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Sample records for protein source effects

  1. Effect of protein level and protein source on zinc absorption in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, B.A.; Almgren, A.; Kivistoe, B.C.; Cederblad, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of increasing levels of various protein sources on zinc absorption from a legume-based meal was studied in humans with the use of a radionuclide technique. The meals were extrinsically labelled with 65Zn and absorption was determined from measurements of the whole-body retention of the isotope. The mean fractional zinc absorption for the 13 meals was 24.7 +/- 6.9% and was only influenced by the protein content of the meal to a limited extent (r = 0.45). However, the amount of zinc absorbed from the meals was strongly correlated with both the protein (r = 0.85) and zinc content (r = 0.86): 5.9 +/- 1.7 mumol of zinc was absorbed from the basal bean meal which had the lowest protein content; the addition of low zinc chicken doubled the protein content and increased zinc absorption to 10.3 +/- 2.0 mumol; the addition of zinc-rich beef also doubled the protein content, however, zinc absorption was increased to 15.9 +/- 4.7 mumol. It is concluded that the zinc content of the main protein source of the diet determines the amount of zinc absorbed to a large extent. However, relatively small amounts of animal protein can significantly improve the value of a legume-based meal as a source of zinc.

  2. Investigation of the effects of dietary protein source on copper and zinc bioavailability in rainbow trout

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited research has examined the effects that dietary protein sources have on copper (Cu) and Zinc (Zn) absorption, interactions and utilization in rainbow trout. Therefore, the objective of the first trial was to determine what effect protein source (plant vs. animal based), Cu source (complex vs....

  3. Short term effects on bone quality associated with consumption of soy protein isolate and other dietary protein sources in rapidly growing female rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beneficial effects of soy protein consumption on bone quality have been reported. The effects of other dietary protein sources such as whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) and rice protein isolate (RPI) on bone growth has been less well examined. The current study compared effects of feeding soy protein i...

  4. Effects of grain source, grain processing, and protein degradability on rumen kinetics and microbial protein synthesis in Boer kids.

    PubMed

    Brassard, M-E; Chouinard, P Y; Berthiaume, R; Tremblay, G F; Gervais, R; Martineau, R; Cinq-Mars, D

    2015-11-01

    Microbial protein synthesis in the rumen would be optimized when dietary carbohydrates and proteins have synchronized rates and extent of degradation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of varying ruminal degradation rate of energy and nitrogen sources on intake, nitrogen balance, microbial protein yield, and kinetics of nutrients in the rumen of growing kids. Eight Boer goats (38.2 ± 3.0 kg) were used. The treatments were arranged in a split-plot Latin square design with grain sources (barley or corn) forming the main plots (squares). Grain processing methods and levels of protein degradability formed the subplots in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement for a total of 8 dietary treatments. The grain processing method was rolling for barley and cracking for corn. Levels of protein degradability were obtained by feeding untreated soybean meal (SBM) or heat-treated soybean meal (HSBM). Each experimental period lasted 21 d, consisting of a 10-d adaptation period, a 7-d digestibility determination period, and a 4-d rumen evacuation and sampling period. Kids fed with corn had higher purine derivatives (PD) excretion when coupled with SBM compared with HSBM and the opposite occurred with barley-fed kids ( ≤ 0.01). Unprocessed grain offered with SBM led to higher PD excretion than with HSBM whereas protein degradability had no effect when processed grain was fed ( ≤ 0.03). Results of the current experiment with high-concentrate diets showed that microbial N synthesis could be maximized in goat kids by combining slowly fermented grains (corn or unprocessed grains) with a highly degradable protein supplement (SBM). With barley, a more rapidly fermented grain, a greater microbial N synthesis was observed when supplementing a low-degradable protein (HSBM).

  5. Food protein sources.

    PubMed

    Pirie, N W

    1976-07-01

    Work on food, planned by the U.M. (Use and Management) Section of the U.K. committe, was limited to sources of protein because we agreed that more problems calling for research were likely to arise in getting adequate supplies of protein than of other types of food. Deer meat can be produced on land too rough and exposed for sheep; parts of the work on their metabolism and food requirements necessitated building a mobile laboratory. The manner in which the nutritive value of maize is affected by changes in the ratios in which the component proteins are present, stimulated similar studies on barley and groundnut. There is good quality protein in coconuts and leaves but its use in human food is restricted by the presence of fibre. Methods for separating protein from fibre and other deleterious components were improved. In cooperation with scientists in India and Nigeria, the potential yield of protein-deficient foods. e.g. cassava, were 'ennobled' by growing micro-organisms on them with the addition of a cheap source of nitrogen.

  6. Feed preference in pigs: effect of selected protein, fat, and fiber sources at different inclusion rates.

    PubMed

    Solà-Oriol, D; Roura, E; Torrallardona, D

    2011-10-01

    Three double-choice feeding experiments were conducted to study the effect of different feedstuffs on feed preference in pigs. Fifteen protein sources, 6 fat sources, and 3 fiber sources were evaluated in Exp. 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Pigs were offered a series of double choices between a common reference diet and the diet with the ingredient under evaluation. The reference diet contained a soybean meal product with 56% CP (SBM-56), sunflower oil, and wheat bran, which were considered as the feedstuffs of reference for the protein, fat, and fiber sources, respectively. Preference, expressed as percentage of the tested diet to total feed intake, was affected by feedstuff nature and by its inclusion rate. In Exp. 1, feeds with fish meal at 50 and 100 g·kg⁻¹, dried porcine hydrolyzed protein at 50 g·kg⁻¹, and lupine, soybean meal with 44% CP, and dried skim milk at 100 g·kg⁻¹ were preferred (P < 0.05) to the reference feed with SBM-56. On the contrary, relative to SBM-56, an avoidance (preference less than 50%) was observed for potato protein at all inclusion rates tested, rapeseed meal and acid milk whey at 100 and 200 g·kg⁻¹, and dried porcine hydrolyzed protein, soybean protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and sunflower meal at 200 g·kg(-1). The storage of dried skim milk, soybean protein concentrate, and potato protein for 10 mo resulted in a reduction (P < 0.001) of their preference values. In Exp. 2, the feed with palm oil (at 30 g·kg⁻¹) was preferred (P < 0.05), whereas feeds with linseed oil (at 30 and 100 g·kg⁻¹) and soybean oil (at 100 g·kg⁻¹) were avoided (P < 0.05) when contrasted with the reference feed with sunflower oil. Finally, in Exp. 3 diets with dehydrated alfalfa and sugar beet pulp at 130 g·kg⁻¹ had a reduced (P < 0.05) preference compared with the reference diet with wheat bran. It is concluded that feedstuff nature, inclusion rate, and freshness affect feed preference in pigs. Feedstuff preferences should be

  7. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L. H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss. PMID:26821042

  8. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Campbell, Wayne W

    2016-01-26

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER) in overweight and obese adults. Subjects were randomly assigned to one protein source and then consumed diets with different quantities of protein (4 weeks each) in a randomized crossover manner. Perceived appetite ratings (free-living and in-lab), TEF, and fasting cardio-metabolic indices were assessed at the end of each 4-week period. Protein source and quantity did not affect TEF, hunger, or desire to eat, other than a modestly higher daily composite fullness rating with 30% vs. 10% protein diet (p = 0.03). While the 20% and 30% protein diets reduced cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and APO-B vs. 10% protein (p < 0.05), protein source did not affect cardio-metabolic indices. In conclusion, diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss.

  9. Effects of Forage Sources on Rumen Fermentation Characteristics, Performance, and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Midlactation Cows

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Hou, Yujie; Yang, Hongbo; Shi, Renhuang; Wu, Caixia; Huo, Yongjiu; Zhao, Guoqi

    2014-01-01

    Eight multiparous Holstein cows (632±12 kg BW; 135±16 DIM) were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design to evaluate the effects of forage sources on rumen fermentation characteristics, performance, and microbial protein (MCP) synthesis. The forage portion of the diets contained alfalfa hay (AH), oat hay (OH), Leymus chinensis (LC), or rice straw (RS) as the primary source of fiber. Diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric, and cows were fed four corn silages based total mixed rations with equivalent nonfiber carbohydrate (NFC) and forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF). Dry matter intake was not affected by the source of dietary forages, ranging from 18.83 to 19.20 kg/d, consequently, milk yield was similar among diets. Because of the numerical differences in milk fat and milk protein concentrations, 4% FCM and ECM yields were unchanged (p>0.05). Mean rumen pH, NH3-N content, and concentrations of volatile fatty acids in the rumen fluid were not affected by the treatments (p>0.05). Dietary treatments did not affect the total tract apparent digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein (p>0.05); however, digestibility of NDF and acid detergent fiber in RS diet was higher compared with AH, OH, and LC diets (p<0.05). Total purine derivative excretion was higher in cows fed AH, OH, and LC diets compared with those fed RS diet (p<0.05), consequently, estimated MCP synthesis was 124.35 g/d higher in cows fed AH diet compared with those fed RS diet (p<0.05). The results indicated that cows fed AH, OH, LC, and RS diets with an equivalent forage NDF and NFC have no unfavourable effect on the ruminal fermentation and productive parameters. PMID:25050001

  10. Effect of different protein sources on growth and carcass traits in growing-finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Shelton, J L; Hemann, M D; Strode, R M; Brashear, G L; Ellis, M; McKeith, F K; Bidner, T D; Southern, L L

    2001-09-01

    Crossbred gilts (n = 180) and barrows (n = 180) from the Louisiana State University (LSU) Agricultural Center and the University of Illinois (UI) were used to compare the effect of soybean meal in swine diets, relative to other protein sources, on growth performance and carcass traits of growing-finishing pigs. Four replications with five pigs each at each location were allotted to nine dietary treatments: soybean meal control (SBM), crystalline AA (corn-AA), extruded soybeans (ESB), canola meal (CAN), peanut meal (PNT), sunflower meal (SFLR), ground peas, meat and bone meal (MBM), and poultry by-product meal (PLTY). The diets were formulated to meet or exceed NRC nutrient requirements and to have equal Lys:ME according to dietary phase and sex. Corn was the grain source in all diets and the protein sources were the sole source of supplemental protein in all diets except when AA were added to meet the requirement. Pigs (three per pen at each location) were killed at an average final BW of 114 kg in the LSU or UI Meat Science Laboratories. Pigs fed SBM had greater (P < 0.05) ADG than pigs fed the corn-AA, CAN, SFLR, MBM, or PLTY and greater (P < 0.05) ADFI relative to pigs fed the corn-AA, ESB, MBM, or PLTY. Gain:feed was decreased (P < 0.05) in pigs fed corn-AA or SFLR but increased (P < 0.05) in pigs fed ESB compared with pigs fed the SBM diet. Loin muscle area was decreased (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the corn-AA or MBM diets compared with pigs fed the SBM diet. Tenth-rib backfat thickness was greater (P < 0.10) in pigs fed corn-AA, peas, or MBM than in those fed SBM. The NPPC percentage acceptable quality lean and kilograms of lean were decreased (P < 0.10) in pigs fed corn-AA, peas, or MBM compared with those fed SBM. Results from this experiment suggest that pigs fed SBM have equal or better growth performance and carcass traits than pigs fed other protein sources.

  11. Effects of glucose and protein sources on bovine embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E; Diez, C

    2000-02-28

    Oviductal factors may be obtained by ultrafiltration of conditioned medium, added to a simple media and used in bovine embryo culture. In this study, we aimed to analyze the development of bovine embryos produced with oviductal factors compared to those cultured in the presence of BSA or serum, the effects of glucose in presence of these protein supplements, and the ability of oviductal factors to support embryo development during the entire culture period. In vitro produced bovine zygotes from slaughterhouse ovaries were cultured in modified-synthetic oviduct fluid (mSOF) alone or supplemented with (1) oviductal factors, (2) BSA and (3) FCS. Oviductal factors showed embryotrophic activity, although with blastocyst rates lower than those in BSA and FCS. Glucose (1.5 mM) added at Day 2 of culture did not affect development in the presence of oviductal factors. The number of cells in expanded blastocysts was unaffected by the presence of glucose or any of the protein supplements used. Both BSA and FCS, respectively, improved blastocyst rates of Day 6 embryos produced with oviductal factors. The effect of oviductal factors was masked by the presence of BSA during the entire culture. FCS promoted an earlier appearance of blastocysts. It is concluded that the effect of glucose on in vitro embryo development depends upon the source of protein. Oviductal factors are not an appropriate supplement for embryos beyond Day 6 of culture in SOF, although blastocyst rates of such embryos may be increased by culturing them in the presence of FCS or BSA.

  12. Distinctive effects of plant protein sources on renal disease progression and associated cardiac hypertrophy in experimental kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Gauthier, Joy; Roy, Manon; Jia, Yong; Li, Huan; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2011-07-01

    Dietary soy protein reduces renal disease progression in a number of renal diseases, suggesting that plant compared with animal proteins may be renoprotective. The inclusion of other plant protein sources could enhance compliance of intervention diets, but the effects of other plant protein sources are not known. Weanling Han:SPRD-cy rats with experimental polycystic kidney disease were given hemp-, pea- and soy protein-based diets compared with the standard AIN 93G diet with casein as the protein source. Kidneys from diseased rats given diets which contained soy or hemp protein compared with casein-based diets were less enlarged, had lower fluid content, smaller cyst volumes, less fibrosis, lower chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) levels and normalized serum creatinine levels. Soy and hemp protein diets also normalized heart size, which was enlarged in diseased compared with normal rats consuming casein. Kidneys from diseased rats given pea protein compared with casein were more enlarged and had higher fluid content and cyst volumes, despite growing better and having lower serum creatinine and renal chemokine receptor 2 levels, and similar levels of renal fibrosis. Not all plant proteins are equally protective in experimental kidney disease and associated cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Effect of Starch Sources and Protein Content on Extruded Aquaculture Feed Containing DDGS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A 3x3 completely randomized design was used to investigate the extrusion cooking and product characteristics of DDGS, protein levels, and various starch sources in a laboratory scale single screw extruder. Cassava, corn, and potato starches with varying levels of DDGS (20, 30, and 40% wb) were extru...

  14. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Plant Compared with Animal Protein Sources on Features of Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chalvon-Demersay, Tristan; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Arfsten, Judith; Egli, Léonie; Gaudichon, Claire; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Tomé, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Dietary protein may play an important role in the prevention of metabolic dysfunctions. However, the way in which the protein source affects these dysfunctions has not been clearly established. The aim of the current systematic review was to compare the impact of plant- and animal-sourced dietary proteins on several features of metabolic syndrome in humans. The PubMed database was searched for both chronic and acute interventional studies, as well as observational studies, in healthy humans or those with metabolic dysfunctions, in which the impact of animal and plant protein intake was compared while using the following variables: cholesterolemia and triglyceridemia, blood pressure, glucose homeostasis, and body composition. Based on data extraction, we observed that soy protein consumption (with isoflavones), but not soy protein alone (without isoflavones) or other plant proteins (pea and lupine proteins, wheat gluten), leads to a 3% greater decrease in both total and LDL cholesterol compared with animal-sourced protein ingestion, especially in individuals with high fasting cholesterol concentrations. This observation was made when animal proteins were provided as a whole diet rather than given supplementally. Some observational studies reported an inverse association between plant protein intake and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but this was not confirmed by intervention studies. Moreover, plant protein (wheat gluten, soy protein) intake as part of a mixed meal resulted in a lower postprandial insulin response than did whey. This systematic review provides some evidence that the intake of soy protein associated with isoflavones may prevent the onset of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, i.e., hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, in humans. However, we were not able to draw any further conclusions from the present work on the positive effects of plant proteins relating to glucose homeostasis and body composition.

  15. Protein turnover, amino acid profile and amino acid flux in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: effects of dietary protein source.

    PubMed

    Mente, Eleni; Coutteau, Peter; Houlihan, Dominic; Davidson, Ian; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2002-10-01

    The effect of dietary protein on protein synthesis and growth of juvenile shrimps Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated using three different diets with equivalent protein content. Protein synthesis was investigated by a flooding dose of tritiated phenylalanine. Survival, specific growth and protein synthesis rates were higher, and protein degradation was lower, in shrimps fed a fish/squid/shrimp meal diet, or a 50% laboratory diet/50% soybean meal variant diet, than in those fed a casein-based diet. The efficiency of retention of synthesized protein as growth was 94% for shrimps fed the fish meal diet, suggesting a very low protein turnover rate; by contrast, the retention of synthesized protein was only 80% for shrimps fed the casein diet. The amino acid profile of the casein diet was poorly correlated with that of the shrimps. 4 h after a single meal the protein synthesis rates increased following an increase in RNA activity. A model was developed for amino acid flux, suggesting that high growth rates involve a reduction in the turnover of proteins, while amino acid loss appears to be high.

  16. Effect of dietary protein sources on production performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaocui; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jing; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; low-gossypol cottonseed meal, LCSM; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on laying performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens. Methods A total of 432 32-wk-old laying hens were randomly divided into 6 treatments with 6 replicates of 12 birds each. The birds were fed diets containing SBM, LCSM100, or DRM100 individually or in combination with an equal amount of crude protein (CP) (LCSM50, DRM50, and LCSM50-DRM50). The experimental diets, which were isocaloric (metabolizable energy, 11.11 MJ/kg) and isonitrogenous (CP, 16.5%), had similar digestible amino acid profile. The feeding trial lasted 12 weeks. Results The daily egg mass was decreased in the LCSM100 and LCSM50-DRM50 groups (p<0.05) in weeks 41 to 44. The LCSM50 group did not affect egg production compared to the SBM group in weeks 41 to 44 (p>0.05) and showed increased yolk color at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Compared to the SBM group, the LCSM100 and LCSM50-DRM50 groups showed decreased albumen weight (p<0.05), CP weight in the albumen (p<0.05) and CP weight in the whole egg (p<0.05) at 44 weeks. Plasma total protein (TP) levels were lower in the LCSM100 group than in the SBM group at 44 weeks (p<0.05); however, TP, albumin, and globulin levels were not significantly different between the LCSM50 group and the SBM group or between the DRM50 group and the SBM group (p>0.05). Conclusion Together, our results suggest that the LCSM100 or DRM100 diets may produce the adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality after feeding for 8 more weeks. The 100.0 g/kg LCSM diet or the148.7 g/kg DRM diet has no adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality. PMID:27608634

  17. Effect of dietary protein sources on production performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaocui; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jing; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; low-gossypol cottonseed meal, LCSM; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on laying performance, egg quality, and plasma parameters of laying hens. A total of 432 32-wk-old laying hens were randomly divided into 6 treatments with 6 replicates of 12 birds each. The birds were fed diets containing SBM, LCSM100, or DRM100 individually or in combination with an equal amount of crude protein (CP) (LCSM50, DRM50, and LCSM50-DRM50). The experimental diets, which were isocaloric (metabolizable energy, 11.11 MJ/kg) and isonitrogenous (CP, 16.5%), had similar digestible amino acid profile. The feeding trial lasted 12 weeks. The daily egg mass was decreased in the LCSM100 and LCSM50-DRM50 groups (p<0.05) in weeks 41 to 44. The LCSM50 group did not affect egg production compared to the SBM group in weeks 41 to 44 (p>0.05) and showed increased yolk color at the end of the trial (p<0.05). Compared to the SBM group, the LCSM100 and LCSM50-DRM50 groups showed decreased albumen weight (p<0.05), CP weight in the albumen (p<0.05) and CP weight in the whole egg (p<0.05) at 44 weeks. Plasma total protein (TP) levels were lower in the LCSM100 group than in the SBM group at 44 weeks (p<0.05); however, TP, albumin, and globulin levels were not significantly different between the LCSM50 group and the SBM group or between the DRM50 group and the SBM group (p>0.05). Together, our results suggest that the LCSM100 or DRM100 diets may produce the adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality after feeding for 8 more weeks. The 100.0 g/kg LCSM diet or the148.7 g/kg DRM diet has no adverse effects on laying performance and egg quality.

  18. Dietary starch source and protein degradability in diets containing sucrose: effects on ruminal measures and proposed mechanism for degradable protein effects.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    A feeding study was conducted to evaluate ruminal effects of starch source (STA) and rumen-degradable dietary protein (RDP) in diets with added sucrose. The experimental design was an incomplete Latin square with three 21-d periods, 8 ruminally cannulated lactating cows, and a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments. Treatments were STA (dry ground corn or high-moisture corn) as more slowly and more rapidly fermenting starch sources, respectively, and relative amount of RDP (+RDP: added protein from soybean meal; -RDP: heat-treated expeller soybean product partially substituted for soybean meal). Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and similar in starch and neutral detergent fiber concentrations. Dry matter (DM) intake was 1 kg greater with +RDP compared with -RDP diets. For ruminal digesta measures made 2 h postfeeding, weight of digesta DM was unaffected by treatment; total kilograms of wet digesta and kilograms of liquid tended to be greater with +RDP than with -RDP, and no effect was observed of STA × RDP. Digesta DM percentage was greater with -RDP than with +RDP. At 2 h postfeeding, ruminal pool sizes (mol) of lactate and total AA were larger and those of total organic acids (OA) and ammonia tended to be larger with +RDP than with -RDP; no effects of STA or STA × RDP were detected. Rumen-degradable protein effects on lactate and OA pool sizes may be due to a protein-mediated increase in fermentation rate of carbohydrate. Organic acid concentrations at 2 h postfeeding did not show the same response pattern or significance as the pool size data; high-moisture corn tended to be greater than dry ground corn and no effect was observed for RDP or STA × RDP. Concentration and pool size for OA were more weakly correlated [coefficient of determination (R(2)) = 0.66] than was the case for other ruminal analytes (R(2) >0.80). Organic acid pool size and kilograms of digesta liquid were strongly correlated (R(2) = 0.79), whereas concentration and kilograms of

  19. Effect of source and level of protein supplementation on rice straw utilization by Brahman steers.

    PubMed

    McCann, J C; Sawyer, J E; Wickersham, T A

    2017-01-01

    Seven ruminally cannulated Brahman steers were used in a 7 × 4 incomplete block design to determine the effects of cottonseed meal (CSM; 43.9% CP, 82.9% RDP) or dried distillers' grains (DDG; 27.5% CP, 43.6% RDP) supplementation on rice straw utilization (47 g/kg CP and 681 g/kg NDF). Treatments consisted of a negative control receiving no supplement (control) and 3 levels (60, 120, and 180 mg N/kg BW) of either CSM or DDG. Periods were 14 d with 8 d for adaptation and 6 d for data collection. Steers had ad libitum access to rice straw and were fed supplements daily. Increased supplementation resulted in a linear increase ( ≤ 0.06) in forage OM intake from 13.5 g/kg BW by controls to 15.5 and 16.1 g/kg BW for 180 mg N/kg BW of DDG and CSM, respectively. No differences between sources were observed ( = 0.84). Total digestible OM intake was increased by supplementation (linear, < 0.01) from 6.9 g/kg BW (control) to 10.0 and 11.2 g/kg BW for 180 mg N/kg BW of CSM and DDG, respectively. A greater response was observed for DDG ( = 0.05) due to greater provision of supplement (g DM/d) to achieve isonitrogenous treatment levels. Total tract OM digestion tended to increase with DDG supplementation (linear, = 0.08) but not CSM supplementation ( = 0.19). Both supplements did not affect NDF digestion ( > 0.40) or calculated forage NDF digestibility ( > 0.40). Ruminal ammonia concentrations peaked 4 h after supplementation/feeding with the greatest concentration (4.0 m) observed for 180 mg N/kg BW of CSM and the lowest concentration at 4 h observed in the control (0.8 m). Provision of CSM resulted in a linear increase ( < 0.01) in average ruminal ammonia, in contrast to the quadratic response ( = 0.02) observed with DDG supplementation. Total VFA production linearly increased for both CSM and DDG supplementation ( = 0.09 and = 0.01, respectively). Protein supplements containing high and low levels of RDP were effective at improving intake and utilization of rice straw by

  20. Effects of raw material source, ash content, and assay length on protein efficiency ratio and net protein ratio values for animal protein meals.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M L; Parsons, C M

    1997-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the protein efficiency ratio (PER) and net protein ratio (NPR) of meat and bone meals containing 24 or 34% ash, poultry by-product meals containing 7 or 16% ash, lamb meals containing 15 or 24% ash, a lamb meal analog containing 19% ash (mixture of lamb meal and turkey meal), and two meat and bone meals processed at either a low or a high temperature. The PER values (weight gain per unit of protein intake) and NPR values (PER corrected for maintenance) were determined using a chick growth assay in which chicks were fed a N-free diet or 10% CP diets containing one of the animal meals as the only source of dietary protein for 6, 9, or 13 d. The PER of the lamb meal analog was greater (P < 0.05) than that of the other meals, and the PER values of the poultry by-product meals were generally greater than those for the lamb and meat and bone meals. The PER values for the lamb meals were higher than those for most of the meat and bone meals. The PER of the 34% ash meat and bone meal was lower (P < 0.05) than the PER of the 24% ash meat and bone meal (1.03 vs 1.63, respectively, at 9 d). Further experiments showed that the lower PER of the high ash meat and bone meal was not due to its high Ca and P content. Ash content had no significant effect on PER of the poultry by-product and lamb meals. The PER of the low-temperature meat and bone meal was higher (P < 0.05) than the PER of the high-temperature meat and bone meal. The relative differences in NPR values among the animal meals were similar to those observed for PER values. Decreasing the length of the assay from 13 to 6 d increased the PER and NPR of all meals but had little or no effect on the ranking of values among meals. The results of this study indicated that PER and NPR values of animal meals were influenced by raw material source, and that ash content and processing temperature affected the PER and NPR of meat and bone meal. The results also indicated that PER and NPR

  1. Effect of supplemental protein source during the winter on pre- and postpartum glucose metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circulating serum glucose concentrations as well as glucose utilization have been shown to be affected by forage quality. Supplemental protein provided to grazing range cows while consuming low quality forage may improve glucose metabolism. The objective of our study was to determine the effects of ...

  2. The effect of dietary protein and lipid source on dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, F.T.; Lellis, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary protein and lipid source on dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout. Seven diets were each fed to four replicate lots of 300 first-feeding fry cultured in 75 1 aluminum troughs for 8 weeks. Two basal diets were manufactured with approximately equal nutrient content, one using krill and squid meals and the other anchovy meal as the primary protein-containing ingredients. The meals used to manufacture the diets were separated into two fractions: lipid (ether-extractable); and protein/ash (non-ether-extractable) using a large soxhlet. The fractions were then recombined to create two additional diets; one containing anchovy protein/ash with krill/squid lipid, the other krill/squid protein/ash with fish lipid. A fifth diet recombined krill/squid protein/ash with krill/squid lipid to evaluate effects of the extraction process. Two additional treatments included a diet with a portion of the krill meal replaced by poultry by-product meal, and the basal anchovy meal diet supplemented with sodium, magnesium, and copper. Fish consuming diets containing anchovy meal as the primary protein source gained more weight (P < 0.05) than fish consuming krill/squid meal-based diets. Dorsal fin index (DFI, measured as mean dorsal fin height x 100/total fish length) was greater (P < 0.05) for fish consuming diets containing krill/squid meal protein/ash fraction (DFI = 9.9%-10.0%) than for fish consuming diets containing anchovy meal protein/ash fraction (DFI = 4.9%-5.3%), regardless of lipid source. Supplementation of the anchovy meal diet with sodium, magnesium, and copper improved (P < 0.05) DFI by approximately 20%, but not to the level supported by the krill/squid meal protein/ash fraction diets. The cost of the krill meal diet was reduced by inclusion of poultry by-product meal without affecting dorsal fin condition. These data indicate that the dietary agent contributing to dorsal fin erosion in rainbow trout is not present in

  3. Effects of dietary forage sources on rumen microbial protein synthesis and milk performance in early lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Fu, Y; Wang, B; Wang, C; Ye, J A; Wu, Y M; Liu, J-X

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dietary forage sources on milk performance, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and N utilization in early lactation dairy cows. Twelve primiparous Chinese Holstein dairy cows (45 ± 6.0 DIM) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Diets were isonitrogenous and isocaloric, with a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 45:55 [dry matter (DM) basis] and contained similar concentrate mixtures. Different forage sources were then added (on a DM basis): 21% corn silage, 19% corn stover, and 5% alfalfa hay (CS); 19% corn silage, 21% Chinese wild rye hay and 5% alfalfa hay (CWR); or 19% corn silage, 9% Chinese wild rye hay, and 17% alfalfa hay (AH). Each period lasted for 21 d, with the first 14 d for an adaptation period. Dry matter intake was not affected by the source of dietary forage. Milk yield was higher for cows fed AH than those fed CS, with an intermediate value for CWR. Milk protein content was higher in the cows fed AH compared with CWR (3.02 vs. 2.92%), with CS (2.95%) at an intermediate position. The contents of milk fat and lactose were not different among the treatments. However, milk efficiency (milk yield/DM intake) was higher for cows fed AH than those fed CS, with those fed CWR intermediate. Cows fed AH had higher microbial protein yield and metabolizable protein than those fed CS or CWR. The concentrations of urea N in the urine, blood, and milk were decreased for cows fed AH, indicating an increased N conversion. The results indicated that corn stover could replace Chinese wild rye grass in the diets for lactating cows and that a high proportion of alfalfa hay in the diet is beneficial for milk protein production by increasing microbial protein yield. This can be attributed to the improving the supply of rumen-available energy.

  4. Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Because the source of protein may play a role in its satiating effect, we investigated the effect of different proteins on satiation and short-term satiety. Methods Two randomized single-blind cross-over studies were completed. In the first study, we investigated the effect of a preload containing 20 g of casein, whey, pea protein, egg albumin or maltodextrin vs. water control on food intake 30 min later in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 4 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.4 kg/m2). Subjective appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales at 10 min intervals after the preload. Capillary blood glucose was measured every 30 min during 2 hrs before and after the ad libitum meal. In the second study, we compared the effect of 20 g of casein, pea protein or whey vs. water control on satiation in 32 male volunteers (25 ± 0.6 yrs, BMI 24 ± 0.5 kg/m2). The preload was consumed as a starter during an ad libitum meal and food intake was measured. The preloads in both studies were in the form of a beverage. Results In the first study, food intake was significantly lower only after casein and pea protein compared to water control (P = 0.02; 0.04 respectively). Caloric compensation was 110, 103, 62, 56 and 51% after casein, pea protein, whey, albumin and maltodextrin, respectively. Feelings of satiety were significantly higher after casein and pea protein compared to other preloads (P < 0.05). Blood glucose response to the meal was significantly lower when whey protein was consumed as a preload compared to other groups (P < 0.001). In the second study, results showed no difference between preloads on ad libitum intake. Total intake was significantly higher after caloric preloads compared to water control (P < 0.05). Conclusion Casein and pea protein showed a stronger effect on food intake compared to whey when consumed as a preload. However, consuming the protein preload as a starter of a meal decreased its impact on food intake as opposed to consuming it 30 min before the meal

  5. Protective effect of soybeans as protein source in the diet against cadmium-aorta redox and morphological alteration.

    PubMed

    Pérez Díaz, Matías F F; Acosta, Mariano; Mohamed, Fabián H; Ferramola, Mariana L; Oliveros, Liliana B; Gimenez, María S

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of cadmium exposition on thoracic aorta redox status and morphology, and the putative protective effect of soybeans in the diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups: 3 fed with a diet containing casein and 3 containing soybeans, as protein source. Within each protein group, one was given tap water (control) and the other two tap water containing 15 and 100 ppm of Cd(2+), respectively, for two months. In rats fed with casein diet, 15 ppm of Cd induced an increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and of the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, which were even higher with 100 ppm of Cd(2+), in aorta. Also, 100 ppm Cd(2+) exposure increased superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) activity; CAT, GPX, SOD, Nrf2 and metallothioneine II mRNA expressions and CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein levels, compared with control. Aorta endothelial and cytoplasmic alterations were observed. However, with the soybeans diet, 15 and 100 ppm of Cd(2+) did not modify TBARS levels; CAT, GPX and Nrf2 mRNA expressions; CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein; and the aorta morphology, compared with control. The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes and protects against morphological alterations induced, in a dose-dependent way, by Cd in aorta.

  6. Effect of legume grains as a source of dietary protein on the quality of organic lamb meat.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Adriana; Tornambè, Gabriele; Di Grigoli, Antonino; Genna, Vincenzo; Bellina, Vincenzo; Di Miceli, Giuseppe; Giambalvo, Dario

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects on lamb growth, carcass traits and meat quality of replacing conventional soybean meal in the diet with alternative legume grains. Twenty-eight male lambs of Comisana breed weighing 16.9 ± 2.7 kg at weaning (66 ± 6 days old) were assigned to one of four diets. Until slaughter at 129 ± 6 days of age, each group received ad libitum pelleted alfalfa hay and concentrates differing in the source of protein: chickpea, faba bean, pea or soybean meal. Lambs fed chickpea showed higher dry matter and protein intakes from concentrate than those fed soybean. Lambs' growth, carcass weight and net dressing percentage did not vary by protein source, although chickpea lambs had more perirenal and pelvic fat than those in the soybean group. Diet did not affect chemical composition, colour, thawing and cooking losses, tenderness, and sensory properties of meat. Chickpea increased trans-vaccenic and linoleic acid, and chickpea and faba bean increased the isomers of conjugated linoleic acid. Legume grains can completely replace soybean meal in concentrate, resulting in lamb carcasses and meat of comparable quality. Chickpea leads to an increase in feed intake of lambs and in fat depots in the carcass, and a more beneficial fatty acid profile. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Comparable effects of breakfast meals varying in protein source on appetite and subsequent energy intake in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Dougkas, Anestis; Östman, Elin

    2017-02-27

    The satiating effect of animal vs plant proteins remains unknown. The present study examined the effects of breakfasts containing animal proteins [milk (AP)], a blend of plant proteins [oat, pea and potato (VP)] or 50:50 mixture of the two (MP) compared with a carbohydrate-rich meal (CHO) on appetite, energy intake (EI) and metabolic measures. A total of 28 males [mean age 27.4 (±SD 4.2) years, BMI 23.4 (±2.1) kg/m(2)] consumed three isoenergetic (1674 kJ) rice puddings matched for energy density and macronutrient content as breakfast (25% E from protein) in a single-blind, randomised, cross over design. Appetite ratings and blood samples were collected and assessed at baseline and every 30 and 60 min, respectively, until an ad libitum test meal was served 3.5 h later. Free-living appetite was recorded hourly and EI in weighed food records for the remainder of the day. No differences in subjective appetite ratings were observed after consumption of the AP, VP and MP. Furthermore, there were no differences between the AP, VP, MP and CHO breakfasts in ad libitum EI and self-reported EI during the remainder of the day. Although insulin metabolism was not affected, CHO induced a higher glucose response (P = 0.001) and total amino acids concentration was in the order of AP = MP > VP > CHO breakfast (P = 0.001). Manipulating the protein source of foods consumed as breakfast, elicited comparable effects on appetite and EI at both laboratory and free-living environment in healthy men.

  8. Chloroplasts as a nitric oxide cellular source. Effect of reactive nitrogen species on chloroplastic lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Jasid, Sebastián; Simontacchi, Marcela; Bartoli, Carlos G; Puntarulo, Susana

    2006-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generation by soybean (Glycine max var. ADM 4800) chloroplasts was studied as an endogenous product assessed by the electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping technique. Nitrite and l-arginine (Arg) are substrates for enzymatic activities considered to be the possible sources of NO in plants. Soybean chloroplasts showed a NO production of 3.2 +/- 0.2 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein in the presence of 1 mm NaNO(2). Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea resulted in a lower rate (1.21 +/- 0.04 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein) of NO generation. Chloroplasts incubated with 1 mm Arg showed NO production of 0.76 +/- 0.04 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein that was not affected either by omission of Ca(2+) or by supplementation with Ca(2+) and calmodulin to the incubation medium. This production was inhibited when chloroplasts were incubated in the presence of NO synthase inhibitors N(omega)-nitro-l-Arg methyl ester hydrochloride and N(omega)-nitro-l-Arg. In vitro exposure of chloroplasts to an NO donor (250 mum S-nitrosoglutathione) decreased lipid radical content in membranes by 29%; however, incubation in the presence of 25 mum peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) led to an increase in lipid-derived radicals (34%). The effect of ONOO(-) on protein oxidation was determined by western blotting, showing an increase in carbonyl content either in stroma or thylakoid proteins as compared to controls. Moreover, ONOO(-) treatment significantly affected both O(2) evolution and chlorophyll fluorescence in thylakoids. Data reported here suggest that NO is an endogenous metabolite in soybean chloroplasts and that reactive nitrogen species could exert either antioxidant or prooxidant effects on chloroplast macromolecules.

  9. Nitrogen utilization in growing lambs: effects of grain (starch) and protein sources with various rates of ruminal degradation.

    PubMed

    Matras, J; Bartle, S J; Preston, R L

    1991-01-01

    The potential interaction between grain (starch) and protein sources with varying ruminal degradation rates on N utilization in growing lambs was evaluated. Three grain sources with varying ruminal degradation rates, (barley greater than steam-flaked sorghum [SFSG] greater than dry-rolled sorghum [DRSG]) and three protein sources (urea greater than a 50:25:25 mixture of urea: blood meal:corn gluten meal [N basis, U/BC] greater than 50:50 mixture of meal:corn gluten meal [N basis, BC]), were evaluated in a 3 x 3 factorial arrangement. Supplemental protein sources provided 33% of dietary N (CP = 11.0%). For each grain-protein combination, a 3 x 3 Latin square metabolism trial was conducted using two sets of three lambs and three periods. Within-square treatments were 1.4, 1.7 and 2.0 times maintenance intake levels. No interactions were observed (P greater than .2) between dietary treatments and intake level. Grain sources did not differ (P greater than .2) in N balance or the proportion of N retained. Lambs fed urea diets retained less N (3.6 vs 4.2 and 4.1 g/d for urea vs U/BC and BC, respectively; linear, P = .07; quadratic, P = .12) and utilized N less efficiently (43.1 vs 51.9 and 52.5%, respectively; linear, P less than .001; quadratic, P = .10) than lambs fed BC diets. The grain x protein interaction was significant for most variables. Nitrogen utilization was most efficient (24 to 27% of N intake retained) when rapidly degraded sources (barley and urea) and slowly degraded sources (sorghum and BC) were fed together or when U/BC was the supplemental protein source (interaction P less than .08). An advantage was found for selection of starch and protein sources with similar ruminal degradation rates.

  10. Protective effect of soybeans as protein source in the diet against cadmium-aorta redox and morphological alteration

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez Díaz, Matías F.F.; Acosta, Mariano; Mohamed, Fabián H.; Ferramola, Mariana L.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gimenez, María S.

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of cadmium exposition on thoracic aorta redox status and morphology, and the putative protective effect of soybeans in the diet. Male Wistar rats were separated into 6 groups: 3 fed with a diet containing casein and 3 containing soybeans, as protein source. Within each protein group, one was given tap water (control) and the other two tap water containing 15 and 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}, respectively, for two months. In rats fed with casein diet, 15 ppm of Cd induced an increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and of the catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, which were even higher with 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+}, in aorta. Also, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} exposure increased superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) activity; CAT, GPX, SOD, Nrf2 and metallothioneine II mRNA expressions and CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein levels, compared with control. Aorta endothelial and cytoplasmic alterations were observed. However, with the soybeans diet, 15 and 100 ppm of Cd{sup 2+} did not modify TBARS levels; CAT, GPX and Nrf2 mRNA expressions; CAT, GPx and NOX-2 protein; and the aorta morphology, compared with control. The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes and protects against morphological alterations induced, in a dose-dependent way, by Cd in aorta. - Highlights: • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} in drinking water induces oxidative stress in aorta. • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} increases Nrf2, MT II and NOX2 expressions in aorta. • Under casein diet, 100 ppm Cd{sup 2+} induces morphological changes in rat aorta. • The soybean diet attenuates the redox changes induced by Cd in rat aorta. • The soybean diet attenuates morphological alterations induced by Cd in rat aorta.

  11. Effects of protein sources on growth, immunity and antioxidant capacity of juvenile pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chuangye; Hao, Ruijuan; Deng, Yuewen; Liao, Yongshan; Wang, Qingheng; Sun, Ruijiao; Jiao, Yu; Du, Xiaodong

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we formulated five diets, namely, P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5, with Chlorella sp. powder, Spirulina platensis powder, yeast powder, soybean meal and corn gluten, respectively, as major protein sources. A feeding experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of formulated diets on the growth performance, immunity and antioxidant and biomineralization capacity of juvenile pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata martensii). In the experiments, the five groups were separately fed with P1, P2, P3, P4 and P5 diets. After 45 days of feeding, pearl oysters fed on P1, P2, P3 and P4 diets showed significantly higher absolute growth rate and protease and amylase activities than those fed on P5 diet (P < 0.05). Moreover, pearl oysters fed on P1, P2, P3 and P4 diets exhibited significantly higher activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (P < 0.05). Significantly higher expression levels of SOD, GPx, CAT, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP90, nacrein, pif177 and pearlin mRNA were observed in pearl oysters fed on P1, P2, P3 and P4 diets relative to those fed on P5 (P < 0.05). Results suggested the suitability of Chlorella sp. powder, S. platensis powder, yeast powder and soybean meal as protein sources for development of formulated diets for pearl oyster P. f. martensii. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Protein Complex Identification by Integrating Protein-Protein Interaction Evidence from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bo; Lin, Hongfei; Chen, Yang; Yang, Zhihao; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding protein complexes is important for understanding the science of cellular organization and function. Many computational methods have been developed to identify protein complexes from experimentally obtained protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, interaction information obtained experimentally can be unreliable and incomplete. Reconstructing these PPI networks with PPI evidences from other sources can improve protein complex identification. Results We combined PPI information from 6 different sources and obtained a reconstructed PPI network for yeast through machine learning. Some popular protein complex identification methods were then applied to detect yeast protein complexes using the new PPI networks. Our evaluation indicates that protein complex identification algorithms using the reconstructed PPI network significantly outperform ones on experimentally verified PPI networks. Conclusions We conclude that incorporating PPI information from other sources can improve the effectiveness of protein complex identification. PMID:24386289

  13. Effects of protein sources on concentrations of hydrogen sulphide in the rumen headspace gas of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, A J M; Cabrita, A R J; Pinho, L A O; Kim, E J; Dewhurst, R J

    2013-01-01

    Two Latin square design experiments investigated the relationship between hydrogen sulphide concentration in the rumen headspace gas of dairy cows and the early stages of protein degradation in the rumen. In Expt 1, three protein sources differing in rumen N (nitrogen) degradability (maize gluten feed (MGF); sunflower meal (SFM); and soyabean meal (SBM)) were used, whereas in Expt 2 four different batches of the same feed (MGF) differing in colour (CIE L*, a*, b* (CIELAB) scale) were used. After allowing the concentration of hydrogen sulphide in rumen gas to decline close to zero, a fixed amount of protein sources was offered to cows and the concentrations of hydrogen sulphide were recorded in rumen headspace gas at 30-min intervals. In Expt 1, the concentration of hydrogen sulphide showed considerable variation between protein sources, with MGF having the highest concentration followed by SFM and SBM resulting in very low concentrations. The N wash losses (zero time measurements with nylon bags) ranked the feeds in the same way, from MGF (highest; 61%) to SBM (lowest; 26%). There were marked differences in the degradation of cystine and methionine between protein sources, although the degradation of cystine was always higher than for methionine. MGF (Expt 2) led to increased concentrations of hydrogen sulphide, with peak concentrations achieved between 1 and 2 h after feeding. The concentrations of hydrogen sulphide were higher for MGF1, intermediate for MGF2 and lower for MGF3 and MGF4, agreeing with colour scale. Differences in the early stages of dietary sulphur degradation corresponded with differences in hydrogen sulphide concentrations in rumen gas. The results suggest that hydrogen sulphide concentrations in the rumen headspace gas could be useful to evaluate nutritional parameters not measured by the in sacco technique, contributing to a better understanding of the response of dairy cows to different protein supplements.

  14. Effect of dietary energy source and level on nutrient digestibility, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and milk performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Q; Zhang, Y D; Zhao, M; Zhang, T; Zhu, D; Bu, D P; Wang, J Q

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary energy source and level on intake, digestion, rumen microbial protein synthesis, and milk production in lactating dairy cows, using corn stover as a forage source. Eight multiparous Holstein cows, 4 of which were fitted with rumen cannulas, were evaluated in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design, with each period lasting 21 d. The cows were randomly assigned into 4 treatment groups: low-energy (LE) ground corn (GC), LE steam-flaked corn (SFC), high-energy (HE) GC, and HE SFC. Changes to ruminal energy degradation rates were induced by feeding the cows diets of either finely ground corn or SFC as components of diets with the same total energy level. Milk yield, milk protein content and yield, and milk lactose yield all increased in response to higher levels of dietary energy, whereas contents of milk fat and lactose were unaffected. Cows fed HE diets had a higher crude microbial protein yield and total-tract apparent digestibility than those receiving LE diets. Milk yield, milk protein yield, and microbial protein yield were also higher when SFC replaced GC as the main energy source for lactating cows fed LE diets. These results suggest that an increased dietary energy level and ruminal degradation rate are beneficial to milk protein production, which we suggest is due to increased yields of microbial proteins, when cows are fed corn stover as a dietary forage source.

  15. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Kevin B; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-07-23

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes. However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on type 2 diabetes risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or type 2 diabetes risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars-all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or type 2 diabetes risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product's glucoregulatory effects.

  16. Emerging Evidence for the Importance of Dietary Protein Source on Glucoregulatory Markers and Type 2 Diabetes: Different Effects of Dairy, Meat, Fish, Egg, and Plant Protein Foods

    PubMed Central

    Comerford, Kevin B.; Pasin, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies provide evidence that a higher intake of protein from plant-based foods and certain animal-based foods is associated with a lower risk for type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few distinguishable differences between the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in plant-based foods, and it is likely their numerous non-protein components (e.g., fibers and phytochemicals) that drive the relationship with T2DM risk reduction. Conversely, the glucoregulatory qualities of the proteins in animal-based foods are extremely divergent, with a higher intake of certain animal-based protein foods showing negative effects, and others showing neutral or positive effects on T2DM risk. Among the various types of animal-based protein foods, a higher intake of dairy products (such as milk, yogurt, cheese and whey protein) consistently shows a beneficial relationship with glucose regulation and/or T2DM risk reduction. Intervention studies provide evidence that dairy proteins have more potent effects on insulin and incretin secretion compared to other commonly consumed animal proteins. In addition to their protein components, such as insulinogenic amino acids and bioactive peptides, dairy products also contain a food matrix rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium, trans-palmitoleic fatty acids, and low-glycemic index sugars—all of which have been shown to have beneficial effects on aspects of glucose control, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and/or T2DM risk. Furthermore, fermentation and fortification of dairy products with probiotics and vitamin D may improve a dairy product’s glucoregulatory effects. PMID:27455320

  17. Effects of carbon sources and plant protein levels in a biofloc system on growth performance, and the immune and antioxidant status of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Abdallah Tageldien; Esteban, Maria Ángeles

    2017-05-01

    The efficacy of different biofloc treatments (BFTs) to compensate for a reduction in dietary protein level under zero-water exchange systems was studied during a 10 weeks experiment, assessing the effect on water quality, growth, immune and antioxidant status of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) fingerlings. Six groups were established and fed the same plant-based feed containing 20 or 30% crude protein: two groups in clear water conditions with no added carbon source, two biofloc groups given a wheat milling by-product (WMB) as additional carbon source and two biofloc groups given rice bran (RB). The results showed that biofloc volume was higher when WMB was used as carbon source. The highest growth performance were obtained with the biofloc system and the higher dietary protein level. Fish fed 20% crude protein and stocked in WMB biofloc significantly outperformed the fish fed 30% crude protein and stocked in clear water. Significant improvements in hematocrit, white blood cells, lymphocytes, plasma proteins, and humoral (immunoglobulin, lysozyme, myeloperoxidase and ACH50) and cellular (phagocytosis activity and respiratory burst) immune parameters were observed in all BFT fish. BFT also increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Moreover, the fish fed 20% dietary protein and reared in both biofloc conditions showed equal or superior levels of the immunological criteria to fish fed 30% protein in clear water conditions. In conclusion, using WMB as carbon source could make up for a reduction in dietary protein levels of 10% and improve growth performance, and the immune and antioxidant status of O. niloticus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of nitrogen source in high-concentrate, low-protein beef cattle diets on microbial fermentation studied in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Devant, M; Ferret, A; Calsamiglia, S; Casals, R; Gasa, J

    2001-07-01

    In Exp. 1, four Holstein heifers (112+/-5.5 kg BW) fitted with ruminal cannulas were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square to evaluate the effects of N source on ruminal fermentation and urinary excretion of purine derivatives. A 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used; the factors were the type of protein source (soybean meal, SBM, vs a 50:50 mixture of fish meal and corn gluten meal, FMCGM) and the partial substitution of protein source by urea (with vs without). Heifers were allowed to consume concentrate and barley straw on an ad libitum basis. Barley straw:concentrate ratio (12:88) and average ruminal pH (6.25) were not affected (P > 0.05) by treatment. Ruminal NH3 N concentration and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were not affected (P > 0.05) by supplemental N source. In situ CP degradability of supplemented SBM was very low (50%). In Exp. 2, eight dual-flow continuous-culture fermenters were used to study diet effects on microbial fermentation and nutrient flow, using forage:concentrate ratio, solid and liquid passage rates, and pH fluctuation to simulate in vivo conditions. The treatment containing SBM without urea reached the greatest total VFA concentration (P < 0.01), molar percentage of acetate (P < 0.05), and NH3 N concentration (P < 0.05), followed by treatments with partial substitution of protein source by urea, and finally by the treatment containing FMCGM. True OM digestion tended to increase (P = 0.13) in treatments containing SBM. These results suggest that amino N from SBM and NH3 N concentration stimulated nutrient digestion. Microbial protein synthesis was lowest in treatments with FMCGM and without urea, indicating that rapidly available N limited microbial growth. The low CP degradability of SBM observed may have contributed to the limitation in N supply for microbial growth. Efficiency of microbial protein synthesis increased in treatments containing urea (P < 0.05). Protein source affected total (P < 0.05) and essential AA (P

  19. Effect of dietary mineral sources and oil content on calcium utilization and kidney calcification in female Fischer rats fed low-protein diets.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Shizuko; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Kajiwara, Tomoko; Azami, Shoji; Kitano, Takao

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effects of dietary mineral source and oil intake on kidney calcification in 4-wk-old female Fischer rats after consuming the AIN-76 purified diet (AIN-76). A modified AIN-76 mineral mixture was used, although the original calcium (Ca)/phosphorus (P) molar ratio remained unchanged. Rats were fed the modified diets for a period of 40 d before their kidneys were removed on the last day. Ca balance tests were performed on days 31 to 36 and biochemical analysis of urine was also studied. Kidney Ca, P, and magnesium (Mg) in the standard diet group (20% protein and 5% oil) were not affected by the mineral source. Kidney Ca, P, and Mg in the low-protein (10% protein) diet group, were found to be influenced by the dietary oil content and mineral source. In particular, the different mineral sources differentially increased kidney mineral accumulation. Pathological examination of the kidney showed that the degree of kidney calcification was proportional to the dietary oil content in the 10% dietary protein group, reflecting the calcium content of the kidney. The information gathered on mineral sources in this study will help future researchers studying the influence of dietary Ca/P molar ratios, and histological changes in the kidney.

  20. The effects of inulin supplementation of diets with or without hydrolysed protein sources on digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and immunoglobulins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, A; Hesta, M; Hermans, J M; Janssens, G P J

    2006-11-01

    Dogs with food allergy are often treated by giving a diet with hydrolysed protein sources. Prebiotics might also be successful in prevention and treatment of allergic disease through their effect on the colonic microflora, analogous to studies on probiotics in allergic children. The present study was set up to investigate the effect of supplementing inulin (IN) to commercial hypoallergenic dog diets on apparent nutrient digestibility, faecal characteristics, haematology and Ig in dogs. Supplementation of 3 % IN did not affect faecal pH, food and water intake and urine production. Compared with the intact protein diet with a limited number of ingredients (L), the diet with a hydrolysed protein source (H) resulted in an increased water intake (P<0.001), which could be due to the osmotic effect of free amino acids. Faeces production was increased by IN due to increased faecal moisture content. Increased faeces production on the H diet was mainly due to a higher DM excretion. Subsequently, the apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of DM was lower in the H diet group. A similar result was noted for ADC of diethyl ether extract and crude ash. The ADC of crude protein was higher in the H diet group, whereas IN decreased the ADC of crude protein. Differences in the ADC of crude protein among the different diets disappeared after correction for a higher faecal biomass, except for the dogs fed the L+IN diet. Total faecal IgA concentrations were lower in the H group (P<0.05) because of lower antigenic stimulation of hydrolysed protein, which implies that hydrolysed protein is really hypoallergenic. The present study indicates that the use of hydrolysed protein diets for canine food allergy treatment can affect digestibility and that combination with IN affected apparent protein digestibility but not IgA response.

  1. Effects of cornmeal or molasses supplemented with different protein sources on milk production and nitrogen utilization of organic dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sixteen lactating organic Jersey cows were assigned to four replicated 4 × 4 Latin squares with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to compare the effects of feeding cornmeal (CM) or molasses (MOL) with either flaxseed meal (Flax) or a protein mix [(PM = 11% soybean meal (SB) + 5% sunflower ...

  2. Effects of rumen-undegradable protein sources and supplemental 2-hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid and lysine-HCl on lactation performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Johnson-VanWieringen, L M; Harrison, J H; Davidson, D; Swift, M L; von Keyserlingk, M A G; Vazquez-Anon, M; Wright, D; Chalupa, W

    2007-11-01

    One hundred primiparous and multiparous Holstein cows were used in an experiment to evaluate the effect of supplementing diets with either a plant- or an animal-based source of rumen-undegradable protein (RUP), with or without AA supplementation, during the transition period and early lactation on milk production response. The experimental design was a randomized block design with approximately one-third of the cows being primiparous. Cows were assigned to 1 of 4 prepartum diets introduced 3 wk before the expected calving date and switched to the corresponding postpartum diet at calving. Diets 1 (AMI) and 2 (AMI+) included a vegetable RUP source (heat- and lignosulfonate-treated canola meal), with diet 2 containing supplemental Lys x HCl and Met hydroxy analog sources [D,L-2 hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid; Alimet feed supplement]. Diets 3 (PRO) and 4 (PRO+) consisted of a blend of animal RUP sources (blood meal, fish meal, feather meal, and porcine meat and bone meal), with diet 4 containing supplemental Lys x HCl and Met hydroxy analog sources [D,L-2 hydroxy-4-(methylthio)-butanoic acid; Alimet]. During the first 4 wk of lactation, dry matter intake was less when synthetic Lys x HCl and Alimet were supplemented, but this effect was no longer evident in wk 5 to 9 of the experiment. Interestingly, despite the initial decrease in dry matter intake in the cows fed AA-supplemented diets, there was no effect of treatment on milk production or the ratio of fat-corrected milk to dry matter intake throughout the 17 wk of the study. Undegradable protein source (vegetable vs. animal) did not affect dry matter intake, milk production, or 3.5% fat-corrected milk production for the first 17 wk of lactation. The results of this study indicate that heat- and lignosulfonate-treated canola meal can be used as a source of undegradable protein in place of high-quality rumen-undegradable animal protein sources without negative effects on milk production when diets are equivalent

  3. Natural proteins: Sources, isolation, characterization and applications

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, Jitendra Y.; Bhambar, Rajendra S.; Narkhede, Minal R.; Gawali, Sonali R.

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, plant protein contributes substantially as a food resource because it contains essential amino acids for meeting human physiological requirements. However, many versatile plant proteins are used as medicinal agents as they are produced by using molecular tools of biotechnology. Proteins can be obtained from plants, animals and microorganism cells. The abundant economical proteins can be obtained from plant seeds. These natural proteins are obtained by isolation procedures depending on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Isolation and purification of single protein from cells containing mixtures of unrelated proteins is achievable due to the physical and chemical attributes of proteins. The following characteristics are unique to each protein: Amino acid composition, sequence, subunit structures, size, shape, net charge, isoelectric point, solubility, heat stability and hydrophobicity. Based on these properties, various methods of isolation exist, like salting out and isoionic precipitation. Purification of proteins is quiet challenging and, therefore, several approaches like sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and chromatography are available. Characterization of proteins can be performed by mass spectrometry/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The amino acid sequence of a protein can be detected by using tandem mass spectrometry. In this article, a review has been made on the sources, isolation, purification and characterization of natural proteins. PMID:24347918

  4. Effect of supplementation of lysine producing microbes vis-a-vis source and level of dietary protein on performance and egg quality characteristics of post-peak layers.

    PubMed

    Manju, G U; Reddy, B S V; Gloridoss, Gideon; Prabhu, T M; Giridhar, K S; Suma, N

    2015-04-01

    The aim was to study the effect of supplementation of lysine producing microbes (LPM) as an in vivo source of lysine on performance and egg quality characters of post-peak layers. BIS (1992) specified diets (except crude protein [CP] and lysine) were prepared using either soybean meal (SBM) or groundnut extractions (GNE) or sunflower extractions (SFE) with 16 and 15% CP resulting in six control diets. Further, each control diet was fortified with either synthetic lysine or LPM to meet BIS (1992) specified lysine requirement resulting in the set of 12 test diets. Each of the eighteen diets was offered to quadruplets groups of 4 post-peak (52 weeks) commercial laying hens in each. The trial lasted for 119 days. The results revealed that the feed consumption and body weight changes and Roche yolk color and yolk index were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) different among different treatments. However, egg production, feed efficiency, egg weight, egg shape index, Haugh unit score, albumen index and shell thickness, and net returns remained non-significant (p ≤ 0.05) among different treatments. Among main factors, protein level (16% and 15% CP) made a significant (p ≤ 0.05) difference in egg production (79.6 and 75.1%) and feed efficiency (2.64 and 2.81 kg feed/kg egg mass, respectively). Among protein source GNE- and SFE-based diet fed groups showed significantly (p < 0.0%) higher feed consumption and body weight gain than SBM based diets fed birds. Yolk color (7.0, 7.3 and 7.3, respectively) and yolk index (0.40, 0.38 and 0.43, respectively) were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) different from the protein sources. CP level and Protein source interaction effects showed significant differences in albumen index and Haugh unit score. Optimum level of protein (16% CP) and GNE as a source of protein tended to be superior in increasing the performance and egg characteristics of post-peak layers and supplementation of lysine in either synthetic or LPM form found to be beneficial in

  5. Effect of protein source and soluble carbohydrate addition on rumen fermentation and lactation performance of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M E; Redfearn, D D; Ward, J D; Blouin, D C

    2001-07-01

    Rumen in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of rumen undegradable protein and soluble carbohydrates on rumen ammonia N release and lactation performance of Holstein cows. In the in vitro experiment, freeze-dried annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum, LAM) pasture was supplemented 1:1 with ground corn-based grain supplements containing expeller or solvent soybean meal with sucrose or lactose supplements at 0, 2.5, or 5% of dry matter (DM). The ammonia release rate was slower with expeller compared with solvent soybean meal-supplemented diets. Sucrose supplementation at the 5% level lowered rumen ammonia concentrations, but lactose-fortification of grain supplements was without effect. In the in vivo study, 32 multiparous Holstein cows were blocked according to milk yield and randomly assigned to corn-based grain supplements containing 1) solvent soybean meal, 2) solvent soybean meal + 5% sucrose supplement, 3) expeller soybean meal, or 4) expeller soybean meal + 5% sucrose supplement. Grain supplements and fresh annual ryegrass were component fed at approximately a 1:1 grain to forage ratio (DM basis). Forage DM intake was higher for cows receiving solvent soybean meal supplemented grain supplements than those receiving expeller soybean meal (12.2 +/- 2.1 vs. 11.4 +/- 2.2 kg/d), but total DM intake was similar for all diets (22.8 +/- 2.9 kg/d). Fat-corrected milk yield was similar for all diets averaging 37.5, 38.2, 39.1, and 37.6 kg/d for diets 1 to 4, respectively. Rumen fermentation, milk urea nitrogen, and body condition were unaffected by supplements; however, cows fed grain supplement 1 utilized dietary energy more efficiently than cows offered the other dietary treatments. High dietary crude protein concentrations may have limited lactation response to rumen undegradable protein and sugar.

