffer or with SDS, glycerol, phosphate, 2-mercaptoethanol. Insoluble material was removed by centrifugation. The supernatants were assayed for protein methyl esters. The released (/sup 3/H)methanol was extracted into toluene:isoamyl alcohol (3:2) and quantitated by liquid scintillation. The production of volatile methanol was confirmed by use of Conway diffusion cells. Soluble proteins accounted for about one-fourth of the total protein methyl ester extracted by SDS. In PCPS, the SDS extracted proteins have about three times the level of esterification of the soluble proteins whereas in PD there is little difference between soluble and SDS extracted protein. The level of protein esterification in PD is about one-tenth that observed in PCPS. Temperature stress caused large changes in the level of protein esterification. The data suggest protein methyl esters may contribute to the adaptation to environmental stress.

  18. Molecular origins of internal friction effects on protein-folding rates.

    PubMed

    de Sancho, David; Sirur, Anshul; Best, Robert B

    2014-07-02

    Recent experiments on protein-folding dynamics have revealed strong evidence for internal friction effects. That is, observed relaxation times are not simply proportional to the solvent viscosity as might be expected if the solvent were the only source of friction. However, a molecular interpretation of this remarkable phenomenon is currently lacking. Here, we use all-atom simulations of peptide and protein folding in explicit solvent, to probe the origin of the unusual viscosity dependence. We find that an important contribution to this effect, explaining the viscosity dependence of helix formation and the folding of a helix-containing protein, is the insensitivity of torsion angle isomerization to solvent friction. The influence of this landscape roughness can, in turn, be quantitatively explained by a rate theory including memory friction. This insensitivity of local barrier crossing to solvent friction is expected to contribute to the viscosity dependence of folding rates in larger proteins.

  19. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1995-01-01

    During the fourth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme. These clearly revealed the influence of higher molecular weight protein impurities on interface shape; (2) characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions. These efforts have, for the first time, resulted in lysozyme free of higher molecular weight components; (3) continuation of the salt repartitioning studies with Seikagaku lysozyme, which has a lower protein impurity content that Sigma stock. These efforts confirmed our earlier findings of higher salt contents in smaller crystals. However, less salt is in corporated into the crystals grown from Seikagaku stock. This strongly suggests a dependence of salt repartitioning on the concentration of protein impurities in lysozyme. To test this hypothesis, repartitioning studies with the high purity lysozyme prepared in-house will be begun shortly; (4) numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics. These simulations have produced interface shapes which are in good agreement with out experimental observations; and (5) light scattering studies on under- and supersaturated lysozyme solutions. A consistent interpretation of the static and dynamic data leaves little doubt that pre-nucleation clusters, claimed to exist even in undersaturated solutions, are not present. The article: 'Growth morphology response to nutrient and impurity nonuniformities' is attached.

  20. Effect of sole nitrogen sources and temperature on activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Mines, R.O. Jr.; Sherrard, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of temperature on biokinetic coefficients used to design aerobic biological systems treating nitrogen deficient wastewaters at a COD: TKN ratio of 13.7:1 are presented. The impact of temperature on substrate removal, waste biosolids production, and oxygen requirements with the effects of nitrification is delineated at temperatures of 5 C, 10 C, 20 C, and 30 C for two nitrogen sources; ammonia and nitrate. Temperature correction coefficients ({theta}) are presented and the implications for the design and operation of suspended growth biological systems are discussed.

  1. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  2. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  3. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  4. Oxya hyla hyla (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Alternative Protein Source for Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mousumi; Mandal, Suman Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient composition of the grasshoppers Oxya hyla hyla showed that they are a rich nutrient source containing 687.7 g protein/kg of dry body weight. Their antinutrient values fell within nutritionally acceptable values of the poultry bird Coturnix japonica japonica (Japanese quail). The most required essential amino acids and fatty acids were also present in sufficient amount. For feeding trial nine diets were formulated on an equal crude protein (230 g/kg) basis with grasshopper meal, fish meal, and soybean meal. Three sets of diets with grasshopper meal were prepared with 50 g/kg, 100 g/kg, and 150 g/kg grasshopper of total feed. Similarly, other diet sets were prepared with fish meal and also with soybean meal. Results were compared with another group of Japanese quails fed on a reference diet that was considered as control. Two experiments were conducted with a total number of 600, seven-day-old, Japanese quails. In experiment 1 for determination of growth performance, quails were randomly distributed into ten groups of males and ten groups of females containing 30 birds each. In experiment 2 for determination of laying performance, identical ten groups were prepared in ten repetitions (2 females and 1 male in each group) from the six-week-old birds of experiment 1. Birds of diet set GM2 have gained the highest body weight (male 4.04 g/bird/day; female 5.01 g/bird/day) followed by birds of FM3 diet set (male 3.72 g/bird/day; female 4.40 g/bird/day), whereas birds of reference diet have gained 3.05 g/bird/day for male and 3.23 g/bird/day for female. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) of birds fed with GM2 was the lowest (male 3.33; female 2.97) whereas FCR of R group was higher (male 4.37; female 4.65) than grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. Hen day production percentage was higher (72.2) in GM2 group, followed by FM3 (63.5) group. R group had lower 1st egg weight (9.0 g), weight gain (8.2 g), percentage of hen day production (41

  5. Soybean meal substitution with a yeast-derived microbial protein source in dairy cow diets.

    PubMed

    Sabbia, J A; Kalscheur, K F; Garcia, A D; Gehman, A M; Tricarico, J M

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects substituting soybean meal with a yeast-derived microbial protein (YMP) on rumen and blood metabolites, dry matter intake, and milk production of high-producing dairy cows. Sixteen Holstein cows (12 multiparous and 4 primiparous), 93 ± 37 DIM (mean ± SD) at the beginning of the experiment, were used in a 4×4 Latin square design with four 28-d periods. Cows were blocked by parity and production, with 1 square consisting of 4 animals fitted with rumen cannulas. Basal diets, formulated for 16.1% crude protein and 1.56 Mcal/kg of net energy for lactation, contained 40% corn silage, 20% alfalfa hay, and 40% concentrate mix. During each period, cows were fed 1 of 4 treatment diets corresponding to YMP (DEMP; Alltech Inc., Nicholasville, KY) concentrations of 0, 1.14, 2.28, and 3.41% DM. Soybean meal (44% CP) was replaced by YMP to attain isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets. Dietary treatments had no effect on pH and on most ruminal volatile fatty acid concentrations, with the exception of isovalerate, which decreased linearly with the addition of YMP. Rumen ammonia concentration decreased linearly, whereas free amino acids, total amino acid nitrogen, and soluble proteins weighing more than 10 kDa showed a cubic response on rumen N fractionation. A quadratic response was observed in oligopeptides that weighed between 3 and 10 kDa and peptides under 3kDa when expressed as percentages of total amino acids and total nitrogen. Although nonesterified fatty acid concentration in blood did not differ between treatments, β-hydroxybutyrate and plasma glucose increased linearly as YMP increased. Dry matter intake showed a cubic effect, where cows fed 1.14, and 3.41% YMP had the highest intake. Milk production was not affected by YMP, whereas a trend was observed for a quadratic increase for 4% fat-corrected milk and energy-corrected milk. Medium- and long-chain fatty acid concentrations in milk increased quadratically

  6. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, R. A.; Burridge, T.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs. PMID:26351099

  7. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  8. Competing Sound Sources Reveal Spatial Effects in Cortical Processing

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Ross K.; Billimoria, Cyrus P.; Perrone, Ben P.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Sen, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Why is spatial tuning in auditory cortex weak, even though location is important to object recognition in natural settings? This question continues to vex neuroscientists focused on linking physiological results to auditory perception. Here we show that the spatial locations of simultaneous, competing sound sources dramatically influence how well neural spike trains recorded from the zebra finch field L (an analog of mammalian primary auditory cortex) encode source identity. We find that the location of a birdsong played in quiet has little effect on the fidelity of the neural encoding of the song. However, when the song is presented along with a masker, spatial effects are pronounced. For each spatial configuration, a subset of neurons encodes song identity more robustly than others. As a result, competing sources from different locations dominate responses of different neural subpopulations, helping to separate neural responses into independent representations. These results help elucidate how cortical processing exploits spatial information to provide a substrate for selective spatial auditory attention. PMID:22563301

  9. Air Pollution in Megacities: Sources and Regional/Global Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.

    2007-12-01

    Air Pollution in Megacities is increasing significantly in all continents. The socio-economic and health problems are escalating, especially in developing countries. In terms of sources, urban transportation is relevant in most cities, as well as industrial pollution. In Latin American Cities such as Sao Paulo, Mexico City and Santiago, serious governmental efforts are being doing to reduce emissions and effects. Latin America has about 300 cities with population above 300.000 people. In Sao Paulo, the significant increase in the use of ethanol as fuel brings important increase in aldehyde concentrations. In all 3 Megacities, high aerosol concentrations are observed, with clear effects on population health. Large studies on aerosol source apportionment were done in these 3 cities, and detailed results will be presented. Quantification of aerosol sources is a problem, especially in the organic aerosol component that is high in most of Megacities. In Asia and Africa, the problems are similar as in Latin America, and the large emissions from these urban centers are relevant and needs to be taken into account in policies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  10. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors.

    PubMed

    Sporea, R A; Burridge, T; Silva, S R P

    2015-09-09

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs.

  11. Effect of protein supplemented cassava diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, V G; Leelamma, S

    1996-04-01

    The effect of feeding rats with cassava diet (tapioca) has been investigated with respect to the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and levels of TBARS. By varying the levels of protein in the diet and cyanide content of cassava, the possible role of a high protein diet in the prevention of oxidant stress has been shown. Rhodanese which detoxifes cyanide is also found to be inhibited in rats fed low protein diet while the inhibition was only marginal in the high protein fed groups. PMID:8754627

  12. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term stability of the interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been improved. Growth or dissolution of a crystal on a 100 A scale can now be clearly distinguished from dimensional changes occurring within the optical path of the interferometer. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the local interfacial displacement at several widely-spaced positions on the crystal surface with high local depth resolution, has already yielded novel results. We found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) the mean growth step density is greater at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed to interpret the large body of data in a unified way. The results strongly suggests that (1) the ion to lysozyme ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter on the order of 10 microns. The computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization (see the First Report) has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies. These results show that some elements of a moving boundary problem must be incorporated into the model in order to obtain a more realistic description. Our experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions has been extensively tested. Scattering intensity measurements with a true Rayleigh scatterer produced systematically increased forward scattering, indicating problems with glare. These have been resolved. Preliminary measurements with supersaturated lysozyme solutions revealed that the scatterers grow with time. Work has begun on a computer program

  13. Run-up Variability due to Source Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Giudice, Tania; Zolezzi, Francesca; Traverso, Chiara; Valfrè, Giulio; Poggi, Pamela; Parker, Eric J.

    2010-05-01

    assess the impact on the North African coast. The effects of uncertainty in fault parameters were assessed by perturbing the base model, and observing variation on wave height along the coast. The tsunami wave run-up was computed at 4020 locations along the Egyptian coast between longitudes 28.7 E and 33.8 E. To assess the effects of fault parameters uncertainty, input model parameters have been varied and effects on run-up have been analyzed. The simulations show that for a given point there are linear relationships between run-up and both fault dislocation and rupture length. A superposition analysis shows that a linear combination of the effects of the different source parameters (evaluated results) leads to a good approximation of the simulated results. This relationship is then used as the basis for a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation was performed for 1600 scenarios at each of the 4020 points along the coast. The coefficient of variation (the ratio between standard deviation of the results and the average of the run-up heights along the coast) is comprised between 0.14 and 3.11 with an average value along the coast equal to 0.67. The coefficient of variation of normalized run-up has been compared with the standard deviation of spectral acceleration attenuation laws used for probabilistic seismic hazard assessment studies. These values have a similar meaning, and the uncertainty in the two cases is similar. The 'rule of thumb' relationship between mean and sigma can be expressed as follows: ?+ σ ≈ 2?. The implication is that the uncertainty in run-up estimation should give a range of values within approximately two times the average. This uncertainty should be considered in tsunami hazard analysis, such as inundation and risk maps, evacuation plans and the other related steps.

  14. MutaBind estimates and interprets the effects of sequence variants on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Simonetti, Franco L; Goncearenco, Alexander; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-07-01

    Proteins engage in highly selective interactions with their macromolecular partners. Sequence variants that alter protein binding affinity may cause significant perturbations or complete abolishment of function, potentially leading to diseases. There exists a persistent need to develop a mechanistic understanding of impacts of variants on proteins. To address this need we introduce a new computational method MutaBind to evaluate the effects of sequence variants and disease mutations on protein interactions and calculate the quantitative changes in binding affinity. The MutaBind method uses molecular mechanics force fields, statistical potentials and fast side-chain optimization algorithms. The MutaBind server maps mutations on a structural protein complex, calculates the associated changes in binding affinity, determines the deleterious effect of a mutation, estimates the confidence of this prediction and produces a mutant structural model for download. MutaBind can be applied to a large number of problems, including determination of potential driver mutations in cancer and other diseases, elucidation of the effects of sequence variants on protein fitness in evolution and protein design. MutaBind is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/mutabind/. PMID:27150810

  15. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed.

  16. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed. PMID:26249677

  17. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Qualitative changes in floral pollen protein have been shown to be an important aspect of pollinator health. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.), provides an essential autumnal source of floral pollen for wild bee and honeybee populations prior to winter, with tall or Canada gol...

  18. Effect of Protein Supercharging on Interaction with Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley; Obermeyer, Allie; Mills, Carolyn; Dong, Xuehui

    Complexation of proteins with polyelectrolytes can lead to a liquid-liquid phase separation to generate a viscous complex coacervate phase rich in protein and polyelectrolyte. However, many proteins do not readily coacervate at conditions near neutral pH and physiological ionic strength. Here, protein supercharging is used to systematically explore the effect of protein charge on the complex coacervation with polycations. Four model proteins were chemically modified to generate a panel of proteins with varying surface charge, with both the average charge and charge distribution quantified by mass spectrometry. Proteins phase separated with the qP4VP and qPDMAEMA polycations when the ratio of negatively charged residues to positively charged residues was greater than 1.1-1.2. Efficient partitioning of the protein into the coacervate phase required larger charge ratio (1.5-2.0). The model proteins were also encapsulated in complex coacervate core micelles. Dynamic light scattering was used to assess the formation of micelles with POEGMA- b-qP4VP and revealed micellar hydrodynamic radii of approximately 25-30 nm. Small angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the formation of spherical micelles.

  19. Effect of puromycin aminonucleoside on HSPG core protein content of glomerular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinath, B.S.; Singh, A.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.; Lewis, E.J. )

    1988-10-01

    It has been suggested that the glomerular basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) is an important determinant of the glomerular permselectivity barrier. Derangements in the content of basement membrane heparan sulfate have been implicated in alterations in glomerular permselectivity seen in many glomerular diseases such as aminonucleoside nephrosis. The cellular origin and metabolism of the glomerular basement membrane HSPG have not been studied in detail. The authors have detected the expression of the proteoglycan by cloned glomerular visceral epithelial cells of the rat by employing a specific antibody against the core protein of HSPG isolated from the rat glomerular basement membrane. These findings suggest that in the rat in vivo glomerular visceral epithelial cells are one source of heparan sulfate present in the glomerular basement membrane. The effect of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) on the HSPG core protein content of the cloned glomerular epithelial cells was studied. By a quantitative immunoperoxidase method, the aminonucleoside caused a 28% reduction in the core protein content of the epithelial cells following 72 h of incubation. However, the content of Heymann nephritis-related antigen, Fx1A was unchanged. Studies employing ({sup 3}H)leucine incorporation showed that PAN was a weak inhibitor of de novo protein synthesis at 24 h of incubation, with complete recovery at 48 and 72 h. These data suggest that PAN effect on heparan sulfate core protein cannot be attributed to generalized inhibition of protein synthesis. The precise mechanism underlying the aminonucleoside effect on heparan sulfate core protein remains to be elucidated.

  20. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental setup for the in-situ high resolution optical monitoring of protein crystal growth/dissolution morphologies was substantially improved. By augmenting the observation system with a temperature-controlled enclosure, laser illumination for the interferometric microscope, and software for pixel by pixel light intensity recording, a height resolution of about two unit cells for lysozyme can now be obtained. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied. Quite unexpectedly, it was found that the longer crystals were in contact with their solution, the lower was their ion content. The development of a model for diffusive-convective transport and resulting distribution of the growth rate on facets was completed. Results obtained for a realistic growth cell geometry show interesting differences between 'growth runs' at 1g and 0g. The kinematic viscosity of lysozyme solutions of various supersaturations and salt concentrations was monitored over time. In contrast to the preliminary finding of other authors, no changes in viscosity were found over four days. The experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions was completed, and a computer program for the evaluation of multi-angle light scattering data was acquired.

  1. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    The experimental setup for the in-situ high resolution optical monitoring of protein crystal growth/dissolution morphologies was substantially improved. By augmenting the observation system with a temperature-controlled enclosure, laser illumination for the interferometric microscope, and software for pixel by pixel light intensity recording, a height resolution of about two unit cells for lysozyme can now be obtained. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied. Quite unexpectedly, it was found that the longer crystals were in contact with their solution, the lower was their ion content. The development of a model for diffusive-convective transport and resulting distribution of the growth rate on facets was completed. Results obtained for a realistic growth cell geometry show interesting differences between 'growth runs' at 1g and 0g. The kinematic viscosity of lysozyme solutions of various supersaturations and salt concentrations was monitored over time. In contrast to the preliminary finding of other authors, no changes in viscosity were found over four days. The experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions was completed, and a computer program for the evaluation of multi-angle light scattering data was acquired.

  2. Effects of confinement and crowding on folding of model proteins.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, M; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a simple coarse-grained model of crambin placed inside of a softly repulsive sphere of radius R. The confinement makes folding at the optimal temperature slower and affects the folding scenarios, but both effects are not dramatic. The influence of crowding on folding are studied by placing several identical proteins within the sphere, denaturing them, and then by monitoring refolding. If the interactions between the proteins are dominated by the excluded volume effects, the net folding times are essentially like for a single protein. An introduction of inter-proteinic attractive contacts hinders folding when the strength of the attraction exceeds about a half of the value of the strength of the single protein contacts. The bigger the strength of the attraction, the more likely is the occurrence of aggregation and misfolding.

  3. The effect of the unfolded protein response on the production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David Rhys; Walmsley, Amanda Maree

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are currently produced through a wide variety of host systems, including yeast, E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. One of the most recent systems developed uses plant cells. While considerable advances have been made in the yields and fidelity of plant-made recombinant proteins, many of these gains have arisen from the development of recombinant factors. This includes elements such as highly effective promoters and untranslated regions, deconstructed viral vectors, silencing inhibitors, and improved DNA delivery techniques. However, unlike other host systems, much of the work on recombinant protein production in plants uses wild-type hosts that have not been modified to facilitate recombinant protein expression. As such, there are still endogenous mechanisms functioning to maintain the health of the cell. The result is that these pathways, such as the unfolded protein response, can actively work to reduce recombinant protein production to maintain the integrity of the cell. This review examines how issues arising from the unfolded protein response have been addressed in other systems, and how these methods may be transferable to plant systems. We further identify several areas of host plant biology that present attractive targets for modification to facilitate recombinant protein production.

  4. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  5. Effective protein-protein interaction from structure factor data of a lysozyme solution

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C.; Costa, D.; Ruberto, R.; Wanderlingh, U.; Cavero, M.; Pellicane, G.

    2013-08-07

    We report the determination of an effective protein-protein central potential for a lysozyme solution, obtained from the direct inversion of the total structure factor of the system, as extracted from small angle neutron scattering. The inversion scheme rests on a hypernetted-chain relationship between the effective potential and the structural functions, and is preliminarily tested for the case of a Lennard-Jones interaction. The characteristics of our potential are discussed in comparison with current models of effective interactions in complex fluids. The phase behavior predictions are also investigated.

  6. Effective protein-protein interaction from structure factor data of a lysozyme solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramo, M. C.; Caccamo, C.; Cavero, M.; Costa, D.; Pellicane, G.; Ruberto, R.; Wanderlingh, U.

    2013-08-01

    We report the determination of an effective protein-protein central potential for a lysozyme solution, obtained from the direct inversion of the total structure factor of the system, as extracted from small angle neutron scattering. The inversion scheme rests on a hypernetted-chain relationship between the effective potential and the structural functions, and is preliminarily tested for the case of a Lennard-Jones interaction. The characteristics of our potential are discussed in comparison with current models of effective interactions in complex fluids. The phase behavior predictions are also investigated.

  7. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  8. A Search for Sources of Treatment Effects in a Teacher Effectiveness Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Alene Hawes

    This study investigated possible sources of teacher change in the Stallings Effective Use of time (EUOT) staff development program administered to preservice teachers. These sources were: (1) the full EUOT program with feedback plus workshops; (2) feedback only; and (3) the trainer as post-treatment observer. Over a 15-month period, 20 student…

  9. Mercury as a Global Pollutant: Sources, Pathways, and Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy. PMID:23590191

  10. Mercury as a global pollutant: sources, pathways, and effects.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Mason, Robert P; Chan, Hing Man; Jacob, Daniel J; Pirrone, Nicola

    2013-05-21

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy.

  11. Effect of carbon source on pyrimidine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2010-08-01

    The effect of carbon source on the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was studied at the level of enzyme synthesis. Although pyrimidine supplementation of glucose-grown Ps. oryzihabitans cells produced a slight but statistically significant effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, catabolite repression of the enzyme activities by glucose appeared to be occurring. Pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain grown on glucose indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the mutant strain cells, dihydroorotase and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase activities were found to about double while aspartate transcarbamoylase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were slightly elevated compared to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil.

  12. Effect of carbon source on pyrimidine biosynthesis in Pseudomonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2010-08-01

    The effect of carbon source on the regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was studied at the level of enzyme synthesis. Although pyrimidine supplementation of glucose-grown Ps. oryzihabitans cells produced a slight but statistically significant effect on the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway enzyme activities, catabolite repression of the enzyme activities by glucose appeared to be occurring. Pyrimidine limitation experiments undertaken using an orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase mutant strain grown on glucose indicated that repression of enzyme synthesis by pyrimidines was occurring. Following pyrimidine limitation of the mutant strain cells, dihydroorotase and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase activities were found to about double while aspartate transcarbamoylase and orotate phosphoribosyltransferase activities were slightly elevated compared to their activities in the mutant strain cells grown on excess uracil. PMID:20473969

  13. Observations of collective effects at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.N.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1995-10-01

    We present a summary of measurements of single beam collective effects in the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We describe measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities, including some recent results using the newly commissioned feedback systems and the results of an initial search for the fast ion instability. Single bunch effects include bunch lengthening, energy spread increase, HOM loss measurements, head-tail damping rates, current dependent tune shifts, and transverse mode coupling instability threshold. The longitudinal measurements are consistent with a broadband impedance {vert_bar}{Zeta}{sub {parallel}}/{eta}{vert_bar}{sub eff} = 0.22{plus_minus}0.07 {Omega} and transverse measurements indicate broadband impedances of {Zeta}{sub y,eff} = 155 k{Omega}/m and Z{sub x,eff} = 58 k{Omega}/m.

  14. Whole-body protein kinetics in children with kwashiorkor and infection: a comparison of egg white and milk as dietary sources of protein.

    PubMed

    Manary, M J; Brewster, D R; Broadhead, R L; Graham, S M; Hart, C A; Crowley, J R; Fjeld, C R; Yarasheski, K E

    1997-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that during treatment of kwashiorkor (including marasmic kwashiorkor) with infection there is a lower rate of amino acid oxidation when the dietary intake of amino acids resembles the amino acid composition of acute phase proteins (APPs). Twenty-two children in Blantyre, Malawi, with kwashiorkor and acute infection were fed an isoenergetic, isonitrogenous diet with either egg white or milk as a protein source. The whole-body amino acid oxidation rate was measured after 24 h by determining the plasma urea rate of appearance, and whole-body protein breakdown and synthesis rates were determined from the plasma leucine rate of appearance. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, alpha1-antitrypsin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) were determined on admission and at 24 and 48 h. The 11 children who received milk had a lower rate of amino acid oxidation than the children who received egg white (x +/- SD: 137 +/- 65 compared with 195 +/- 66 micromol urea x kg body wt(-1) x h(-1), P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the two groups in the rate of whole-body protein breakdown or protein synthesis. The TNF-alpha concentration correlated inversely with whole-body protein breakdown and synthesis rates, and the IL-6 concentration correlated directly with C-reactive protein. We conclude that by making the amino acid composition of the diet resemble that of APPs in the treatment of acute kwashiorkor, the rate of amino acid oxidation can be decreased.

  15. Effects of chilling on protein synthesis in tomato suspension cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Matadial, B.; Pauls, K.P. )

    1989-04-01

    The effect of chilling on cell growth, cell viability, protein content and protein composition in suspension cultures of L. esculentum and L. hirsutum was investigated. Cell growth for both species was arrested at 2{degrees}C but when cultures were transferred to 25{degree}C cell growth resumed. There was no difference in viability between control and chilled cultures of L. esculentum, however, L. hirsutum control cultures exhibited larger amounts of Fluorescein Diacetate induced fluorescence than chilled cultures. {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation into proteins was 2.5-2 times higher in L. hirsutum than in L. esculentum. Quantitative and qualitative differences, in {sup 35}S-methionine labelled proteins, between chilled and control cultures were observed by SDS-PAGE and fluorography. Protein content in chilled cultures decreased over time but then increased when cultures were transferred to 25{degrees}C.

  16. Effect of Supercharging on Coacervation Between Proteins and Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley; Obermeyer, Allie; Mills, Carolyn; Dong, Xuehui

    2015-03-01

    Complex coacervates have attracted a great deal of attention as a method to encapsulate biological molecules including DNA and proteins. However, a large fraction of proteins will not form coacervates with oppositely charged polymers unless their surface charge density is increased through a process known as supercharging. Using mass spectrometry, we are able to quantify the formal charge distribution of proteins after supercharging, and with this knowledge of the chemical state of the protein measure coacervate formation for a panel of proteins as a function of charge. While many of the proteins studied do not form coacervates or coacervate over only a narrow range of composition in their native form, all proteins form coacervates above a critical charge level with increasing range of coacervation as surface charge density increases. The resulting data is consistent with a strong induced charging effect in the coacervate state, as the largest coacervate forms near a charge ratio corresponding to proteins at their maximum charge. These observations in bulk coacervation are translated to the design of coacervate core micelles, providing an increased quantitative understanding of structure formation in these systems.

