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Sample records for protein subunit interfaces

  1. Identification of proteins at the subunit interface of the Escherichia coli ribosome by cross-linking with dimethyl 3,3'-dithiobis(propionimidate).

    PubMed

    Cover, J A; Lambert, J M; Norman, C M; Traut, R R

    1981-05-12

    The 70S ribosomes of Escherichia coli were treated with dimethyl 3,3'-dithiobis(propionimidate). Under conditions where 40% of the lysine epsilon-amino groups became modified, about 50% of the ribosomes became resistant to dissociation into 30S and 50S subunits when analyzed in the absence of reducing agents on sucrose gradients containing low magnesium concentrations. Dissociation took place in the presence of reducing agents, indicating that the bifunctional reagent had reacted with proteins from both subunits. Proteins were extracted from purified cross-linked 70S ribosomes by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes and non-cross-linked proteins were first fractionated by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gel were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Monomeric proteins derived from cross-linked dimers appeared below the diagonal of non-cross-linked proteins since the second electrophoresis but not the first is run under reducing conditions to cleave the cross-linked species. Final identification of the constituent proteins in each dimer was made by radioiodination of the cross-linked proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis in the presence of nonradioactive marker 70S protein. The identification of 11 cross-linked protein dimers which contained one protein from each of the two ribosomal subunits is described. We conclude that the proteins in these cross-linked pairs are located in the regions of contact between the two subunits, i.e., at the "subunit interface". PMID:7018568

  2. Direct evidence for the localization of the steroid-binding site of the plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) at the interface between the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sui, L. M.; Hughes, W.; Hoppe, A. J.; Pétra, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Complete dissociation of dimeric plasma sex steroid-binding protein (SBP or SHBG) was obtained in 6 M urea at 10 degrees C. Removal of urea resulted in the refolding of monomers, followed by reformation of dimeric SBP, which migrates with the same mobility as the native protein. Dimerization does not require Ca+2 or steroid. Renatured monomers yield dimers with dissociation constants for 5 alpha-dihydrotesterone (DHT) and 17 beta-estradiol (E2) indistinguishable from those of native human SBP. This phenomenon was also demonstrated by mixing human and rabbit SBPs that, upon renaturation, form a hybrid dimer composed of one human subunit and one rabbit subunit. The hybrid binds both DHT and E2 in contrast to rSBP, which only binds the androgen. Therefore, we conclude that (1) docking of the two subunits creates an asymmetric steroid-binding site located at the interface between the subunits, and (2) only one face of the dimer defines the specificity for binding E2 by encompassing portion of a structural motif that recognizes the flat ring A of E2. The remaining portion, which recognizes the saturated ring A of DHT, is shared by both faces of the dimer. Because native monomers do not exist alone, the often-asked question of whether the SBP monomer binds steroid can be considered meaningless; steroid-binding activity is expressed only in the dimeric state. Finally, formation of the hybrid indicates that SBP dimerization represents a conserved event during the molecular evolution of SBP, suggesting that the structural elements responsible for dimerization will be homologous in SBPs from other species. PMID:8976560

  3. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  4. Structural modeling of the catalytic subunit-regulatory subunit dimeric complex of the camp-dependent protein kinase.

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, C-S; Gallagher, S. C.; Walsh, D. A.; Trewhella, J.

    2001-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a multifunctional kinase that serves as a prototype for understanding second messenger signaling and protein phosphorylation. In the absence of a cAMP signal, PKA exists as a dimer of dimers, consisting of two regulatory (R) and two catalystic (C) subunits. Based on experimentally derived data (i.e., crystal structures of the R and C subunits, mutagenesis data identifying points of subunit-subunit contacts), the neutron scattering derived model for the heterodimer (Zhao et al., 1998) and using a set of computational approaches (homology modeling, Monte Carlo simulation), they have developed a high-resolution model of the RII{alpha}-C{alpha} dimer. The nature of the subunit-subunit interface was studied. The model reveals an averaged size dimer interface (2100 Angstrom{sup 2}) that is distant from the pseudo-substrate binding site on the C subunit. The additional contacts made by the pseudosubstrate increases the stability of the dimeric complex. Based on a set of R-C dimer structures derived using a simulated annealing approach, specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the two subunits and were identified.