  6. Effect of prepartum energy intake and postpartum protein source on plasma somatotropin and insulin in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Seymour, W M; Herbein, J H; Akers, R M; Polan, C E

    1988-11-01

    Forty-two Holstein cows were fed a high or low energy diet during the last third of lactation, then fed soybean meal or dried brewers grains in the subsequent lactation. Responses of plasma somatotropin and insulin to arginine were measured at 6 and 15 wk postpartum. Basal somatotropin, response area, and peak value were greater at 6 versus 15 wk of lactation. Insulation responses were greater at 15 wk of lactation. At 6 wk, basal somatotropin was higher (6.1 versus 4.1 ng/ml) in cows fed the low energy diet prepartum. Shape of somatotropin response curves at 6 wk differed between prepartum energy intakes, but response areas were similar. Plasma insulin at 6 wk tended to be higher (1.0 versus .7 ng/ml) in cows fed dried brewers grains. At 15 wk, both insulin and somatotropin response areas tended to be smaller for cows fed dried brewers grains, and shape of insulin response curves differed between protein sources. Of the observed hormonal responses to diet, only 6-wk plasma somatotropin was associated with differences in production parameters. Somatotropin secretion during early lactation appears to respond to prepartum changes in the energy status.

  7. Effects of source of protein and supplementary extracted isoflavones and anthocyanins on longevity of Stroke-prone Spontaneously Hypertensive (SHRSP) rats.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Nimal Ratnayke, W M; Mueller, Rudolf; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    Amount of dietary protein is known to influence blood pressure in humans and animal models. However, contradictory reports are available on the influence of source of dietary protein and soy isoflavones on blood pressure. Information on potential effect of anthocyanins, potent flavonoid antioxidants widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, on hypertension is also limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine whether source of dietary protein (casein vs. soybean protein, washed by alcohol to remove most isoflavones), dietary extracted isoflavones and anthocyanins modulate the lifespan of Stroke-prone Spontaneously Hypertensive (SHRSP) rats, one of the most suitable models for hemorrhagic stroke. Body weight and systolic blood-pressure matched groups of 47 day-old SHRSP rats (n = 16) received semi-purified diets containing 200 g/kg protein (casein or soybean) supplemented with 0 or 500 mg/kg isoflavones (NOVASOY, a commercial soy isoflavones supplement extracted from soybean), and 0 or 500 mg/kg anthocyanins (extracted from elderberry). The drinking water contained 10 g/l sodium chloride to induce early hypertension. Survival times and survival rates of rats were determined. The survival rates were determined for each group and expressed as a percentage of the original number of rats still alive on a given day. The survival times and survival rates of animals fed casein and soybean protein diets were not different (P > 0.05). However, there was a significant effect of supplementation with isoflavones or anthocyanins on survival times and survival rates. Death occurred significantly earlier (P < 0.05) in the isoflavones- or anthocyanins-supplemented groups.

  8. Effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity and antioxidant status of commercial broilers

    PubMed Central

    Chichilichi, Biswal; Mohanty, G. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Pradhan, C. R.; Behura, N. C.; Das, A.; Behera, K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of partial supplementation of sun-dried Azolla as a protein source on the immunity of commercial broilers in coastal Odisha. Materials and Methods: A 180 day-old broiler chicks were distributed in six dietary treatments viz. C1: Basal diet, C2: Basal diet + enzyme, T1: Basal diet +5% protein from Azolla, T2: Basal diet + 5% protein from Azolla + enzyme, T3: Basal diet +10% protein from Azolla, and T4: Basal diet + 10% protein from Azolla + enzyme. Cutaneous basophilc hypersensitivity (CBH) and humoral immunity response were determined at the 38th day of age. At 42nd day, the weight of lymphoid organs, an antioxidant enzyme, and lipid peroxidation activity were determined. Results: The CBH response did not differ significantly among the treated groups, but the sheep red blood cells response was significantly higher in T4. The weight of lymphoid organs or immune organs of all the treated groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05). The erythrocyte catalase level of T4 group was found to be significantly higher than rest of the treated groups except T3. Conclusion: It may be concluded that supplementation of Azolla at 10% of dietary protein requirement along with enzyme supplementation in an isonitrogenous diet showed a better immune response in broilers. PMID:27047208

  9. Developmental Block and Programmed Cell Death in Bos indicus Embryos: Effects of Protein Supplementation Source and Developmental Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sheila Merlo; Marinho, Luciana Simões Rafagnin; Lunardelli, Paula Alvares; Seneda, Marcelo Marcondes; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if the protein source of the medium influences zebu embryo development and if developmental kinetics, developmental block and programmed cell death are related. The culture medium was supplemented with either fetal calf serum or bovine serum albumin. The embryos were classified as Fast (n = 1,235) or Slow (n = 485) based on the time required to reach the fourth cell cycle (48 h and 90 h post insemination - hpi -, respectively). The Slow group was further separated into two groups: those presenting exactly 4 cells at 48 hpi (Slow/4 cells) and those that reached the fourth cell cycle at 90 hpi (Slow). Blastocyst quality, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial membrane potential and signs of apoptosis or necrosis were evaluated. The Slow group had higher incidence of developmental block than the Fast group. The embryos supplemented with fetal calf serum had lower quality. DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential were absent in embryos at 48 hpi but present at 90 hpi. Early signs of apoptosis were more frequent in the Slow and Slow/4 cell groups than in the Fast group. We concluded that fetal calf serum reduces blastocyst development and quality, but the mechanism appears to be independent of DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic cells detected at 48 hpi reveal a possible mechanism of programmed cell death activation prior to genome activation. The apoptotic cells observed in the slow-developing embryos suggested a relationship between programmed cell death and embryonic developmental kinetics in zebu in vitro-produced embryos. PMID:25760989

  10. Effect of carbohydrate sources and levels of cotton seed meal in concentrate on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in young dairy bulls.

    PubMed

    Wanapat, M; Anantasook, N; Rowlinson, P; Pilajun, R; Gunun, P

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of levels of cottonseed meal with various carbohydrate sources in concentrate on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in dairy bulls. Four, 6 months old dairy bulls were randomly assigned to receive four dietary treatments according to a 2×2 factorial arrangement in a 4×4 Latin square design. Factor A was carbohydrate source; cassava chip (CC) and cassava chip+rice bran in the ratio of 3:1 (CR3:1), and factor B was cotton seed meal levels in the concentrate; 109 g CP/kg (LCM) and 328 g CP/kg (HCM) at similar overall CP levels (490 g CP/kg). Bulls received urea-lime treated rice straw ad libitum and were supplemented with 10 g of concentrate/kg BW. It was found that carbohydrate source and level of cotton seed meal did not have significant effects on ruminal pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration, microbial protein synthesis or feed intake. Animals which received CC showed significantly higher BUN concentration, ruminal propionic acid and butyric acid proportions, while dry matter, organic matter digestibility, populations of total viable bacteria and proteolytic bacteria were lower than those in the CR3:1 treatment. The concentration of total volatile fatty acids was higher in HCM than LCM treatments, while the concentration of butyric acid was higher in LCM than HCM treatments. The population of proteolytic bacteria with the LCM treatments was higher than the HCM treatments; however other bacteria groups were similar among the different levels of cotton seed meal. Bulls which received LCM had higher protein digestibility than those receiving HCM. Therefore, using high levels of cassava chip and cotton seed meal might positively impact on energy and nitrogen balance for the microbial population in the rumen of the young dairy bull.

  11. Allergenicity assessment strategy for novel food proteins and protein sources.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty; Broekman, Henrike; Knulst, André; Houben, Geert

    2016-08-01

    To solve the future food insecurity problem, alternative and sustainable protein sources (e.g. insects, rapeseed, fava bean and algae) are now being explored for the production of food and feed. To approve these novel protein sources for future food a comprehensive risk assessment is needed according to the European food legislation. Allergenicity risk assessment might pose some major difficulties, since detailed guidance on how to assess the allergenic potential of novel foods is not available. At present, the approach relies mostly on the guidance of allergenicity assessment for genetically modified (GM) plant foods. The most recent one was proposed by EFSA (2010 and 2011); "weight-of-evidence approach". However this guidance is difficult to interpret, not completely applicable or validated for novel foods and therefore needs some adjustments. In this paper we propose a conceptual strategy which is based on the "weight-of-evidence approach" for food derived from GM plants and other strategies that were previously published in the literature. This strategy will give more guidance on how to assess the allergenicity of novel food proteins and protein sources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo.

    PubMed

    Foiklang, Suban; Wanapat, Metha; Toburan, Wetchasit

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to determine effect of various plant protein sources in high-quality feed block (HQFB) on feed intake, rumen fermentation, and microbial population in swamp buffalo. Four rumen-fistulated swamp buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Four kinds of plant protein sources (coarse rice bran (CRB), cassava hay (CH), Phaseolus calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay (MH)) were mixed in the HQFB. HQFBs were allowed to be licked at free choice, and urea-lime-treated rice straw (ULRS) were fed ad libitum. It was found that bacterial population and fungal zoospores in CH-fed group tended to be higher than those in other groups. Moreover, protozoal population in CH, P. calcaratus hay, and MH were lower than those in CRB supplemented group (P < 0.05). Cellulolytic bacterial population was highest in CH-fed group while proteolytic bacteria population was highest in P. calcaratus hay-fed group (P < 0.05). CH-fed group had higher ULRS intake than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Nutrient digestibility of CP, NDF, and ADF in CH-fed group was significantly higher than those in other groups (P < 0.05). Total VFA was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). N absorption was highest in CH-fed group (P < 0.05). Based on this study, it could be concluded that cassava hay, P. calcaratus hay, and mulberry hay are potential to be used as protein sources in the HQFBs especially cassava hay.

  13. The effect of 2 liquid feeds and 2 sources of protein in starter on performance and blood metabolites in Holstein neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, A M; Heidari Jahan Abadi, S; Naserian, A A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of 2 liquid feeds and 2 protein sources in starter on the performance and blood metabolite responses of Holstein neonatal calves from birth to 6 wk of age. Calves (20 males and 20 females) based on sex were randomly assigned to 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial arrangement, including soybean meal (SBM) and meat and bone meal (MB) with either fermented colostrum (or fresh milk. Although sex and liquid feed had no significant effect on feed intake, calves consumed more feed intake on the diet containing SBM (15 ± 0.2 kg) than MB (13 ± 0.2 kg) during the experimental period; also, weight gain was affected by both liquid feed and starter. Liquid feed and starter had significant effects on calf body size, including pin width, hip width, withers height, hip height, and stomach size, but no significant effects were observed on calf body size between the sexes. Plasma glucose concentration was not affected by sex, liquid feed, or starter. Plasma urea nitrogen concentration decreased in the first 3 wk and then started to increase during the last 3 wk, but it was only affected by starter and calves receiving SBM (10.18 mg/dL) had a higher concentration of plasma urea nitrogen than calves receiving MB (9.6 mg/dL) at the end of the experiment. Plasma growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I concentrations decreased in all treatment groups from d 0 to the end of the study. No significant effects were observed on plasma growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I concentrations between the 2 sexes, but they were significantly affected by both liquid feed and starter. Results of the present study provide useful information to apply to Holstein neonatal calves during the first 6 wk of life when liquid feed and 2 sources of protein in starter are considered.

  14. Use of larvae meal as protein source in broiler diet: Effect on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits.

    PubMed

    Bovera, F; Loponte, R; Marono, S; Piccolo, G; Parisi, G; Iaconisi, V; Gasco, L; Nizza, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of insect meal from larvae ( larvae meal [TML]) as complete replacement of soybean meal (SBM) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and carcass and meat traits of broilers. A total of eighty 30-d-old male Shaver brown broilers were homogenously divided into 2 groups (each consisting of 8 replicates of 5 birds). Up to 62 d of age, the groups were fed 2 isoproteic and isoenergetic diets differing for the ingredient used as the main protein source: the control group was fed a corn-SBM-based diet, whereas in the TML group, the SBM was completely replaced by TML. Broiler growth performance was measured during the trial. At 62 d of age, 2 broilers per replicate (16 per group) were slaughtered and apparent ileal digestibility coefficients and carcass and meat traits were determined. The use of TML as the main protein source in the broiler diet had no significant effect on most growth performance and carcass traits and chemical and physical properties of meat, the latter being important for marketing purposes. The feed conversion ratio in the entire experimental period (from 30 to 62 d) was improved in the TML group compared with the SBM group ( < 0.05). The apparent ileal digestibility coefficients of DM, OM, and CP in broilers fed the SBM diet were greater ( < 0.01) than the other group. The full digestive system in broilers fed SBM had a lower ( < 0.05) absolute and relative weight than that of broilers fed TML. Also, the weight and the percentage of the spleen in the SBM group were lower ( < 0.05) than those in the TML group. The length of the entire intestine in the group fed TML was greater ( < 0.05) than the other group and the same happened when intestinal length was expressed as percentage of broiler BW ( < 0.05). Among the different intestinal tracts, the ileum and ceca of broilers fed TML had a greater ( < 0.05) length than that of broilers fed SBM. Also, ceca weight (as an absolute value or percentage on

  15. Potential application of microalga Spirulina platensis as a protein source.

    PubMed

    Lupatini, Anne Luize; Colla, Luciane Maria; Canan, Cristiane; Colla, Eliane

    2017-02-01

    The high protein level of various microalgal species is one of the main reasons to consider them an unconventional source of this compound. Spirulina platensis stands out for being one of the richest protein sources of microbial origin (460-630 g kg(-1) , dry matter basis), having similar protein levels when compared to meat and soybeans. The use of S. platensis in food can bring benefits to human health owing to its chemical composition, since it has high levels of vitamins, minerals, phenolics, essential fatty acids, amino acids and pigments. Furthermore, the development of new protein sources to supply the shortage of this nutrient is an urgent need, and protein from S. platensis plays an important role in this scenario. In this sense, extraction processes that allow maximum protein yield and total utilization of biomass is an urgent need, and ultrasonic waves have proven to be an effective extraction technique. The number of scientific papers related to protein fraction from S. platensis is still limited; thus further studies on its functional and technological properties are needed. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Investigations on the effect of forage source, grinding, and urea supplementation on ruminal fermentation and microbial protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Bastian; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of maize silage and grass silage on microbial fermentation and protein flow in a semi-continuous rumen simulation system (Rusitec) when milling screen size (MSS) during grinding was varied. Oven-dried silages were milled through screens of 1, 4 or 9 mm pore size and incubated for 48 h in a Rusitec system. Furthermore, the effect of N supplementation to maize silage (MSS: 4 mm) was investigated and single dose vs. continuous infusion of urea-N were compared. Degradation of organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), fibre fractions and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as well as short-chain fatty acid production differed significantly between forage sources. Urea-N supplementation improved the degradation of NSC, but not that of fibre fractions in maize silage. The way of urea supply had only marginal effects on fermentation characteristics. An increase in MSS, and consequently in mean feed particle size, led to an improvement in the degradation of OM, CP and NSC, but efficiency of microbial net protein synthesis (EMPS; mg microbial N flow/g degraded OM) and the microbial amino acid profile were less affected. EMPS was higher in grass silage than in maize silage and was improved by urea-N supplementation in maize silage. This study indicates that fermentation of NSC as well as EMPS during incubation of maize silage was limited by availability of NH3-N. Furthermore, an increase in MSS above 1 mm seems to improve fermentation of silages in the Rusitec system.

  17. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  18. Developmental Genes Have Pleiotropic Effects on Plant Morphology and Source Capacity, Eventually Impacting on Seed Protein Content and Productivity in Pea1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Burstin, Judith; Marget, Pascal; Huart, Myriam; Moessner, Annie; Mangin, Brigitte; Duchene, Christiane; Desprez, Bruno; Munier-Jolain, Nathalie; Duc, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Increasing pea (Pisum sativum) seed nutritional value and particularly seed protein content, while maintaining yield, is an important challenge for further development of this crop. Seed protein content and yield are complex and unstable traits, integrating all the processes occurring during the plant life cycle. During filling, seeds are the main sink to which assimilates are preferentially allocated at the expense of vegetative organs. Nitrogen seed demand is satisfied partly by nitrogen acquired by the roots, but also by nitrogen remobilized from vegetative organs. In this study, we evaluated the respective roles of nitrogen source capacity and sink strength in the genetic variability of seed protein content and yield. We showed in eight genotypes of diverse origins that both the maximal rate of nitrogen accumulation in the seeds and nitrogen source capacity varied among genotypes. Then, to identify the genetic factors responsible for seed protein content and yield variation, we searched for quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed traits and for indicators of sink strength and source nitrogen capacity. We detected 261 QTL across five environments for all traits measured. Most QTL for seed and plant traits mapped in clusters, raising the possibility of common underlying processes and candidate genes. In most environments, the genes Le and Afila, which control internode length and the switch between leaflets and tendrils, respectively, determined plant nitrogen status. Depending on the environment, these genes were linked to QTL of seed protein content and yield, suggesting that source-sink adjustments depend on growing conditions. PMID:17449650

  19. An alternative animal protein source: cultured beef.

    PubMed

    Post, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    Alternative sources of animal proteins are needed that can be produced efficiently, thereby providing food security with diminished ecological burden. It is feasible to culture beef from bovine skeletal muscle stem cells, but the technology is still under development. The aim is to create a beef mimic with equivalent taste, texture, and appearance and with the same nutritional value as livestock-produced beef. More specifically, there is a need for optimization of protein content and fat content. In addition, scalability of production requires modification of current small-scale bioreactors to the largest possible scale. The necessary steps and current progress suggest that this aim is achievable, but formal evidence is still required. Similarly, we can be optimistic about consumer acceptance based on initial data, but detailed studies are needed to gain more insight into potential psychological obstacles that could lead to rejection. These challenges are formidable but likely surmountable. The severity of upcoming food-security threats warrants serious research and development efforts to address the challenges that come with bringing cultured beef to the market. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet retains effectiveness to reduce blood pressure when lean pork is substituted for chicken and fish as the predominant source of protein.

    PubMed

    Sayer, R Drew; Wright, Amy J; Chen, Ningning; Campbell, Wayne W

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney disease and premature mortality that is improved by the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet. The DASH diet emphasizes increased consumption of fruit and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, nuts, and poultry and fish and reduced intakes of fats, red meats (including pork), sodium, and added sugars. We sought to evaluate whether the consumption of lean pork compared with the consumption of chicken and fish as the predominant protein source in a DASH-style diet affected blood pressure (BP) control in men and women with elevated BP. In a randomized crossover study, 13 women and 6 men [mean ± SEM age: 61 ± 2 y; BMI (in kg/m²): 31.2 ± 1.4] with elevated BP [systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure (DBP): 130 ± 2/85 ± 2 mm Hg] consumed a DASH-style diet for two 6-wk controlled dietary interventions (with a 4-wk diet washout between interventions) with either lean pork [DASH diet with pork (DASH-P)] or chicken and fish [DASH diet with chicken and fish (DASH-CF), the control diet] as the major protein source (55% of total protein intake). SBP and DBP were measured manually and with a 24-h BP monitoring system on 3 d before and 3 d at the end of each diet intervention. Preintervention manual BP (DASH-P: 130/84 ± 2/1 mm Hg; DASH-CF: 129/84 ± 2/1 mg Hg) and postintervention manual BP (DASH-P: 122/79 ± 2/1 mm Hg; DASH-CF: 123/78 ± 3/1) were not different between the DASH-P and DASH-CF. Consumption of these DASH-style diets for 6 wk reduced all measures of BP (P < 0.05) with no differences in responses between the DASH-CF and DASH-P. The results indicate that adults with elevated BP may effectively incorporate lean pork into a DASH-style diet for BP reduction. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Effects of feeding canola meal or wheat dried distillers grains with solubles as a major protein source in low- or high-crude protein diets on ruminal fermentation, omasal flow, and production in cows.

    PubMed

    Mutsvangwa, T; Kiran, D; Abeysekara, S

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of feeding canola meal (CM) or wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (W-DDGS) as the major source of protein in diets varying in crude protein (CP) content on ruminal fermentation, microbial protein production, omasal nutrient flow, and production performance in lactating dairy cows. Eight lactating dairy cows were used in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with 29-d periods (21 d of dietary adaptation and 8 d of measurements) and a 2×2 factorial arrangement of dietary treatments. Four cows in 1 Latin square were ruminally cannulated to allow ruminal and omasal sampling. The treatment factors were (1) source of supplemental protein (CM vs. W-DDGS) and (2) dietary CP content (15 vs. 17%; DM basis). Diets contained 50% forage and 50% concentrate, and were fed twice daily at 0900 and 1600 h as total mixed rations for ad libitum intake. Dry matter intake and milk yield were unaffected by dietary treatments; however, milk yield in cows that were fed CM was numerically greater (+1.1 kg/d) when compared with cows fed W-DDGS. Feeding CM increased milk lactose content compared with feeding W-DDGS. Milk urea nitrogen and ruminal NH3-N concentrations were greater in cows fed the high-CP compared with those fed the low-CP diet. The rumen-degradable protein supply was greater in cows fed the high-CP when compared with those fed the low-CP diet when diets contained CM, whereas rumen-degradable protein supply was lower in cows fed the high-CP when compared with those fed the low-CP diet when diets contained W-DDGS. Total N flow at the omasal canal was not affected by diet; however, omasal flow of NH3-N was greater in cows fed CM when compared with those fed W-DDGS. The rumen-undegradable protein supply was greater in cows fed the low-CP when compared with those fed the high-CP diet when diets contained CM, whereas rumen-undegradable protein supply was lower in cows fed the low-CP when compared with those fed the

  2. Effect of palm kernel cake as protein source in a concentrate diet on intake, digestibility and live weight gain of goats fed Napier grass.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mijanur; Abdullah, Ramli Bin; Wan Embong, Wan Khadijah; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Akashi, Ryo

    2013-03-01

    The effects of palm kernel cake (PKC) as a protein source in a concentrate diet (comprising 35 % crushed maize, 30 % rice bran, 32 % PKC, 2 % vitamin mineral premix and 1 % salt) were examined on intake, live weight (LW) gain and digestibility in female goats (average LW of 12.4 ± 2.6 kg). Four goats were randomly allocated to each of the four treatment diets: (a) Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) offered ad libitum (T1), (b) T1 + concentrate at 0.5 % of LW (T2), (c) T1 + concentrate at 1.0 % of LW (T3) and (d) T1 + concentrate at 2.0 % of LW (T4). A 7-day digestibility trial and an 82-day growth experiment were conducted. No differences were observed among diets for intakes of roughage dry matter (DM), total DM, organic matter (OM) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF). The crude protein (CP) intake increased (P < 0.05) as the level of concentrate in the diets increased. Goats fed the T2, T3 and T4 diets gained 10.2, 34.1 and 52.5 g/head/day, respectively, while the control group (T1) lost weight (-12.7 g/head/day). The apparent digestibilities of DM, OM and CP were similar (P > 0.05) among treatments. The digestibility of dietary NDF decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of concentrate, but there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference between T2 and T3 diets. Supplementing a basal diet of Napier grass with PKC-based concentrate improved CP intake and LW gain. The PKC-based concentrate diet can therefore be exploited for the use of local feed resources for goat production; however, further research is required to achieve the best growth response.

  3. Investigating effects of sample pretreatment on protein stability using size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rakow, Tobias; El Deeb, Sami; Hahne, Thomas; El-Hady, Deia Abd; AlBishri, Hassan M; Wätzig, Hermann

    2014-09-01

    In this study, size-exclusion chromatography and high-resolution atomic absorption spectrometry methods have been developed and evaluated to test the stability of proteins during sample pretreatment. This especially includes different storage conditions but also adsorption before or even during the chromatographic process. For the development of the size exclusion method, a Biosep S3000 5 μm column was used for investigating a series of representative model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, monoclonal immunoglobulin G antibody, and myoglobin. Ambient temperature storage was found to be harmful to all model proteins, whereas short-term storage up to 14 days could be done in an ordinary refrigerator. Freezing the protein solutions was always complicated and had to be evaluated for each protein in the corresponding solvent. To keep the proteins in their native state a gentle freezing temperature should be chosen, hence liquid nitrogen should be avoided. Furthermore, a high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry method was developed to observe the adsorption of proteins on container material and chromatographic columns. Adsorption to any container led to a sample loss and lowered the recovery rates. During the pretreatment and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, adsorption caused sample losses of up to 33%.

  4. Probing Protein Sequences as Sources for Encrypted Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Guilherme D.; Magalhães, Mariana T. Q.; Tinoco, Maria L. P.; Aragão, Francisco J. L.; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M.; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources. PMID:23029273

  5. Probing protein sequences as sources for encrypted antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Brand, Guilherme D; Magalhães, Mariana T Q; Tinoco, Maria L P; Aragão, Francisco J L; Nicoli, Jacques; Kelly, Sharon M; Cooper, Alan; Bloch, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that a wealth of potentially biologically active peptides may lurk within proteins, we describe here a methodology to identify putative antimicrobial peptides encrypted in protein sequences. Candidate peptides were identified using a new screening procedure based on physicochemical criteria to reveal matching peptides within protein databases. Fifteen such peptides, along with a range of natural antimicrobial peptides, were examined using DSC and CD to characterize their interaction with phospholipid membranes. Principal component analysis of DSC data shows that the investigated peptides group according to their effects on the main phase transition of phospholipid vesicles, and that these effects correlate both to antimicrobial activity and to the changes in peptide secondary structure. Consequently, we have been able to identify novel antimicrobial peptides from larger proteins not hitherto associated with such activity, mimicking endogenous and/or exogenous microorganism enzymatic processing of parent proteins to smaller bioactive molecules. A biotechnological application for this methodology is explored. Soybean (Glycine max) plants, transformed to include a putative antimicrobial protein fragment encoded in its own genome were tested for tolerance against Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causative agent of the Asian soybean rust. This procedure may represent an inventive alternative to the transgenic technology, since the genetic material to be used belongs to the host organism and not to exogenous sources.

  6. Renal Diet for Vegetarians: Which Protein Sources Are Best?

    MedlinePlus

    ... labels. Many ready-to-eat foods, canned beans, vegan meats, and soy- and rice-based cheeses are ... important nutrients. Type of vegetarian diet Protein sources Vegan — allows only plant-based foods Soy protein (tofu, ...

  7. Effect of protein source on amino acid supply, milk production, and metabolism of plasma nutrients in dairy cows fed grass silage.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, M; Vanhatalo, A; Huhtanen, P

    2002-12-01

    This study conducted according to a 4 x 4 Latin square with 28 d periods and four ruminally cannulated Finnish Ayrshire cows investigated the effect of protein supplements differing in amino acid (AA) profile and rumen undegradable protein content on postruminal AA supply and milk production. Mammary metabolism of plasma AA and other nutrients were also studied. The basal diet (Control; 13.4% crude protein) consisted of grass silage and barley in a ratio of 55:45 on a dry matter basis. The other three isonitrogenous diets (17.0% crude protein) were control + fishmeal (FM), control + soybean meal (SBM), and control + corn gluten meal (CGM). The protein supplements replaced portions of dry matter of the control diet maintaining the silage to barley ratio constant for all diets. Dry matter intake was limited to 95% of the preexperimental ad libitum intake and was similar (mean 19.8 kg/d dry matter) across the diets. Protein supplements increased milk, lactose, and protein yields but did not affect yields of energy-corrected milk or milk fat. Milk protein yield response was numerically lowest for diet SBM. Protein supplements increased milk protein concentration but decreased milk fat and lactose concentrations. Microbial protein synthesis and rumen fermentation parameters were similar across the diets, except for an increased rumen ammonia concentration for diets supplemented with protein feeds. Protein supplements increased N intake, ruminal organic matter and N, and total tract organic matter, N, and neutral detergent fiber digestibilities. Protein supplements also increased N and AA flows into the omasum, with SBM giving the lowest and CGM the highest flows. This was associated with an unchanged microbial N flow and a higher undegraded dietary N flow. The omasal flows of individual AA reflected differences in total N flow and AA profile of the experimental diets. Differences in AA flows did not always reflect plasma AA concentrations. The results indicated that AA

  8. Food Proteins as Source of Opioid Peptides-A Review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Swati; Nurgali, Kulmira; Mishra, Vijay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Traditional opioids, mainly alkaloids, have been used in the clinical management of pain for a number of years but are often associated with numerous side-effects including sedation, dizziness, physical dependence, tolerance, addiction, nausea, vomiting, constipation and respiratory depression which prevent their effective use. Opioid peptides derived from food provide significant advantages as safe and natural alternative due to the possibility of their production using animal and plant proteins as well as comparatively less side-effects. This review aims to discuss the current literature on food-derived opioid peptides focusing on their production, methods of detection, isolation and purification. The need for screening more dietary proteins as a source of novel opioid peptides is emphasized in order to fully understand their potential in pain management either as a drug or as part of diet complementing therapeutic prescription.

  9. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation techniques, proteins were extracted and isolated from four different unicellular sources (Arthrospira (spirulina) maxima, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraselmis impellucida, and Scenedesmus dimorphus). Despite differences in protein contents of the sources (27–62% w/w) and in protein extractability (17–74% w/w), final protein isolates were obtained that had similar protein contents (62–77% w/w) and protein yields (3–9% w/w). Protein solubility as a function of pH was different between the sources and in ionic strength dependency, especially at pH < 4.0. Overall, the characterization and extraction protocol used allows a relatively fast and well-described isolation of purified proteins from novel protein sources. PMID:28701042

  10. Comparison of Protein Extracts from Various Unicellular Green Sources.

    PubMed

    Teuling, Emma; Wierenga, Peter A; Schrama, Johan W; Gruppen, Harry

    2017-08-28

    Photosynthetic unicellular organisms are considered as promising alternative protein sources. The aim of this study is to understand the extent to which these green sources differ with respect to their gross composition and how these differences affect the final protein isolate. Using mild isolation techniques, proteins were extracted and isolated from four different unicellular sources (Arthrospira (spirulina) maxima, Nannochloropsis gaditana, Tetraselmis impellucida, and Scenedesmus dimorphus). Despite differences in protein contents of the sources (27-62% w/w) and in protein extractability (17-74% w/w), final protein isolates were obtained that had similar protein contents (62-77% w/w) and protein yields (3-9% w/w). Protein solubility as a function of pH was different between the sources and in ionic strength dependency, especially at pH < 4.0. Overall, the characterization and extraction protocol used allows a relatively fast and well-described isolation of purified proteins from novel protein sources.

  11. Short communication: Effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture on feeding behavior and performance of calves during the weaning transition.

    PubMed

    Hadam, D; Kański, J; Burakowska, K; Penner, G B; Kowalski, Z M; Górka, P

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of canola meal use as a protein source in a starter mixture (SM) on feeding behavior and performance of calves during weaning transition. A total of 36 female Holstein calves of a mean age 14.9±1.6 d and body weight 40.1±4.2 kg (mean ± SD) were allocated to 1 of 3 treatments differing in the main source of protein for the SM (12 calves per treatment): (1) soybean meal (TSBM); (2) soybean meal and canola meal (TSBM/TCM); and (3) canola meal (TCM). The SM was offered for ad libitum consumption beginning on the first day of the study, whereas milk replacer (MR) was fed in amounts equal to 900 g (as fed) per day from d 1 to 35 and 450 g/d from d 36 to 42 of the study. Calves were completely weaned on d 43 of the study (57.9±1.6 d of age; mean ± SD), and their performance was monitored for an additional 2 wk. Calf body weight was recorded weekly, and MR and SM intake and fecal fluidity were recorded daily. Feeding behavior of calves during weaning transition, including frequency (no./d), time (min/d), and rate (g/min) of eating the SM as well as frequency and time of drinking water, was monitored on 6 calves per treatment for 2 consecutive days before MR step-down (d 34-35), at MR step-down (d 41-42), and after weaning (d 48-49 of study). Starter mixture intake tended to be higher for TSBM calves as compared with TSBM/TCM calves from d 1 to 35 of the study but was not different between TSBM and TCM calves and was not different between treatments in the whole study period. Calves from TCM treatment had reduced average daily gain (ADG) and feed efficiency (g of ADG/kg of dry matter intake) and a higher fecal score in the period from d 1 to 35 of the study and had lower feed efficiency and tended to have lower ADG in the whole study period as compared with TSBM calves. Average daily gain and feed efficiency did not differ between TSBM and TSBM/TCM calves. Frequency of eating the SM and drinking water as well as time

  12. Proteins interacting with cloning scars: a source of false positive protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Boanca, Gina; Lee, Zachary T; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2015-02-23

    A common approach for exploring the interactome, the network of protein-protein interactions in cells, uses a commercially available ORF library to express affinity tagged bait proteins; these can be expressed in cells and endogenous cellular proteins that copurify with the bait can be identified as putative interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. Control experiments can be used to limit false-positive results, but in many cases, there are still a surprising number of prey proteins that appear to copurify specifically with the bait. Here, we have identified one source of false-positive interactions in such studies. We have found that a combination of: 1) the variable sequence of the C-terminus of the bait with 2) a C-terminal valine "cloning scar" present in a commercially available ORF library, can in some cases create a peptide motif that results in the aberrant co-purification of endogenous cellular proteins. Control experiments may not identify false positives resulting from such artificial motifs, as aberrant binding depends on sequences that vary from one bait to another. It is possible that such cryptic protein binding might occur in other systems using affinity tagged proteins; this study highlights the importance of conducting careful follow-up studies where novel protein-protein interactions are suspected.

  13. Effects of corn-based diet starch content and neutral detergent fiber source on lactation performance, digestibility, and bacterial protein flow in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Fredin, S M; Akins, M S; Ferraretto, L F; Shaver, R D

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of corn-based dietary starch content and source of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) on lactation performance, nutrient digestion, bacterial protein flow, and ruminal parameters in lactating dairy cows. Eight ruminally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows averaging 193±11d in milk were randomly assigned to treatments in a replicated 4×4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatment diets were high corn grain (HCG; 38% corn silage, 19% dry ground corn, and 4% soy hulls), high soy hulls (HSH; 38% corn silage, 11% dry ground corn, and 13% soy hulls), high corn silage (HCS; 50% corn silage, 6% dry ground corn, and 4% soy hulls), and low corn silage (LCS; 29% corn silage, 15% corn, and 19% soy hulls). The HCG, HSH, HCS, and LCS diets contained 29, 23, 24, and 22% starch; 27, 32, 30, and 32% total NDF; and 21, 21, 25, and 17% forage NDF (dry matter basis), respectively. Mean dry matter intake and milk yield were unaffected by treatment. Cows fed LCS had reduced milk fat content compared with HSH and HCS. The concentration of milk urea nitrogen was greater for cows fed HCS compared with the other treatments. Total-tract digestion of NDF was reduced for cows fed the HCG diet. Total-tract starch digestion was increased for cows fed the HSH and HCS compared with HCG and LCS diets. Bacterial protein flow was unaffected by treatment. Ruminal ammonia concentration was reduced in cows fed the HCG and LCS diets compared with the HCS diet. Ruminal propionate increased and the acetate:propionate ratio decreased in cows fed the LCS diet compared with the HCS diet. Ruminal pH was greater for cows fed the HCS diet compared with cows fed the LCS diet. Diet digestibility and performance of mid- to late-lactation cows fed reduced-starch diets by partially replacing corn grain with soy hulls or corn silage was similar to or improved compared with cows fed a normal-starch diet.

  14. Effect of bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) seeds as a replacement protein source of soybean meal on performance and carcass characteristics of finishing Awassi lambs.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Abdullah Y; Muwalla, Marwan M; Qudsieh, Rasha I; Titi, Hosam H

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of replacing the protein source of soybean meal (SBM) with different levels of bitter vetch seeds (BVS) in the diets of finishing Awassi ram lambs on performance, and carcass characteristics. Diets were designed based on replacing SBM with BVS as a percentage of the diet. Diets were: control (0% BVS), substituting 5% of SBM (5% BVS), 10% of SBM (10% BVS) and the entire SBM in the ration with BVS (15% BVS). Forty eight lambs (18.74 +/- 3.95 kg initial body weight and 70 days of age) were randomly assigned to 4 treatment diets (12 lambs/treatment). Lambs were given an adaptation period of 10 days and the experiment lasted for 84 days. At the end of the trial, a digestibility experiment was performed and 6 lambs from each treatment were slaughtered to evaluate carcass characteristics. Average daily gain tended (P = 0.07) to be higher for lambs fed 10% BVS when compared to the other diets. Neutral detergent fiber digestibility was higher (P < 0.01) in control diet compared to the other diets. Fat depth (C) and leg fat depth (L3) tended (0.05 < P < 0.1) to be affected by BVS levels in the diet. Leg total lean % was the highest (P < 0.05) in 5% BVS and 10% BVS diets. These results suggest that substituting SBM with BVS in the diets did not influence performance or carcass characteristics of lambs. However, the cost of ration formulation decreases since SBM is a very expensive component of the ration.

  15. Differential Effects of Low-Phenylalanine Protein Sources on Brain Neurotransmitters and Behavior in C57Bl/6-Pahenu2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sawin, Emily A.; Murali, Sangita G.; Ney, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase, which metabolizes phenylalanine (phe) to tyrosine. A low-phe diet plus amino acid (AA) formula is necessary to prevent cognitive impairment; glycomacropeptide (GMP) contains minimal phe and provides a palatable alternative to the AA formula. Our objective was to assess neurotransmitter concentrations in brain and the behavioral phenotype of PKU mice (Pahenu2 on the C57Bl/6 background) and how this is affected by low-phe protein sources. Wild type (WT) and PKU mice, both male and female, were fed high-phe casein, low-phe AA, or low-phe GMP diets between 3–18 weeks of age. Behavioral phenotype was assessed using the open field and marble burying tests, and brain neurotransmitter concentration measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection system. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA with genotype, sex, and diet as the main treatment effects. Brain mass and the concentrations of catecholamines and serotonin were reduced in PKU mice compared to WT mice; the low-phe AA and GMP diets improved these parameters in PKU mice. Relative brain mass was increased in female PKU mice fed the GMP diet compared to the AA diet. PKU mice exhibited hyperactivity and impaired vertical exploration compared to their WT littermates during the open field test. Regardless of genotype or diet, female mice demonstrated increased vertical activity time and increased total ambulatory and horizontal activity counts compared with male mice. PKU mice fed the high-phe casein diet buried significantly fewer marbles than WT control mice fed casein; this was normalized in PKU mice fed the low-phe AA and GMP diets. In summary, C57Bl/6-Pahenu2 mice showed an impaired behavioral phenotype and reduced brain neurotransmitter concentrations that were improved by the low-phe AA or GMP diets. These data support lifelong adherence to a low-phe diet for PKU. PMID:24560888

  16. Dietary protein source and level alters growth in neon tetras.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutritional studies for aquarium fish like the neon tetra are sparse in comparison with those for food fish. To determine the optimum dietary protein level and source for growth of neon tetras, diets were formulated to contain 25, 35, 45 and 55% dietary protein from either marine animal protein or ...

  17. A by-product of swine slaughtering as a protein source in broiler diets: effects on performance, composition of excreta, litter quality and on foot pad health.

    PubMed

    Kölln, M; Loi-Brügger, A; Kamphues, J

    2017-06-01

    Foot pad dermatitis (FPD) is of great concern in poultry industry, and dietary strategies are needed to improve foot pad health because of animal welfare and economic reasons. As the main factor for the development of FPD is the DM content of litter (consisting mainly of excreta; Kamphues et al., 2011), there are different dietary approaches to influence this disease pattern. In two consecutive trials, a total of 200 broilers were kept from day 7 until the 35th day of life. They were divided into four groups at each trial and fed with one of four experimental diets, based on wheat and corn mainly, but differing in the protein source: Group 1 was fed a diet with soya bean meal (SBM) as the main protein source, whereas Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4 were assigned to diets with 4, 8 and 12% of a protein-rich (66.7% CP in DM) by-product of swine slaughtering [Swine Protein Meal (SPM); in exchange for SBM]. The inclusion of 12% SPM resulted in a decreased dietary potassium content of about 3 g/kg diet (Group 1 vs. 4). Increasing dietary levels of the by-product (8 and 12%) led to lowered feed intake (Group 1 vs. 4: ~10%) and weight gain (Group 1 vs. Group 4: ~8.5%). Although highest DM contents of excreta and litter were determined in Group 4, foot pad health was not influenced positively as hypothesized. Remarkable was the observed 'stickiness' of excreta when the by-product was included in the diet at increasing levels, presumably due to the high proportion of bones in the by-product. In conclusion, substituting SBM by 4% of the by-product of swine slaughtering in broiler diets did not impair performance parameters, but led to the most favourable foot pad scores in this study. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Differential Effects of Dietary Fat Content and Protein Source on Bone Phenotype and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Female C57Bl/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sawin, Emily A.; Stroup, Bridget M.; Murali, Sangita G.; O’Neill, Lucas M.; Ntambi, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycomacropeptide (GMP) is a 64-amino acid glycophosphopeptide released from κ-casein during cheesemaking that promotes satiety, reduces body fat, increases bone mass and infers prebiotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The impact of adiposity and gender on bone health is unclear. Objective To determine how feeding female mice diets providing 60% Fat Kcal (high-fat) or 13% Fat Kcal (control) with either GMP or casein as the protein source impacts: body composition, ex vivo fatty acid oxidation, bone (femoral) biomechanical performance, and the relationship between body composition and bone. Methods Weanling female C57Bl/6 mice were fed high-fat (60% Fat Kcal) or control diets (13% Fat Kcal) with GMP or casein from 3 to 32 weeks of age with assessment of body weight and food intake. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fatty acid oxidation was measured in liver, muscle, and fat tissues using 14C-palmitate. Plasma concentrations of hormones and cytokines were determined. Bone biomechanical performance was assessed by the 3-point bending test. Results Female mice fed high-fat diets showed increased fatty acid oxidation capacity in both gastrocnemius muscle and brown adipose tissue compared to mice fed the control diets with a lower fat content. Despite increased fat mass in mice fed the high-fat diets, there was little evidence of glucose impairment or inflammation. Mice fed the high-fat diets had significantly greater total body bone mineral density (BMD), femoral BMD, and femoral cross-sectional area than mice fed the control diets. Femora of mice fed the high-fat diets had increased yield load and maximum load before fracture, consistent with greater bone strength, but reduced post-yield displacement or ductility, consistent with bone brittleness. Female mice fed a high-fat GMP diet displayed increased fat oxidation capacity in subcutaneous fat relative to mice fed the high-fat casein diet. Regardless of dietary fat

  19. Factors influencing dietary protein sources in the PREMIER trial population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hwa; Miwa, Saki; Li, Yi-Ju; Wang, Yanfang; Levy, Erma; Lastor, Katherine; Champagne, Catherine

    2010-02-01

    Previous research suggests that protein intake, particularly plant protein, may benefit blood pressure control. However, very little has been published regarding protein sources in diets of US adults and factors influencing these choices. The purpose of this report is to describe specific sources of animal and plant proteins in diets of PREMIER clinical trial participants at baseline and how the PREMIER intervention, along with participant demographics, affected protein sources. Adult participants (n=809) who completed the 18-month PREMIER lifestyle intervention trial and had at least one diet recall at each of three study visits were included. Participants were recruited from four clinical centers in the Eastern, Southern, and Northeastern regions of United States. The PREMIER trial, conducted from 1999 to 2002, compared the impact on blood pressure of two structured behavioral interventions focusing on the traditional lifestyle modifications for blood pressure control with or without the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension dietary pattern. Protein sources were assessed by two unannounced 24-hour recalls at each of three study visits. Differences in protein sources were mainly related to participant demographics, with relatively moderate impact of the intervention. The top four protein sources for all the study participants were poultry, dairy, refined grains and beef, each contributing approximately 10% to 17% in descending order to the total protein intake at baseline. Animal and plant protein each comprised approximately 66% and 34%, respectively, to the total daily protein intake at baseline, and such overall contribution pattern remained relatively constant over time. However, sex, race, age, and body weight status all influenced contribution patterns from different food groups significantly. These influences significantly impact choice and are essential elements to consider when designing intervention programs to alter protein contributions from animal

  20. Dietary Protein Intake in Dutch Elderly People: A Focus on Protein Sources

    PubMed Central

    Tieland, Michael; Borgonjen-Van den Berg, Karin J.; Van Loon, Luc J. C.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sufficient high quality dietary protein intake is required to prevent or treat sarcopenia in elderly people. Therefore, the intake of specific protein sources as well as their timing of intake are important to improve dietary protein intake in elderly people. Objectives: to assess the consumption of protein sources as well as the distribution of protein sources over the day in community-dwelling, frail and institutionalized elderly people. Methods: Habitual dietary intake was evaluated using 2- and 3-day food records collected from various studies involving 739 community-dwelling, 321 frail and 219 institutionalized elderly people. Results: Daily protein intake averaged 71 ± 18 g/day in community-dwelling, 71 ± 20 g/day in frail and 58 ± 16 g/day in institutionalized elderly people and accounted for 16% ± 3%, 16% ± 3% and 17% ± 3% of their energy intake, respectively. Dietary protein intake ranged from 10 to 12 g at breakfast, 15 to 23 g at lunch and 24 to 31 g at dinner contributing together over 80% of daily protein intake. The majority of dietary protein consumed originated from animal sources (≥60%) with meat and dairy as dominant sources. Thus, 40% of the protein intake in community-dwelling, 37% in frail and 29% in institutionalized elderly originated from plant based protein sources with bread as the principle source. Plant based proteins contributed for >50% of protein intake at breakfast and between 34% and 37% at lunch, with bread as the main source. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from animal protein, with meat as the dominant source. Conclusion: Daily protein intake in these older populations is mainly (>80%) provided by the three main meals, with most protein consumed during dinner. More than 60% of daily protein intake consumed is of animal origin, with plant based protein sources representing nearly 40% of total protein consumed. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from animal protein, while

  1. Dietary Protein Intake in Dutch Elderly People: A Focus on Protein Sources.

    PubMed

    Tieland, Michael; Borgonjen-Van den Berg, Karin J; Van Loon, Luc J C; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2015-11-25

    Sufficient high quality dietary protein intake is required to prevent or treat sarcopenia in elderly people. Therefore, the intake of specific protein sources as well as their timing of intake are important to improve dietary protein intake in elderly people. to assess the consumption of protein sources as well as the distribution of protein sources over the day in community-dwelling, frail and institutionalized elderly people. Habitual dietary intake was evaluated using 2- and 3-day food records collected from various studies involving 739 community-dwelling, 321 frail and 219 institutionalized elderly people. Daily protein intake averaged 71 ± 18 g/day in community-dwelling, 71 ± 20 g/day in frail and 58 ± 16 g/day in institutionalized elderly people and accounted for 16% ± 3%, 16% ± 3% and 17% ± 3% of their energy intake, respectively. Dietary protein intake ranged from 10 to 12 g at breakfast, 15 to 23 g at lunch and 24 to 31 g at dinner contributing together over 80% of daily protein intake. The majority of dietary protein consumed originated from animal sources (≥60%) with meat and dairy as dominant sources. Thus, 40% of the protein intake in community-dwelling, 37% in frail and 29% in institutionalized elderly originated from plant based protein sources with bread as the principle source. Plant based proteins contributed for >50% of protein intake at breakfast and between 34% and 37% at lunch, with bread as the main source. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from animal protein, with meat as the dominant source. Daily protein intake in these older populations is mainly (>80%) provided by the three main meals, with most protein consumed during dinner. More than 60% of daily protein intake consumed is of animal origin, with plant based protein sources representing nearly 40% of total protein consumed. During dinner, >70% of the protein intake originated from animal protein, while during breakfast and lunch a large proportion of

  2. CombFunc: predicting protein function using heterogeneous data sources.

    PubMed

    Wass, Mark N; Barton, Geraint; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2012-07-01

    Only a small fraction of known proteins have been functionally characterized, making protein function prediction essential to propose annotations for uncharacterized proteins. In recent years many function prediction methods have been developed using various sources of biological data from protein sequence and structure to gene expression data. Here we present the CombFunc web server, which makes Gene Ontology (GO)-based protein function predictions. CombFunc incorporates ConFunc, our existing function prediction method, with other approaches for function prediction that use protein sequence, gene expression and protein-protein interaction data. In benchmarking on a set of 1686 proteins CombFunc obtains precision and recall of 0.71 and 0.64 respectively for gene ontology molecular function terms. For biological process GO terms precision of 0.74 and recall of 0.41 is obtained. CombFunc is available at http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/combfunc.

  3. Brain protein deciphered at Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This computer-generated model of a rat glutamate receptor is the first complete portrait of this important link in the nervous system. At the top of the Y-shaped protein, a pair of molecules splay outward like diverging prongs. The bottom section, which is embedded in a neuronal membrane, houses the ion channel. The resolution of this image is 3.6 angstroms per pixel, or just under four ten-billionths of a meter per image unit. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/01/21/glutamate-receptor/

  4. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration.

  5. Crowd sourcing difficult problems in protein science().

    PubMed

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Dedicated computing resources are expensive to develop, maintain, and administrate. Frequently, research groups require bursts of computing power, during which progress is still limited by available computing resources. One way to alleviate this bottleneck would be to use additional computing resources. Today, many computing devices remain idle most of the time. Passive volunteer computing exploits this unemployed reserve of computing power by allowing device-owners to donate computing time on their own devices. Another complementary way to alleviate bottlenecks in computing resources is to use more efficient algorithms. Engaging volunteer computing employs human intuition to help solve challenging problems for which efficient algorithms are difficult to develop or unavailable. Designing engaging volunteer computing projects is challenging but can result in high-quality solutions. Here, we highlight four examples. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. Effects of fasting and refeeding on the digestive tract of zebrafish (Danio rerio) fed with Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis), a high protein feed source.

    PubMed

    Lo Cascio, Patrizia; Calabrò, Concetta; Bertuccio, Clara; Paterniti, Irene; Palombieri, Deborah; Calò, Margherita; Albergamo, Ambrogina; Salvo, Andrea; Gabriella Denaro, Maria

    2017-07-01

    In the present work, morphological and molecular effects of short-term feed deprivation and refeeding with Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) on zebrafish digestive tract were determined. Once elucidated the proximate composition of Spirulina feed, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of peptide transporter (PepT1) and cholecystokinin (CCK8) were carried out in the gastrointestinal tract of zebrafish, previously morphologically investigated. Two and five fasting days caused not only morphostructural alterations, but also the downregulation of PepT1 and CCK8 proteins. Conversely, the recovery of normal morphological conditions, along with an increased PepT1 and CCK8 expression, were observed after refeeding with Spirulina. The increase of PepT1 expression in zebrafish may be responsible for the enhanced CCK8 secretion, so that both proteins may contribute to an improved digestion process during refeeding. These observations could be supported not only by compensatory mechanisms induced by fasting and refeeding but also by an higher protein quality of Spirulina-based diet.

  7. Bioactivities of alternative protein sources and their potential health benefits.

    PubMed

    Pihlanto, A; Mattila, P; Mäkinen, S; Pajari, A-M

    2017-08-14

    Increasing the utilisation of plant proteins is needed to support the production of protein-rich foods that could replace animal proteins in the human diet so as to reduce the strain that intensive animal husbandry poses to the environment. Lupins, quinoa and hempseed are significant sources of energy, high quality proteins, fibre, vitamins and minerals. In addition, they contain compounds such as polyphenols and bioactive peptides that can increase the nutritional value of these plants. From the nutritional standpoint, the right combination of plant proteins can supply sufficient amounts of essential amino acids for human requirements. This review aims at providing an overview of the current knowledge of the nutritional properties, beneficial and non-nutritive compounds, storage proteins, and potential health benefits of lupins, quinoa and hempseed.

  8. Long-term use of corn coproducts as a source of protein in beef finishing diets and the effects on carcass characteristics and round muscle quality.

    PubMed

    Stelzleni, A M; Segers, J R; Stewart, R L

    2016-03-01

    A finishing trial was conducted during the late spring and summer of 2 consecutive years to evaluate long-term feeding of corn gluten feed and dried distillers' grains with solubles in finishing rations in the southeastern United States on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality attributes. Each year, 36 steers (yr 1 BW = 396 ± 18 kg; yr 2 BW = 436 ± 23 kg) were assigned to 1 of 3 finishing diets that contained 1) 25% dried corn gluten feed (CGF), 2) 25% dried distillers' grains plus solubles (DDGS), or 3) 10% soybean meal and 15% ground corn (SBM) and evaluated over a 100-d feedlot period. All steers were previously fed their respective diets at 25% of DM in a corn silage-based stockering system for 84 d. During the 100-d feedlot trial, weights were recorded and carcass traits were estimated via ultrasound on d -0, 50, and 100. All steers were subsequently harvested under federal inspection and had carcass data collected for quality and yield traits. At 48 h postmortem, the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), and semimembranosus (SM) were collected for proximate analysis and aged for 7, 14, and 21 d for Warner-Bratzler shear and sensory analysis. Diet did not affect ( ≥ 0.14) BW, DMI, or ultrasound composition traits; however, DDGS steers had greater ADG ( = 0.05) than SBM steers and had greater ( = 0.04) G:F than CGF or SBM steers. There were no differences in carcass characteristics due to diet except the CGF carcasses had greater LM area and marbling scores ( ≤ 0.05). Protein source did not affect proximate composition, but the RF had greater percent moisture and lower percent protein compared with the VL and SM and greater percent lipid than the SM ( ≤ 0.01). Shear force analysis revealed a diet × aging period interaction ( = 0.04) where DDGS steaks were similar across all aging periods; however, steaks from SBM and CGF carcasses became more tender after 14 and 21 d of aging, respectively. Sensory panel results indicate

  9. Protein source and nutrient density in the diets of male broilers from 8 to 21 d of age: Effects on small intestine morphology.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Peebles, E D; Morgan, T W; Harkess, R L; Zhai, W

    2015-01-01

    In a companion study, high amino acid (AA) or apparent metabolizable energy (AME) densities in the diets of broilers from 8 to 21 d of age were found to improve feed conversion. A total of 1,120 male Ross×Ross 708 chicks were randomly allocated to 80 pens (8 treatments, 10 replications per treatment, 14 chicks per pen). A 2×2×2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to investigate the interaction among the protein source (high distillers dried grains with solubles diet [hDDGS] or high meat and bone meal diet [hMBM]), AA density (moderate or high), and AME density (2,998 or 3,100 kcal/kg) of diets on small intestine morphology. Duodenum, jejunum, and ileum samples from 2 chicks per pen were collected and measured individually at 21 d. Jejunum sections were processed for histological analysis. Chicks fed hDDGS diets exhibited longer small intestines than did chicks fed hMBM diets. Particularly, when chicks were fed high AA density diets, jejuna were longer in groups fed hDDGS diets than groups fed hMBM diets. Dietary treatments did not affect jejunum villus height, width, area, crypt depth, villus to crypt ratio, goblet cell size, or cell density. In birds fed diets containing a moderate AA and a high AME density, jejunum muscle layers of chicks fed hDDGS diets were thicker than those fed hMBM diets. Chicks exhibited a lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) and a higher BW gain when their crypts were shorter. In conclusion, an hDDGS diet may facilitate small intestine longitudinal growth in broilers, which may subsequently improve dietary nutrient absorption. In addition, broiler chicks with shallow intestinal crypts exhibited better growth performance.

  10. Food proteins: new sources from seeds. Fortified and processed seed proteins have a role in satisfying human protein needs.

    PubMed

    Altschul, A M

    1967-10-13

    Adequate protein nutrition is possible at lower cost without the undermining of man's satisfaction with his food. This potential requires the upgrading of the proteins of cereals by supplementation with amino acids and the development of new protein foods from low-cost sources such as the oilseeds; infant malnutrition can be eliminated by such means. The more sophisticated new foods such as protein beverages and textured products are proving acceptable to man and will supplement meager supplies of animal protein.

  11. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    SciTech Connect

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  12. Effect of dietary inclusion of toasted guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) meal as a source of protein on performance of White Leghorn layers.

    PubMed

    Rao, S V Rama; Raju, M V L N; Prakash, B; Reddy, E Pradeep Kumar; Panda, A K

    2015-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effect of including toasted (120°C/35 min) guar meal (GM, Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) in the diet on performance and egg shell quality of White Leghorn (WL) layers. Totals of 2376 and 2816 layer chickens (Babcock, BV 300) were randomly distributed into 27 and 32 replicates with 88 birds each in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Three diets in Experiment 1 (0, 50 and 100 g GM) and 4 diets in Experiment 2 (0, 50, 100 and 150 g GM/kg) were prepared having similar concentrations of energy and protein. Each diet was fed ad libitum to 9 and 8 replicates, respectively, in Experiments 1 (from 53 to 68 weeks) and 2 (35 to 46 weeks of age). Compared to soya bean meal (SBM) GM contained similar concentrations of protein, but was deficient in all essential amino acids except arginine, which was 70% higher than in SBM. Total non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) content in GM (166 g/kg) was lower than that of SBM (179 g/kg). Amongst different NSP fractions, GM contained higher levels of arabans, xylans, mannans and glucans compared to SBM. The galactomannan gum content in GM was 46 g/kg. Egg production (EP), body weight (BW), food intake (FI), food efficiency (FE) and egg quality (shell weight, shell per cent, shell thickness, Haugh unit score, egg density and egg breaking strength) parameters were not affected by incorporating GM up to 100 g/kg diet in Experiment 1. However, egg weight (EW) and egg mass (EM) were reduced significantly in groups fed on 100 g/kg diet. In Experiment 2, EP and FE were not affected by incorporating GM up to 100 g/kg, but were reduced at 150 g/kg diet. FI, EW, BW and egg quality parameters were not affected by incorporating toasted GM up to 150 g/kg diet. Based on the results of both experiments, it is concluded that toasted GM can be included in WL layer diets up to 100 g/kg without affecting EP, FE, EW, EM, Haugh unit score, BW and egg shell quality parameters.