  17. Effects of postmortem delays on protein composition and oxidation.

    PubMed

    ElHajj, Zeinab; Cachot, Amélie; Müller, Terry; Riederer, Irène M; Riederer, Beat M

    2016-03-01

    Human autopsy brain tissue is widely used to study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases. However, when it comes to an evaluation of data obtained from such tissue, it is essential to consider potential postmortem effects on protein composition, posttranslational modification and proteolysis with increasing postmortem delays. In this study, we analyzed mouse brain tissues with different postmortem delays (pmd) of 0 h, 6h and 24h, for changes in protein composition, proteolysis and modifications such as S-nitrosylation, carbonylation and ubiquitination. Proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) were of special interest, including cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins or proteins involved in inflammation. Several proteins were fairly resistant to degradation during the first 6h but started to degrade thereafter. S-nitrosylation and carbonylation showed not much variation, except for those proteins that were susceptible to degradation. Brain spectrin was S-nitrosylated at death, and S-nitrosylated degradation fragments were measured at a pmd of 24h, indicating a susceptibility of brain spectrin to degradation. Furthermore, the physiological role of S-nitrosylation remains to be investigated. When studying human brain tissue, some proteins are more susceptible to degradation than others, while ubiquitination and carbonylation were little affected during the first 24h after death.

  18. Glycosylation of Therapeutic Proteins: An Effective Strategy to Optimize Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Solá, Ricardo J.; Griebenow, Kai

    2009-01-01

    During their development and administration, protein-based drugs routinely display suboptimum therapeutic efficacies due to their poor physicochemical and pharmacological properties. These innate liabilities have driven the development of molecular level strategies to improve the therapeutic behavior of protein drugs. Among, the currently developed approaches, glycoengineering is one of the most promising due fact that it has been shown to simultaneously afford improvements over most of the parameters necessary for optimization of protein drug in vivo efficacy (e.g., in vitro and in vivo molecular stability, pharmacodynamic responses, and pharmacokinetic profiles) while allowing for targeting to the desired site of action. The intent of this article is to provide an account of the effects that glycosylation has on the therapeutic efficacy of protein drugs and to describe the current understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation leads to such effects. PMID:20055529

  19. Effects of Glycosylation on the Stability of Protein Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    SOLÁ, RICARDO J.; GRIEBENOW, KAI

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, protein-based therapeutics have substantially expanded the field of molecular pharmacology due to their outstanding potential for the treatment of disease. Unfortunately, protein pharmaceuticals display a series of intrinsic physical and chemical instability problems during their production, purification, storage, and delivery that can adversely impact their final therapeutic efficacies. This has prompted an intense search for generalized strategies to engineer the long-term stability of proteins during their pharmaceutical employment. Due to the well known effect that glycans have in increasing the overall stability of glycoproteins, rational manipulation of the glycosylation parameters through glycoengineering could become a promising approach to improve both the in vitro and in vivo stability of protein pharmaceuticals. The intent of this review is therefore to further the field of protein glycoengineering by increasing the general understanding of the mechanisms by which glycosylation improves the molecular stability of protein pharmaceuticals. This is achieved by presenting a survey of the different instabilities displayed by protein pharmaceuticals, by addressing which of these instabilities can be improved by glycosylation, and by discussing the possible mechanisms by which glycans induce these stabilization effects. PMID:18661536

  20. Considering effects of nanosecond pulsed electric fields on proteins.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Most, if not all, effects of intense, pulsed electric fields are analyzed in terms of electrical charging of plasma membranes and/or subcellular membranes. However, not all cell responses from nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) are fully explained by poration of cell membranes. Observations that nsPEFs induce a Ca2-dependent dissipation of the mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm), which is enhanced when high frequency components are present in fast rise-fall waveforms, are not compatible with a poration event. Ca(2+) is shown to have little or no effect on propidium iodide uptake as a measure of plasma membrane poration and consequently intracellular membranes. Since most if not all Ca(2+)-regulated events are mediated by proteins, actions of nsPEFs on a protein(s) that regulate and/or affect the mitochondria membrane potential are possible. To show that nsPEFs can directly affect proteins, nsPEFs non-thermally inactivated the catalytic (phosphotransferase) activity of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, which is the prototype of the protein kinase superfamily that share a common catalytic mechanism and whose functions are highly dependent on their structure. These studies present indirect and direct evidences that nsPEFs can affect proteins and their functions, at least in part, by affecting their structure.

  1. Protein Composition Determines the Effect of Crowding on the Properties of Disordered Proteins.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cayla M; Kim, Young C; Mittal, Jeetain

    2016-07-12

    Unlike dilute experimental conditions under which biological molecules are typically characterized, the cell interior is crowded by macromolecules, which affects both the thermodynamics and kinetics of in vivo processes. Although the excluded-volume effects of macromolecular crowding are expected to cause compaction of unfolded and disordered proteins, the extent of this effect is uncertain. We use a coarse-grained model to represent proteins with varying sequence content and directly observe changes in chain dimensions in the presence of purely repulsive spherical crowders. We find that the extent of crowding-induced compaction is dependent not only on crowder size and concentration, but also on the properties of the protein itself. In fact, we observe a nonmonotonic trend between the dimensions of the polypeptide chain in bulk and the degree of compaction: the most extended chains experience up to 24% compaction, the most compact chains show virtually no change, and intermediate chains compress by up to 40% in size at a 40% crowder volume fraction. Free-volume theory combined with an impenetrable ellipsoidal representation of the chains predicts the crowding effects only for collapsed protein chains. An additional scaling factor, which can be easily computed from protein-crowder potential of mean force, corrects for the penetrability of extended chains and is sufficient to capture the observed nonmonotonic trend in compaction. PMID:27410731

  2. Effect of heat processing on in vitro protein digestibility and some chemical properties of African breadfruit (Treculia africana Decne) seeds.

    PubMed

    Giami, S Y; Adindu, M N; Hart, A D; Denenu, E O

    2001-01-01

    The effects of dry heat (roasting) and moist heat (boiling) on in vitro protein digestibility, protein fractions and other chemical properties of African breadfruit (Treculia africana Decne) seed that affect their utilization as a source of human food were investigated. Chemical analyses showed that the crude protein and fat contents of the unprocessed (raw) seeds were 20. 1% and 13.7%, respectively. The level of phytic acid in the raw seed (1.19 mg/g) was lower than the levels found in some commonly consumed pulses in Nigeria. Albumin and globulin protein fractions were found to be the major seed proteins of African breadfruit seed, constituting 67.8% of the total protein of the raw seed. There were no significant (p > 0.05) differences between crude protein, ash and fat contents of the raw and heat processed samples. Boiling proved more effective than roasting for improving protein digestibility and for reducing the levels of trypsin inhibitor, phytic acid and polyphenols of the samples. The complete removal of these antinutrients, however, would require a more severe heat treatment of the seed, which in turn would profoundly reduce the nutritional value and availability of proteins, as demonstrated by the low values obtained for in vitro protein digestibility, protein fractions and protein extractability.

  3. Picosecond to nanosecond dynamics provide a source of conformational entropy for protein folding.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Andreas M; Demmel, Franz; Ollivier, Jacques; Seydel, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Myoglobin can be trapped in fully folded structures, partially folded molten globules, and unfolded states under stable equilibrium conditions. Here, we report an experimental study on the conformational dynamics of different folded conformational states of apo- and holomyoglobin in solution. Global protein diffusion and internal molecular motions were probed by neutron time-of-flight and neutron backscattering spectroscopy on the picosecond and nanosecond time scales. Global protein diffusion was found to depend on the α-helical content of the protein suggesting that charges on the macromolecule increase the short-time diffusion of protein. With regard to the molten globules, a gel-like phase due to protein entanglement and interactions with neighbouring macromolecules was visible due to a reduction of the global diffusion coefficients on the nanosecond time scale. Diffusion coefficients, residence and relaxation times of internal protein dynamics and root mean square displacements of localised internal motions were determined for the investigated structural states. The difference in conformational entropy ΔSconf of the protein between the unfolded and the partially or fully folded conformations was extracted from the measured root mean square displacements. Using thermodynamic parameters from the literature and the experimentally determined ΔSconf values we could identify the entropic contribution of the hydration shell ΔShydr of the different folded states. Our results point out the relevance of conformational entropy of the protein and the hydration shell for stability and folding of myoglobin. PMID:27425443

  4. Effect of dose and source of supplemental zinc on immune response and oxidative enzymes in lambs.

    PubMed

    Nagalakshmi, D; Dhanalakshmi, K; Himabindu, D

    2009-10-01

    An experiment of 150 days was conducted on 42 male Nellore lambs (28.3 +/- 0.64 kg) to determine the effect of zinc (Zn) supplementation (0,15, 30 and 45 ppm) in diet from inorganic (ZnSO(4)) and organic (Zn proteinate) sources on immune response and antioxidant enzyme activities by allotting them randomly to 7 groups in completely randomized design. The basal diet (BD) contained 29.28 ppm Zn. The humoral immune response assessed at 75 d against B. abortus was higher (P<0.01) with 15 or 30 ppm Zn supplementation from organic source. The dose and source had no effect on titres against chicken RBC antigen. The cell mediated immune response assessed as delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against phytohaemagglutinin-P and in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response against concanavalin A at 150 d was higher (P<0.05) at 15 ppm Zn supplementation compared to BD fed lambs. Supplementation of 45 ppm Zn had no positive effect on immune response. The DTH response and antibody titres against B.abortus were higher (P< 0.05) on Zn proteinate compared to ZnSO(4) at 15 ppm Zn supplementation. The lipid peroxidase activity was lower (P < 0.01), while the RBC superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were higher (P < 0.01) in lambs at 15 ppm Zn supplementation compared to BD diet fed lambs, assessed at 75 d of feeding. Serum globulin concentration and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (75 d of experiment) was higher in Zn supplemented lambs. The ALP activity increased (P < 0.01) with increase in Zn supplementation and being higher when supplementation was from Zn proteinate compared to ZnSO(4). The study indicated that 15 ppm zinc supplementation was required for obtaining higher immune response in lambs when fed a basal diet containing 29.28 ppm Zn and supplementation as Zn proteinate had higher antioxidant enzyme activities and immune response compared to ZnSO(4).

  5. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions.

  6. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:24626853

  7. 1 kHz tabletop ultrashort hard x-ray source for time-resolved x-ray protein crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvalet, Adeline; Darmon, Adeline; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis; Audebert, Patrick

    2006-09-01

    We describe a compact, reliable, and high-average-power femtosecond x-ray source and its first application to diffraction on protein crystal. The setup relies on a homemade Ti: sapphire system delivering 12 mJ at a 1 kHz repetition rate, associated with a small vacuum chamber especially designed for laser-plasma interaction and x-ray applications. This device allows the generation of 5×109 photons/s/sr at 8 keV and optimized x-ray irradiation of the studied sample, which can be placed close to the source. We present the diffraction pattern of a protein crystal in a divergent beam geometry, which is a first step to a subpicosecond x-ray diffraction experiment.

  8. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  9. An Atomistic Statistically Effective Energy Function for Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Topham, Christopher M; Barbe, Sophie; André, Isabelle

    2016-08-01

    Shortcomings in the definition of effective free-energy surfaces of proteins are recognized to be a major contributory factor responsible for the low success rates of existing automated methods for computational protein design (CPD). The formulation of an atomistic statistically effective energy function (SEEF) suitable for a wide range of CPD applications and its derivation from structural data extracted from protein domains and protein-ligand complexes are described here. The proposed energy function comprises nonlocal atom-based and local residue-based SEEFs, which are coupled using a novel atom connectivity number factor to scale short-range, pairwise, nonbonded atomic interaction energies and a surface-area-dependent cavity energy term. This energy function was used to derive additional SEEFs describing the unfolded-state ensemble of any given residue sequence based on computed average energies for partially or fully solvent-exposed fragments in regions of irregular structure in native proteins. Relative thermal stabilities of 97 T4 bacteriophage lysozyme mutants were predicted from calculated energy differences for folded and unfolded states with an average unsigned error (AUE) of 0.84 kcal mol(-1) when compared to experiment. To demonstrate the utility of the energy function for CPD, further validation was carried out in tests of its capacity to recover cognate protein sequences and to discriminate native and near-native protein folds, loop conformers, and small-molecule ligand binding poses from non-native benchmark decoys. Experimental ligand binding free energies for a diverse set of 80 protein complexes could be predicted with an AUE of 2.4 kcal mol(-1) using an additional energy term to account for the loss in ligand configurational entropy upon binding. The atomistic SEEF is expected to improve the accuracy of residue-based coarse-grained SEEFs currently used in CPD and to extend the range of applications of extant atom-based protein statistical

  10. Food protein hydrolysates as a source of dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitory peptides for the management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Power, Orla; Nongonierma, A B; Jakeman, P; FitzGerald, R J

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing and it is estimated that by 2030 approximately 366 million people will be diagnosed with this condition. The use of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors is an emerging strategy for the treatment of T2DM. DPP-IV is a ubiquitous aminodipeptidase that cleaves incretins such as glucagon like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), resulting in a loss in their insulinotropic activity. Synthetic DPP-IV drug inhibitors are being used to increase the half-life of the active GLP-1 and GIP. Dietary intervention is accepted as a key component in the prevention and management of T2DM. Therefore, identification of natural food protein-derived DPP-IV inhibitors is desirable. Peptides with DPP-IV inhibitory activity have been identified in a variety of food proteins. This review aims to provide an overview of food protein hydrolysates as a source of the DPP-IV inhibitory peptides with particular focus on milk proteins. In addition, the proposed modes of inhibition and structure-activity relationship of peptide inhibitors are discussed. Milk proteins and associated peptides also display insulinotropic activity and help regulate blood glucose in healthy and diabetic subjects. Therefore, milk protein derived peptide inhibitors may be a unique multifunctional peptide approach for the management of T2DM.

  11. Evaluation of meat meal, chicken meal, and corn gluten meal as dietary sources of protein in dry cat food

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The nutritional value of meat meal (MM), chicken meal (CM), and corn gluten meal (CGM) as dietary sources of protein in dry food formulated for adult cats was evaluated. Twelve healthy adult cats (11 males and 1 female) were used. Dry diets containing MM, CM, or CGM as the main protein source were given for a 3-week period in a 3 × 3 Latin-square design. Digestion and balance experiments were conducted during the last 7 d of each period. In addition, freshly voided urine was taken to determine urinary pH and number of struvite crystals. As compared with the CM diet, dry-matter digestibility was higher and lower for the MM and CGM groups, respectively. Percentages of nitrogen (N) absorption and N retention to N intake were higher in the MM group, and N utilization was not different between the CM group and the CGM group. All cats excreted alkaline urine (pH > 7). Urinary pH, struvite activity product, and number of struvite crystals in urine were lower for the CGM group. There was no difference in retention of calcium and magnesium among the groups. From the point of view of digestibility and N utilization, MM is superior to CGM, and CM is better than or equivalent to CGM as a protein source of dry foods for adult cats. However, when CM is used as a dietary protein source, some manipulation of dietary base excess may be needed to control urinary acid-base balance, because CM contains higher calcium and phosphorus. PMID:16479729

  12. Evaluation of the hypocholesterolemic effect of vegetable proteins.

    PubMed

    Contaldo, F; Di Biase, G; Giacco, A; Pacioni, D; Moro, C O; Grasso, L; Mancini, M; Fidanza, F

    1983-01-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effect of dietary vegetable proteins was studied by comparing egg-white protein and fava bean protein concentrate in one normal and seven hypercholesterolemic (six type II A, one II B) persons; five completed the crossover design. To maintain stable body weight, subjects were kept on an isocaloric diet (20% protein, 48% carbohydrate (CH), 32% fat, P/S = 2) for 1 month and then hospitalized for two consecutive 18-day periods while receiving an isocaloric diet of different composition (15% protein, 50% CH, 26% fat, P/S = 2). Women were provided 50 g and men 70 g daily of egg-white or fava bean protein concentrate during the two crossover periods. Hematocrit and fasting plasma or serum were analyzed every 3 days for glucose, insulin, uric acid, creatinine, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterols, and for total and VLDL triglyceride. Dietary adequacy of both proteins was evaluated by measuring plasma concentration of prealbumin, transferrin, and retinol-binding globulin. Insulin and hematocrit did not show any change, nor did any other biochemical variables show significant differences when results were compared at the end of each crossover period. Compared with baseline, fasting plasma glucose significantly decreased on the fava bean diet. Serum total and LDL cholesterol decreased during both diets but were statistically significant only on the egg-white diet. Serum HDL cholesterol significantly decreased only on the fava bean diet. Serum total and VLDL triglyceride did not show any significant change. Labile plasma protein concentration was significantly reduced only on the fava bean diet. In conclusion, the fava bean diet did not show a significant effect on lowering serum total and LDL cholesterol. Such an effect was mild but significant on the egg-white diet, compared with baseline.

  13. Effect of Prolonged Simulated Microgravity on Metabolic Proteins in Rat Hippocampus: Steps toward Safe Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Javed, Iqbal; Liu, Yahui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy in cells but also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in oxidative stress when in space. This oxidative stress is responsible for energy imbalances and cellular damage. In this study, a rat tail suspension model was used in individual experiments for 7 and 21 days to explore the effect of simulated microgravity (SM) on metabolic proteins in the hippocampus, a vital brain region involved in learning, memory, and navigation. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomic strategy was used to observe the differential expression of metabolic proteins. Forty-two and sixty-seven mitochondrial metabolic proteins were differentially expressed after 21 and 7 days of SM, respectively. Mitochondrial Complex I, III, and IV, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were down-regulated. Moreover, DJ-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, which defend against oxidative damage, were up-regulated in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis of proteins DJ-1 and COX 5A confirmed the mass spectrometry results. Despite these changes in mitochondrial protein expression, no obvious cell apoptosis was observed after 21 days of SM. The results of this study indicate that the oxidative stress induced by SM has profound effects on metabolic proteins.

  14. Effects of Maize Source and Complex Enzymes on Performance and Nutrient Utilization of Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Defu; Hao, Shengyan; Liu, Guohua; Nian, Fang; Ru, Yingjun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of maize source and complex enzymes containing amylase, xylanase and protease on performance and nutrient utilization of broilers. The experiment was a 4×3 factorial design with diets containing four source maize samples (M1, M2, M3, and M4) and without or with two kinds of complex enzyme A (Axtra XAP) and B (Avizyme 1502). Nine hundred and sixty day old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were used in the trial (12 treatments with 8 replicate pens of 10 chicks). Birds fed M1 diet had better body weight gain (BWG) and lower feed/gain ratio compared with those fed M3 diet and M4 diet (p<0.05). Apparent ileal crude protein digestibility coefficient of M2 was higher than that of M3 (p<0.05). Apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen corrected AME (AMEn) of M1 were significant higher than those of M4 (p<0.05). Supplementation of the basal diets with enzyme A or B improved the BWG by 8.6% (p<0.05) and 4.1% (p>0.05), respectively. The fresh feces output was significantly decreased by the addition of enzyme B (p<0.05). Maize source affects the nutrients digestibility and performance of broilers, and a combination of amylase, xylanase and protease is effective in improving the growth profiles of broilers fed maize-soybean-rapeseed-cotton mixed diets. PMID:25358370

  15. MALDI in-source decay of high mass protein isoforms: application to alpha- and beta-tubulin variants.

    PubMed

    Calligaris, David; Villard, Claude; Terras, Lionel; Braguer, Diane; Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Lafitte, Daniel

    2010-07-15

    Tubulin is one of the major targets in cancer chemotherapy and the target of more than twenty percent of the cancer chemotherapic agents. The modulation of isoform content has been hypothesized as being a cause of resistance to treatment. Isoform differences lie mostly in the C-terminus part of the protein. Extensive characterization of this polypeptide region is therefore of critical importance. MALDI-TOF fragmentation of tubulin C-terminal domains was tested using synthetic peptides. Then, isotypes from HeLa cells were successfully characterized for the first time by in-source decay (ISD) fragmentation of their C-terminus coupled to a pseudo MS(3) technique named T(3)-sequencing. The fragmentation occurred in-source, preferentially generating y(n)-series ions. This approach required guanidination for the characterization of the beta(III)-tubulin C-terminus peptide. This study is, to our knowledge, the first example of reflectron in-source decay (reISD) of the C-terminus of a 50 kDa protein. This potentially occurs via a CID-like mechanism occurring in the MALDI plume. There are now new avenues for top-down characterization of important clinical biomarkers such as beta(III)-tubulin isotypes, a potential marker of drug resistance and tumor progression. This paper raises the challenge of protein isotypes characterization for early cancer detection and treatment monitoring.

  16. Zero Magnitude Effect for the Productivity of Triggered Tsunami Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is applied to tsunami events to explain previously observed temporal clustering of tsunami sources. Tsunami events are defined by National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) tsunami database. For the ETAS analysis, the earthquake magnitude associated with each tsunami event in the NGDC database is replaced by the primary magnitude listed in the Centennial catalog up until 1976 and in the Global CMT catalog from 1976 through 2010. Tsunamis with a submarine landslide or volcanic component are included if they are accompanied by an earthquake, which is most often the case. Tsunami size is used as a mark for determining a tsunami-generating event, according to a minimum completeness level. The tsunami catalog is estimated to be complete for tsunami sizes greater than 1 m since 1900 and greater than 0.1 m since 1960. Of the five parameters in the temporal ETAS model (Ogata, 1988), the parameter that scales the magnitude dependence in the productivity of triggered events is the one that is most different from ETAS parameters derived from similar earthquake catalogs. Maximum likelihood estimates of this magnitude effect parameter is essentially zero, within 95% confidence, for both the 0.1 m and 1.0 m tsunami completeness levels. To explain this result, parameter estimates are determined for the Global CMT catalog under three tsunamigenic conditions: (1) M≥7 and focal depth ≤50 km, (2) submarine location, and (3) dominant component of dip slip. Successive subcatalogs are formed from the Global CMT catalog according to each of these conditions. The high magnitude threshold for tsunamigenesis alone (subcatalog 1) does not explain the zero magnitude effect. The zero magnitude effect also does not appear to be caused the smaller number of tsunamigenic events analyzed in comparison to earthquake catalogs with a similar magnitude threshold. ETAS parameter estimates from the subcatalog (3) with all three tsunamigenic conditions

  17. Dietary protein level and source differentially affect bone metabolism, strength, and intestinal calcium transporter expression during ad libitum and food-restricted conditions in male rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High protein diets may attenuate bone loss during energy restriction (ER). The objective of the current study was to determine whether high protein diets suppress bone turnover and improve bone quality in rats during ER and whether dietary protein source affects this relationship. Eighty 12-week o...

  18. The effect of body protein supply on resistance to cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Gontzea, I; Popescu, F

    1978-01-01

    Six groups of 15 rats were fed on three diets, each differing in the quantity and quality of protein (17.87 as opposed to 8.85 g%, with or without the addition of 0.5 g methionine), one group of each pair of animals being injected subcutaneously with 0.3 mg Cd/kg body weight/day, for 13 weeks. The low protein diet increased the effects of cadmium, rendering them significantly more harmful than in animals which were given the normal protein diet. The incorporation of 0.5 g% DL-methionine in the low protein diet, without increasing the total nitrogen content, diminished the most marked effects induced by the same amounts of cadmium, so that their mean values were not significantly different from those found in the normal protein group treated with the same dose of the metal. The results show that a quantitatively and qualitatively adequate protein supply increased the resistance of the organism to cadmium, diminishing significantly the severity of symptoms induced by the metal. PMID:656340

  19. Sources by Which Students Perceive Professional Counselors' Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Ruth L.; Johnson, Courtney B.

    2012-01-01

    Using qualitative research methods, interviews were conducted with college students regarding the sources they used in generating perceptions of professional counselors. Respondents believed that information sources such as word of mouth, media sources and personal experiences were responsible for their understandings of professional counselors.…

  20. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  1. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:27515418

  2. [Effect of freezing on cord blood serum proteins].

    PubMed

    Nardid, E O; Rozanova, E D; Tsymbal, L V; Zinchenko, A V; Nardid, O A; Grishchenko, V I

    2009-01-01

    The effect of freezing regimes and storage temperatures on protein conformation and the spectrum of cord blood serum has been investigated. Changes in the parameters of ESR spectra of spin probes in cord blood serum after slow freezing and subsequent thawing were established, indicating protein conformational changes characterized by loosening. This fact is confirmed by an earlier process, the first stage of albumin heat denaturation, as indicated by calorimetric data. It was shown that slow cooling results in the aggregation of serum protein in which serum albumin and immunoglobulins play an important role. It was concluded that, for retaining the properties, of cord blood serum proteins, it is preferable to perform cooling at a rate not lower than 100 degrees C/min and a storage temperature of -80 degrees C and lower. PMID:19894629

  3. [The experimental effect of growth stimulants on protein assimilation].

    PubMed

    Nikolaevskaia, V R; Volkova, L D

    1990-01-01

    In experiments on rats it was established that the compound CAM-300 in a dose of 2 mg/kg did not induce body mass growth, protein biological value increase or pepsinogen concentration change in the gastric mucosa. Fenobolin stimulation of growth in the experimental animals was attended by a three-fold rise in pepsinogen concentration in the gastric mucosa, the pure utilization of protein being unchanged. The action of the compound 6-(6,10-dioxyundecyl)-beta-resorcin acid gamma-lacton (International Minerals Corporation) did not change biological value and the pure utilization of protein, pepsinogen concentration in the gastric mucosa was slightly lowered. Evaluation of the pure utilization of protein is the principle test in the estimation of the compound anabolic effect.

  4. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation.