  5. Cooperative protein structural dynamics of homodimeric hemoglobin linked to water cluster at subunit interface revealed by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Goo; Muniyappan, Srinivasan; Oang, Key Young; Kim, Tae Wu; Yang, Cheolhee; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2016-01-01

    Homodimeric hemoglobin (HbI) consisting of two subunits is a good model system for investigating the allosteric structural transition as it exhibits cooperativity in ligand binding. In this work, as an effort to extend our previous study on wild-type and F97Y mutant HbI, we investigate structural dynamics of a mutant HbI in solution to examine the role of well-organized interfacial water cluster, which has been known to mediate intersubunit communication in HbI. In the T72V mutant of HbI, the interfacial water cluster in the T state is perturbed due to the lack of Thr72, resulting in two less interfacial water molecules than in wild-type HbI. By performing picosecond time-resolved X-ray solution scattering experiment and kinetic analysis on the T72V mutant, we identify three structurally distinct intermediates (I1, I2, and I3) and show that the kinetics of the T72V mutant are well described by the same kinetic model used for wild-type and F97Y HbI, which involves biphasic kinetics, geminate recombination, and bimolecular CO recombination. The optimized kinetic model shows that the R-T transition and bimolecular CO recombination are faster in the T72V mutant than in the wild type. From structural analysis using species-associated difference scattering curves for the intermediates, we find that the T-like deoxy I3 intermediate in solution has a different structure from deoxy HbI in crystal. In addition, we extract detailed structural parameters of the intermediates such as E-F distance, intersubunit rotation angle, and heme-heme distance. By comparing the structures of protein intermediates in wild-type HbI and the T72V mutant, we reveal how the perturbation in the interfacial water cluster affects the kinetics and structures of reaction intermediates of HbI. PMID:27158635

  6. Identification of New Mutations at the PCNA Subunit Interface that Block Translesion Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kondratick, Christine M; Boehm, Elizabeth M; Dieckman, Lynne M; Powers, Kyle T; Sanchez, Julio C; Mueting, Samuel R; Washington, M Todd

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an essential role in DNA replication and repair by interacting with a large number of proteins involved in these processes. Two amino acid substitutions in PCNA, both located at the subunit interface, have previously been shown to block translesion synthesis (TLS), a pathway for bypassing DNA damage during replication. To better understand the role of the subunit interface in TLS, we used random mutagenesis to generate a set of 33 PCNA mutants with substitutions at the subunit interface. We assayed the full set of mutants for viability and sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We then selected a subset of 17 mutants and measured their rates of cell growth, spontaneous mutagenesis, and UV-induced mutagenesis. All except three of these 17 mutants were partially or completely defective in induced mutagenesis, which indicates a partial or complete loss of TLS. These results demonstrate that the integrity of the subunit interface of PCNA is essential for efficient TLS and that even conservative substitutions have the potential to disrupt this process. PMID:27258147

  7. Identification of New Mutations at the PCNA Subunit Interface that Block Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kondratick, Christine M.; Boehm, Elizabeth M.; Dieckman, Lynne M.; Powers, Kyle T.; Sanchez, Julio C.; Mueting, Samuel R.; Washington, M. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an essential role in DNA replication and repair by interacting with a large number of proteins involved in these processes. Two amino acid substitutions in PCNA, both located at the subunit interface, have previously been shown to block translesion synthesis (TLS), a pathway for bypassing DNA damage during replication. To better understand the role of the subunit interface in TLS, we used random mutagenesis to generate a set of 33 PCNA mutants with substitutions at the subunit interface. We assayed the full set of mutants for viability and sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. We then selected a subset of 17 mutants and measured their rates of cell growth, spontaneous mutagenesis, and UV-induced mutagenesis. All except three of these 17 mutants were partially or completely defective in induced mutagenesis, which indicates a partial or complete loss of TLS. These results demonstrate that the integrity of the subunit interface of PCNA is essential for efficient TLS and that even conservative substitutions have the potential to disrupt this process. PMID:27258147