  13. Protein source tryptophan versus pharmaceutical grade tryptophan as an efficacious treatment for chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Craig; Hudson, Susan Patricia; Hecht, Tracy; MacKenzie, Joan

    2005-04-01

    Intact protein rich in tryptophan was not seen as an alternative to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan since protein also contains large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) that compete for transport sites across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Deoiled gourd seed (an extremely rich source of tryptophan-22 mg tryptophan/1 g protein) was combined with glucose, a carbohydrate that reduces serum levels of competing LNAAs which was then compared to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan with carbohydrate as well as carbohydrate alone. Objective and subjective measures of sleep were employed to measure changes in sleep as part of a double blind placebo controlled study where subjects were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) Protein source tryptophan (deoiled gourd seed) in combination with carbohydrate; (2) pharmaceutical grade tryptophan in combination with carbohydrate; (3) carbohydrate alone. Out of 57 subjects 49 of those who began the study completed the three week protocol. Protein source tryptophan with carbohydrate and pharmaceutical grade tryptophan, but not carbohydrate alone, resulted in significant improvement on subjective and objective measures of insomnia. Protein source tryptophan with carbohydrate alone proved effective in significantly reducing time awake during the night. Protein source tryptophan is comparable to pharmaceutical grade tryptophan for the treatment of insomnia.

  14. Sources of dietary protein and risk of hypertension in a general Dutch population.

    PubMed

    Altorf-van der Kuil, Wieke; Engberink, Mariëlle F; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Boer, Jolanda M A; Monique Verschuren, W M

    2012-11-28

    Evidence suggests a small beneficial effect of dietary protein on blood pressure (BP), especially for plant protein. We examined the relationship between several types of dietary protein (total, plant, animal, dairy, meat and grain) and the risk of hypertension in a general population of 3588 Dutch adults, aged 26-65 years, who were free of hypertension at baseline. Measurements were done at baseline and after 5 and 10 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR), with 95 % CI, for incident hypertension were obtained in tertiles of energy-adjusted protein, using time-dependent Cox regression models. Models were adjusted for age, sex, BMI, education, smoking, baseline systolic BP, dietary confounders and protein from other sources (if applicable). Mean BP was 118/76 mmHg at baseline. Protein intake was 85 (sd 22) g/d (approximately 15 % of energy) with 62 % originating from animal sources. The main sources of protein were dairy products (28 %), meat (24 %) and grain (19 %). During the follow-up, 1568 new cases of hypertension were identified (44 % of the participants). Energy-adjusted intake of total protein, plant protein and animal protein was not significantly associated with hypertension risk (all HR approximately 1·00, P>0·60). Protein from grain showed a significant inverse association with incident hypertension, with a HR of 0·85 (95 % CI 0·73, 1·00, P trend = 0·04) for the upper tertile ( ≥ 18 g/d) v. the lower tertile ( < 14 g/d), whereas dairy protein and meat protein were not associated with incident hypertension. In conclusion, higher intake of grain protein may contribute to the prevention of hypertension, which warrants confirmation in other population-based studies and randomised controlled trials.

  15. Mixed compared with single-source proteins in high-protein diets affect kidney structure and function differentially in obese fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay G; Wojcik, Jennifer L; Ibrahim, Naser H M; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-02-01

    Questions remain regarding the potential negative effects of dietary high protein (HP) on kidney health, particularly in the context of obesity in which the risk for renal disease is already increased. To examine whether some of the variability in HP effects on kidney health may be due to source of protein, obese fa/fa Zucker rats were given HP (35% of energy from protein) diets containing either casein, soy protein, or a mixed source of animal and plant proteins for 12 weeks. Control lean and obese rats were given diets containing casein at normal protein (15% of energy from protein) levels. Body weight and blood pressure were measured, and markers of renal structural changes, damage, and function were assessed. Obesity alone resulted in mild renal changes, as evidenced by higher kidney weights, proteinuria, and glomerular volumes. In obese rats, increasing the protein level using the single, but not mixed, protein sources resulted in higher renal fibrosis compared with the lean rats. The mixed-protein HP group also had lower levels of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, even though this diet further increased kidney and glomerular size. Soy and mixed-protein HP diets also resulted in a small number of damaged glomeruli, while soy compared with mixed-protein HP diet delayed the increase in blood pressure over time. Since obesity itself confers added risk of renal disease, an HP diet from mixed-protein sources that enables weight loss but has fewer risks to renal health may be advantageous.

  16. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D. ); Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M. ); Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y. ); Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  17. Laue diffraction protein crystallography at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Getzoff, E.D.; McRee, D.; Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Sweet, R.M.; Moffat, K.; Ng, K.; Rivers, M.L.; Schildkamp, W.; Teng, T.Y.; Singer, P.T.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    A new facility for the study of protein crystal structure using Laue diffraction has been established at the X26 beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The characteristics of the beam line and diffraction apparatus are described. Selected results of some of the initial experiments are discussed briefly by beam line users to illustrate the scope of the experimental program. Because the Laue method permits the recording of large data sets in a single shot, one goal in establishing this facility has been to develop the means to study time-resolved structures within protein crystals. Systems being studied include: the reactions catalyzed by trypsin; photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin; and the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

  18. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  19. Use of different dietary protein sources for lactating goats: milk production and composition as functions of protein degradability and amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Sanz Sampelayo, M R; Pérez, M L; Gil Extremera, F; Boza, J J; Boza, J

    1999-03-01

    To establish the effect of the nature of four different protein sources [fababeans, 27.8% crude protein (CP); sunflower meal, 41.7% CP; corn gluten feed, 18.8% CP; and cottonseed, 18.3% CP] on milk protein production by goats, the ruminal degradation of these feeds was studied as was the amino acid (AA) composition of the original material and that of the undegradable fractions of the protein sources. Four diets were designed; 20% of their protein was supplied by each of the different sources. Four groups of 5 Granadina goats were used to study the utilization of these diets for milk production. No significant differences were observed in dry matter intake or milk production. The milk produced by goats fed the diet containing sunflower meal had the lowest protein concentration; the highest milk protein concentration was observed for goats fed the diet containing corn gluten feed. From a multivariate analysis, it was deduced that the quickly degradable protein fraction in the rumen and the ruminally undegradable protein fraction were the components of the protein sources most directly related to the milk protein produced. Given the similar AA profiles of the undegradable fractions of the different protein sources, the possible supplementation achieved from these ruminally undegradable fractions must be established by the amount of protein supplied regardless of AA composition.

  20. Nutritional evaluation of poultry by-product meal as a protein source for ruminants: effects on performance and nutrient flow and disappearance in steers.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, D W; Larson, B T; Bauer, M L; Branco, A F; McLeod, K R; Harmon, D L; Mitchell, G E

    1998-09-01

    We conducted three studies with steers to evaluate poultry by-product meal (PBM) as a supplemental N source for ruminants. An in situ study compared the solubility, degradation rate, and ruminal escape of PBM N with blood meal (BM), corn gluten meal (CGM), and soybean meal (SBM) N. Additionally, an 84-d growth study (n = 95, 228+/-5 kg BW) and a digestion trial (6 x 6 Latin square) were conducted. The basal diet for the growth and digestion studies consisted of 49% corn silage, 36% cottonseed hulls, and 15% supplement (DM basis). Sources of supplemental N (% of total supplemental N) were 100% SBM and 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% PBM, with urea used to balance for N. In situ ruminal escape N (25.2, 55.3, 86.7, and 98.9% for SBM, PBM, CGM, and BM, respectively) was greater (P < .05) for PBM than for SBM; however, a greater (P < .05) proportion of BM and CGM N escaped ruminal degradation compared with PBM. Dry matter intake, ADG and gain/ feed increased linearly (P < .003) as PBM increased; however, no differences (P > .48) were observed in these variables for 100% PBM compared with 100% SBM. Duodenal N flow and small intestinal N disappearance increased linearly (P < .05) as PBM increased in the diet. Bacterial N flow to the small intestine was not affected (P > .19) by treatment; however, 100% SBM decreased (P < .04) bacterial CP synthesis (g bacterial N/kg OM disappearance from the stomach) compared with 0 and 100% PBM. In vivo ruminal escape N of PBM and SBM was 40.6 and 13.7%, respectively. Ruminal NH3 N decreased linearly (P < .001) as PBM increased. These data suggest that PBM can replace SBM as a source of supplemental N for steer calves that consume a diet based on corn silage and cottonseed hulls.

  1. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σS. Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and

  2. Proteins of Brassicaceae oilseeds and their potential as a plant protein source.

    PubMed

    Wanasundara, Janitha P D

    2011-08-01

    Among the commercially cultivated Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) plants, Brassica juncea, Brassica napus, Brassica rapa, and Sinapis alba store significant amounts of oil and protein in the seed. At present, Brassica seed proteins are primarily used for livestock feeding based on the nutritional value. The point of curiosity is whether the present knowledge on the protein structure, biochemical characteristics, nutritive value, and the recovery processes are inadequate to develop Brassica proteins into a usable plant protein source or these proteins are of substandard for uses beyond animal nutrition applications. Cruciferin (11S) and napin (2S) are the predominant storage proteins of Brassicaceae seeds that contribute to different properties and functions. A gamut of information is available on the chemistry, nutritional value, as well as the functionality in foods, and associated non-protein components of canola/rapeseed storage proteins. The intention of this article is to critically review what is known about the predominant storage proteins of commercially produced Brassicaceae seeds relative to the above aspects and identify the knowledge gaps.

  3. Dietary protein source influence on body size and composition in growing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel L; Barry, R Jeff; Powell, Mickie L; Nagy, Tim R; D'Abramo, L R; Watts, Stephen A

    2013-09-01

    The importance of nutritional components on growth and body composition outcomes has been demonstrated in multiple model organisms. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) have an established role in research laboratories for its utility in understanding developmental biology and genetics, the influence of diet composition on basic growth outcomes is less well demonstrated. In the current study, four protein sources were tested in isolation using isonitrogenous diets or combined using a defined lab diet. Fish (n≈60/group) were group housed (n≤10 fish/1.8 L tank) and fed ad libitum three times daily for 12 weeks. Fish were assessed for effects on length, body weight, and body composition (lean and fat mass). Individuals fed wheat gluten protein were significantly shorter in length, with significantly lower body weight and lean mass in both male and female fish, although percent body fat was high compared with other diets. Casein-fed fish similarly had significantly reduced body length, body weight, and lean and fat mass in both male and female fish, with a low percent body fat compared with other diets (leanest). Fish protein hydrolysate-fed fish had significantly lower lean mass and a high percent body fat, whereas soy protein isolate diet performed similarly to a mixed-protein control diet for all measured outcomes. These results suggest that the protein source, with accompanying amino acid ratios or additional protein source differences, has a significant impact on growth and body composition outcomes in zebrafish when fed in a semipurified, defined diet background.

  4. Protein source in a high-protein diet modulates reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Jennifer L; Devassy, Jessay G; Wu, Yinghong; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2016-01-01

    High-protein diets are being promoted to reduce insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis in metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the effect of protein source in high-protein diets on reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was examined. Fa/fa Zucker rats were provided normal-protein (15% of energy) casein, high-protein (35% of energy) casein, high-protein soy, or high-protein mixed diets with animal and plant proteins. The high-protein mixed diet reduced area under the curve for insulin during glucose tolerance testing, fasting serum insulin and free fatty acid concentrations, homeostatic model assessment index, insulin to glucose ratio, and pancreatic islet cell area. The high-protein mixed and the high-protein soy diets reduced hepatic lipid concentrations, liver to body weight ratio, and hepatic steatosis rating. These improvements were observed despite no differences in body weight, feed intake, or adiposity among high-protein diet groups. The high-protein casein diet had minimal benefits. A high-protein mixed diet was the most effective for modulating reductions in insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis independent of weight loss, indicating that the source of protein within a high-protein diet is critical for the management of these metabolic syndrome parameters. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  5. Predicting protein-protein interactions from multimodal biological data sources via nonnegative matrix tri-factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris; Nie, Feiping

    2013-04-01

    Protein interactions are central to all the biological processes and structural scaffolds in living organisms, because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Several high-throughput methods, for example, yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry method, can help determine protein interactions, which, however, suffer from high false-positive rates. Moreover, many protein interactions predicted by one method are not supported by another. Therefore, computational methods are necessary and crucial to complete the interactome expeditiously. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting protein interactions from a new mathematical perspective--sparse matrix completion, and propose a novel nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based matrix completion approach to predict new protein interactions from existing protein interaction networks. Through using manifold regularization, we further develop our method to integrate different biological data sources, such as protein sequences, gene expressions, protein structure information, etc. Extensive experimental results on four species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Caenorhabditis elegans, have shown that our new methods outperform related state-of-the-art protein interaction prediction methods.

  6. Energy restriction but not protein source affects antioxidant capacity in athletes.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Janet W; Shute, Max; Heffron, Sean P; Saker, Korinn E

    2006-09-15

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of energy restriction on antioxidant capacity in trained athletes. Secondly, our study determined whether dietary protein source influenced the antioxidant response, performance, and immunity. Twenty male cyclists consumed either whey or casein supplement (40 g/day) in addition to their diet for 17 days. All subjects subsequently underwent 4 days of energy restriction using a formula diet (20 kcal/kg) while continuing protein supplementation. Energy restriction caused 2.7 +/- 0.3 kg weight loss, increased lymphocyte total glutathione (tGSH) 37%, red blood cell glutathione peroxidase 48%, plasma cysteine 12%, and decreased whole blood reduced to oxidized GSH (rGSH/GSSG) ratio by 52%. The only immunity factor altered by energy restriction was an increase in stimulated phagocytosis (65%). Acute submaximal exercise reduced blood tGSH but increased glutathione peroxidase. Performance of a high intensity cycle test following 45 min of moderate exercise tended to be reduced by energy restriction (P = 0.06) but was unaffected by protein source. Energy restriction caused a negative nitrogen balance with no difference from dietary protein source. In conclusion, acute energy restriction increased plasma cysteine and several markers of the glutathione antioxidant system in trained athletes. A high cysteine dietary protein source did not influence these responses.

  7. Effect of dry- versus wet-autoclaving of spray-dried egg albumen compared with casein as protein sources on apparent nitrogen and energy balance, plasma urea nitrogen and glucose concentrations, and growth performance of neonatal swine.

    PubMed

    Watkins, K L; Veum, T L

    2010-08-01

    Forty crossbred neonatal pigs with an average initial age of 4 d and BW of 2.16 kg were used in a 28-d experiment to evaluate the nutritional effects of autoclaving a commercial sugar-free, spray-dried egg albumen (EA) compared with casein. Basal diet protein sources were lactic acid casein and EA. Two more dietary treatments were made by replacing the EA with dry-autoclaved EA (DAEA) or wet-autoclaved EA (WAEA, EA and water mixed in a 1.0:1.2 ratio before autoclaving). The DAEA and WAEA were autoclaved at 121 degrees C and 1.75 kg/cm(2) pressure for 30 min, and WAEA was oven-dried after autoclaving. Analyzed trypsin inhibitor units/mg of EA, DAEA, and WAEA were 535.0, 9.0, and 6.5, respectively. Pigs were fed the diets in gruel form to appetite in individual metabolism cages every 2 h during the experiment. Blood samples were taken on d 7, 14, and 21, and total urine and fecal grab-samples were collected from d 14 to 21 of the experiment. Response criteria were N and energy balance, plasma urea N (PUN) and glucose concentrations, and growth performance. The WAEA was a higher quality protein source for neonatal pigs than DAEA. Pigs fed the diet containing WAEA absorbed and retained more (P < 0.05) grams of N/d, had higher (P < 0.05) percentages of N and energy that were absorbed and retained/intake, had lower (P < 0.05) concentrations of PUN overall, and had higher (P < 0.05) ADG and G:F than pigs fed the diet containing DAEA. Most response criteria of pigs fed the diets containing DAEA or EA were not different, although pigs fed the diet containing DAEA had lower (P < 0.05) overall PUN concentrations, and pigs fed the diet containing EA had higher (P < 0.05) percentages of energy absorbed and retained/intake, and higher ADG and G:F than pigs fed the diet containing DAEA. Growth performance was not different for pigs fed the diets containing WAEA or casein. However, pigs fed the diet containing casein excreted less (P < 0.05) fecal N, retained more (P < 0/05) grams

  8. Indigenous lactobacilli strains of food and human sources reverse enteropathogenic E. coli O26:H11-induced damage in intestinal epithelial cell lines: effect on redistribution of tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Ruchi; Mandal, Hemanti; Bagchi, Tamishraha

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the neutralizing effect of lactobacilli isolated from indigenous food and human sources on enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) O26 : H11-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in vitro. This was assessed by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability assays using intestinal cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2. Furthermore, the expression and distribution of tight junction (TJ) proteins were analysed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. The nine strains used in the study were from different species viz. Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillushelveticus, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum. All strains were able to reverse the decrease in TEER and corresponding increase in permeability across E. coli-infected monolayers. Maximum reversal was observed after 18 h [up to 93.8±2.0 % by L. rhamnosus GG followed by L. fermentum IIs11.2 (92.6±2.2 %) and L. plantarum GRI-2 (91.9±0.9 %)] of lactobacilli exposure following EPEC O26 : H11 infection. All strains were able to redistribute the TJ proteins to the cell periphery either partially or completely. Moreover, L. helveticus FA-7 was also able to significantly increase the mRNA expression of ZO-1 and claudin-1 (2.5-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively; P<0.05). The rapid reversal observed by these strains could be mostly because of the redistribution rather than increased mRNA expression of TJ proteins. In conclusion, L. helveticus FA-7, L. fermentum FA-1 and L. plantarum GRI-2 were good in all the aspects studied, and the other strains were good in some aspects. L. helveticus FA-7, L. fermentum FA-1 and L. plantarum GRI-2 can therefore be used for potential therapeutic purpose against intestinal epithelial dysfunction.

  9. Interaction of protein percent with caloric density and protein source for lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, H H; Blanco, O; Harris, B; Beede, D K

    1985-07-01

    Experiment 1 was to test effect of three ratios of energy to protein in complete mixed diets for 36 lactating cows in three, 28-d periods. Energy was varied with cottonseed hulls, pelleted ground corrugated boxes, and a mixture of the two. Crude protein was varied with soybean meal to give energy:crude protein of 5.7, 5.0, and 4.6 for each energy amount. Cottonseed meal was compared with soybean meal in corrugated box diets. Feed intake was much higher with cottonseed hulls, and appreciable feedlot bloat resulted from pelleted ground corrugated box diets. Data adjusted to equal feed intake showed significant effect of energy to crude protein ratio on milk yield and improved digestion of organic matter with soybean meal vs. cottonseed meal. Experiment 2 tested the hypothesis that lactating cows consuming high-protein alfalfa may benefit from supplemental protein. Diets were 50% forage. Six diets were 14 or 18% crude protein in three ratios of alfalfa hay to corn silage (0:100, 50:50, 100:0). Additional corn silage diets were to compare: 14 versus 18% protein from distiller's dried grains with solubles only and with .5 or .9% urea (four diets); two 14% protein diets compared .6% added potassium chloride with or without .5% urea. Thirty-six Holstein cows in early lactation received one of the 12 diets in each of three 28-d periods. Distiller's grains with solubles markedly depressed milk yield (2.2 kg/d) and milk protein (.22%); heat damage of distiller's grains was evident. Protein interacted with alfalfa so gain in milk from 18 versus 14% increased from .55 to 1.36 to 2.66 kg/d as alfalfa changed from 0 to 50 to 100%. Thus, crude protein of alfalfa was not as effective as that from soybean meal in supporting milk yield.

  10. High Power Josephson Effect Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    large spacing was nsed ,along with cooling water, os Iao a d$ to ensure the substrate temperature did not rise durn theCox flow Osiltr.adsaljnto ry~ h m...Here two arra’s. a 400 s.m Josephson effect detector and an SIS mixer are "I integrated on a single silicon substrate . One array func- tions as the...junction’s shunt resistor, on array’s output power and detector’s current- voltage characteristics are also discussed. I. INTRODUCTION - U Phb &z locked

  11. Dietary protein source affects lipid metabolism in the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Dias, J; Alvarez, M J; Arzel, J; Corraze, G; Diez, A; Bautista, J M; Kaushik, S J

    2005-09-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of dietary protein sources on lipogenesis and fat deposition in a marine teleost, the European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Four isonitrogenous (crude protein (CP, Nx6.25), 44% DM) and isoenergetic (22-23 kJ/g DM) diets were formulated to contain one of the following as the major protein source: fish meal (FM), one of two soy protein concentrates (SPC) and corn gluten meal (CGM). Apparent digestibility coefficients of the diets and raw ingredients, as well as soluble nitrogen (ammonia and urea) and phosphorus excretion were measured. Growth rates of seabass fed plant protein-based diets were significantly lower than those fed fish meal based diet. The protein utilisation was strongly correlated to the dietary essential amino acids index. Measurements of N excretion (ammonia and urea nitrogen) confirmed these data. Daily fat gain at the whole body level ranged between 1.1 to 1.7 g/kg BW, with the highest values being recorded in fish fed the fish meal based diet. Levels of plasma triglycerides and cholesterol were lower in fish fed soy protein diets than in those fed the diet solely based on fish meal. Soy protein rich diets decreased the activities of selected hepatic lipogenic enzymes (glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, ATP-citrate lysase, acetylcoenzyme A carboxylase and fatty acid synthetase). Highest lipogenic enzyme activities where found in fish fed the fish meal diet, except for fatty acid synthetase which was increased in seabass fed the corn-gluten meal based diets. Overall data suggest that dietary protein sources affects fat deposition and the lipogenic potential in European seabass.

  12. CHANGES IN DISULFIDE BOND CONTENT OF PROTEINS IN A YEAST STRAIN LACKING MAJOR SOURCES OF NADPH

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Karyl I.; Carroll, Christopher A.; Weintraub, Susan T.; Mc-Alister-Henn, Lee

    2006-01-01

    A yeast mutant lacking the two major cytosolic sources of NADPH, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf1p) and NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (Idp2p), has been demonstrated to lose viability when shifted to medium with acetate or oleate as the carbon source. This loss in viability was found to correlate with an accumulation of endogenous oxidative byproducts of respiration and peroxisomal β-oxidation. To assess effects on cellular protein of endogenous versus exogenous oxidative stress, a proteomics approach was used to compare disulfide bond-containing proteins in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain following shifts to acetate and oleate media with those in the parental strain following similar shifts to media containing hydrogen peroxide. Among prominent disulfide bond-containing proteins were several with known antioxidant functions. These and several other proteins were detected as multiple electrophoretic isoforms, with some isoforms containing disulfide bonds under all conditions and other isoforms exhibiting a redox-sensitive content of disulfide bonds, i.e., in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain and in the hydrogen peroxide-challenged parental strain. The disulfide bond content of some isoforms of these proteins was also elevated in the parental strain grown on glucose, possibly suggesting a redirection of NADPH reducing equivalents to support rapid growth. Further examination of protein carbonylation in the idp2Δzwf1Δ strain shifted to oleate medium also led to identification of common and unique protein targets of endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:17157197

  13. The protein source determines the potential of high protein diets to attenuate obesity development in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Liisberg, Ulrike; Myrmel, Lene Secher; Fjære, Even; Rønnevik, Alexander K.; Bjelland, Susanne; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Holm, Jacob Bak; Basse, Astrid Linde; Hansen, Jacob B.; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2016-01-01

    abstract The notion that the obesogenic potential of high fat diets in rodents is attenuated when the protein:carbohydrate ratio is increased is largely based on studies using casein or whey as the protein source. We fed C57BL/6J mice high fat-high protein diets using casein, soy, cod, beef, chicken or pork as protein sources. Casein stood out as the most efficient in preventing weight gain and accretion of adipose mass. By contrast, mice fed diets based on pork or chicken, and to a lesser extent mice fed cod or beef protein, had increased adipose tissue mass gain relative to casein fed mice. Decreasing the protein:carbohydrate ratio in diets with casein or pork as protein sources led to accentuated fat mass accumulation. Pork fed mice were more obese than casein fed mice, and relative to casein, the pork-based feed induced substantial accumulation of fat in classic interscapular brown adipose tissue accompanied by decreased UCP1 expression. Furthermore, intake of a low fat diet with casein, but not pork, as a protein source reversed diet-induced obesity. Compared to pork, casein seems unique in maintaining the classical brown morphology in interscapular brown adipose tissue with high UCP1 expression. This was accompanied by increased expression of genes involved in a futile cycling of fatty acids. Our results demonstrate that intake of high protein diets based on other protein sources may not have similar effects, and hence, the obesity protective effect of high protein diets is clearly modulated by protein source. PMID:27386160

  14. Effects of diuretics on urinary proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xundou

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker is the measurable change associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood which has mechanisms to keep the internal environment homeostatic, urine is more likely to reflect changes of the body. As a result, urine is likely to be a better biomarker source than blood. However, since the urinary proteome is affected by many factors, including diuretics, careful evaluation of those effects is necessary if urinary proteomics is used for biomarker discovery. The human orthologs of most of these 14 proteins affected are stable in the healthy human urinary proteome, and 10 of them are reported as disease biomarkers. Thus, our results suggest that the effects of diuretics deserve more attention in future urinary protein biomarker studies. Moreover, the distinct effects of diuretics on the urinary proteome may provide clues to the mechanisms of diuretics.

  15. Iron-sulfur Proteins Are the Major Source of Protein-bound Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes Formed in Escherichia coli Cells under Nitric Oxide Stress

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Aaron P.; Duan, Xuewu; Huang, Hao; Ding, Huangen

    2011-01-01

    Protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have been observed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells under nitric oxide (NO) stress. The identity of proteins that bind DNICs, however, still remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that iron-sulfur proteins are the major source of protein-bound DNICs formed in Escherichia coli cells under NO stress. Expression of recombinant iron-sulfur proteins, but not the proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, almost doubles the amount of protein-bound DNICs formed in E. coli cells after NO exposure. Purification of recombinant proteins from the NO-exposed E. coli cells further confirms that iron-sulfur proteins, but not the proteins without iron-sulfur clusters, are modified forming protein-bound DINCs. Deletion of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscA and SufA to block the [4Fe-4S] cluster biogenesis in E. coli cells largely eliminates the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, suggesting that iron-sulfur clusters are mainly responsible for the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs in cells. Furthermore, depletion of “chelatable iron pool” in the wild-type E. coli cells effectively removes iron-sulfur clusters from proteins and concomitantly diminishes the NO-mediated formation of protein-bound DNICs, indicating that iron-sulfur clusters in proteins constitute at least part of “chelatable iron pool” in cells. PMID:21420489

  16. Dietary protein sources and the risk of stroke in men and women.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Adam M; Pan, An; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Stampfer, Meir; Hu, Frank B; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Willett, Walter C

    2012-03-01

    Few dietary protein sources have been studied prospectively in relation to stroke. We examined the relation between foods that are major protein sources and risk of stroke. We prospectively followed 84 010 women aged 30 to 55 years at baseline and 43 150 men aged 40 to 75 years at baseline without diagnosed cancer, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Diet was assessed repeatedly by a standardized and validated questionnaire. We examined the association between protein sources and incidence of stroke using a proportional hazard model adjusted for stroke risk factors. During 26 and 22 years of follow-up in women and men, respectively, we documented 2633 and 1397 strokes, respectively. In multivariable analyses, higher intake of red meat was associated with an elevated risk of stroke, whereas a higher intake of poultry was associated with a lower risk. In models estimating the effects of exchanging different protein sources, compared with 1 serving/day of red meat, 1 serving/day of poultry was associated with a 27% (95% CI, 12%-39%) lower risk of stroke, nuts with a 17% (95% CI. 4%-27%) lower risk, fish with a 17% (95% CI, 0%-30%) lower risk, low-fat dairy with an 11% (95% CI, 5%-17%) lower risk, and whole-fat dairy with a 10% (95% CI, 4%-16%) lower risk. We did not see significant associations with exchanging legumes or eggs for red meat. These data suggest that stroke risk may be reduced by replacing red meat with other dietary sources of protein.

  17. Dietary Protein Source Influence on Body Size and Composition in Growing Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R. Jeff; Powell, Mickie L.; Nagy, Tim R.; D'Abramo, L.R.; Watts, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The importance of nutritional components on growth and body composition outcomes has been demonstrated in multiple model organisms. Although zebrafish (Danio rerio) have an established role in research laboratories for its utility in understanding developmental biology and genetics, the influence of diet composition on basic growth outcomes is less well demonstrated. In the current study, four protein sources were tested in isolation using isonitrogenous diets or combined using a defined lab diet. Fish (n≈60/group) were group housed (n≤10 fish/1.8 L tank) and fed ad libitum three times daily for 12 weeks. Fish were assessed for effects on length, body weight, and body composition (lean and fat mass). Individuals fed wheat gluten protein were significantly shorter in length, with significantly lower body weight and lean mass in both male and female fish, although percent body fat was high compared with other diets. Casein-fed fish similarly had significantly reduced body length, body weight, and lean and fat mass in both male and female fish, with a low percent body fat compared with other diets (leanest). Fish protein hydrolysate-fed fish had significantly lower lean mass and a high percent body fat, whereas soy protein isolate diet performed similarly to a mixed-protein control diet for all measured outcomes. These results suggest that the protein source, with accompanying amino acid ratios or additional protein source differences, has a significant impact on growth and body composition outcomes in zebrafish when fed in a semipurified, defined diet background. PMID:23656299

  18. Variations in Protein Concentration and Nitrogen Sources in Different Positions of Grain in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangnan; Zhou, Longjing; Liu, Fulai; Zhou, Qin; Cai, Jian; Wang, Xiao; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The distribution patterns of total protein and protein components in different layers of wheat grain were investigated using the pearling technique, and the sources of different protein components and pearling fractions were identified using 15N isotope tracing methods. It was found that N absorbed from jointing to anthesis (JA) and remobilized to the grain after anthesis was the principal source of grain N, especially in the outer layer. For albumin and globulin, the amount of N absorbed during different stages all showed a decreasing trend from the surface layer to the center part. Whereas, for globulin and glutenin, the N absorbed after anthesis accounted for the main part indicating that for storage protein, the utilization of N assimilated after anthesis is greater than that of the stored N assimilated before anthesis. It is concluded that manipulation of the N application rate during different growth stages could be an effective approach to modulate the distribution of protein fractions in pearled grains for specific end-uses. PMID:27446169

  19. Lysine requirement of broiler chicks as affected by protein source and method of statistical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barbour, G; Latshaw, J D; Bishop, B

    1993-09-01

    1. An experiment was designed to test if the lysine requirement, expressed as g lysine/kg CP, was the same for several protein sources. 2. Groundnut meal, groundnut meal adjusted with indispensable amino acids or sesame meal supplied the dietary CP at 180 g/kg diet. Increments of lysine (1.5 g/kg diet) were added to each of these diets. 3. The gain, food intake and food efficiency responses of broiler chicks were analysed using a quadratic equation and a two-slope method. An estimate of lysine requirements was also obtained from a survey of college students. 4. The different methods produced widely different estimates of lysine requirement. 5. The average lysine requirement was estimated at 50.1 g lysine/kg CP for groundnut meal, 61.7 for adjusted groundnut meal and 54.9 for sesame meal. 6. Reasons for the effect of statistical analysis and protein source on lysine requirement are discussed.

  20. A carnivorous sundew plant prefers protein over chitin as a source of nitrogen from its traps.

    PubMed

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Krausko, Miroslav; Adamec, Lubomír

    2016-07-01

    Carnivorous plants have evolved in nutrient-poor wetland habitats. They capture arthropod prey, which is an additional source of plant growth limiting nutrients. One of them is nitrogen, which occurs in the form of chitin and proteins in prey carcasses. In this study, the nutritional value of chitin and protein and their digestion traits in the carnivorous sundew Drosera capensis L. were estimated using stable nitrogen isotope abundance. Plants fed on chitin derived 49% of the leaf nitrogen from chitin, while those fed on the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) derived 70% of its leaf nitrogen from this. Moreover, leaf nitrogen content doubled in protein-fed in comparison to chitin-fed plants indicating that the proteins were digested more effectively in comparison to chitin and resulted in significantly higher chlorophyll contents. The surplus chlorophyll and absorbed nitrogen from the protein digestion were incorporated into photosynthetic proteins - the light harvesting antennae of photosystem II. The incorporation of insect nitrogen into the plant photosynthetic apparatus may explain the increased rate of photosynthesis and plant growth after feeding. This general response in many genera of carnivorous plants has been reported in many previous studies.

  1. Protein and lipid sources affect cholesterol concentrations of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z J; Hardy, R W

    2004-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of protein and lipid sources on cholesterol, AA, and fatty acid content, and on biological performance of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone). In Exp. 1, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish meal; soybean meal; casein; fish meal + soybean meal; fish meal + casein; soybean meal + casein; and fish meal + soybean meal + casein. In Exp. 2, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish oil; soy oil; poultry fat; fish oil + soy oil; fish oil + poultry fat; soy oil + poultry fat; and fish oil + soy oil + poultry fat. Nine shrimp (average BW 570 mg) were stocked per 60-L tank, with three tanks per diet in each experiment. Shrimp were fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 28 d. Protein sources affected shrimp cholesterol, feed consumption, feed efficiency, protein consumption, protein efficiency ratio, and crude body fat (P < or = 0.05), but not weight gain, survival, hepatosomatic index, body protein, ash, and AA composition. Body (without hepatopancreas) cholesterol concentrations were the highest in shrimp fed the diet containing fish meal (0.81%), lowest for those fed the casein diet (0.64%), and intermediate in the other dietary treatment groups (range 0.71 to 0.74%). Lipid source also affected shrimp body cholesterol, body fatty acid profiles, and fatty acid profiles in the hepatopancreas (P < or = 0.05), but not growth performance, body protein, fat, ash, and cholesterol concentrations in the hepatopancreas. Shrimp fed the fish oil diet had the highest body cholesterol (0.75%), whereas those fed the soy oil or poultry fat diets were lowest (0.66 and 0.65%, respectively). Results indicate that by replacing fish meal and fish oil with soybean meal and soy oil, shrimp growth performance is not affected, but body cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  2. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Pasiakos, Stefan M.; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R.; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007–2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public. PMID:26308049

  3. Sources and Amounts of Animal, Dairy, and Plant Protein Intake of US Adults in 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Lieberman, Harris R; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2015-08-21

    Dietary guidelines suggest consuming a mixed-protein diet, consisting of high-quality animal, dairy, and plant-based foods. However, current data on the distribution and the food sources of protein intake in a free-living, representative sample of US adults are not available. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2007-2010, were used in these analyses (n = 10,977, age ≥ 19 years). Several US Department of Agriculture (USDA) databases were used to partition the composition of foods consumed into animal, dairy, or plant components. Mean ± SE animal, dairy, and plant protein intakes were determined and deciles of usual intakes were estimated. The percentages of total protein intake derived from animal, dairy, and plant protein were 46%, 16%, and 30%, respectively; 8% of intake could not be classified. Chicken and beef were the primary food sources of animal protein intake. Cheese, reduced-fat milk, and ice cream/dairy desserts were primary sources of dairy protein intake. Yeast breads, rolls/buns, and nuts/seeds were primary sources of plant protein intake. This study provides baseline data for assessing the effectiveness of public health interventions designed to alter the composition of protein foods consumed by the American public.

  4. Continuous cell-free protein synthesis using glycolytic intermediates as energy sources.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Chang-Gil; Oh, In-Seok; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2008-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that glycolytic intermediates can serve as efficient energy sources to regenerate ATP during continuous-exchange cell-free (CECF) protein synthesis reactions. Through the use of an optimal energy source, approximately 10 mg/ml of protein was generated from CECF protein synthesis reaction at greatly reduced reagent costs. Compared with the conventional reactions utilizing phosphoenol pyruvate as an energy source, the described method yields 10-fold higher productivity per unit reagent cost, making the techniques of CECF protein synthesis more realistic alternative for rapid protein production.

  5. Micro-algae as a source of protein.

    PubMed

    Becker, E W

    2007-01-01

    About five decades ago, the mass production of certain protein-rich micro-algae was considered as a possibility to close the predicted so called "protein gap". Comprehensive analyses and nutritional studies have demonstrated that these algal proteins are of high quality and comparable to conventional vegetable proteins. However, due to high production costs as well as technical difficulties to incorporate the algal material into palatable food preparations, the propagation of algal protein is still in its infancy. To date, the majority of micro-algal preparations are marketed as health food, as cosmetics or as animal feed.

  6. Effects of Supplementation of Mulberry (Morus alba) Foliage and Urea-rice Bran as Fermentable Energy and Protein Sources in Sheep Fed Urea-treated Rice Straw Based Diet.

    PubMed

    Yulistiani, Dwi; Jelan, Z A; Liang, J B; Yaakub, H; Abdullah, N

    2015-04-01

    A digestibility study was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplementing mulberry foliage and urea rice-bran as a source of fermentable energy and protein to 12 sheep fed diets based on urea-treated rice straw (TRS). The three dietary treatments were: T1, TRS with mulberry; T2, TRS with 50% mulberry replaced with rice bran and urea; and T3, TRS with rice bran and urea. The study was arranged in a completely randomized design with four replications for each treatment. The sheep were fed one of the three diets and the supplements were offered at 1.2% of the body weight (BW) and the TRS was provided ad libitum. There were no differences (p>0.05) among the three treatment groups with respect to dry matter (DM) intake (76.8±4.2 g/kg BW(0.75)) and DM, organic matter (OM), and crude protein (CP) digestibility (55.3±1.22; 69.9±0.85; 46.3±1.65% respectively for DM, OM, and CP). The digestibility of fiber (neutral detergent fiber [NDF] and acid detergent fiber) was significantly lower (p<0.05) for T3 (46.2 and 46.6 respectively) compared to T1 (55.8 and 53.7 respectively) and T2 (54.1 and 52.8 respectively). Nitrogen (N) intake by sheep on diet T3 was significantly (p<0.05) higher than sheep fed diet T1. However, N balance did not differ among the three diets (3.0±0.32 g/d). In contrast, the rumen ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations in sheep fed T2 and T3 were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in sheep fed T1. The NH3-N concentrations for all three diets were above the critical value required for optimum rumen microbial growth and synthesis. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations were highest (p<0.05) in T1 (120.3 mM), whilst the molar proportion of propionic acid was highest in T3 (36.9%). However, the microbial N supply in sheep fed T1 and T3 was similar but was significantly (p<0.05) higher than for sheep fed T2. It was concluded that mulberry foliage is a potential supplement of fermentable energy and protein for sheep fed TRS based diet. The suggested level of

  7. Effects of Supplementation of Mulberry (Morus alba) Foliage and Urea-rice Bran as Fermentable Energy and Protein Sources in Sheep Fed Urea-treated Rice Straw Based Diet

    PubMed Central

    Yulistiani, Dwi; Jelan, Z. A.; Liang, J. B.; Yaakub, H.; Abdullah, N.

    2015-01-01

    A digestibility study was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplementing mulberry foliage and urea rice-bran as a source of fermentable energy and protein to 12 sheep fed diets based on urea-treated rice straw (TRS). The three dietary treatments were: T1, TRS with mulberry; T2, TRS with 50% mulberry replaced with rice bran and urea; and T3, TRS with rice bran and urea. The study was arranged in a completely randomized design with four replications for each treatment. The sheep were fed one of the three diets and the supplements were offered at 1.2% of the body weight (BW) and the TRS was provided ad libitum. There were no differences (p>0.05) among the three treatment groups with respect to dry matter (DM) intake (76.8±4.2 g/kg BW0.75) and DM, organic matter (OM), and crude protein (CP) digestibility (55.3±1.22; 69.9±0.85; 46.3±1.65% respectively for DM, OM, and CP). The digestibility of fiber (neutral detergent fiber [NDF] and acid detergent fiber) was significantly lower (p<0.05) for T3 (46.2 and 46.6 respectively) compared to T1 (55.8 and 53.7 respectively) and T2 (54.1 and 52.8 respectively). Nitrogen (N) intake by sheep on diet T3 was significantly (p<0.05) higher than sheep fed diet T1. However, N balance did not differ among the three diets (3.0±0.32 g/d). In contrast, the rumen ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations in sheep fed T2 and T3 were significantly (p<0.05) higher than in sheep fed T1. The NH3-N concentrations for all three diets were above the critical value required for optimum rumen microbial growth and synthesis. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations were highest (p<0.05) in T1 (120.3 mM), whilst the molar proportion of propionic acid was highest in T3 (36.9%). However, the microbial N supply in sheep fed T1 and T3 was similar but was significantly (p<0.05) higher than for sheep fed T2. It was concluded that mulberry foliage is a potential supplement of fermentable energy and protein for sheep fed TRS based diet. The suggested level of

  8. Intestinal Fluid Permeability in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Is Affected by Dietary Protein Source

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haibin; Kortner, Trond M.; Gajardo, Karina; Chikwati, Elvis; Tinsley, John; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    In Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), and also in other fish species, certain plant protein ingredients can increase fecal water content creating a diarrhea-like condition which may impair gut function and reduce fish growth. The present study aimed to strengthen understanding of the underlying mechanisms by observing effects of various alternative plant protein sources when replacing fish meal on expression of genes encoding proteins playing key roles in regulation of water transport across the mucosa of the distal intestine (DI). A 48-day feeding trial was conducted with five diets: A reference diet (FM) in which fish meal (72%) was the only protein source; Diet SBMWG with a mix of soybean meal (30%) and wheat gluten (22%); Diet SPCPM with a mix of soy protein concentrate (30%) and poultry meal (6%); Diet GMWG with guar meal (30%) and wheat gluten (14.5%); Diet PM with 58% poultry meal. Compared to fish fed the FM reference diet, fish fed the soybean meal containing diet (SBMWG) showed signs of enteritis in the DI, increased fecal water content of DI chyme and higher plasma osmolality. Altered DI expression of a battery of genes encoding aquaporins, ion transporters, tight junction and adherens junction proteins suggested reduced transcellular transport of water as well as a tightening of the junction barrier in fish fed the SBMWG diet, which may explain the observed higher fecal water content and plasma osmolality. DI structure was not altered for fish fed the other experimental diets but alterations in target gene expression and fecal water content were observed, indicating that alterations in water transport components may take place without clear effects on intestinal structure. PMID:27907206

  9. Vegetarian compared with meat dietary protein source and phosphorus homeostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moe, Sharon M; Zidehsarai, Miriam P; Chambers, Mary A; Jackman, Lisa A; Radcliffe, J Scott; Trevino, Laurie L; Donahue, Susan E; Asplin, John R

    2011-02-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) are in positive phosphorus balance, but phosphorus levels are maintained in the normal range through phosphaturia induced by increases in fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). This provides the rationale for recommendations to restrict dietary phosphate intake to 800 mg/d. However, the protein source of the phosphate may also be important. We conducted a crossover trial in nine patients with a mean estimated GFR of 32 ml/min to directly compare vegetarian and meat diets with equivalent nutrients prepared by clinical research staff. During the last 24 hours of each 7-day diet period, subjects were hospitalized in a research center and urine and blood were frequently monitored. The results indicated that 1 week of a vegetarian diet led to lower serum phosphorus levels and decreased FGF23 levels. The inpatient stay demonstrated similar diurnal variation for blood phosphorus, calcium, PTH, and urine fractional excretion of phosphorus but significant differences between the vegetarian and meat diets. Finally, the 24-hour fractional excretion of phosphorus was highly correlated to a 2-hour fasting urine collection for the vegetarian diet but not the meat diet. In summary, this study demonstrates that the source of protein has a significant effect on phosphorus homeostasis in patients with CKD. Therefore, dietary counseling of patients with CKD must include information on not only the amount of phosphate but also the source of protein from which the phosphate derives.

  10. [In vitro availability of minerals in infant foods with different protein source].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Larqué, E; Marín, J F; Zamora, S

    2001-01-01

    As the result of the digestion process, it is produced at gastrointestinal level interactions between proteins-minerals and minerals-minerals that might modify the bioavailability of the nutrients initially designed for an adequate nutrition in infant formulas. The aim of the present study is to compare the in vitro availability of some minerals and trace elements (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron and zinc) in infant formulas of initiation elaborated with different protein sources: formulas based on cow milk protein (whey-casein) versus vegetal protein (soy-based infant formulas). Also, for evaluating the effects of the different mineral supplementation in the availability of minerals, it was used infant formulas from two different manufacturers. Milk-protein based infant formulas showed for both manufacturers higher dialysis percentage (%) of phosphorus and zinc than the soy-protein based formulas. The availability of iron in the soy formula of the manufacturer A lowered significantly (P < 0.05) respect to the whey-casein based formula (9.6 +/- 2.3 versus 4.6 +/- 0.8), but not respect to the whey-casein formula of manufacturer B (9.6 +/- 1.1 versus 9.0 +/- 0.7), which might be due to the lowest proportion of phytic acid in this last commercial formula. Dialysability of all the minerals analysed from soy-protein based formulas showed significant differences depending on the manufacturer. The purification processes of the soy protein have a high repercussion in the mineral availability of soy-based infant formulas. It could be more interesting to use soy proteins more purified, with low level of phytic acid, in the elaboration of soy infants formulas, than the supplementation them with high amounts of minerals.

  11. Replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets.

    PubMed

    Khalaji, S; Manafi, M; Olfati, Z; Hedyati, M; Latifi, M; Veysi, A

    2016-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of replacing soybean meal with gelatin extracted from cow skin and corn protein concentrate as a protein source in broiler diets. Experiments were carried out as a completely randomized design where each experiment involved 4 treatments of 6 replicates and 10 chicks in each pen. Soybean meal proteins in a corn-soy control diet were replaced with 15, 30, and 45% of cow skin gelatin (CSG) or corn protein concentrate (CPC), respectively, in experiments 1 and 2. BW and cumulative feed intake were measured at 7, 21, and 42 d of age. Blood characteristics, relative organs weight and length, ileal digesta viscosity, ileal morphology, and cecal coliform and Salmonella population were measured at 42 d of age. Apparent total tract digestibility of protein was determined during 35 to 42 d of age. Replacement of soybean meal with CSG severely inhibited BW gain, decreased feed intake, and increased FCR in broilers during the experimental period (P ≤ 0.01). The inclusion of CPC reduced BW and increased FCR significantly (P ≤ 0.05) at 21 and 42 d of age without any consequence in feed intake. Protein digestibility was reduced and ileal digesta viscosity was increased linearly by increasing the amount of CSG and CPC in the control diet (P ≤ 0.01). Replacement of soybean meal with CSG and CPC did not significantly alter blood cell profile and plasma phosphorus, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, Aspartate transaminase, and HDL and LDL cholesterol concentration. The inclusion of CSG linearly (P ≤ 0.05) increased plasma uric acid concentration and alkaline phosphatase activity. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels were decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) when the amount of CSG replacement was 15%. The results of this experiment showed that using CSG and CPC negatively affects broiler performance and therefore is not a suitable alternative to soybean meal in commercial diets. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. The impact of carbohydrate and protein level and sources on swine manure foaming properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study explored the impact of swine diet on the composition, methane production potential, and foaming properties of manure. Samples of swine manure were collected from controlled feeding trials with diets varying in protein and carbohydrate levels and sources. Protein sources consisted of corn ...

  13. The potential of blue lupins as a protein source, in the diets of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R F; Parkinson, Sarah; Fleming, Hannah R; Theobald, Vince J; Leemans, Dave K; Burgess, Tony

    2016-12-01

    Layers diets typically contain 15-20% soya due to its high crude protein content (ca. 36%). Reliance on soya for protein can result in large increases in cost of feed due to the law of supply and demand as a global commodity. Lupin grains have high protein content (35-40%) but previous experience with white lupins has shown toxic effects in poultry due to high levels alkaloids and poor performance due to anti-nutritional Non-starch polysaccharides (NSP). Here blue lupins either processed or whole were trialled for their potential as a protein source. Point of lay chickens (64) at 16 weeks of age were weighed and allocated to 16 coops of four hens. Coops, as the experimental unit, were randomly allocated to four treatments: layers mash with soya (Control); or layers mash with 150 g of lupin/kg diet with the lupin either: whole (Whole); dehulled (Dehulled) or dehulled + a solid state fermentation enzyme extract (SSF; 150 g/tonne DM). All diets were ground and formulated to be balanced for energy, crude protein and essential amino acids using NIRS. No difference in growth rate, final hen weight, DM and water intake, eggs per day, mean egg weight, yellowness of yolk or chroma was found between treatments. There was a trend (P<0.1) for the SSF treatment to produce less heavy shells and a significant effect for the lupin treatments to have redder yolks (P<0.001). Fecal DM and bacterial counts were not different and there was no sign of enteritis or intestinal tissue hyperplasia from hen autopsies. Inclusion of blue lupins in the diet of laying hens at a rate of 150 g/kg DM resulted in no adverse effects in production or hen health and could be used as part of a balanced ration with inclusion of NSP degrading enzymes to reduce reliance on soya protein.

  14. Fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    Crickenberger, R.G.; Henderson, H.E.; Reddy, C.A.

    1981-04-01

    Four feeding trials were conducted to evaluate fermented ammoniated condensed whey as a crude protein supplement for finishing cattle fed corn silage or corn - corn silage diets. Feed efficiencies and daily gains with protein treatments were noted. The trials indicate that fermented ammoniated condensed whey is comparable to soybean meal as a crude protein source for feedlot cattle. (Refs. 18).

  15. Underutilised legumes: potential sources for low-cost protein.

    PubMed

    Prakash, D; Niranjan, A; Tewari, S K; Pushpangadan, P

    2001-07-01

    Seeds of 104 leguminous species belonging to 17 genera were analysed for their protein contents. The promising ones were investigated for fibre, carbohydrate, ash, oil, fatty acids, amino acid profile and trypsin inhibitor activity (TIA). The variation of fibre contents was 4.1-8.9%, carbohydrate 18.4-49.2%, ash 1.8-7.2%, TIA 48.7-87.5 mg/g, oil 1.3-19.8% and protein 11.0-51.6%. The protein content (41-45%) in Acacia mellifera (41.6%), Albizzia lebbek (43.6%), Bauhinia triandra (42.7%), Lathyrus odoratus (42.8%), Parkinsonia aculeata (41.6%), Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (41.9%), Sesbania paludosa (41.2%) and S. sesban (43.8%) was in close proximity to soybean (42.8%), whereas Bauhinia retusa (51.6%), B. variegata (46.5%), Delonix elata (48.7%) and Gliricidia maculata (46.3%) showed higher percentages of protein than soybean. The essential amino acid composition of some of the seed proteins was reasonably well balanced (lysine up to 7.6%). The seeds of Bauhinia retusa (18.6%), B. triandra (16.5%), B. variegata (17.3%), Gliricidia maculata (16.2%), Parkia biglandulosa (18.9%) and Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (19.8%) had a good amount of oil, comparable to soybean (18-22%). The fatty acid composition of some genera/species was quite promising with high amount of unsaturated fatty acids.

  16. ASSOCIATIONS OF PROTEIN INTAKE AND PROTEIN SOURCE WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND FRACTURE RISK: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    LANGSETMO, L.; BARR, S.I.; BERGER, C.; KREIGER, N.; RAHME, E.; ADACHI, J.D.; PAPAIOANNOU, A.; KAISER, S. M; PRIOR, J.C.; HANLEY, D.A.; KOVACS, C.S.; JOSSE, R.G.; GOLTZMAN, D.

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein has been hypothesized to cause lower bone mineral density (BMD) and greater fracture risk. Previous results are conflicting and few studies have assessed potential differences related to differing protein sources. Objective To determine associations between total protein intake, and protein intake by source (dairy, non-dairy animal, plant) with BMD, BMD change, and incident osteoporotic fracture. Design/Setting Prospective cohort study (Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study). Participants/Measures Protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) at Year 2 (1997–99) using a food frequency questionnaire (N=6510). Participants were contacted annually to ascertain incident fracture. Total hip and lumbar spine BMD was measured at baseline and Year 5. Analyses were stratified by group (men 25–49 y, men 50+ y, premenopausal women 25–49 y, and postmenopausal women 50+ y) and adjusted for major confounders. Fracture analyses were limited to those 50+ y. Results Intakes of dairy protein (with adjustment for BMI) were positively associated with total hip BMD among men and women aged 50+ y, and in men aged 25–49. Among adults aged 50+ y, those with protein intakes of <12% TEI (women) and <11% TEI (men) had increased fracture risk compared to those with intakes of 15% TEI. Fracture risk did not significantly change as intake increased above 15% TEI, and was not significantly associated with protein source. Conclusions In contrast to hypothesized risk of high protein, we found that for adults 50+ y, low protein intake (below 15% TEI) may lead to increased fracture risk. Source of protein was a determinant of BMD, but not fracture risk. PMID:26412291

  17. The quality of new sources of protein and their suitability for weanlings and young children*

    PubMed Central

    Viteri, F. E.; Bressani, R.

    1972-01-01

    A number of formulated protein-rich mixtures have been developed with the objective of preventing protein deficiency in vulnerable population groups, particularly in weanlings and children of pre-school in the developing countries. This paper describes an investigation, by the nitrogen balance index method, of the protein quality of several such mixtures. The results indicate that most of the mixtures are suitable protein sources for children of pre-school age. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3 PMID:4538543

  18. Meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans and peas) are more satiating than meals based on animal protein sources (veal and pork) - a randomized cross-over meal test study.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Marlene D; Bendsen, Nathalie T; Christensen, Sheena M; Astrup, Arne; Raben, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Recent nutrition recommendations advocate a reduction in protein from animal sources (pork, beef) because of environmental concerns. Instead, protein from vegetable sources (beans, peas) should be increased. However, little is known about the effect of these vegetable protein sources on appetite regulation. To examine whether meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans/peas) are comparable to meals based on animal protein sources (veal/pork) regarding meal-induced appetite sensations. In total, 43 healthy, normal-weight, young men completed this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way, cross-over meal test. The meals (all 3.5 MJ, 28 energy-% (E%) fat) were either high protein based on veal and pork meat, HP-Meat (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate, 6 g fiber/100 g); high protein based on legumes (beans and peas), HP-Legume (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate, 25 g fiber/100 g); or low-protein based on legumes, LP-Legume (9 E% protein, 62 E% carbohydrate, 10 g fiber/100 g). Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at baseline and every half hour using visual analog scales until the ad libitum meal 3 h after the test meal. Repeated measurements analyses and summary analyses were performed using ANCOVA (SAS). HP-Legume induced lower composite appetite score, hunger, prospective food consumption, and higher fullness compared to HP-Meat and LP-Legume (p<0.05). Furthermore, satiety was higher after HP-Legume than HP-Meat (p<0.05). When adjusting for palatability, HP-Legume still resulted in lower composite appetite scores, hunger, prospective consumption, and higher fullness compared to HP-Meat (p<0.05). Furthermore, HP-Legume induced higher fullness than LP-Legume (p<0.05). A 12% and 13% lower energy intake, respectively, was seen after HP-Legume compared to HP-Meat or LP-Legume (p<0.01). Vegetable-based meals (beans/peas) influenced appetite sensations favorably compared to animal-based meals (pork/veal) with similar energy and protein content

  19. Meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans and peas) are more satiating than meals based on animal protein sources (veal and pork) – a randomized cross-over meal test study

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Marlene D.; Bendsen, Nathalie T.; Christensen, Sheena M.; Astrup, Arne; Raben, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent nutrition recommendations advocate a reduction in protein from animal sources (pork, beef) because of environmental concerns. Instead, protein from vegetable sources (beans, peas) should be increased. However, little is known about the effect of these vegetable protein sources on appetite regulation. Objective To examine whether meals based on vegetable protein sources (beans/peas) are comparable to meals based on animal protein sources (veal/pork) regarding meal-induced appetite sensations. Design In total, 43 healthy, normal-weight, young men completed this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way, cross-over meal test. The meals (all 3.5 MJ, 28 energy-% (E%) fat) were either high protein based on veal and pork meat, HP-Meat (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate, 6 g fiber/100 g); high protein based on legumes (beans and peas), HP-Legume (19 E% protein, 53 E% carbohydrate, 25 g fiber/100 g); or low-protein based on legumes, LP-Legume (9 E% protein, 62 E% carbohydrate, 10 g fiber/100 g). Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at baseline and every half hour using visual analog scales until the ad libitum meal 3 h after the test meal. Repeated measurements analyses and summary analyses were performed using ANCOVA (SAS). Results HP-Legume induced lower composite appetite score, hunger, prospective food consumption, and higher fullness compared to HP-Meat and LP-Legume (p<0.05). Furthermore, satiety was higher after HP-Legume than HP-Meat (p<0.05). When adjusting for palatability, HP-Legume still resulted in lower composite appetite scores, hunger, prospective consumption, and higher fullness compared to HP-Meat (p<0.05). Furthermore, HP-Legume induced higher fullness than LP-Legume (p<0.05). A 12% and 13% lower energy intake, respectively, was seen after HP-Legume compared to HP-Meat or LP-Legume (p<0.01). Conclusion Vegetable-based meals (beans/peas) influenced appetite sensations favorably compared to animal-based meals (pork

  20. Effects of protein concentration and heat treatment on concentration of digestible and metabolizable energy and on amino acid digestibility in four sources of canola meal fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Maison, T; Stein, H H

    2014-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine DE and ME and the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and the standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA in 4 sources of canola meal (high-protein [CM-HP], high-temperature-processed [CM-HT], low-temperature-processed [CM-LT], and conventional [CM-CV] canola meal) and in conventional soybean meal (SBM) fed to growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 48 growing barrows (initial BW: 39.7 ± 1.58 kg) were individually housed in metabolism cages and randomly assigned to 6 treatments in a randomized complete block design with 2 blocks of 24 pigs and 8 replicate pigs per treatment. The 6 diets included a corn-based basal diet and 5 diets that were formulated by mixing corn and 1 of the sources of canola meal (39.0% inclusion) or SBM (28.5% inclusion). Feces and urine were collected for 5 d following a 5-d adaptation period. The DE and ME in each source of canola meal and in SBM were calculated using the difference procedure. The DE and ME in the 4 sources of canola meal were less (P < 0.05) than in corn and SBM (DE: 2,854, 2,680, 2,892, and 2,883 vs. 3,324 and 3,784 kcal/kg, respectively; ME: 2,540, 2,251, 2,681, and 2,637 vs. 3,213 and 3,523 kcal/kg, respectively). No differences in the concentrations of DE and ME were observed among the 4 sources of canola meal. In Exp. 2, 12 growing barrows (initial BW: 34.0 ± 1.41 kg) that had a T-cannula installed in the distal ileum were randomly allotted to a repeated 6 × 6 Latin square design with 6 diets and 6 periods in each square. Five diets that contained 35% SBM or 45% of 1 of the 4 sources of canola meal as the sole source of CP and AA were formulated, and a N-free diet was also used. Each period lasted 7 d and ileal digesta were collected on d 6 and 7 of each period. The AID and SID of CP and all AA in SBM were greater (P < 0.05) than in the 4 sources of canola meal. Compared with CM-CV, CM-HP had greater (P < 0.05) AID of Ile, Lys, Asp, Cys, and Pro and greater (P < 0.05) SID of Lys

  1. Gastrointestinal endogenous proteins as a source of bioactive peptides--an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein.