  5. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:27515418

  6. Effects of a Ground Source Heat Pump in Discontinuous Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R.; Garber-Slaght, R.; Daanen, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    A ground source heat pump (GSHP) was installed in a discontinuous permafrost region of Fairbanks Alaska in 2013 with the primary aim of determining the effect of different ground cover options on the long-term subterranean temperature regime. Three different surface treatments were applied to separate loops of the GSHP; grass, sand, and gravel, and temperature monitoring was established at several depths above and below the heat sink loops. The GSHP has been actively utilized to supplement the heat in a hydronic heating system of a neighboring 5000 ft2 research facility. The ground immediately surrounding the GSHP was not permafrost when initially installed. Numerical modeling simulations were used to predict the long-term ground temperature regime surrounding the GSHP loops, and results indicate that permafrost would begin to form after the first year. A pseudo-steady state temperature regime would establish in approximately 8 years with a yearly fluctuation of -14°C to -2°C. Simulations also indicate that permafrost could be prevented with a 15 W/m recharge during the summer, such as from a solar thermal system. The ground surface treatments have negligible effect on the ground temperature below 1 meter and therefore have no long-term effect on the active region the GSHP. Data collected from thermistors in the two years since installation indicate that permafrost has not yet been established, although the ground is now becoming seasonally frozen due to the GSHP energy removal. Yearly average temperatures are declining, and extrapolation indicates that permafrost will establish in future years. The GSHP coefficient of performance (COP) was initially 3.6 and is declining with the decreasing ground temperatures. Economic modeling indicates that the system may become uneconomical in future years, although volatile energy costs have a substantial effect of the prediction.

  7. Bacterial membranes: possible source of a major dissolved protein in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Eiichiro; Nishiyama, Sumie; Kamo, Masaharu; Tsugita, Akira

    1995-06-01

    We have measured dissolved protein at a variety of depths at three stations in the Pacific, ranging from the tropics to the subarctic. Most of the dissolved protein at these stations is distributed over a wide range of molecular masses, but consists of fewer than thirty individual proteins. One, with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa, is a major constituent at all stations. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was found to be a homologue of porin P, a trans-outer-membrane channel protein of Gram-negative bacteria. Correspondence of N-terminal amino acid sequences and apparent molecular masses between this dissolved protein and porin P indicates that almost the complete homologue of porin P, from the N-terminus to (probably) the C-terminus, survives without modification in the water column. Persistence of appreciable amounts of an identifiable protein suggests a pathway for production of dissolved organic matter whereby enzyme-resistant biopolymers survive and accumulate in the sea.

  8. Erythrina edulis (Pajuro) Seed Protein: A New Source of Antioxidant Peptides.

    PubMed

    Intiquilla, Arturo; Jiménez-Aliaga, Karim; Zavaleta, Amparo I; Arnao, Inés; Peña, Carmen; Chávez-Hidalgo, Elizabeth L; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    Erythrina edulis Triana ex Micheli is a protein-enriched legume traditionally used for both dietary and medicinal purposes. In this paper, protein concentrate was obtained from the seed flour. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a high number and intensity of bands in the range between 10 and 90 kDa. Neutrase, Flavourzyme, and Alcalase were used to hydrolyze the protein concentrate at different times. By SDS-PAGE, the lower resistance of proteins to Alcalase action was observed, providing hydrolyzates with higher radical scavenging activity. The 120 min-hydrolyzate showed ORAC and TEAC values of 2.51 and 0.91 μmol Trolox equivalents/mg of protein, respectively. A fraction lower than 3 kDa and rich in hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids was demonstrated to be mainly responsible for the observed activity. E. edulis could be a new alternative in the formulation of functional foods not only for its high protein content but also for the potential biological properties of its hydrolyzates. PMID:27534115

  9. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  10. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  11. Effect of nanosilica and silicon sources on plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, soil nutrients and maize seed germination.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Gopalu; Suriyaprabha, Rangaraj; Manivasakan, Palanisamy; Yuvakkumar, Rathinam; Rajendran, Venkatachalam; Prabu, Periyasamy; Kannan, Narayanasamy

    2013-09-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of nanosilica and different sources of silicon on soil properties, total bacterial population and maize seed germination. Nanosilica was synthesised using rice husk and characterised. Silica powder was amorphous (50 nm) with >99.9% purity. Sodium silicate treated soil inhibited plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in contrast to nanosilica and other bulk sources. Surface property and effect of soil nutrient content of nanosilica treatment were improved. Colony forming unit (CFU) was doubled in the presence of nanosilica from 4 × 105 CFU (control) to 8 × 105 CFU per gram of soil. The silica and protein content of bacterial biomass clearly showed an increase in uptake of silica with an increase in nanosilica concentration. Nanosilica promoted seed germination percentage (100%) in maize than conventional Si sources. These studies show that nanosilica has favourable effect on beneficial bacterial population and nutrient value of soil. PMID:24028804

  12. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  13. An analytic method to determine the effect of source modeling errors on the apparent location and direction of biological sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Munck, J. C.; van Dijk, B. W.; Spekreijse, H.

    1988-02-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) can be used to determine the location, the direction, and strength of electrical brain activity. For this purpose mathematical models are used which describe regions in the head with different conductivity. In most models, the sources are described by mathematical (current) point dipoles. However, EPs and EEGs are generated with more extensive cortical areas. In this study an analytic method is described to calculate the effect of source extension on the potential distribution measured at the scalp and also on the difference between the location of the extended source and the location of the equivalent point dipole. General formulas are derived which express in spherical harmonics the potential distribution that results from a circularly symmetric extended source. It is shown that for sources that obey specific symmetries the influence of source extension on the potential distribution is a fourth-order effect in the distance between electrode and the origin (the middle point of the head), and a second-order effect in the extension. It is also shown that for such sources the error in localization (i.e., the distance between the position of the equivalent dipole and the center of the extended source) is zero when Geselowitz's method [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-12, 164 (1965)] is used. Because in volume conductor models the relation between source and potential is given by Poisson's equation, it is suggested by the authors that the results of the present study may be extended to applications in other fields of physics as well.

  14. Nucleation and convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following activities are reported on: repartitioning of NaCl and protein impurities in lysozyme crystallization; dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities; facet morphology response to nonuniformities in nutrient and impurity supply; interactions in undersaturated and supersaturated lysozyme solutions; heterogeneity determination and purification of commercial hen egg white lysozyme; nonlinear response of layer growth dynamics in the mixed kinetics-bulk transport regime; development of a simultaneous multiangle light scattering technique; and x-ray topography of tetragonal lysozyme grown by the temperature-control technique.

  15. Modeling grain nitrogen accumulation and protein composition to understand the sink/source regulations of nitrogen remobilization for wheat.

    PubMed

    Martre, Pierre; Porter, John R; Jamieson, Peter D; Triboï, Eugène

    2003-12-01

    A functional explanation for the regulation of grain nitrogen (N) accumulation in cereal by environmental and genetic factors remains elusive. Here, new mechanistic hypotheses of grain N accumulation are proposed and tested for wheat (Triticum aestivum). First, we tested experimentally the hypothesis that grain N accumulation is mostly source regulated. Four contrasting cultivars, in terms of their grain N concentrations and yield potentials, were grown with non-limiting N supply. Grain number per ear was reduced by removing the top part of the ear at anthesis. Reduction in grain number gave a significant increase in N content per grain for all cultivars, showing that grain N accumulation was source regulated. However, on a per ear basis, cultivars with a high grain number fully compensated their N accumulation for reduced grain number at anthesis. Cultivars with a lower grain number did not compensate completely, and grain N per ear was decreased by 16%. Second, new mechanistic hypotheses of the origins of grain N source regulation and its response to environment were tested by simulation. The hypotheses were: (a). The regulation by N sources of grain N accumulation applies only for the storage proteins (i.e. gliadin and glutenin fractions); (b). accumulation of structural and metabolic proteins (i.e. albumin-globulin and amphiphilic fractions) is sink-regulated; and (c). N partitioning between gliadins and glutenins is constant during grain development and unmodified by growing conditions. Comparison of experimental and simulation results of the accumulation of grain protein fractions under wide ranges of N fertilization, temperatures, and irrigation supported these hypotheses.

  16. Minimizing variations in functionality of whey protein concentrates from different sources.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I; Konstance, R P; Tomasula, P M

    2004-03-01

    Enhancement in processing technology has improved the nutritional and functional properties of whey protein concentrates by increasing the content and quality of the protein, leading to their increased use in different food products. The extent of heat treatment affects the quality of the whey protein concentrate, and wide variation in product quality exists due to the various means of manufacture and from the whey product history from farm to factory. The study was carried out with 6 commercial whey protein concentrates with 80% protein (WPC80) to determine variations in physical properties, particle size and density, and functional properties--solubility, gel strength, foam volume, and stability. Significant differences were observed among all the products for every property compared. Particulate size was the most important determinant of functional characteristics. Larger particulate WPC80 had significantly higher fat content and were less soluble with poor foam stability; but narrowing the particle size distribution through sieving, minimized variations. We determined that sieving all products within the particle size distribution range of 100 to 150 microns minimized variation in physical composition, making functionality uniform. WPC80 from different manufacturers can be made to perform uniformly within a narrow functionality range by reducing the particle size distribution through sieving. PMID:15202660

  17. Minimizing variations in functionality of whey protein concentrates from different sources.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I; Konstance, R P; Tomasula, P M

    2004-03-01

    Enhancement in processing technology has improved the nutritional and functional properties of whey protein concentrates by increasing the content and quality of the protein, leading to their increased use in different food products. The extent of heat treatment affects the quality of the whey protein concentrate, and wide variation in product quality exists due to the various means of manufacture and from the whey product history from farm to factory. The study was carried out with 6 commercial whey protein concentrates with 80% protein (WPC80) to determine variations in physical properties, particle size and density, and functional properties--solubility, gel strength, foam volume, and stability. Significant differences were observed among all the products for every property compared. Particulate size was the most important determinant of functional characteristics. Larger particulate WPC80 had significantly higher fat content and were less soluble with poor foam stability; but narrowing the particle size distribution through sieving, minimized variations. We determined that sieving all products within the particle size distribution range of 100 to 150 microns minimized variation in physical composition, making functionality uniform. WPC80 from different manufacturers can be made to perform uniformly within a narrow functionality range by reducing the particle size distribution through sieving.

  18. Biophysical approach to investigate temperature effects on protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saengpayab, Yaowapa; Kanthang, Pisan; Schreier, Stefan; Modchang, Charin; Nuttavut, Narin; Triampo, Darapond; Triampo, Wannapong

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of this work is to gain more understanding of the temperature dependence of Min protein dynamics employing spot tracking technique (STT) and biophysical characterization. We observed and confirmed the variation of protein cluster dynamics at evaluated temperatures. We found that the time MinD was retained at the cell poles played an important role in this variation. From 25 °C to 37 °C, the MinD protein oscillation period decreased 2.3 times and the anomalous dynamic exponent increased 2.4 times. The time-varied anomalous diffusion coefficient was found to be temperature dependent, which was qualitatively consistent with the prediction by Tsallis statistical mechanics. Furthermore, the average apparent effective potential depth of membrane-bound MinD protein decreased from 10.01 to 3.54 kBT. These results showed that the diffusive mode and the MinD protein cluster distribution at the cell poles were altered with temperature and this then affected the whole Min protein dynamics.

  19. Effects of NMR Spectral Resolution on Protein Structure Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Tikole, Suhas; Jaravine, Victor; Orekhov, Vladislav Yu.; Güntert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods. PMID:23874675

  20. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  1. Parental source effect of inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene of mice and men

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, W.; Grimm, T.; Mueller, C.R.; Bittner, R.

    1994-09-01

    Skewed X-inactivation has been suspected the genetic cause for some manifesting female carriers of BMD and DMD. To test whether a parental source effect on the protein expression of the dystrophin gene exists, we have set up backcrosses of mdx mice to wild type strains, enabling us to study the effect of the well-defined origin of the mutation on the dystrophin expression. In skeletal muscle sections the immunohistological staining patterns of dystrophin antibodies were showing a significant difference in the proportion of dystrophin positive versus negative fibers, suggesting a lower expression of paternally inherited mdx mutations. These data are in concordance with the pyruvate kinase (PK) levels in the serum: PK levels were much higher when the mutation was of maternal origin as compared to PK levels in paternally derived mutations. In order to test this {open_quotes}paternal source effect{close_quotes} in humans, we checked obligatory carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) for the origin of their mutations. Creatin kinase (CK) levels in 21 carriers with maternally derived mutations were compared to CK values from 8 heterozygotes with mutations of paternal origin: CK (mat) = 140.3 IU/1 versus CK (pat) = 48.6 IU/I. The difference is statistically significant at the 5% level. These observations suggest either a differential X-inactivation or an imprinting of the dystrophin gene in mice and men.

  2. Estimating the effect of fermentation yeast on distillers grains protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) is the key co-product of bio-ethanol production from grains. Major factors affecting its quality and market values include protein quantity (concentration) and quality (amino acid composition). Yet, the effect of fermentation yeast on DDGS quality has no...

  3. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione.

  4. Effect of dietary protein levels on sex hormones in growing male rats kept under constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Miho; Esashi, Takatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to clarify the effects of dietary protein levels on the gonadal development and sex hormones in male rats kept under constant darkness as a model of disturbed daily rhythm. Four-week-old male rats (Fischer 344 strain) were kept under constant darkness or normal lighting (12-h light/dark cycle). Two kinds of experimental diet were prepared, one with low dietary protein levels (9% casein) and one with normal levels (18% casein). Harper mineral mixture and Panvitan were used as mineral and vitamin sources, respectively. After 4 weeks, gonadal weight, serum testosterone, and other hormone contents were evaluated. The gonadal weight in the constant darkness groups (D-groups) was lower than that in the normal lighting groups (N-groups). Although the low-protein diet in the D-groups significantly reduced gonadal weight, the normal-protein diet mitigated the reduction of gonadal weight in rats kept under constant darkness. Serum testosterone and androstenedione concentrations were lower in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet. There were no effects of lighting condition or protein levels on serum luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle- stimulating hormone (FSH), or progesterone concentrations. These results indicate that the suppression of gonadal development in D-group rats fed the low-protein diet was caused by low testosterone, which we attribute to the inhibition of synthesized androstenedione, a precursor of testosterone. The present study showed that constant darkness and the low- protein diet inhibited the synthetic pathway from progesterone to androstenedione. PMID:23095819

  5. Effect of soy protein on swine intestinal lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, H.T.

    1987-01-01

    Hypocholesterolemic effect of soy protein appears to be the result of reduced cholesterol absorption and enhanced cholesterol excretion. The objective of this study is to delineate the underlying mechanism of soy protein effect on cholesterol absorption. At the end of a 5-week soy-protein or casein diet, swine were subjected to cannulation of mesenteric lymph duct under halothane anesthesia. A single dose of 250 ..mu..Ci (/sup 14/C)-cholesterol and 10 mCi (/sup 3/H)-leucine was infused into the upper jejunum two hours after one-fifth of daily food was given. Then lymph was collected hourly for three hours and the lipoprotein fractions were separated by ultracentrifugation. SDS-PAGE (5%) was used to measure the concentrations of individual apoproteins by densitometric scanning. The three-hour lymphatic transport of cholesterol in casein-fed swine was significantly higher than in those fed soy protein. Triglyceride transports were similar in two groups. The (/sup 3/H)-leucine incorporation study revealed that transport of apo B-48 bore a significant positive relationship to transport of cholesterol in both chylomicron and VLDL fractions of mesenteric lymph. A greater apo B-48 secretion with higher specific activity was probably responsible for the greater transport of cholesterol in chylomicrons in casein-fed swine. On the other hand, the lesser cholesterol transport in chylomicrons in soy protein-fed swine was probably caused by lower apo B-48 secretion. Similarly, the transport of lymph VLDL cholesterol in swine fed casein or soy protein paralleled the amount of accompanying apo B-48. Dietary proteins probably influence the intestinal synthesis of apo B-48 which in turn affects cholesterol transport into the lymphatics.

  6. Green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a new source of IgE-binding lipid transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Pastorello, Elide A; Pravettoni, Valerio; Farioli, Laura; Primavesi, Laura; Scibilia, Joseph; Piantanida, Marta; Mascheri, Ambra; Conti, Amedeo

    2010-04-14

    Green beans belong to the Fabaceae family, which includes widely consumed species, such as beans, peanuts, and soybeans. In the literature, few cases have described allergic reactions upon the exposure to green bean boiling steam or ingestion. Here, we describe five patients reporting documented adverse reactions upon the ingestion of cooked green beans, and we characterize the responsible allergen. Fresh and cooked green beans were tested by a prick + prick technique. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and IgE immunoblotting were performed with boiled vegetable extract, and the N-terminal sequence of the immunoreactive protein was obtained by analyzing the excised band in a protein sequencer. Immunoblotting inhibition of cooked green bean with in-house-purified peach lipid transfer protein (LTP) Pru p 3 was performed. An interesting green bean protein was chromatographically purified, tested with a pool serum, and inhibited with Pru p 3. Moreover, its molecular mass was determined by mass spectrometry. Prick + prick tests with raw and cooked green beans were positive for all of the patients. IgE immunoblotting showed that all of the patients reacted toward a unique IgE-binding protein at about 9 kDa. The obtained N-terminal sequence revealed the following amino acids: Ala-Ile-Ser-X-Gly-Qln-Val-Thr-Ser-Ser-Leu-Ala, corresponding to an LTP. A complete inhibition of the IgE binding to this protein, in both raw and purified extract, was obtained by purified peach Pru p 3, confirming previous IgE immunoblotting results.

  7. Cecotrophy behavior and use of urea as non-protein nitrogen (NPN) source for capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Filho, Sérgio Luiz Gama; Mendes, Alcester; Tavares, Ellis Fernanda Kowalski; da Cunha Nogueira, Selene Siqueira

    2013-11-01

    Fifteen female adult capybaras, with initial average body weight (BW) of 32.7 (± 5.8) kg, were kept in individual pens to evaluate effect of supplementation of concentrate feed and its supply time on cecotrophy behavior frequency. The animals were allocated in a completely randomized design, with five animals per treatment, receiving three diets: grass only, grass and grain corn offered in a single meal, and grass and grain corn offered in two daily meals; all cecotrophy acts were recorded. Later, in a second experiment, five capybaras received five levels of urea in their diet: 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 g urea/100 kg BW, replacing soybean meal as true protein source, in a 5 × 5 Latin square design. The animals were weighed and their blood was collected every 2 weeks. The frequency of cecotrophy (Ps < 0.05) was higher when the capybaras were fed grass only (0.5 ± 0.07 acts/h) than when they received grass and corn in a single meal (0.3 ± 0.05 acts/h) and grass and corn supplied in separate meals (0.1 ± 0.03 acts/h). With increased urea in their diet, the capybaras showed initial signs of chronic intoxication, together with increments in serum urea (r = 0.87, P < 0.05) and a decreasing trend in daily weight gain (r = -0.38, P = 0.06). Therefore, when including concentrate feeds in capybara diet, these must be mixed with roughage in a single meal to avoid high decrease in the frequency of cecotrophy behavior and increase in dry matter intake. The replacement of soybean meal with urea in capybara diet is not recommended.

  8. Whey proteins as source of dipeptidyl dipeptidase IV (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, Giovanni; Sibilia, Valeria; Caroli, Anna Maria; Cocchi, Daniela

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that whey proteins can reduce postprandial glucose levels and stimulate insulin release in healthy subjects and in subjects with type 2 diabetes by reducing dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) activity in the proximal bowel and hence increasing intact incretin levels. Our aim was to identify DPP-4 inhibitors among short peptides occurring in hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin, the major whey protein found in the milk of ruminants. We proved that the bioactive peptide Ile-Pro-Ala can be regarded as a moderate DPP-4 inhibitor.

  9. The mitochondrial protein Mcu1 plays important roles in carbon source utilization, filamentation, and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guobo; Wang, Haitao; Liang, Weihong; Cao, Chengjun; Tao, Li; Naseem, Shamoon; Konopka, James B; Wang, Yue; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is both a pathogen and a commensal in humans. The ability to utilize different carbon sources available in diverse host niches is vital for both commensalism and pathogenicity. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is an important signaling molecule as well as a carbon source in C. albicans. Here, we report the discovery of a novel gene MCU1 essential for GlcNAc utilization. Mcu1 is located in mitochondria and associated with multiple energy- and metabolism-related proteins including Por1, Atp1, Pet9, and Mdh1. Consistently, inactivating Por1 impaired GlcNAc utilization as well. Deletion of MCU1 also caused defects in utilizing non-fermentable carbon sources and amino acids. Furthermore, MCU1 is required for filamentation in several inducing conditions and virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. We also deleted TGL99 and GUP1, two genes adjacent to MCU1, and found that the gup1/gup1 mutant exhibited mild defects in the utilization of several carbon sources including GlcNAc, maltose, galactose, amino acids, and ethanol. Our results indicate that MCU1 exists in a cluster of genes involved in the metabolism of carbon sources. Given its importance in metabolism and lack of a homolog in humans, Mcu1 could be a potential target for developing antifungal agents.

  10. Effects of dietary nitrogen levels and carbohydrate sources on apparent ruminal synthesis of some B vitamins in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, V; Gervais, R; Graulet, B; Nozière, P; Doreau, M; Fanchone, A; Castagnino, D D S; Girard, C L

    2016-04-01

    Effects of nitrogen level and carbohydrate source on apparent ruminal synthesis (ARS) of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were evaluated using 4 lactating Holstein cows distributed in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with treatments following a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Cows were fitted with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum. The treatments were 2 N levels and 2 carbohydrate sources. The diet with the high N level provided 14% crude protein, calculated to meet 110% of the protein requirements and an adequate supply in rumen-degradable protein, whereas the diet with the low N level contained 11% crude protein, calculated to meet 80% of the protein requirements with a shortage in rumen-degradable protein. Carbohydrate source treatments differed by their nature (i.e., high in starch from barley, corn, and wheat, or high in fiber from soybean hulls and dehydrated beet pulp). All 4 diets were isoenergetic, based on corn silage, and had the same forage-to-concentrate ratio (60:40, dry matter basis). Duodenal flow was determined using YbCl3 as a marker. Each B-vitamin ARS was calculated as duodenal flow minus daily intake. The intake of several B vitamins varied among treatments, but because the animals consumed a similar amount of feed every day (average of 20 kg of dry matter/d) the difference was mostly due to vitamin content of each ingredient and their relative proportion in the diets. Decreasing N concentration in the diet reduced vitamin B6 duodenal flow and increased its apparent ruminal degradation. It also decreased duodenal flow and ARS of folates. The high-starch diets increased duodenal flow and ruminal balance of riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folates, whereas the high-fiber diets increased vitamin B12 ARS and duodenal flow. These effects on apparent synthesis are possibly due to changes in ruminal fermentation.

  11. Effects of dietary nitrogen levels and carbohydrate sources on apparent ruminal synthesis of some B vitamins in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, V; Gervais, R; Graulet, B; Nozière, P; Doreau, M; Fanchone, A; Castagnino, D D S; Girard, C L

    2016-04-01

    Effects of nitrogen level and carbohydrate source on apparent ruminal synthesis (ARS) of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folates, and vitamin B12 were evaluated using 4 lactating Holstein cows distributed in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with treatments following a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Cows were fitted with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum. The treatments were 2 N levels and 2 carbohydrate sources. The diet with the high N level provided 14% crude protein, calculated to meet 110% of the protein requirements and an adequate supply in rumen-degradable protein, whereas the diet with the low N level contained 11% crude protein, calculated to meet 80% of the protein requirements with a shortage in rumen-degradable protein. Carbohydrate source treatments differed by their nature (i.e., high in starch from barley, corn, and wheat, or high in fiber from soybean hulls and dehydrated beet pulp). All 4 diets were isoenergetic, based on corn silage, and had the same forage-to-concentrate ratio (60:40, dry matter basis). Duodenal flow was determined using YbCl3 as a marker. Each B-vitamin ARS was calculated as duodenal flow minus daily intake. The intake of several B vitamins varied among treatments, but because the animals consumed a similar amount of feed every day (average of 20 kg of dry matter/d) the difference was mostly due to vitamin content of each ingredient and their relative proportion in the diets. Decreasing N concentration in the diet reduced vitamin B6 duodenal flow and increased its apparent ruminal degradation. It also decreased duodenal flow and ARS of folates. The high-starch diets increased duodenal flow and ruminal balance of riboflavin, vitamin B6, and folates, whereas the high-fiber diets increased vitamin B12 ARS and duodenal flow. These effects on apparent synthesis are possibly due to changes in ruminal fermentation. PMID:26851844

  12. Effective Source-to-Source Outlining to Support Whole Program Empirical Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D J; Vuduc, R; Panas, T

    2009-07-17

    Although automated empirical performance optimization and tuning is well-studied for kernels and domain-specific libraries, a current research grand challenge is how to extend these methodologies and tools to significantly larger sequential and parallel applications. In this context, we present the ROSE source-to-source outliner, which addresses the problem of extracting tunable kernels out of whole programs, thereby helping to convert the challenging whole-program tuning problem into a set of more manageable kernel tuning tasks. Our outliner aims to handle large scale C/C++, Fortran and OpenMP applications. A set of program analysis and transformation techniques are utilized to enhance the portability, scalability, and interoperability of source-to-source outlining. More importantly, the generated kernels preserve performance characteristics of tuning targets and can be easily handled by other tools. Preliminary evaluations have shown that the ROSE outliner serves as a key component within an end-to-end empirical optimization system and enables a wide range of sequential and parallel optimization opportunities.