  2. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Proteins as a Source of Bioactive Peptides - An In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Montoya, Carlos A.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.; Moughan, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein. PMID:24901416

  3. Dietary Protein Sources Affect Internal Quality of Raw and Cooked Shell Eggs under Refrigerated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. C.; Zhang, H. J.; Wu, S. G.; Yue, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Li, J.; Qi, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; cottonseed protein, CSP; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on the internal quality of refrigerated eggs. A total of 360 laying hens (32 wk of age) were randomly allotted to six treatment groups (five replicates per treatment) and fed diets containing SBM, CSP, or DRM individually or in combination with equal crude protein content (SBM-CSP, SBM-DRM, and CSP-DRM) as the protein ingredient(s). A 6×3 factorial arrangement was employed with dietary types and storage time (0 d, 2 wk, and 4 wk) as the main effects. After 12 wk of diet feeding, a total of 270 eggs were collected for egg quality determination. The egg Haugh unit (HU) in the CSP, SBM-DRM, and DRM groups were significantly lower than those in the SBM and SBM-CSP groups. The hardness and springiness of the cooked yolk in the CSP group were significantly higher than those in the other treatment groups. A lower HU, lower yolk index and higher albumen pH were observed in the DRM group compared to the SBM and SBM-CSP groups when the eggs were stored to 4 wk, and the HU was improved in the CSP-DRM group compared to the DRM group (p<0.05). Higher yolk hardness was observed in the CSP group compared to the other groups during storage (p<0.05), but the hardness of the cooked yolk in the SBM-CSP and CSP-DRM groups showed no difference in comparison to the SBM group. In conclusion, CSP may ameliorate the negative effects of DRM on the HU of refrigerated eggs, and SBM or DRM may alleviate the adverse effects of CSP on yolk hardness. PMID:26580286

  4. Dietary Protein Sources Affect Internal Quality of Raw and Cooked Shell Eggs under Refrigerated Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, X C; Zhang, H J; Wu, S G; Yue, H Y; Wang, J; Li, J; Qi, G H

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; cottonseed protein, CSP; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on the internal quality of refrigerated eggs. A total of 360 laying hens (32 wk of age) were randomly allotted to six treatment groups (five replicates per treatment) and fed diets containing SBM, CSP, or DRM individually or in combination with equal crude protein content (SBM-CSP, SBM-DRM, and CSP-DRM) as the protein ingredient(s). A 6×3 factorial arrangement was employed with dietary types and storage time (0 d, 2 wk, and 4 wk) as the main effects. After 12 wk of diet feeding, a total of 270 eggs were collected for egg quality determination. The egg Haugh unit (HU) in the CSP, SBM-DRM, and DRM groups were significantly lower than those in the SBM and SBM-CSP groups. The hardness and springiness of the cooked yolk in the CSP group were significantly higher than those in the other treatment groups. A lower HU, lower yolk index and higher albumen pH were observed in the DRM group compared to the SBM and SBM-CSP groups when the eggs were stored to 4 wk, and the HU was improved in the CSP-DRM group compared to the DRM group (p<0.05). Higher yolk hardness was observed in the CSP group compared to the other groups during storage (p<0.05), but the hardness of the cooked yolk in the SBM-CSP and CSP-DRM groups showed no difference in comparison to the SBM group. In conclusion, CSP may ameliorate the negative effects of DRM on the HU of refrigerated eggs, and SBM or DRM may alleviate the adverse effects of CSP on yolk hardness.

  5. Evaluation of a new high protein variety of soybeans as a source of protein and energy for dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McNiven, M A; Robinson, P H; MacLeod, J A

    1994-09-01

    Twenty Holstein cows in midlactation were used in a Latin square design to evaluate the nutritional quality of a high protein soybean (CP 45%) fed raw or roasted. Treatments were 1) control (soybean meal); 2) conventional soybean (Maple Isle), raw; 3) conventional soybean, roasted; 4) high protein soybean (AC Proteus), raw; and 5) high protein soybean, roasted. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and consisted of approximately 10% whole crop barley silage, 15% corn silage, 19% alfalfa silage, 31% rolled barley, 17% cracked corn, and from 6.5 to 8.6% of the appropriate protein source on a DM basis. Replacement of conventional soybean with the high protein soybean increased milk and milk component yields. All soybean treatments lowered milk protein percentages versus soybean meal although milk protein yield was only reduced for the raw Maple Isle soybean treatment. Milk fat percentage was reduced for the roasted AC Proteus soybean treatment versus soybean meal and both Maple Isle soybean treatments, although total milk fat yield did not differ among treatments. Heat treatment by roasting tended to affect total milk yield positively for both types of soybeans, but only the increase for Maple Isle was significant. Milk from cows fed full fat soybeans had more long-chain fatty acids than milk from cows fed soybean meal. Roasting the soybeans further increased the amounts of long-chain fatty acids. The new high protein soybean, AC Proteus, appears to be an excellent source of supplemental protein and energy for lactating dairy cows.

  6. Beneficial effects of protein hydrolysates in exercise and sports nutrition.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Jiang, B; Li, K; Shen, W; Tang, J L

    2017-01-01

    Protein hydrolysates (PH) are rich sources of proteins that supply the need of exercising muscles. PHs are enriched in di- and tripeptides and are better than free amino acids or intact proteins when muscle anabolic effect is considered. Digestion, absorption and muscle uptake of amino acids are faster and more efficient when PH is ingested in comparison to the respective intact protein. PHs not only enhance endurance in high intensity exercise regimen, but also help in faster post-exercise recovery of muscle by promoting glycogen synthesis, although the latter effect requires more convincing evidence. PHs have been shown to exhibit insulinotrophic effect as it enhances the secretion of insulin and the hormone, in turn, exerts muscle anabolic effect.

  7. Taurine supplemented plant protein based diets with alternative lipid sources for juvenile sea bream, sparus aurata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two lipid sources were evaluated as fish oil replacements in fishmeal free, plant protein based diets for juvenile gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata. A twelve week feeding study was undertaken to examine the performance of fish fed the diets with different sources of essential fatty acids (canola o...

  8. Evaluation of Peanut Meal as an Alternative Dietary Protein Source for Channel Catfish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Use of peanut meal as an alternative protein source in diets for channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated in a 9-week study under controlled laboratory conditions. Five practical diets (28% crude protein and 6% crude lipid) were formulated to contain 0, 10, 15, 20, and 25% peanut meal as a ...

  9. Distillers dried grains with solubles as alternative protein source in diets of tilapia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research efforts by nutritionists to reduce feed costs have resulted in increased use of lower cost alternative plant proteins in fish feed formulations as replacements of fish meal and other expensive protein sources. Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a dried residue that remains after ...

  10. Distillers dried grains with solubles as alternative protein sources in diets of tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research efforts by nutritionist to reduce feed costs have resulted in increased use of lower cost alternative plant proteins in fish feed formulations as replacements of fish meal and other more expensive protein sources. Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), a dried residue that remains af...

  11. Different haplotypes encode the same protein for independent sources of ZYMV resistance in cucumber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) production is negatively affected by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Three sources of ZYMV resistance have been commercially deployed and all three resistances are conditioned by a single recessive gene. A vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4-like (VPS4-like)...

  12. Palatability of water-soluble extracts of protein sources and replacement of fishmeal by a selected mixture of protein sources for juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chun; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Zhou, Huihui; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Poor palatability is a limiting factor for replacing fishmeal with other protein sources in aquaculture. The water-soluble molecules with low molecular weights are the major determinants of the palatability of diets. The present study was conducted to investigate the palatability of water-soluble extracts from single protein source (single extract pellets) and the mixture of these extracts with different proportions (blended extract pellets) in juvenile turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus). Then according to the palatability of blended extract pellets, an optimal mixture proportion was selected, and a new protein source made from raw protein materials with the selected proportion was formulated to replace fishmeal. Summarily, the palatability of single extract pellets for turbot was descendent from fishmeal to pet-food grade poultry by-product meal, wheat gluten meal, soybean meal, peanut meal, meat and bone meal, and corn gluten meal. Subsequently, according to the palatability of single extract pellets, 52 kinds of blended extract pellets were designed to test their palatability. The results showed that the pellets presented remarkably different palatability, and the optimal one was diet 52 (wheat gluten meal: pet-food grade poultry by-product meal: meat and bone meal: corn gluten meal = 1:6:1:2). The highest ingestion ratio (the number of pellets ingested/the number of pellets fed) was 0.73 ± 0.03, which was observed in Diet 52. Then five isonitrogenous (52% crude protein) and isocaloric (20 kJ g-1 gross energy) diets were formulated by replacing 0 (control), 35%, 50%, 65% and 80% of fishmeal with No.52 blending proportion. After a 10-weeks feeding trial, a consistent feed intake was found among all replacement treatments. Replacement level of fishmeal up to 35% did not significantly influence final body weight, specific growth rate, feed efficiency ratio, and protein efficiency ratio of turbot. Therefore, the water-soluble extracts of protein sources play an

  13. Feasibility of partial replacement of fishmeal with proteins from different sources in diets of Korean rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Quangen; Zhu, Xiaoming; Yang, Yunxia; Han, Dong; Xie, Shouqi

    2014-12-01

    An 8-week feeding experiment was conducted in an indoor recirculation seawater system to investigate the effects of partial replacement of dietary fishmeal with proteins from five sources on the growth performance and feed utilization of Sebastes schlegeli. Six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated using fishmeal (FM, the control) as sole protein source, or proteins from five sources including poultry by-product meal (PBM), meat and bone meal (MBM), soybean meal (SBM), cottonseed meal (CSM) and canola meal (CNM). Fifteen percent of the crude protein provided by fish meal was replaced, respectively. The results showed that the differences in specific growth rate (SGR) and survival rate (SR) among fish fed PBM, MBM, SBM, CSM and whole FM diets were not significant. However, SGR and SR of fish fed CNM diet was significantly lower than that of other treatments. Feeding rate, feed conversion, nutrient retention showed similar patterns to that of growth. Fish fed CSM and CNM showed significantly lower apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of dry matter and gross energy than those fed others while fish fed CNM showed lower ADC of crude protein than those fed others ( P<0.05). These results suggested that it was feasible to substitute 15% dietary protein provided by fishmeal with PBM, MBM, SBM and CSM, respectively, but not with CNM as the replacement with CNM reduced fish growth and feed utilization.

  14. Dose-response effects of different plant sterol sources in fat spreads on serum lipids and C-reactive protein and on the kinetic behavior of serum plant sterols.

    PubMed

    Clifton, P M; Mano, M; Duchateau, G S M J E; van der Knaap, H C M; Trautwein, E A

    2008-08-01

    To test the dose-response effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) of plant sterols (PS) from different sources in a low-fat spread. Dose responses of soybean oil (BO), tall oil (TO) and a mix of tall oil and rapeseed oil (TO/RP) as fatty acid esters were tested in a parallel design in free-living subjects recruited from the general community who had elevated cholesterol concentrations. Subjects received either control for 6 weeks or 1.6 g PS per day for 3 weeks, then 3.0 g/day for 3 weeks. LDL-c was lowered significantly by consumption of 1.6 g/day of PS (-10.4%, range -7.3 to -11.4%). Increasing the dose to 3.0 g/day modestly reduced LDL-c concentrations further to -14.7%. TO, containing 78% sitosterol, produced an increase in serum sitosterol of 6.5 nmol/ml, while BO, containing only 27% campesterol, produced an increase in serum campesterol of 9.5 nmol/ml in 6 weeks. After PS withdrawal, serum sterols declined by 50% within 2 weeks. Different PS sources were equally effective in lowering serum LDL-c concentrations. The decrease in absolute concentrations of LDL-c was dependent on the baseline concentrations.

  15. Effects of alternative reinforcement sources: A reevaluation

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Abdulrazaq A.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of two alternative sources of food delivery on the key-peck responding of pigeons were examined. Pecking was maintained by a variable-interval 3-min schedule. In the presence of this schedule in different conditions, either a variable-time 3-min schedule delivering food independently of responding or an equivalent schedule that required a minimum 2-s pause between a key peck and food delivery (a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule) was added. The differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule reduced response rates more than did the variable-time schedule in most instances. The delay between a key peck and the next reinforcer consistently was longer under the differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule than under the variable-time schedule. Response rates and median delay between responses and reinforcers were negatively correlated. These results contradict earlier conclusions about the behavioral effects of alternative reinforcement. They suggest that an interpretation in terms of response–reinforcer contiguity is consistent with the data. PMID:16812558

  16. Cosolvent Effects on Protein Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canchi, Deepak R.; García, Angel E.

    2013-04-01

    Proteins are marginally stable, and the folding/unfolding equilibrium of proteins in aqueous solution can easily be altered by the addition of small organic molecules known as cosolvents. Cosolvents that shift the equilibrium toward the unfolded ensemble are termed denaturants, whereas those that favor the folded ensemble are known as protecting osmolytes. Urea is a widely used denaturant in protein folding studies, and the molecular mechanism of its action has been vigorously debated in the literature. Here we review recent experimental as well as computational studies that show an emerging consensus in this problem. Urea has been shown to denature proteins through a direct mechanism, by interacting favorably with the peptide backbone as well as the amino acid side chains. In contrast, the molecular mechanism by which the naturally occurring protecting osmolyte trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes proteins is not clear. Recent studies have established the strong interaction of TMAO with water. Detailed molecular simulations, when used with force fields that incorporate these interactions, can provide insight into this problem. We present the development of a model for TMAO that is consistent with experimental observations and that provides physical insight into the role of cosolvent-cosolvent interaction in determining its preferential interaction with proteins.

  17. Early Life Protein Intake: Food Sources, Correlates, and Tracking across the First 5 Years of Life.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Karen J; Abbott, Gavin; Zheng, Miaobing; McNaughton, Sarah A

    2017-08-01

    High consumption of protein has been associated with accelerated growth and adiposity in early childhood. To describe intake, food sources, correlates, and tracking of protein in young children. Secondary analysis of Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT). Dietary data were collected using three 24-hour dietary recalls at ages 9 and 18 months as well as 3.5 and 5 years. First-time mothers and their child (n=542) participated in an 18-month intervention to prevent childhood obesity and the cohort was followed-up with no intervention when children were aged 3.5 and 5 years. Protein intake, food sources, correlates, and tracking of protein. Child and maternal correlates of protein intake were identified using linear regression and tracking of protein intake was examined using Pearson correlations of residualized protein scores between time points. Mean protein (grams per day) intake was 29.7±11.0, 46.3±11.5, 54.2±13.8, and 60.0±14.8 at 9 and 18 months and 3.5 and 5 years, respectively. Protein intakes at all ages were two to three times greater than age-appropriate Australian recommendations. The primary source of protein at 9 months was breast/formula milk. At later ages, the principal sources were milk/milk products, breads/cereals, and meat/meat products. Earlier breastfeeding cessation, earlier introduction of solids, high dairy milk consumption (≥500 mL), and high maternal education were significant predictors of high protein intake at various times (P<0.05). Slight tracking was found for protein intakes at 9 months, 18 months, and 5 years (r=0.16 to 0.21; P<0.01). This study provides unique insights into food sources and correlates of young children's high protein intakes, and confirms that early protein intakes track slightly up to age 5 years. These finding have potential to inform nutrition interventions and strategies to address high protein intakes and protein-related obesity risk. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and

  18. Interactive source and message effects in persuasion.

    PubMed

    Siu, Wanda

    2010-04-01

    In this study, the influence of source and message frame on judgments of a public service announcement was examined. The participants in the experiment were 408 undergraduate students (126 men, 280 women, 2 unknown; M age=20.0, SD=2.5, range=18-23) of a Midwestern U.S. university. Message frame and source were manipulated in a between-subjects design. Two levels of the message frame were benefits of physical activity and costs of not engaging in regular physical activity; the source was a healthy or unhealthy individual. In the Healthy-source condition, "Kim Jones" set realistic goals for exercise and had a healthy lifestyle. Conversely, she was described as a sedentary individual who led an unhealthy lifestyle in the Sick-source condition. Results indicated that respondents in the conditions of gain frame-healthy source and cost frame-unhealthy source had more positive message judgment as compared to respondents in the conditions of gain frame-unhealthy source and cost frame-healthy source.

  19. Intestinal supply of amino acids in steers fed ruminally degradable and undegradable crude protein sources alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Cecava, M J; Parker, J E

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of combining ruminally degradable and undegradable CP sources on ruminal microbial protein synthesis and postruminal N and amino acid (AA) flows in steers. Six steers fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were fed diets containing corn silage and high-moisture corn supplemented with urea, soybean meal (SBM), dry corn gluten feed (DCGF), a combination of corn gluten meal and blood meal (CB), or SBM and DCGF in combination with CB. Estimated ruminal N escapes for SBM, DCGF, and CB were 32, 25, and 68%, respectively. Supplemental CP sources supplied 35 to 40% of diet CP (12.5% CP diets). Dry matter intake was adjusted to 2.3% of BW for each steer in each period. Total N flow at the duodenum decreased (P < .01) when the diet was supplemented with urea vs other proteins due to decreased (P < .01) flow of nonmicrobial N. However, microbial N and AA flows were greater (P < .05) for urea than for other protein supplements. Disappearance of OM and NDF in the stomach decreased (P < .07) or was numerically lower but nonmicrobial N at the duodenum increased (P < .08) as CB replaced SBM or DCGF in the diet. Protein source had little effect on ruminal fermentation characteristics except that ruminal ammonia N (NH3N) concentration was higher (P < .05) for urea than for other treatments. Total AA and essential AA flows to and disappearance from the small intestine increased (P < .06) as CB replaced DCGF. However, substituting CB for SBM had little effect on intestinal flows and disappearance of AA. These data suggest that source of ruminally degradable CP can influence the efficacy of feeding ruminally degradable and undegradable CP in combination. In general, source of supplemental CP had a greater effect on the quantity than on the profile of absorbable AA supplied to the duodenum.

  20. Energy restriction only slightly influences protein metabolism in obese rats, whatever the level of protein and its source in the diet.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, L; Bos, C; Azzout-Marniche, D; Fromentin, G; Mosoni, L; Hafnaoui, N; Piedcoq, J; Tomé, D; Gaudichon, C

    2013-02-01

    High protein (HP) diets during energy restriction have been studied extensively regarding their ability to reduce body fat and preserve lean body mass, but little is known about their effects on protein metabolism in lean tissues. To determine the effects of energy restriction and protein intake on protein anabolism and catabolism in rats. For 5 weeks, 56 male Wistar rats were fed an obesity induction (OI) diet . They were then subjected to a 40% energy restriction using the OI diet or a balanced HP diet for 3 weeks, whereas a control group was fed the OI diet ad libitum (n=8 per group). HP-restricted rats were divided into five groups differing only in terms of their protein source: total milk proteins, casein (C), whey (W), a mix of 50% C and W, and soy (n=8). The animals were then killed in the postprandial state and their body composition was determined. Protein synthesis rates were determined in the liver, gastrocnemius and kidney using a subcutaneous (13)C valine flooding dose. mRNA levels were measured for key enzymes involved in the three proteolysis pathways. Energy restriction, but not diet composition, impacted weight loss and adiposity, whereas lean tissue mass (except in the kidney) was not influenced by diet composition. Levels of neoglucogenic amino acids tended to fall under energy restriction (P<0.06) but this was reversed by a high level of protein. The postprandial protein synthesis rates in different organs were similar in all groups. By contrast, mRNA levels encoding proteolytic enzymes rose under energy restriction in the muscle and kidney, but this was counteracted by a HP level. In adult obese rats, energy restriction but not diet composition affected fat pads and had little impact on protein metabolism, despite marked effects on proteolysis in the kidney and muscle.

  1. Effects of Epistemological Sensitization on Source Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porsch, Torsten; Bromme, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The uneven distribution of knowledge within modern societies requires a reliance on sources (e.g., reference books, teachers, the Internet) in addition to own experience. Most scientific issues are far too complex to be understood in any depth by laypersons. Successful knowledge acquisition comprises the ability to vary the amount of sources used…

  2. Effects of Epistemological Sensitization on Source Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porsch, Torsten; Bromme, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The uneven distribution of knowledge within modern societies requires a reliance on sources (e.g., reference books, teachers, the Internet) in addition to own experience. Most scientific issues are far too complex to be understood in any depth by laypersons. Successful knowledge acquisition comprises the ability to vary the amount of sources used…

  3. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins.

    PubMed

    Sułkowska, Joanna I; Sulkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-16

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot.

  4. Stabilizing effect of knots on proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Sułkowski, Piotr; Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics studies within a coarse-grained, structure-based model were used on two similar proteins belonging to the transcarbamylase family to probe the effects of the knot in the native structure of a protein. The first protein, N-acetylornithine transcarbamylase, contains no knot, whereas human ormithine transcarbamylase contains a trefoil knot located deep within the sequence. In addition, we also analyzed a modified transferase with the knot removed by the appropriate change of a knot-making crossing of the protein chain. The studies of thermally and mechanically induced unfolding processes suggest a larger intrinsic stability of the protein with the knot. PMID:19064918

  5. Reading is believing: the truth effect and source credibility.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Linda A; Mattson, Mark E

    2011-12-01

    Five experiments explored how source reliability influences people's tendency to rate statements as more credible when they were encountered earlier (the truth effect). Undergraduates read statements from one reliable source and one unreliable source. Statements read multiple times were perceived as more valid and were more often correctly identified on a general knowledge test than statements read once or not at all. This occurred at varying retention intervals whether the statements originated from a reliable or unreliable source, when people had little memory for the statements themselves or their source, and when the discrediting information about the sources came either before or after reading the facts. While repetition aided recognition and source accuracy, both were unaffected by the reliability of the source. Consistent with the source monitoring framework, familiarity may create an illusion of truth for statements when people lack source-specifying cues, especially cues regarding the reliability of the source. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations of nonspecific salt effects on protein-protein binding free energies.

    PubMed

    Bertonati, Claudia; Honig, Barry; Alexov, Emil

    2007-03-15

    The salt dependence of the binding free energy of five protein-protein hetero-dimers and two homo-dimers/tetramers was calculated from numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Overall, the agreement with experimental values is very good. In all cases except one involving the highly charged lactoglobulin homo-dimer, increasing the salt concentration is found both experimentally and theoretically to decrease the binding affinity. To clarify the source of salt effects, the salt-dependent free energy of binding is partitioned into screening terms and to self-energy terms that involve the interaction of the charge distribution of a monomer with its own ion atmosphere. In six of the seven complexes studied, screening makes the largest contribution but self-energy effects can also be significant. The calculated salt effects are found to be insensitive to force-field parameters and to the internal dielectric constant assigned to the monomers. Nonlinearities due to high charge densities, which are extremely important in the binding of proteins to negatively charged membrane surfaces and to nucleic acids, make much smaller contributions to the protein-protein complexes studied here, with the exception of highly charged lactoglobulin dimers. Our results indicate that the Poisson-Boltzmann equation captures much of the physical basis of the nonspecific salt dependence of protein-protein complexation.

  7. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  8. Monitoring Guidance for Determining the Effectiveness of Nonpoint Source Controls

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A nonpoint source monitoring and evaluation guide written for use by those who monitor and those who evaluate monitoring proposals. It focuses on monitoring to determine the effectiveness of nonpoint source controls at the watershed and practice levels

  9. Molecular Origins of Internal Friction Effects on Protein Folding Rates

    PubMed Central

    Sirur, Anshul

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments on protein folding dynamics have revealed strong evidence for internal friction effects. That is, observed relaxation times are not simply proportional to the solvent viscosity as might be expected if the solvent were the only source of friction. However, a molecular interpretation of this remarkable phenomenon is currently lacking. Here, we use all-atom simulations of peptide and protein folding in explicit solvent, to probe the origin of the unusual viscosity dependence. We find that an important contribution to this effect, explaining the viscosity dependence of helix formation and the folding of a helix-containing protein, is the insensitivity of torsion angle isomerization to solvent friction. The influence of this landscape roughness can, in turn, be quantitatively explained by a rate theory including memory friction. This insensitivity of local barrier crossing to solvent friction is expected to contribute to the viscosity dependence of folding rates in larger proteins. PMID:24986114

  10. In Silico Characterization of Pectate Lyase Protein Sequences from Different Source Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Sangeeta; Kumar, Manish; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Sarangi, Bijaya Ketan; Yadav, Dinesh

    2010-01-01

    A total of 121 protein sequences of pectate lyases were subjected to homology search, multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree construction, and motif analysis. The phylogenetic tree constructed revealed different clusters based on different source organisms representing bacterial, fungal, plant, and nematode pectate lyases. The multiple accessions of bacterial, fungal, nematode, and plant pectate lyase protein sequences were placed closely revealing a sequence level similarity. The multiple sequence alignment of these pectate lyase protein sequences from different source organisms showed conserved regions at different stretches with maximum homology from amino acid residues 439–467, 715–816, and 829–910 which could be used for designing degenerate primers or probes specific for pectate lyases. The motif analysis revealed a conserved Pec_Lyase_C domain uniformly observed in all pectate lyases irrespective of variable sources suggesting its possible role in structural and enzymatic functions. PMID:21048874

  11. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  12. Effects of protein aggregates: an immunologic perspective.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Amy S

    2006-08-04

    The capacity of protein aggregates to enhance immune responses to the monomeric form of the protein has been known for over a half-century. Despite the clear connection between protein aggregates and antibody mediated adverse events in treatment with early therapeutic protein products such as intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) and human growth hormone, surprisingly little is known about the nature of the aggregate species responsible for such effects. This review focuses on a framework for understanding how aggregate species potentially interact with the immune system to enhance immune responses, garnered from basic immunologic research. Thus, protein antigens presented in a highly arrayed structure, such as might be found in large nondenatured aggregate species, are highly potent in inducing antibody responses even in the absence of T-cell help. Their potency may relate to the ability of multivalent protein species to extensively cross-link B-cell receptor, which (1) activates B cells via Bt kinases to proliferate, and (2) targets protein to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-loading compartments, efficiently eliciting T-cell help for antibody responses. The review further focuses on protein aggregates as they affect an immunogenicity risk assessment, the use of animal models and studies in uncovering effects of protein aggregates, and changes in product manufacture and packaging that may affect generation of protein aggregates.

  13. Developing column material for the separation of serum amyloid P and C reactive protein from biological sources.

    PubMed

    Ersöz, Arzu; Ünlüer, Özlem Biçen; Dönmez, Gülnur; Hür, Deniz; Say, R Dvan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we have investigated the isolation of serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) from rainbow trout. It has recently been found that SAP is deposited in atherosclerotic lesions or neurofibrillary tangles, which are related to aging process and Alzheimer's disease. Given the importance of CRP, the CRP level in blood is becoming recognized as a potential means of monitoring cardiovascular risk. These two proteins, members of the pentraxin family of oligomeric serum proteins, were isolated from rainbow trout using N-methacryloyl-phosphoserine (MA-pSer) immobilized poly (2-hydroxy ethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) cryogels as a column material in a fast protein liquid chromatography system. The separation process was verified in two steps. First, SAP and CRP proteins were isolated together from serum sample of rainbow trout using MA-pSer/PHEMA cryogel columns. Second, SAP protein was separated chromatographically from CRP protein using the Ca(2+) ion immobilized PHEMA cryogel column. According to the data, a new and effective technique has been developed for the isolation of SAP and CRP proteins from a biological source, rainbow trout. Finally, purified SAP and CRP were loaded using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel and western blot analysis to investigate the purity of chromatographically isolated SAP and CRP compared with commertial SAP and CRP.

  14. Health effects of soy protein and isoflavones in humans.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao Wu

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations suggest that soy consumption may be associated with a lower incidence of certain chronic diseases. Clinical studies also show that ingestion of soy proteins reduces the risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This led to the approval of the food-labeling health claim for soy proteins in the prevention of coronary heart disease by the U.S. FDA in 1999. Similar health petitions for soy proteins have also been approved thereafter in the United Kingdom, Brazil, South Africa, the Philippines, Indonesia, Korea, and Malaysia. However, the purported health benefits are quite variable in different studies. The Nutrition Committee of the American Heart Association has assessed 22 randomized trials conducted since 1999 and found that isolated soy protein with isoflavones (ISF) slightly decreased LDL cholesterol but had no effect on HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein(a), or blood pressure. The other effects of soy consumption were not evident. Although the contributing factors to these discrepancies are not fully understood, the source of soybeans and processing procedures of the protein or ISF are believed to be important because of their effects on the content and intactness of certain bioactive protein subunits. Some studies have documented potential safety concerns on increased consumption of soy products. Impacts of soy products on thyroid and reproductive functions as well as on certain types of carcinogenesis require further study in this context. Overall, existing data are inconsistent or inadequate in supporting most of the suggested health benefits of consuming soy protein or ISF.

  15. ATTRACT and PTools: open source programs for protein-protein docking.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Saladin, Adrien; Fiorucci, Sébastien; Prévost, Chantal; Zacharias, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of the structure of protein-protein complexes based on structures or structural models of isolated partners is of increasing importance for structural biology and bioinformatics. The ATTRACT program can be used to perform systematic docking searches based on docking energy minimization. It is part of the object-oriented PTools library written in Python and C++. The library contains various routines to manipulate protein structures, to prepare and perform docking searches as well as analyzing docking results. It also intended to facilitate further methodological developments in the area of macromolecular docking that can be easily integrated. Here, we describe the application of PTools to perform systematic docking searches and to analyze the results. In addition, the possibility to perform multi-component docking will also be presented.

  16. Interaction between dietary protein content and the source of carbohydrates along the gastrointestinal tract of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Robert; Boudry, Christelle; Bindelle, Jérôme; Vahjen, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Although fermentable carbohydrates (CHO) can reduce metabolites derived from dietary protein fermentation in the intestine of pigs, the interaction between site of fermentation and substrate availability along the gut is still unclear. The current study aimed at determining the impact of two different sources of carbohydrates in diets with low or very high protein content on microbial metabolite profiles along the gastrointestinal tract of piglets. Thirty-six piglets (n = 6 per group) were fed diets high (26%, HP) or low (18%, LP) in dietary protein and with or without two different sources of carbohydrates (12% sugar beet pulp, SBP, or 8% lignocellulose, LNC) in a 2 × 3 factorial design. After 3 weeks, contents from stomach, jejunum, ileum, caecum, proximal and distal colon were taken and analysed for major bacterial metabolites (D-lactate, L-lactate, short chain fatty acids, ammonia, amines, phenols and indols). Results indicate considerable fermentation of CHO and protein already in the stomach. HP diets increased the formation of ammonia, amines, phenolic and indolic compounds throughout the different parts of the intestine with most pronounced effects in the distal colon. Dietary SBP inclusion in LP diets favoured the formation of cadaverine in the proximal parts of the intestine. SBP mainly increased CHO-derived metabolites such as SCFA and lactate and decreased protein-derived metabolites in the large intestine. Based on metabolite profiles, LNC was partly fermented in the distal large intestine and reduced mainly phenols, indols and cadaverine, but not ammonia. Multivariate analysis confirmed more diet-specific metabolite patterns in the stomach, whereas the CHO addition was the main determinant in the caecum and proximal colon. The protein level mainly influenced the metabolite patterns in the distal colon. The results confirm the importance of CHO source to influence the formation of metabolites derived from protein fermentation along the intestinal

  17. Effects of confinement on protein folding and protein stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, G.; Yuan, J. M.; Vallieres, M.; Dong, H.; Sun, Z.; Wei, Y.; Li, F. Y.; Lin, S. H.

    2003-05-01

    In a cell, proteins exist in crowded environments; these environments influence their stability and dynamics. Similarly, for an enzyme molecule encapsulated in an inorganic cavity as in biosensors or biocatalysts, confinement and even surface effects play important roles in its stability and dynamics. Using a minimalist model (two-dimensional HP lattice model), we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations to study confinement effects on protein stability. We have calculated heat capacity as a function of temperature using the histogram method and results obtained show that confinement tends to stabilize the folded conformations, consistent with experimental results (some reported here) and previous theoretical analyses. Furthermore, for a protein molecule tethered to a solid surface the stabilization effect can be even greater. We have also investigated the effects of confinement on the kinetics of the refolding and unfolding processes as functions of temperature and box size. As expected, unfolding time increases as box size decreases, however, confinement affects folding times in a more complicated way. Our theoretical results agree with our experimentally observed trends that thermal stability of horseradish peroxidase and acid phosphatase, encapsulated in mesoporous silica, increases as the pore size of the silica matrix decreases.

  18. Source memory in rats is impaired by an NMDA receptor antagonist but not by PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra E.; Xu, Zhili; Lai, Yvonne Y.; Kulkarni, Pushkar M.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Hohmann, Andrea G.; Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2016-01-01

    Limitations of preclinical models of human memory contribute to the pervasive view that rodent models do not adequately predict therapeutic efficacy in producing cognitive impairments or improvements in humans. We used a source-memory model (i.e. a representation of the origin of information) we developed for use in rats to evaluate possible drug-induced impairments of both spatial memory and higher order memory functions in the same task. Memory impairment represents a major barrier to use of NMDAR antagonists as pharmacotherapies. The scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDa (PSD95) links NMDARs to the neuronal enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which catalyzes production of the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, interrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions downstream of NMDARs represents a novel therapeutic strategy to interrupt NMDAR-dependent NO signaling while bypassing unwanted side effects of NMDAR antagonists. We hypothesized that the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 would impair source memory. We also hypothesized that PSD95-nNOS inhibitors (IC87201 and ZL006) would lack the profile of cognitive impairment associated with global NMDAR antagonists. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed NMDA-stimulated formation of cGMP, a marker of NO production, in cultured hippocampal neurons. MK-801, at doses that did not impair motor function, impaired source memory under conditions in which spatial memory was spared. Thus, source memory was more vulnerable than spatial memory to impairment. By contrast, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors, IC87201 and ZL006, administered at doses that are behaviorally effective in rats, spared source memory, spatial memory, and motor function. Thus, PSD95-nNOS inhibitors are likely to exhibit favorable therapeutic ratios compared to NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26909849

  19. Lipid extracted algae as a source for protein and reduced sugar: a step closer to the biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Rawat, Ismail; Guldhe, Abhishek; Bux, Faizal

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using lipid extracted algae (LEA) as a source for protein and reduced sugar, and the effects of various procedural treatments on their yields. LEA provided comparable yields of protein and reduced sugars to those from total algae. Oven drying provided highest yields of all products followed by freeze drying, while sun drying significantly lowered their yields. Effective cell disruption by microwave and autoclave increased the lipid yields from algae, but resulted in increased loss of other compounds with lipid extracting solvents lowering their yields during sequential extraction. Relatively inefficient cell disruption by ultrasonication and osmotic shock lowered the amount of cell protein lost to the lipid extracting solvents. These results highlight the complexity of concurrent extraction of all value added products from algae, and the need for proper selection of the processes to achieve the objectives of integrated biorefinery.

  20. Potential sources of mouth drying in beverages fortified with dairy proteins: A comparison of casein- and whey-rich ingredients.

    PubMed

    Withers, C A; Lewis, M J; Gosney, M A; Methven, L

    2014-03-01

    Oral nutritional supplement drinks (ONS) are beverages high in dairy proteins that are prescribed to individuals at risk of malnutrition. Consumption of ONS is poor in elderly care facilities, with patients commenting that the sensory attributes of these drinks reduce their enjoyment and willingness to consume. Mouth drying is an attribute of ONS found to build with repeated consumption, which may further limit liking of these products. This study investigated the sources of drying sensations by sequential profiling, with a trained sensory panel rating a range of model milk systems and ONS over repeated sips and during after-effects. Sequential profiling found that fortification of milk with both caseinate and whey protein concentrate significantly increased the perception of mouth drying over repeated consumption, increasing by between 35 and 85% over consumption of 40mL. Enrichment of ONS with either whey protein concentrate or milk protein concentrate to a total protein content of 8.7% (wt/wt) resulted in whey and casein levels of 4.3:4.4% and 1.7:7.0% respectively. The product higher in whey protein was substantially more mouth drying, implying that whey proteins may be the most important contributor to mouth drying in ONS. However, efforts to mask mouth drying of protein-fortified milk by increasing sweetness or fat level were unsuccessful at the levels tested. Increasing the viscosity of protein-fortified milk led to a small but significant reduction in mouth drying. However, this approach was not successful when tested within complete ONS. Further analysis is required into the mechanism of protein-derived mouth drying to mask negative sensations and improve the enjoyment and consumption of protein-rich ONS. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PANDORA: keyword-based analysis of protein sets by integration of annotation sources.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Noam; Vaaknin, Avishay; Linial, Michal

    2003-10-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput methods and the application of computational tools for automatic classification of proteins have made it possible to carry out large-scale proteomic analyses. Biological analysis and interpretation of sets of proteins is a time-consuming undertaking carried out manually by experts. We have developed PANDORA (Protein ANnotation Diagram ORiented Analysis), a web-based tool that provides an automatic representation of the biological knowledge associated with any set of proteins. PANDORA uses a unique approach of keyword-based graphical analysis that focuses on detecting subsets of proteins that share unique biological properties and the intersections of such sets. PANDORA currently supports SwissProt keywords, NCBI Taxonomy, InterPro entries and the hierarchical classification terms from ENZYME, SCOP and GO databases. The integrated study of several annotation sources simultaneously allows a representation of biological relations of structure, function, cellular location, taxonomy, domains and motifs. PANDORA is also integrated into the ProtoNet system, thus allowing testing thousands of automatically generated clusters. We illustrate how PANDORA enhances the biological understanding of large, non-uniform sets of proteins originating from experimental and computational sources, without the need for prior biological knowledge on individual proteins.

  2. Silkworms culture as a source of protein for humans in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunan; Tang, Liman; Tong, Ling; Liu, Hong

    2009-04-01

    This paper focuses on the problem about a configuration with complete nutrition for humans in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) applied in the spacebases. The possibility of feeding silkworms to provide edible animal protein with high quality for taikonauts during long-term spaceflights and lunar-based missions was investigated from several aspects, including the nutrition structure of silkworms, feeding method, processing methods, feeding equipment, growing conditions and the influences on the space environmental condition changes caused by the silkworms. The originally inedible silk is also regarded as a protein source. A possible process of edible silk protein was brought forward in this paper. After being processed, the silk can be converted to edible protein for humans. The conclusion provides a promising approach to solving the protein supply problem for the taikonauts living in space during an extended exploration period.

  3. Impact of dietary carbohydrate and protein source and content on swine manure foaming properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diet ingredients are thought to contribute to foaming problems associated with swine deep-pit systems. Two experiments explored the impact of protein and carbohydrate sources in swine diets on the physicochemical properties, methane production potential, and foaming characteristics of swine manure. ...

  4. Submerged monoxenic culture medium development for Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens: protein sources.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chun-Hwi; Whang, Kyung Sook; Gaugler, Randy; Yoo, Sun Kyun

    2011-08-01

    Most medium formulations for improving culture of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) based on protein sources have used enriched media like animal feed such as dried egg yolk, lactalbumin, and liver extract, among other ingredients. Most results, however, showed unstable yields and longer production time. Many of the results do not show the detailed parameters of fermentation. Soy flour, cotton seed flour, corn gluten meal, casein powder, soytone, peptone, casein hydrolysates, and lactalbumin hydrolysate as protein sources were tested to determine the source to support optimal symbiotic bacteria and nematode growth. The protein hydrolysates selected did not improve bacterial cell mass compared with the yeast extract control, but soy flour was the best, showing 75.1% recovery and producing more bacterial cell number (1.4×10⁹/ml) than all other sources. The highest yield (1.85×10⁵ IJs/ml), yield coefficient (1.67×10⁶ IJs/g medium), and productivity (1.32×10⁷ IJs/l/day) were also achieved at enriched medium with soybean protein.

  5. Detection of Missing Proteins Using the PRIDE Database as a Source of Mass Spectrometry Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The current catalogue of the human proteome is not yet complete, as experimental proteomics evidence is still elusive for a group of proteins known as the missing proteins. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) has been successfully using technology and bioinformatic resources to improve the characterization of such challenging proteins. In this manuscript, we propose a pipeline starting with the mining of the PRIDE database to select a group of data sets potentially enriched in missing proteins that are subsequently analyzed for protein identification with a method based on the statistical analysis of proteotypic peptides. Spermatozoa and the HEK293 cell line were found to be a promising source of missing proteins and clearly merit further attention in future studies. After the analysis of the selected samples, we found 342 PSMs, suggesting the presence of 97 missing proteins in human spermatozoa or the HEK293 cell line, while only 36 missing proteins were potentially detected in the retina, frontal cortex, aorta thoracica, or placenta. The functional analysis of the missing proteins detected confirmed their tissue specificity, and the validation of a selected set of peptides using targeted proteomics (SRM/MRM assays) further supports the utility of the proposed pipeline. As illustrative examples, DNAH3 and TEPP in spermatozoa, and UNCX and ATAD3C in HEK293 cells were some of the more robust and remarkable identifications in this study. We provide evidence indicating the relevance to carefully analyze the ever-increasing MS/MS data available from PRIDE and other repositories as sources for missing proteins detection in specific biological matrices as revealed for HEK293 cells. PMID:27581094

  6. Detection of Missing Proteins Using the PRIDE Database as a Source of Mass Spectrometry Evidence.

    PubMed

    Garin-Muga, Alba; Odriozola, Leticia; Martínez-Val, Ana; Del Toro, Noemí; Martínez, Rocío; Molina, Manuela; Cantero, Laura; Rivera, Rocío; Garrido, Nicolás; Dominguez, Francisco; Sanchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Corrales, Fernando J; Segura, Victor

    2016-11-04

    The current catalogue of the human proteome is not yet complete, as experimental proteomics evidence is still elusive for a group of proteins known as the missing proteins. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) has been successfully using technology and bioinformatic resources to improve the characterization of such challenging proteins. In this manuscript, we propose a pipeline starting with the mining of the PRIDE database to select a group of data sets potentially enriched in missing proteins that are subsequently analyzed for protein identification with a method based on the statistical analysis of proteotypic peptides. Spermatozoa and the HEK293 cell line were found to be a promising source of missing proteins and clearly merit further attention in future studies. After the analysis of the selected samples, we found 342 PSMs, suggesting the presence of 97 missing proteins in human spermatozoa or the HEK293 cell line, while only 36 missing proteins were potentially detected in the retina, frontal cortex, aorta thoracica, or placenta. The functional analysis of the missing proteins detected confirmed their tissue specificity, and the validation of a selected set of peptides using targeted proteomics (SRM/MRM assays) further supports the utility of the proposed pipeline. As illustrative examples, DNAH3 and TEPP in spermatozoa, and UNCX and ATAD3C in HEK293 cells were some of the more robust and remarkable identifications in this study. We provide evidence indicating the relevance to carefully analyze the ever-increasing MS/MS data available from PRIDE and other repositories as sources for missing proteins detection in specific biological matrices as revealed for HEK293 cells.

  7. Physicochemical and Functional Properties of Vegetable and Cereal Proteins as Potential Sources of Novel Food Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Soria-Hernández, Cintya; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proteins from vegetable and cereal sources are an excellent alternative to substitute animal-based counterparts because of their reduced cost, abundant supply and good nutritional value. The objective of this investigation is to study a set of vegetable and cereal proteins in terms of physicochemical and functional properties. Twenty protein sources were studied: five soya bean flour samples, one pea flour and fourteen newly developed blends of soya bean and maize germ (five concentrates and nine hydrolysates). The physicochemical characterization included pH (5.63 to 7.57), electrical conductivity (1.32 to 4.32 mS/cm), protein content (20.78 to 94.24% on dry mass basis), free amino nitrogen (0.54 to 2.87 mg/g) and urease activity (0.08 to 2.20). The functional properties showed interesting differences among proteins: water absorption index ranged from 0.41 to 18.52, the highest being of soya and maize concentrates. Nitrogen and water solubility ranged from 10.14 to 74.89% and from 20.42 to 95.65%, respectively. Fat absorption and emulsification activity indices ranged from 2.59 to 4.72 and from 3936.6 to 52 399.2 m2/g respectively, the highest being of pea flour. Foam activity (66.7 to 475.0%) of the soya and maize hydrolysates was the best. Correlation analyses showed that hydrolysis affected solubility-related parameters whereas fat-associated indices were inversely correlated with water-linked parameters. Foam properties were better of proteins treated with low heat, which also had high urease activity. Physicochemical and functional characterization of the soya and maize protein concentrates and hydrolysates allowed the identification of differences regarding other vegetable and cereal protein sources such as pea or soya bean. PMID:27904358

  8. Nitrogen Metabolism in Lactating Goats Fed with Diets Containing Different Protein Sources

    PubMed Central

    Santos, A. B.; Pereira, M. L. A.; Silva, H. G. O.; Pedreira, M. S.; Carvalho, G. G. P.; Ribeiro, L. S. O.; Almeida, P. J. P.; Pereira, T. C. J.; Moreira, J. V.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate urea excretion, nitrogen balance and microbial protein synthesis in lactating goats fed with diets containing different protein sources in the concentrate (soybean meal, cottonseed meal, aerial part of cassava hay and leucaena hay). Four Alpine goats whose mean body weight was 42.6±6.1 kg at the beginning of the experiment, a mean lactation period of 94.0±9.0 days and a production of 1.7±0.4 kg of milk were distributed in a 4×4 Latin square with four periods of 15 days. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous, containing 103.0 g/kg of CP, 400 g/kg of Tifton 85 hay and 600 g/kg of concentrate. Diet containing cottonseed meal provided (p<0.05) increased excretion of urea and urea nitrogen in the urine (g/d and mg/kg of BW) when compared with leucaena hay. The diets affected the concentrations of urea nitrogen in plasma (p<0.05) and excretion of urea nitrogen in milk, being that soybean meal and cottonseed meal showed (p<0.05) higher than the average aerial part of the cassava hay. The use of diets with cottonseed meal as protein source in the concentrate in feeding of lactating goats provides greater nitrogen excretion in urine and negative nitrogen balance, while the concentrate with leucaena hay as a source of protein, provides greater ruminal microbial protein synthesis. PMID:25050000

  9. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-05

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. © 2015 Paulo et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Effect of protein deficiency on suppressor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khorshidi, M; Mohagheghpour, N

    1979-01-01

    The effects of moderate protein deficiency on the in vitro response of spleen cells to phytohemagglutinin in A/Jax mice were studied. The response of spleen cells from protein-deficient mice to phytohemagglutinin was found to be enhanced as compared with that of cells from control animals. Since inadequate development or function of suppressor cells in the protein-deficient mice offered a possible explanation for the enhanced lymphoproliferative activity, cocultures of spleen cells from protein-deficient and control animals were tested for their responses to phytohemagglutinin. Suppression of [3H]thymidine incorporation was detected in coculture of 25% mitomycin-treated spleen cells from control animals and 75% spleen cells from protein-deficient mice. The suppressor (regulator) elements in control spleens were found to reside in the adherent cell population. PMID:313906

  11. Plants can use protein as a nitrogen source without assistance from other organisms

    PubMed Central

    Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Lonhienne, Thierry G. A.; Rentsch, Doris; Robinson, Nicole; Christie, Michael; Webb, Richard I.; Gamage, Harshi K.; Carroll, Bernard J.; Schenk, Peer M.; Schmidt, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen is quantitatively the most important nutrient that plants acquire from the soil. It is well established that plant roots take up nitrogen compounds of low molecular mass, including ammonium, nitrate, and amino acids. However, in the soil of natural ecosystems, nitrogen occurs predominantly as proteins. This complex organic form of nitrogen is considered to be not directly available to plants. We examined the long-held view that plants depend on specialized symbioses with fungi (mycorrhizas) to access soil protein and studied the woody heathland plant Hakea actites and the herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, which do not form mycorrhizas. We show that both species can use protein as a nitrogen source for growth without assistance from other organisms. We identified two mechanisms by which roots access protein. Roots exude proteolytic enzymes that digest protein at the root surface and possibly in the apoplast of the root cortex. Intact protein also was taken up into root cells most likely via endocytosis. These findings change our view of the spectrum of nitrogen sources that plants can access and challenge the current paradigm that plants rely on microbes and soil fauna for the breakdown of organic matter. PMID:18334638

  12. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

  13. Effect of Stirring Method on Protein Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaoi, Mari; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-10-01

    We previously proposed the use of solution stirring during the growth of protein crystals using the Micro-Stirring technique with a rotary shaker. In this paper, we report on the effects of a new type solution flow on the crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) using a wave shaker. The time required for nucleation was reduced by wave stirring, but increased by rotary stirring. Nucleation was stimulated by wave stirring. This result indicates that protein crystal growth in a stirred solution is strongly dependent on the stirring method used and the solution flow. Therefore, optimized stirring conditions are essential for producing high-quality protein crystals.

  14. Laser plasma as an effective ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masek, Karel; Krasa, Josef; Laska, Leos; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Rohlena, Karel; Kralikova, Bozena; Skala, Jiri; Woryna, Eugeniusz; Farny, J.; Parys, Piotr; Wolowski, Jerzy; Mraz, W.; Haseroth, H.; Sharkov, B.; Korschinek, G.

    1998-09-01

    Ions in different charge state and with different energy distribution are generated in the process of interaction of intense laser radiation with solid targets. Multiply charged ions of medium- and high-Z elements (Al, Co, Ni, Cu, Sn, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Pb, Bi), produced by photodissociation iodine laser system PERUN ((lambda) equals 1.315 micrometer, EL approximately 40 J, (tau) approximately 500 ps) are reported. Corpuscular diagnostics based on time-of-flight method (ion collectors and a cylindrical electrostatic ion energy analyzer) as well as Thomson parabola spectrometer were used in the experiments. The ions in maximum charge state up to about 55+ and with energies of several MeV were registered at a distance of about 2 m from the plasma plume. Measured ion current densities higher than 10 mA/cm2 in about 1 m from the target demonstrate the performance of laser ion source. A theoretical interpretation of ion spectra is attempted.

  15. Synergistic effects of resistance training and protein intake: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; Cholewa, Jason Michael; Naimo, Marshall Alan; Zhi, X I A; Magagnin, Daiane; de Sá, Rafaele Bis Dal Ponte; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Teixeira, Tamiris da Silva; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to increase skeletal muscle mass. The muscle protein accretion process depends on a robust synergistic action between protein intake and overload. The intake of protein after resistance training increases plasma amino acids, which results in the activation of signaling molecules leading to increased muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Although both essential and non-essential amino acids are necessary for hypertrophy, the intake of free L-leucine or high-leucine whole proteins has been specifically shown to increase the initiation of translation that is essential for elevated MPS. The literature supports the use of protein intake following resistance-training sessions to enhance MPS; however, less understood are the effects of different protein sources and timing protocols on MPS. The sum of the adaptions from each individual training session is essential to muscle hypertrophy, and thus highlights the importance of an optimal supplementation protocol. The aim of this review is to present recent findings reported in the literature and to discuss the practical application of these results. In that light, new speculations and questions will arise that may direct future investigations. The information and recommendations generated in this review should be of benefit to clinical dietitians as well as those engaged in sports.

  16. Silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) are new sources of high quality protein and lipid.

    PubMed

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Katagiri, Mitsuaki; Yamato, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the nutritional value of silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori) and the content of α-glucosidase inhibitor. The percentages of total protein and lipid contents by dry weight were 55.6 and 32.2%, respectively. Silkworm pupae protein had high levels of essential amino acids such as valine, methionine and phenylalanine. The contents of essential amino acids in silkworm pupae protein satisfied the FAO/WHO/UNU suggested requirements (2007). In addition, they also possessed n-3 fatty acids, especially α-linolenic acid (36.3%), as a major component. The 50% ethanol extract of silkworm pupae contained 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), which is a potent α-glucosidase inhibitor. These results suggest that silkworm pupae are a new source of high quality protein, lipid, and α-glucosidase inhibitor.

  17. Fingerprinting protein structures effectively and efficiently.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xuefeng; Li, Shuai Cheng; He, Lin; Li, Ming

    2014-04-01

    One common task in structural biology is to assess the similarities and differences among protein structures. A variety of structure alignment algorithms and programs has been designed and implemented for this purpose. A major drawback with existing structure alignment programs is that they require a large amount of computational time, rendering them infeasible for pairwise alignments on large collections of structures. To overcome this drawback, a fragment alphabet learned from known structures has been introduced. The method, however, considers local similarity only, and therefore occasionally assigns high scores to structures that are similar only in local fragments. We propose a novel approach that eliminates false positives, through the comparison of both local and remote similarity, with little compromise in speed. Two kinds of contact libraries (ContactLib) are introduced to fingerprint protein structures effectively and efficiently. Each contact group of the contact library consists of one local or two remote fragments and is represented by a concise vector. These vectors are then indexed and used to calculate a new combined hit-rate score to identify similar protein structures effectively and efficiently. We tested our method on the high-quality protein structure subset of SCOP30 containing 3297 protein structures. For each protein structure of the subset, we retrieved its neighbor protein structures from the rest of the subset. The best area under the Receiver-Operating Characteristic curve, archived by ContactLib, is as high as 0.960. This is a significant improvement compared with 0.747, the best result achieved by FragBag. We also demonstrated that incorporating remote contact information is critical to consistently retrieve accurate neighbor protein structures for all- query protein structures. https://cs.uwaterloo.ca/∼xfcui/contactlib/.

  18. Effective source approach to self-force calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Ian; Wardell, Barry; Diener, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Numerical evaluation of the self-force on a point particle is made difficult by the use of delta functions as sources. Recent methods for self-force calculations avoid delta functions altogether, using instead a finite and extended 'effective source' for a point particle. We provide a review of the general principles underlying this strategy, using the specific example of a scalar point charge moving in a black hole spacetime. We also report on two new developments: (i) the construction and evaluation of an effective source for a scalar charge moving along a generic orbit of an arbitrary spacetime, and (ii) the successful implementation of hyperboloidal slicing that significantly improves on previous treatments of boundary conditions used for effective-source-based self-force calculations. Finally, we identify some of the key issues related to the effective source approach that will need to be addressed by future work.

  19. Food proteins as a source of bioactive peptides with diverse functions.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J

    2012-08-01

    In addition to supplying essential nutrients, some food proteins can confer additional health benefits beyond nutrition. The presence of bioactive proteins and peptides in different foods is a factor not currently taken into consideration when assessing the dietary quality of food proteins. The range of described physiological benefits attributed to bioactive proteins and peptides is diverse. Multiple factors can potentially impact on the ability of a bioactive peptide or protein to elicit an effect. Although some food proteins act directly in their intact form to elicit their effects, generally it is peptides derived from digestion, hydrolysis or fermentation that are of most interest. The levels of bioactive peptides generated must be sufficient to elicit a response, but should not be so high as to be unsafe, thus causing negative effects. In addition, some peptides cause systemic effects and therefore must be absorbed, again in sufficient amounts to elicit their action. Many studies to date have been carried out in vitro; therefore it is important that further trials are conducted in vivo to assess efficacy, dose response and safety of the peptides, particularly if health related claims are to be made. Therefore, methods must be developed and standardised that enable the measurement of health benefits and also the level of bioactive peptides which are absorbed into the bloodstream. Once standardised, such methods may provide a new perspective and an additional mechanism for analysing protein quality which is currently not encompassed by the use of the protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS).

  20. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    PubMed

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

    PubMed Central

    Ziska, Lewis H.; Pettis, Jeffery S.; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E.; Tomecek, Martha B.; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H. Wayne

    2016-01-01

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca. However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most widespread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842–2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situ trial of S. canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r2 = 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r2 = 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees. PMID:27075256

  2. Does alpha-helix folding necessarily provide an energy source for the protein-lipid binding?

    PubMed

    Gursky, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Lipid-induced alpha-helix folding, which occurs in many lipid surface-binding proteins and peptides such as apolipoproteins and synucleins, has been proposed to provide an energy source for protein-lipid interactions. We propose that in a system comprised of a phospholipid surface and a small polypeptide that is unfolded in solution and binds reversibly to lipid surface, helical folding involves expenditure of free energy as compared to a similar polypeptide that is alpha-helical in solution. This is a consequence of the entropic cost of helix folding that is illustrated in a simple thermodynamic model and exemplifies the general "key-into-lock" paradigm of protein-ligand binding. Even though this simple model does not explicitly address the protein-induced lipid re-arrangement and may not directly apply to large proteins that undergo significant tertiary structural changes upon lipid binding, it suggests that the notion of helix folding as an energy source for lipid binding should be treated with caution.

  3. Rice Bran Protein as a Potent Source of Antimelanogenic Peptides with Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Akihito; Tanaka, Seiya; Tanaka, Takaaki; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2016-10-28

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is consumed as a staple food globally, and rice bran, the byproduct, is an unused biomass that is ultimately discarded as waste. Thus, in the present study, a technique for producing tyrosinase inhibitory peptides from rice bran protein (RBP) was developed. Simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin produced numerous peptides. Subsequently, six tyrosinase inhibitory peptides were isolated from the hydrolysate fractions in a multistep purification protocol, and their amino acid sequences were determined. Three of these peptides had a C-terminal tyrosine residue and exhibited significant inhibitory effects against tyrosinase-mediated monophenolase reactions. Furthermore, peptide CT-2 (Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-Tyr) potently inhibited melanogenesis in mouse B16 melanoma cells without causing cytotoxicity, suggesting the potential of CT-2 as an agent for melanin-related skin disorder treatment. The present data indicate that RBP is a potent source of tyrosinase inhibitory peptides and that simultaneous treatment of RBP with chymotrypsin and trypsin efficiently produces these peptides.

  4. Dynamically polarized samples for neutron protein crystallography at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinkui; Pierce, Josh; Myles, Dean; Robertson, J. L.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Standaert, Bob; Cuneo, Matt; Li, Le; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-09-01

    To prepare for the next generation neutron scattering instruments for the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and to broaden the scientific impact of neutron protein crystallography at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, we have recently ramped up our efforts to develop a dynamically polarized target for neutron protein crystallography at the SNS. Proteins contain a large amount of hydrogen which contributes to incoherent diffraction background and limits the sensitivity of neutron protein crystallography. This incoherent background can be suppressed by using polarized neutron diffraction, which in the same time also improves the coherent diffraction signal. Our plan is to develop a custom Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) setup tailored to neutron protein diffraction instruments. Protein crystals will be polarized at a magnetic field of 5 T and temperatures of below 1 K. After the dynamic polarization process, the sample will be brought to a frozen-spin mode in a 0.5 T holding field and at temperatures below 100 mK. In a parallel effort, we are also investigating various ways of incorporating polarization agents needed for DNP, such as site specific spin labels, into protein crystals.

  5. Theory Of Salt Effects On Protein Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Yuba; Schmit, Jeremy

    Salt is one of the major factors that effects protein solubility. Often, at low salt concentration regime, protein solubility increases with the salt concentration(salting in) whereas at high salt concentration regime, solubility decreases with the increase in salt concentration(salting out). There are no quantitative theories to explain salting in and salting out. We have developed a model to describe the salting in and salting out. Our model accounts for the electrostatic Coulomb energy, salt entropy and non-electrostatic interaction between proteins. We analytically solve the linearized Poisson Boltzmann equation modelling the protein charge by a first order multipole expansion. In our model, protein charges are modulated by the anion binding. Consideration of only the zeroth order term in protein charge doesn't help to describe salting in phenomenon because of the repulsive interaction. To capture the salting in behaviour, it requires an attractive electrostatic interaction in low salt regime. Our work shows that at low salt concentration, dipole interaction is the cause for salting in and at high salt concentration a salt-dependent depletion interaction dominates and gives the salting out. Our theoretical result is consistent with the experimental result for Chymosin protein NIH Grant No R01GM107487.

  6. Separation of source and propagation effects at regional distances

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, P.; Jarpe, S.; Mayeda, K.

    1994-12-31

    Improved estimates of the contributions of source and propagation effects to regional seismic signals are needed to explain the performance of existing discriminants and to help develop more robust methods for identifying underground explosions. In this paper, we use close-in, local, and regional estimates of explosion source time functions to remove source effects from regional recordings of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), a one kiloton chemical explosion in N-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, and nearby nuclear explosions and earthquakes. Using source corrected regional waveforms, we find that regional Pg and Lg spectra of shallow explosions have significant low frequency ({approximately}1Hz) enhancements when compared to normal depth earthquakes. Data and simulations suggest that such enhancements are most sensitive to source depth, but may also be a function of mechanism, source receiver distance, and regional structure.

  7. A transdisciplinary approach to the initial validation of a single cell protein as an alternative protein source for use in aquafeeds.

    PubMed

    Tlusty, Michael; Rhyne, Andrew; Szczebak, Joseph T; Bourque, Bradford; Bowen, Jennifer L; Burr, Gary; Marx, Christopher J; Feinberg, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    The human population is growing and, globally, we must meet the challenge of increased protein needs required to feed this population. Single cell proteins (SCP), when coupled to aquaculture production, offer a means to ensure future protein needs can be met without direct competition with food for people. To demonstrate a given type of SCP has potential as a protein source for use in aquaculture feed, a number of steps need to be validated including demonstrating that the SCP is accepted by the species in question, leads to equivalent survival and growth, does not result in illness or other maladies, is palatable to the consumer, is cost effective to produce and can easily be incorporated into diets using existing technology. Here we examine white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) growth and consumer taste preference, smallmouth grunt (Haemulon chrysargyreum) growth, survival, health and gut microbiota, and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) digestibility when fed diets that substitute the bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens at a level of 30% (grunts), 100% (shrimp), or 55% (salmon) of the fishmeal in a compound feed. In each of these tests, animals performed equivalently when fed diets containing M. extorquens as when fed a standard aquaculture diet. This transdisciplinary approach is a first validation of this bacterium as a potential SCP protein substitute in aquafeeds. Given the ease to produce this SCP through an aerobic fermentation process, the broad applicability for use in aquaculture indicates the promise of M. extorquens in leading toward greater food security in the future.

  8. Influence of protein fermentation and carbohydrate source on in vitro methane production.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, J L; González, J; Carro, M D

    2017-10-01

    Incubations were carried out with batch cultures of ruminal micro-organisms from sheep to analyse the influence of the N source on in vitro CH4 production. The two substrates were mixtures of maize starch and cellulose in proportions of 75:25 and 25:75 (STAR and CEL substrates, respectively), and the three nitrogen (N) sources were ammonia (NH4 Cl), casein (CA) and isolated soya bean protein (SP). Five isonitrogenous treatments were made by replacing non-protein-N (NPN) with CA or SP at levels of 0 (NPN), 50 (CA50 and SP50, respectively) and 100% (CA100 and SP100) of total N. All N treatments were applied at a rate of 35 mg of N/g of substrate organic matter and incubations lasted 16.5 h. With both proteins, N source × substrate interactions (p = 0.065 to 0.002) were detected for CH4 production and CH4 /total VFA ratio. The increases in CH4 production observed by replacing the NPN with protein-N were higher (p < 0.05) for STAR than for CEL substrate, but the opposite was observed for the increases in volatile fatty acid (VFA) production. As a consequence, replacing the NPN by increased levels of CA or SP led to linear increases (p < 0.05) in CH4 /total VFA ratio with STAR, whereas CH4 /total VFA ratio tended (p < 0.10) to be decreased with CEL substrate. Increasing the amount of both proteins decreased linearly (p < 0.05) ammonia-N concentrations, which may indicate an incorporation of amino acids and peptides into microbial protein without being first deaminated into ammonia-N. In incubations with the tested N sources as the only substrate, the fermentation of 1 mg of CA or SP produced 1.24 and 0.60 μmol of CH4 respectively. The results indicate the generation of CH4 from protein fermentation, and that the response of CH4 production to protein-N supply may differ with the basal substrate. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Zachary D.; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E.; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans. IMPORTANCE The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence

  10. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Moye, Zachary D; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Hagen, Stephen J; Burne, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP

  11. Effects of pH on protein-protein interactions and implications for protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Dumetz, André C; Chockla, Aaron M; Kaler, Eric W; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2008-04-01

    The effects of pH on protein interactions and protein phase behavior were investigated by measuring the reduced second osmotic virial coefficient (b2) for ovalbumin and catalase, and the aggregate and crystal solubilities for ovalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin A and B, ribonuclease A and lysozyme. The b2 trends observed for ovalbumin and catalase show that protein interactions become increasingly attractive with decreasing pH. This trend is in good agreement with ovalbumin phase behavior, which was observed to evolve progressively with decreasing pH, leading to formation of amorphous aggregates instead of gel bead-like aggregates, and spherulites instead of needle-like crystals. For both acidic and basic proteins, the aggregate solubility during protein salting-out decreased with decreasing pH, and contrary to what is commonly believed, neither aggregate nor crystal solubility had a minimum at the isoelectric point. beta-Lactoglobulin B was the only protein investigated to show salting-in behavior, and crystals were obtained at low salt concentrations in the vicinity of its isoelectric point. The physical origin of the different trends observed during protein salting-in and salting-out is discussed, and the implications for protein crystallization are emphasized.

  12. Direct comparison of linear and macrocyclic compound libraries as a source of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yu; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-03-09

    There has been much discussion of the potential desirability of macrocyclic molecules for the development of tool compounds and drug leads. But there is little experimental data comparing otherwise equivalent macrocyclic and linear compound libraries as a source of protein ligands. In this Letter, we probe this point in the context of peptoid libraries. Bead-displayed libraries of macrocyclic and linear peptoids containing four variable positions and 0-2 fixed residues, to vary the ring size, were screened against streptavidin and the affinity of every hit for the target was measured. The data show that macrocyclization is advantageous, but only when the ring contains 17 atoms, not 20 or 23 atoms. This technology will be useful for conducting direct comparisons between many different types of chemical libraries to determine their relative utility as a source of protein ligands.

  13. Varying type of forage, concentration of metabolizable protein, and source of carbohydrate affects nutrient digestibility and production by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; St-Pierre, N R; Willett, L B

    2009-11-01

    The effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), type of carbohydrate, and their interactions on nutrient digestibility and production were evaluated using a central composite treatment design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Rumen-degradable protein comprised 10.7% of the dry matter (DM) in all diets, but undegradable protein ranged from 4.1 to 7.1%, resulting in dietary MP concentrations of 8.8 to 12.0% of the DM. Dietary starch ranged from 22 to 30% of the DM with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber concentrations. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block consisted of three 21-d periods, and each cow was assigned a unique sequence of 3 diets, resulting in 108 observations. Milk production and composition, feed intake, and digestibility of major nutrients (via total collection of feces and urine) were measured. Few significant interactions between main effects were observed. Starch concentration had only minor effects on digestibility and production. Replacing corn silage with alfalfa decreased digestibility of N but increased digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. Increasing the concentration of MP increased N digestibility. The concentration (Mcal/kg) of dietary digestible energy (DE) increased linearly as starch concentration increased (very small effect) and was affected by a forage by MP interaction. At low MP, high alfalfa reduced DE concentration, but at high MP, increasing alfalfa increased DE concentration. Increasing alfalfa increased DM and DE intakes, which increased yields of energy-corrected milk, protein, and fat. Increasing MP increased yields of energy-corrected milk and protein. The response in milk protein to changes in MP was much less than predicted using the National Research Council (2001) model.

  14. Quantifying the Molecular Origins of Opposite Solvent Effects on Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Han, Alvin X.; Pek, Han B.; Loo, Bernard L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the nature of solvent-protein interactions is generally weak and non-specific, addition of cosolvents such as denaturants and osmolytes strengthens protein-protein interactions for some proteins, whereas it weakens protein-protein interactions for others. This is exemplified by the puzzling observation that addition of glycerol oppositely affects the association constants of two antibodies, D1.3 and D44.1, with lysozyme. To resolve this conundrum, we develop a methodology based on the thermodynamic principles of preferential interaction theory and the quantitative characterization of local protein solvation from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that changes of preferential solvent interactions at the protein-protein interface quantitatively account for the opposite effects of glycerol on the antibody-antigen association constants. Detailed characterization of local protein solvation in the free and associated protein states reveals how opposite solvent effects on protein-protein interactions depend on the extent of dewetting of the protein-protein contact region and on structural changes that alter cooperative solvent-protein interactions at the periphery of the protein-protein interface. These results demonstrate the direct relationship between macroscopic solvent effects on protein-protein interactions and atom-scale solvent-protein interactions, and establish a general methodology for predicting and understanding solvent effects on protein-protein interactions in diverse biological environments. PMID:23696727

  15. A smoother effective source for scalar self-force simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter; Vega, Ian; Wardell, Barry

    2014-03-01

    In recent years the effective source approach to the self-force problem has had remarkable success culminating with the first self-consistent evolutions of a scalar charge around a Schwarzschild black hole. However, due primarily to the limited smoothness of the effective source used so far (it is continuous but not differentiable) the simulations have limited accuracy, significantly affecting their usefulness when comparing with other approaches. We will present new simulations with a smoother effective source (now twice differentiable) and contrast the accuracy and computational cost with the previous simulations. With support from NSF grant no 1307396.

  16. Persistent toxic substances: sources, fates and effects.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ming H; Armour, Margaret-Ann; Naidu, Ravi; Man, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Persistent toxic substances (PTS) include the Stockholm persistent organic pollutants, like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin/furan, etc., and organometallic compounds, like organomercury, organotin, and organolead, which all share the same characteristics of being persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative, and able to travel long distances through different media. The adverse health effects of some of the emerging chemicals like pentabromodiphenyl ether, bisphenol A, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, which are widely used in daily appliances (e.g., TVs, computers, mobile phones, plastic baby bottles), have become a public health concern due to more evidence now available showing their adverse effects like disturbance of the endocrine system and cancer. This article is an attempt to review the current status of PTS in our environment, citing case studies in China and North America, and whether our existing drinking water treatment and wastewater treatment processes are adequate in removing them from water. Some management issues of these emerging chemicals of concern are also discussed.

  17. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J; Chance, Mark R; Ralston, Corie

    2014-07-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale.

  18. Suite of three protein crystallography beamlines with single superconducting bend magnet as the source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Howells, Malcolm; McKinney, Wayne; Krupnick, James; Cambie, Daniella; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Cork, Carl W.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Dickert, Jeffery; Meigs, George; Ralston, Corie; Holton, James M.; Alber, Thomas; Berger, James M.; Agard, David A.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-08-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), three protein crystallography (PX) beamlines have been built that use as a source one of the three 6 Tesla single pole superconducting bending magnets (superbends) that were recently installed in the ring. The use of such single pole superconducting bend magnets enables the development of a hard x-ray program on a relatively low energy 1.9 GeV ring without taking up insertion device straight sections. The source is of relatively low power, but due to the small electron beam emittance, it has high brightness. X-ray optics are required to preserve the brightness and to match the illumination requirements for protein crystallography. This was achieved by means of a collimating premirror bent to a plane parabola, a double crystal monochromator followed by a toroidal mirror that focuses in the horizontal direction with a 2:1 demagnification. This optical arrangement partially balances aberrations from the collimating and toroidal mirrors such that a tight focused spot size is achieved. The optical properties of the beamline are an excellent match to those required by the small protein crystals that are typically measured. The design and performance of these new beamlines are described.

  19. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale. PMID:24971962

  20. Electrochemically induced pH changes resulting in protein unfolding in the ion source of an electrospray mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Konermann, L; Silva, E A; Sogbein, O F

    2001-10-15

    The operation of an electrospray ion source in the positive ion mode involves charge-balancing oxidation reactions at the liquid/metal interface of the sprayer capillary. One of these reactions is the electrolytic oxidation of water. The protons generated in this process acidify the analyte solution within the electrospray capillary. This work explores the effects of this acidification on the electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrum of the protein cytochrome c (cyt c). In aqueous solution containing 40% propanol, cyt c unfolds around pH 5.6. Mass spectra recorded under these conditions, using a simple ESI series circuit, display a bimodal charge-state distribution that reflects an equilibrium mixture of folded and unfolded protein in solution. These spectra are not strongly affected by electrochemical acidification. An "external loop" is added to the ESI circuit when the metal needle of the sample injection syringe is connected to ground. The resulting circuit represents two coupled electrolytic cells that share the ESI capillary as a common anode. Under these conditions, the rate of charge-balancing oxidation reactions is dramatically increased because the ion source has to supply electrons for both, the external circuit and the ESI circuit. The analytical implications of this effect are briefly discussed. Mass spectra of cyt c recorded with the syringe needle grounded are shifted to higher charge states, indicating that electrochemical acidification has caused the protein to unfold in the ion source. The acidification can be suppressed by increasing the flow rate and lowering the electrolyte concentration of the solution and by using an electrolyte that acts as redox buffer. The observed acidification is similar for sprayer capillaries made of platinum and stainless steel. Removal of the protective oxide layer on the stainless steel surface results in effective redox buffering for a few minutes.

  1. Reaching saturation in patterned source vertical organic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Michael; Sheleg, Gil; Keum, Chang-min; Zucker, Jonathan; Lussem, Bjorn; Tessler, Nir

    2017-05-01

    Like most of the vertical transistors, the Patterned Source Vertical Organic Field Effect Transistor (PS-VOFET) does not exhibit saturation in the output characteristics. The importance of achieving a good saturation is demonstrated in a vertical organic light emitting transistor; however, this is critical for any application requiring the transistor to act as a current source. Thereafter, a 2D simulation tool was used to explain the physical mechanisms that prevent saturation as well as to suggest ways to overcome them. We found that by isolating the source facet from the drain-source electric field, the PS-VOFET architecture exhibits saturation. The process used for fabricating such saturation-enhancing structure is then described. The new device demonstrated close to an ideal saturation with only 1% change in the drain-source current over a 10 V change in the drain-source voltage.

  2. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur. PMID:26468660

  3. The effect of enamel proteins on erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, T.; Carvalho, T. S.; Lussi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Enamel proteins form a scaffold for growing hydroxyapatite crystals during enamel formation. They are then almost completely degraded during enamel maturation, resulting in a protein content of only 1% (w/v) in mature enamel. Nevertheless, this small amount of remaining proteins has important effects on the mechanical and structural properties of enamel and on the electrostatic properties of its surface. To analyze how enamel proteins affect tooth erosion, human enamel specimens were deproteinated. Surface microhardness (SMH), surface reflection intensity (SRI) and calcium release of both deproteinated and control specimens were monitored while continuously eroding them. The deproteination itself already reduced the initial SMH and SRI of the enamel significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01). During the course of erosion, the progression of all three evaluated parameters differed significantly between the two groups (p < 0.001 for each). The deproteinated enamel lost its SMH and SRI faster, and released more calcium than the control group, but these differences were only significant at later stages of erosion, where not only surface softening but surface loss can be observed. We conclude that enamel proteins have a significant effect on erosion, protecting the enamel and slowing down the progression of erosion when irreversible surface loss starts to occur.

  4. Diet-induced weight loss: the effect of dietary protein on bone.

    PubMed

    Tang, Minghua; O'Connor, Lauren E; Campbell, Wayne W

    2014-01-01

    High-protein (>30% of energy from protein or >1.2 g/kg/day) and moderately high-protein (22% to 29% of energy from protein or 1.0 to 1.2 g/kg/day) diets are popular for weight loss, but the effect of dietary protein on bone during weight loss is not well understood. Protein may help preserve bone mass during weight loss by stimulating insulin-like growth factor 1, a potent bone anabolism stimulator, and increasing intestinal calcium absorption. Protein-induced acidity is considered to have minimal effect on bone resorption in adults with normal kidney function. Both the quantity and predominant source of protein influence changes in bone with diet-induced weight loss. Higher-protein, high-dairy diets may help attenuate bone loss during weight loss.

  5. Effect of Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David; Li, Ying; Wüst, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Using Wang-Landau sampling with approriate trial moves[2], we investigate the effect of different types of mutations on lattice proteins in the HP model. While exact studies have been carried out for short HP proteins[3], the systems we investigate are of much larger size and hence not accessible for exact enumerations. Based on the estimated density of states, we systematically analyse the changes in structure and degeneracy of ground states of particular proteins and measure thermodynamic quantities like the stability of ground states and the specific heat, for example. Both, neutral mutations, which do not change the structure and stability of ground states, as well as critical mutations, which do change the thermodynamic behavior qualitatively, have been observed. Research supported by NSF

  6. Crystal packing effects on protein loops.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Chaya S; Pollack, Rena M

    2005-07-01

    The effects of crystal packing on protein loop structures are examined by (1) a comparison of loops in proteins that have been crystallized in alternate packing arrangements, and (2) theoretical prediction of loops both with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment. Results show that in a minority of cases, loop geometries are dependent on crystal packing effects. Explicit representation of the crystal environment in a loop prediction algorithm can be used to model these effects and to reconstruct the structures, and relative energies, of a loop in alternative packing environments. By comparing prediction results with and without the inclusion of the crystal environment, the loop prediction algorithm can further be used to identify cases in which a crystal structure does not represent the most stable state of a loop in solution. We anticipate that this capability has implications for structural biology.

  7. Isotopic Analysis of Sporocarp Protein and Structural Material Improves Resolution of Fungal Carbon Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Janet; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Hobbie, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal acquisition of resources is difficult to assess in the field. To determine whether fungi received carbon from recent plant photosynthate, litter or soil-derived organic (C:N bonded) nitrogen, we examined differences in δ13C among bulk tissue, structural carbon, and protein extracts of sporocarps of three fungal types: saprotrophic fungi, fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae, or fungi with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae. Sporocarps were collected from experimental plots of the Duke Free-air CO2 enrichment experiment during and after CO2 enrichment. The differential 13C labeling of ecosystem pools in CO2 enrichment experiments was tracked into fungi and provided novel insights into organic nitrogen use. Specifically, sporocarp δ13C as well as δ15N of protein and structural material indicated that fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae used soil-derived organic nitrogen sources for protein carbon, fungi with hydrophilic ectomycorrhizae used recent plant photosynthates for protein carbon and both fungal groups used photosynthates for structural carbon. Saprotrophic fungi depended on litter produced during fumigation for both protein and structural material. PMID:28082951

  8. Influence of supplemental protein source and feeding frequency on rumen fermentation and performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P H; McQueen, R E

    1994-05-01

    Multiparous Holstein cows in early lactation were fed a basal mixed ration of 47% (DM) alfalfa and timothy silage and 53% barley and corn concentrate twice daily for ad libitum intake at 1630 and 0600 h. Two supplemental protein sources that differed in their resistance to rumen proteolysis were fed at 9% of total DMI in either two meals per day at 1730 and 0700 h or five meals per day at 1730, 2130, 0200, 0700, and 1200 h. The study was a 4 x 4 Latin square design with six blocks of 4 cows in which one block of cows was fitted with rumen cannulas. Intakes of DM, OM, NDF, and CP were not influenced by treatments. However, cows supplemented with five meals a day tended to consume the mixed ration more rapidly after both the p.m. and a.m. feedings. Milk yield and its content of protein, fat, and lactose also were not influenced by treatments. Average rumen pH was higher, and propionate concentrations were lower, for cows supplemented with five meals, but diurnal patterns were not influenced. Propionate and rumen ammonia N concentrations were lower for cows supplemented with the more resistant protein source; however, rumen VFA, as well as soluble and peptide N concentrations, were not influenced by the type of supplemental protein. Results do not support benefits of synchronized rumen release of energy and N to overall cow production, but rather support previous research that soluble protein or peptide N, or both, may act as a pool to provide N for microbial growth at times of the day when ammonia N concentrations are very low.

  9. Convergence of carbohydrate-biased intake targets in caged worker honeybees fed different protein sources.

    PubMed

    Altaye, Solomon Z; Pirk, Christian W W; Crewe, Robin M; Nicolson, Susan W

    2010-10-01

    The nutritional needs of bees are supplied by nectar carbohydrates and by protein and other nutrients in pollen but little is known of how bees achieve nutritional balance. Using newly emerged caged worker honeybees (Apis mellifera scutellata), we investigated whether bees maintain their intake target when confined to pairs of imbalanced complementary diets varying in protein to carbohydrate (P:C) ratio. Diets were formulated using three protein sources [casein, royal jelly or Feed-Bee (a natural pollen substitute)] and sucrose. Within each protein type, honeybees switched between complementary diets and converged on the same P:C intake target. However, this target differed between protein types: P:C ratios were 1:12, 1:14 and 1:11 on casein, royal jelly and Feed-Bee diets, respectively. Except for an early peak in protein consumption on royal jelly diets, these strongly convergent ratios remained constant over the 14 day experiment. This is probably due to the absence of brood, reflected in relatively stable values measured for haemolymph protein concentration and hypopharyngeal gland activation in bees on Feed-Bee diets. Performance of caged workers was also assessed in terms of survival and ovarian activation. Survival was highest on casein diets and lowest on Feed-Bee diets but ovarian activation was highest on royal jelly diets and lowest on casein diets. This may be due to additional components in Feed-Bee and royal jelly (e.g. fatty acids), which are needed to activate the ovaries but also reduce survival. Nutrient intake of broodless workers is directly related to their own physiological requirements, and the strong carbohydrate bias may reflect the high metabolic rate of honeybees even under resting conditions.

  10. Convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystals for X-ray diffraction study are usually grown resting on the bottom of a hanging drop of a saturated protein solution, with slow evaporation to the air in a small enclosed cell. The evaporation rate is controlled by hanging the drop above a reservoir of water, with its saturation vapor pressure decreased by a low concentration of a passive solute. The drop has a lower solute concentration, and its volume shrinks by evaporation until the molecular concentrations match. Protein crystals can also be grown from a seed crystal suspended or supported in the interior of a supersaturated solution. The main analysis of this report concerns this case because it is less complicated than hanging-drop growth. Convection effects have been suggested as the reason for the apparent cessation of growth at a certain rather small crystal size. It seeems that as the crystal grows, the number of dislocations increases to a point where further growth is hindered. Growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle has been proposed as a method for obtaining larger crystals. Experimental observations of convection effects during the growth of protein crystals have been reported.

  11. Membrane protein crystallization in lipidic mesophases: detergent effects.

    PubMed Central

    Ai, X; Caffrey, M

    2000-01-01

    The "cubic phase method" for growing crystals of membrane proteins uses a complex mixture of water, lipid, protein, and other components. The current view is that the cubic phase is integral to the process. Thus additives from whatever source introduce the possibility of destabilizing the phase, thereby compromising the crystallization process. Detergents are used to solubilize membrane proteins and are likely to be ported into the cubic medium with the target protein. Depending on the identity and concentration of the detergent, the cubic phase, which itself is membranous, may be solubilized or destabilized in such a way as to render it unsuitable as a crystal growing system. The nonionic detergent n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside is commonly used in membrane protein work. In this study, we evaluate its effect on the cubic mesophase of hydrated monoolein. X-ray diffraction was used for phase identification and mesophase microstructure characterization. The results show that while low levels of the detergent are tolerated, increasing concentrations trigger a cubic-to-lamellar phase transition in a temperature-dependent manner. This finding is rationalized in the context of complementary molecular shapes of the lipid and the detergent and has implications for the mechanism of crystallization in lipidic mesophases as discussed. PMID:10866965

  12. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  13. Branched-chain amino acids as a protein- and energy-source in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hisataka; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Tajika, Masahiro; Kato, Masahiko; Fukushima, Hideki; Shiraki, Makoto

    2004-01-09

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common manifestation in cirrhotic patients with reported incidences as high as 65-90%. PEM affects largely the patients' quality of life and survival. Thus, diagnosis of and intervention for PEM is important in the clinical management of liver cirrhosis. Supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is indicated to improve protein malnutrition. As an intervention for energy malnutrition, frequent meal or late evening snack has been recently recommended. Plasma amino acid analysis characterizes the patients with liver cirrhosis to have decreased BCAA. Such reduction of BCAA is explained by enhanced consumption of BCAA for ammonia detoxication and for energy generation. Supplementation with BCAA raises in vitro the synthesis and secretion of albumin by cultured rat hepatocytes without affecting albumin mRNA expression. BCAA recover the impaired turnover kinetics of albumin both in rat cirrhotic model and in cirrhotic patients. Longer-term supplementation with BCAA raises plasma albumin, benefits quality of life issues, and finally improves survival in liver cirrhosis. Recent interests focused on the timing of administration of BCAA, since daytime BCAA are usually consumed by energy generation for physical exercise of skeletal muscles. Nocturnal BCAA seem to be more favorable as a source of protein synthesis by giving higher nitrogen balance. This minireview focuses on the basic and clinical aspects of BCAA as a pharmaco-nutritional source to control PEM in liver cirrhosis.

  14. Denaturated proteins: Draining effect and molecular dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondos, A.

    2010-09-01

    Using equations derived from the synthetic macromolecules, we calculate the dimensions in solution of the denaturated proteins. For these calculations, we use a value for the Flory’s parameter Φ obtained from an equation established for the polymers presenting a draining effect, and which is lower than the value of 2.6×10 23 (cgs) generally used. The obtained values for the dimensions of the denaturated proteins (end to end distance, statistical segment length and relation from the end to end distance and the number of residue) using the method proposed here are in good agreement with the values obtained from Flory and co-workers. On the contrary, the values obtained in this work are different from the values proposed by other authors who do not take into account the draining effect and use a value for Φ equal to 2.6×10 23.

  15. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hoennicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-15

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  16. Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Manica, J.; Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X.-R.

    2012-11-01

    Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

  17. Proteins mediating DNA loops effectively block transcription.

    PubMed

    Vörös, Zsuzsanna; Yan, Yan; Kovari, Daniel T; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2017-07-01

    Loops are ubiquitous topological elements formed when proteins simultaneously bind to two noncontiguous DNA sites. While a loop-mediating protein may regulate initiation at a promoter, the presence of the protein at the other site may be an obstacle for RNA polymerases (RNAP) transcribing a different gene. To test whether a DNA loop alters the extent to which a protein blocks transcription, the lac repressor (LacI) was used. The outcome of in vitro transcription along templates containing two LacI operators separated by 400 bp in the presence of LacI concentrations that produced both looped and unlooped molecules was visualized with scanning force microscopy (SFM). An analysis of transcription elongation complexes, moving for 60 s at an average of 10 nt/s on unlooped DNA templates, revealed that they more often surpassed LacI bound to the lower affinity O2 operator than to the highest affinity Os operator. However, this difference was abrogated in looped DNA molecules where LacI became a strong roadblock independently of the affinity of the operator. Recordings of transcription elongation complexes, using magnetic tweezers, confirmed that they halted for several minutes upon encountering a LacI bound to a single operator. The average pause lifetime is compatible with RNAP waiting for LacI dissociation, however, the LacI open conformation visualized in the SFM images also suggests that LacI could straddle RNAP to let it pass. Independently of the mechanism by which RNAP bypasses the LacI roadblock, the data indicate that an obstacle with looped topology more effectively interferes with transcription. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  18. Variations in recollection: The effects of complexity on source recognition

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Colleen M.; Murray, Linda J.; Elfman, Kane; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    Whether recollection is a threshold or signal detection process is highly controversial. U-shaped zROCs observed in tests thought to rely heavily on recollection, such as source memory tests, have provided evidence in favor of the threshold assumption, but zROCs are not always as U-shaped as threshold theory predicts. Source zROCs have been shown to become more linear when the contribution of familiarity to source discriminations is increased, and this may account for the existing results. However, another way in which source zROCs may become more linear is if recollection can become more graded under certain conditions. We tested the ‘graded recollection’ account in the current study. We found that increasing stimulus complexity (i.e., changing from single words to sentences), or increasing source complexity (i.e., changing the sources from audio to videos of speakers), resulted in flatter source zROCs. In addition, conditions expected to reduce recollection (i.e., divided attention and amnesia) had comparable effects on source memory in simple and complex conditions, suggesting that differences between simple and complex conditions were due to differences in the nature of recollection, rather than differences in the utility of familiarity. The results suggest that under conditions of high complexity recollection can appear more graded and it can produce curved ROCs. The results have implications for measurement models and for current theories of recognition memory. PMID:21417513

  19. Effect of Carbon and Energy Source on Bacterial Chromate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, William Aaron; Apel, William Arnold; Petersen, J. N.; Peyton, Brent Michael

    2002-07-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate carbon and energy sources suitable to support hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction by a bacterial consortium enriched from dichromate-contaminated aquifer sediments. The consortium was cultured under denitrifying conditions in a minimal, synthetic groundwater medium that was amended with various individual potential carbon and energy sources. The effects of these individual carbon and energy sources on Cr(VI) reduction and growth were measured. The consortium was found to readily reduce Cr(VI) with sucrose, acetate, L-asparagine, hydrogen plus carbon dioxide, ethanol, glycerol, glycolate, propylene glycol, or D-xylose as a carbon and energy source. Minimal Cr(VI) reduction was observed when the consortium was cultured with citrate, 2-ketoglutarate, L-lactate, pyruvate, succinate, or thiosulfate plus carbon dioxide as a carbon and energy source when compared with abiotic controls. The consortium grew on all of the above carbon and energy sources, with the highest cell densities reached using D-xylose and sucrose, demonstrating that the consortium is metabolically diverse and can reduce Cr(VI) using a variety of different carbon and energy sources. The results suggest that the potential exists for the enrichment of Cr(VI)-reducing microbial populations in situ by the addition of a sucrose-containing feedstock such as molasses, which is an economical and readily available carbon and energy source.

  20. Examining near-source effects in the far field

    SciTech Connect

    App, F.N.; Bos, R.J.; Dey, T.N.; Jones, E.M.; Kamm, J.R.; Taylor, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    A fundamental objective of the S-6 (physical basis for discrimination) sub-task of the CTBT R&D Seismic Monitoring Program at Los Alamos is to analyze the sensitivity of the regional signal to source configuration, material properties, geologic layering and structure, along with complications along the path of the signal. Our approach is to combine the results of conventional analysis of field data from explosions and earthquakes with results of numerical models of actual and idealized situations. Existing first-principles, finite difference codes allow us to examine source effects in the non-linear regime; linking the results of these near-source calculations to finite difference, anelastic wave propagation codes allows us to examine the effect of various source region and propagation path characteristics on signals observed at regional distances. An investigation of discriminant differences for the DIVIDER and CORREO underground nuclear explosions is provided as an example of the approach used.

  1. Evaluation of plant and animal protein sources as partial or total replacement of fish meal in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A feeding trial was conducted in a closed system with Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) juveniles (mean weight, 2.84 g) to examine the effects of total replacement of fish meal (FM), with and without supplementation of DL-methionine (Met) and L-lysine (Lys), by plant protein sources. Fish were f...

  2. Depositional controls, distribution, and effectiveness of world's petroleum source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D.; Ulmishek, G.F.

    1989-03-01

    Six stratigraphic intervals representing one-third of Phanerozoic time contain source rocks that have provided more than 90% of the world's discovered oil and gas reserves (in barrels of oil equivalent). The six intervals include (1) Silurian (generated 9% of the world's reserves); (2) Upper Devonian-Tournaisian (8% of reserves); (3) Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian (8% of reserves); (4) Upper Jurassic (25% of reserves); (5) middle Cretaceous (29% of reserves); and (6) Oligocene-Miocene (12.5% of reserves). This uneven distribution of source rocks in time has no immediately obvious cyclicity, nor are the intervals exactly repeatable in the commonality of factors that controlled the formation of source rocks. In this study, source rocks of the six intervals have been mapped worldwide together with oil and gas reserves generated by these rocks. Analysis of the maps shows that the main factors affecting deposition of these source rocks and their spatial distribution and effectiveness in generating hydrocarbon reserves are geologic age, global and regional tectonics, paleogeography, climate, and biologic evolution. The effect of each of the factors on geologic setting and quality of source rocks has been analyzed. Compilation of data on maturation time for these source rocks demonstrated that the majority of discovered oil and gas is very young, more than 80% of the world's oil and gas reserves have been generated since Aptian time, and nearly half of the world's hydrocarbons have been generated and trapped since the Oligocene.

  3. Consideration of dynamic photothermal effect for evaluation of scanning light sources in optical devices using pulsed source criteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the potential radiation hazards of scanning light sources in medical optical devices is critical. Currently, point scanning light sources of continuous radiation are treated as pulsed sources, where the dwell time at each point is equal to the pulse duration. This study compares the photothermal effects from scanning light and pulsed sources using numerical calculation for scanning without restricting aperture and with various spot sizes. The calculation results show that the thermal damage threshold of scanning source not restricted by measurement aperture does not significantly differ from that of pulsed source. Temporal temperature response and size-dependent photothermal effect also confirm the similarity between scanning and pulsed sources.

  4. Effects of tannin source and concentration from tree leaves on two species of tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Earl, Julia E; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation in and around freshwater ecosystems can affect aquatic organisms through the production of secondary compounds, which are retained in leaves after senescence and are biologically active. Tannins can be toxic to tadpoles, but the plant source of tannins and tannin concentration have been confounded in experimental designs in previous studies. To examine the effects of the concentration and source of tannins (tree species), we examined the effects of 4 factors on tadpole survival, growth, and development: tannin source (red oak [Quercus rubra], white oak [Quercus alba], or sugar maple [Acer saccharum]); tannin concentration (including a control); diet protein level; and tadpole species (American toad [Anaxyrus americanus] and spring peepers [Pseudacris crucifer]). Tannin source and concentration affected spring peeper survival, but American toads had uniformly high survival. Spring peepers had a lower survival rate in high tannin concentrations of oak leachate but a high survival rate in both concentrations of sugar maple leachate. These differences in survival did not correspond with changes in dissolved oxygen, and no effect of dietary protein level on tadpole performance was observed. The presence of plant leachate resulted in increased tadpole growth in both species, but the mechanism for this finding is unclear. The results of the present study show that tannin concentration and source are important factors for tadpole performance, adding further evidence that plant chemistry can affect aquatic organisms. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Non-Einstein source effects in massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Waldron, A.

    2014-01-01

    We exhibit novel effects (absent in GR) of sources in massive gravity. First, we show that removing its ghost mode forces a field-current identity: The metric's trace is locally proportional to that of its stress tensor; a point source implies a metric singularity enhanced by the square of the graviton's range. Second, exterior solutions acquire spatial stress hair—their metric components depend on the interior Tij. Also, in contrast to naïve expectations, the Newtonian potential of a source is now determined by both its spatial stress and mass. Our explicit results are obtained at linear, Fierz-Pauli, level but qualitatively persist nonlinearly.

  6. Enzyme activities and arylsulfatase protein content of dust and the soil source: biochemical fingerprints?

    PubMed

    Acosta-Martínez, V; Zobeck, T M

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the potential of enzyme activities, which are sensitive to soil properties and management, for the characterization of dust properties. Enzyme activities may be among the dust properties key to identifying the soil source of dust. We generated dust (27 and 7 microm) under controlled laboratory conditions from agricultural soils (0-5 cm) with history of continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or cotton rotated with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], rye (Secale cereale L.), or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional) systems. The 27- and 7-microm dust samples showed activities of beta-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase, which are related to cellulose degradation and phosphorus and sulfur mineralization in soil, respectively. Dust samples generated from a loam and sandy clay loam showed higher enzyme activities compared with dust samples from a fine sandy loam. Enzyme activities of dust samples were significantly correlated to the activities of the soil source with r > 0.74 (P < 0.01). The arylsulfatase proteins contents of the soils (0.04-0.65 mg protein kg(-1) soil) were lower than values reported for soils from other regions, but still dust contained arylsulfatase protein. The three enzyme activities studied, as a group, separated the dust samples due to the crop rotation or tillage practice history of the soil source. The results indicated that the enzyme activities of dust will aid in providing better characterization of dust properties and expanding our understanding of soil and air quality impacts related to wind erosion.

  7. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics. PMID:27323846

  8. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-06-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics.

  9. Payer source influence on effectiveness of lifestyle medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Vogelgesang, Joseph; Drozek, David; Nakazawa, Masato; Shubrook, Jay H

    2015-09-01

    Many chronic diseases are responsive to interventions focused on diet and physical activity. The Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is an intensive, community-based lifestyle intervention that effectively treats many chronic diseases and their risk factors. This is a pilot study examining the effect of payer source for CHIP tuition on participants' outcomes. Seventy-nine self-selected participants (73.4% female) attended 1 of 3 CHIP classes (classes 7-9) offered January through May 2013 in Athens, Ohio. Participants were categorized into 3 groups based on the source(s) of their tuition payment: self-pay, employer-pay, or scholarship. Chronic disease risk factors for each individual were assessed at the beginning and conclusion of the program. Outcome variables included percent reduction between pre- and post CHIP measures in body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Results were compared between type of payer source (out of pocket vs employer and/or scholarship) and between each individual CHIP class attended. There was no statistical difference in outcomes based on payer source. Those who received funding through their employer or a scholarship experienced similar effects from a lifestyle intervention program as those who paid out of pocket. This study demonstrates that the benefit of CHIP for reducing chronic disease risk factors exists independent of payment source, and thus suggests its benefit may cross socioeconomic lines.

  10. Protein-fold recognition using an improved single-source K diverse shortest paths algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lhota, John; Xie, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction, when construed as a fold recognition problem, is one of the most important applications of similarity search in bioinformatics. A new protein-fold recognition method is reported which combines a single-source K diverse shortest path (SSKDSP) algorithm with Enrichment of Network Topological Similarity (ENTS) algorithm to search a graphic feature space generated using sequence similarity and structural similarity metrics. A modified, more efficient SSKDSP algorithm is developed to improve the performance of graph searching. The new implementation of the SSKDSP algorithm empirically requires 82% less memory and 61% less time than the current implementation, allowing for the analysis of larger, denser graphs. Furthermore, the statistical significance of fold ranking generated from SSKDSP is assessed using ENTS. The reported ENTS-SSKDSP algorithm outperforms original ENTS that uses random walk with restart for the graph search as well as other state-of-the-art protein structure prediction algorithms HHSearch and Sparks-X, as evaluated by a benchmark of 600 query proteins. The reported methods may easily be extended to other similarity search problems in bioinformatics and chemoinformatics. The SSKDSP software is available at http://compsci.hunter.cuny.edu/~leixie/sskdsp.html.

  11. Studies on feeding peanut meal as a protein source for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Costa, E F; Miller, B R; Pesti, G M; Bakalli, R I; Ewing, H P

    2001-03-01

    Four experiments were conducted to compare the performance of broilers fed soybean meal (SBM) versus peanut meal (PNM) as protein sources. Ross x Ross 208 broiler chickens were placed in battery brooders (Experiments 1 to 3, four replicates of 8 chicks per treatment) and floor pens (Experiment 4, four replicates of 34 chicks per treatment). In Experiment 1, addition of 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3% Thr to a corn-PNM-based diet increased 0 to 18 d BW gain (BWG; 0.374c vs. 0.495b vs. 0.508b vs. 0.508b kg, respectively) and decreased feed conversion ratio (FCR; 2.09c vs. 1.63b vs. vs. 1.54b vs. 1.54b g/g, respectively) compared to the corn-SBM-based control diet (BWG = 0.593a and FCR = 1.36a). In Experiment 2, diets were formulated with the same amino acid minimums, and as the percentage of PNM increased in the diets (0, 10, 20, and 32%), BWG decreased (0.560a vs. 0.532a vs. 0.521a vs. 0.458b kg, respectively) and FCR increased (1.72b vs. 1.71b vs. 1.79bc vs. 1.86c g/g, respectively). In Experiment 3, addition of Thr to a corn-PNM-based diet increased BWG (-Thr = 0.284c vs. +Thr = 0.397b kg) and decreased FCR (-Thr = 1.60b vs. +Thr = 1.54b g/g). The BWG and FCR were best for the corn-SBM-based control diet (0.499a kg and 1.38a g/g, respectively). In Experiment 4, during the growing period (18 to 42 d), significant interactions occurred between protein source (PNM vs. SBM) and protein level (16 and 20% vs. 24%) for BW and FCR but not for carcass, breast, or leg quarter yield or fat pad weights (P < 0.05) at 42 d of age. Technical (not economic) performance of birds fed PNM was similar to SBM at the highest protein levels fed. PNM could be used as a protein source for broilers under appropriate economic conditions.

  12. An economical and highly productive cell-free protein synthesis system utilizing fructose-1,6-bisphosphate as an energy source.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Keum, Jung-Won; Oh, In-Seok; Choi, Cha-Yong; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2007-07-15

    In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective and highly productive cell-free protein synthesis system derived from Escherichia coli. Through the use of an optimal energy source and cell extract, approximately 1.3mg/mL of protein was generated from a single batch reaction at greatly reduced reagent costs. Compared to previously reported systems, the described method yields approximately 14-fold higher productivity per unit reagent cost making this cell-free synthesis technique a promising alternative for more efficient protein production.

  13. Milk proteins as a source of tryptophan-containing bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Nongonierma, Alice B; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan (W) is an essential amino acid which is primarily required for protein synthesis. It also acts as a precursor of key biomolecules for human health (serotonin, melatonin, tryptamine, niacin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), phosphorylated NAD (NADP), quinolinic acid, kynureric acid, etc.). Among dietary proteins, milk proteins are particularly rich in W. W residues within milk proteins may be released by proteolytic/peptidolytic enzymes either as a free amino acid or as part of peptide sequences. Different W-containing peptides originating from milk proteins have been shown in vitro to display a wide range of bioactivities such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition along with antioxidant, antidiabetic and satiating related properties. Free W has been shown in certain instances to have an effect on cognition and the aforementioned bioactive properties. However, a higher bioactive potency has generally been observed with specific W-containing peptides compared to free W. Since W is thermolabile, the impact of processing on the stability of W-containing peptides needs to be considered. Milk protein-derived W-containing peptides may have significant potential as natural health promoting agents in humans.

  14. Effect Analysis of Gradient Air-gun Source for Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, L.; Tong, S.; Zou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Aimed at our nation's request of exploration and exploitation of marine petroleum and gas hydrate, we studied the signature features of marine air-gun source based on nonideal gas equations and actual conditions. By analyzing signature features of air-guns of clustered, tuned, time-delayed and coded in different 3D marine air-gun source, the optimum firing pattern of marine gradient 3D air-gun arrays has been set up. Because of the complexity of ghosts, traditional seismic acquisition using horizontal air-gun arrays cannot eliminate the ghost effectively. The acquisition applying gradient air-gun array utilizes the ghost's feature that its distance to the desired signal grows with the increase of the source's depth, so it can suppress the source ghost relatively easily and improve the frequency band-width of seismic data. By comparing and analyzing the theory and the actual application effect, the signature simulation of the gradient air-gun source has been verified. Using the gradient source, components of high and low frequency of seismic reflection data are enhanced. Meanwhile, the resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of seismic data are improved and the imaging result becomes better.

  15. Effect of acute heat stress on plant nutrient metabolism proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abrupt heating decreased the levels (per unit total root protein) of all but one of the nutrient metabolism proteins examined, and for most of the proteins, effects were greater for severe vs. moderate heat stress. For many of the nutrient metabolism proteins, initial effects of heat (1 d) were r...

  16. Environmental Impact of the Production of Mealworms as a Protein Source for Humans – A Life Cycle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Oonincx, Dennis G. A. B.; de Boer, Imke J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The demand for animal protein is expected to rise by 70–80% between 2012 and 2050, while the current animal production sector already causes major environmental degradation. Edible insects are suggested as a more sustainable source of animal protein. However, few experimental data regarding environmental impact of insect production are available. Therefore, a lifecycle assessment for mealworm production was conducted, in which greenhouse gas production, energy use and land use were quantified and compared to conventional sources of animal protein. Production of one kg of edible protein from milk, chicken, pork or beef result in higher greenhouse gas emissions, require similar amounts of energy and require much more land. This study demonstrates that mealworms should be considered a more sustainable source of edible protein. PMID:23284661

  17. Environmental impact of the production of mealworms as a protein source for humans - a life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Oonincx, Dennis G A B; de Boer, Imke J M

    2012-01-01

    The demand for animal protein is expected to rise by 70-80% between 2012 and 2050, while the current animal production sector already causes major environmental degradation. Edible insects are suggested as a more sustainable source of animal protein. However, few experimental data regarding environmental impact of insect production are available. Therefore, a lifecycle assessment for mealworm production was conducted, in which greenhouse gas production, energy use and land use were quantified and compared to conventional sources of animal protein. Production of one kg of edible protein from milk, chicken, pork or beef result in higher greenhouse gas emissions, require similar amounts of energy and require much more land. This study demonstrates that mealworms should be considered a more sustainable source of edible protein.

  18. Elderberries: a source of ribosome-inactivating proteins with lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Jesús; Jiménez, Pilar; Quinto, Emiliano J; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Garrosa, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Gayoso, Manuel J; Girbés, Tomás

    2015-01-30

    Sambucus (Adoxaceae) species have been used for both food and medicine purposes. Among these, Sambucus nigra L. (black elder), Sambucus ebulus L. (dwarf elder), and Sambucus sieboldiana L. are the most relevant species studied. Their use has been somewhat restricted due to the presence of bioactive proteins or/and low molecular weight compounds whose ingestion could trigger deleterious effects. Over the last few years, the chemical and pharmacological characteristics of Sambucus species have been investigated. Among the proteins present in Sambucus species both type 1, and type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), and hololectins have been reported. The biological role played by these proteins remains unknown, although they are conjectured to be involved in defending plants against insect predators and viruses. These proteins might have an important impact on the nutritional characteristics and food safety of elderberries. Type 2 RIPs are able to interact with gut cells of insects and mammals triggering a number of specific and mostly unknown cell signals in the gut mucosa that could significantly affect animal physiology. In this paper, we describe all known RIPs that have been isolated to date from Sambucus species, and comment on their antiviral and entomotoxic effects, as well as their potential uses.

  19. Evaluation and use of disaccharides as energy source in protein-free mammalian cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leong, Dawn Sow Zong; Tan, Janice Gek Ling; Chin, Christine Lin; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Ng, Say Kong

    2017-03-30

    Mammalian cells are generally considered to be unable to utilize polysaccharides for cell growth because the phospholipid bilayer in the cell membrane has very low permeability to sugars. With the recent discovery of the only known animal disaccharide transporter, a sucrose transporter, we considered the potential use of polysaccharides as energy source, because that can impact biopharmaceutical manufacturing by potentially increasing carbohydrate loading in the culture medium and decreasing lactate accumulation. In this study, we found that mammalian cells can utilize maltose for growth in the absence of glucose and successfully adapted CHO-K1, CHO-DG44 and HEK293 cells to grow in glucose-free, maltose-containing serum-free protein-free media. We then cultivated a non-adapted CHO-K1 producer cell line in media containing both glucose and maltose to show that the cells can utilize maltose in a biphasic manner, that maltose enters the cells, and that maltose utilization only took place in the presence of the cells. This is the first report of a protein-free mammalian cell culture using a disaccharide as energy source.

  20. The Potential Source of B. licheniformis Contamination During Whey Protein Concentrate 80 Manufacture.

    PubMed

    Md Zain, Siti Norbaizura; Bennett, Rod; Flint, Steve

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the possible source of predominant Bacillus licheniformis contamination in a whey protein concentrate (WPC) 80 manufacturing plant. Traditionally, microbial contaminants of WPC were believed to grow on the membrane surfaces of the ultrafiltration plant as this represents the largest surface area in the plant. Changes from hot to cold ultrafiltration have reduced the growth potential for bacteria on the membrane surfaces. Our recent studies of WPCs have shown the predominant microflora B. licheniformis would not grow in the membrane plant because of the low temperature (10 °C) and must be growing elsewhere. Contamination of dairy products is mostly due to bacteria being released from biofilm in the processing plant rather from the farm itself. Three different reconstituted WPC media at 1%, 5%, and 20% were used for biofilm growth and our results showed that B. licheniformis formed the best biofilm at 1% (low solids). Further investigations were done using 3 different media; tryptic soy broth, 1% reconstituted WPC80, and 1% reconstituted WPC80 enriched with lactose and minerals to examine biofilm growth of B. licheniformis on stainless steel. Thirty-three B. licheniformis isolates varied in their ability to form biofilm on stainless steel with stronger biofilm in the presence of minerals. The source of biofilms of thermo-resistant bacteria such as B. licheniformis is believed to be before the ultrafiltration zone represented by the 1% WPC with lactose and minerals where the whey protein concentration is about 0.6%.

  1. Careful accounting of extrinsic noise in protein expression reveals correlations among its sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, John A.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2017-06-01

    In order to grow and replicate, living cells must express a diverse array of proteins, but the process by which proteins are made includes a great deal of inherent randomness. Understanding this randomness—whether it arises from the discrete stochastic nature of chemical reactivity ("intrinsic" noise), or from cell-to-cell variability in the concentrations of molecules involved in gene expression, or from the timings of important cell-cycle events like DNA replication and cell division ("extrinsic" noise)—remains a challenge. In this article we analyze a model of gene expression that accounts for several extrinsic sources of noise, including those associated with chromosomal replication, cell division, and variability in the numbers of RNA polymerase, ribonuclease E, and ribosomes. We then attempt to fit our model to a large proteomics and transcriptomics data set and find that only through the introduction of a few key correlations among the extrinsic noise sources can we accurately recapitulate the experimental data. These include significant correlations between the rate of mRNA degradation (mediated by ribonuclease E) and the rates of both transcription (RNA polymerase) and translation (ribosomes) and, strikingly, an anticorrelation between the transcription and the translation rates themselves.

  2. Evaluation and use of disaccharides as energy source in protein-free mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Dawn Sow Zong; Tan, Janice Gek Ling; Chin, Christine Lin; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Ng, Say Kong

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells are generally considered to be unable to utilize polysaccharides for cell growth because the phospholipid bilayer in the cell membrane has very low permeability to sugars. With the recent discovery of the only known animal disaccharide transporter, a sucrose transporter, we considered the potential use of polysaccharides as energy source, because that can impact biopharmaceutical manufacturing by potentially increasing carbohydrate loading in the culture medium and decreasing lactate accumulation. In this study, we found that mammalian cells can utilize maltose for growth in the absence of glucose and successfully adapted CHO-K1, CHO-DG44 and HEK293 cells to grow in glucose-free, maltose-containing serum-free protein-free media. We then cultivated a non-adapted CHO-K1 producer cell line in media containing both glucose and maltose to show that the cells can utilize maltose in a biphasic manner, that maltose enters the cells, and that maltose utilization only took place in the presence of the cells. This is the first report of a protein-free mammalian cell culture using a disaccharide as energy source. PMID:28358044

  3. Alternative Protein Sources in the Diet Modulate Microbiota and Functionality in the Distal Intestine of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Torres, Alexander; Kortner, Trond M.; Merrifield, Daniel L.; Tinsley, John; Bakke, Anne Marie; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study aimed to investigate whether alternative dietary protein sources modulate the microbial communities in the distal intestine (DI) of Atlantic salmon, and whether alterations in microbiota profiles are reflected in modifications in host intestinal function and health status. A 48-day feeding trial was conducted, in which groups of fish received one of five diets: a reference diet in which fishmeal (diet FM) was the only protein source and four experimental diets with commercially relevant compositions containing alternative ingredients as partial replacements of fishmeal, i.e., poultry meal (diet PM), a mix of soybean meal and wheat gluten (diet SBMWG), a mix of soy protein concentrate and poultry meal (diet SPCPM), and guar meal and wheat gluten (diet GMWG). Samples were taken of DI digesta and mucosa for microbial profiling using high-throughput sequencing and from DI whole tissue for immunohistochemistry and expression profiling of marker genes for gut health. Regardless of diet, there were significant differences between the microbial populations in the digesta and the mucosa in the salmon DI. Microbial richness was higher in the digesta than the mucosa. The digesta-associated bacterial communities were more affected by the diet than the mucosa-associated microbiota. Interestingly, both legume-based diets (SBMWG and GMWG) presented high relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria in addition to alteration in the expression of a salmon gene related to cell proliferation (pcna). It was, however, not possible to ascertain the cause-effect relationship between changes in bacterial communities and the host's intestinal responses to the diets. IMPORTANCE The intestine of cultivated Atlantic salmon shows symptoms of compromised function, which are most likely caused by imbalances related to the use of new feed ingredients. Intestinal microbiota profiling may become in the future a valuable endpoint measurement in order to assess fish intestinal

  4. Alternative Protein Sources in the Diet Modulate Microbiota and Functionality in the Distal Intestine of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Gajardo, Karina; Jaramillo-Torres, Alexander; Kortner, Trond M; Merrifield, Daniel L; Tinsley, John; Bakke, Anne Marie; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2017-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether alternative dietary protein sources modulate the microbial communities in the distal intestine (DI) of Atlantic salmon, and whether alterations in microbiota profiles are reflected in modifications in host intestinal function and health status. A 48-day feeding trial was conducted, in which groups of fish received one of five diets: a reference diet in which fishmeal (diet FM) was the only protein source and four experimental diets with commercially relevant compositions containing alternative ingredients as partial replacements of fishmeal, i.e., poultry meal (diet PM), a mix of soybean meal and wheat gluten (diet SBMWG), a mix of soy protein concentrate and poultry meal (diet SPCPM), and guar meal and wheat gluten (diet GMWG). Samples were taken of DI digesta and mucosa for microbial profiling using high-throughput sequencing and from DI whole tissue for immunohistochemistry and expression profiling of marker genes for gut health. Regardless of diet, there were significant differences between the microbial populations in the digesta and the mucosa in the salmon DI. Microbial richness was higher in the digesta than the mucosa. The digesta-associated bacterial communities were more affected by the diet than the mucosa-associated microbiota. Interestingly, both legume-based diets (SBMWG and GMWG) presented high relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria in addition to alteration in the expression of a salmon gene related to cell proliferation (pcna). It was, however, not possible to ascertain the cause-effect relationship between changes in bacterial communities and the host's intestinal responses to the diets.IMPORTANCE The intestine of cultivated Atlantic salmon shows symptoms of compromised function, which are most likely caused by imbalances related to the use of new feed ingredients. Intestinal microbiota profiling may become in the future a valuable endpoint measurement in order to assess fish intestinal health

  5. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  6. An assessment of soybeans and other vegetable proteins as source of salmonella contamination in pig production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The impact of salmonella contaminated feed ingredients on the risk for spreading salmonella to pigs was assessed in response to two incidences when salmonella was spread by feed from two feed mills to 78 swine producing herds. Methods The assessment was based on results from the salmonella surveillance of feed ingredients before introduction to feed mills and from HACCP - based surveillance of the feed mills. Results from the mills of the Company (A) that produced the salmonella contaminated feed, were by the Chi. Square test compared to the results from all the other (B - E) feed producers registered in Sweden. Isolated serovars were compared to serovars from human cases of salmonellosis. Results Salmonella (28 serovars) was frequently isolated from imported consignments of soybean meal (14.6%) and rape seed meal (10.0%). Company A largely imported soybean meal from crushing plants with a history of unknown or frequent salmonella contamination. The risk for consignments of vegetable proteins to be salmonella contaminated was 2.4 times (P < 0.0006) larger for A when compared to the mills of the other companies which largely were supplied by soybean meal from a crushing plant with a low risk for salmonella contamination. Also the level of feed mill contamination of salmonella was higher for feed mills belonging to Company A in comparison to the other companies before and also after heat treatment. Four (10.5%) of the 38 serovars isolated from feed ingredients (28) and feed mills (10) were on the EU 2007 top ten list of human cases of salmonellosis and all but eight (78.9%) on a 12 year list (1997-2008) of cases of human salmonellosis in Sweden. Conclusions Salmonella contaminated feed ingredients are an important source for introducing salmonella into the feed and food chain. Effective HACCP-based control and associated corrective actions are required to prevent salmonella contamination of feed. Efforts should be taken to prevent salmonella contamination

  7. Acyl-acyl carrier protein as a source of fatty acids for bacterial bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, D.M.; Meighen, E.A.

    1985-09-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 3/H)tetradecanoic acid and ATP showed that the bioluminescence-related 32-kDa acyltransferase from Vibrio harveyi can specifically catalyze the deacylation of a /sup 3/H-labeled 18-kDa protein observed in extracts of this bacterium. The 18-kDa protein has been partially purified and its physical and chemical properties strongly indicate that it is fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP). Both this V. harveyi (/sup 3/H)acylprotein and (/sup 3/H)palmitoyl-ACP from Escherichia coli were substrates in vitro for either the V. harveyi 32-kDa acyltransferase or the analogous enzyme (34K) from Photobacterium phosphoreum. TLC analysis indicated that the hexane-soluble product of the reaction is fatty acid. No significant cleavage of either E. coli or V. harveyi tetradecanoyl-ACP was observed in extracts of these bacteria unless the 32-kDa or 34K acyltransferase was present. Since these enzymes are believed to be responsible for the supply of fatty acids for reduction to form the aldehyde substrate of luciferase, the above results suggest that long-chain acyl-ACP is the source of fatty acids for bioluminescence.