  13. Effect of Zinc Source on Hematological, Metabolic Parameters and Mineral Balance in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Aliarabi, Hassan; Fadayifar, Amir; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zamani, Pouya; Bahari, Aliasghar; Farahavar, Abbas; Dezfoulian, Amir Hossein

    2015-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to study the effects of different sources of zinc (Zn) on blood metabolites and balances of some minerals in lambs. In the first part, 20 6-7-month-old lambs were randomly allotted to four treatments including (1) basal diet containing 22.47 mg Zn/kg DM without supplementary Zn (control), (2) basal diet + 40 mg Zn/kg DM as ZnSO4 (ZnSO4 40), (3) basal diet + 20 mg Zn/kg DM as Zn-proteinate (Zn-Pro 20), and (4) basal diet + 40 mg Zn/kg DM as Zn-proteinate (Zn-Pro 40). Blood samples were taken on days 0, 28, and 65 before morning feeding. In the second part, four lambs from each treatment were randomly transferred to metabolic cages to evaluate the effects of different sources of Zn on N, Zn, Fe, and Cu retentions. This trial consisted of 18 days, with the first 12 days as the adaptation period followed by 6 days of sample collection. The results of this study showed that the source of Zinc had no significant effect on the analyzed parameters. Average daily gain and feed efficiency were improved by Zn supplementation (P < 0.05). Daily feed intake, plasma glucose, Fe and Cu concentrations, serum total antioxidant capacity, red blood cell count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin concentration did not differ significantly between treatments (P > 0.05). Plasma Zn concentration, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activity, and white blood cell and lymphocyte count differed significantly between control and Zn-supplemented groups (P < 0.05) as Zn supplementation improved these parameters. Nitrogen, Fe, and Cu retentions did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). Zinc retention showed a significant difference between control and Zn-supplemented groups (P < 0.05), but there were no significant differences among the Zn-supplemented groups. The results of this study show that Zn supplementation improved performance and zinc retention in lambs. However, there were no significant

  14. Effect of Zinc Source on Hematological, Metabolic Parameters and Mineral Balance in Lambs.

    PubMed

    Aliarabi, Hassan; Fadayifar, Amir; Tabatabaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zamani, Pouya; Bahari, Aliasghar; Farahavar, Abbas; Dezfoulian, Amir Hossein

    2015-11-01

    This experiment was conducted to study the effects of different sources of zinc (Zn) on blood metabolites and balances of some minerals in lambs. In the first part, 20 6-7-month-old lambs were randomly allotted to four treatments including (1) basal diet containing 22.47 mg Zn/kg DM without supplementary Zn (control), (2) basal diet + 40 mg Zn/kg DM as ZnSO4 (ZnSO4 40), (3) basal diet + 20 mg Zn/kg DM as Zn-proteinate (Zn-Pro 20), and (4) basal diet + 40 mg Zn/kg DM as Zn-proteinate (Zn-Pro 40). Blood samples were taken on days 0, 28, and 65 before morning feeding. In the second part, four lambs from each treatment were randomly transferred to metabolic cages to evaluate the effects of different sources of Zn on N, Zn, Fe, and Cu retentions. This trial consisted of 18 days, with the first 12 days as the adaptation period followed by 6 days of sample collection. The results of this study showed that the source of Zinc had no significant effect on the analyzed parameters. Average daily gain and feed efficiency were improved by Zn supplementation (P < 0.05). Daily feed intake, plasma glucose, Fe and Cu concentrations, serum total antioxidant capacity, red blood cell count, packed cell volume, and hemoglobin concentration did not differ significantly between treatments (P > 0.05). Plasma Zn concentration, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP) activity, and white blood cell and lymphocyte count differed significantly between control and Zn-supplemented groups (P < 0.05) as Zn supplementation improved these parameters. Nitrogen, Fe, and Cu retentions did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). Zinc retention showed a significant difference between control and Zn-supplemented groups (P < 0.05), but there were no significant differences among the Zn-supplemented groups. The results of this study show that Zn supplementation improved performance and zinc retention in lambs. However, there were no significant

  15. Incorporation of Source Material: The Effect of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Neomy

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of advanced academic writing is the ability to incorporate source material. Yet this ability often poses considerable challenges for international ESL students. Although a number of scholars have called for the explicit teaching of how to acknowledge and incorporate source materials, research evidence on whether explicit…

  16. Biofield-effect protein-sensor: Plasma functionalization of polyaniline, protein immobilization, and sensing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chae-Ryong; Lee, Hyun-Uk; Ahn, Kyun; Jeong, Se-Young; Choi, Jun-Hee; Kim, Jinwoo; Cho, Jiung

    2014-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a biofield-effect protein-sensor (BioFEP) based on atmospheric-pressure plasma (AP) treatment of a conducting polyaniline (PANI) film. Successive H2 and O2 AP (OHAP) treatment generated dominant hydrophilic -OH and O=CO- functional groups on the PANI film surface, which served as strong binding sites to immobilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules. The output current changes of the BioFEP as a function of BSA concentration were obtained. The resistance of the OHAP surface could be sensitively increased from 2.5 × 108 Ω to 2.0 × 1012 Ω with increasing BSA concentrations in the range of 0.025-4 μg/ml. The results suggest that the method is a simple and cost-effective tool to determine the concentration of BSA by measuring electrical resistance.

  17. Egg proteins as allergens and the effects of the food matrix and processing.

    PubMed

    Benedé, S; López-Expósito, I; Molina, E; López-Fandiño, R

    2015-03-01

    Hen eggs are an important and inexpensive source of high-quality proteins in the human diet. Egg, either as a whole or its constituents (egg yolk and white), is a key ingredient in many food products by virtue of its nutritional value and unique functional properties, such as emulsifying, foaming, and gelling. Nevertheless, egg is also known because of its allergenic potential and, in fact, it is the second most frequent source of allergic reactions, particularly in children. This review deals with the structural or functional properties of egg proteins that make them strong allergens. Their ability to sensitize and/or elicit allergic reactions is linked to their resistance to gastroduodenal digestion, which ultimately allows them to interact with the intestinal mucosa where absorption occurs. The factors that affect protein digestibility, whether increasing it, decreasing it, or inducing a different proteolysis pattern, and their influence on their capacity to induce or trigger an allergic reaction are discussed. Special attention is paid to the effect of the food matrix and the processing practices on the capacity of egg proteins to modulate the immune response.

  18. Nutrient digestibility in finishing pigs fed phytase-supplemented barley-based diets containing soybean meal or canola meal as a protein source.

    PubMed

    Woyengo, Tofuko A; Dickson, Taryn; Sands, Jason S; Nyachoti, Charles M

    2009-04-01

    The effect of phytase on nutrient digestibility in finishing pigs fed barley-based diet with soybean meal or canola meal as protein source was investigated. Six ileal-cannulated barrows (70 kg initial BW) were fed five diets in a 5 x 5 Latin square design with one added column. The five diets were based on barley-soybean meal (BSBM) or barley-canola meal (BCM) without or with phytase at 500 FTU/kg, and a casein-cornstarch-based diet, which was used to estimate standardised ileal AA digestibilities. No interactions were detected between phytase and diet on any of the response criteria measured except for apparent total tract N digestibility, which was reduced in BSBM diet but not BCM diet by phytase. Phytase increased (p < 0.01) apparent ileal and total tract P digestibility in both BSBM and BCM diets by at least 17 percentage units, and tended (p < 0.10) to increase the apparent ileal digestibilities of histidine, isoleucine, threonine, valine, cysteine, glycine and tyrosine. In conclusion, the effect of phytase in barley-based diets for finishing pigs on all response criteria measured in this study, except apparent total tract N digestibility, was not influenced by protein source.

  19. Effect of dairy proteins on appetite, energy expenditure, body weight, and composition: a review of the evidence from controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Line Q; Lorenzen, Janne K; Bendsen, Nathalie T; Rasmussen, Charlotte; Astrup, Arne

    2013-07-01

    Evidence supports that a high proportion of calories from protein increases weight loss and prevents weight (re)gain. Proteins are known to induce satiety, increase secretion of gastrointestinal hormones, and increase diet-induced thermogenesis, but less is known about whether various types of proteins exert different metabolic effects. In the Western world, dairy protein, which consists of 80% casein and 20% whey, is a large contributor to our daily protein intake. Casein and whey differ in absorption and digestion rates, with casein being a "slow" protein and whey being a "fast" protein. In addition, they differ in amino acid composition. This review examines whether casein, whey, and other protein sources exert different metabolic effects and targets to clarify the underlying mechanisms. Data indicate that whey is more satiating in the short term, whereas casein is more satiating in the long term. In addition, some studies indicate that whey stimulates the secretion of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide more than other proteins. However, for the satiety (cholecystokinin and peptide YY) and hunger-stimulating (ghrelin) hormones, no clear evidence exists that 1 protein source has a greater stimulating effect compared with others. Likewise, no clear evidence exists that 1 protein source results in higher diet-induced thermogenesis and promotes more beneficial changes in body weight and composition compared with other protein sources. However, data indicate that amino acid composition, rate of absorption, and protein/food texture may be important factors for protein-stimulated metabolic effects.

  20. Effect of dairy proteins on appetite, energy expenditure, body weight, and composition: a review of the evidence from controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Line Q; Lorenzen, Janne K; Bendsen, Nathalie T; Rasmussen, Charlotte; Astrup, Arne

    2013-07-01

    Evidence supports that a high proportion of calories from protein increases weight loss and prevents weight (re)gain. Proteins are known to induce satiety, increase secretion of gastrointestinal hormones, and increase diet-induced thermogenesis, but less is known about whether various types of proteins exert different metabolic effects. In the Western world, dairy protein, which consists of 80% casein and 20% whey, is a large contributor to our daily protein intake. Casein and whey differ in absorption and digestion rates, with casein being a "slow" protein and whey being a "fast" protein. In addition, they differ in amino acid composition. This review examines whether casein, whey, and other protein sources exert different metabolic effects and targets to clarify the underlying mechanisms. Data indicate that whey is more satiating in the short term, whereas casein is more satiating in the long term. In addition, some studies indicate that whey stimulates the secretion of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide more than other proteins. However, for the satiety (cholecystokinin and peptide YY) and hunger-stimulating (ghrelin) hormones, no clear evidence exists that 1 protein source has a greater stimulating effect compared with others. Likewise, no clear evidence exists that 1 protein source results in higher diet-induced thermogenesis and promotes more beneficial changes in body weight and composition compared with other protein sources. However, data indicate that amino acid composition, rate of absorption, and protein/food texture may be important factors for protein-stimulated metabolic effects. PMID:23858091

  1. Effects of meat cooking, and of ingested amount, on protein digestion speed and entry of residual proteins into the colon: a study in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Bax, Marie-Laure; Buffière, Caroline; Hafnaoui, Noureddine; Gaudichon, Claire; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Dardevet, Dominique; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Rémond, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The speed of protein digestion impacts on postprandial protein anabolism. After exercise or in the elderly, fast proteins stimulate protein synthesis more efficiently than slow proteins. It has been shown that meat might be a source of fast proteins. However, cooking temperature, acting on the macrostructure and microstructure of the meat could affect both the speed, and efficiency, of protein digestion. This study aims to evaluate, in vivo, the effect of meat cooking on digestion parameters, in the context of a complete meal. Six minipigs fitted with an ileal cannula and an arterial catheter were used. In order to measure the true ileal digestibility, tested meat was obtained from a calf, the muscle proteins of which were intrinsically labelled with (15)N-amino acids. Three cooking temperatures (60, 75 and 95°C; core temperature for 30 min), and three levels of intake (1, 1.45, and 1.90 g protein/kg body weight) were tested. Following meat ingestion, ileal digesta and arterial blood were collected over a 9-h period. The speed of digestion, evaluated from the kinetics of amino acid appearance in blood within the first 3 h, was greater for the cooking temperature of 75°C, than for 60 or 95°C. The true ileal digestibility, which averaged 95%, was not affected by cooking temperature or by the level of meat intake. The amino acid composition of the digesta flowing at the ileum was not affected by cooking temperature. These results show that cooking temperature can modulate the speed of meat protein digestion, without affecting the efficiency of the small intestinal digestion, and consequently the entry of meat protein residues into the colon.

  2. Effects of meat cooking, and of ingested amount, on protein digestion speed and entry of residual proteins into the colon: a study in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Bax, Marie-Laure; Buffière, Caroline; Hafnaoui, Noureddine; Gaudichon, Claire; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Dardevet, Dominique; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Rémond, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The speed of protein digestion impacts on postprandial protein anabolism. After exercise or in the elderly, fast proteins stimulate protein synthesis more efficiently than slow proteins. It has been shown that meat might be a source of fast proteins. However, cooking temperature, acting on the macrostructure and microstructure of the meat could affect both the speed, and efficiency, of protein digestion. This study aims to evaluate, in vivo, the effect of meat cooking on digestion parameters, in the context of a complete meal. Six minipigs fitted with an ileal cannula and an arterial catheter were used. In order to measure the true ileal digestibility, tested meat was obtained from a calf, the muscle proteins of which were intrinsically labelled with (15)N-amino acids. Three cooking temperatures (60, 75 and 95°C; core temperature for 30 min), and three levels of intake (1, 1.45, and 1.90 g protein/kg body weight) were tested. Following meat ingestion, ileal digesta and arterial blood were collected over a 9-h period. The speed of digestion, evaluated from the kinetics of amino acid appearance in blood within the first 3 h, was greater for the cooking temperature of 75°C, than for 60 or 95°C. The true ileal digestibility, which averaged 95%, was not affected by cooking temperature or by the level of meat intake. The amino acid composition of the digesta flowing at the ileum was not affected by cooking temperature. These results show that cooking temperature can modulate the speed of meat protein digestion, without affecting the efficiency of the small intestinal digestion, and consequently the entry of meat protein residues into the colon. PMID:23593443

  3. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015)PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them. PMID:27627343

  4. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  5. Effects of Chemically Modified Messenger RNA on Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-03-16

    Chemically modified nucleotides play significant roles in the effectiveness of mRNA translation. Here, we describe the synthesis of two sets of chemically modified mRNAs [encoding firefly Luciferase (FLuc) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), respectively], evaluation of protein expression, and correlation analysis of expression level under various conditions. The results indicate that chemical modifications of mRNAs are able to significantly improve protein expression, which is dependent on cell types and coding sequences. Moreover, eGFP mRNAs with N1-methylpseudouridine (me(1)ψ), 5-methoxyuridine (5moU), and pseudouridine (ψ) modifications ranked top three in cell lines tested. Interestingly, 5moU-modified eGFP mRNA was more stable than other eGFP mRNAs. Consequently, me(1)ψ, 5moU, and ψ are promising nucleotides for chemical modification of mRNAs. PMID:26906521

  6. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active proteins in biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Yuki; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    Lipid bilayers forming biological membranes are known to behave as viscous two-dimensional fluids on submicrometer scales; usually they contain a large number of active protein inclusions. Recently, it was shown [A. S. Mikhailov and R. Kapral, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 112, E3639 (2015), 10.1073/pnas.1506825112] that such active proteins should induce nonthermal fluctuating lipid flows leading to diffusion enhancement and chemotaxislike drift for passive inclusions in biomembranes. Here, a detailed analytical and numerical investigation of such effects is performed. The attention is focused on the situations when proteins are concentrated within lipid rafts. We demonstrate that passive particles tend to become attracted by active rafts and are accumulated inside them.

  7. Nucleation and Convection Effects in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1997-01-01

    Work during the second year under this grant (NAG8-1161) resulted in several major achievements. We have characterized protein impurities as well as microheterogeneities in the proteins hen egg white lysozyme and horse spleen apoferritin, and demonstrated the effects of these impurities on nucleation and crystallization. In particular, the purification of apoferritin resulted in crystals with an X-ray diffraction resolution of better than 1.8 A, i.e. a 1 A improvement over earlier work on the cubic form. Furthermore, we have shown, in association with studies of liquid-liquid phase separation, that depending on the growth conditions, lysozyme can produce all growth morphologies that have been observed with other proteins. Finally, in connection with our experimental and simulation work on growth step bunching, we have developed a system-dependent criterion for advantages and disadvantages of crystallization from solution under reduced gravity. In the following, these efforts are described in some detail.

  8. Effects of prodigiosin family compounds from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 1020R on the activities of protein phosphatases and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Soliev, Azamjon B; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 1020R produces prodigiosin and its closely related congeners, which differ in the length of their alkyl side chains. These red-pigmented compounds were found to exhibit cytotoxicity against human leukemia cell lines. The compounds also showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on protein phosphatase 2A and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), while remaining relatively inactive against protein kinases, including protein tyrosine kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinases A and C. Comparative studies of the individual pigmented compounds on PTP1B inhibition showed that as the chain length of the alkyl group at the C-3 position of the compound increased, the inhibitory effect on PTP1B decreased. These results suggest that protein phosphatases but not protein kinases might be involved in the cytotoxicity of the prodigiosin family of compounds against malignant cells.

  9. Effective sampling range for protein-based lures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective sampling range is defined as the maximum distance from which an insect can reach an attractive source in a given period of time. Information on sampling range is valuable for determining appropriate coverage of traps for use in population delimitation, mass trapping control strategies, or...

  10. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir sources.

    PubMed

    Perma, L; Bianchi, C; Nicolini, G; Novario, R; Tanzi, F; Conte, L

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 112Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rqndo phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from cronary treatment were 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for lung, 0.9 x 10(-2) mSv.GBSq(-1).min(-1) for oesophagus and 0.48 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for colon, 7.8 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for stomach and 1.7 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for liver. Coronary treatment iJnvlled an efl'fective dose of (0.046 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1), whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1); there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low.

  11. 42 CFR 422.322 - Source of payment and effect of MA plan election on payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Source of payment and effect of MA plan election on... Advantage Organizations § 422.322 Source of payment and effect of MA plan election on payment. (a) Source of payments. (1) Payments under this subpart for original fee-for-service benefits to MA organizations or...

  12. Content vs. Product: The Effects of Single Sourcing on the Teaching of Technical Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eble, Michelle F.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies and discusses the effects of single sourcing on the writing process. Provides suggestions for incorporating the teaching of single sourcing into technical communication courses. Concludes that educating students about the process of single sourcing is important if they are to become effective technical communicators in the industry. (SG)

  13. Effects of sugars on the thermal stability of a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2013-06-01

    It is experimentally known that the heat-denaturation temperature of a protein is raised (i.e., its thermal stability is enhanced) by sugar addition. In earlier works, we proposed a physical picture of thermal denaturation of proteins in which the measure of the thermal stability is defined as the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding at 298 K normalized by the number of residues. A multipolar-model water was adopted as the solvent. The polyatomic structures of the folded and unfolded states of a protein were taken into account in the atomic detail. A larger value of the measure implies higher thermal stability. First, we show that the measure remains effective even when the model water is replaced by the hard-sphere solvent whose number density and molecular diameter are set at those of real water. The physical picture is then adapted to the elucidation of the effects of sugar addition on the thermal stability of a protein. The water-sugar solution is modeled as a binary mixture of hard spheres. The thermal stability is determined by a complex interplay of the diameter of sugar molecules dC and the total packing fraction of the solution η: dC is estimated from the volume per molecule in the sugar crystal and η is calculated using the experimental data of the solution density. We find that the protein is more stabilized as the sucrose or glucose concentration becomes higher and the stabilization effect is stronger for sucrose than for glucose. These results are in accord with the experimental observations. Using a radial-symmetric integral equation theory and the morphometric approach, we decompose the change in the measure upon sugar addition into two components originating from the protein-solvent pair and protein-solvent many-body correlations, respectively. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume and solvent-accessible-surface terms. These decompositions give physical insights into the microscopic origin of the thermal

  14. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-05-01

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  15. Universal distribution of mutational effects on protein stability, uncoupling of protein robustness from sequence evolution and distinct evolutionary modes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Faure, Guilhem; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-04-30

    Robustness to destabilizing effects of mutations is thought of as a key factor of protein evolution. The connections between two measures of robustness, the relative core size and the computationally estimated effect of mutations on protein stability (ΔΔG), protein abundance and the selection pressure on protein-coding genes (dN/dS) were analyzed for the organisms with a large number of available protein structures including four eukaryotes, two bacteria and one archaeon. The distribution of the effects of mutations in the core on protein stability is universal and indistinguishable in eukaryotes and bacteria, centered at slightly destabilizing amino acid replacements, and with a heavy tail of more strongly destabilizing replacements. The distribution of mutational effects in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus gammatolerans is significantly shifted toward strongly destabilizing replacements which is indicative of stronger constraints that are imposed on proteins in hyperthermophiles. The median effect of mutations is strongly, positively correlated with the relative core size, in evidence of the congruence between the two measures of protein robustness. However, both measures show only limited correlations to the expression level and selection pressure on protein-coding genes. Thus, the degree of robustness reflected in the universal distribution of mutational effects appears to be a fundamental, ancient feature of globular protein folds whereas the observed variations are largely neutral and uncoupled from short term protein evolution. A weak anticorrelation between protein core size and selection pressure is observed only for surface residues in prokaryotes but a stronger anticorrelation is observed for all residues in eukaryotic proteins. This substantial difference between proteins of prokaryotes and eukaryotes is likely to stem from the demonstrable higher compactness of prokaryotic proteins.

  16. Modeling effectiveness of gradual increases in source level to mitigate effects of sonar on marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Ramp-up or soft-start procedures (i.e., gradual increase in the source level) are used to mitigate the effect of sonar sound on marine mammals, although no one to date has tested whether ramp-up procedures are effective at reducing the effect of sound on marine mammals. We investigated the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures in reducing the area within which changes in hearing thresholds can occur. We modeled the level of sound killer whales (Orcinus orca) were exposed to from a generic sonar operation preceded by different ramp-up schemes. In our model, ramp-up procedures reduced the risk of killer whales receiving sounds of sufficient intensity to affect their hearing. The effectiveness of the ramp-up procedure depended strongly on the assumed response threshold and differed with ramp-up duration, although extending the duration of the ramp up beyond 5 min did not add much to its predicted mitigating effect. The main factors that limited effectiveness of ramp up in a typical antisubmarine warfare scenario were high source level, rapid moving sonar source, and long silences between consecutive sonar transmissions. Our exposure modeling approach can be used to evaluate and optimize mitigation procedures. PMID:24471782

  17. Modeling effectiveness of gradual increases in source level to mitigate effects of sonar on marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Ramp-up or soft-start procedures (i.e., gradual increase in the source level) are used to mitigate the effect of sonar sound on marine mammals, although no one to date has tested whether ramp-up procedures are effective at reducing the effect of sound on marine mammals. We investigated the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures in reducing the area within which changes in hearing thresholds can occur. We modeled the level of sound killer whales (Orcinus orca) were exposed to from a generic sonar operation preceded by different ramp-up schemes. In our model, ramp-up procedures reduced the risk of killer whales receiving sounds of sufficient intensity to affect their hearing. The effectiveness of the ramp-up procedure depended strongly on the assumed response threshold and differed with ramp-up duration, although extending the duration of the ramp up beyond 5 min did not add much to its predicted mitigating effect. The main factors that limited effectiveness of ramp up in a typical antisubmarine warfare scenario were high source level, rapid moving sonar source, and long silences between consecutive sonar transmissions. Our exposure modeling approach can be used to evaluate and optimize mitigation procedures.

  18. Corn steep liquor and fermented ammoniated condensed whey as protein sources for lactating cows and yearling heifers grazing winter native range

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.J.; Lusby, K.S.; Horn, G.W.; Dvorak, M.J.

    1982-06-01

    Corn steep liquor (CSL) and fermented ammoniated condensed whey (FACW) were compared to cottonseed meal (CSM) as protein sources for wintering 61 lactating first-calf Hereford heifers and 32 yearling Hereford heifers on native range. Cattle were allotted by weight and individually fed 6 days per week for 12 weeks one of four protein treatments: negative control (NC), positive control (PC), CSL and FACW to provide .7, 1.5, .15 and 1.5 lb crude protein (CP) per day, respectively, to the lacating heifers and .2, .4, .4 and .4lb cP per day, respectively, to the yearling heifers. CMS was supplied in the CSL and FACW treatments at the same level as in the negative control. Lactating heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight and body condition (120 lb and 1.6 units) than those fed the PC (45.8 lb and .9 units). Weight and condition losses were similar (P more than .05) for lactating heifers fed PC, CSL and FACW. Yearling heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (49.4 vs 10.6 lb). Yearling heifers fed CSL and FACW gained more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (17.6 and 9.3 vs - 10.6 lb). Feeding CSL resulted in signficantly lower rumen pH, lower ruminal acetate and higher ruminal butyrate, isovalerate and caproate levels than did feeding either control. Supplementing with FACW produced significantly lower rumen pH, higher rumen ammonia and soluble carbohydrate levels, lower ruminal acetate, and higher ruminal propionate and butyrate concentrations than did either control supplement. Corn steep liquor and FDCW appear to be effective protein sources for cows and heifers grazing winter native range.

  19. Silkworm feeding as the source of the animal protein for human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunan, Y.; Tang, L.; Liu, H.

    Controlled Ecological Life-Support System CELSS which is also called Bioregenerative Life Support System has been considered now as the most advanced and complicated Closed Ecological System in the world Based on the construction principle of the CELSS the resources could be permanently regenerated so the flexibility and security for long-term spaceflight and lunar-base missions could be improved The cost could be also decreased CELSS is more appropriated for long-term manned spaceflight and applied for the possibility of long-term space missions or planetary probe in the lower cost The increasing closure and reliability is considered as the development and integrality direction of Life-Support System LSS The LSS closure and configuration is mainly depended on the human space diet composition Vast researches have been carried on this aspect but these researches mainly concentrate on the space vegetable protein exploitation The animal protein supply is still a problem the solution should be found and the LSS constitution analysis also deserves being explored Many animals have been taken into account to provide the animal proteins nowadays world-wide animals selection mainly focus on the poultry for instance sheep chicken fish etc But the poultry feeding exist many problems such as the long growth periods low efficiency complex feeding procedures and capacious feeding space and these animals also cause the water and air pollution The complete food composition is often depended on the features of the nation diet habit Chinese have

  20. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  1. Surface topography effects in protein adsorption on nanostructured carbon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2013-04-16

    We report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of protein adsorption on the surface of nanosized carbon allotropes, namely single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) considering both the convex outer surface and the concave inner surface, together with a graphene sheet for comparison. These systems are chosen to investigate the effect of the surface curvature on protein adsorption at the same surface chemistry, given by sp(2) carbon atoms in all cases. The simulations show that proteins do favorably interact with these hydrophobic surfaces, as previously found on graphite which has the same chemical nature. However, the main finding of the present study is that the adsorption strength does depend on the surface topography: in particular, it is slightly weaker on the outer convex surfaces of SWNT and is conversely enhanced on the inner concave SWNT surface, being therefore intermediate for flat graphene. We additionally find that oligopeptides may enter the cavity of common SWNT, provided their size is small enough and the tube diameter is large enough for both entropic and energetic reasons. Therefore, we suggest that proteins can effectively be used to solubilize in water single-walled (and by analogy also multiwalled) carbon nanotubes through adsorption on the outer surface, as indeed experimentally found, and to functionalize them after insertion of oligopeptides within the cavity of nanotubes of appropriate size. PMID:23517008

  2. Effects of high external electric fields on protein conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, Pier Paolo; Bramanti, Alessandro; Maruccio, Giuseppe; del Mercato, Loretta Laureana; Chiuri, Rocco; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross

    2005-06-01

    Resistance of biomolecules to high electric fields is a main concern for nanobioelectronics/nanobiosensing applications, and it is also a relevant issue from a fundamental perspective, to understand the dielectric properties and structural dynamics of proteins. In nanoscale devices, biomolecules may experience electric fields as high as 107 V/m in order to elicit charge transport/transfer. Understanding the effects of such fields on their structural integrity is thus crucial to assess the reliability of biomolecular devices. In this study, we show experimental evidence for the retention of native-like fold pattern by proteins embedded in high electric fields. We have tested the metalloprotein azurin, deposited onto SiO2 substrates in air with proper electrode configuration, by applying high static electric fields (up to 106-107 V/m). The effects on the conformational properties of protein molecules have been determined by means of intrinsic fluorescence measurements. Experimental results indicate that no significant field-induced conformational alteration occurs. This behavior is also discussed and supported by theoretical predictions of the intrinsic intra-protein electric fields. As the general features of such inner fields are not peculiar of azurin, the conclusions presented here should have general validity.