  8. ProDaMa: an open source Python library to generate protein structure datasets.

    PubMed

    Armano, Giuliano; Manconi, Andrea

    2009-10-02

    The huge difference between the number of known sequences and known tertiary structures has justified the use of automated methods for protein analysis. Although a general methodology to solve these problems has not been yet devised, researchers are engaged in developing more accurate techniques and algorithms whose training plays a relevant role in determining their performance. From this perspective, particular importance is given to the training data used in experiments, and researchers are often engaged in the generation of specialized datasets that meet their requirements. To facilitate the task of generating specialized datasets we devised and implemented ProDaMa, an open source Python library than provides classes for retrieving, organizing, updating, analyzing, and filtering protein data. ProDaMa has been used to generate specialized datasets useful for secondary structure prediction and to develop a collaborative web application aimed at generating and sharing protein structure datasets. The library, the related database, and the documentation are freely available at the URL http://iasc.diee.unica.it/prodama.

  9. Integrated ultraviolet and tunable mid-infrared laser source for analyses of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazama, Hisanao; Takatani, Yoshiaki; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Mass spectrometry using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technique is one of the most widely used method to analyze proteins in biological research fields. However, it is difficult to analyze insoluble proteins which have important roles in researches on disease mechanisms or in developments of drugs by using ultraviolet (UV) lasers which have commonly been used for MALDI. Recently, a significant improvement in MALDI process of insoluble proteins using a combination of a UV nitrogen laser and a tunable mid-infrared (MIR) free electron laser (FEL) was reported. Since the FEL is a very large and expensive equipment, we have developed a tabletop laser source which can generate both UV and tunable MIR lasers. A tunable MIR laser (5.5-10 μm) was obtained by difference frequency generation (DFG) between a Nd:YAG and a tunable Cr:forsterite lasers using two AgGaS II crystals. The MIR laser can generate pulses with an energy of up to 1.4 mJ at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. A UV laser was obtained by third harmonic generation of a Nd:YAG laser splitted from that used for DFG. A time interval between the UV and the MIR laser pulses can be adjusted with a variable optical delay.

  10. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    SciTech Connect

    Nedoma, J.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  11. Hypocholesterolemic and Anticarcinogenic Effect of Vicia faba Protein Hydrolyzates.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Erika B; Sánchez-Chino, Xariss; Garduño-Siciliano, Leticia; Álvarez-González, Rosa I; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Téllez-Medina, Darío I; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the consumption of vegetal-source proteins has been studied to determine their preventing effect on the development of several chronic diseases. The initial purpose of this report was to determine the effect of a hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) given to mice, alone or with azoxymethane (AOM), on various obesity biochemical biomarkers, as well as on the induction of colon aberrant crypts (aberrant crypt foci; ACF). At the end of the 5-week assay, animals fed the HCD showed alterations in the level of total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoproteins, and in the Atherogenic Index; besides, a significant elevation was observed in the number of ACF. Our second aim was to examine the effect of a Faba Protein Hydrolyzate (FPH) on mice fed the HCD. We first obtained protein hydrolyzates from the seeds of Vicia faba, determined the in vitro antioxidant potential with two tests, and, subsequently, evaluated the effect on obesity biomarkers and on the number of ACF. In the first case, we found that, generally, the best protective effect was obtained with the low dose of FPH (10 mg/kg) administered to animals fed the HCD, and injected AOM. With respect to the number of ACF, we observed that this dose was more effective, inhibiting such lesions to almost the level determined for the normocholesterolemic diet (NCD). Therefore, our results demonstrated the relevance of a HCD to develop anomalies in obesity biomarkers in mouse, as well as to increase the number of precarcinogenic lesions. Our results also showed a protective response with the administration of FPH, particularly with a specific dose, suggesting the need for extending research on the matter by widening the spectra of doses, in order to clearly define its potential to counteract the damage induced by the HCD, as well as to confirm if antioxidation in mice was involved in such an effect.

  12. Evaluation of the fermentation dynamics of soluble crude protein from three protein sources in continuous culture fermenters.

    PubMed

    Bach, A; Ruiz Moreno, M; Thrune, M; Stern, M D

    2008-06-01

    Eight dual-flow continuous culture fermenters (1.03 +/- 0.05 L) were used to assess differences in microbial degradation of the soluble CP fraction of canola meal (CMSCP), soybean meal (SBMSCP), and fish meal (FMSCP) using a completely randomized design with two 9-d experimental periods and a solution of tryptone as a control treatment (control). All fermenters received the same basal diet (58% ground corn, 40% canary grass hay, 0.4% vitamin-mineral premix, 1% CaCO(3), 0.6% salt on a DM basis) in 8 equal portions daily. During sampling on the last 3 d of each period, 90-mL doses containing soluble CP were infused into the fermenters 30 min after the beginning of the first and last feedings of the day. The total amount of soluble CP supplied by the infusions of FMSCP, CMSCP, and SBMSCP was 3.2 g/d, representing 24% of the daily dietary CP intake. Infusion of FMSCP resulted in the greatest (P < 0.05) NH(3)-N concentration (4.6 +/- 0.40 mg/dL) compared with the other treatments (0.5 +/- 0.40 mg/dL). Microbial N flow (g/d) from the fermenters was also greatest (P < 0.05) with FMSCP (1.42 +/- 0.062) compared with the other soluble CP fractions (1.08 +/- 0.062). The efficiency of microbial protein synthesis tended to be lowest with the control diet, and the efficiency of N utilization was lowest with FMSCP treatment. These results indicate that N was limiting microbial growth in the control diet, and there was more rumen-available N with the FMSCP diet compared with the other dietary treatments. The extent of degradation of the soluble CP fraction from fish meal, soybean meal, and canola meal was determined to be 99, 30, and 37% of soluble CP, respectively. These results indicate that the soluble CP fraction is not 100% degraded in all feeds and that assuming a high degradation extent of the soluble CP fraction from soybean meal and canola meal may result in an underestimation of the supply of undegradable protein from these protein sources.

  13. Sources of variation in rates of in vitro ruminal protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, G A; Udén, P; Murphy, M L; Lapins, A

    2004-05-01

    Rates and extents of ruminal protein degradation for casein, solvent soybean meal (SSBM), expeller soybean meal (ESBM), and alfalfa hay were estimated from net appearance of NH3 and total amino acids in in vitro media containing 1 mM hydrazine and 30 mg/L of chloramphenicol. Protein was added at 0.13 mg of N/mL of medium, and incubations were conducted for 4 to 6 h, usually with hourly sampling. Inocula were obtained from ruminally cannulated donor cows fed diets of grass silage or alfalfa and corn silages plus concentrates. Preincubation or dialysis of inocula was used to suppress background NH3 and total amino acids; however, preincubation yielded more rapid degradation rates for casein and SSBM and was used in subsequent incubations. Preincubation with added vitamins, VFA, hemin, or N did not alter protein degradation. Protein degradation rates estimated for SSBM, ESBM, and alfalfa were not different when computed from total N release or N release in NH3 plus total amino acids, regardless of whether amino acids were quantified using ninhydrin colorimetry or o-phthalaldehyde fluorescence. Accounting for the release of peptide-N also did not affect estimated degradation. However, casein degradation rates were more rapid when using total N release or accounting for peptide-N, indicating significant accumulation of small peptides during its breakdown. Rates also were more rapid with inocula from lactating cows versus nonlactating cows with lower feed intake. Protein degradation rates were different due to time after feeding: casein rate was more rapid, but SSBM and ESBM rates were slower with inocula obtained after feeding. Several characteristics of ruminal inoculum that influenced breakdown of the rapidly degraded protein casein did not appear to have direct effects on degradation of protein in soybean meal.

  14. Quantity and source of dietary protein influence metabolite production by gut microbiota and rectal mucosa gene expression: a randomized, parallel, double-blind trial in overweight humans.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Martin; Portune, Kevin Joseph; Steuer, Nils; Lan, Annaïg; Cerrudo, Victor; Audebert, Marc; Dumont, Florent; Mancano, Giulia; Khodorova, Nadezda; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Airinei, Gheorghe; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Davila, Anne-Marie; Claus, Sandrine Paule; Sanz, Yolanda; Blachier, François

    2017-10-01

    Background: Although high-protein diets (HPDs) are frequently consumed for body-weight control, little is known about the consequences for gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity and for large intestine mucosal homeostasis. Moreover, the effects of HPDs according to the source of protein need to be considered in this context.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quantity and source of dietary protein on microbiota composition, bacterial metabolite production, and consequences for the large intestinal mucosa in humans.Design: A randomized, double-blind, parallel-design trial was conducted in 38 overweight individuals who received a 3-wk isocaloric supplementation with casein, soy protein, or maltodextrin as a control. Fecal and rectal biopsy-associated microbiota composition was analyzed by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. Fecal, urinary, and plasma metabolomes were assessed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. Mucosal transcriptome in rectal biopsies was determined with the use of microarrays.Results: HPDs did not alter the microbiota composition, but induced a shift in bacterial metabolism toward amino acid degradation with different metabolite profiles according to the protein source. Correlation analysis identified new potential bacterial taxa involved in amino acid degradation. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not modified by HPDs, but was associated with a specific microbiota and bacterial metabolite profile. Casein and soy protein HPDs did not induce inflammation, but differentially modified the expression of genes playing key roles in homeostatic processes in rectal mucosa, such as cell cycle or cell death.Conclusions: This human intervention study shows that the quantity and source of dietary proteins act as regulators of gut microbiota metabolite production and host gene expression in the rectal mucosa, raising new questions on the impact of HPDs on the large intestine mucosa homeostasis. This trial was registered at

  15. Fine sediment sources in conservation effects assessment project watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two naturally occurring radionuclides, 7Be and 210Pbxs , were used as tracers to discriminate eroded surface soils from channel-derived sediments in the fine suspended sediment loads of eight Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) benchmark watersheds. Precipitation, source soils, and suspe...

  16. Fraunhofer Diffraction Effects on Total Power for a Planckian Source.

    PubMed

    Shirley, E L

    2001-01-01

    An algorithm for computing diffraction effects on total power in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by a circular lens or aperture is derived. The result for Fraunhofer diffraction of monochromatic radiation is well known, and this work reports the result for radiation from a Planckian source. The result obtained is valid at all temperatures.

  17. Effect of starch sources on extruded aquaculture feed containing DDGS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aquaculture is one of the most rapidly growing sectors of agriculture, and is a reliable growth market for the prepared feeds. A Brabender laboratory-scale single screw extruder was used to study the effect of various starch sources (cassava, corn, and potato), DDGS levels (20, 30, and 40% (wb)), an...

  18. The Effects of Sources of Motivation on Teachers' Motivation Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocabas, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    This study, in which a descriptive scanning model is used, aims to determine the effects of motivational sources on teachers' motivation levels. The population sample for this study consists of teachers working in the Elazig city center in 2006-2007 academic year. A sample of 225 teachers was randomly selected from this population. Data obtained…

  19. The Effects of Sources of Motivation on Teachers' Motivation Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocabas, Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    This study, in which a descriptive scanning model is used, aims to determine the effects of motivational sources on teachers' motivation levels. The population sample for this study consists of teachers working in the Elazig city center in 2006-2007 academic year. A sample of 225 teachers was randomly selected from this population. Data obtained…

  20. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  1. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, R.L.; Przybyla-Kelly, K.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n = 64) and animal (n = 233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (espfm) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (espfs/fm). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of espfs/fm for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% espfm and 100% espfs/fm in raw sewage influent; 30% for both espfm and espfs/fm in septic waste; and 0% espfm and 80% espfs/fm in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (espfs/fm) and 4.7% (espfm); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all espfm), gulls (10/34, espfs/fm; 2/34, espfm), mice (3/22, all espfs/fm), and songbirds (5/55, all espfs/fm). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both espfm and espfs/fm were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  2. Influence of using a blend of rennet casein and whey protein concentrate as protein source on the quality of Mozzarella cheese analogue.

    PubMed

    Dhanraj, Padhiyar; Jana, Atanu; Modha, Hiral; Aparnathi, K D

    2017-03-01

    The effect of incorporating whey protein concentrate (WPC) on the quality characteristics of Mozzarella cheese analogue (MCA) based on rennet casein (RC) was studied. The proportion of RC:WPC tried out were 95:5, 90:10, and 85:15 w/w. The formulation of MCA comprised of 23.5% of blend of RC and WPC, 15% specialty vegetable fat, 2.75% trisodium citrate + disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (2.5:1, w/w), 0.07% calcium chloride, 0.6% citric acid, 1.1% NaCl, 1.5% cheese bud flavoring, and rest water. Varying the proportion of RC and WPC had a significant influence on the composition, textural properties, baking qualities and sensory quality of MCA judged as a topping on pizza pie. MCA made using protein blends (RC:WPC-90:10 or 85:15) behaved satisfactorily during pizza baking trials. However, looking at the superiority of MCA made using RC:WPC (90:10) with regard to shred quality and marginal superiority in terms of the total sensory score of cheese, judged as pizza topping, the former blend (i.e. RC:WPC, 90:10) was selected. The MCA obtained employing such protein blend had composition similar to that of Pizza cheese prepared from cheese milk and had requisite baking characteristics needed as a pizza topping. It is recommended to use a blend of RC and WPC (90:10) as the protein source in the formulation of MCA to obtain nutritionally superior cheese product having desired functional properties for its end use in baking applications.

  3. Effects of soy protein and calcium levels on mineral bioaccessibility and protein digestibility from enteral formulas.

    PubMed

    Galán, María Gimena; Drago, Silvina Rosa

    2014-09-01

    Enteral formulas (EF) are complex food systems which have all the nutrients in their matrix for the complete human nourishment. However, there are components in EF which can interact with minerals, reducing their absorption, and thereof the EF nutritional quality. The effect of soy protein (SP) and Ca content on Fe, Zn, and Ca bioaccessibility and protein digestibility (%DP) was assessed using a response surface design in EF. Tested SP levels were 2.5-5.0 g/100 mL of total protein. Ca levels were adjusted with Ca citrate within a range between 50 and 100 mg/100 mL. SP content negatively influenced %DP and Fe, Zn and Ca bioaccessibility. As SP content increased, mineral bioaccessibility and %DP decreased, probably due to the increased levels of phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors from SP. Ca content only affected %DCa, which had a direct relationship with Ca levels, while did not affect Fe and Zn bioaccessibility or %DP. Since Ca citrate did not impair Fe and Zn bioaccessibility, it could be an appropriate Ca source for EF fortification.

  4. Flavor and Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Isolates from Different Whey Sources.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated flavor and functional characteristics of whey protein isolates (WPIs) from Cheddar, Mozzarella, Cottage cheese, and rennet casein whey. WPIs were manufactured in triplicate. Powders were rehydrated and evaluated in duplicate by descriptive sensory analysis. Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Functional properties were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, heat stability, and protein solubility. WPI from Cheddar and Cottage cheese whey had the highest cardboard flavor, whereas sweet aromatic flavor was highest in Mozzarella WPI, and rennet casein WPI had the lowest overall flavor and aroma. Distinct sour taste and brothy/potato flavor were also noted in WPI from Cottage cheese whey. Consistent with sensory results, aldehyde concentrations were also highest in Cheddar and Cottage cheese WPI. Overrun, yield stress, and foam stability were not different (P > 0.05) among Cheddar, Mozzarella, and rennet casein WPI, but WPI foams from Cottage cheese whey had a lower overrun and air-phase fraction (P < 0.05). Cottage cheese WPI was more heat stable at pH 7 (P < 0.05) than other WPI in 4% protein solutions, and was the only WPI to not gel at 10% protein. Cottage cheese WPI was less soluble at pH 4.6 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05) and also exhibited higher turbidity loss at pH 3 to 7 compared to other WPI (P < 0.05). This study suggests that WPI produced from nontraditional whey sources could be used in new applications due to distinct functional and flavor characteristics.

  5. Varying forage type, metabolizable protein concentration, and carbohydrate source affects manure excretion, manure ammonia, and nitrogen metabolism of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; Willett, L B; St-Pierre, N R; Borger, D C; McKelvey, T R; Wyatt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), and type of carbohydrate on manure excretion by dairy cows and production of ammonia from that manure were evaluated using a central composite experimental design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Diets contained 10.7% rumen-degradable protein with variable concentrations of undegradable protein so that dietary MP ranged from 8.8 to 12%. Starch concentration ranged from 22 to 30% with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block was a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square resulting in 108 observations. Manure output (urine and feces) was measured using total collection, and fresh feces and urine were combined into slurries and incubated for 48 h to measure NH3-N production. Feces, urine, and manure output averaged 50.5, 29.5, and 80.1 kg/d, respectively. Manure output increased with increasing dry matter intake (approximately 3.5 kg of manure/kg of dry matter intake), increased concentrations of alfalfa (mostly via changes in urine output), and decreased concentrations of starch (mostly via changes in fecal output). The amount of NH3-N produced per gram of manure decreased with increasing alfalfa because excreted N shifted from urine to feces. Increasing MP increased NH3-N produced per gram of manure mainly because of increased urinary N, but increased fecal N also contributed to the manure NH3. Manure NH3-N production per cow (accounts for effects on manure production and NH3-N produced per unit of manure) was least and milk protein yields were maximal for diets with high alfalfa (75% of the forage), moderate MP (11% of diet dry matter), and high starch (30% of diet dry matter).

  6. Physiological Effects of GLT1 Modulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Growing on Different Nitrogen Sources.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Adamo, Giusy Manuela; Frascotti, Gianni; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most employed cell factories for the production of bioproducts. Although monomeric hexose sugars constitute the preferential carbon source, this yeast can grow on a wide variety of nitrogen sources that are catabolized through central nitrogen metabolism (CNM). To evaluate the effects of internal perturbations on nitrogen utilization, we characterized strains deleted or overexpressed in GLT1, encoding for one of the key enzymes of the CNM node, the glutamate synthase. These strains, together with the parental strain as control, have been cultivated in minimal medium formulated with ammonium sulfate, glutamate, or glutamine as nitrogen source. Growth kinetics, together with the determination of protein content, viability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation at the single cell level, revealed that GLT1 modulations do not significantly influence the cellular physiology, whereas the nitrogen source does. As important exceptions, GLT1 deletion negatively affected the scavenging activity of glutamate against ROS accumulation, when cells were treated with H2O2, whereas Glt1p overproduction led to lower viability in glutamine medium. Overall, this confirms the robustness of the CNM node against internal perturbations, but, at the same time, highlights its plasticity in respect to the environment. Considering that side-stream protein-rich waste materials are emerging as substrates to be used in an integrated biorefinery, these results underline the importance of preliminarily evaluating the best nitrogen source not only for media formulation, but also for the overall economics of the process.

  7. Dietary Protein Sources and Incidence of Breast Cancer: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Zeng, Rong; Huang, Junpeng; Li, Xufeng; Zhang, Jiren; Ho, James Chung-Man; Zheng, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Protein is important to the human body, and different sources of protein may have different effects on the risk of breast cancer. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the association between different dietary protein sources and breast cancer risk. PubMed and several databases were searched until December 2015. Relevant articles were retrieved according to specific searching criteria. Forty-six prospective studies were included. The summary relative risk (RR) for highest versus lowest intake was 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01–1.14, I2 = 34.6%) for processed meat, 0.92 (95% CI 0.84–1.00, I2 = 0%) for soy food, 0.93 (95% CI 0.85–1.00, I2 = 40.1%) for skim milk, and 0.90 (95% CI 0.82–1.00, I2 = 0%) for yogurt. Similar conclusions were obtained in dose-response association for each serving increase: total red meat (RR: 1.07; 95% CI 1.01–1.14, I2 = 7.1%), fresh red meat (RR: 1.13; 95% CI 1.01–1.26, I2 = 56.4%), processed meat (RR: 1.09; 95% CI 1.02–1.17, I2 = 11.8%), soy food (RR: 0.91; 95% CI 0.84–1.00, I2 = 0%), and skim milk (RR: 0.96; 95% CI 0.92–1.00, I2 = 11.9%). There was a null association between poultry, fish, egg, nuts, total milk, and whole milk intake and breast cancer risk. Higher total red meat, fresh red meat, and processed meat intake may be risk factors for breast cancer, whereas higher soy food and skim milk intake may reduce the risk of breast cancer. PMID:27869663

  8. Influence of several sources and amounts of iron on DNA, lipid and protein oxidative damage during anaemia recovery.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; García, Yenela; López-Aliaga, Inmaculada; Alférez, María J M; Hijano, Silvia; Ramos, Aurora; Campos, Margarita S

    2013-12-01

    The study was designed to assess the effect of several Fe amounts and sources on haematological parameters, DNA, lipid and protein oxidative damage during the course of Fe-deficiency anaemia recovery. Peripheral DNA damage was assessed using an alkaline comet assay. The brain, liver, erythrocyte and duodenal mucosa lipid peroxidation and protein damage were assessed in control and anaemic rats after Fe repletion with three different sources (FeSO4, haem Fe, and FeSO4 + haem Fe) and amounts (45, 12, and 31 mg Fe/kg diet) of Fe: F diet, H diet or C diet, respectively. After supplying the diets, the haematological parameters studied were recovered; being remarkable is the haemoglobin increase. The DNA damage was lower in rats with the H diet, as revealed by the percentage of DNA in head, tail and Olive tail moment compared in rats with the F (P < 0.001) and C (P < 0.05) diets. Lipid peroxidation was similar in all the tissues, except in the duodenal mucosa which was lower with H and C diets (P < 0.001). The animals fed with C diet showed lower oxidative protein damage in the duodenal mucosa (P < 0.001) and was also lower in the liver and erythrocytes for H and C diets (P < 0.001). No differences were found in the brain under our experimental conditions. In conclusion, Fe supplementation with low doses of haem Fe or combined forms of non-haem and haem Fe (FeSO4 + haem) are efficient in restoring the impaired haematological parameters and prevent the evoked oxidative stress associated with Fe supplements.

  9. High whey protein intake delayed the loss of lean body mass in healthy old rats, whereas protein type and polyphenol/antioxidant supplementation had no effects.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, Laurent; Gatineau, Eva; Gatellier, Philippe; Migné, Carole; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Rémond, Didier; Rocher, Emilie; Dardevet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to compare and combine 3 nutritional strategies to slow down the age-related loss of muscle mass in healthy old rats: 1) increase protein intake, which is likely to stimulate muscle protein anabolism; 2) use leucine rich, rapidly digested whey proteins as protein source (whey proteins are recognized as the most effective proteins to stimulate muscle protein anabolism). 3) Supplement animals with a mixture of chamomile extract, vitamin E, vitamin D (reducing inflammation and oxidative stress is also effective to improve muscle anabolism). Such comparisons and combinations were never tested before. Nutritional groups were: casein 12% protein, whey 12% protein, whey 18% protein and each of these groups were supplemented or not with polyphenols/antioxidants. During 6 months, we followed changes of weight, food intake, inflammation (plasma fibrinogen and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and body composition (DXA). After 6 months, we measured muscle mass, in vivo and ex-vivo fed and post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis, ex-vivo muscle proteolysis, and oxidative stress parameters (liver and muscle glutathione, SOD and total antioxidant activities, muscle carbonyls and TBARS). We showed that although micronutrient supplementation reduced inflammation and oxidative stress, the only factor that significantly reduced the loss of lean body mass was the increase in whey protein intake, with no detectable effect on muscle protein synthesis, and a tendency to reduce muscle proteolysis. We conclude that in healthy rats, increasing protein intake is an effective way to delay sarcopenia.

  10. Food Sources of Protein and Risk of Incident Gout in the Singapore Chinese Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Gim Gee; Pan, An; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prospective studies evaluating diet in relation to the risk of gout in Asian populations are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the consumption of dietary protein from each of its major sources and the risk of gout in a Chinese population. Methods We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults who were 45–74 years old at recruitment during the years 1993–1998. Habitual diet information was collected via a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and physician-diagnosed gout was self-reported during 2 followup interviews up to the year 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, among 51,114 eligible study participants who were free of gout at baseline and responded to our followup interviews. Results A total of 2,167 participants reported physician-diagnosed gout during the followup period. The multivariate-adjusted HRs (with 95% CIs) of gout, comparing the first quartile with the fourth quartile, were as follows: 1.27 (1.12–1.44; P for trend < 0.001) for total protein, 1.27 (1.11–1.45; P for trend < 0.001) for poultry, 1.16 (1.02–1.32; P for trend = 0.006) for fish and shellfish, 0.86 (0.75–0.98; P for trend = 0.018) for soy food, and 0.83 (0.73–0.95; P for trend = 0.012) for nonsoy legumes. No statistically significant associations were found with protein intake from other sources (red meat, eggs, dairy products, grains, or nuts and seeds). Conclusion In this Chinese population living in Singapore, higher total dietary protein intake from mainly poultry and fish/shellfish was associated with an increased risk of gout, while dietary intake of soy and nonsoy legumes was associated with a reduced risk of gout. PMID:25808549

  11. Food Sources of Protein and Risk of Incident Gout in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Gim Gee; Pan, An; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2015-07-01

    Prospective studies evaluating diet in relation to the risk of gout in Asian populations are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the consumption of dietary protein from each of its major sources and the risk of gout in a Chinese population. We used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults who were 45-74 years old at recruitment during the years 1993-1998. Habitual diet information was collected via a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, and physician-diagnosed gout was self-reported during 2 followup interviews up to the year 2010. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), with adjustment for potential confounders, among 51,114 eligible study participants who were free of gout at baseline and responded to our followup interviews. A total of 2,167 participants reported physician-diagnosed gout during the followup period. The multivariate-adjusted HRs (with 95% CIs) of gout, comparing the first quartile with the fourth quartile, were as follows: 1.27 (1.12-1.44; P for trend < 0.001) for total protein, 1.27 (1.11-1.45; P for trend < 0.001) for poultry, 1.16 (1.02-1.32; P for trend = 0.006) for fish and shellfish, 0.86 (0.75-0.98; P for trend = 0.018) for soy food, and 0.83 (0.73-0.95; P for trend = 0.012) for nonsoy legumes. No statistically significant associations were found with protein intake from other sources (red meat, eggs, dairy products, grains, or nuts and seeds). In this Chinese population living in Singapore, higher total dietary protein intake from mainly poultry and fish/shellfish was associated with an increased risk of gout, while dietary intake of soy and nonsoy legumes was associated with a reduced risk of gout. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Pollen source effects on growth of kernel structures and embryo chemical compounds in maize.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, W; Mantese, A I; Maddonni, G A

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have reported effects of pollen source on the oil concentration of maize (Zea mays) kernels through modifications to both the embryo/kernel ratio and embryo oil concentration. The present study expands upon previous analyses by addressing pollen source effects on the growth of kernel structures (i.e. pericarp, endosperm and embryo), allocation of embryo chemical constituents (i.e. oil, protein, starch and soluble sugars), and the anatomy and histology of the embryos. Maize kernels with different oil concentration were obtained from pollinations with two parental genotypes of contrasting oil concentration. The dynamics of the growth of kernel structures and allocation of embryo chemical constituents were analysed during the post-flowering period. Mature kernels were dissected to study the anatomy (embryonic axis and scutellum) and histology [cell number and cell size of the scutellums, presence of sub-cellular structures in scutellum tissue (starch granules, oil and protein bodies)] of the embryos. Plants of all crosses exhibited a similar kernel number and kernel weight. Pollen source modified neither the growth period of kernel structures, nor pericarp growth rate. By contrast, pollen source determined a trade-off between embryo and endosperm growth rates, which impacted on the embryo/kernel ratio of mature kernels. Modifications to the embryo size were mediated by scutellum cell number. Pollen source also affected (P < 0.01) allocation of embryo chemical compounds. Negative correlations among embryo oil concentration and those of starch (r = 0.98, P < 0.01) and soluble sugars (r = 0.95, P < 0.05) were found. Coincidently, embryos with low oil concentration had an increased (P < 0.05-0.10) scutellum cell area occupied by starch granules and fewer oil bodies. The effects of pollen source on both embryo/kernel ratio and allocation of embryo chemicals seems to be related to the early established sink strength (i.e. sink size and sink activity) of the

  13. Handicapping: the effects of its source and frequency.

    PubMed

    McElroy, James C; Crant, J Michael

    2008-07-01

    Using a sample of 246 working adults, the authors created a 2 x 2 x 2 experimental design to isolate the influence of performance outcome, source of handicapping, and frequency of handicapping on reactions to handicapping in organizations. Dependent measures were observers' allocations of credit/blame, interpersonal affect, and the perceived credibility of the explanation. Results showed direct effects on observer impressions for all 3 independent variables, along with a significant Source x Frequency interaction. Handicapping information presented by others yielded more favorable observer impressions than did self-handicapping, and frequent handicapping decreased observer impressions. The least credible handicapping strategy was multiple self-handicaps. A significant 3-way interaction showed that source and frequency affected perceived credibility differently, depending upon whether actual performance was a success or a failure.

  14. Optimization of native fluorescence detection of proteins using a pulsed nano laser excitation source

    PubMed Central

    Heywood, Matthew S.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a mathematical description of the S/N ratio in a fluorescence-based protein detector for capillary electrophoresis that uses a pulsed UV laser at 266 nm as an excitation source. The model accounts for photobleaching, detector volume, laser repetition rate, and analyte flow rate. We have experimentally characterized such a system, and present a comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model. Using the model, the system was optimized for test analytes tryptophan, tyrosine, BSA, and conalbumin, producing detection limits (3σ) of 0.67 nM, 5.7 nM, 0.9 nM, and 1.5 nM, respectively. Based on the photobleaching data, a photobleaching cross section of 1.4×10−18 cm2 at 266 nm was calculated for tryptophan. PMID:21073798

  15. Optimization of native fluorescence detection of proteins using a pulsed nanolaser excitation source.

    PubMed

    Heywood, Matthew S; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2010-11-01

    We present a mathematical description of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in a fluorescence-based protein detector for capillary electrophoresis that uses a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser at 266 nm as an excitation source. The model accounts for photobleaching, detector volume, laser repetition rate, and analyte flow rate. We have experimentally characterized such a system, and we present a comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model. Using the model, the system was optimized for test analytes tryptophan, tyrosine, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and conalbumin, producing detection limits (3σ) of 0.67 nM, 5.7 nM, 0.9 nM, and 1.5 nM, respectively. Based on the photobleaching data, a photobleaching cross-section of 1.4 × 10(-18)cm(2) at 266 nm was calculated for tryptophan.

  16. Constraining the effective action by a method of external sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Millington, Peter

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel method of evaluating the effective action, wherein the physical one- and two-point functions are obtained in the limit of non-vanishing external sources. We illustrate the self-consistency of this method by recovering the usual 2PI effective action due to Cornwall, Jackiw and Tomboulis, differing only by the fact that the saddle-point evaluation of the path integral is performed along the extremal quantum, rather than classical, path. As such, this approach is of particular relevance to situations where the dominant quantum and classical paths are non-perturbatively far away from one-another. A pertinent example is the decay of false vacua in radiatively-generated potentials, as may occur for the electroweak vacuum of the Standard Model. In addition, we describe how the external sources may instead be chosen so as to yield the two-particle-point-irreducible (2PPI) effective action of Coppens and Verschelde. Finally, in the spirit of the symmetry-improved effective action of Pilaftsis and Teresi, we give an example of how the external sources can be used to preserve global symmetries in truncations of the 2PI effective action. Specifically, in the context of an O (2) model with spontaneous symmetry breaking, we show that this approach allows the Hartree-Fock approximation to be re-organized, such that the Goldstone boson remains massless algebraically in the symmetry-broken phase and we obtain the correct second-order thermal phase transition.

  17. Effect of mineral and manure phosphorus sources on runoff phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, Peter J A; Sharpley, Andrew N; Moyer, Barton G; Elwinger, Gerald F

    2002-01-01

    Concern over nonpoint-source phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural lands to surface waters has resulted in scrutiny of factors affecting P loss potential. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to quantify the effects of alternative P sources (dairy manure, poultry manure, swine slurry, and diammonium phosphate), application methods, and initial soil P concentrations on runoff P losses from three acidic soils (Buchanan-Hartleton, Hagerstown, and Lewbeach). Low P (12 to 26 mg kg(-1) Mehlich-3 P) and high P (396 to 415 mg kg(-1) Mehlich-3 P) members of each soil were amended with 100 kg total P ha(-1) from each of the four P sources either by surface application or mixing, and subjected to simulated rainfall (70 mm h(-1) to produce 30 min runoff). Phosphorus losses from fertilizer and manure applied to the soil surface differed significantly by source, with dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) accounting for 64% of total phosphorus (TP) (versus 9% for the unamended soils). For manure amended soils, these losses were linearly related to water-soluble P concentration of manure (r2 = 0.86 for DRP, r2 = 0.78 for TP). Mixing the P sources into the soil significantly decreased P losses relative to surface P application, such that DRP losses from amended, mixed soils were not significantly different from the unamended soil. Results of this study can be applied to site assessment indices to quantify the potential for P loss from recently manured soils.

  18. Protein source and dietary structure influence growth performance, gut morphology, and hindgut fermentation characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Qaisrani, S N; Moquet, P C A; van Krimpen, M M; Kwakkel, R P; Verstegen, M W A; Hendriks, W H

    2014-12-01

    An experiment with 210 male (Ross 308) 1-d-old broilers was conducted to test the hypothesis that a coarse diet improves performance of broilers fed a poorly digestible protein source. A highly digestible diet based on soybean meal was gradually replaced by a low digestible diet based on rapeseed meal (RSM) in 5 steps (RSM-0%, RSM-25%, RSM-50%, RSM-75%, and RSM-100%). Two diet structures (fine and coarse) were used as an additional factor. These 2 factors and their interactions were tested at different ages in a factorial arrangement with 10 dietary treatments. An increase in indigestible dietary protein negatively affected feed intake (P = 0.003), BW gain (P = 0.008), and feed conversion ratio (P = 0.034). This increase in dietary indigestible protein contents resulted in a decrease (P = 0.001) in total cecal volatile fatty acid concentration from 209.1 to 125.9 mmol/kg of DM digesta in broilers with increasing RSM in diets. Increase in the indigestible protein level, from RSM-0% to RSM-100%, resulted in a decrease (P = 0.042) in villus heights (1,782 vs. 1,574 µm), whereas crypt depths increased (P = 0.021; 237 vs. 274 µm). A coarse diet improved feed intake (P = 0.006), BW gain (P = 0.014), and feed conversion ratio (P = 0.009). Broilers fed coarse diets had approximately 11, 24, and 10% lower relative empty weights of the crop, proventriculus, and jejunum, respectively, whereas a 15% heavier gizzard was found compared with those fed the fine diets. Dietary coarseness resulted in approximately 16% lower gizzard pH, 21% greater villus heights, 27% lower crypt depths, 24% reduced branched-chain fatty acids, and 12% lower biogenic amines in the cecal digesta compared with broilers fed fine diets. In conclusion, feeding coarse particles improved broiler performance irrespective of digestibility of the diet. Hindgut protein fermentation can be reduced by coarse grinding of the diet.

  19. Production of Defatted Palm Kernel Cake Protein Hydrolysate as a Valuable Source of Natural Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Anwar, Farooq; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a valuable protein hydrolysate from palm kernel cake (PKC) for the development of natural antioxidants. Extracted PKC protein was hydrolyzed using different proteases (alcalase, chymotrypsin, papain, pepsin, trypsin, flavourzyme, and bromelain). Subsequently, antioxidant activity and degree of hydrolysis (DH) of each hydrolysate were evaluated using DPPH• radical scavenging activity and O-phthaldialdehyde spectrophotometric assay, respectively. The results revealed a strong correlation between DH and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates, where among these, protein hydrolysates produced by papain after 38 h hydrolysis exhibited the highest DH (91 ± 0.1%) and DPPH• radical scavenging activity (73.5 ± 0.25%) compared to the other hydrolysates. In addition, fractionation of the most effective (potent) hydrolysate by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography indicated a direct association between hydrophobicity and radical scavenging activity of the hydrolysates. Isoelectric focusing tests also revealed that protein hydrolysates with basic and neutral isoelectric point (pI) have the highest radical scavenging activity, although few fractions in the acidic range also exhibited good antioxidant potential. PMID:22942692

  20. MALDI In-Source Decay of Protein: The Mechanism of c-Ion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    The in-source decay (ISD) phenomenon, the fragmentation at an N–Cα bond of a peptide backbone that occurs within several tens of nanoseconds in the ion-source in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS), is discussed from the standpoints of the discovery and early publications dealing with MALDI-ISD, the formation of c-ions in energy-sudden desorption/ionization methods, the formation of radical species in a MALDI, model construction for ISD, and matrix materials that are suitable for use in MALDI-ISD. The formation of c-ions derived from peptides and proteins in MALDI-ISD can be rationalized by a mechanism involving intermolecular hydrogen transfer, denoted as the “Takayama’s model” by De Pauw’s group (Anal. Chem. 79: 8678–8685, 2007). It should be emphasized that the model for MALDI-ISD was constructed on the basis of X-ray crystallography and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analyses of matrix crystals, as well as the use of isotopically-labelled peptides. PMID:27162707

  1. Natural Photoreceptors as a Source of Fluorescent Proteins, Biosensors, and Optogenetic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Shemetov, Anton A.; Kaberniuk, Andrii A.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical tools have revolutionized modern biology by allowing detection and control of biological processes with exceptional spatiotemporal precision and sensitivity. Natural photoreceptors provide researchers with a vast source of molecular templates for engineering of fluorescent proteins, biosensors, and optogenetic tools. Here, we give a brief overview of natural photoreceptors and their mechanisms of action. We then discuss fluorescent proteins and biosensors developed from light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) domains and phytochromes, as well as their properties and applications. These fluorescent tools possess unique characteristics not achievable with green fluorescent protein–like probes, including near-infrared fluorescence, independence of oxygen, small size, and photo-sensitizer activity. We next provide an overview of available optogenetic tools of various origins, such as LOV and BLUF (blue-light-utilizing flavin adenine dinucleotide) domains, cryptochromes, and phytochromes, enabling control of versatile cellular processes. We analyze the principles of their function and practical requirements for use. We focus mainly on optical tools with demonstrated use beyond bacteria, with a specific emphasis on their applications in mammalian cells. PMID:25706899

  2. Effect of distributed heat source on low frequency thermoacoustic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Lijun; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2013-06-01

    The problem of thermoacoustic instabilities in the combustor of modern air-breathing engines has become a topic of concern, which occurs as a result of unstable coupling between the heat release fluctuations and acoustic perturbations. A three-dimensional thermoacoustic model including the distributed non-uniform heat source and non-uniform flow is developed based on the domain decomposition spectral method. The importance of distributed heat source on combustion instabilities of longitudinal modes is analyzed with the help of a simplified geometrical configuration of combustor. The results show that the longitudinal distribution of heat source has a crucial effect on instabilities. In addition, the effect of circumferentially non-uniform heat source and non-uniform flow on longitudinal instabilities is also investigated. It can be found that the influence of circumferential non-uniformity can become significant on the lowest frequency instabilities, in particular, the oscillation frequency and growth rate are all evidently affected by temperature non-uniformity and time delay non-uniformity.

  3. EPSILON-CP: using deep learning to combine information from multiple sources for protein contact prediction.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Kolja; Schneider, Michael; Brock, Oliver

    2017-06-17

    Accurately predicted contacts allow to compute the 3D structure of a protein. Since the solution space of native residue-residue contact pairs is very large, it is necessary to leverage information to identify relevant regions of the solution space, i.e. correct contacts. Every additional source of information can contribute to narrowing down candidate regions. Therefore, recent methods combined evolutionary and sequence-based information as well as evolutionary and physicochemical information. We develop a new contact predictor (EPSILON-CP) that goes beyond current methods by combining evolutionary, physicochemical, and sequence-based information. The problems resulting from the increased dimensionality and complexity of the learning problem are combated with a careful feature analysis, which results in a drastically reduced feature set. The different information sources are combined using deep neural networks. On 21 hard CASP11 FM targets, EPSILON-CP achieves a mean precision of 35.7% for top- L/10 predicted long-range contacts, which is 11% better than the CASP11 winning version of MetaPSICOV. The improvement on 1.5L is 17%. Furthermore, in this study we find that the amino acid composition, a commonly used feature, is rendered ineffective in the context of meta approaches. The size of the refined feature set decreased by 75%, enabling a significant increase in training data for machine learning, contributing significantly to the observed improvements. Exploiting as much and diverse information as possible is key to accurate contact prediction. Simply merging the information introduces new challenges. Our study suggests that critical feature analysis can improve the performance of contact prediction methods that combine multiple information sources. EPSILON-CP is available as a webservice: http://compbio.robotics.tu-berlin.de/epsilon/.

  4. The immunopotentiating effects of shark-derived protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Jean-François; Duarte, Jairo; Vinderola, Gabriel; Anguenot, Raphaël; Beaulieu, Martin; Matar, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    Peptides derived from natural sources can act as immunomodulating agents and prevent infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunopotentiating and protective effects of a shark-derived protein hydrolysate (SPH) against an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 infection in a murine model. Mice were fed an aqueous solution of SPH for 7 days before being inoculated with an experimental enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 infection. After euthanasia, small intestines were removed for histological study and the number of IgA and IgG producing cells was determined by direct immunofluorescence. Cytokines were measured in the serum and the intestinal fluid. The oral administration of SPH enhanced the gut barrier function via up-regulation of immunoglobulin A-producing cells and intestinal cytokines production, including interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The increase of transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10 contribute to the down-regulation of uncontrolled-inflammatory reaction induced by E. coli infection. From these results, the anti-inflammatory properties of SPH may be caused by regulation and priming mechanisms of the immune system. Enzymatic protein degradation confers immunomodulating and protective potentials to shark proteins and the resulted peptides could be used as an alternative therapy to reduce the risk of bacterial infections and inflammatory-related diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation thermometer size-of-source effect testing using aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Liebmann, F.; Kolat, T.

    2013-09-11

    Size-of-source effect is an important attribute of any radiation thermometer. The effects of this attribute may be quantified in a number of different ways to include field-of-view, distance ratio, or size-of-source effect. These parameters provide needed information for the user of a radiation thermometer, as they aid in determining whether the measured object is large enough for adequate radiation thermometry measurement. Just as important, these parameters provide needed information for calibration. This information helps to determine calibration geometry, and it is needed for calibration uncertainty determination. For determination of size-of-source effect, there are a limited number of test methods furnished by the standards available today. The test methods available may be cumbersome to perform due to the cost of the required equipment and the time needed to set-up and perform the test. Other methods have been proposed. This paper discusses one such method. This method uses a circular aperture such as that used in radiation thermometer calibration. It describes the method both theoretically and mechanically. It then discusses testing done to verify this method comparing the results to those obtained while performing steps in current standards. Finally, based on this testing, the basis for a new standard test method is presented.

  6. Comparison of spray-dried egg and albumen powder with conventional animal protein sources as feed ingredients in diets fed to weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Piao, Xiangshu; Ma, Xiaokang; Xu, Xiao; Zeng, Zhikai; Tian, Qiyu; Li, Yao

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the apparent (AID) and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of amino acids (AA) in spray-dried egg (SPE) and albumen powder (AP) compared with spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP), dried porcine solubles (DPS) and fish meal (FM). Additionally, the effects of these egg byproducts as a replacement for conventional animal proteins on the performance and nutrient digestibility of piglets were studied. In Exp. 1, six barrows fitted with ileal T-cannulas were allotted to a 6 × 6 Latin Square design and fed six diets. The AID and SID of AA were generally higher in AP and FM (P < 0.01) than in the other protein sources. In Exp. 2, 150 piglets weaned at 21 days, were fed diets containing the five protein sources for 3 weeks. Weight gain of piglets fed SDPP was the highest among the treatments. Dry matter and protein digestibility for pigs offered SDPP were higher (P < 0.01) than those offered FM and DPS. AP decreased (P < 0.05) Escherichia coli counts in the cecum. DPS decreased (P < 0.05) serum diamine oxidase compared with SPE. In conclusion, AP and SPE are competitive with traditional animal protein sources and can be successfully fed to piglets without compromising performance. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  7. Protein biofortified sorghum: effect of processing into traditional african foods on their protein quality.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janet; Taylor, John R N

    2011-03-23

    Protein biofortification into crops is a means to combat childhood protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in developing countries, by increasing the bioavailability of protein in staple plant foods and ensuring sustainability of the crop. Protein biofortification of sorghum has been achieved by both chemically induced mutation and genetic engineering. For this biofortification to be effective, the improved protein quality in the grain must be retained when it is processed into staple African foods. Suppression of kafirin synthesis by genetic engineering appeared to be superior to improved protein digestibility by chemical mutagenesis, because both the lysine content and protein digestibility were substantially improved and maintained in a range of African foods. For the genetically engineered sorghums, the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score was almost twice that of their null controls and considerably higher than the high protein digestibility sorghum type. Such protein biofortified sorghum has considerable potential to alleviate PEM.

  8. Beneficial effects of soy protein consumption for renal function.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James W

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in dietary protein intake have an important role in prevention and management of several forms of kidney disease. Using soy protein instead of animal protein reduces development of kidney disease in animals. Reducing protein intake preserves kidney function in persons with early diabetic kidney disease. Our clinical observations led us to the soy-protein hypothesis that "substitution of soy protein for animal protein results in less hyperfiltration and glomerular hypertension with resulting protection from diabetic nephropathy." These components of soy protein may lead to the benefits: specific peptides, amino acids, and isoflavones. Substituting soy protein for animal protein usually decreases hyperfiltration in diabetic subjects and may reduce urine albumin excretion. Limited data are available on effects of soy peptides, isoflavones, and other soy components on renal function on renal function in diabetes. Further studies are required to discern the specific benefits of soy protein and its components on renal function in diabetic subjects.

  9. The effects of high protein diets on thermogenesis, satiety and weight loss: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Halton, Thomas L; Hu, Frank B

    2004-10-01

    For years, proponents of some fad diets have claimed that higher amounts of protein facilitate weight loss. Only in recent years have studies begun to examine the effects of high protein diets on energy expenditure, subsequent energy intake and weight loss as compared to lower protein diets. In this study, we conducted a systematic review of randomized investigations on the effects of high protein diets on dietary thermogenesis, satiety, body weight and fat loss. There is convincing evidence that a higher protein intake increases thermogenesis and satiety compared to diets of lower protein content. The weight of evidence also suggests that high protein meals lead to a reduced subsequent energy intake. Some evidence suggests that diets higher in protein result in an increased weight loss and fat loss as compared to diets lower in protein, but findings have not been consistent. In dietary practice, it may be beneficial to partially replace refined carbohydrate with protein sources that are low in saturated fat. Although recent evidence supports potential benefit, rigorous longer-term studies are needed to investigate the effects of high protein diets on weight loss and weight maintenance.

  10. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  11. Chicken feathers as a natural source of sulphur to develop sustainable protein films with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Tania; Leceta, Itsaso; de la Caba, Koro; Guerrero, Pedro

    2017-08-08

    In this work, the effect of hydrolyzed keratin on the properties of soy protein-based films was analyzed when different manufacture processes were employed. It is widely known that the processing method selected can affect the film properties as a function of the structure obtained during the film formation. Therefore, the assessment of hydrolyzed keratin/soy protein films processed by casting and compression moulding was carried out by means of the analysis of physicochemical, thermal, mechanical, optical and surface properties. It was observed that the incorporation of hydrolyzed keratin, obtained from a simpler, environmentally friendlier and more sustainable extraction method, resulted in the improvement of the thermal stability of the films, irrespective of the processing method employed. Moreover, the films processed by compression moulding showed enhanced tensile strength, which increased with the incorporation of hydrolyzed keratin due to the formation of disulfide bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Generic effective source for scalar self-force calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Barry; Vega, Ian; Thornburg, Jonathan; Diener, Peter

    2012-05-01

    A leading approach to the modeling of extreme mass ratio inspirals involves the treatment of the smaller mass as a point particle and the computation of a regularized self-force acting on that particle. In turn, this computation requires knowledge of the regularized retarded field generated by the particle. A direct calculation of this regularized field may be achieved by replacing the point particle with an effective source and solving directly a wave equation for the regularized field. This has the advantage that all quantities are finite and require no further regularization. In this work, we present a method for computing an effective source which is finite and continuous everywhere, and which is valid for a scalar point particle in arbitrary geodesic motion in an arbitrary background spacetime. We explain in detail various technical and practical considerations that underlie its use in several numerical self-force calculations. We consider as examples the cases of a particle in a circular orbit about Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes, and also the case of a particle following a generic timelike geodesic about a highly spinning Kerr black hole. We provide numerical C code for computing an effective source for various orbital configurations about Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes.

  13. An analysis of source structure effects in radio interferometry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    To begin a study of structure effects, this report presents a theoretical framework, proposes an effective position approach to structure corrections based on brightness distribution measurements, and analyzes examples of analytical and measured brightness distributions. Other topics include the effect of the frequency dependence of a brightness distribution on bandwidth synthesis (BWS) delay, the determination of the absolute location of a measured brightness distribution, and structure effects in dual frequency calibration of charged particle delays. For the 10 measured distributions analyzed, it was found that the structure effect in BWS delay at X-band (3.6 cm) can reach 30 cm, but typically falls in the range of 0 to 5 cm. A trial limit equation that is dependent on visibility was successfully tested against the 10 measured brightness distributions (seven sources). If the validity of this particular equation for an upper limit can be established for nearly all sources, the structure effect in BWS delay could be greatly reduced without supplementary measurements of brightness distributions.

  14. Incidence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in human and animal fecal sources.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard L; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna; Shively, Dawn A; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N

    2007-09-01

    The occurrence of the enterococcal surface protein (esp) gene in the opportunistic pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium is well-documented in clinical research. Recently, the esp gene has been proposed as a marker of human pollution in environmental waters; however, information on its relative incidence in various human and animal fecal sources is limited. We have determined the occurrence of the esp gene in enterococci from human (n=64) and animal (n=233) fecal samples by polymerase chain reaction using two primer sets: one presumably specific for E. faecium (esp(fm)) and the other for both E. faecalis and E. faecium (esp(fs/fm)). We believe that this research is the first to explore the use of esp(fs/fm) for the detection of human waste in natural environmental settings. The incidence in human sources was 93.1% esp(fm) and 100% esp(fs/fm) in raw sewage influent; 30% for both esp(fm) and esp(fs/fm) in septic waste; and 0% esp(fm) and 80% esp(fs/fm) in active pit toilets. The overall occurrence of the gene in animal feces was 7.7% (esp(fs/fm)) and 4.7% (esp(fm)); animal types with positive results included dogs (9/43, all esp(fm)), gulls (10/34, esp(fs/fm); 2/34, esp(fm)), mice (3/22, all esp(fs/fm)), and songbirds (5/55, all esp(fs/fm)). The esp gene was not detected in cat (0/34), deer (0/4), goose (0/18), or raccoon (0/23) feces. The inconsistent occurrence, especially in septic and pit toilet sewage, suggests a low statistical power of discrimination between animal and human sources, which means a large number of replicates should be collected. Both esp(fm) and esp(fs/fm) were common in raw sewage, but neither one efficiently differentiated between animal and other human sources.

  15. Low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshki, Adel; Zapata, Rizaldy C.; Singh, Arashdeep; Yee, Nicholas J.; Chelikani, Prasanth K.

    2016-01-01

    Diets deficient in protein often increase food consumption, body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We compared the effects of diets varying in protein concentrations on energy balance in obesity-prone rats. We demonstrate that protein-free (0% protein calories) diets decreased energy intake and increased energy expenditure, very low protein (5% protein) diets increased energy intake and expenditure, whereas moderately low protein (10% protein) diets increased energy intake without altering expenditure, relative to control diet (15% protein). These diet-induced alterations in energy expenditure are in part mediated through enhanced serotonergic and β-adrenergic signaling coupled with upregulation of key thermogenic markers in brown fat and skeletal muscle. The protein-free and very low protein diets decreased plasma concentrations of multiple essential amino acids, anorexigenic and metabolic hormones, but these diets increased the tissue expression and plasma concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-21. Protein-free and very low protein diets induced fatty liver, reduced energy digestibility, and decreased lean mass and body weight that persisted beyond the restriction period. In contrast, moderately low protein diets promoted gain in body weight and adiposity following the period of protein restriction. Together, our findings demonstrate that low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance. PMID:27122299

  16. Low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Adel; Zapata, Rizaldy C; Singh, Arashdeep; Yee, Nicholas J; Chelikani, Prasanth K

    2016-04-28

    Diets deficient in protein often increase food consumption, body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We compared the effects of diets varying in protein concentrations on energy balance in obesity-prone rats. We demonstrate that protein-free (0% protein calories) diets decreased energy intake and increased energy expenditure, very low protein (5% protein) diets increased energy intake and expenditure, whereas moderately low protein (10% protein) diets increased energy intake without altering expenditure, relative to control diet (15% protein). These diet-induced alterations in energy expenditure are in part mediated through enhanced serotonergic and β-adrenergic signaling coupled with upregulation of key thermogenic markers in brown fat and skeletal muscle. The protein-free and very low protein diets decreased plasma concentrations of multiple essential amino acids, anorexigenic and metabolic hormones, but these diets increased the tissue expression and plasma concentrations of fibroblast growth factor-21. Protein-free and very low protein diets induced fatty liver, reduced energy digestibility, and decreased lean mass and body weight that persisted beyond the restriction period. In contrast, moderately low protein diets promoted gain in body weight and adiposity following the period of protein restriction. Together, our findings demonstrate that low protein diets produce divergent effects on energy balance.

  17. Effect of the quality of the interaction data on predicting protein function from protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing-Shan; Wang, Zheng-Zhi; Li, Gang-Guo; Wang, Guang-Yun; Zhao, Ying-Jie

    2009-03-01

    Protein function prediction is an important issue in the post-genomic era. When protein function is deduced from protein interaction data, the traditional methods treat each interaction sample equally, where the qualities of the interaction samples are seldom taken into account. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the quality of protein-protein interaction data on predicting protein function. Moreover, two improved methods, weight neighbour counting method (WNC) and weight chi-square method (WCHI), are proposed by considering the quality of interaction samples with the neighbour counting method (NC) and chi-square method (CHI). Experimental results have shown that the qualities of interaction samples affect the performances of protein function prediction methods seriously. It is also demonstrated that WNC and WCHI methods outperform NC and CHI methods in protein function prediction when example weights are chosen properly.

  18. The effect of source's shape for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Mikada, H.; Goto, T.; Takekawa, J.; Onishi, K.; Kasahara, J.; Kuroda, T.

    2009-12-01

    In conventional simulation of seismic wave propagation, the source which generates signals is usually given by a point force or by a particle velocity at a point. In practice, seismic wave is generated by signal generators with finite volume and width. Since seismic lines span a distance up to hundreds meter to several kilometers, many people conducted seismic survey and data processing with the assumption that the size of signal generator is negligible compared with survey scale. However, there are no studies that tells how the size of baseplate influences generated seismic waves. Such estimations, therefore, are meaningful to consider the scale of generator. In this sense, current seismic processing might require a theoretical background about the seismic source for further detailed analysis. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of seismic source’s shape to resultant wave properties, and then estimate how effective the consideration about the scale of signal generator is for analyzing the seismic data. To evaluate source’s scale effect, we performed finite element analysis with the 3D model including the baseplate of source and the heterogeneous ground medium. We adopted a finite element method (FEM) and chose the code named “MD Nastran” (MSC Software Ver.2008) to calculate seismic wave propagation. To verify the reliability of calculation, we compared the result of FEM and that of finite-difference method (FDM) with wave propagating simulation of isotropic and homogeneous model with a point source. The amplitude and phase of those two were nearly equal each other. We considered the calculation of FEM is accurate enough and can be performed in the following calculations. As the first step, we developed a simple point source model and a baseplate model. The point source model contains only the ground represented by an elastic medium. The force generating the signal is given at the nodal point of the surface in this case. On the other

  19. Sources and effects of low-frequency noise.

    PubMed

    Berglund, B; Hassmén, P; Job, R F

    1996-05-01

    The sources of human exposure to low-frequency noise and its effects are reviewed. Low-frequency noise is common as background noise in urban environments, and as an emission from many artificial sources: road vehicles, aircraft, industrial machinery, artillery and mining explosions, and air movement machinery including wind turbines, compressors, and ventilation or air-conditioning units. The effects of low-frequency noise are of particular concern because of its pervasiveness due to numerous sources, efficient propagation, and reduced efficacy of many structures (dwellings, walls, and hearing protection) in attenuating low-frequency noise compared with other noise. Intense low-frequency noise appears to produce clear symptoms including respiratory impairment and aural pain. Although the effects of lower intensities of low-frequency noise are difficult to establish for methodological reasons, evidence suggests that a number of adverse effects of noise in general arise from exposure to low-frequency noise: Loudness judgments and annoyance reactions are sometimes reported to be greater for low-frequency noise than other noises for equal sound-pressure level; annoyance is exacerbated by rattle or vibration induced by low-frequency noise; speech intelligibility may be reduced more by low-frequency noise than other noises except those in the frequency range of speech itself, because of the upward spread of masking. On the other hand, it is also possible that low-frequency noise provides some protection against the effects of simultaneous higher frequency noise on hearing. Research needs and policy decisions, based on what is currently known, are considered.

  20. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors.

    PubMed

    Sporea, R A; Burridge, T; Silva, S R P

    2015-09-09

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs.

  2. Self-Heating Effects In Polysilicon Source Gated Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, R. A.; Burridge, T.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Source-gated transistors (SGTs) are thin-film devices which rely on a potential barrier at the source to achieve high gain, tolerance to fabrication variability, and low series voltage drop, relevant to a multitude of energy-efficient, large-area, cost effective applications. The current through the reverse-biased source barrier has a potentially high positive temperature coefficient, which may lead to undesirable thermal runaway effects and even device failure through self-heating. Using numerical simulations we show that, even in highly thermally-confined scenarios and at high current levels, self-heating is insufficient to compromise device integrity. Performance is minimally affected through a modest increase in output conductance, which may limit the maximum attainable gain. Measurements on polysilicon devices confirm the simulated results, with even smaller penalties in performance, largely due to improved heat dissipation through metal contacts. We conclude that SGTs can be reliably used for high gain, power efficient analog and digital circuits without significant performance impact due to self-heating. This further demonstrates the robustness of SGTs. PMID:26351099

  3. Competing Sound Sources Reveal Spatial Effects in Cortical Processing

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Ross K.; Billimoria, Cyrus P.; Perrone, Ben P.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.; Sen, Kamal

    2012-01-01

    Why is spatial tuning in auditory cortex weak, even though location is important to object recognition in natural settings? This question continues to vex neuroscientists focused on linking physiological results to auditory perception. Here we show that the spatial locations of simultaneous, competing sound sources dramatically influence how well neural spike trains recorded from the zebra finch field L (an analog of mammalian primary auditory cortex) encode source identity. We find that the location of a birdsong played in quiet has little effect on the fidelity of the neural encoding of the song. However, when the song is presented along with a masker, spatial effects are pronounced. For each spatial configuration, a subset of neurons encodes song identity more robustly than others. As a result, competing sources from different locations dominate responses of different neural subpopulations, helping to separate neural responses into independent representations. These results help elucidate how cortical processing exploits spatial information to provide a substrate for selective spatial auditory attention. PMID:22563301

  4. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  5. Air Pollution in Megacities: Sources and Regional/Global Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.

    2007-12-01

    Air Pollution in Megacities is increasing significantly in all continents. The socio-economic and health problems are escalating, especially in developing countries. In terms of sources, urban transportation is relevant in most cities, as well as industrial pollution. In Latin American Cities such as Sao Paulo, Mexico City and Santiago, serious governmental efforts are being doing to reduce emissions and effects. Latin America has about 300 cities with population above 300.000 people. In Sao Paulo, the significant increase in the use of ethanol as fuel brings important increase in aldehyde concentrations. In all 3 Megacities, high aerosol concentrations are observed, with clear effects on population health. Large studies on aerosol source apportionment were done in these 3 cities, and detailed results will be presented. Quantification of aerosol sources is a problem, especially in the organic aerosol component that is high in most of Megacities. In Asia and Africa, the problems are similar as in Latin America, and the large emissions from these urban centers are relevant and needs to be taken into account in policies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  6. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-09-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching.

  7. Quantitative Characterization of Local Protein Solvation To Predict Solvent Effects on Protein Structure

    PubMed Central

    Vagenende, Vincent; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of solvent preferences of proteins is essential to the understanding of solvent effects on protein structure and stability. Although it is generally believed that solvent preferences at distinct loci of a protein surface may differ, quantitative characterization of local protein solvation has remained elusive. In this study, we show that local solvation preferences can be quantified over the entire protein surface from extended molecular dynamics simulations. By subjecting microsecond trajectories of two proteins (lysozyme and antibody fragment D1.3) in 4 M glycerol to rigorous statistical analyses, solvent preferences of individual protein residues are quantified by local preferential interaction coefficients. Local solvent preferences for glycerol vary widely from residue to residue and may change as a result of protein side-chain motions that are slower than the longest intrinsic solvation timescale of ∼10 ns. Differences of local solvent preferences between distinct protein side-chain conformations predict solvent effects on local protein structure in good agreement with experiment. This study extends the application scope of preferential interaction theory and enables molecular understanding of solvent effects on protein structure through comprehensive characterization of local protein solvation. PMID:22995508

  8. Scale effects of nitrate sinks and sources in stream networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Weiler, Markus; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2014-05-01

    Increasing N-fertilizer applications in agricultural catchments are considered as one of the major sources for dissolved nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) in surface water. While NO3-N mobilization pathways depend on catchment's pedological and hydrogeological characteristics and its runoff generation processes, in-stream retention and removal processes depend on local/reach-scale conditions such as weather, discharge, channel morphology, vegetation, shading or hyporheic exchange and others. However, knowledge is still limited to scale up locally observable retention and removal processes to larger stream networks to understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of in-stream NO3-N concentrations. Relevant processes to consider explicitly are the effects of 'hot spots', dominant NO3-N sources (e.g. sub-catchments, 'critical source areas') or specific NO3-N sinks (e.g. riparian wetlands and stream reaches with high biogeochemical activity). We studied these processes in a 1.7 km2 agricultural headwater catchment, where distinct locations of groundwater inflow (a dense artificial drainage network) and a predominantly impervious streambed allowed separating mixing and dilution processes as well as in-stream retention and removal processes. During two summer seasons we conducted a set (25) of stream network wide (stream water and drainage water) synoptic sampling campaigns including climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream water chemistry and physical water parameters (dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperatures, electrical conductivity, pH). Analyzing these data sets we were able to determine a) time variant NO3-N concentrations and loads for all sub-catchments (sources), b) time variant in-stream removal rates for all stream reaches (sinks) and c) the hierarchical order of all contributing NO3-N sinks and sources and their time variant influence on total NO3-N export. Climate parameters, discharge, channel geomorphology, vegetation, stream

  9. Viscosity Analysis of Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions: Role of Size, Electroviscous Effect and Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-01-01

    Increased solution viscosity results in difficulties in manufacturing and delivery of therapeutic protein formulations, increasing both the time and production costs, and leading to patient inconvenience. The solution viscosity is affected by the molecular properties of both the solute and the solvent. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of size, charge and protein-protein interactions on the viscosity of Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig(TM)) protein solutions. The effect of size of the protein molecule on solution viscosity was investigated by measuring intrinsic viscosity and excluded volume calculations for monoclonal antibody (mAb) and DVD-Ig(TM) protein solutions. The role of the electrostatic charge resulting in electroviscous effects for DVD-Ig(TM) protein was assessed by measuring zeta potential. Light scattering measurements were performed to detect protein-protein interactions affecting solution viscosity. DVD-Ig(TM) protein exhibited significantly higher viscosity compared to mAb. Intrinsic viscosity and excluded volume calculations indicated that the size of the molecule affects viscosity significantly at higher concentrations, while the effect was minimal at intermediate concentrations. Electroviscous contribution to the viscosity of DVD-Ig(TM) protein varied depending on the presence or absence of ions in the solution. In buffered solutions, negative k D and B 2 values indicated the presence of attractive interactions which resulted in high viscosity for DVD-Ig(TM) protein at certain pH and ionic strength conditions. Results show that more than one factor contributes to the increased viscosity of DVD-Ig(TM) protein and interplay of these factors modulates the overall viscosity behavior of the solution, especially at higher concentrations.

  10. Protein timing and its effects on muscular hypertrophy and strength in individuals engaged in weight-training

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether past research provides conclusive evidence about the effects of type and timing of ingestion of specific sources of protein by those engaged in resistance weight training. Two essential, nutrition-related, tenets need to be followed by weightlifters to maximize muscle hypertrophy: the consumption of 1.2-2.0 g protein.kg -1 of body weight, and ≥44-50 kcal.kg-1 of body weight. Researchers have tested the effects of timing of protein supplement ingestion on various physical changes in weightlifters. In general, protein supplementation pre- and post-workout increases physical performance, training session recovery, lean body mass, muscle hypertrophy, and strength. Specific gains, differ however based on protein type and amounts. Studies on timing of consumption of milk have indicated that fat-free milk post-workout was effective in promoting increases in lean body mass, strength, muscle hypertrophy and decreases in body fat. The leucine content of a protein source has an impact on protein synthesis, and affects muscle hypertrophy. Consumption of 3–4 g of leucine is needed to promote maximum protein synthesis. An ideal supplement following resistance exercise should contain whey protein that provides at least 3 g of leucine per serving. A combination of a fast-acting carbohydrate source such as maltodextrin or glucose should be consumed with the protein source, as leucine cannot modulate protein synthesis as effectively without the presence of insulin. Such a supplement post-workout would be most effective in increasing muscle protein synthesis, resulting in greater muscle hypertrophy and strength. In contrast, the consumption of essential amino acids and dextrose appears to be most effective at evoking protein synthesis prior to rather than following resistance exercise. To further enhance muscle hypertrophy and strength, a resistance weight- training program of at least 10–12 weeks with compound movements for

  11. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-03

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP.

  12. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a “fast” protein and caseinate (CA) as a “slow” protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  13. Feeding value of field pea as a protein source in forage-based diets fed to beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Soto-Navarro, S A; Encinias, A M; Bauer, M L; Lardy, G P; Caton, J S

    2012-02-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of field peas as a protein source in diets for beef cattle. In the first study, 4 cultivars of field pea were incubated in situ to determine rate and extent of CP disappearance. Results indicate that field pea cultivars vary in CP content (22.6, 26.1, 22.6, and 19.4%, DM basis for Profi, Arvika, Carneval, and Trapper, respectively). Soluble protein fraction ranged from 34.9% for Trapper to 54.9% for Profi. Degradable CP fraction was greater (P = 0.01) for Trapper compared with the other cultivars, and no differences (P ≥ 0.25) were observed among Profi, Arvika, and Carneval. Rate of CP degradation differed (P ≤ 0.03) for all cultivars, with Profi being the greatest and Trapper the smallest (10.8, 10.0, 8.1, and 6.3 ± 1.4%/h for Profi, Carneval, Arvika, and Trapper, respectively). Estimated RDP was not different (P = 0.21) for all 4 cultivars. In the second study, 30 crossbred beef steers (301 ± 15 kg) were individually fed and used to evaluate effects of field pea processing (whole, rolled, or ground) on steer performance. Diets contained 40% field pea grain. Growing steers consuming whole field pea had greater ADG (P = 0.08) than those consuming processed field pea (1.69, 1.52, and 1.63 ± 0.05 kg/d, for whole, rolled, and ground, respectively). However, DMI (kg/d and as % of BW) and G:F were not different (P ≥ 0.24). In the third study, 35 individually fed gestating beef cows (694 ± 17 kg) were used to evaluate the use of field pea as a protein supplement for medium quality grass hay (9.3% CP). Treatments consisted of whole field peas at 1) 0 g (CON), 2) 680 g (FP680), 3) 1,360 g (FP1360), and 4) 2,040 g (FP2040), and 5) 1,360 g of 74% barley and 26% canola meal (BCM). Total intake (forage + supplement) of gestating beef cows increased with increasing field pea level (linear, P = 0.01; supplemented vs. nonsupplemented, P = 0.01). In summary, protein quantity and rate of ruminal protein degradation

  14. Protein Traffic Disorders: an Effective High-Throughput Fluorescence Microscopy Pipeline for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Hugo M.; Uliyakina, Inna; Awatade, Nikhil T.; Proença, Maria C.; Tischer, Christian; Sirianant, Lalida; Kunzelmann, Karl; Pepperkok, Rainer; Amaral, Margarida D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane proteins are essential molecules in the cell which mediate interactions with the exterior milieu, thus representing key drug targets for present pharma. Not surprisingly, protein traffic disorders include a large range of diseases sharing the common mechanism of failure in the respective protein to reach the plasma membrane. However, specific therapies for these diseases are remarkably lacking. Herein, we report a robust platform for drug discovery applied to a paradigmatic genetic disorder affecting intracellular trafficking – Cystic Fibrosis. This platform includes (i) two original respiratory epithelial cellular models incorporating an inducible double-tagged traffic reporter; (ii) a plasma membrane protein traffic assay for high-throughput microscopy screening; and (iii) open-source image analysis software to quantify plasma membrane protein traffic. By allowing direct scoring of compounds rescuing the basic traffic defect, this platform enables an effective drug development pipeline, which can be promptly adapted to any traffic disorder-associated protein and leverage therapy development efforts. PMID:25762484

  15. Effect of diet composition on protein requirements of children and adults in northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, M N; Valencia, M E; Brown, D S

    1993-01-01

    The overall vegetable and animal protein combinations of the diet in Northern Mexico were determined through a dietary population survey. Vegetable sources made up 45% and animal protein was 55% (45V/55A). Further combinations of up to 100% vegetable protein dietary mixtures (100V) were studied to test the sensibility of the variations on protein requirements of pre-school, school children and adults. Diets were analyzed for amino acid composition and in vivo protein digestibility in rats to estimate true protein requirements according to FAO/WHO/UNU (1985). The effect on the pre-school group showed the widest variation with 1.46 g/kg/day in the 45V/55A to 2.63 in the 100V. For the school-aged children and adults the variations were 1.15-1.79 and 0.94-0.84 g/kg/day respectively.

  16. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  17. Algal Photobiology: A Rich Source of Unusual Light Sensitive Proteins for Synthetic Biology and Optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2016-01-01

    The light absorption system in eukaryotic (micro)algae includes highly sensitive photoreceptors, which change their conformation in response to different light qualities on a subsecond time scale and induce physiological and behavioral responses. Some of the light sensitive modules are already in use to engineer and design photoswitchable tools for control of cellular and physiological activities in living organisms with various degrees of complexity. Thus, identification of new light sensitive modules will not only extend the source material for the generation of optogenetic tools but also foster the development of new light-based strategies in cell signaling research. Apart from searching for new proteins with suitable light-sensitive modules, smaller variants of existing light-sensitive modules would be helpful to simplify the construction of hybrid genes and facilitate the generation of mutated and chimerized modules. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing as well as functional analysis of photoreceptors and their interaction partners will help to discover new light sensitive modules.

  18. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-05

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  19. S-layer proteins as a source of carotenoids: Isolation of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin from its S-layer protein DR_2577.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Esposito, Francesca; El Alaoui, Sabah; Piano, Dario

    2017-09-01

    S-layers are regular paracrystalline arrays of proteins or glycoproteins that characterize the outer envelope of several bacteria and archaea. The auto-assembling properties of these proteins make them suitable for application in nanotechnologies. However, the bacterial cell wall and its S-layer are also an important binding sites for carotenoids and they may represent a potential source of these precious molecules for industrial purposes. The S-layer structure and its components were extensively studied in the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which for long time represented one of the model organisms in this respect. The protein DR_2577 has been shown to be one of the naturally over-expressed S-layer components in this bacterium. The present report describes a high scale purification procedure of this protein in solution. The purity of the samples, assayed by native and denaturing electrophoresis, showed how this method leads to a selective and high efficient recovery of the pure DR_2577. Recently, we have found that the deinoxanthin, a carotenoid typical of D. radiodurans, is a cofactor non covalently bound to the protein DR_2577. The pure DR_2577 samples may be precipitated or lyophilized and used as a source of the carotenoid cofactor deinoxanthin by an efficient extraction using organic solvents. The procedure described in this work may represent a general approach for the isolation of S-layer proteins and their carotenoids with potentials for industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Association Between Protein Intake by Source and Osteoporotic Fracture in Older Men: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Shikany, James M; Cawthon, Peggy M; Cauley, Jane A; Taylor, Brent C; Vo, Tien N; Bauer, Douglas C; Orwoll, Eric S; Schousboe, John T; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-03-01

    Dietary protein is a potentially modifiable risk factor for fracture. Our objectives were to assess the association of protein intake with incident fracture among older men and whether these associations varied by protein source or by skeletal site. We studied a longitudinal cohort of 5875 men (mean age 73.6 ± 5.9 years) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. At baseline, protein intake was assessed as percent of total energy intake (TEI) with mean intake from all sources = 16.1%TEI. Incident clinical fractures were confirmed by physician review of medical records. There were 612 major osteoporotic fractures, 806 low-trauma fractures, 270 hip fractures, 193 spine fractures, and 919 non-hip non-spine fractures during 15 years of follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models with age, race, height, clinical site, TEI, physical activity, marital status, osteoporosis, gastrointestinal surgery, smoking, oral corticosteroids use, alcohol consumption, and calcium and vitamin D supplements as covariates to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), all expressed per unit (SD = 2.9%TEI) increase. Higher protein intake was associated with a decreased risk of major osteoporotic fracture (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.00) with a similar association found for low-trauma fracture. The association between protein and fracture varied by protein source; eg, increased dairy protein and non-dairy animal protein were associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.65 to 0.98] and HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.72 to 0.97], respectively), whereas plant-source protein was not (HR = 0.99 [95% CI, 0.78 to 1.24]). The association between protein and fracture varied by fracture site; total protein was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture (HR = 0.84 [95% CI, 0.73 to 0.95]), but not clinical spine fracture (HR = 1.06 [95% CI, 0.92 to 1.22]). In conclusion, those with high protein intake

  1. High pressure effects on allergen food proteins.

    PubMed

    Somkuti, Judit; Smeller, László

    2013-12-15

    There are several proteins, which can cause allergic reaction if they are inhaled or ingested. Our everyday food can also contain such proteins. Food allergy is an IgE-mediated immune disorder, a growing health problem of great public concern. High pressure is known to affect the structure of proteins; typically few hundred MPa pressure can lead to denaturation. That is why several trials have been performed to alter the structure of the allergen proteins by high pressure, in order to reduce its allergenicity. Studies have been performed both on simple protein solutions and on complex food systems. Here we review those allergens which have been investigated under or after high pressure treatment by methods capable of detecting changes in the secondary and tertiary structure of the proteins. We focus on those allergenic proteins, whose structural changes were investigated by spectroscopic methods under pressure in correlation with the observed allergenicity (IgE binding) changes. According to this criterion we selected the following allergen proteins: Mal d 1 and Mal d 3 (apple), Bos d 5 (milk), Dau c 1 (carrot), Gal d 2 (egg), Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 (peanut), and Gad m 1 (cod). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxya hyla hyla (Orthoptera: Acrididae) as an Alternative Protein Source for Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mousumi; Mandal, Suman Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient composition of the grasshoppers Oxya hyla hyla showed that they are a rich nutrient source containing 687.7 g protein/kg of dry body weight. Their antinutrient values fell within nutritionally acceptable values of the poultry bird Coturnix japonica japonica (Japanese quail). The most required essential amino acids and fatty acids were also present in sufficient amount. For feeding trial nine diets were formulated on an equal crude protein (230 g/kg) basis with grasshopper meal, fish meal, and soybean meal. Three sets of diets with grasshopper meal were prepared with 50 g/kg, 100 g/kg, and 150 g/kg grasshopper of total feed. Similarly, other diet sets were prepared with fish meal and also with soybean meal. Results were compared with another group of Japanese quails fed on a reference diet that was considered as control. Two experiments were conducted with a total number of 600, seven-day-old, Japanese quails. In experiment 1 for determination of growth performance, quails were randomly distributed into ten groups of males and ten groups of females containing 30 birds each. In experiment 2 for determination of laying performance, identical ten groups were prepared in ten repetitions (2 females and 1 male in each group) from the six-week-old birds of experiment 1. Birds of diet set GM2 have gained the highest body weight (male 4.04 g/bird/day; female 5.01 g/bird/day) followed by birds of FM3 diet set (male 3.72 g/bird/day; female 4.40 g/bird/day), whereas birds of reference diet have gained 3.05 g/bird/day for male and 3.23 g/bird/day for female. Feed conversion ratio (FCR) of birds fed with GM2 was the lowest (male 3.33; female 2.97) whereas FCR of R group was higher (male 4.37; female 4.65) than grasshopper meal and fish meal based diets. Hen day production percentage was higher (72.2) in GM2 group, followed by FM3 (63.5) group. R group had lower 1st egg weight (9.0 g), weight gain (8.2 g), percentage of hen day production (41

  3. Effect of Ultrasound in Soybean Protein Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukase, Hirokazu; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ide, Masao

    1994-05-01

    Application of ultrasound for accelerating the extraction of nutriments in food processing has been attempted. However, conditions of exposure to ultrasound were not clear in previous studies. This paper reports on the relationship between the ultrasonic pressure and the amount of extracted protein from soybeans. Experiments were conducted using a beaker, in which the ultrasonic fields were precisely measured. Soybean flakes suspended in water were put in the beaker and placed in a water tank. The amount of extracted protein in water upon ultrasonic exposure was calculated by the Kjeldahl method. It was found that the amount of extracted protein increased in proportion to ultrasonic pressure up to the total amount of soybean protein soluble in water. Furthermore, this paper describes the denaturation of the protein produced by the ultrasonic cavitation.

  4. Effects of ultrasound on the thermal and structural characteristics of proteins in reconstituted whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Zisu, Bogdan; Palmer, Martin; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2011-09-01

    The sonication-induced changes in the structural and thermal properties of proteins in reconstituted whey protein concentrate (WPC) solutions were examined. Differential scanning calorimetry, UV-vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were used to determine the thermal properties of proteins, measure thiol groups and monitor changes to protein hydrophobicity and secondary structure, respectively. The enthalpy of denaturation decreased when WPC solutions were sonicated for up to 5 min. Prolonged sonication increased the enthalpy of denaturation due to protein aggregation. Sonication did not alter the thiol content but resulted in minor changes to the secondary structure and hydrophobicity of the protein. Overall, the sonication process had little effect on the structure of proteins in WPC solutions which is critical to preserving functional properties during the ultrasonic processing of whey protein based dairy products.

  5. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  6. The Effect of Protein Impurities on Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    While bulk crystallization from impure solutions is used industrially as a purification step for a wide variety of materials, it is a technique that has rarely been used for proteins. Proteins have a reputation for being difficult to crystallize and high purity of the initial crystallization solution is considered paramount for success in the crystallization. Although little is written on the purifying capability of protein crystallization or of the effect of impurities on the various aspects of the crystallization process, recent published reports show that crystallization shows promise and feasibility as a purification technique for proteins. In order to further examine the issue of purity in macromolecule crystallization this study investigates the effect of the protein impurities, avidin, ovalbumin and conalbumin, at concentrations up to 50%, on the solubility, crystal face growth rates and crystal purity, of the protein lysozyme. Solubility was measured in batch experiments while a computer controlled video microscope system was used to measure the f {101} and {101} lysozyme crystal face growth rates. While little effect was observed on solubility and high crystal purity was obtained (>99.99%), the effect of the impurities on the face growth rates varied from no effect to a significant face specific effect leading to growth cessation, a phenomenon that is frequently observed in protein crystal growth. The results shed interesting light on the effect of protein impurities on protein crystal growth and strengthen the feasibility of using crystallization as a unit operation for protein purification.

  7. The Effect of Protein Impurities on Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    While bulk crystallization from impure solutions is used industrially as a purification step for a wide variety of materials, it is a technique that has rarely been used for proteins. Proteins have a reputation for being difficult to crystallize and high purity of the initial crystallization solution is considered paramount for success in the crystallization. Although little is written on the purifying capability of protein crystallization or of the effect of impurities on the various aspects of the crystallization process, recent published reports show that crystallization shows promise and feasibility as a purification technique for proteins. In order to further examine the issue of purity in macromolecule crystallization this study investigates the effect of the protein impurities, avidin, ovalbumin and conalbumin, at concentrations up to 50%, on the solubility, crystal face growth rates and crystal purity, of the protein lysozyme. Solubility was measured in batch experiments while a computer controlled video microscope system was used to measure the f {101} and {101} lysozyme crystal face growth rates. While little effect was observed on solubility and high crystal purity was obtained (>99.99%), the effect of the impurities on the face growth rates varied from no effect to a significant face specific effect leading to growth cessation, a phenomenon that is frequently observed in protein crystal growth. The results shed interesting light on the effect of protein impurities on protein crystal growth and strengthen the feasibility of using crystallization as a unit operation for protein purification.

  8. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Qualitative changes in floral pollen protein have been shown to be an important aspect of pollinator health. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.), provides an essential autumnal source of floral pollen for wild bee and honeybee populations prior to winter, with tall or Canada gol...

  9. Effective protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of Jerusalem artichoke leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meide; Shen, Shihua

    2013-07-01

    Protein extraction is a crucial step for proteomics studies. To establish an effective protein extraction protocol suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) analysis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), three different protein extraction methods-trichloroacetic acid/acetone, Mg/NP-40, and phenol/ammonium acetate-were evaluated using Jerusalem artichoke leaves as source materials. Of the three methods, trichloroacetic acid/acetone yielded the best protein separation pattern and highest number of protein spots in 2DE analysis. Proteins highly abundant in leaves, such as Rubisco, are typically problematic during leaf 2DE analysis, however, and this disadvantage was evident using trichloroacetic acid/acetone. To reduce the influence of abundant proteins on the detection of low-abundance proteins, we optimized the trichloroacetic acid/acetone method by incorporating a PEG fractionation approach. After optimization, 363 additional (36.2%) protein spots were detected on the 2DE gel. Our results suggest that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method is a better protein extraction technique than Mg/NP-40 and phenol/ammonium acetate in Jerusalem artichoke leaf 2DE analysis, and that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method combined with PEG fractionation procedure is the most effective approach for leaf 2DE analysis of Jerusalem artichoke. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Determination of sulfur in human hair using high resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and its correlation with total protein and albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Nil; Baysal, Asli

    2017-04-01

    Human hair is a valuable contributor for biological monitoring. It is an information storage point to assess the effects of environmental, nutritional or occupational sources on the body. Human proteins, amino acids or other compounds are among the key components to find the sources of different effects or disorders in the human body. Sulfur is a significant one of these compounds, and it has great affinity to some metals and compounds. This property of the sulfur affects the human health positively or negatively. In this manuscript, sulfur was determined in hair samples of autistic and age-match control group children via molecular absorption of CS using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. For this purpose, hair samples were appropriately washed and dried at 75 °C. Then samples were dissolved in microwave digestion using HNO3 for sulfur determination. Extraction was performed with HCl hydrolysation by incubation for 24 h at 110 °C for total protein and albumin determination. The validity of the method for the sulfur determination was tested using hair standard reference materials. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified values at 95% confidence level. Finally correlation of sulfur levels of autistic children's hair with their total protein and albumin levels were done.

  11. Linking Aerosol Source Activities to Present and Future Climate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Streets, D.; Menon, S.; Unger, N.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol source sectors (transport, power, industry, residential, biomass burning) generate distinct mixtures of aerosol species. These mixtures in turn have different effects on climate. As sectoral emissions change in coming decades, whether by regulation or not, it is helpful to link pollution from source types to climate consequences. We do so, using our global (GISS GCM) aerosol model for present and future IPCC SRES scenarios. According to our model, residential and transport sectors have net positive 1995 aerosol forcings (0.04 and 0.03 W m-2) due to their large black carbon contents. However, the sulfate-dominated power and industry sectors have net negative 1995 forcings (-0.10 and -0.09 W m-2). Due to the near-balance of absorbing and scattering components, biomass burning forcing is small. For the 2050 SRES A1B scenario, the net (negative) aerosol forcing is double 1995 due primarily to increased sulfur emissions in the industry and power sectors. For 2050 B1 the net (negative) forcing decreases relative to 1995, as sulfur emissions are reduced. Both future scenarios project decreasing residential emissions. Yet transport emissions are expected to remain significant and thus become the dominant source of warming aerosols in the future. Aerosol pollution is projected to shift southward relative to the present, as the current industrialized regions generally reduce emissions and tropical and southern hemispheric regions continue to develop. Similar to these SRES scenarios, IIASA scenarios project a decline in residential emissions; however IIASA is more optimistic about transport sector emissions reductions. We will conduct present-day climate experiments, including aerosol direct and indirect effects, to study impacts of power and transport sectors on climate features such as air temperature and hydrologic cycle.

  12. [Cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies of severe bacterial infection in infants with fever without a source].

    PubMed

    Buendía, Jefferson Antonio; Sánchez-Villamil, Juana Patricia; Urman, Gabriela

    2016-09-01

    Serious bacterial infections in infants under 2-years-of-age with fever without a source remains, despite advances in vaccination, a matter of concern for both physicians and parents. Having cost-effectiveness information is relevant to guide decision making in clinical practice in this scenario. Objective: To determine the cost-effectiveness of four different strategies of screening in Argentina for serious bacterial infection in children presenting with fever without a source. Materials and methods: We designed a decision tree to model a hypothetical cohort of 10,000 children with fever without a source. We compared the incremental cost-effectiveness of four strategies to detect serious bacterial infection: Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test, Rochester criteria + procalcitonin test, Rochester criteria, and expectant observation. Results: Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test was the most cost-effective strategy with USD$ 784 for each correctly diagnosed case versus USD$ 839 of Rochester criteria + procalcitonin test, USD$ 1,116 of expectant observation or USD$ 1,193 of Rochester criteria. When the probability of serious bacterial infections was equal or less than 14%, the strategy of choice was expectant observation. Conclusions: The Rochester criteria + C reactive protein test was the most cost-effective strategy to detect serious bacterial infection in one to three months old children with fever without a source. However, in low risk settings for such infection, the strategy of choice is expectant observation.

  13. Spectral properties of Hawaiian microearthquakes: source, site, and attenuation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Shear-wave spectra were determined for 397 Hawaiian earthquakes located near Kilauea Caldera, and on its south flank, with moments (M/sub 0/) from 10/sup 17.4/ to 10/sup 20.8/ dyne-cm. An inversion of the spectra averaged the path effects, and separated the source spectra from the effects of site response relative to assumed good stations. Large variations in site response explain the station dependence of corner frequencies and magnitude that were seen in earlier studies. The theoretical spectra for the Brune source model, modified by an assumed spectral decay parameter related to near-surface attenuation, were examined. Previous investigators hypothesized that the south flank of Kilauea is moving away from the rest of the island along the old oceanic sediment layer. The author suggests that this layer is divided into a rupture zone defined by the earthquakes at depths of 9 km, and one or two slide zones that allow sliding but not fracture. The smaller, shallower earthquakes may result from stresses in the block above the rupture zone, caused by motion of the block away from the rest of the island. The author speculates that near the rift zones, the old sedimentary layer has been strengthened and made capable of fracture by intrusion of sills into the sediments, or by thermal or hydrothermal alteration of sediments, or both.

  14. Mercury as a Global Pollutant: Sources, Pathways, and Effects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant that affects human and ecosystem health. We synthesize understanding of sources, atmosphere-land-ocean Hg dynamics and health effects, and consider the implications of Hg-control policies. Primary anthropogenic Hg emissions greatly exceed natural geogenic sources, resulting in increases in Hg reservoirs and subsequent secondary Hg emissions that facilitate its global distribution. The ultimate fate of emitted Hg is primarily recalcitrant soil pools and deep ocean waters and sediments. Transfers of Hg emissions to largely unavailable reservoirs occur over the time scale of centuries, and are primarily mediated through atmospheric exchanges of wet/dry deposition and evasion from vegetation, soil organic matter and ocean surfaces. A key link between inorganic Hg inputs and exposure of humans and wildlife is the net production of methylmercury, which occurs mainly in reducing zones in freshwater, terrestrial, and coastal environments, and the subsurface ocean. Elevated human exposure to methylmercury primarily results from consumption of estuarine and marine fish. Developing fetuses are most at risk from this neurotoxin but health effects of highly exposed populations and wildlife are also a concern. Integration of Hg science with national and international policy efforts is needed to target efforts and evaluate efficacy. PMID:23590191

  15. Effects of antinutritional factors on protein digestibility and amino acid availability in foods.

    PubMed

    Gilani, G Sarwar; Cockell, Kevin A; Sepehr, Estatira

    2005-01-01

    Digestibility of protein in traditional diets from developing countries such as India, Guatemala, and Brazil is considerably lower compared to that of protein in typical North American diets (54-78 versus 88-94%). The presence of less digestible protein fractions, high levels of insoluble fiber, and high concentrations of antinutritional factors in the diets of developing countries, which are based on less refined cereals and grain legumes as major sources of protein, are responsible for poor digestibility of protein. The effects of the presence of some of the important antinutritional factors on protein and amino digestibilities of food and feed products are reviewed in this chapter. Food and feed products may contain a number of antinutritional factors that may adversely affect protein digestibility and amino acid availability. Antinutritional factors may occur naturally, such as glucosinolates in mustard and rapeseed protein products, trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinins in legumes, tannins in legumes and cereals, phytates in cereals and oilseeds, and gossypol in cottonseed protein products. Antinutritional factors may also be formed during heat/alkaline processing of protein products, yielding Maillard compounds, oxidized forms of sulfur amino acids, D-amino acids, and lysinoalanine (LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative). The presence of high levels of dietary trypsin inhibitors from soybeans, kidney beans, or other grain legumes can cause substantial reductions in protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 50%) in rats and pigs. Similarly, the presence of high levels of tannins in cereals, such as sorghum, and grain legumes, such as fababean (Vicia faba L.), can result in significantly reduced protein and amino acid digestibilities (up to 23%) in rats, poultry, and pigs. Studies involving phytase supplementation of production rations for swine or poultry have provided indirect evidence that normally encountered levels of phytates in cereals and legumes

  16. Observations of collective effects at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Barry, W.; Corlett, J.N.; Fox, J.; Teytelman, D.

    1995-10-01

    We present a summary of measurements of single beam collective effects in the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We describe measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities, including some recent results using the newly commissioned feedback systems and the results of an initial search for the fast ion instability. Single bunch effects include bunch lengthening, energy spread increase, HOM loss measurements, head-tail damping rates, current dependent tune shifts, and transverse mode coupling instability threshold. The longitudinal measurements are consistent with a broadband impedance {vert_bar}{Zeta}{sub {parallel}}/{eta}{vert_bar}{sub eff} = 0.22{plus_minus}0.07 {Omega} and transverse measurements indicate broadband impedances of {Zeta}{sub y,eff} = 155 k{Omega}/m and Z{sub x,eff} = 58 k{Omega}/m.

  17. Effects of Source Correlations on the Spectrum of Radiated Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    paraxial approximation, with a known result for far-zone radiant intensity of Gaussian Schell - model sources3. Spectral changes on propagation of...33 2.2 The radiation efficiency of planar Gaussian Schell - model sources ............ 34...increase in the source correlation length. Page 40. Figure 2.5: The radiation efficiency of Gaussian Schell - model sources as a function of the rms

  18. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed. PMID:26249677

  19. Hypocholesterolaemic effects of lupin protein and pea protein/fibre combinations in moderately hypercholesterolaemic individuals.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Triolo, Michela; Bosisio, Raffaella; Bondioli, Alighiero; Calabresi, Laura; De Vergori, Viviana; Gomaraschi, Monica; Mombelli, Giuliana; Pazzucconi, Franco; Zacherl, Christian; Arnoldi, Anna

    2012-04-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of plant proteins (lupin protein or pea protein) and their combinations with soluble fibres (oat fibre or apple pectin) on plasma total and LDL-cholesterol levels. A randomised, double-blind, parallel group design was followed: after a 4-week run-in period, participants were randomised into seven treatment groups, each consisting of twenty-five participants. Each group consumed two bars containing specific protein/fibre combinations: the reference group consumed casein+cellulose; the second and third groups consumed bars containing lupin or pea proteins+cellulose; the fourth and fifth groups consumed bars containing casein and oat fibre or apple pectin; the sixth group and seventh group received bars containing combinations of pea protein and oat fibre or apple pectin, respectively. Bars containing lupin protein+cellulose ( - 116 mg/l, - 4·2%), casein+apple pectin ( - 152 mg/l, - 5·3%), pea protein+oat fibre ( - 135 mg/l, - 4·7%) or pea protein+apple pectin ( - 168 mg/l, - 6·4%) resulted in significant reductions of total cholesterol levels (P<0·05), whereas no cholesterol changes were observed in the subjects consuming the bars containing casein+cellulose, casein+oat fibre or pea protein+cellulose. The present study shows the hypocholesterolaemic activity and potential clinical benefits of consuming lupin protein or combinations of pea protein and a soluble fibre, such as oat fibre or apple pectin.

  20. Effect of whey protein and glycomacropeptide on measures of satiety in normal-weight adult women.

    PubMed

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Protein is the most satiating macronutrient and dairy whey protein is thought to be more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be attributable to the presence of glycomacropeptide (GMP). The objective of this study was to investigate the role of GMP in the satiating effect of whey protein. Isoenergetic (~1600 kJ) preload drinks contained GMP isolate (86% GMP, "GMP"), whey protein isolate (WPI) with 21% naturally occurring GMP, WPI with 2% naturally present GMP, or maltodextrin carbohydrate ("carbohydrate"). Satiety was assessed in 22 normal-weight adult women by determining the consumption of a test meal provided ad libitum 120 min following ingestion of a preload drink, and also by using visual analogue scales (VAS) for rating feelings of hunger, desire to eat, prospective consumption and fullness (appetite). The ad libitum test meal intake was significantly different between the preload drinks (p = 0.0003), with food intake following ingestion of both WPI preload drinks (regardless of the amount of GMP) being ~18% lower compared with the beverages enriched with carbohydrate or GMP alone. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the VAS-rated feelings of appetite among the four preload drinks. GMP alone did not reduce subsequent food intake compared with a drink enriched with carbohydrate, but whey protein had a greater satiating effect than carbohydrate. The presence of GMP in whey does not appear to be the cause of the observed effect of whey protein on satiety.

  1. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Heating Has No Effect on the Net Protein Utilisation from Egg Whites in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yayoi; Kimura, Mamoru; Masuda, Yasunobu; Kunou, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    Egg whites (EW) are a good source of protein; however, they are typically heated prior to consumption. Therefore, we investigated the effects of different heating conditions on the protein utilisation rate of EW. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 36, 198 ± 1 g) were divided into six groups and fed American Institute of Nutrition-76 chow containing unheated EW, soft-boiled EW, boiled EW, milk whey protein, soybean protein, or no protein over a 10-day period using pair-feeding. Urine and faeces were sampled daily beginning on day 5 to measure nitrogen content and the net protein utilisation (NPU) rate. The soybean protein group had a significantly lower level of food intake and was thus excluded from subsequent analyses. The NPU value was similar among the unheated, soft-boiled, and boiled EW groups (97.5 ± 0.4, 96.5 ± 0.1, and 96.5 ± 0.7, resp.). The EW group values were significantly higher than the whey group values (90.5 ± 1.0). These results show that EW serve as a good source of protein, irrespective of heating. PMID:28337477

  3. Glucocorticoid effects on hippocampal protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schlatter, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Following subcutaneous injection of rats with 5 mg corticosterone, hippocampal slices in vitro show increased ({sup 35}S)-methionine labeling of a cytosolic protein with an apparent molecular weight (M{sub r}) of 35,000 and an isoelectric point (IEP) of 6.6. This labeling is temporally consistent with a transcriptional event, and is steroid- and tissue-specific. The pear serum concentration of steroid occurs one hour or less following the injection. Maximal labeling of this protein is reached whenever serum corticosterone values are approximately 100 ng/ml. When endogenous corticosterone levels are elevated to 100 ng/ml through stressors or exogenous ACTH injections the same maximal increase in synthesis of the 35,000 M{sub r} protein is observed. Adrenalectomy prevents the observed response from occurring following stressor application or ACTH injections. Comparison of the increases observed after administration of the type 2 receptor agonist RU 28362 and aldosterone, which has a higher affinity for the type 1 receptor, shows a 50-fold greater sensitivity of the response to the type 2 receptor agonist. Synthesis of this protein following serum increases of steroid possibly correlates to the theorized function of the type 2 receptor feedback regulation. The similar protein in the liver has an IEP of 6.8 and a slightly higher M{sub r}. A second hippocampal protein with an M{sub r} of 46,000 and an IEP of 6.2 is also increased in labeling. Two additional liver proteins, one of Mr 53,000 (IEP of 6.2) and the other with an M{sub r} of 45,000 (IEP of 8.7-7.8) are increased in the liver following glucocorticoid administration.

  4. A critical examination of the available data sources for estimating meat and protein consumption in the USA.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Keri Szejda; Righter, Allison C; Santo, Raychel E

    2016-06-01

    To describe the methods, strengths and limitations of available data sources for estimating US meat and protein consumption in order to facilitate accurate interpretations and applications. We examined agricultural supply and dietary intake databases from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), the US Department of Health and Human Services and the FAO to describe their methodology and to report the most recent estimates for meat and protein consumption. Together, loss-adjusted agricultural supply data and dietary recall data provide the best available estimates of US consumption; the most recent sources indicated that US citizens (ages 2 years and over) consume 4·4-5·9 oz (125·9-166·5 g) of total meat and 6·2-7·4 oz-eq (175·2-209·4 g-eq) from the USDA Protein Foods Group per day. Meat constitutes the majority of intake within the Protein Foods Group, and red meat and processed meat constitute the majority of total meat intake. Nutrient supply data indicate that total meat represents an estimated 43·1 % of the total protein available in the US food supply, but without any loss-adjusted nutrient data, per capita protein intake is best estimated by dietary recall data to be 79·9 g/d. In order to address public health concerns related to excess meat and/or protein consumption, practitioners, educators and researchers must appropriately use available data sources in order to accurately report consumption at the population level. Implications for comparing these estimates with various recommended intakes are discussed.

  5. Effect of surfaces in modulating protein folding mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Joan

    2014-03-01

    Protein-surface interactions are ubiquitous in the crowded cytosol, where proteins encounter a variety of surfaces, ranging from membranes surfaces, to the surfaces presented by chaperone molecules. Protein-surface interactions are also at the heart of a number of emerging technologies, including protein micro-arrays, biosensors and biomaterials. The effect of surfaces on protein structure and stability can vary substantially depending on the chemical composition of the surface. In this talk, I will present detailed atomistic simulations of the folding of a small beta-sheet protein in the presence of graphite and titanium oxide surfaces. The role of water-mediated and direct protein-surface interactions in governing protein conformations will be discussed.

  6. Pollen source effects on growth of kernel structures and embryo chemical compounds in maize

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, W.; Mantese, A. I.; Maddonni, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies have reported effects of pollen source on the oil concentration of maize (Zea mays) kernels through modifications to both the embryo/kernel ratio and embryo oil concentration. The present study expands upon previous analyses by addressing pollen source effects on the growth of kernel structures (i.e. pericarp, endosperm and embryo), allocation of embryo chemical constituents (i.e. oil, protein, starch and soluble sugars), and the anatomy and histology of the embryos. Methods Maize kernels with different oil concentration were obtained from pollinations with two parental genotypes of contrasting oil concentration. The dynamics of the growth of kernel structures and allocation of embryo chemical constituents were analysed during the post-flowering period. Mature kernels were dissected to study the anatomy (embryonic axis and scutellum) and histology [cell number and cell size of the scutellums, presence of sub-cellular structures in scutellum tissue (starch granules, oil and protein bodies)] of the embryos. Key Results Plants of all crosses exhibited a similar kernel number and kernel weight. Pollen source modified neither the growth period of kernel structures, nor pericarp growth rate. By contrast, pollen source determined a trade-off between embryo and endosperm growth rates, which impacted on the embryo/kernel ratio of mature kernels. Modifications to the embryo size were mediated by scutellum cell number. Pollen source also affected (P < 0·01) allocation of embryo chemical compounds. Negative correlations among embryo oil concentration and those of starch (r = 0·98, P < 0·01) and soluble sugars (r = 0·95, P < 0·05) were found. Coincidently, embryos with low oil concentration had an increased (P < 0·05–0·10) scutellum cell area occupied by starch granules and fewer oil bodies. Conclusions The effects of pollen source on both embryo/kernel ratio and allocation of embryo chemicals seems to be related to the early

  7. Influence of carbohydrate source on ruminal fermentation characteristics, performance, and microbial protein synthesis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gozho, G N; Mutsvangwa, T

    2008-07-01

    Eight multiparous Holstein cows (676 +/- 57 kg of body weight; 121 +/- 17 d-in-milk) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design to determine the effects of 4 sources of carbohydrate on milk yield and composition, ruminal fermentation, and microbial N flow to the duodenum. Four cows in one of the Latin squares were fitted with permanent ruminal cannulae. Diets contained (DM basis) 50% forage in combinations of alfalfa hay and barley silage, and 50% concentrate. The concentrate portion of the diets contained barley, corn, wheat, or oats grain as the primary source of carbohydrate. Intake of DM ranged from 24.0 to 26.2 kg/d, and it tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet; consequently, milk yield tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with those fed the barley-based diet. Cows fed the barley- or wheat-based diets had a lower milk fat content compared with those fed the corn-based diet. Ruminal fermentation characteristics were largely unaffected by the source of dietary carbohydrate, with similar ruminal pH and volatile fatty acid and ammonia concentrations for the first 6 h after the morning feeding. Dietary treatment did not affect total tract apparent digestibility of DM, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber; however, total tract apparent digestibility of starch in cows fed the oats-based diet was higher compared with those fed the corn-and wheat-based diets. Nitrogen that was used for productive purposes (i.e., N secreted in milk + N apparently retained by the cow) tended to be lower in cows fed the wheat-based diet compared with cows fed the barley-, corn-, or oats-based diets. Urinary purine derivative (PD) excretion was similar in cows fed the barley-, corn-, and wheat-based diets; however, purine derivative excretion was higher in cows fed the barley-based diet compared with those fed the oats-based diet. Consequently, estimated microbial N flow to the duodenum was

  8. VUV irradiation effects on proteins in high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wien, F; Miles, A J; Lees, J G; Vrønning Hoffmann, S; Wallace, B A

    2005-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy is emerging as an important new tool in structural molecular biology. Previously we had shown that in lower-flux SRCD instruments, such as UV1 at ISA and beamline 3.1 at the SRS, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation damage to proteins was not evident after exposure over a period of hours. No effects were detected in either the protein primary or the secondary structures. However, with the development of high-flux beamlines, such as CD12 at the SRS, this issue has been revisited because of changes observed in the SRCD spectra of consecutive scans of protein samples obtained on this high-flux beamline. Experiments have been designed to distinguish between two different possible mechanisms: (i) photoionization causing free radicals or secondary electrons producing degradation of the protein, and (ii) local heating of the sample resulting in protein denaturation. The latter appears to be the principal source of the signal deterioration.

  9. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  10. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  11. A primer on cytokines: sources, receptors, effects, and inducers.

    PubMed Central

    Curfs, J H; Meis, J F; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J A

    1997-01-01

    Protection against pathogens is a prerequisite for survival of most organisms. To cope with this continuous challenge, complex defense mechanisms have evolved. The construction, adaptation, and maintenance of these mechanisms are under control of an extensive network of regulatory proteins called cytokines. A great number of cytokines have been described over the last 2 decades. This review consists of an overview of cytokines that are involved in immune responses and describes some historical and general aspects as well as prospective clinical applications. Major biological effects together with information on cytokine receptors, producers, inducers, and biochemical and molecular characteristics are listed in tables. In addition, some basic information is given on cytokine receptor signal transduction. Finally, the recent discoveries of cytokine receptors functioning as coreceptors in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus are summarized. PMID:9336671

  12. Effect of light source and regimen on growing broilers.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; Robinzon, B; Rosenstrauch, A

    1999-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different light sources and light schedules on the growth and quality of commercial broilers. In each experiment 810 broiler chicks were divided into 3 groups, 3 replicates per group. All were reared at 20 lux. Body weight and food consumption were recorded weekly. Experiment 1. Birds were reared under 3 light sources: incandescent light bulb, warm-white fluorescent light tube or warm-white mini-fluorescent light bulb. Experiment 2. Birds were reared on 3 light schedules. 23 h light and 1 h dark (23L: 1D) throughout; an increasing light schedule with initial 23L:1D then 8L: 16D increasing daylight gradually to 16L:8D or an intermittently increasing daylight schedule (16:8P) where light and dark periods were shorter but portioned to achieve the same total hours per day up to 16L:8D. Broilers reared under mini-fluorescent light bulb were heavier than those under fluorescent tubes or incandescent bulbs by 49 d. Until 42 d of age, photoperiod had no effect on growth. However, at 49 d broilers reared under 16:8P and 16L:8D regimens were heavier than those or 23L:1D. At 42 d, female broilers on 23L:1D, were heavier than those on 16L:8D and 16:8P. Mortality was higher in groups on 23L:1D than on 16L:8D on 16:8P. At 49 d incidence of leg condemnation was higher in the 16:8P group. However, skin damage was lower in this group than in those on 23L: 1D and 16L:8D.

  13. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  14. Effect of trehalose on protein structure

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nishant Kumar; Roy, Ipsita

    2009-01-01

    Trehalose is a ubiquitous molecule that occurs in lower and higher life forms but not in mammals. Till about 40 years ago, trehalose was visualized as a storage molecule, aiding the release of glucose for carrying out cellular functions. This perception has now changed dramatically. The role of trehalose has expanded, and this molecule has now been implicated in a variety of situations. Trehalose is synthesized as a stress-responsive factor when cells are exposed to environmental stresses like heat, cold, oxidation, desiccation, and so forth. When unicellular organisms are exposed to stress, they adapt by synthesizing huge amounts of trehalose, which helps them in retaining cellular integrity. This is thought to occur by prevention of denaturation of proteins by trehalose, which would otherwise degrade under stress. This explanation may be rational, since recently, trehalose has been shown to slow down the rate of polyglutamine-mediated protein aggregation and the resultant pathogenesis by stabilizing an aggregation-prone model protein. In recent years, trehalose has also proved useful in the cryopreservation of sperm and stem cells and in the development of a highly reliable organ preservation solution. This review aims to highlight the changing perception of the role of trehalose over the last 10 years and to propose common mechanisms that may be involved in all the myriad ways in which trehalose stabilizes protein structures. These will take into account the structure of trehalose molecule and its interactions with its environment, and the explanations will focus on the role of trehalose in preventing protein denaturation. PMID:19177348

  15. A new strategy to determine the protein mutation site using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization in-source decay: derivatization by ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengzhe; Zhai, Yixing; Guo, Cheng; Liu, Yaqin; Tang, Daoquan; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-03-20

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) can be considered as state of the art in the field of proteins and peptides analysis. In this work, we have designed an ionic liquid derivative strategy to obtain abundant fragment ions in MALDI in-source decay (ISD) and used the analysis of angiogenin with mutation in the fortieth (K40I) as an instance. Firstly, we have synthesized two types of ionic liquids, 3-allyl-4-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium and 4-methyl-3-(pent-4-yn-1-yl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium. Then in the light-catalyzed reaction, the alkenyl ionic liquid can open the disulfide bond of K40I protein and add to the thiol. And the derived protein can process in-source decay under the effect of ionic liquid group to produce c-z type ions. Additionally this fragmentation is potentiated to support widely range of fragment ions which can cover the location of mutation. Our results have supplied a new top-down method about how to analyze the mutation or even post-translational modification of proteins in MALDI mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sources by Which Students Perceive Professional Counselors' Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Ruth L.; Johnson, Courtney B.

    2012-01-01

    Using qualitative research methods, interviews were conducted with college students regarding the sources they used in generating perceptions of professional counselors. Respondents believed that information sources such as word of mouth, media sources and personal experiences were responsible for their understandings of professional counselors.…

  17. Roasted soybeans, blood meal, and tallow as sources of fat and ruminally undegradable protein in the diets of lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Pires, A V; Eastridge, M L; Firkins, J L

    1996-09-01

    The effect of roasted soybeans, blood meal, and tallow as sources of fat and RUP for lactating dairy cows was studied. Forty-five cows, blocked by age, calving date, and milk yield during the previous lactation, were assigned randomly to the following treatments (ingredient in the DM, RUP as a percentage of CP, and fat in the DM, respectively): 1) soybean meal (16, 35, and 3.2%), 2) whole roasted soybeans (18, 40, and 6.2%), 3) ground roasted soybeans (18, 40, and 6.2%), 4) blood meal (2.7, 40, and 3.2%), and 5) blood meal plus tallow (2.7 and 3, 40, and 6.2%). Diets were fed from wk 3 to 18 of lactation and consisted of 20% alfalfa silage, 30% corn silage, and 50% concentrate. The DMI of blood meal and whole roasted soybean diets was about 11% lower than DMI of the soybean meal diet. Milk yield (38.4 kg/d) and milk fat percentage (3.37%) were similar among diets. The roasted soybean diets resulted in the lowest milk protein percentage. Less than 2.7% blood meal might be advisable for diets fed to high yielding dairy cows to avoid reduced DMI.

  18. Interactive effects of boron, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth and physiology in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    High concentrations of boron (B) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, is sometimes diminished in agricultural drainwater ponds contaminated with Se and B. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm (microgram/g) Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 1,000 ppm B (as boric acid), 15 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B, or 60 ppm Se with 1,000 ppm B. In a concurrent experiment, the above sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After four weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and histopathological lesions of the liver occurred. Boron alone caused some reduction in growth. Several interactive effects occurred between B and Se, including further reduction in growth, and increases in plasma glutathione reductase activity, hematocrit, hemoglobin and plasma protein concentrations. With 7% protein, the growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, 60 ppm Se caused 100% mortality, and growth effects of 15 ppm Se and 1,000 ppm B alone were more pronounced than with 22% protein. Selenium accumulation increased in the liver with 7% protein. Interactive effects were greater for Se and B with 7% protein than with 22% protein and included significant mortality and enhanced accumulation of Se in the liver. These findings suggest the potential for more severe toxicological effects of Se and B independently and interactively on duckling survival and development when dietary protein is diminished.

  19. Effects of different sources of physically effective fiber on rumen microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C N; Kim, M; Eastridge, M L; Yu, Z

    2016-03-01

    Physically effective fiber is needed by dairy cattle to prevent ruminal acidosis. This study aimed to examine the effects of different sources of physically effective fiber on the populations of fibrolytic bacteria and methanogens. Five ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were each fed five diets differing in physically effective fiber sources over 15 weeks (21 days/period) in a Latin Square design: (1) 44.1% corn silage, (2) 34.0% corn silage plus 11.5% alfalfa hay, (3) 34.0% corn silage plus 5.1% wheat straw, (4) 36.1% corn silage plus 10.1% wheat straw, and (5) 34.0% corn silage plus 5.5% corn stover. The impact of the physically effective fiber sources on total bacteria and archaea were examined using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Specific real-time PCR assays were used to quantify total bacteria, total archaea, the genus Butyrivibrio, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and three uncultured rumen bacteria that were identified from adhering ruminal fractions in a previous study. No significant differences were observed among the different sources of physical effective fiber with respect to the microbial populations quantified. Any of the physically effective fiber sources may be fed to dairy cattle without negative impact on the ruminal microbial community.

  20. In-Source Decay and Pseudo-MS3 of Peptide and Protein Ions Using Liquid AP-MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Dilillo, Marialaura; Pellegrini, Davide; Yadav, Avinash; de Graaf, Erik L.; McDonnell, Liam A.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure MALDI on a Q-Exactive instrument was optimized for in-source decay and pseudo-MS3. The dependence of AP-MALDI ISD on the MALDI liquid matrix was investigated for peptides and proteins. The liquid matrices enabled long-life ISD signal, and exhibited high fragment ion yield and signal stability. Extensive a-, b-, c-, y-, and z-type fragment series were observed depending on the matrix used but were most extensive with 2,5-DHB. Complete sequence coverage of small peptide and intact protein-terminus sequence tags were obtained and confirmed using HCD as a pseudo-MS3 method.

  1. Zero Magnitude Effect for the Productivity of Triggered Tsunami Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model is applied to tsunami events to explain previously observed temporal clustering of tsunami sources. Tsunami events are defined by National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) tsunami database. For the ETAS analysis, the earthquake magnitude associated with each tsunami event in the NGDC database is replaced by the primary magnitude listed in the Centennial catalog up until 1976 and in the Global CMT catalog from 1976 through 2010. Tsunamis with a submarine landslide or volcanic component are included if they are accompanied by an earthquake, which is most often the case. Tsunami size is used as a mark for determining a tsunami-generating event, according to a minimum completeness level. The tsunami catalog is estimated to be complete for tsunami sizes greater than 1 m since 1900 and greater than 0.1 m since 1960. Of the five parameters in the temporal ETAS model (Ogata, 1988), the parameter that scales the magnitude dependence in the productivity of triggered events is the one that is most different from ETAS parameters derived from similar earthquake catalogs. Maximum likelihood estimates of this magnitude effect parameter is essentially zero, within 95% confidence, for both the 0.1 m and 1.0 m tsunami completeness levels. To explain this result, parameter estimates are determined for the Global CMT catalog under three tsunamigenic conditions: (1) M≥7 and focal depth ≤50 km, (2) submarine location, and (3) dominant component of dip slip. Successive subcatalogs are formed from the Global CMT catalog according to each of these conditions. The high magnitude threshold for tsunamigenesis alone (subcatalog 1) does not explain the zero magnitude effect. The zero magnitude effect also does not appear to be caused the smaller number of tsunamigenic events analyzed in comparison to earthquake catalogs with a similar magnitude threshold. ETAS parameter estimates from the subcatalog (3) with all three tsunamigenic conditions

  2. BIMOLECULAR FLUORESCENCE COMPLEMENTATION ANALYSIS OF INDUCIBLE PROTEIN INTERACTIONS: EFFECTS OF FACTORS AFFECTING PROTEIN FOLDING ON FLUORESCENT PROTEIN FRAGMENT ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Robida, Aaron M; Kerppola, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analysis enables visualization of the subcellular locations of protein interactions in living cells. We investigated the temporal resolution and the quantitative accuracy of BiFC analysis using fragments of different fluorescent proteins. We determined the kinetics of BiFC complex formation in response to the rapamycin-inducible interaction between the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB). Fragments of YFP fused to FKBP and FRB produced detectable BiFC complex fluorescence 10 minutes after rapamycin addition and a ten-fold increase in the mean fluorescence intensity in 8 hours. The N-terminal fragment of the Venus fluorescent protein fused to FKBP produced constitutive BiFC complexes with several C-terminal fragments fused to FRB. A chimeric N-terminal fragment containing residues from Venus and YFP produced either constitutive or inducible BiFC complexes depending on the temperature at which the cells were cultured. The concentrations of inducers required for half-maximal induction of BiFC complex formation by all fluorescent protein fragments tested were consistent with the affinities of the inducers for unmodified FKBP and FRB. Treatment of the FK506 inhibitor of FKBP-FRB interaction prevented the formation of BiFC complexes by FKBP and FRB fusions, but did not disrupt existing BiFC complexes. Proteins synthesized prior to rapamycin addition formed BiFC complexes with the same efficiency as newly synthesized proteins. Inhibitors of protein synthesis attenuated BiFC complex formation independent of their effects on fusion protein synthesis. The kinetics at which they inhibited BiFC complex formation suggest that they prevented association of the fluorescent protein fragments, but not the slow maturation of BiFC complex fluorescence. Agents that induce the unfolded protein response also reduced formation of BiFC complexes. The effects of these agents were suppressed by cellular

  3. Molecular origins of internal friction effects on protein-folding rates.

    PubMed

    de Sancho, David; Sirur, Anshul; Best, Robert B

    2014-07-02

    Recent experiments on protein-folding dynamics have revealed strong evidence for internal friction effects. That is, observed relaxation times are not simply proportional to the solvent viscosity as might be expected if the solvent were the only source of friction. However, a molecular interpretation of this remarkable phenomenon is currently lacking. Here, we use all-atom simulations of peptide and protein folding in explicit solvent, to probe the origin of the unusual viscosity dependence. We find that an important contribution to this effect, explaining the viscosity dependence of helix formation and the folding of a helix-containing protein, is the insensitivity of torsion angle isomerization to solvent friction. The influence of this landscape roughness can, in turn, be quantitatively explained by a rate theory including memory friction. This insensitivity of local barrier crossing to solvent friction is expected to contribute to the viscosity dependence of folding rates in larger proteins.

  4. Interactive effects of arsenate, selenium, and dietary protein on survival, growth, and physiology in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Sanderson, C.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Cromartie, E.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1992-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic food chains associated with irrigation drainwater. Total biomass of invertebrates, a maJor source of protein for wild ducklings, may vary in environments that are contaminated with selenium. Dayold mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 22% protein or diets containing 15 ppm Se (as selenomethionine), 60 ppm Se, 200 ppm As (as sodium arsenate), 15 ppm Se with 200 ppm As, or 60 ppm Se with 200 ppm As. In a concurrent experiment, the same sequence was repeated with a proteinrestricted (7%) but isocaloric diet. After 4 weeks, blood and tissue samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. With 22% protein and 60 ppm Se in the diet, duckling survival and growth was reduced and livers had histopathological lesions. Arsenic alone caused some reduction in growth. Antagonistic interactive effects occurred between As and Se, including complete to partial alleviation of the following Se effects: mortality, impaired growth, hepatic lesions and lipid peroxidation, and altered glutathione and thiol status. With 7% protein, survival and growth of controls was less than that with 22% protein, Se (60 ppm) caused 100% mortality, and As (200 ppm) caused mortality, decreased growth, and liver histopathology. These findings suggest the potential for antagonistic effects of Se and As on duckling survival, growth, and physiology with adequate dietary protein but more severe toxicological effects when dietary protein is diminished.