  3. Antithrombotic Effects of Amaranthus hypochondriacus Proteins in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sabbione, Ana Clara; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Añón, María Cristina; Scilingo, Adriana A

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of disability and premature death throughout the world. Diets with antithrombotic components offer a convenient and effective way of preventing and reducing CVD incidence. The aim of the present work was to assess in vivo and ex vivo effects of Amaranthus hypochondriacus proteins on platelet plug formation and coagulation cascade. Amaranth proteins were orally administrated to rats (AG, 8 animals) and bleeding time was determined showing no significant difference compared with control rats (CG, 7 animals). However, results show a strong tendency, suggesting that amaranth proteins are involved in the inhibition of thrombus formation. Non-anticoagulated blood extracted from animals was analyzed with the hemostatometer, where AG parameters obtained were twice the values showed by CG. The clotting tests, thrombin time (TT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), presented a 17 and 14% clotting formation increase respectively when comparing AG with CG. The ex-vivo assays confirm the hypothesis inferring that amaranth proteins are a potential antithrombotic agent. PMID:26627100

  4. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J; Lee, Andrew L; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-02-23

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H → C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), which are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass modulation, which slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond time scale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5 to 45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction's transition state (or tunneling ready state, TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with (13)C, (15)N, and (2)H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yields an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD's conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H → C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically modulated heavy enzymes in general.

  5. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J; Lee, Andrew L; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-02-23

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H → C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), which are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass modulation, which slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond time scale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5 to 45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction's transition state (or tunneling ready state, TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with (13)C, (15)N, and (2)H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yields an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD's conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H → C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically modulated heavy enzymes in general. PMID:26813442

  6. Teaching Doppler Effect with a passing noise source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Ivan F.; Mocellin, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    The noise pitch variation of a passing noise source allows a low cost experimental approach to calculate speed and, for the first time, distance. We adjusted the recorded noise pitch variation to the Doppler shift equation for sound. We did this by taking into account the frequency delay due to the sound source displacement and performing a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the noise signal using free software. This experimental method was successfully applied to aircraft and automobiles.

  7. A precedence effect resolves phantom sound source illusions in the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Norman; Elias, Damian O.; Mason, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Localizing individual sound sources under reverberant environmental conditions can be a challenge when the original source and its acoustic reflections arrive at the ears simultaneously from different paths that convey ambiguous directional information. The acoustic parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea (Diptera: Tachinidae) relies on a pair of ears exquisitely sensitive to sound direction to localize the 5-kHz tone pulsatile calling song of their host crickets. In nature, flies are expected to encounter a complex sound field with multiple sources and their reflections from acoustic clutter potentially masking temporal information relevant to source recognition and localization. In field experiments, O. ochracea were lured onto a test arena and subjected to small random acoustic asymmetries between 2 simultaneous sources. Most flies successfully localize a single source but some localize a ‘phantom’ source that is a summed effect of both source locations. Such misdirected phonotaxis can be elicited reliably in laboratory experiments that present symmetric acoustic stimulation. By varying onset delay between 2 sources, we test whether hyperacute directional hearing in O. ochracea can function to exploit small time differences to determine source location. Selective localization depends on both the relative timing and location of competing sources. Flies preferred phonotaxis to a forward source. With small onset disparities within a 10-ms temporal window of attention, flies selectively localize the leading source while the lagging source has minimal influence on orientation. These results demonstrate the precedence effect as a mechanism to overcome phantom source illusions that arise from acoustic reflections or competing sources. PMID:19332794

  8. Health effects of protein intake in healthy elderly populations: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Agnes N.; Cederholm, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the evidence behind the dietary requirement of protein and to assess the health effects of varying protein intake in healthy elderly persons in order to evaluate the evidence for an optimal protein intake. The literature search covered year 2000–2011. Prospective cohort, case–control, and intervention studies of a general healthy population in settings similar to the Nordic countries with protein intake from food-based sources were included. Out of a total of 301 abstracts, 152 full papers were identified as potentially relevant. After careful scrutiny, 23 papers were quality graded as A (highest, n=1), B (n=18), or C (n=4). The grade of evidence was classified as convincing, probable, suggestive, or inconclusive. The evidence is assessed as: probable for an estimated average requirement (EAR) of 0.66 g good-quality protein/kg body weight (BW)/day based on nitrogen balance (N-balance) studies and the subsequent recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of 0.83 g good-quality protein/kg BW/day representing the minimum dietary protein needs of virtually all healthy elderly persons. Regarding the optimal level of protein related to functional outcomes like maintenance of bone mass, muscle mass, and strength, as well as for morbidity and mortality, the evidence is ranging from suggestive to inconclusive. Results from particularly prospective cohort studies suggest a safe intake of up to at least 1.2–1.5 g protein/kg BW/day or approximately 15–20 E%. Overall, many of the included prospective cohort studies were difficult to fully evaluate since results mainly were obtained by food frequency questionnaires that were flawed by underreported intakes, although some studies were ‘calibrated’ to correct for under- or over-reporting. In conclusion, the evidence is assessed as probable regarding the EAR based on N-balance studies and suggestive to inconclusive regarding an optimal protein intake higher than the estimated

  9. Specific-ion effects on the aggregation mechanisms and protein-protein interactions for anti-streptavidin immunoglobulin gamma-1.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Gregory V; Razinkov, Vladimir I; Kerwin, Bruce A; Laue, Thomas M; Woodka, Andrea H; Butler, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-05-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is common in the biopharmaceutical industry and potentially jeopardizes product shelf life, therapeutic efficacy, and patient safety. The present article focuses on the relationship(s) among protein-protein interactions, aggregate growth mechanisms, aggregate morphologies, and specific-ion effects for an anti-streptavidin (AS) immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG1). Aggregation mechanisms of AS-IgG1 were determined as a function of pH and NaCl concentration with sodium acetate buffer and compared to previous work with sodium citrate. Aggregate size and shape were determined using a combination of laser light scattering and small-angle neutron or X-ray scattering. Protein-protein interactions were quantified in terms of the protein-protein Kirkwood-Buff integral (G22) determined from static light scattering and in terms of the protein effective charge (Zeff) measured using electrophoretic light scattering. Changing from citrate to acetate resulted in significantly different protein-protein interactions as a function of pH for low NaCl concentrations when the protein displayed positive Zeff. Overall, the results suggest that electrostatic repulsions between proteins were lessened because of preferential accumulation of citrate anions, compared to acetate anions, at the protein surface. The predominant aggregation mechanisms correlated well with G22, indicating that ion-specific effects beyond traditional mean-field descriptions of electrostatic protein-protein interactions are important for predicting qualitative shifts in protein aggregation state diagrams. Interestingly, while solution conditions dictated which mechanisms predominated, aggregate average molecular weight and size displayed a common scaling behavior across both citrate- and acetate-based systems. PMID:25885209

  10. Inhibitory effect of corcin on aggregation of 1N/4R human tau protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karakani, Ali Mohammadi; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Mahmood Ghaffari, Seyed; Ahmadian, Shahin; Mokhtari, Farzad; Jalili Firuzi, Mahshad; Zahra Bathaie, Seyedeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. One of the hallmarks of AD is an abnormal accumulation of fibril forms of tau protein which is known as a microtubule associated protein. In this regard, inhibition of tau aggregation has been documented to be a potent therapeutic approach in AD and tauopathies. Unfortunately, the available synthetic drugs have modest beneficial efficacy with several side effects. Therefore, pipeline drugs from natural sources with anti-aggregation properties can be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. Among medicinal plants, saffron (Crocus sativus, L.), as a traditional herbal medicine has different pharmacological properties and can be used as treatment for several nervous system impairment including depression and dementia. Crocin as a major constituent of saffron is the glycosylated form of crocetin. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of crocin on aggregation of recombinant human tau protein 1N/4R isoform using biochemical methods and cell culture. Results: Results revealed that tau protein under the fibrillation condition and in the presence of crocin had enough stability with low tendency for aggregation. Crocin inhibited tau aggregation with IC50 of 100 µg/ml. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that crocin could suppress the formation of tau protein filaments. Conclusion: Inhibitory effect of crocin could be related to its interference with nucleation phase that led to increases in monomer species of tau protein. Based on our results, crocin is recommended as a proper candidate to be used in AD treatment. PMID:26124935

  11. Effect of osmolytes on pressure-induced unfolding of proteins: a high-pressure SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Krywka, Christina; Sternemann, Christian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Royer, Catherine; Winter, Roland

    2008-12-22

    Herein, we explore the effect of different types of osmolytes on the high-pressure stability and tertiary structure of a well-characterized monomeric protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase). Changes in the denaturation pressure and the radius of gyration are obtained in the presence of different concentrations of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol and urea. To reveal structural changes in the protein upon compression at various osmolyte conditions, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were carried out. To this end, a new high-pressure cell suitable for high-precision SAXS studies at synchrotron sources was built, which allows one to carry out scattering experiments up to maximum pressures of about 7 kbar. Our data clearly indicate that the osmolytes that stabilize proteins against temperature-induced unfolding drastically increase their pressure stability and that the elliptically shaped curve of the pressure-temperature-stability diagram of proteins is shifted to higher temperatures and pressures with increasing osmolyte concentration. A drastic stabilization is observed for the osmolyte TMAO, which exhibits not only a significant stabilization against temperature-induced unfolding, but also a particularly strong stabilization of the protein against pressure. In fact, such findings are in accordance with in vivo studies (for example P. J. Yancey, J. Exp. Biol. 2005, 208, 2819-2830), where unusually high TMAO concentrations in some deep-sea animals were found. Conversely, chaotropic agents such as urea have a strong destabilizing effect on both the temperature and pressure stability of the protein. Our data also indicate that sufficiently high TMAO concentrations might be able to largely offset the destabilizing effect of urea. The different scenarios observed are discussed in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies.

  12. Effect of osmolytes on pressure-induced unfolding of proteins: a high-pressure SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Krywka, Christina; Sternemann, Christian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Royer, Catherine; Winter, Roland

    2008-12-22

    Herein, we explore the effect of different types of osmolytes on the high-pressure stability and tertiary structure of a well-characterized monomeric protein, staphylococcal nuclease (SNase). Changes in the denaturation pressure and the radius of gyration are obtained in the presence of different concentrations of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), glycerol and urea. To reveal structural changes in the protein upon compression at various osmolyte conditions, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were carried out. To this end, a new high-pressure cell suitable for high-precision SAXS studies at synchrotron sources was built, which allows one to carry out scattering experiments up to maximum pressures of about 7 kbar. Our data clearly indicate that the osmolytes that stabilize proteins against temperature-induced unfolding drastically increase their pressure stability and that the elliptically shaped curve of the pressure-temperature-stability diagram of proteins is shifted to higher temperatures and pressures with increasing osmolyte concentration. A drastic stabilization is observed for the osmolyte TMAO, which exhibits not only a significant stabilization against temperature-induced unfolding, but also a particularly strong stabilization of the protein against pressure. In fact, such findings are in accordance with in vivo studies (for example P. J. Yancey, J. Exp. Biol. 2005, 208, 2819-2830), where unusually high TMAO concentrations in some deep-sea animals were found. Conversely, chaotropic agents such as urea have a strong destabilizing effect on both the temperature and pressure stability of the protein. Our data also indicate that sufficiently high TMAO concentrations might be able to largely offset the destabilizing effect of urea. The different scenarios observed are discussed in the context of recent experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:18924198

  13. Effect of whey protein isolate on rehydration after exercise.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis J; Mattin, Lewis; Aldiss, Peter; Adebishi, Rukayat; Hobson, Ruth M

    2014-05-01

    Studies have examined adding protein to carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration drinks, but the effects of protein in isolation remain unknown. Ten subjects completed two trials in which they were dehydrated (~2 % of pre-exercise body mass) by intermittent cycling in the heat. Subjects then rehydrated (150 % total mass loss) over 1 h with mineral water (W) or mineral water plus 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate (WP) and remained in the laboratory for a further 4 h. Blood and urine samples were provided pre-exercise, post-exercise, post-rehydration and every hour thereafter. From blood samples, serum osmolality, change in plasma volume and plasma albumin content was determined, whilst the volume and osmolality of urine samples were determined. There was no difference between trials for total urine volume [W: 1,234 (358) mL; WP: 1,306 (268) mL; P = 0.409], drink retention [W: 40 (14) %; WP: 37 (14) %; P = 0.322] or net fluid balance [W: -605 (318) mL; WP: -660 (274) mL; P = 0.792] 4-h post-rehydration. Plasma volume was greater 3 and 4 h post-drinking during WP, and plasma albumin content relative to pre-exercise was increased 1-4 h post-drinking in WP only. These results suggest that addition of 20 g L(-1) whey protein isolate neither enhances nor inhibits post-exercise rehydration, when a volume equivalent to 150 % of sweat losses is ingested in 1 h. As post-exercise nutritional requirements are multifactorial (rehydration, glycogen resynthesis, myofibrillar/mitochondrial protein synthesis), these data demonstrate that when post-exercise protein intake might benefit recovery or adaptation, this can be achieved without compromising rehydration.

  14. The buccal gland of Lampetra japonica is a source of diverse bioactive proteins.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rong; Pang, Yue; Li, Qing Wei

    2012-05-01

    The parasitic phase lampreys (Lampetra japonica) are bloodsuckers in the marine, and their buccal gland secretion (lamphredin) contains various regulators such as anticoagulants, ion channel blockers, and immune suppressors like those from leeches, insects, ticks, vampire bats, and snakes. This review focuses on the functions and characteristics of the active proteins from the buccal gland of L. japonica for the first time, and provides new insights into the parasitic mechanisms of lampreys and the possibilities of developing drugs such as novel anticoagulants, thrombolytic agents, local anesthetics, and immunosuppressants. PMID:22586701

  15. Hydrophobic effect in protein folding and other noncovalent processes involving proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Spolar, R S; Ha, J H; Record, M T

    1989-01-01

    Large negative standard heat capacity changes (delta CP degree much less than 0) are the hallmark of processes that remove nonpolar surface from water, including the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to a nonaqueous phase and the folding, aggregation/association, and ligand-binding reactions of proteins [Sturtevant, J. M. (1977) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 2236-2240]. More recently, Baldwin [Baldwin, R. L. (1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8069-8072] proposed that the delta CP degree of protein folding could be used to quantify the contribution of the burial of nonpolar surface (the hydrophobic effect) to the stability of a globular protein. We demonstrate that identical correlations between the delta CP degree and the change in water-accessible nonpolar surface area (delta Anp) are obtained for both the transfer of nonpolar solutes from water to the pure liquid phase and the folding of small globular proteins: delta CP degree/delta Anp = -(0.28 +/- 0.05) (where delta Anp is expressed in A2 and delta CP degree is expressed in cal.mol-1.K-1; 1 cal = 4.184 J). The fact that these correlations are identical validates the proposals by both Sturtevant and Baldwin that the hydrophobic effect is in general the dominant contributor to delta CP degree and provides a straightforward means of estimating the contribution of the hydrophobic driving force (delta Ghyd degree) to the standard free energy change of a noncovalent process characterized by a large negative delta CP degree in the physiological temperature range: delta Ghyd degree congruent to (80 +/- 10)delta CP degree. PMID:2813394

  16. Effect of Replacing Animal Protein with Plant Protein on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viguiliouk, Effie; Stewart, Sarah E.; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Ng, Alena Praneet; Mirrahimi, Arash; de Souza, Russell J.; Hanley, Anthony J.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.; Sievenpiper, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on the effect of replacing sources of animal protein with plant protein on glycemic control has been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effect of this replacement on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through 26 August 2015. We included RCTs ≥ 3-weeks comparing the effect of replacing animal with plant protein on HbA1c, fasting glucose (FG), and fasting insulin (FI). Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data, assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2-statistic). Thirteen RCTs (n = 280) met the eligibility criteria. Diets emphasizing a replacement of animal with plant protein at a median level of ~35% of total protein per day significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.15%; 95%-CI: −0.26, −0.05%), FG (MD = −0.53 mmol/L; 95%-CI: −0.92, −0.13 mmol/L) and FI (MD = −10.09 pmol/L; 95%-CI: −17.31, −2.86 pmol/L) compared with control arms. Overall, the results indicate that replacing sources of animal with plant protein leads to modest improvements in glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Owing to uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for larger, longer, higher quality trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02037321. PMID:26633472

  17. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) can replace patient serum as a protein source in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) program.

    PubMed

    Benadiva, C A; Kuczynski-Brown, B; Maguire, T G; Mastoianni, L; Flickinger, G L

    1989-06-01

    Alternate protein sources have been suggested to replace the commonly used cord or patient serum for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. During an 11-month period 127 patients treated for in vitro fertilization had either their serum (N = 71) or bovine serum albumin (BSA; N = 56) used as the protein source in the insemination and growth media. Ham's F-10 + 0.5% BSA was used for sperm swim-up and insemination media and 1% BSA was used for the growth media. Patient's serum was added to Ham's F-10 culture media at concentrations of 7.5 and 15% for insemination and growth, respectively. Embryo transfer was performed with Ham's F-10 containing 90% maternal serum in both groups. Fertilization rate of 259 oocytes inseminated in medium containing patient's serum did not differ when compared with 200 oocytes inseminated in medium containing BSA. Likewise, rates of abnormal fertilization, cleavage, and pregnancy were similar in both groups. In a second experiment, 148 normally fertilized oocytes were transferred after 24 hr in culture to growth media containing two different concentrations of BSA (0.5 or 1%). Cleavage rates for the two groups were similar and the percentage of embryos developed to greater than or equal to 4 cells did not differ significantly. We conclude that a single concentration of BSA can safely be used to supplement culture media in human IVF with several practical and economical benefits.

  18. Aliphatic peptidyl hydroperoxides as a source of secondary oxidation in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Saladino, Jessica; Liu, Mian; Live, David; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a technique for studying protein structure and binding that entails oxidizing a protein system of interest with diffusing hydroxyl radicals, and then measuring the amount of oxidation of each amino acid. One important issue in hydroxyl radical footprinting is limiting amino acid oxidation by secondary oxidants to prevent uncontrolled oxidation which can cause amino acids to appear more solvent accessible than they really are. Previous work suggested that hydrogen peroxide was the major secondary oxidant of concern in hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments; however, even after elimination of all hydrogen peroxide, some secondary oxidation was still detected. Evidence is presented for the formation of peptidyl hydroperoxides as the most abundant product upon oxidation of aliphatic amino acids. Both reverse phase liquid chromatography and catalase treatment were shown to be ineffective at eliminating peptidyl hydroperoxides. The ability of these peptidyl hydroperoxides to directly oxidize methionine is demonstrated, suggesting the value of methionine amide as an in situ protectant. Hydroxyl radical footprinting protocols require the use of an organic sulfide or similar peroxide scavenger in addition to removal of hydrogen peroxide in order to successfully eradicate all secondary oxidizing species and prevent uncontrolled oxidation of sulfur-containing residues. PMID:19278868

  19. Protein lipid interaction in bile: effects of biliary proteins on the stability of cholesterol-lecithin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Luk, A S; Kaler, E W; Lee, S P

    1998-02-23

    The nucleation of cholesterol crystals is an obligatory precursor to cholesterol gallstone formation. Nucleation, in turn, is believed to be preceded by aggregation and fusion of cholesterol-rich vesicles. We have investigated the effects of two putative pro-nucleating proteins, a concanavalin A-binding protein fraction and a calcium-binding protein, on the stability of sonicated small unilamellar cholesterol-lecithin vesicles. Vesicle aggregation is followed by monitoring absorbance, and upon addition of the concanavalin A-binding protein fraction the absorbance of a vesicle dispersion increases continuously with time. Vesicle fusion is probed by a fluorescence contents-mixing assay. Vesicles apparently fuse slowly after the addition of the concanavalin A-binding protein, although inner filter effects confound the quantitative measurement of fusion rates. The rates of change of absorbance and fluorescence increase with the concentration of the protein, and the second-order dimerization rate constant increases with both the protein concentration and the cholesterol content of the vesicles. On the other hand, the calcium-binding protein has no effect on the stability of the vesicle dispersion. This protein may therefore affect cholesterol crystal formation not by promoting the nucleation process, but by enhancing crystal growth and packaging. Our results demonstrate that biliary proteins can destabilize lipid vesicles and that different proteins play different roles in the mechanism of cholesterol gallstone formation.

  20. Effects of sources on time-domain finite difference models.

    PubMed

    Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2014-07-01

    Recent work on excitation mechanisms in acoustic finite difference models focuses primarily on physical interpretations of observed phenomena. This paper offers an alternative view by examining the properties of models from the perspectives of linear algebra and signal processing. Interpretation of a simulation as matrix exponentiation clarifies the separate roles of sources as boundaries and signals. Boundary conditions modify the matrix and thus its modal structure, and initial conditions or source signals shape the solution, but not the modal structure. Low-frequency artifacts are shown to follow from eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix, and previously reported artifacts are predicted from eigenvalue estimates. The role of source signals is also briefly discussed. PMID:24993210

  1. Dietary influence on the m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition of lambs in relation to protein source.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Karlsson, L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Martinsson, K; Dugan, M E R

    2012-08-01

    Dietary lipid effect, as a consequence of protein supplement, on lamb m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition was investigated, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates. Crossbred lambs (White Swedish Landrace × Texel) were fed a barley-based diet without (CON) or with protein supplements including peas (PEA), rapeseed cake (RC) or hempseed cake (HC). The HC diet resulted in the highest muscle 22:6n-3 proportion, with the RC diet being similar (P<0.05). Protein supplement did not affect the c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion, however the HC diet increased some minor CLA isomers, including t10,c12 CLA (P<0.05). The t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 were lowest for the RC diet (P<0.05), likely relating to rumen conditions and precursor availability. The saturated, monounsaturated and branched-chain fatty acids were largely unaffected by protein supplement. In conclusion, feeding the RC diet lowered the t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 in meat, and modestly increased 22:6n-3 content. The direction of these changes would be beneficial, making the RC diet the preferred protein supplement; however the magnitude of the changes in the present experiment may not be sufficient to have an impact on human health.

  2. Dietary influence on the m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition of lambs in relation to protein source.

    PubMed

    Turner, T D; Karlsson, L; Mapiye, C; Rolland, D C; Martinsson, K; Dugan, M E R

    2012-08-01

    Dietary lipid effect, as a consequence of protein supplement, on lamb m. longissimus dorsi fatty acid composition was investigated, with emphasis on biohydrogenation intermediates. Crossbred lambs (White Swedish Landrace × Texel) were fed a barley-based diet without (CON) or with protein supplements including peas (PEA), rapeseed cake (RC) or hempseed cake (HC). The HC diet resulted in the highest muscle 22:6n-3 proportion, with the RC diet being similar (P<0.05). Protein supplement did not affect the c9,t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) proportion, however the HC diet increased some minor CLA isomers, including t10,c12 CLA (P<0.05). The t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 were lowest for the RC diet (P<0.05), likely relating to rumen conditions and precursor availability. The saturated, monounsaturated and branched-chain fatty acids were largely unaffected by protein supplement. In conclusion, feeding the RC diet lowered the t10-18:1 and total trans-18:1 in meat, and modestly increased 22:6n-3 content. The direction of these changes would be beneficial, making the RC diet the preferred protein supplement; however the magnitude of the changes in the present experiment may not be sufficient to have an impact on human health. PMID:22459498

  3. Chemical methodology as a source of small-molecule checkpoint inhibitors and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) modulators

    PubMed Central

    Huryn, Donna M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Brummond, Kay M.; Chambers, Peter G.; Eyer, Benjamin; Ireland, Alex W.; Kawasumi, Masaoki; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Lloyd, Kayla; Manteau, Baptiste; Nghiem, Paul; Quade, Bettina; Seguin, Sandlin P.; Wipf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Unique chemical methodology enables the synthesis of innovative and diverse scaffolds and chemotypes and allows access to previously unexplored “chemical space.” Compound collections based on such new synthetic methods can provide small-molecule probes of proteins and/or pathways whose functions are not fully understood. We describe the identification, characterization, and evolution of two such probes. In one example, a pathway-based screen for DNA damage checkpoint inhibitors identified a compound, MARPIN (ATM and ATR pathway inhibitor) that sensitizes p53-deficient cells to DNA-damaging agents. Modification of the small molecule and generation of an immobilized probe were used to selectively bind putative protein target(s) responsible for the observed activity. The second example describes a focused library approach that relied on tandem multicomponent reaction methodologies to afford a series of modulators of the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) molecular chaperone. The synthesis of libraries based on the structure of MAL3-101 generated a collection of chemotypes, each modulating Hsp70 function, but exhibiting divergent pharmacological activities. For example, probes that compromise the replication of a disease-associated polyomavirus were identified. These projects highlight the importance of chemical methodology development as a source of small-molecule probes and as a drug discovery starting point. PMID:21502524

  4. Electrostatic coupling to pH-titrating sites as a source of cooperativity in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, V.; Bashford, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative mechanism for the cooperative binding of charged ligands to proteins. The ligand-binding sites are electrostatically coupled to protein side chains that can undergo protonation and deprotonation. The binding of one ligand alters the protein's protonation equilibrium in a manner that makes the the binding of the second ligand more favorable. This mechanism requires no conformational change to produce a cooperative effect, although it is not exclusive of conformational change. We present a theoretical description of the mechanism, and calculations on three kinds of systems: A model system containing one protonation site and two ligand-binding sites; a model system containing two protonation sites and two ligand-binding sites; and calbindin D9k, which contains two Ca2+-binding sites and 30 protonation sites. For the one-protonation-site model, it is shown that the influence of the protonation site can only be cooperative. The competition of this effect with the anticooperative effect of ligand-ligand repulsion is studied in detail. For the two-protonation site model, the effect can be either cooperative or, in special cases, anticooperative. For calbindin D9k, the calculations predict that six protonation sites in or near the ligand-binding sites make a cooperative contribution that approximately cancels the anticooperative effect of Ca2+-Ca2+ repulsion, accounting for more than half of the total cooperative effect that is needed to overcome repulsion and produce the net cooperativity observed experimentally. We argue that cooperative mechanisms of the kind described here are likely when there is more than one ligand-binding site in a protein domain. PMID:9761483

  5. Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Broomfield, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    Costs and water quality effects of controlling point and nonpoint pollution sources are compared for the DuPage River basin in northern Illinois. Costs are estimated for effluent standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants and for the alternative, controlling runoff from nonpoint sources such as streets, agricultural lands, and forests. A dynamic water-quality/hydrology simulation model is used to determine water quality effects of various treatment plant standards and nonpoint-source controls. Costs and water quality data are combined, and the point-source and nonpoint-source plans are compared on a cost-effectiveness basis. Nonpoint-source controls are found to be more cost-effective than stricter control of pollutants from point sources.