  5. Macromolecular crowding effects on protein-protein binding affinity and specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young C.; Best, Robert B.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2010-11-01

    Macromolecular crowding in cells is recognized to have a significant impact on biological function, yet quantitative models for its effects are relatively undeveloped. The influence of crowding on protein-protein interactions is of particular interest, since these mediate many processes in the cell, including the self-assembly of larger complexes, recognition, and signaling. We use a residue-level coarse-grained model to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on the assembly of protein-protein complexes. Interactions between the proteins are treated using a fully transferable energy function, and interactions of protein residues with the spherical crowders are repulsive. We show that the binding free energy for two protein complexes, ubiquitin/UIM1 and cytochrome c/cytochrome c peroxidase, decreases modestly as the concentration of crowding agents increases. To obtain a quantitative description of the stabilizing effect, we map the aspherical individual proteins and protein complexes onto spheres whose radii are calculated from the crowder-excluded protein volumes. With this correspondence, we find that the change in the binding free energy due to crowding can be quantitatively described by the scaled particle theory model without any fitting parameters. The effects of a mixture of different-size crowders—as would be found in a real cell—are predicted by the same model with an additivity ansatz. We also obtain the remarkable result that crowding increases the fraction of specific complexes at the expense of nonspecific transient encounter complexes in a crowded environment. This result, due to the greater excluded volume of the nonspecific complexes, demonstrates that macromolecular crowding can have subtle functional effects beyond the relative stability of bound and unbound complexes.

  6. Effects of polyamines on prostatic chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, K; Wilson, M J; Goueli, S A; Williams-Ashman, H G

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented on the influence of polyamines on prostatic chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions involving both exogenous and endogenous substrates. The activities toward the model acidic protein substrate, dephosphophosvitin, were maximal at 160--200mM-NaCl (or -KCl or -NH4Cl). Under these conditions, spermidine and spermine added in concentrations up to 2mM were essentially without effect. However, without addition of NaCl to the medium, marked stimulation of these reactions was elicited by these polyamines at 1--2mM concentrations. The stimulatory effects were not due to non-specific changes in the ionic strength or to substitution of spermine for Mg2+, as maximal stimulation by 1 mM-spermine was observed only at optimal (2--4mM) Mg2+ concentrations. Qualitatively similar effects of polyamines were observed with enzyme preparations from the prostates of castrated rats, and with chromatin and non-histone-protein preparations from other tissues besides ventral prostate. When phosphorylation of endogenous non-histone proteins of the chromatin was measured, spermine stimulated both the initial rates and the final extent of transphosphorylation, even in the presence of optimal concentration of NaCl. By contrast, spermine or spermidine had no effect on the chromatin- and non-histone-protein-associated protein kinase reactions determined with lysine-rich histones as substrates. Chemically NN-dimethylated dephosphophosvitin was a less active substrate for the chromatin-associated protein kinase, but its phosphorylation was more markedly stimulated by spermine in comparison with unmodified dephosphophosvitin. These observations hint that the polyamine stimulations of the various protein kinase reactions may be due to effects on the conformations of the non-histone protein substrates rather than on the kinases themselves. PMID:747650

  7. Effects of Maize Source and Complex Enzymes on Performance and Nutrient Utilization of Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Defu; Hao, Shengyan; Liu, Guohua; Nian, Fang; Ru, Yingjun

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of maize source and complex enzymes containing amylase, xylanase and protease on performance and nutrient utilization of broilers. The experiment was a 4×3 factorial design with diets containing four source maize samples (M1, M2, M3, and M4) and without or with two kinds of complex enzyme A (Axtra XAP) and B (Avizyme 1502). Nine hundred and sixty day old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were used in the trial (12 treatments with 8 replicate pens of 10 chicks). Birds fed M1 diet had better body weight gain (BWG) and lower feed/gain ratio compared with those fed M3 diet and M4 diet (p<0.05). Apparent ileal crude protein digestibility coefficient of M2 was higher than that of M3 (p<0.05). Apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen corrected AME (AMEn) of M1 were significant higher than those of M4 (p<0.05). Supplementation of the basal diets with enzyme A or B improved the BWG by 8.6% (p<0.05) and 4.1% (p>0.05), respectively. The fresh feces output was significantly decreased by the addition of enzyme B (p<0.05). Maize source affects the nutrients digestibility and performance of broilers, and a combination of amylase, xylanase and protease is effective in improving the growth profiles of broilers fed maize-soybean-rapeseed-cotton mixed diets. PMID:25358370

  8. Effects of maize source and complex enzymes on performance and nutrient utilization of broilers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Defu; Hao, Shengyan; Liu, Guohua; Nian, Fang; Ru, Yingjun

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of maize source and complex enzymes containing amylase, xylanase and protease on performance and nutrient utilization of broilers. The experiment was a 4×3 factorial design with diets containing four source maize samples (M1, M2, M3, and M4) and without or with two kinds of complex enzyme A (Axtra XAP) and B (Avizyme 1502). Nine hundred and sixty day old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were used in the trial (12 treatments with 8 replicate pens of 10 chicks). Birds fed M1 diet had better body weight gain (BWG) and lower feed/gain ratio compared with those fed M3 diet and M4 diet (p<0.05). Apparent ileal crude protein digestibility coefficient of M2 was higher than that of M3 (p<0.05). Apparent metabolisable energy (AME) and nitrogen corrected AME (AMEn) of M1 were significant higher than those of M4 (p<0.05). Supplementation of the basal diets with enzyme A or B improved the BWG by 8.6% (p<0.05) and 4.1% (p>0.05), respectively. The fresh feces output was significantly decreased by the addition of enzyme B (p<0.05). Maize source affects the nutrients digestibility and performance of broilers, and a combination of amylase, xylanase and protease is effective in improving the growth profiles of broilers fed maize-soybean-rapeseed-cotton mixed diets.

  9. Effect of enzymatic protein deamidation on protein solubility and flavor binding properties of soymilk.

    PubMed

    Suppavorasatit, Inthawoot; Lee, Soo-Yeun; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    The effect of enzymatic deamidation by protein-glutaminase (PG) on protein solubility and flavor binding potential of soymilk was studied. Treatment of soymilk with PG for 2 h (temperature of 44 °C and enzyme:substrate ratio (E/S) of 40 U/g protein) resulted in high degree of protein deamidation (66.4% DD) and relatively low degree of protein hydrolysis (4.25% DH). Deamidated (DSM) and control soymilks (CSM) did not differ with respect to aroma, but differed in taste characteristics by sensory evaluation. Protein solubility in DSM was enhanced at weakly acidic conditions (pH 5.0), but did not differ from non-deamidated soymilk at pH values of 3.0 and 7.0. Odor detection thresholds for the flavor compounds vanillin and maltol were approximately 5 and 3 fold lower, respectively, in DSM than in CSM. Dose-response curves (Fechner's law plots and n exponents from Stevens's power law) further demonstrated that DSM had a lower flavor binding potential than CSM. PG deamidation has the potential to reduce flavor binding problems encountered in high protein-containing foods and beverages. The findings of this study can help lead to the development of technology to produce protein-containing foods with improved functional properties, especially protein solubility, and potentially decreased flavor fade problems associated with flavor-protein interactions, especially with carbonyl containing flavor compounds. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. An analytic method to determine the effect of source modeling errors on the apparent location and direction of biological sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Munck, J. C.; van Dijk, B. W.; Spekreijse, H.

    1988-02-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) can be used to determine the location, the direction, and strength of electrical brain activity. For this purpose mathematical models are used which describe regions in the head with different conductivity. In most models, the sources are described by mathematical (current) point dipoles. However, EPs and EEGs are generated with more extensive cortical areas. In this study an analytic method is described to calculate the effect of source extension on the potential distribution measured at the scalp and also on the difference between the location of the extended source and the location of the equivalent point dipole. General formulas are derived which express in spherical harmonics the potential distribution that results from a circularly symmetric extended source. It is shown that for sources that obey specific symmetries the influence of source extension on the potential distribution is a fourth-order effect in the distance between electrode and the origin (the middle point of the head), and a second-order effect in the extension. It is also shown that for such sources the error in localization (i.e., the distance between the position of the equivalent dipole and the center of the extended source) is zero when Geselowitz's method [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-12, 164 (1965)] is used. Because in volume conductor models the relation between source and potential is given by Poisson's equation, it is suggested by the authors that the results of the present study may be extended to applications in other fields of physics as well.

  11. Replacing Soybean Meal with Alternative Protein Sources in Diets for Pond-raised hybrid catfish, ¿ Ictalurus punctatus × ¿ Ictalurus furcatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present study investigated the replacement of soybean meal with combinations of two or three alternative protein sources in diets for pond-raised hybrid catfish, ' Ictalurus punctatus × ' Ictalurus furcatus. Alternative protein sources evaluated included cottonseed meal, distillers dried grains ...

  12. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1995-01-01

    During the fourth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme. These clearly revealed the influence of higher molecular weight protein impurities on interface shape; (2) characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions. These efforts have, for the first time, resulted in lysozyme free of higher molecular weight components; (3) continuation of the salt repartitioning studies with Seikagaku lysozyme, which has a lower protein impurity content that Sigma stock. These efforts confirmed our earlier findings of higher salt contents in smaller crystals. However, less salt is in corporated into the crystals grown from Seikagaku stock. This strongly suggests a dependence of salt repartitioning on the concentration of protein impurities in lysozyme. To test this hypothesis, repartitioning studies with the high purity lysozyme prepared in-house will be begun shortly; (4) numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics. These simulations have produced interface shapes which are in good agreement with out experimental observations; and (5) light scattering studies on under- and supersaturated lysozyme solutions. A consistent interpretation of the static and dynamic data leaves little doubt that pre-nucleation clusters, claimed to exist even in undersaturated solutions, are not present. The article: 'Growth morphology response to nutrient and impurity nonuniformities' is attached.

  13. Utilization of glycerin byproduct derived from soybean oil biodiesel as a carbon source for heterologous protein production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Anastácio, G S; Santos, K O; Suarez, P A Z; Torres, F A G; De Marco, J L; Parachin, N S

    2014-01-01

    Crude glycerol, also known as glycerin, is the main byproduct of the biodiesel industry. It has been estimated that up to 40,000 tons of glycerin will be produced each year by 2020. This study evaluated the value-added use of crude glycerol derived from soybean biodiesel preparation as a carbon source for heterologous protein production using the yeast Pichia pastoris. Eleven glycerin samples were obtained by methanolysis of soybean oil using different acids or bases as catalysts. Cell growth experiments showed that crude glycerol containing either potassium or sodium hydroxide resulted in 1.5-2 times higher final cell densities when compared to glycerol P.A. Finally, crude glycerol containing sodium hydroxide was successfully utilized for constitutive heterologous α-amylase production in P. pastoris. This study demonstrated that crude glycerol without any purification steps may be directly used as carbon source for protein production in P. pastoris.

  14. Effects of a Ground Source Heat Pump in Discontinuous Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R.; Garber-Slaght, R.; Daanen, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    A ground source heat pump (GSHP) was installed in a discontinuous permafrost region of Fairbanks Alaska in 2013 with the primary aim of determining the effect of different ground cover options on the long-term subterranean temperature regime. Three different surface treatments were applied to separate loops of the GSHP; grass, sand, and gravel, and temperature monitoring was established at several depths above and below the heat sink loops. The GSHP has been actively utilized to supplement the heat in a hydronic heating system of a neighboring 5000 ft2 research facility. The ground immediately surrounding the GSHP was not permafrost when initially installed. Numerical modeling simulations were used to predict the long-term ground temperature regime surrounding the GSHP loops, and results indicate that permafrost would begin to form after the first year. A pseudo-steady state temperature regime would establish in approximately 8 years with a yearly fluctuation of -14°C to -2°C. Simulations also indicate that permafrost could be prevented with a 15 W/m recharge during the summer, such as from a solar thermal system. The ground surface treatments have negligible effect on the ground temperature below 1 meter and therefore have no long-term effect on the active region the GSHP. Data collected from thermistors in the two years since installation indicate that permafrost has not yet been established, although the ground is now becoming seasonally frozen due to the GSHP energy removal. Yearly average temperatures are declining, and extrapolation indicates that permafrost will establish in future years. The GSHP coefficient of performance (COP) was initially 3.6 and is declining with the decreasing ground temperatures. Economic modeling indicates that the system may become uneconomical in future years, although volatile energy costs have a substantial effect of the prediction.

  15. A study on feeding hazelnut kernel oil meal as a protein source for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Erener, Guray; Burak Ak, F; Ocak, Nuh

    2009-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of substituting different levels of hazelnut kernel oil meal (HKM) for soybean meal (SBM) in diets for broiler. A total of 450 one-day-old female Ross 308 broiler chicks were allocated randomly to three treatment groups of 150 birds each in a randomized design. Each treatment group consisted of five replicates each of 30 chicks. All diets (in mash form) were formulated to meet nutrient concentrations recommended for broilers. The experiment lasted for six weeks. In the experiment, an SBM control (SBM) diet was compared to two HKM diets, replacing 50 (50HKM) and 100% (HKM) of SBM protein, respectively. Body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion ratio of broilers were adversely affected (P < 0.05) by the HKM diets at 42 days of age. Broilers fed 50HKM and HKM had growth performances similar (P > 0.05). The carcass yield and abdominal fat pads of birds fed diets with SBM were higher (P < 0.05) than those of chicks fed the 50HKM and HKM diets. The edible inner organ weight of chicks fed diets with HKM was the heaviest (P < 0.05). It is concluded that SBM cannot be replaced even up to 50% with HKM in commercial broiler diet.

  16. Bioavailability of PAHs: effects of soot carbon and PAH source.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Waverly A; Cope, W Gregory; Shea, Damian

    2004-04-01

    The bioavailability of 38 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds was determined through calculation of biota-sediment-accumulation factors (BSAF). BSAF values were calculated from individual PAH concentrations in freshwater mussel, marine clam, and sediment obtained from field and laboratory bioaccumulation studies. Sediment that was amended with different types of soot carbon (SC) was used in some of the bioaccumulation experiments. BSAF values for petrogenic PAH were greater than those for pyrogenic PAH (e.g., 1.57 +/- 0.53 vs 0.25 +/- 0.23, respectively), indicating that petrogenic PAH are more bioavailable than pyrogenic PAH (p < 0.05). This trend was consistent among marine and freshwater sites. Increased SC content of sediment resulted in a linear decrease in the bioavailability of pyrogenic PAHs (r2 = 0.85). The effect of increasing SC content on petrogenic PAH was negligible. SC was considered as an additional sorptive phase when calculating BSAF values, and using PAH-SC partition coefficients from the literature, we obtained unreasonably large BSAF values for all petrogenic PAH and some pyrogenic PAH. This led us to conclude that a quantitative model to assess bioavailability through a combination of organic carbon and soot carbon sorption is not applicable among field sites with a wide range of soot carbon fractions and PAH sources, at least given our current knowledge of PAH-SC partitioning. Our data offer evidence that many factors including analysis of a full suite of PAH analytes, PAH hydrophobicity, sediment organic carbon content, sediment soot carbon content, and PAH source are importantto adequately assess PAH bioavailability in the environment.

  17. Concordance of commercial data sources for neighborhood-effects studies.

    PubMed

    Hoehner, Christine M; Schootman, Mario

    2010-07-01

    Growing evidence supports a relationship between neighborhood-level characteristics and important health outcomes. One source of neighborhood data includes commercial databases integrated with geographic information systems to measure availability of certain types of businesses or destinations that may have either favorable or adverse effects on health outcomes; however, the quality of these data sources is generally unknown. This study assessed the concordance of two commercial databases for ascertaining the presence, locations, and characteristics of businesses. Businesses in the St. Louis, Missouri area were selected based on their four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes and classified into 14 business categories. Business listings in the two commercial databases were matched by standardized business name within specified distances. Concordance and coverage measures were calculated using capture-recapture methods for all businesses and by business type, with further stratification by census-tract-level population density, percent below poverty, and racial composition. For matched listings, distance between listings and agreement in four-digit SIC code, sales volume, and employee size were calculated. Overall, the percent agreement was 32% between the databases. Concordance and coverage estimates were lowest for health-care facilities and leisure/entertainment businesses; highest for popular walking destinations, eating places, and alcohol/tobacco establishments; and varied somewhat by population density. The mean distance (SD) between matched listings was 108.2 (179.0) m with varying levels of agreement in four-digit SIC (percent agreement = 84.6%), employee size (weighted kappa = 0.63), and sales volume (weighted kappa = 0.04). Researchers should cautiously interpret findings when using these commercial databases to yield measures of the neighborhood environment.

  18. Concordance of Commercial Data Sources for Neighborhood-Effects Studies

    PubMed Central

    Schootman, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a relationship between neighborhood-level characteristics and important health outcomes. One source of neighborhood data includes commercial databases integrated with geographic information systems to measure availability of certain types of businesses or destinations that may have either favorable or adverse effects on health outcomes; however, the quality of these data sources is generally unknown. This study assessed the concordance of two commercial databases for ascertaining the presence, locations, and characteristics of businesses. Businesses in the St. Louis, Missouri area were selected based on their four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes and classified into 14 business categories. Business listings in the two commercial databases were matched by standardized business name within specified distances. Concordance and coverage measures were calculated using capture–recapture methods for all businesses and by business type, with further stratification by census-tract-level population density, percent below poverty, and racial composition. For matched listings, distance between listings and agreement in four-digit SIC code, sales volume, and employee size were calculated. Overall, the percent agreement was 32% between the databases. Concordance and coverage estimates were lowest for health-care facilities and leisure/entertainment businesses; highest for popular walking destinations, eating places, and alcohol/tobacco establishments; and varied somewhat by population density. The mean distance (SD) between matched listings was 108.2 (179.0) m with varying levels of agreement in four-digit SIC (percent agreement = 84.6%), employee size (weighted kappa = 0.63), and sales volume (weighted kappa = 0.04). Researchers should cautiously interpret findings when using these commercial databases to yield measures of the neighborhood environment. PMID:20480397

  19. Effects of immunosuppressive treatment on protein expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Kędzierska, Karolina; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Sindrewicz, Krzysztof; Bober, Joanna; Domański, Leszek; Parafiniuk, Mirosław; Urasińska, Elżbieta; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Maciej; Smektała, Tomasz; Masiuk, Marek; Skrzypczak, Wiesław; Ożgo, Małgorzata; Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The structural proteins of renal tubular epithelial cells may become a target for the toxic metabolites of immunosuppressants. These metabolites can modify the properties of the proteins, thereby affecting cell function, which is a possible explanation for the mechanism of immunosuppressive agents’ toxicity. In our study, we evaluated the effect of two immunosuppressive strategies on protein expression in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Fragments of the rat kidneys were homogenized after cooling in liquid nitrogen and then dissolved in lysis buffer. The protein concentration in the samples was determined using a protein assay kit, and the proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The obtained gels were then stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue, and their images were analyzed to evaluate differences in protein expression. Identification of selected proteins was then performed using mass spectrometry. We found that the immunosuppressive drugs used in popular regimens induce a series of changes in protein expression in target organs. The expression of proteins involved in drug, glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was pronounced. However, to a lesser extent, we also observed changes in nuclear, structural, and transport proteins’ synthesis. Very slight differences were observed between the group receiving cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (CMG) and the control group. In contrast, compared to the control group, animals receiving tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and glucocorticoids (TMG) exhibited higher expression of proteins responsible for renal drug metabolism and lower expression levels of cytoplasmic actin and the major urinary protein. In the TMG group, we observed higher expression of proteins responsible for drug metabolism and a decrease in the expression of respiratory chain enzymes (thioredoxin-2) and markers of distal renal tubular damage (heart fatty acid-binding protein) compared to expression in the CMG

  20. Source and Path Effects on Regional Phases in China

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.S., Randall, G.E., Hartse, H.E., Taylor, S.R., Patton, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    As part of the CTBT Research and Development regional characterization effort, we are assembling, organizing and analyzing geological, geophysical,and seismic data for inclusion in a knowledge base for China. We have collected seismic data from 11 Chinese Digital Seismic Network (CDSN) stations as well as IRIS stations AAK, TLY, ULN and NIL from adjoining regions. Using the published event locations and origin times, we identify Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg phases,construct travel time curves, and estimate apparent velocities from broadband and short period seismograms. Following this, we collect amplitudes of regional seismic phases and associated noise levels using bandpassed waveforms. Studies of path specific propagation of the seismic phases have mapped blockages and have generated corrections useful in reducing scatter in magnitude estimates and in discriminant ratios. Such path corrections reduce RMS distance and mb- corrected Lg amplitude to as much as 60% of its original level (log{sub 10} domain). Path corrections are less effective with Pn data. We also study source scaling effects on these data which will allow us to refine path corrections further.

  1. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  2. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  3. Different carbon sources affect lifespan and protein redox state during Saccharomyces cerevisiae chronological ageing.

    PubMed

    Magherini, F; Carpentieri, A; Amoresano, A; Gamberi, T; De Filippo, C; Rizzetto, L; Biagini, M; Pucci, P; Modesti, A

    2009-03-01

    In this study, a proteomic approach that combines selective labelling of proteins containing reduced cysteine residues with two-dimensional electrophoresis/mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the redox state of protein cysteines during chronological ageing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The procedure was developed on the grounds that biotin-conjugated iodoacetamide (BIAM) specifically reacts with reduced cysteine residues. BIAM-labelled proteins can then be selectively isolated by streptavidin affinity capture. We compared cells grown on 2% glucose in the exponential phase and during chronological ageing and we found that many proteins undergo cysteine oxidation. The target proteins include enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. Both caloric restriction and growth on glycerol resulted in a decrease in the oxidative modification. Furthermore, in these conditions a reduced production of ROS and a more negative glutathione half cell redox potential were observed.

  4. Evaluation of meat meal, chicken meal, and corn gluten meal as dietary sources of protein in dry cat food

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The nutritional value of meat meal (MM), chicken meal (CM), and corn gluten meal (CGM) as dietary sources of protein in dry food formulated for adult cats was evaluated. Twelve healthy adult cats (11 males and 1 female) were used. Dry diets containing MM, CM, or CGM as the main protein source were given for a 3-week period in a 3 × 3 Latin-square design. Digestion and balance experiments were conducted during the last 7 d of each period. In addition, freshly voided urine was taken to determine urinary pH and number of struvite crystals. As compared with the CM diet, dry-matter digestibility was higher and lower for the MM and CGM groups, respectively. Percentages of nitrogen (N) absorption and N retention to N intake were higher in the MM group, and N utilization was not different between the CM group and the CGM group. All cats excreted alkaline urine (pH > 7). Urinary pH, struvite activity product, and number of struvite crystals in urine were lower for the CGM group. There was no difference in retention of calcium and magnesium among the groups. From the point of view of digestibility and N utilization, MM is superior to CGM, and CM is better than or equivalent to CGM as a protein source of dry foods for adult cats. However, when CM is used as a dietary protein source, some manipulation of dietary base excess may be needed to control urinary acid-base balance, because CM contains higher calcium and phosphorus. PMID:16479729

  5. Effect of temperature stress on protein methyl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, W.; Kracaw, K.

    1986-05-01

    Protein methyl esters have been implicated in a number of physiological processes. They have measured the effect of temperature stress on the levels of protein methyl esters in the mesophilic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum (PCPS) and the thermophilic fungus P. duponti (PD). PD and PCPS were incubated with (methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine. The mycelia were collected by filtration, frozen in liquid nitrogen and ground to a fine powder. The nitrogen powder was extracted with either phosphate buffer or with SDS, glycerol, phosphate, 2-mercaptoethanol. Insoluble material was removed by centrifugation. The supernatants were assayed for protein methyl esters. The released (/sup 3/H)methanol was extracted into toluene:isoamyl alcohol (3:2) and quantitated by liquid scintillation. The production of volatile methanol was confirmed by use of Conway diffusion cells. Soluble proteins accounted for about one-fourth of the total protein methyl ester extracted by SDS. In PCPS, the SDS extracted proteins have about three times the level of esterification of the soluble proteins whereas in PD there is little difference between soluble and SDS extracted protein. The level of protein esterification in PD is about one-tenth that observed in PCPS. Temperature stress caused large changes in the level of protein esterification. The data suggest protein methyl esters may contribute to the adaptation to environmental stress.

  6. Effect of protein restriction during brooding on spontaneous turkey cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Breeding, S W; McRee, W A; Ficken, M D; Ferket, P R

    1994-01-01

    The effect of early protein restriction on poult performance and mortality due to spontaneous turkey cardiomyopathy were examined in a facility that historically had a high incidence of the condition. Two thousand male turkey poults were divided into two equal subgroups for the first 4 weeks of life: one received standard commercial rations for the first 4 weeks (high-protein subgroup), and the other received rations with a protein content approximately 70% of the first subgroup (low-protein subgroup). Rations were the same after 4 weeks of age (standard commercial rations). At 16 weeks of age, turkeys in the low-protein subgroup weighed an average of 12.32 kilograms (27.1 pounds), whereas turkeys in the high-protein subgroup weighed an average of 12.73 kilograms (28.0 pounds). Total mortality for the low-protein subgroup was 10.1%, whereas total mortality for the high-protein subgroup was 15.7%. Total mortality due to spontaneous turkey cardiomyopathy in the high-protein subgroup was greater than twice that in the low-protein subgroup (10.4% versus 4.6%). These results show that lowering the protein content of the feed in the first 4 weeks significantly reduces mortality due to spontaneous turkey cardiomyopathy, but body weight gain is also reduced.

  7. Effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Feoli, Ana M; Siqueira, Ionara R; Almeida, Lúcia; Tramontina, Ana C; Vanzella, Cláudia; Sbaraini, Sabrina; Schweigert, Ingrid D; Netto, Carlos A; Perry, Marcos L S; Gonçalves, Carlos A

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protein malnutrition on oxidative status in rat brain areas. We investigated various parameters of oxidative status, free radical content (dichlorofluorescein formation), indexes of damage to lipid (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay), and protein damage (tryptophan and tyrosine content) in addition to total antioxidant reactivity levels and antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in different cerebral regions (cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum) from rats subjected to prenatal and postnatal protein malnutrition (control 25% casein and protein malnutrition 7% casein). Protein malnutrition altered various parameters of oxidative stress, especially damage to macromolecules. Free radical content was unchanged by protein malnutrition. There was an increase in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, the index of lipid peroxidation, in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex (P < 0.05) from protein-malnourished rats. Moreover, significant decreases in tryptophan and tyrosine in all tested brain structures (P < 0.05) were observed. Catalase activity was significantly decreased in the cerebellum (P < 0.05). In addition, a significant decrease in total antioxidant reactivity levels (P < 0.05) was observed in the cerebral cortex from protein-malnourished rats. The present data indicated that protein malnutrition increased oxidative damage to lipids and proteins from the studied brain areas. These results may be an indication of an important mechanism for changes in brain development that are caused by protein malnutrition.

  8. Cholesterol-lowering effect of rice bran protein containing bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jilite; Shimada, Masaya; Kato, Yukina; Kusada, Mio; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary plant protein is well known to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Rice bran is a by-product of rice milling and is a good source of protein. The present study examined whether feeding rats a high-cholesterol diet containing 10% rice bran protein (RBP) for 10 d affected cholesterol metabolism. Rats fed dietary RBP had lower serum total cholesterol levels and increased excretion of fecal steroids, such as cholesterol and bile acids, than those fed dietary casein. In vitro assays showed that RBP strongly bound to taurocholate, and inhibited the micellar solubility of cholesterol, compared with casein. Moreover, the bile acid-binding proteins of the RBP were eluted by a chromatographic column conjugated with cholic acid, and one of them was identified as hypothetical protein OsJ_13801 (NCBI accession No. EAZ29742) using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action of the RBP may be caused by the bile acid-binding proteins.

  9. Dietary phosphorus restriction in dialysis patients: potential impact of processed meat, poultry, and fish products as protein sources.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Richard A; Mehta, Ojas

    2009-07-01

    Dietary intake of phosphorus is derived largely from protein sources and is a critical determinant of phosphorus balance in patients with chronic kidney disease. Information about the phosphorus content of prepared foods generally is unavailable, but it is believed to contribute significantly to the phosphorus burden of patients with chronic kidney disease. Analysis of dietary components. We measured the phosphorus content of 44 food products, including 30 refrigerated or frozen precooked meat, poultry, and fish items, generally national brands. Measured and reported phosphorus content of foods. Phosphorus by using Association of Analytical Communities official method 984.27; protein by using Association of Analytical Communities official method 990.03. We found that the ratio of phosphorus to protein content in these items ranged from 6.1 to 21.5 mg of phosphorus per 1 g of protein. The mean ratio in the 19 food products with a label listing phosphorus as an additive was 14.6 mg/g compared with 9.0 mg/g in the 11 items without listed phosphorus. The phosphorus content of only 1 precooked food product was available in a widely used dietary database. Results cannot be extrapolated to other products. Manufacturers also may alter the phosphorus content of foods at any time. Protein content was not directly measured for all foods. Better reporting of phosphorus content of foods by manufacturers could result in improved dietary phosphorus control without risk of protein malnutrition.

  10. The effect of molluscan glue proteins on gel mechanics.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, J M; Pease, L B; Pierce, C M; Startz, T P; Zhang, Y; Smith, A M

    2004-03-01

    Several molluscs have been shown to alternate between a non-adhesive trail mucus and a similar gel that forms a strong glue. The major structural difference between the two secretions is the presence of specific proteins in the adhesive mucus. The present study identifies similar proteins from the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus and the land snail Helix aspersa. To investigate the role played by these proteins in adhesion, the proteins were isolated from the adhesive mucus of different molluscs and added to commercial polymer solutions. The effect was observed qualitatively, and quantified using a dynamic rheometer. The isolated proteins triggered gelling or visible stiffening of agar, pectin and polygalacturonic acid. The effect was stronger on more negatively charged polymers. The effect of the proteins was concentration dependent with an optimal concentration of 1-1.5 mg ml(-1), and was weakened when their structure changed. Other proteins and carbohydrates found in the adhesive mucus had no clear mechanical effect on gels. These findings show that the addition of these proteins to large, anionic polymers plays a central role in the formation of a glue from a mucus-like secretion. Such a mechanism may be common among invertebrates, and it may guide biomimetic approaches in the development of glues and gels.

  11. The effect of multiple heat sources on exomoon habitable zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Vera; Heller, René; Turner, Edwin L.

    2017-05-01

    With dozens of Jovian and super-Jovian exoplanets known to orbit their host stars in or near the stellar habitable zones, it has recently been suggested that moons the size of Mars could offer abundant surface habitats beyond the solar system. Several searches for such exomoons are now underway, and the exquisite astronomical data quality of upcoming space missions and ground-based extremely large telescopes could make the detection and characterization of exomoons possible in the near future. Here we explore the effects of tidal heating on the potential of Mars- to Earth-sized satellites to host liquid surface water, and we compare the tidal heating rates predicted by tidal equilibrium model and a viscoelastic model. In addition to tidal heating, we consider stellar radiation, planetary illumination and thermal heat from the planet. However, the effects of a possible moon atmosphere are neglected. We map the circumplanetary habitable zone for different stellar distances in specific star-planet-satellite configurations, and determine those regions where tidal heating dominates over stellar radiation. We find that the "thermostat effect" of the viscoelastic model is significant not just at large distances from the star, but also in the stellar habitable zone, where stellar radiation is prevalent. We also find that tidal heating of Mars-sized moons with eccentricities between 0.001 and 0.01 is the dominant energy source beyond 3-5 AU from a Sun-like star and beyond 0.4-0.6 AU from an M3 dwarf star. The latter would be easier to detect (if they exist), but their orbital stability might be under jeopardy due to the gravitational perturbations from the star.

  12. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term stability of the interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been improved. Growth or dissolution of a crystal on a 100 A scale can now be clearly distinguished from dimensional changes occurring within the optical path of the interferometer. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the local interfacial displacement at several widely-spaced positions on the crystal surface with high local depth resolution, has already yielded novel results. We found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) the mean growth step density is greater at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed to interpret the large body of data in a unified way. The results strongly suggests that (1) the ion to lysozyme ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter on the order of 10 microns. The computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization (see the First Report) has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies. These results show that some elements of a moving boundary problem must be incorporated into the model in order to obtain a more realistic description. Our experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions has been extensively tested. Scattering intensity measurements with a true Rayleigh scatterer produced systematically increased forward scattering, indicating problems with glare. These have been resolved. Preliminary measurements with supersaturated lysozyme solutions revealed that the scatterers grow with time. Work has begun on a computer program

  13. Effects of soy protein and isoflavones on insulin resistance and adiponectin in male monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Janice D; Zhang, Li; Shadoan, Melanie K; Kavanagh, Kylie; Chen, Haiying; Tresnasari, Kristianti; Kaplan, Jay R; Adams, Michael R

    2008-07-01

    Isoflavones may influence insulin action by means of their well-known receptor-mediated estrogenic activity. However, isoflavones also bind to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) that are strongly associated with insulin action. Soy protein with its isoflavones has previously been shown to improve glycemic control in diabetic postmenopausal women and to improve insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized monkeys. The purpose of the current report was to extend our studies of dietary soy protein to male monkeys and determine effects of the soy isoflavones on insulin resistance. Two studies are reported here. Study one involved 91 male monkeys consuming 3 diets differing only by the source of protein (casein-lactalbumin, soy protein with a low isoflavone concentration, or soy protein with a high isoflavone concentration). Intravenous glucose tolerance tests were done, and plasma adiponectin and lipoprotein concentrations were determined after 25 months of study. Samples of visceral fat were obtained at 31 months for assessment of adiponectin and PPARgamma expression. The second study involved 8 monkeys in a Latin-square design that compared the effects of diets with casein/lactalbumin, soy protein with a high isoflavone concentration, or soy protein that was alcohol-washed to deplete the isoflavones. After 8 weeks of treatment, insulin sensitivity and plasma lipoproteins were assessed. At 10 weeks, a biopsy of the skeletal muscle was performed for determination of insulin receptor, PPARalpha, and PPARgamma content. The major findings were that consumption of isoflavone-containing soy protein dose-dependently increased insulin responses to the glucose challenge and decreased plasma adiponectin, whereas isoflavone-depleted soy protein decreased body weight and had no effect on plasma adiponectin concentrations. Muscle PPARalpha and gamma expression was also increased with the isoflavone-depleted soy relative to either casein or soy protein containing the

  14. Effective Source-to-Source Outlining to Support Whole Program Empirical Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C; Quinlan, D J; Vuduc, R; Panas, T

    2009-07-17

    Although automated empirical performance optimization and tuning is well-studied for kernels and domain-specific libraries, a current research grand challenge is how to extend these methodologies and tools to significantly larger sequential and parallel applications. In this context, we present the ROSE source-to-source outliner, which addresses the problem of extracting tunable kernels out of whole programs, thereby helping to convert the challenging whole-program tuning problem into a set of more manageable kernel tuning tasks. Our outliner aims to handle large scale C/C++, Fortran and OpenMP applications. A set of program analysis and transformation techniques are utilized to enhance the portability, scalability, and interoperability of source-to-source outlining. More importantly, the generated kernels preserve performance characteristics of tuning targets and can be easily handled by other tools. Preliminary evaluations have shown that the ROSE outliner serves as a key component within an end-to-end empirical optimization system and enables a wide range of sequential and parallel optimization opportunities.

  15. Effects of phosphatidylethanolamine glycation on lipid-protein interactions and membrane protein thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Levi, Valeria; Villamil Giraldo, Ana M; Castello, Pablo R; Rossi, Juan P F C; González Flecha, F Luis

    2008-11-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of biomolecules has been implicated in the pathophysiology of aging and diabetes. Among the potential targets for glycation are biological membranes, characterized by a complex organization of lipids and proteins interacting and forming domains of different size and stability. In the present study, we analyse the effects of glycation on the interactions between membrane proteins and lipids. The phospholipid affinity for the transmembrane surface of the PMCA (plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase) was determined after incubating the protein or the phospholipids with glucose. Results show that the affinity between PMCA and the surrounding phospholipids decreases significantly after phosphospholipid glycation, but remains unmodified after glycation of the protein. Furthermore, phosphatidylethanolamine glycation decreases by approximately 30% the stability of PMCA against thermal denaturation, suggesting that glycated aminophospholipids induce a structural rearrangement in the protein that makes it more sensitive to thermal unfolding. We also verified that lipid glycation decreases the affinity of lipids for two other membrane proteins, suggesting that this effect might be common to membrane proteins. Extending these results to the in vivo situation, we can hypothesize that, under hyperglycaemic conditions, glycation of membrane lipids may cause a significant change in the structure and stability of membrane proteins, which may affect the normal functioning of membranes and therefore of cells.

  16. N(α)-Acetylation of yeast ribosomal proteins and its effect on protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamita, Masahiro; Kimura, Yayoi; Ino, Yoko; Kamp, Roza M; Polevoda, Bogdan; Sherman, Fred; Hirano, Hisashi

    2011-04-01

    N(α)-Acetyltransferases (NATs) cause the N(α)-acetylation of the majority of eukaryotic proteins during their translation, although the functions of this modification have been largely unexplored. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), four NATs have been identified: NatA, NatB, NatC, and NatD. In this study, the N(α)-acetylation status of ribosomal protein was analyzed using NAT mutants combined with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). A total of 60 ribosomal proteins were identified, of which 17 were N(α)-acetylated by NatA, and two by NatB. The N(α)-acetylation of two of these, S17 and L23, by NatA was not previously observed. Furthermore, we tested the effect of ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation on protein synthesis using the purified ribosomes from each NAT mutant. It was found that the protein synthesis activities of ribosomes from NatA and NatB mutants were decreased by 27% and 23%, respectively, as compared to that of the normal strain. Furthermore, we have shown that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation by NatA influences translational fidelity in the presence of paromomycin. These results suggest that ribosomal protein N(α)-acetylation is necessary to maintain the ribosome's protein synthesis function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Protein profile changes during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 12 proteins were identified as down-regulated. A total of 38 differentially expressed proteins grouped into 5 regulation patterns were determined to relate to the aging and anti-aging process. By using the Gene Ontology system, we found that numerous functional gene products involved in metabolism, stress response, reactive oxygen species and cell cycle regulation were differentially expressed during the oocyte aging process, and most of these proteins are for the first time reported in our study, including 2 novel proteins. In addition, several proteins were found to be modified during oocyte aging. These data contribute new information that may be useful for future research on cellular aging and for improvement of oocyte quality.

  18. Effect of nanosilica and silicon sources on plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, soil nutrients and maize seed germination.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Gopalu; Suriyaprabha, Rangaraj; Manivasakan, Palanisamy; Yuvakkumar, Rathinam; Rajendran, Venkatachalam; Prabu, Periyasamy; Kannan, Narayanasamy

    2013-09-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of nanosilica and different sources of silicon on soil properties, total bacterial population and maize seed germination. Nanosilica was synthesised using rice husk and characterised. Silica powder was amorphous (50 nm) with >99.9% purity. Sodium silicate treated soil inhibited plant growth promoting rhizobacteria in contrast to nanosilica and other bulk sources. Surface property and effect of soil nutrient content of nanosilica treatment were improved. Colony forming unit (CFU) was doubled in the presence of nanosilica from 4 × 105 CFU (control) to 8 × 105 CFU per gram of soil. The silica and protein content of bacterial biomass clearly showed an increase in uptake of silica with an increase in nanosilica concentration. Nanosilica promoted seed germination percentage (100%) in maize than conventional Si sources. These studies show that nanosilica has favourable effect on beneficial bacterial population and nutrient value of soil.

  19. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  20. Three-color femtosecond source for simultaneous excitation of three fluorescent proteins in two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Wu, Juwell; Horton, Nicholas G; Lin, Charles P; Xu, Chris

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-based, three-color femtosecond source for simultaneous imaging of three fluorescent proteins (FPs) using two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM). The three excitation wavelengths at 775 nm, 864 nm and 950 nm, are obtained through second harmonic generation (SHG) of the 1550-nm pump laser and the 1728-nm and 1900-nm solitons generated through soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) in a large-mode-area (LMA) fiber. These energetic pulses are well matched to the two-photon excitation peaks of red, cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (TagRFPs, TagCFPs, and TagYFPs) for efficient excitation. We demonstrate simultaneous 2PM of human melanoma cells expressing a "rainbow" combination of these three fluorescent proteins.

  1. Atmospheric Model Effects on Infrasound Source Inversion from the Source Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, L. A.; Aur, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiments (SPE) consist of a series of underground explosive shots at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) designed to gain an improved understanding of the generation and propagation of physical signals in the near and far field. Characterizing the acoustic and infrasound source mechanism from underground explosions is of great importance in non-proliferation activities. To this end we perform full waveform source inversion of infrasound data collected from SPE shots at distances from 300 m to 1 km and frequencies up to 20 Hz. Our method requires estimating the state of the atmosphere at the time of each shot, computing Green's functions through these atmospheric models, and subsequently inverting these signals in the frequency domain to obtain a source time function. To estimate the state of the atmosphere at the time of the shot, we utilize two different datasets: North American Regional Reanalysis data, a comprehensive but lower resolution dataset, and locally obtained sonde and surface weather observations. We synthesize Green's functions through these atmospheric models using Sandia's moving media acoustic propagation simulation suite. These models include 3-D variations in topography, temperature, pressure, and wind. We will compare and contrast the atmospheric models derived from the two weather datasets and discuss how these differences affect computed source waveforms and contribute to modeling uncertainty. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Protein retention and liver aminotransferase activities in Atlantic salmon fed diets containing different energy sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fynn-Aikins, K.; Hughes, S.G.; Vandenberg, G.W.

    1995-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fingerlings (14.4 g) were fed diets containing either glucose, dextrin, raw corn starch and lipid, or a high protein U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service open-formula diet (ASD2-30) for 12 weeks. Significant differences in weight gain and feed: gain ratio were not observed among salmon fed the diets containing glucose, dextrin or ASD2-30. Diets containing dextrin and glucose supported greater protein retention and reduction in alanine aminotransferase activity than the other diets. Activity of aspartate aminotransferase was not affected by the dietary treatment. Protein retention correlated highly with alanine aminotransferase activity.

  3. Effect of altering local protein fluctuations using artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-03-01

    The fluctuations in Arg111, a significantly fluctuating residue in cathepsin K, were locally regulated by modifying Arg111 to Gly111. The binding properties of 15 dipeptides in the modified protein were analyzed by molecular simulations, and modeled as decision trees using artificial intelligence. The decision tree of the modified protein significantly differed from that of unmodified cathepsin K, and the Arg-to-Gly modification exerted a remarkable effect on the peptide binding properties. By locally regulating the fluctuations of a protein, we may greatly alter the original functions of the protein, enabling novel applications in several fields.

  4. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental setup for the in-situ high resolution optical monitoring of protein crystal growth/dissolution morphologies was substantially improved. By augmenting the observation system with a temperature-controlled enclosure, laser illumination for the interferometric microscope, and software for pixel by pixel light intensity recording, a height resolution of about two unit cells for lysozyme can now be obtained. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied. Quite unexpectedly, it was found that the longer crystals were in contact with their solution, the lower was their ion content. The development of a model for diffusive-convective transport and resulting distribution of the growth rate on facets was completed. Results obtained for a realistic growth cell geometry show interesting differences between 'growth runs' at 1g and 0g. The kinematic viscosity of lysozyme solutions of various supersaturations and salt concentrations was monitored over time. In contrast to the preliminary finding of other authors, no changes in viscosity were found over four days. The experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions was completed, and a computer program for the evaluation of multi-angle light scattering data was acquired.

  5. Evaluating lysine requirements of nursery pigs fed low protein diets with different sources of nonessential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jones, C K; Tokach, M D; Usry, J L; Neill, C R; Patience, J F

    2014-08-01

    The Lys requirement of nursery pigs may be dependent on the source of nonessential AA (NEAA) nitrogen or the source of Lys itself. However, little peer-reviewed data examines these phenomena. The objectives of these experiments were to determine if the Lys requirement of pigs is altered when 1) low protein diets are supplemented with different sources of NEAA nitrogen or 2) Lys is supplied as a crystalline source instead of intact protein such as soybean meal (SBM). Two 14-d experiments were conducted using 450 (Exp. 1) and 540 (Exp. 2) pigs (PIC C22/C29 × 337). There were 10 treatments in each experiment, each aligned as a 2 × 5 factorial. In Exp. 1, there were 2 sources of NEAA (l-Gln + l-Gly or l-Gly + l-Ala + l-Pro + l-His) and 5 levels of Lys (1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6%). In Exp. 2, there were 2 sources of proteins providing additional Lys (l-Lys HCl or SBM) and the same 5 levels of Lys. Following weaning at 18 to 22 d of age, pigs were fed a common starter diet for 5 d postweaning followed by a 14-d treatment period. Pigs were weighed and feed disappearance determined on d 0, 7, and 14 of the experiment. Data were analyzed using the MIXED and NLIN procedures of SAS (SAS Inst., Cary, NC). In Exp. 1, increasing CP and Lys resulted in a quadratic increase (P < 0.05) in ADG and a linear improvement (P < 0.05) in G:F during the 14-d treatment period. Breakpoint regression analyses revealed that optimum ADG was obtained at 1.36% Lys, while optimum G:F was obtained at 1.45% Lys. The source of NEAA did not affect (P > 0.10) growth performance during the treatment period. In Exp. 2, both ADG and G:F increased linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing Lys. Optimal ADG was obtained at 1.47% Lys, but the breakpoint for optimum G:F was above tested levels. Source of Lys did not affect (P > 0.10) ADG, but pigs fed additional Lys from crystalline sources had improved (P < 0.05) G:F than those fed additional Lys from intact protein at 1.50% Lys; however, the analyzed Lys

  6. Dietary protein level and source differentially affect bone metabolism, strength, and intestinal calcium transporter expression during ad libitum and food-restricted conditions in male rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High protein diets may attenuate bone loss during energy restriction (ER). The objective of the current study was to determine whether high protein diets suppress bone turnover and improve bone quality in rats during ER and whether dietary protein source affects this relationship. Eighty 12-week o...

  7. Effect of Protein Supercharging on Interaction with Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Bradley; Obermeyer, Allie; Mills, Carolyn; Dong, Xuehui

    Complexation of proteins with polyelectrolytes can lead to a liquid-liquid phase separation to generate a viscous complex coacervate phase rich in protein and polyelectrolyte. However, many proteins do not readily coacervate at conditions near neutral pH and physiological ionic strength. Here, protein supercharging is used to systematically explore the effect of protein charge on the complex coacervation with polycations. Four model proteins were chemically modified to generate a panel of proteins with varying surface charge, with both the average charge and charge distribution quantified by mass spectrometry. Proteins phase separated with the qP4VP and qPDMAEMA polycations when the ratio of negatively charged residues to positively charged residues was greater than 1.1-1.2. Efficient partitioning of the protein into the coacervate phase required larger charge ratio (1.5-2.0). The model proteins were also encapsulated in complex coacervate core micelles. Dynamic light scattering was used to assess the formation of micelles with POEGMA- b-qP4VP and revealed micellar hydrodynamic radii of approximately 25-30 nm. Small angle neutron scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the formation of spherical micelles.

  8. Estimated effects of silicone glue on protein crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Mihoko; Shimizu, Noriko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Mori, Yusuke

    2010-09-01

    Silicone glue (modified silicone polymer) is widely used for both experiments involving inorganic crystal growth and those involving organic materials like proteins. This material is very useful for building a hand-made experiment setup or for fixing protein crystals to specific locations. Though silicone glue is regarded as harmful to proteins, no systematic verification was performed to investigate its impurity effects on protein crystal growth. We focused on and estimated the impurity effects of silicone glue on protein crystal growth. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was used as a model protein. Surface morphology and step velocity of tetragonal lysozyme crystals in the presence and absence of silicone glue were investigated by laser confocal interference contrast microscopy (LCM-DIM). The surface morphology of a tetragonal lysozyme crystal in the presence of silicone glue corresponded to that grown in a lysozyme solution without silicone glue. The dependency of step velocities on supersaturation in the presence of silicone glue also exhibited the same tendency as that of a glue-free system. These two phenomena indicate that the silicone glue did not act as an impurity on lysozyme crystals. Therefore, we conclude that silicone glue is an effective material for various unique experiments involving protein crystals or for applying new methods to create large, high-quality protein crystals.

  9. Mutual effects of disorder and order in fusion proteins between intrinsically disordered domains and fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marina; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are being paid an increasing amount of interest due to the understanding of the crucial role that flexible regions play in molecular recognition and in signaling. Accordingly, reports focusing on the structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins or regions are growing exponentially. Relatively few studies have however been reported on the mutual effects of ordered and disordered moieties in artificial fusion proteins. In this review, we focus on the few available experimental data based on the use of chimeras in which fluorescent proteins were fused to disordered domains of different lengths, compactness and propensity to form secondary structures. The impact of the artificial fusion on the conformational and functional properties of the resulting proteins is discussed.

  10. Lensless Ghost Diffraction with Partially Coherent Sources: Effects of the Source Size, Transverse Coherence, Detector Size and Defocusing Length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2011-09-01

    Lensless ghost diffraction with partially coherent sources is investigated theoretically and numerically. Based on the classical optical coherent theory and the Gauss-Shell model of the partially coherent sources, we derive an analytical imaging formula of lensless ghost diffraction (LGD). Using this formula, we can see the effects of the transverse size and coherence of the sources, the detector size and defocusing length on the quality of LGD. Numerical results are presented to show that for different detector sizes and defocusing lengths, high quality LGD can be realized by using sources with appropriate transverse sizes and coherent widths. These findings can be used to choose the optimal parameters in the design of a realistic LGD system.

  11. Effect of carbon source on compost nitrogen and carbon losses.

    PubMed

    Barrington, Suzelle; Choinière, Denis; Trigui, Maher; Knight, William

    2002-07-01

    The effect of C source on N losses by volatilization during composting was measured using four bulking agents, each at three humidity levels and composted in duplicate under passive and active aeration. The bulking agents were pine shavings alone and corrected with soybean, chopped grass hay alone and corrected with urea, long (unchopped) wheat straw and chopped oat straw. The readily available C of each bulking agent was determined by analyzing for BOD5. In 105 l laboratory vessels, the bulking agents were mixed with liquid swine manure and tap water for a C/N of 20 and three humidity levels of 60%, 65% and 70%. While being aerated actively or passively, the mixtures were composted for 21 days. Their initial and final C and N contents were measured to conduct a mass balance analysis and calculate C and N losses. C and N losses were compared to bulking agent BOD5. N losses were compared to C losses. The humidity level and aeration regime had no effect on C and N losses but the N losses were correlated to C losses and only the C losses could be correlated to the BOD5 of the bulking agent. Thus, the N losses are related not only to the availability of C but also to the extent of composting. A relationship established between N and C losses indicated that 85% of the initial total N of the compost was available for microbial degradation and that 70% of the available C was lost as CO2 during the immobilization process.

  12. Effects of confinement and crowding on folding of model proteins.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, M; Cieplak, Marek

    2008-12-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations for a simple coarse-grained model of crambin placed inside of a softly repulsive sphere of radius R. The confinement makes folding at the optimal temperature slower and affects the folding scenarios, but both effects are not dramatic. The influence of crowding on folding are studied by placing several identical proteins within the sphere, denaturing them, and then by monitoring refolding. If the interactions between the proteins are dominated by the excluded volume effects, the net folding times are essentially like for a single protein. An introduction of inter-proteinic attractive contacts hinders folding when the strength of the attraction exceeds about a half of the value of the strength of the single protein contacts. The bigger the strength of the attraction, the more likely is the occurrence of aggregation and misfolding.

  13. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  14. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-08-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  15. Nonsense Mediated Decay Resistant Mutations Are a Source of Expressed Mutant Proteins in Colon Cancer Cell Lines with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David S.; Bird, Matthew J.; Jorissen, Robert N.; Yu, Yen Lin; Walker, Franscesa; Zhang, Hui Hua; Nice, Edouard C.; Burgess, Antony W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Frameshift mutations in microsatellite instability high (MSI-High) colorectal cancers are a potential source of targetable neo-antigens. Many nonsense transcripts are subject to rapid degradation due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), but nonsense transcripts with a cMS in the last exon or near the last exon-exon junction have intrinsic resistance to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). NMD-resistant transcripts are therefore a likely source of expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High tumours. Methods Using antibodies to the conserved N-termini of predicted mutant proteins, we analysed MSI-High colorectal cancer cell lines for examples of naturally expressed mutant proteins arising from frameshift mutations in coding microsatellites (cMS) by immunoprecipitation and Western Blot experiments. Detected mutant protein bands from NMD-resistant transcripts were further validated by gene-specific short-interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown. A genome-wide search was performed to identify cMS-containing genes likely to generate NMD-resistant transcripts that could encode for antigenic expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancers. These genes were screened for cMS mutations in the MSI-High colon cancer cell lines. Results Mutant protein bands of expected molecular weight were detected in mutated MSI-High cell lines for NMD-resistant transcripts (CREBBP, EP300, TTK), but not NMD-sensitive transcripts (BAX, CASP5, MSH3). Expression of the mutant CREBBP and EP300 proteins was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Five cMS-bearing genes identified from the genome-wide search and without existing mutation data (SFRS12IP1, MED8, ASXL1, FBXL3 and RGS12) were found to be mutated in at least 5 of 11 (45%) of the MSI-High cell lines tested. Conclusion NMD-resistant transcripts can give rise to expressed mutant proteins in MSI-High colon cancer cells. If commonly expressed in primary MSI-High colon cancers, MSI-derived mutant proteins could be useful as cancer specific immunological

  16. Parental source effect of inherited mutations in the dystrophin gene of mice and men

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, W.; Grimm, T.; Mueller, C.R.; Bittner, R.

    1994-09-01

    Skewed X-inactivation has been suspected the genetic cause for some manifesting female carriers of BMD and DMD. To test whether a parental source effect on the protein expression of the dystrophin gene exists, we have set up backcrosses of mdx mice to wild type strains, enabling us to study the effect of the well-defined origin of the mutation on the dystrophin expression. In skeletal muscle sections the immunohistological staining patterns of dystrophin antibodies were showing a significant difference in the proportion of dystrophin positive versus negative fibers, suggesting a lower expression of paternally inherited mdx mutations. These data are in concordance with the pyruvate kinase (PK) levels in the serum: PK levels were much higher when the mutation was of maternal origin as compared to PK levels in paternally derived mutations. In order to test this {open_quotes}paternal source effect{close_quotes} in humans, we checked obligatory carriers of Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) for the origin of their mutations. Creatin kinase (CK) levels in 21 carriers with maternally derived mutations were compared to CK values from 8 heterozygotes with mutations of paternal origin: CK (mat) = 140.3 IU/1 versus CK (pat) = 48.6 IU/I. The difference is statistically significant at the 5% level. These observations suggest either a differential X-inactivation or an imprinting of the dystrophin gene in mice and men.

  17. Effects of gravity on contractile proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henney, H. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A method was established for the isolation and purification of nuclei in high yield from the microplasmodia of Physarum flavicomum. Purified nuclei were resistant to breakage by methods commonly employed for isolated plant and animal nuclei. Several methods for the extraction of nuclear protein were compared. Incubation of nuclear lysates with either 2 M NaCl, with or without 5 M urea, or 1 M CaCl2 resulted in the extraction of nuclear action together with histones. The histones were chemically fractionated into the 5 basic groups common to other eucaryotic tissue. Amino acid analyses of the total histone were also performed. Nuclear actin was found to have a molecular weight of 41,000 ? 4,000 daltons as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid composition of the nuclear action was established.

  18. EFFECTS OF PLANT PROTEIN DIETS ON THE HEALTH OF FARMED AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS).

    PubMed

    DiGeronimo, Peter M; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Crossland, Nicholas A; Del Piero, Fabio; Reigh, Robert C; Nevarez, Javier G

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this prospective, blinded study was to compare plasma biochemical values and gross and histologic evaluation of kidney and liver from American alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis ) fed extruded diets with protein derived from animal or plant sources. Alligators in two treatment groups were fed an extruded diet with protein derived primarily from plant products for 7 (n = 20) or 10 (n = 20) mo prior to harvest. A control group (n = 20) was fed a commercial diet with protein derived from animal products for the duration of the study. Plasma biochemistry panels were obtained and gross and histologic examination of kidney and liver tissues was conducted for each animal. No differences were found between alligators fed diets with animal or plant protein in terms of either biochemistry profiles or gross or histologic examination of kidney and liver. Plant-based diets, fed for up to 10 mo, do not appear to have any ill effects on the kidney or liver of American alligators.

  19. [Preparation and penetrating effect of the polyarginine-enhanced green fluorescence protein fusion protein].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Bai, Yin; Zhao, Jingzhuang; Ye, Xianlong; Wang, Wenfei; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan; Jing, Yan

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study is to establish a platform to deliver therapeutic proteins into target cells through a polyarginine-based cell penetrating peptide. To facilitate the expression of therapeutic proteins, a pSUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier)-R9-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. After induction, the fusion protein SUMO-R9-EGFP was efficiently expressed. To validate the cell penetrating ability of the fusion protein, HepG2 cells were incubated with the purified R9-EGFP or EGFP protein as control, internalization of the fluorescent proteins was examined by either flow cytometry or confocal microscopy. The result obtained by flow cytometry showed that the R9-EGFP fusion protein could efficiently penetrate into the HepG2 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. In contrast, the fluorescence was barely detected in the HepG2 cells incubated with EGFP control. The fluorescence intensity of the R9-EGFP treated cells reached plateau phase after 1.5 h. The result obtained by confocal microscopy shows that R9-EGFP efficiently entered into the HepG2 cells and was exclusively located in the cytoplasm, whereas, no fluorescence was detected in the cells incubated with the EGFP control. The heparin inhibition experiment showed that heparin could inhibit penetrating effect of the R9-EGFP protein by about 50%, suggesting that the penetrating ability of the fusion protein is heparin-dependent. In summary, the study has established a platform to deliver therapeutic proteins into target cells through a polyarginine-based penetrating peptide.

  20. Modeling Grain Nitrogen Accumulation and Protein Composition to Understand the Sink/Source Regulations of Nitrogen Remobilization for Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Martre, Pierre; Porter, John R.; Jamieson, Peter D.; Triboï, Eugène

    2003-01-01

    A functional explanation for the regulation of grain nitrogen (N) accumulation in cereal by environmental and genetic factors remains elusive. Here, new mechanistic hypotheses of grain N accumulation are p