  6. Effect of phosphorus levels on the protein profiles of secreted protein and root surface protein of rice.

    PubMed

    Shinano, Takuro; Yoshimura, Tomoko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Unno, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-11-01

    Plant roots are complicated organs that absorb water and nutrients from the soil. Roots also play an essential role in protecting plants from attack by soil pathogens and develop a beneficial role with some soil microorganisms. Plant-derived rhizosphere proteins (e.g., root secretory proteins and root surface binding proteins) are considered to play important roles in developing mutual relationships in the rhizosphere. In the rhizosphere, where plant roots meet the surrounding environment, it has been suggested that root secretory protein and root surface binding protein are important factors. Furthermore, it is not known how the physiological status of the plant affects the profile of these proteins. In this study, rice plants were grown aseptically, with or without phosphorus nutrition, and proteins were obtained from root bathing solution (designated as root secretory proteins) and obtained using 0.2 M CaCl2 solution (designated as root surface binding proteins). The total number of identified proteins in the root bathing solution was 458, and the number of root surface binding proteins was 256. More than half of the proteins were observed in both fractions. Most of the proteins were categorized as either having signal peptides or no membrane transport helix sites. The functional categorization suggested that most of the proteins seemed to have secretory pathways and were involved in defense/disease-related functions. These characteristics seem to be unique to rhizosphere proteins, and the latter might be part of the plants strategy to defeat pathogens in the soil. The low phosphorus treatment significantly increased the number of pathogenesis-related proteins in the root secretory proteins, whereas the change was small in the case of the root surface binding proteins. The results suggested that the roots are actively and selectively secreting protein into the rhizosphere. PMID:24083427

  7. Effect of Fluorescently Labeling Protein Probes on Kinetics of Protein-Ligand Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.S.; Landry, J.P.; Fei, Y.Y.; Luo, J.T.; Wang, X.B.; Lam, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Un-labeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured kon and koff for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as KD = koff/kon, for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3 ~ 4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye; and (2) KD for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  8. Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y S; Landry, J P; Fei, Y Y; Zhu, X D; Luo, J T; Wang, X B; Lam, K S

    2008-12-01

    We studied the effect of fluorescently labeling proteins on protein-ligand reactions. Unlabeled ligands (streptavidin-binding peptides and rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) as antigen targets) are immobilized on epoxy-functionalized glass slides. Unlabeled and Cy3-labeled protein probes from the same batch (streptavidin and goat antibodies) subsequently react with the surface-immobilized targets. By monitoring in situ the surface mass density change using an oblique-incidence reflectivity difference scanning microscope (a label-free detector), we measured k(on) and k(off) for streptavidin-peptide reactions and antibody-antigen reaction. We found that (1) equilibrium dissociation constants, defined as K(D) = k(off)/k(on), for streptavidin-peptide reactions increases by a factor of 3-4 when the solution-phase streptavidin is labeled with Cy3 dye and (2) K(D) for reactions of solution-phase goat anti-rabbit antibodies with rabbit IgG targets also change significantly when the goat antibodies are labeled with Cy3 dye. PMID:18991423

  9. Effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity on nanoparticle-protein interactions: different protein configurations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rixiang; Carney, Randy P; Ikuma, Kaoru; Stellacci, Francesco; Lau, Boris L T

    2014-06-24

    As nanoparticles (NPs) enter into biological systems, they are immediately exposed to a variety and concentration of proteins. The physicochemical interactions between proteins and NPs are influenced by the surface properties of the NPs. To identify the effects of NP surface heterogeneity, the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gold NPs (AuNPs) with similar chemical composition but different surface structures were investigated. Different interaction modes and BSA conformations were studied by dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Depending on the surface structure of AuNPs, BSA seems to adopt either a "side-on" or an "end-on" conformation on AuNPs. ITC demonstrated that the adsorption of BSA onto AuNPs with randomly distributed polar and nonpolar groups was primarily driven by electrostatic interaction, and all BSA were adsorbed in the same process. The adsorption of BSA onto AuNPs covered with alternating domains of polar and nonpolar groups was a combination of different interactions. Overall, the results of this study point to the potential for utilizing nanoscale manipulation of NP surfaces to control the resulting NP-protein interactions. PMID:24882660

  10. Effects of wheat protein in milk replacers on abomasal emptying rate in calves.

    PubMed

    Wittek, T; Ernstberger, M; Muckenhuber, M; Flöck, M

    2016-04-01

    Diarrhoea is a condition with tremendous impact on calf health. Infectious agents play a dominant role; however, non-infective factors may also contribute to pathogenesis of diarrhoea. One factor, the abomasal emptying rate, is mainly influenced by the composition of feed. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of different protein sources in milk replacers on abomasal emptying rate and clinical parameters. The effect of increasing age of the calves on abomasal emptying was also evaluated. The study compared abomasal emptying rates and clinical parameters in calves, which were fed either milk replacer containing only whey protein or one which partially contained wheat protein. Abomasal emptying rate was estimated by ultrasonography. Ten calves were used in the study over 18 days, and each calf was fed 3 periods of 3 days length using different milk replacers in an alternating crossover design. The abomasum was emptied significantly faster when the wheat protein containing milk replacer was fed (half-emptying time wheat protein 49.1 ± 4.1 min, half-emptying time milk protein 59.1 ± 7.4 min); however, clinical parameters and weight gain did not differ between the feeding regimes. Age did not significantly influence abomasal emptying rate. As milk replacers containing wheat proteins increased abomasal emptying rate, they may have a higher potential to initiate diarrhoea, especially if high volumes are fed. Thus, the feeding regimes are likely to be even more important when such milk replacers are used.

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on the physical conformation of the erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins.

    PubMed

    Bellary, S S; Anderson, K W; Arden, W A; Butterfield, D A

    1995-01-01

    Red blood cell deformability is important for effective circulation in the capillaries. It is known that red cell deformability is significantly reduced during septic shock. Surface to volume ratio, physical effects of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fluidity of lipid bilayer are some of the important intrinsic factors that regulate this mechanical function. Alterations in the physical conformation of cytoskeletal proteins in septic conditions could significantly alter their function. In this study, erythrocytes in whole blood were treated with lipopolysaccharide, the outer covering of Gram-negative bacteria released during Gram-negative sepsis. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with a protein-specific maleimide nitroxide spin label covalently bound to cytoskeletal proteins was used to investigate the resulting changes occurring in the physical state of cytoskeletal proteins in isolated membranes. Treatment of red blood cells with a lipopolysaccharide concentration as low as 40 micrograms/mL of blood solution for 90 minutes showed a significant decrease in the relevant EPR parameter (p < 0.01) of the spin label bound to subsequently isolated membranes, suggestive of a decreased segmental motion of the spin label and an increase in cytoskeletal protein-protein interactions. These results suggest a marked conformational alteration in the cytoskeletal proteins induced by the lipopolysaccharide and may explain, in part, the marked reduction in red blood cell deformability during septic shock. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide does not exert most of its effects on the host directly, but rather elicits the production of host factors that leads to complex septic shock. Leukocytes, endothelial tissue and many other cells release these mediators. Leukocytes are thought to be a particularly important source of such mediators, including cytokines (tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, etc.), oxygen free radicals, proteases, and hydrolyses. In order to

  12. Variations in Recollection: The Effects of Complexity on Source Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Colleen M.; Murray, Linda J.; Elfman, Kane; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Whether recollection is a threshold or signal detection process is highly controversial, and the controversy has centered in part on the shape of receiver operating characteristics (ROCs) and z-transformed ROCs (zROCs). U-shaped zROCs observed in tests thought to rely heavily on recollection, such as source memory tests, have provided evidence in…

  13. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-(13)C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state 13Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N; Kay, Lewis E; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-07-01

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-(13)C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state (13)Cα chemical shifts using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-(13)C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state (13)Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s(-1), despite the small fraction of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using (13)Cα spin probes.

  14. Chloroform in the environment: occurrence, sources, sinks and effects.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, A

    2003-03-01

    The chloroform flux through the environment is apparently constant at some 660+/-220 Ggyr(-1) (+/-1sigma) and about 90% of the emissions are natural in origin: the largest single source being in offshore sea water (contributing 360+/-90 Ggyr(-1)), with soil processes the next most important (220+/-100 Ggyr(-1)). Other natural sources, mainly volcanic and geological, account for less than 20 Ggyr(-1). The non-natural sources total 66+/-23 Ggyr(-1) and are much better characterised than the natural sources. They are predominantly the result of using strong oxidising agent on organic material in the presence of chloride ion, a direct parallel with the natural processes occurring in soils. Chloroform partitions preferentially into the atmosphere; the equilibrium distribution is greater than 99% and the average global atmospheric concentration has been calculated to be 18.5 pmolmol(-1). Atmospheric oxidation, the principal removal process, is approximately in balance with the identified source fluxes. Chloroform is widely dispersed in the aquatic environment (even naturally present in some mineral waters). Consequently, it is also widely dispersed in the tissue of living creatures and in foodstuffs but there is little evidence of bioaccumulation and the quantities in foodstuffs and drinking water are not problematical for human ingestion at the highest concentrations found. Definitive studies have shown that current environmental concentrations of chloroform do not present an ecotoxicological risk, even to fish at the embryonic and larval stages when they are most susceptible. By virtue of the very small amounts that actually become transported to the stratosphere, chloroform does not deplete ozone materially, nor is it a photochemically active volatile organic compound (VOC). It has a global warming potential that is less than that of the photochemically active VOCs and is not classed as a greenhouse gas.

  15. Effect of short-term cold exposure on skeletal muscle protein breakdown in rats.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, L H; Zanon, N M; Garófalo, M A; Navegantes, L C C; Kettelhut, I C

    2013-11-01

    Although it is well established that carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are profoundly altered by cold stress, the effects of short-term cold exposure on protein metabolism in skeletal muscle are still poorly understood. Because cold acclimation requires that an organism adjust its metabolic flux, and muscle amino acids may be an important energy source for heat production, we hypothesize that muscle proteolysis is increased and protein synthesis is decreased under such a stress condition. Herein, cold exposure for 24 h decreased rates of protein synthesis and increased overall proteolysis in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, but it did not affect muscle weight. An increase in proteolysis was accompanied by hyperactivity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in both soleus and EDL, and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis in EDL. Furthermore, muscles of rats exposed to cold showed increased mRNA and protein levels of atrogin-1 and muscle RING finger enzyme-1 (MuRF1). Additionally, cold stress reduced phosphorylation of Akt and Forkhead box class O1 (FoxO1), a well-known effect that increases FoxO translocation to the nucleus and leads to activation of proteolysis. Plasma insulin levels were lower, whereas catecholamines, corticosterone, and thyroid hormones were higher in cold-exposed rats compared with control rats. The present data provide the first direct evidence that short-term cold exposure for 24 h decreases rates of protein synthesis and increases the UPS and Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic processes, and increases expression of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in skeletal muscles of young rats. The activation of atrophy induced by acute cold stress seems to be mediated at least in part through the inactivation of Akt/FoxO signaling and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

  16. Effects of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg proteins.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Reyhan Selin; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Soykut, Esra Acar; Ertaş, Nusret

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of heat treatment parameters on liquid whole egg (LWE) proteins by using ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Heat treatment (at 60-68°C for 1-5min) was applied to LWE. Treated LWE was centrifuged and supernatant was taken for measurement of UV-VIS spectroscopy and CE. The change in UV absorbance showed loss of protein solubility depending on heat treatments parameters. Electropherograms of samples demonstrated the effect of treatment parameters on composition of LWE proteins. It was found that conalbumin and lysozyme were influenced by the treatment, while ovalbumin and ovomucoid were not affected. CE combined with principal component analysis (PCA) was used for classification of samples untreated or treated and treated at different treatment parameters. The results of the study revealed that the extent of heat treatment in LWE samples could be determined with PCA of the CE measurements. PMID:27596410

  17. Effect of altered sink:source ratio on photosynthetic metabolism of source leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Plaut, Z.; Mayoral, M.L.; Reinhold, L.

    1987-11-01

    When seven crop species were grown under identical environmental conditions, decreased sink:source ratio led to a decreased photosynthetic rate within 1 to 3 days in Cucumis sativus L., Gossypium hirsutum L., and Raphanus sativus L., but not in Capsicum annuum L., Solanum melongena L., Phaseolus vulgaris L., or Ricinus communis L. The decrease was not associated with stomatal closure. In cotton and cucumbers, sink removal led to an increase in starch and sugar content, in glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate pools, and in the proportion of /sup 14/C detected in sugar phosphates and UDPglucose following /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ supply. When mannose was supplied to leaf discs to sequester cytoplasmic inorganic phosphate, promotion of starch synthesis, and inhibition of CO/sub 2/ fixation, were observed in control discs, but not in discs from treated plants. Phosphate buffer reduced starch synthesis in the latter, but not the former discs. The findings suggest that sink removal led to a decreased ratio inorganic phosphate:phosphorylated compounds. In beans /sup 14/C in sugar phosphates increased following sink removal, but without sucrose accumulation, suggesting tighter feedback control of sugar level. Starch accumulated to higher levels than in the other plants, but CO/sub 2/ fixation rate was constant for several days.

  18. Effect of plant phenolics on protein and lipid oxidation in cooked pork meat patties.

    PubMed

    Vuorela, Satu; Salminen, Hanna; Mäkelä, Maija; Kivikari, Riitta; Karonen, Maarit; Heinonen, Marina

    2005-11-01

    Rapeseed and pine bark are rich sources of phenolic compounds that have in previous studies been shown to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, the antioxidant effect of rapeseed and pine bark phenolics in inhibiting the oxidation of lipids and proteins in meat was tested as a possible functional food application. The cooked pork meat with added plant material was oxidized for 9 days at 5 degrees C under light. The suitable level of plant material addition was first screened by following lipid oxidation only. For further investigations plant materials were added at a level preventing lipid oxidation by >80%. The oxidation was followed by measuring the formation of hexanal by headspace gas chromatography and the formation of protein carbonyls by converting them to 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones and measured by spectrophotometer. It was shown that rapeseed and pine bark were excellent antioxidants toward protein oxidation (inhibitions between 42 and 64%). These results indicate that rapeseed and pine bark could be potential sources of antioxidants in meat products.

  19. Milk Proteins, Peptides, and Oligosaccharides: Effects against the 21st Century Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chia-Chien; Hernández-Ledesma, Blanca; Fernández-Tomé, Samuel; Weinborn, Valerie; Barile, Daniela; de Moura Bell, Juliana María Leite Nobrega

    2015-01-01

    Milk is the most complete food for mammals, as it supplies all the energy and nutrients needed for the proper growth and development of the neonate. Milk is a source of many bioactive components, which not only help meeting the nutritional requirements of the consumers, but also play a relevant role in preventing various disorders. Milk-derived proteins and peptides have the potential to act as coadjuvants in conventional therapies, addressing cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, intestinal health, and chemopreventive properties. In addition to being a source of proteins and peptides, milk contains complex oligosaccharides that possess important functions related to the newborn's development and health. Some of the health benefits attributed to milk oligosaccharides include prebiotic probifidogenic effects, antiadherence of pathogenic bacteria, and immunomodulation. This review focuses on recent findings demonstrating the biological activities of milk peptides, proteins, and oligosaccharides towards the prevention of diseases of the 21st century. Processing challenges hindering large-scale production and commercialization of those bioactive compounds have been also addressed. PMID:25789308

  20. The effect of microgravity on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherson, Alexander; Greenwood, Aaron; Day, John

    1991-01-01

    Based on the results of microgravity crystallization experiments using the protein canavalin aboard four separate U.S. Space Shuttle missions, visual observations and diffraction data are presented that support the contention that protein crystals of improved quality can be obtained in a microgravity environment. With canavalin, no significant increase in resolution was noted, but an overall improvement in diffraction quality, as judged by statistical analyses of the data, was clear. This improvement in quality may be due primarily to the elimination of defects and dislocations rather than an overall enhancement of order. The mechanism for this improvement may be microgravity-stabilized depletion zones that develop around growing crystals that establish and maintain optimal growth conditions more rapidly following nucleation. Such zones would be destroyed by convective flow effects in earth's gravity.

  1. An osmolyte mitigates the destabilizing effect of protein crowding.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Mohona; Pielak, Gary J

    2014-09-01

    Most theories predict that macromolecular crowding stabilizes globular proteins, but recent studies show that weak attractive interactions can result in crowding-induced destabilization. Osmolytes are ubiquitous in biology and help protect cells against stress. Given that dehydration stress adds to the crowded nature of the cytoplasm, we speculated that cells might use osmolytes to overcome the destabilization caused by the increased weak interactions that accompany desiccation. We used NMR-detected amide proton exchange experiments to measure the stability of the test protein chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 under physiologically relevant crowded conditions in the presence and absence of the osmolyte glycine betaine. The osmolyte overcame the destabilizing effect of the cytosol. This result provides a physiologically relevant explanation for the accumulation of osmolytes by dehydration-stressed cells.

  2. Differential effects of vasopressin and phenylephrine on protein kinase C-mediated protein phosphorylations in isolated hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Johanson, R.A.; Wiliamson, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Receptor-mediated breakdown of inositol lipids produces two intracellular signals, diacylglycerol, which activates protein kinase C, and inositol trisphosphate, which causes release of intracellular vesicular Ca/sup 2 +/. This study examined the effects of Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and phorbol ester (PMA) on hepatocyte protein phosphorylations. (/sup 32/P) Phosphoproteins from hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/P were resolved by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE and corresponding autoradiographs were quantitated by densitometric analysis. The phosphorylation of five proteins, a plasma membrane bound 16 kDa protein with pI 6.4, a cytosolic 16 kDa protein with pI 5.8, and proteins with Mr's of 36 kDa, 52 kDa, and 68 kDa, could be attributed to phosphorylation by protein kinase C since the phosphorylation was stimulated by PMA. When the vasopressin concentration was varied, low vasopressin stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein of the above set of proteins, while higher vasopressin concentrations were required to stimulate the phosphorylation of all five proteins. Phenylephrine, even at supramaximal concentrations, stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein. These results suggest that phenylephrine is a less potent activator of protein kinase C than vasopressin by virtue of limited or localized diacylglycerol production.

  3. The protein composition of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits: the effects of single protein omission.

    PubMed

    Buck, M A; Olah, T V; Perrault, A R; Cooperman, B S

    1991-06-01

    Using reverse phase HPLC, we have been able to quantify the protein compositions of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits, formed either with the full complement of 30S proteins in the reconstitution mix or with a single protein omitted. We denote particles formed in the latter case as SPORE (single protein omission reconstitution) particles. An important goal in 30S reconstitution studies is the formation of reconstituted subunits having uniform protein composition, preferably corresponding to one copy of each protein per reconstituted particle. Here we describe procedures involving variation of the protein:rRNA ratio that approach this goal. In SPORE particles the omission of one protein often results in the partial loss in uptake of other proteins. We also describe procedures to increase the uptake of such proteins into SPORE particles, thus enhancing the utility of the SPORE approach in defining the role of specific proteins in 30S structure and function. The losses of proteins other than the omitted protein provide a measure of protein:protein interaction within the 30S subunit. Most of these losses are predictable on the basis of other such measures. However, we do find evidence for several long-range protein:protein interactions (S6:S3, S6:S12, S10:S16, and S6:S4) that have not been described previously.

  4. The absence of protein--sparing effects utilizing crystalline amino acids in stressed patients.

    PubMed

    Ching, N; Mills, C J; Grossi, C; Angers, J W; Jham, G; Zurawinsky, H; Nealon, T F

    1979-11-01

    The protein-sparing effects of the peripheral infusion of crystalline amino acids (PAA) was studied metabolically in selected surgical patients subjected to various degrees of stress. Twenty-one patients (sixteen cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, three with major abdominal traumatic injuries and four with paralytic ileus) were infused with 2 1/24 hours of a solution of 4.2% Travasol amino acids with only 5% glucose as a source of nonprotein calories. One-half of the cancer patients were also allowed ad libitum oral intake of a regular hospital diet or Vivonex-HN. The nutritional status was evaluated by measuring changes in body weight, serum albumin levels and nitrogen balance. Body weight decreased in only the trauma patients. When these solutions were the sole source of nutrients all patients were in negative nitrogen balance and had significant decreases in their serum albumin levels. Serum albumin levels were preserved only when extra sources of calories were provided. The infusion of the crystalline amino acids without adequate levels of nonprotein energy did not conserve protein in these stressed patients.

  5. [Fattening and slaughter values of pigs in relation to their genotype and to the protein source in their feed rations].

    PubMed

    Jacyno, E; Czarnecki, R; Owsianny, J; Lachowicz, K; Gajowiecki, L

    1996-01-01

    The studies were carried out on F1 progeny of multiparous Polish Large White sows and boars of Belgian Landrace, Hampshire x Pietrain hybrid, and Pietrain breed. The control group consisted of purebred Polish Large White pigs. The experimental part of the studies was performed on 120 fatteners divided up to 4 race groups, with 30 heads in each (namely 15 barrows and 15 gilts). Moreover, each group was divided into two following subgroups: the SoS one, which was given feed mixture with extracted soybean meal and the RpS one, which was given feed mixture with extracted rapeseed meal. The fattening started with 23 kg of body weight and was realized up to 100 kg. Twenty fatteners from each group (including 5 barrows and 5 gilts from a subgroup) were subjected to the control slaughter. The fatteners average daily body weight gains, and energy and digestible crude protein conversion per 1 kg of gain were as follows: after Belgain Landrace boars 788 g, 32.3 MJ and 358 g; after Hampshire x Pietrain boars 766 g, 33.6 MJ and 373 g; after Pietrain boars 720 g, 34.4 MJ and 382 g; after control group boars 705 g, 36.3 MJ and 403 g, respectively. It was found that hybrids after boars of evaluated breeds have positively (P < or = 0,01) better carcass meatness, and in a better way use digestible protein and metabolizable energy for production of 1 kg of meat. On that reason the best are hybrids after Belgian Landrace boars, carcasses of which yielded 52.4% of meat and converted 27% less of digestible crude protein and metabolizable energy for 1 kg meat production, than the White Large Polish fatteners. For no examined feature interaction between genotype and protein source in feeding diet was found. The growth rate and utilization of fodder were better for pigs fed on mixture with extracted soybean meal than for the ones fed on mixture with extracted rapeseed meal (P < or = 0.05). The fodders with high protein content did not differentiate meatness traits, whereas digestible crude

  6. Recovery from cycling exercise: effects of carbohydrate and protein beverages.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Boop, Christopher A; Luden, Nicholas D; Smith, Alexia G; Womack, Christopher J; Saunders, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different carbohydrate-protein (CHO + Pro) beverages were compared during recovery from cycling exercise. Twelve male cyclists (VO(2peak): 65 ± 7 mL/kg/min) completed ~1 h of high-intensity intervals (EX1). Immediately and 120 min following EX1, subjects consumed one of three calorically-similar beverages (285-300 kcal) in a cross-over design: carbohydrate-only (CHO; 75 g per beverage), high-carbohydrate/low-protein (HCLP; 45 g CHO, 25 g Pro, 0.5 g fat), or low-carbohydrate/high-protein (LCHP; 8 g CHO, 55 g Pro, 4 g fat). After 4 h of recovery, subjects performed subsequent exercise (EX2; 20 min at 70% VO(2peak) + 20 km time-trial). Beverages were also consumed following EX2. Blood glucose levels (30 min after beverage ingestion) differed across all treatments (CHO > HCLP > LCHP; p < 0.05), and serum insulin was higher following CHO and HCLP ingestion versus LCHP. Peak quadriceps force, serum creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and fatigue/energy ratings measured pre- and post-exercise were not different between treatments. EX2 performance was not significantly different between CHO (48.5 ± 1.5 min), HCLP (48.8 ± 2.1 min) and LCHP (50.3 ± 2.7 min). Beverages containing similar caloric content but different proportions of carbohydrate/protein provided similar effects on muscle recovery and subsequent exercise performance in well-trained cyclists. PMID:22852050

  7. Dietary Casein and Soy Protein Isolate Modulate the Effects of Raffinose and Fructooligosaccharides on the Composition and Fermentation of Gut Microbiota in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Gaowa; Ni, Kuikui; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Nishino, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Although diet has an important influence on the composition of gut microbiota, the impact of dietary protein sources has only been studied to a minor extent. In this study, we examined the influence of different dietary protein sources regarding the effects of prebiotic oligosaccharides on the composition and metabolic activity of gut microbiota. Thirty female rats were fed casein and soy protein isolate with cellulose, raffinose (RAF), and fructooligosaccharides (FOS). Microbiota composition was examined by real-time qPCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Dietary protein source affected cecum microbiota; acetic acid concentration and Lactobacillus spp. populations were greater with soy protein than with casein. Prebiotic oligosaccharides had distinctive effects on gut microbiota; RAF increased the acetic acid concentration and Bifidobacterium spp. populations, and FOS increased the butyric acid concentration regardless of the dietary protein. Likewise, Bifidobacterium sp., Collinsella sp., and Lactobacillus sp. were detected in microbiota of the rats fed RAF, and Bacteroides sp., Roseburia sp., and Blautia sp. were seen in microbiota of the rats fed FOS. Interactions between dietary proteins and prebiotic oligosaccharides were observed with Clostridium perfringens group populations and cecum IgA concentration. RAF and FOS decreased C. perfringens group populations in casein-fed rats, and the combination of soy protein and RAF substantially increased cecum IgA concentration. These results indicate that dietary proteins can differentially modulate the effects of prebiotic oligosaccharides on gut fermentation and microbiota, depending on the type of carbohydrate polymers involved. PMID:27434756

  8. Effects of ozone on functional properties of proteins.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Hicran; Ibanoglu, Esra; Catal, Hatice; Ibanoglu, Senol

    2012-09-15

    The present study investigates whether the ozone treatment could be an alternative to improve some functional properties of proteins. Ozone treatment was applied on whey protein isolate and egg white proteins which have been extensively used in food products to improve textural, functional and sensory attributes. Ozone treatment of proteins was performed either in aqueous solutions or as gas ozonation of pure protein powders. Foam formation and foam stability of proteins were enhanced extensively. The solubility of proteins were reduced as influenced from the aqueous and gas ozonation medium. The reduction was more pronounced in egg white proteins. Ozone treatment affected emulsion activity of whey protein isolate negatively and reduced the emulsion stability.

  9. Effect of source tampering in the security of quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2015-08-01

    The security of source has become an increasingly important issue in quantum cryptography. Based on the framework of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), the source becomes the only region exploitable by a potential eavesdropper (Eve). Phase randomization is a cornerstone assumption in most discrete-variable (DV) quantum communication protocols (e.g., QKD, quantum coin tossing, weak-coherent-state blind quantum computing, and so on), and the violation of such an assumption is thus fatal to the security of those protocols. In this paper, we show a simple quantum hacking strategy, with commercial and homemade pulsed lasers, by Eve that allows her to actively tamper with the source and violate such an assumption, without leaving a trace afterwards. Furthermore, our attack may also be valid for continuous-variable (CV) QKD, which is another main class of QKD protocol, since, excepting the phase random assumption, other parameters (e.g., intensity) could also be changed, which directly determine the security of CV-QKD.

  10. Effects of two different levels of dietary protein on body composition and protein nutritional status of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Tirapegui, Julio; Ribeiro, Sandra Maria Lima; Pires, Ivanir Santana de Oliveira; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of a high-protein diet on growth, body composition, and protein nutritional status of young rats. Newly-weaned Wistar rats, weighing 45-50 g, were distributed in two experimental groups, according to their diets, which contained 12% (G12) or 26% protein (G26), over a period of 3 weeks. The animals were euthanized at the end of this period and the following analyses were performed: chemical composition of the carcass, proteoglycan synthesis, IGF-I concentration (serum, muscle and cartilage), total tissue RNA, protein concentration (muscle and cartilage) and protein synthesis (muscle and cartilage). The high-protein diet was found to result in a higher fat-free mass and lower fat mass in the carcass, with no difference in growth or protein nutritional status.

  11. Protein membrane interaction: effect of myelin basic protein on the dynamics of oriented lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, F.; Relini, A.; Gliozzi, A.; Rolandi, R.; Cavatorta, P.; Deriu, A.; Fasano, A.; Riccio, P.

    2003-08-01

    We have studied the effect of physiological amounts of myelin basic protein (MBP) on pure dimyristoyl L-α-phosphatidic acid (DMPA) oriented membranes. The investigation has been carried out using several complementary experimental methods to provide a detailed characterization of the proteo-lipid complexes. In particular, taking advantage of the power of the quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique as optimal probe in biology, a significant effect is suggested to be induced by MBP on the anisotropy of lipid dynamics across the liquid-gel phase transition. Thus, the enhancement of the spatially restricted, vertical translation motion of DMPA is suggested to be the main responsible for the increased contribution of the out of plane lipid dynamics observed at 340 K.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of the effect on blood pressure of dietary non-meat protein versus meat protein in normotensive omnivores.

    PubMed

    Prescott, S L; Jenner, D A; Beilin, L J; Margetts, B M; Vandongen, R

    1988-06-01

    1. A randomized, controlled trial was carried out to examine whether changes in type and amount of dietary protein were responsible for earlier observations of blood-pressure-lowering effects of lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets. 2. Sixty-four subjects were pair-matched for sex, age, weight and sitting systolic blood pressure, and were randomly allocated to receive one of two types of protein supplement: one containing proteins from meat, the other proteins from non-meat sources. The supplements were balanced in terms of other nutrients. Consumption of other meat, poultry or fish was prohibited. 3. Sitting and standing blood pressures, weight, dietary intakes and plasma and urinary electrolytes were measured at regular intervals during the 12 weeks of trial. Urinary 3-methylhistidine was used as a measure of compliance. 4. Fifty subjects completed the trial. There were no statistically significant blood pressure differences between groups either at baseline or at end-of-trial, neither were there any substantive differences in mean blood pressure changes between baseline and end-of-trial. 3-Methyl-histidine excretion was significantly lower in subjects on the non-meat diet. 5. The results suggest that the protein components of the lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet are not responsible for the blood-pressure-lowering effects of that diet.

  13. The effects of protein isolates and hydrocolloids complexes on dough rheology, physicochemical properties and qualities of gluten-free crackers.

    PubMed

    Nammakuna, Natthakarn; Barringer, Sheryl A; Ratanatriwong, Puntarika

    2016-03-01

    To understand the suitability of protein-hydrocolloid complexes as replacement for wheat protein in rice crackers, and the effect of protein source, carboxylmethylcellulose (CMC) and hydroxylpropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) at 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0% w/w, and 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% w/w of xanthan gum (XN) were added to flour-blendedrice crackers (FF). A variety of protein isolates was added to 2.5%, 5.0%, and 10% w/w combinations of protein isolates and hydrocolloids were investigated. The controls were FF, 100% rice crackers (RF), and wheat crackers (WF). About 1.5% CMC samples had the closest hardness to WF, followed by 0.5%XN and 1.5%HPMC, and 0.5%XN crackers had the highest moisture content and water activities followed by 0.75%XN, 1.5%CMC, and 1.5%HPMC. Increasing % of hydrocolloids also increased puffiness. Protein isolate crackers had higher moisture content and water activity. Protein isolates improved puffiness. Whey protein improved elasticity, while hydrocolloids added to leguminous protein increased loss tangent. PMID:27004105

  14. Position-dependent Effects of Polylysine on Sec Protein Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fu-Cheng; Bageshwar, Umesh K.; Musser, Siegfried M.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial Sec protein translocation system catalyzes the transport of unfolded precursor proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Using a recently developed real time fluorescence-based transport assay, the effects of the number and distribution of positive charges on the transport time and transport efficiency of proOmpA were examined. As expected, an increase in the number of lysine residues generally increased transport time and decreased transport efficiency. However, the observed effects were highly dependent on the polylysine position in the mature domain. In addition, a string of consecutive positive charges generally had a more significant effect on transport time and efficiency than separating the charges into two or more charged segments. Thirty positive charges distributed throughout the mature domain resulted in effects similar to 10 consecutive charges near the N terminus of the mature domain. These data support a model in which the local effects of positive charge on the translocation kinetics dominate over total thermodynamic constraints. The rapid translocation kinetics of some highly charged proOmpA mutants suggest that the charge is partially shielded from the electric field gradient during transport, possibly by the co-migration of counter ions. The transport times of precursors with multiple positively charged sequences, or “pause sites,” were fairly well predicted by a local effect model. However, the kinetic profile predicted by this local effect model was not observed. Instead, the transport kinetics observed for precursors with multiple polylysine segments support a model in which translocation through the SecYEG pore is not the rate-limiting step of transport. PMID:22367204

  15. Multivariate Analysis of Side Effects of Drug Molecules Based on Knowledge of Protein Bindings and ProteinProtein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Funatsu, Kimito

    2014-12-01

    Here, we examined the relationships between 969 side effects associated with 658 drugs and their 1368 human protein targets using our hybrid approaches. Firstly, L-shaped PLS (LPLS) was used to construct a multivariate model of side effects and protein bindings of drug molecules. LPLS is an extension of standard PLS regression, where, in addition to the response matrix Y and the regressor matrix X, an extra data matrix Z is constructed that summarizes the background information of X. X and Y are matrices comprising drugs-target proteins, and drugs-side effects, respectively. The Z matrix is the proteinprotein interaction data. From the loading plot of Y, we could identify two remarkable side effects (urinary incontinence and increased salivation) From the corresponding loading plot of X, the responsible protein targets causing each side effect could be estimated (sodium channels and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors). The loading plot of the Z matrix indicated that the GABA receptors interact with each other and they heavily influence the side effect of increased salivation. Secondly, Bayesian classifier methods were separately applied to the cases of the two side effects. That is, the Bayesian classifier method was used to classify drug molecules as binding or not binding to the responsible protein targets associated with each side effect. Using atom-coloring techniques, it was possible to estimate which fragments on the drug molecule might cause the specific side effects. This information is valuable for drug design to avoid specific side effects.

  16. Effects of dietary tannin source on performance, feed efficiency, ruminal fermentation, and carcass and non-carcass traits in steers fed a high-grain diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannins are polyphenolic secondary plant compounds that have been shown to affect microbial activity to impact fermentation, protein degradation, methane production, and potential to mitigate foodborne pathogens. This study was conducted to examine the effects of source of tannin (condensed, CT, vs....

  17. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Georgatzi, Vasiliki; Bregou, Erinda; Priftis, Alexandros; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP) from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP-) induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls (CARB), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL(-1) increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27127549

  18. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Georgatzi, Vasiliki; Bregou, Erinda; Priftis, Alexandros; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP) from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP-) induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls (CARB), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL−1 increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27127549

  19. Effective stabilization of CLA by microencapsulation in pea protein.

    PubMed

    Costa, A M M; Nunes, J C; Lima, B N B; Pedrosa, C; Calado, V; Torres, A G; Pierucci, A P T R

    2015-02-01

    CLA was microencapsulated by spray drying in ten varied wall systems (WS) consisting of pea protein isolate or pea protein concentrate (PPC) alone at varied core:WS ratios (1:2; 1:3 and 1:4), or blended with maltodextrin (M) and carboxymethylcellulose at a pea protein:carbohydrate ratio of 3:1. The physical-chemical properties of the CLA microparticles were characterised by core retention, microencapsulation efficiency (ME), particle size and moisture. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) showed the most promising results, thus we evaluated the effect of M addition in the WS on other physical-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability (CLA isomer profile, quantification of CLA and volatile compounds by SPME coupled with CG-MS) during two months of storage at room temperature, CLA:PPC (1:4) was selected for comparisons. CLA:M:PPC (1:1:3) microparticles demonstrated better morphology, solubility, dispersibility and higher glass-transition temperature values. M addition did not influence the oxidative stability of CLA, however its presence improved physical-chemical characteristics necessary for food applications.

  20. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  1. Effects of the ninein-like protein centrosomal protein on breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Wang, Xinzhao; Lv, Minlin; Mu, Dianbin; Wang, Leilei; Zuo, Wensu; Yu, Zhiyong

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of the centrosomal protein, ninein-like protein (Nlp), on the proliferation, invasion and metastasis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, the present study established green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing MCF7 plasmids with steady and overexpression of Nlp (MCG7-GFP-N1p) and blank plasmids (MCF7-GFP) using lentiviral transfection technology in MCF7 the breast cancer cell line. The expression of Nlp was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blott analysis. Differences in levels of proliferation, invasion and metastasis between the MCF7-GFP-Nlp group and MCF-GFP group were compared using MTT, plate colony formation and Transwell migration assays. The cell growth was more rapid and the colony forming rate was markedly increased in the MCF7-GFP-Nlp group (P<0.05) compared with the MCF7-GFP group. The number of cells in the MCF-GFP-Nlp and MCF7-GFP groups transferred across membranes were 878 ± 18.22 and 398 ± 8.02, respectively, in the migration assay. The invasive capacity was significantly increased in the MCF7-GFP-Nlp group (P<0.05) compared with the MCF7-GFP group. The western blotting results demonstrated high expression levels of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 in the MCF7-GFP-Nlp group. The increased expression of Nlp was associated with an increase in MCF7 cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis, which indicated that Nlp promoted breast tumorigenesis and may be used as a potent biological index to predict breast cancer metastasis and develop therapeutic regimes.

  2. Effects of interplanetary transport on derived energetic particle source strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, E. E.; Giacalone, J.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2010-06-01

    We study the transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere in order to relate observations made by an observer at 1 AU to the number and total energy content of accelerated particles at the source, assumed to be near the Sun. We use a numerical simulation that integrates the trajectories of a large number of individual particles moving in the interplanetary magnetic field. We model pitch angle scattering and adiabatic cooling of energetic ions with energies from 50 keV nucleon-1 to 100 MeV nucleon-1. Among other things, we determine the number of times that particles of a given energy cross 1 AU and the average energy loss that they suffer because of adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind. We use a number of different forms of the interplanetary spatial diffusion coefficient and a wide range of scattering mean-free paths and consider a number of different ion species in order to generate a wide range of simulation results that can be applied to individual SEP events. We apply our simulation results to observations made at 1 AU of the 20 February 2002 solar energetic particle event, finding the original energy content of several species. We find that estimates of the source energy based on SEP measurements at 1 AU are relatively insensitive to the mean-free path and scattering scheme if adiabatic cooling and multiple crossings are taken into account.

  3. Effects of Interplanetary Transport on Derived Energetic Particle Source Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chollet, E. E.; Giacalone, J.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    We study the transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the inner heliosphere in order to relate observations made by an observer at 1 AU to the total energy content of particles at the source, assumed to be near the Sun. We use a numerical simulation that integrates the trajectories of a large number of individual particles moving in the interplanetary magnetic field. We model pitch-angle scattering and adiabatic cooling of energetic ions with energies from 50 keV/nucleon to 100 MeV/nucleon. Among other things, we determine the number of times that particles of a given energy cross 1 AU and the average energy loss that they suffer due to adiabatic deceleration in the solar wind. We use a number of different forms of the interplanetary spatial diffusion coefficient, a wide range of scattering mean-free paths, and consider a number of different ion species in order to generate a wide range of simulation results that can be applied to individual SEP events. Our results are used to estimate the total energy needed to accelerate particles for an event on 20 February 2002 based on observations made at 1 AU. We find that estimates of the source energy based on SEP measurements at 1 AU are relatively insensitive to mean free path and scattering scheme.

  4. Health effects of swimmers and nonpoint sources of contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Calderon, R L; Mood, E W; Dufour, A P

    1991-03-01

    Microbiological contamination from nonpoint sources of pollution is usually related to animal faecal wastes through urban, pastureland and forest run-off of stormwater. Currently-used bacterial water quality indicators cannot discriminate between human and animal faecal contamination and, therefore, it is common practice to treat the risk associated with exposure to water polluted by animal or human wastes as equally hazardous. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a risk of gastrointestinal illness after a swimming exposure to water contaminated with animal faecal wastes. The health status and swimming activity of volunteer study participants was followed for 49 days during June, July and August. Multiple bacterial indicators of water quality were monitored daily during the course of the study. Swimming-associated symptomatic gastrointestinal illness was observed in individuals who swam in animal nonpoint source contaminated water. Swimmer illness was not associated with high densities of common faecal indicator bacteria or high volume rainy days. Swimmer illness was associated with high numbers of swimmers per day and high densities of staphylococci. The observed illnesses appeared to be caused by a swimmer to swimmer transmission via the water.

  5. Body Type and Sex of Receiver: Their Effects on Source Credibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckman, Bruce K.; Rancer, Andrew S.

    This study focused on whether actual or stereotypic associations with a speaker's body type would affect his or her credibility. Effects on the source-credibility ratings submitted by a total of 165 students were investigated for three different sources' body types. A significant main effect was found for body type but not for the blocked…

  6. Modeling and analysis of CSAMT field source effect and its characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da, Lei; Xiaoping, Wu; Qingyun, Di; Gang, Wang; Xiangrong, Lv; Ruo, Wang; Jun, Yang; Mingxin, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT) has been a highly successful geophysical tool used in a variety of geological exploration studies for many years. However, due to the artificial source used in the CSAMT technique, two important factors are considered during interpretation: non-plane-wave or geometric effects and source overprint effects. Hence, in this paper we simulate the source overprint effects and analyzed the rule and characteristics of its influence on CSAMT applications. Two-dimensional modeling was carried out using an adaptive unstructured finite element method to simulate several typical models. Also, we summarized the characteristics and rule of the source overprint effects and analyzed its influence on the data taken over several mining areas. The results obtained from the study shows that the occurrence and strength of the source overprint effect is dependent on the location of the source dipole, in relation to the receiver and the subsurface geology. In order to avoid source overprint effects, three principle were suggested to determine the best location for the grounded dipole source in the field.

  7. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments. ᅟ PMID:26369778

  8. Protein Structural Studies by Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: A Critical Look at Electrospray Sources and Calibration Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Vahidi, Siavash; Sowole, Modupeola A.; Konermann, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The question whether electrosprayed protein ions retain solution-like conformations continues to be a matter of debate. One way to address this issue involves comparisons of collision cross sections (Ω) measured by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with Ω values calculated for candidate structures. Many investigations in this area employ traveling wave IMS (TWIMS). It is often implied that nanoESI is more conducive for the retention of solution structure than regular ESI. Focusing on ubiquitin, cytochrome c, myoglobin, and hemoglobin, we demonstrate that Ω values and collisional unfolding profiles are virtually indistinguishable under both conditions. These findings suggest that gas-phase structures and ion internal energies are independent of the type of electrospray source. We also note that TWIMS calibration can be challenging because differences in the extent of collisional activation relative to drift tube reference data may lead to ambiguous peak assignments. It is demonstrated that this problem can be circumvented by employing collisionally heated calibrant ions. Overall, our data are consistent with the view that exposure of native proteins to electrospray conditions can generate kinetically trapped ions that retain solution-like structures on the millisecond time scale of TWIMS experiments.

  9. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, W. Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence, John C. H.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump–probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  10. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  11. 7 Å resolution in protein two-dimensional-crystal X-ray diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark S; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Boutet, Sébastien; Feld, Geoffrey K; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmitt, Marc; Ogren, John I; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J; Spence, John C H; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-07-17

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional crystals in the lipid environment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. Previously, X-ray diffraction from individual two-dimensional crystals did not represent a suitable investigational tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has now provided a means to outrun the damage. Here, we report on measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source XFEL on bacteriorhodopsin two-dimensional crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merging data from about a dozen single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 Å, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase in the resolution. The presented results pave the way for further XFEL studies on two-dimensional crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution. PMID:24914166

  12. Source apportionment and health effect of NOx over the Pearl River Delta region in southern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingcheng; Yao, Teng; Li, Ying; Fung, Jimmy C H; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-05-01

    As one of the most notorious atmospheric pollutants, NOx not only promotes the formation of ozone but also has adverse health effects on humans. It is therefore of great importance to study the sources of NOx and its effects on human health. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) modeling system and ozone source apportionment technology (OSAT) were used to study the contribution of NOx from different emission sources over southern China. The results indicate that heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) and industrial point sources are the two major local NOx sources, accounting for 30.8% and 18.5% of local NOx sources, respectively. In Hong Kong, marine emissions contributed around 43.4% of local NOx in 2011. Regional transport is another important source of this pollutant, especially in February and November, and it can contribute over 30% of ambient NOx on average. Power plant point emission is an significant regional source in Zhuhai, Zhongshan and Foshan. The total emission sources are estimated to cause 2119 (0-4405) respiratory deaths and 991 (0-2281) lung cancer deaths due to long-term exposure to NOx in the Pearl River Delta region. Our results suggest that local governments should combine their efforts and vigorously promote further reduction of NOx emissions, especially for those sources that make a substantial contribution to NOx emissions and affect human health: HDDV, LDGV, industrial point sources and marine sources.

  13. Source apportionment and health effect of NOx over the Pearl River Delta region in southern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingcheng; Yao, Teng; Li, Ying; Fung, Jimmy C H; Lau, Alexis K H

    2016-05-01

    As one of the most notorious atmospheric pollutants, NOx not only promotes the formation of ozone but also has adverse health effects on humans. It is therefore of great importance to study the sources of NOx and its effects on human health. The Comprehensive Air Quality Model (CAMx) modeling system and ozone source apportionment technology (OSAT) were used to study the contribution of NOx from different emission sources over southern China. The results indicate that heavy duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) and industrial point sources are the two major local NOx sources, accounting for 30.8% and 18.5% of local NOx sources, respectively. In Hong Kong, marine emissions contributed around 43.4% of local NOx in 2011. Regional transport is another important source of this pollutant, especially in February and November, and it can contribute over 30% of ambient NOx on average. Power plant point emission is an significant regional source in Zhuhai, Zhongshan and Foshan. The total emission sources are estimated to cause 2119 (0-4405) respiratory deaths and 991 (0-2281) lung cancer deaths due to long-term exposure to NOx in the Pearl River Delta region. Our results suggest that local governments should combine their efforts and vigorously promote further reduction of NOx emissions, especially for those sources that make a substantial contribution to NOx emissions and affect human health: HDDV, LDGV, industrial point sources and marine sources. PMID:26845361

  14. Effect of processing systems on protein quality of feather meals and hog hair meals.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Parsons, C M

    1997-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of five commercial processing systems and to a lesser extent, processing temperature within system, on protein quality of feather meals (FM). Two hog hair meals (HH) were also evaluated. True digestibilities of AA were determined with a 48-h excreta collection assay using cecectomized cockerels. Protein efficiency ratio (PER; grams of gain:grams of CP consumed) was determined with chicks by feeding Met-fortified 15% CP diets containing a FM or HH as the sole source of dietary protein. The six FM samples averaged 88.7% CP, 1.99% Lys, 4.83% Cys, and 0.71% Met on a DM basis. For HH, these values were 92.6, 2.78, 3.76, and 0.85%, respectively. True digestibilities of amino acids and PER of the FM varied among processing systems (e.g., lysine digestibility range was 58 to 72%, PER range was 0.71 to 1.13). Increasing the temperature during processing had no significant effect on protein quality of one FM and one HH. Digestibilities of AA in the FM water-soluble fraction collected after cooking were higher than those in the insoluble fraction. True amino acid digestibility coefficients for FM were higher than those for HH, whereas the PER of several FM were lower than those of HH. The latter response was probably due to the higher Lys content in the HH. The results of this study suggested that type of commercial processing system or conditions can affect the protein quality of FM.

  15. Domain engineering algorithm for practical and effective photon sources.

    PubMed

    Tambasco, J-L; Boes, A; Helt, L G; Steel, M J; Mitchell, A

    2016-08-22

    We introduce a method for shaping the spectral response of nonlinear light sources by tailoring the quasi-phase matching. Our algorithm relies on engineering the poling to accurately trace a generated target signal field amplitude to determine the desired nonlinearity profile. The proposed poling algorithm results in a poling pattern that is more robust to manufacture, as all domain inversions are of equal width. The poling pattern is verified using a nonlinear beam propagation method simulation. This approach is applied to achieve Gaussian-shaped phase matching along a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) crystal in order to generate pure heralded single photons of spectral purity ~0.996-this is highly desirable for heralded single photon quantum optics. PMID:27557240

  16. Assessment of source-specific health effects associated with an unknown number of major sources of multiple air pollutants: a unified Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Sug; Hopke, Philip K; Oh, Man-Suk; Symanski, Elaine; Han, Daikwon; Spiegelman, Clifford H

    2014-07-01

    There has been increasing interest in assessing health effects associated with multiple air pollutants emitted by specific sources. A major difficulty with achieving this goal is that the pollution source profiles are unknown and source-specific exposures cannot be measured directly; rather, they need to be estimated by decomposing ambient measurements of multiple air pollutants. This estimation process, called multivariate receptor modeling, is challenging because of the unknown number of sources and unknown identifiability conditions (model uncertainty). The uncertainty in source-specific exposures (source contributions) as well as uncertainty in the number of major pollution sources and identifiability conditions have been largely ignored in previous studies. A multipollutant approach that can deal with model uncertainty in multivariate receptor models while simultaneously accounting for parameter uncertainty in estimated source-specific exposures in assessment of source-specific health effects is presented in this paper. The methods are applied to daily ambient air measurements of the chemical composition of fine particulate matter ([Formula: see text]), weather data, and counts of cardiovascular deaths from 1995 to 1997 for Phoenix, AZ, USA. Our approach for evaluating source-specific health effects yields not only estimates of source contributions along with their uncertainties and associated health effects estimates but also estimates of model uncertainty (posterior model probabilities) that have been ignored in previous studies. The results from our methods agreed in general with those from the previously conducted workshop/studies on the source apportionment of PM health effects in terms of number of major contributing sources, estimated source profiles, and contributions. However, some of the adverse source-specific health effects identified in the previous studies were not statistically significant in our analysis, which probably resulted because we

  17. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  18. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  19. Effect of protein glycation in the presence or absence of wheat proteins on detection of soybean proteins by commercial ELISA.

    PubMed

    Platteau, C; Cucu, T; De Meulenaer, B; Devreese, B; De Loose, M; Taverniers, I

    2011-02-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is the world's primary provider of protein and oil and is widely used in foodstuffs. However, the use of soybean in foodstuffs might pose a serious threat to allergic consumers since some proteins can cause allergic reactions. To date mostly ELISA methods are used for testing contamination of foodstuffs with soybean. In view of the complexity regarding allergen detection in foodstuffs and appropriate food product labelling, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the Maillard reaction on the detectability of soybean proteins using commercial ELISA kits. Accumulation of protein-bound carbonyls, modification of reactive lysine residues and severe aggregation as a result of incubation with glucose, in the presence or absence of soluble wheat proteins, were recorded. Moreover, detection of soybean proteins by means of three commercial ELISA kits was strongly altered and was highly dependent on the type of kit used. PMID:21253985

  20. The Effect of Malnutrition on Protein Glycosylation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Oznur; Altun, Zekiye; Arslan, Nur; Onvural, Banu; Akan, Pinar; Coker, Canan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of protein energy malnutrition on protein glycosylation by investigating transferrin isoform pattern and its relationship to the degree of malnutrition and the biochemical markers of nutritional status in children. Methods: Forty one children with mild (n=23) and severely/moderately (n=18) acute malnutrition and 29 controls were enrolled in the study. Serum transferrin isoforms were determined by isoelectric focusing electrophoresis. Transferrin, prealbumin, zinc, iron and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were measured using automated analyzers. Findings : Asialotransferrin and disialotransferrin were significantly higher in severely/moderately malnourished patients compared to controls (P=0.04 and P=0.04, respectively). Other transferrin isoform patterns were not different among three groups. Serum IGF-1, transferrin and iron levels of severely/ moderately malnourished group were significantly lower than tose of controls (P=0.001, 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). Serum prealbumin and zinc levels were similar in all three groups. Serum IGF-1, transferrin and iron levels, and all transferrin isoform patterns were not significantly different in mildly malnutrition group from other two groups. Conclusion: The changes in transferrin isoform pattern observed in malnourished patients may indicate that malnutrition is a catabolic state which has effects on glycosylation. PMID:25562020

  1. Effects of C-reactive protein on human lymphocyte responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Vetter, M L; Gewurz, H; Hansen, B; James, K; Baum, L L

    1983-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a trace serum protein that increases markedly in concentration during inflammatory reactions, was recently shown to bind to a subset of human IgG-FcR-bearing peripheral blood lymphocytes in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS). CRP has also been detected on a small percentage of PBL that are associated with NK activity. In the present study, we assessed the effects of CRP and CRP-CPS complexes on a variety of human lymphocyte functions in vitro. CRP and CRP complexes significantly enhanced (generally two to threefold) cell-mediated cytotoxicity, minimally enhanced the MLC reaction, and induced a small but regularly detectable blastogenic response in resting PBL. CRP or CRP-CPS complexes had no effect on mitogen-induced blastogenesis, PWM-induced generation of IgM plaque-forming cells, E-rosette formation, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or NK activity. The basis for the preferential ability of CRP to enhance cytotoxicity responses in vitro is under further investigation.

  2. Effects of polyhydroxy compounds on beetle antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Amornwittawat, Natapol; Wang, Sen; Banatlao, Joseph; Chung, Melody; Velasco, Efrain; Duman, John G.; Wen, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) noncolligatively depress the nonequilibrium freezing point of a solution and produce a difference between the melting and freezing points termed thermal hysteresis (TH). Some low-molecular-mass solutes can affect the TH values. The TH enhancement effects of selected polyhydroxy compounds including polyols and carbohydrates on an AFP from the beetle Dendroides canadensis were systematically investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The number of hydroxyl groups dominates the molar enhancement effectiveness of polyhydroxy compounds having one to five hydroxyl groups. However, the above rule does not apply for polyhydroxy compounds having more than five hydroxyl groups. The most efficient polyhydroxy enhancer identified is trehalose. In a combination of enhancers the strongest enhancer plays the major role in determining the TH enhancement. Mechanistic insights into identification of highly efficient AFP enhancers are discussed. PMID:19038370

  3. [Suppressive effect of protein kinase C inhibitors on tumor cell function via phosphorylation of p53 protein in mice].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Shinozuka, K; Kunitomo, M

    2000-12-01

    We examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the phosphorylation of a p53 protein. Exposure to a protein kinase inhibitor, 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H7), increased the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein, whereas exposure to a tumor promoter phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased it in vivo after incubation with mouse epidermal JB6 cells for 3 h. Exposure to a cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) activator, forskolin, did not decrease the phosphorylation of p53 protein. In the transient transfection/luciferase reporter transactivation assay, H7 slightly increased the mouse double minute (MDM) 2 reporter transactivation activity of the p53 protein after treatment for 24 h, whereas TPA completely blocked it. Exposure to H7 and a specific PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide (bis), dose-dependently reduced the lung-colonizing potential of highly metastatic B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of the wild type p53 protein is inversely related to PKC activation, and also suggest that the phosphorylation of the p53 protein is involved in the function of its transcription factor. The PKC inhibitor may exhibit a potent anti-metastatic effect through the phosphorylation of wild type p53 protein and the activation of its function. PMID:11193387

  4. [Broad beans (Vicia fava, L.) as an alternative source of protein in chick diets].

    PubMed

    Bezares, A; Cuca, M; Avila, E; Velásquez, C

    1980-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the possibility of improving the nutritive value of broad beans (Vicia faba, L.) in poultry diets. In the first experiment, raw and autoclaved (1.0 kg/cm2/15 min) beans, with and without antibiotic supplementation, were studied. The results after 21 days showed no significant differences among treatments in regard to body weight. In feed conversion, however, a significant difference was observed when diets prepared with raw beans were supplemented with 20 ppm of flavomycin. In the second experiment raw and autoclaved beans were supplemented with 0, 10, and 20 ppm of virginiamycin and 200 and 400 ppm of flavomycin to study the effect of these two antibiotics. After 28 days, the results indicated no significant differences with antibiotic supplementation in either raw or autoclaved beans. However, a significant difference (P < 0.05) in body weight was found when beans were autoclaved. In the third experiment, two levels, 31 and 76% of raw and autoclaved beans, were included in the chick diets. The results in body weight, after 28 days, did not show any significant differences between raw and autoclaved beans fed at a 31% level. With the 76% level the autoclaved treatment, however, induced a significantly higher body weight than the diets containing raw beans. PMID:7447590

  5. Training reveals the sources of Stroop and Flanker interference effects.

    PubMed

    Chen, Antao; Tang, Dandan; Chen, Xuefei

    2013-01-01

    In the field of cognitive control, dimensional overlap and pathway automaticity are generally believed to be critical for the generation of congruency effects. However, their specific roles in the generation of congruency effects are unclear. In two experiments, with the 4:2 mapping design, we investigated this issue by examining the training-related effects on congruency effects (the Stroop interference effect and the Flanker interference effect in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively) normally expressed as incongruent minus congruent difference and on their subcomponents (the stimulus interference and response interference). Experiment 1 revealed that the stimulus interference in the Stroop task, wherein the task-relevant (printed color of word) and the task-irrelevant (semantics of word) dimensions of the stimuli were processed in different pathways, was present during early training but was virtually eliminated at the late stage of training. This indicates that the two dimensions overlap at the early stage but separate at the late stage. In contrast, Experiment 2 showed that the response interference in a variant of the Flanker task, wherein the task-relevant (central color word printed in black font) and the task-irrelevant (flanking color words printed in black font) dimensions of the stimuli were processed in the same pathway, was enhanced after training. This indicates that the enhanced automaticity of irrelevant-dimension processing induces stronger response competition, which therefore results in the larger response interference. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that (1) dimensional overlap is necessary for the generation of congruency effects, (2) pathway automaticity can affect the size of congruency effects, and (3) training enhances the degree of automatic processing in a given pathway.

  6. Characterization of the sources of protein-ligand affinity: 1-sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene binding to intestinal fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, W R; Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G

    1996-01-01

    1-Sulfonato-8-(1')anilinonaphthalene (1,8-ANS) was employed as a fluorescent probe of the fatty acid binding site of recombinant rat intestinal fatty acid binding protein (1-FABP). The enhancement of fluorescence upon binding allowed direct determination of binding affinity by fluorescence titration experiments, and measurement of the effects on that affinity of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. Solvent isotope effects were also determined. These data were compared to results from isothermal titration calorimetry. We obtained values for the enthalpy and entropy of this interaction at a variety of temperatures, and hence determined the change in heat capacity of the system consequent upon binding. The ANS-1-FABP is enthalpically driven; above approximately 14 degrees C it is entropically opposed, but below this temperature the entropy makes a positive contribution to the binding. The changes we observe in both enthalpy and entropy of binding with temperature can be derived from the change in heat capacity upon binding by integration, which demonstrates the internal consistency of our results. Bound ANS is displaced by fatty acids and can itself displace fatty acids bound to I-FABP. The binding site for ANS appears to be inside the solvent-containing cavity observed in the x-ray crystal structure, the same cavity occupied by fatty acid. From the fluorescence spectrum and from an inversion of the Debye-Hueckel formula for the activity coefficients as a function of added salt, we inferred that this cavity is fairly polar in character, which is in keeping with inferences drawn from the x-ray structure. The binding affinity of ANS is considered to be a consequence of both electrostatic and conditional hydrophobic effects. We speculate that the observed change in heat capacity is produced mainly by the displacement of strongly hydrogen-bonded waters from the protein cavity. PMID:8770188

  7. Effect of bile diversion on satiety and fat absorption from liquid and solid dietary sources

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, J.E.; Gu, Y.G.; Meyer, J.H.

    1988-12-01

    In previous studies, liquid fat has been used to determine the effect of bile diversion on fat absorption. Since protein digests, in addition to bile salts, are capable of solubilizing lipids, we hypothesized that fat incorporated in the protein-rich matrix of solid food would be less sensitive to bile diversion than fat ingested as an oil or liquid. Using (3H)glycerol triether as a nonabsorbable fat recovery marker, we determined how much (14C)triolein was absorbed from solid (chicken liver) and liquid (margarine) dietary sources. After a standard liquid/solid meal with either the chicken liver or margarine labeled, midintestinal chyme was collected for 6 hr, extracted, and counted for 14C and 3H activity. Zero, eighty, or one hundred percent of endogenous bile was diverted. Fat absorption from both chicken liver and margarine was nearly complete by midintestine with 0% diversion and was little affected by diversion of 80% of bile. Complete biliary diversion significantly decreased fat absorption from margarine (87.9 +/- 4.4 to 37.2 +/- 9.2%, P less than 0.05) but reduced (14C)triolein absorption from chicken liver less consistently and insignificantly (78.8 +/- 6.9 to 43.9 +/- 10.6%). These data indicate that fat absorption is not solely dependent on bile and support the hypothesis that fat ingested in a cellular matrix is less dependent on bile than liquid fat. Using these same animals but with the midintestinal cannulas plugged to expose the distal intestine to unabsorbed luminal nutrients, we also demonstrated that bile diversion of an initial meal reduced food consumption at a meal offered 3 hr later.

  8. Examination of the Sources, Characteristics, and Effects of Titan Haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. H.; West, R. A.

    2004-11-01

    Titan's stratospheric haze represents a significant source of opacity across much of Titan's reflectance spectrum. These haze particles, created by the polymerization of complex hydrocarbons and nitriles and subsequent macromolecular nucleation, may act as nuclei for the condensation of clouds in the troposphere and provide opacity that may affect the distribution of chemical constituents and composition of clouds [1]. However, the characteristics of Titan haze are not entirely well understood. We use a chemically-based nucleation profile to investigate Titan's haze properties, including particle size, structure, and refractive index, with a microphysical model [2]. A spherical shell radiative transfer model is applied to resulting haze profiles to examine haze opacity in the context of Voyager and ground-based observations of Titan's albedo. Results will also be discussed in the framework of the Cassini-Huygens mission. [1] E. H. Wilson and S. K. Atreya, J. Geophys. Res., 109, E06002, 2004. [2] A. J. Friedson, et al., Icarus, 158, 389-400, 2002.

  9. Effect of chickpea aqueous extracts, organic extracts, and protein concentrates on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Girón-Calle, Julio; Vioque, Javier; del Mar Yust, María; Pedroche, Justo; Alaiz, Manuel; Millán, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Pulses should be part of a healthy diet, and it is also becoming clear that they have health-promoting effects. Nevertheless, most studies on the bioactive or health-promoting properties of pulses have been carried out using soybeans. We have studied cell growth-regulating properties, which may be responsible for anti-cancer properties, in chickpea seeds. Chickpea seeds are a staple in the traditional diet of many Mediterranean, Asian, and South and Central American countries. In addition, chickpea seeds have industrial applications since they can be used for the preparation of protein concentrates and isolates. The cell lines Caco-2 (epithelial intestinal) and J774 (macrophages) have been exposed to chickpea seed extracts and protein preparations in order to screen the different chickpea fractions for effects on cell growth. Both cell growth-promoting and cell growth-inhibiting effects were found. Most interestingly, a fraction soluble in ethanol and acetone specifically and almost completely inhibited the growth of Caco-2 cells exhibiting a cancerous phenotype. It is concluded that chickpea seeds are a source of bioactive components and deserve further study for their possible anti-cancer effect.

  10. Probing nanoparticle effect in protein-surfactant complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    SANS experiments have been carried to probe the role of anionic silica nanoparticles in the anionic BSA protein-cationic DTAB surfactant complexes. In protein-surfactant complex, surfactant molecules aggregate to form micelle-like clusters along the unfolded polypeptide chains of the protein. The nanoparticle aggregation mediated by oppositely charged protein-surfactant complex coexists with the free protein-surfactant complexes in the nanoparticle-protein-surfactant system. There is rearrangement of micelles in adsorbed protein-surfactant complex on nanoparticles in leading to their (nanoparticle) aggregation. On the other hand, the unfolding of protein in free protein-surfactant complex is found to be significantly enhanced in presence of nanoparticles.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of Current Awareness Sources in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmole, R. F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of several commercial data bases, journal scanning by information scientists, and the impact of private communication are compared in this study. A previously developed technique for measuring the usefulness of commercial data bases is utilized. (21 references) (Author/KE)

  12. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN SOURCE ON CRUDE OIL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of NH4Cl and KNO3 on biodegradation of light Arabian crude oil by an oil-degrading enrichment culture were studied in respirometers. In poorly buffered sea salts medium, the pH decreased dramatically in cultures that contained NH4Cl, b...

  13. On Sources of the Word Length Effect in Young Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagl, Benjamin; Hawelka, Stefan; Wimmer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how letter length, phoneme length, and consonant clusters contribute to the word length effect in 2nd- and 4th-grade children. They read words from three different conditions: In one condition, letter length increased but phoneme length did not due to multiletter graphemes (H"aus"-B"auch"-S"chach"). In…

  14. Feed utilisation of Ethiopian Highland lambs on a basal diet of Eleucine coracana straw and supplemented with variously sourced protein mixed with wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mulat; Tamir, Berhan; Kurtu, Mohammed Y

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of supplementation of a basal diet of Eleucine coracana (finger millet) straw with different protein sources mixed with wheat bran on feed utilisation in Ethiopian Highland lambs. Twenty yearling intact male lambs (14.9 ± 0.30 kg; mean ± SD) were used in a randomised complete block design. Dietary treatments included a basal diet of E. coracana straw ad libitum (T1); basal diet supplemented with a mixture of 222 g noug seed (Guizotia abyssinica) cake (NSC) and 78 g wheat bran (WB) (T2); basal diet with a mixture of 234 g cotton seedcake (CSC) and 66 g WB (T3); and basal diet with a mixture of 5.4 g urea (U) and 294.6 g WB (T4). The supplements were offered at the daily rate of 300 g dry matter (DM) per lamb in two equal portions at 0800 and 1600 hours. Supplementation of Ethiopian Highland lambs on E. coracana straw basal diet with varied protein sources increased (P < 0.01) the total DM, OM and CP intake and improved (P < 0.01) the daily body weight gain and feed conversion efficiency. Lambs in T2, T3 and T4 gained weight at the rate of 22.7, 21.9 and 14.1 g/day, respectively, while lambs on the control diet lost weight at a rate of -24.9 g/day. Supplementation also improved (P < 0.01) the digestibility of DM, OM, CP and NDF of the total diet. It was concluded that supplementation of E. coracana straw with NSC, CSC and U mixed with WB improves feed utilisation, body weight gain and digestibility in Ethiopian Highland lambs.

  15. PLASMOSE - antimicrobial effects of modular atmospheric plasma sources

    PubMed Central

    Ehlbeck, Jörg; Brandenburg, Ronny; von Woedtke, Thomas; Krohmann, Udo; Stieber, Manfred; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The technological potential of non-thermal plasmas for the antimicrobial treatment of heat sensitive materials is well known and has been documented in a great number of research activities, but the realisation of industrial plasma-based decontamination processes remains a great challenge. One of the reasons for this situation is the fact that an antimicrobial treatment process needs to consider all properties of the product to be treated as well as the requirements of the complete procedure, e.g. a reprocessing of a medical instrument. The aim of the BMBF-funded network project PLASMOSE is to demonstrate the applicability of plasma-based processes for the antimicrobial treatment on selected, heat sensitive products. Modular and selective plasma sources, driven at atmospheric pressure are used. This basic approach shall combine the technological advantages of atmospheric pressure plasmas (avoidance of vacuum devices and batch processing) with the flexibility and handling properties of modular devices. Two different objectives were selected: the outer surface treatment of medical products and the treatment of hollow packaging for pharmaceutical products. The outer surface treatment of medical products, in particular catheters for intracardial electrophysiological studies, is investigated by means of RF-driven plasma jets in argon. Due to its compact design they are predestined for modularisation and can be adapted to nearly any complex 3-dimensional structure as given by the medical products. The realisation of an antimicrobial treatment process of hollow packaging for pharmaceutical products has quite different demands. Such a process is needed to be implemented in in-line filling procedures and to work without additional process gases. The idea is to use an atmospheric air, microwave-driven self propagating discharge. The plasma process is optimized for the decontamination of 200 ml bottles by field simulation studies combined with optical emissions spectroscopy

  16. Effects of dietary protein-energy interrelationships on Holstein steer performance and ruminal bacterial fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Chester-Jones, H; Stern, M D; Metwally, H M; Linn, J G; Ziegler, D M

    1991-12-01

    In vivo and in vitro 3 x 2 factorial experiments were conducted concurrently to evaluate the incorporation of 0, 15, or 30% sugar beet pulp (SBP) as an energy source in diets fed to growing Holstein steers with either soybean meal (SBM) or alcohol-treated, defatted soybean flakes (ATSBF) as primary supplemental protein sources. Three groups of 42 Holstein steers each were fed six different diets from 54 kg initial BW to 320 kg in three experimental periods. There were no overall SBP level x protein source interactions (P greater than .05). Beet pulp level tended to decrease ADG (linear, P = .05) and increase feed/gain (linear, P less than .05) and DMI (quadratic, P less than .05). Each grower diet was used in a substrate for ruminal microbial metabolism in six dual-flow, continuous-culture fermenters. Organic matter and carbohydrate digestion were similar (P greater than .05) among diets. Increasing dietary levels of SBP caused a concomitant increase (P less than .05) in acetate and decrease (P less than .05) in butyrate and isobutyrate concentrations. Beet pulp level x protein source interactions (P less than .05) were observed for CP degradation, ammonia and nonammonia N, and dietary N flow. Crude protein degradation was higher (P less than .05) for the 0% SBP with SBM diet (81.3%) than for the 30% SBP with ATSBF diet (64.4%). Efficiency of bacterial synthesis was similar (P greater than .05) among diets. Results indicated that SBP is an effective dietary energy source for high-energy grower diets at 15 or 30% of the DM but may cause a decrease in some performance traits. There were no nutritional benefits of using ATSBF vs SBM as the supplemental N source.

  17. Effect of Stacked Insecticidal Cry Proteins from Maize Pollen on Nurse Bees (Apis mellifera carnica) and Their Gut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Härtel, Stephan; Näther, Astrid; Dohrmann, Anja B.; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2013-01-01

    Honey bee pollination is a key ecosystem service to nature and agriculture. However, biosafety research on genetically modified crops rarely considers effects on nurse bees from intact colonies, even though they receive and primarily process the largest amount of pollen. The objective of this study was to analyze the response of nurse bees and their gut bacteria to pollen from Bt maize expressing three different insecticidal Cry proteins (Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, and Cry3Bb1). Naturally Cry proteins are produced by bacteria (Bacillus thuringiensis). Colonies of Apis mellifera carnica were kept during anthesis in flight cages on field plots with the Bt maize, two different conventionally bred maize varieties, and without cages, 1-km outside of the experimental maize field to allow ad libitum foraging to mixed pollen sources. During their 10-days life span, the consumption of Bt maize pollen had no effect on their survival rate, body weight and rates of pollen digestion compared to the conventional maize varieties. As indicated by ELISA-quantification of Cry1A.105 and Cry3Bb1, more than 98% of the recombinant proteins were degraded. Bacterial population sizes in the gut were not affected by the genetic modification. Bt-maize, conventional varieties and mixed pollen sources selected for significantly different bacterial communities which were, however, composed of the same dominant members, including Proteobacteria in the midgut and Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. in the hindgut. Surprisingly, Cry proteins from natural sources, most likely B. thuringiensis, were detected in bees with no exposure to Bt maize. The natural occurrence of Cry proteins and the lack of detectable effects on nurse bees and their gut bacteria give no indication for harmful effects of this Bt maize on nurse honey bees. PMID:23533634

  18. Effect of stacked insecticidal Cry proteins from maize pollen on nurse bees (Apis mellifera carnica) and their gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hendriksma, Harmen P; Küting, Meike; Härtel, Stephan; Näther, Astrid; Dohrmann, Anja B; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2013-01-01

    Honey bee pollination is a key ecosystem service to nature and agriculture. However, biosafety research on genetically modified crops rarely considers effects on nurse bees from intact colonies, even though they receive and primarily process the largest amount of pollen. The objective of this study was to analyze the response of nurse bees and their gut bacteria to pollen from Bt maize expressing three different insecticidal Cry proteins (Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, and Cry3Bb1). Naturally Cry proteins are produced by bacteria (Bacillus thuringiensis). Colonies of Apis mellifera carnica were kept during anthesis in flight cages on field plots with the Bt maize, two different conventionally bred maize varieties, and without cages, 1-km outside of the experimental maize field to allow ad libitum foraging to mixed pollen sources. During their 10-days life span, the consumption of Bt maize pollen had no effect on their survival rate, body weight and rates of pollen digestion compared to the conventional maize varieties. As indicated by ELISA-quantification of Cry1A.105 and Cry3Bb1, more than 98% of the recombinant proteins were degraded. Bacterial population sizes in the gut were not affected by the genetic modification. Bt-maize, conventional varieties and mixed pollen sources selected for significantly different bacterial communities which were, however, composed of the same dominant members, including Proteobacteria in the midgut and Lactobacillus sp. and Bifidobacterium sp. in the hindgut. Surprisingly, Cry proteins from natural sources, most likely B. thuringiensis, were detected in bees with no exposure to Bt maize. The natural occurrence of Cry proteins and the lack of detectable effects on nurse bees and their gut bacteria give no indication for harmful effects of this Bt maize on nurse honey bees. PMID:23533634

  19. Regulatory effects of matrix protein variations on influenza virus growth.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, J; Toyoda, T; Nakayama, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    Influenza virus A/WSN/33 forms large plaques (> 3 mm diameter) on MDCK cells whereas A/Aichi/2/68 forms only small plaques (< 1 mm diameter). Fast growing reassortants (AWM), isolated by mixed infection of MDCK cells with these two virus strains in the presence of anti-WSN antibodies, all carried the M gene from WSN. On MDCK cells, these reassortants produced progeny viruses as rapidly as did WSN, and the virus yield was as high as Aichi. The fast-growing reassortants overcame the growth inhibitory effect of lignins. Pulse-labeling experiments at various times after virus infection showed that the reassortant AWM started to synthesize viral proteins earlier than Aichi. Taken together, we conclude that upon infecting MDCK cells, the reassortant viruses advance rapidly into the growth cycle, thereby leading to an elevated level of progeny viruses in the early period of infection. Possible mechanisms of the M gene involvement in the determination of virus growth rate are discussed, in connection with multiple functions of the M proteins. PMID:8257290

  20. Relating the effects of protein type and content in increased-protein cheese pies to consumers' perception of satiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Marcano, J; Varela, P; Fiszman, S

    2015-02-01

    Since proteins have been shown to have the highest satiation-inducing effects of all the macronutrients, increasing the protein level is one of the main strategies for designing foods with enhanced satiating capacity. However, few studies analyze the effect that protein addition has on the texture and flavor characteristics of the target food item to relate it to the expected satiating capacity it elicits. The present work studied cheese pies with three levels of soy and whey proteins. Since the protein level altered the rheological behavior of the batters before baking and the texture of the baked pies, the feasibility of adding several protein levels for obtaining a range of final products was investigated. A check-all-that-apply questionnaire containing 32 sensory and non-sensory characteristics of the samples was given to consumers (n = 131) who also scored the perceived samples' satiating capacity. The results showed that the type and content of protein contributed distinctive sensory characteristics to the samples that could be related to their satiating capacity perception. Harder and drier samples (high protein levels) were perceived as more satiating with less perceptible sweet and milky cheese pie characteristic flavors. Soy contributed an off-flavour. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the interrelation of all these factors, aiding the development of highly palatable solid foods with enhanced satiating capacities.

  1. Effect of dietary protein quality and feeding level on milk secretion and mammary protein synthesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1985-04-01

    Protein synthesis was studied in mammary tissue of rats fed diets deficient in protein quality and/or restricted in food intake throughout gestation and lactation. Diets containing 25% wheat gluten (WG), wheat gluten plus lysine and threonine (WGLT), or casein (C) were pair-fed from conception until day 15 of lactation at 100% or 85% of WG ad libitum consumption (PF100 and PF85, respectively). A seventh group was fed C ad libitum. Rates of protein synthesis were measured in vivo at day 15 of lactation from incorporation o