  8. Operon structure and cotranslational subunit association direct protein assembly in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yu-Wei; Minguez, Pablo; Bork, Peer; Auburger, Josef J; Guilbride, D Lys; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Assembly of protein complexes is considered a posttranslational process involving random collision of subunits. We show that within the Escherichia coli cytosol, bacterial luciferase subunits LuxA and LuxB assemble into complexes close to the site of subunit synthesis. Assembly efficiency decreases markedly if subunits are synthesized on separate messenger RNAs from genes integrated at distant chromosomal sites. Subunit assembly initiates cotranslationally on nascent LuxB in vivo. The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor delays the onset of cotranslational interactions until the LuxB dimer interface is fully exposed. Protein assembly is thus directly coupled to the translation process and involves spatially confined, actively chaperoned cotranslational subunit interactions. Bacterial gene organization into operons therefore reflects a fundamental cotranslational mechanism for spatial and temporal regulation that is vital to effective assembly of protein complexes. PMID:26405228

  9. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Halmai, Miklos; Frittmann, Orsolya; Szabo, Zoltan; Daraba, Andreea; Gali, Vamsi K.; Balint, Eva; Unk, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well. PMID:27537501

  10. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX). According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species. PMID:23113884

  11. Intersurf: dynamic interface between proteins.

    PubMed

    Ray, Nicolas; Cavin, Xavier; Paul, Jean-Claude; Maigret, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Protein docking is a fundamental biological process that links two proteins. This link is typically defined by an interaction between two large zones of the protein boundaries. Visualizing such an interface is useful to understand the process thanks to 3D protein structures, to estimate the quality of docking simulation results, and to classify interactions in order to predict docking affinity between classes of interacting zones. Since the interface may be defined by a surface that separates the two proteins, it is possible to create a map of interaction that allows comparisons to be performed in 2D. This paper presents a very fast algorithm that extracts an interface surface and creates a valid and low-distorted interaction map. Another benefit of our approach is that a pre-computed part of the algorithm enables the surface to be updated in real-time while residues are moved. PMID:15670955

  12. Isolation of the alpha subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins by affinity chromatography with immobilized beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, I H; Sternweis, P C

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to isolate alpha subunits from solubilized membranes of bovine tissues and to separate specific alpha subunits based on their differential affinities for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma subunits were cross-linked to omega-aminobutyl agarose. Up to 7 nmol of alpha subunit could bind to each milliliter of beta gamma-agarose and be recovered by elution with AIF4-. This affinity resin effectively separated the alpha subunits of Gi1 and Gi2 from "contaminating" alpha subunits of Go, the most abundant G protein in bovine brain, by taking advantage of the apparent lower affinity of the alpha subunits of Go for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma-agarose was also used to isolate mixtures of alpha subunits from cholate extracts of membranes from different bovine tissues. alpha subunits of 39-41 kDa (in various ratios) as well as the alpha subunits of Gs were purified. The yields from extracts exceeded 60% for all alpha subunits examined and apparently represented the relative content of alpha subunits in the tissues. This technique can rapidly isolate and identify, from a small amount of sample, the endogenous G proteins in various tissues and cells. So far, only polypeptides in the range of 39-52 kDa have been detected with this approach. If other GTP-binding proteins interact with these beta gamma subunits, the interaction is either of low affinity or mechanistically unique from the alpha subunits isolated in this study. Images PMID:2510152

  13. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  14. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  15. Mutations in G protein beta subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S.; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L.; Elpek, Kutlu G.; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W.; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J.; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Weinstock, David M.; Lane, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of G protein alpha subunits (Gα) occur in 4–5% of all human cancers1 but oncogenic alterations in beta subunits (Gβ) have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors, and disrupt Gα-Gβγ interactions. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered to some extent based on lineage; for example, all eleven GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms while 7 of 8 GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles in Cdkn2a-deficient bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, GNB1 mutations co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including BCR/ABL, JAK2 V617F and BRAF V600K. Co-expression of patient-derived GNB1 alleles with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 mutations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  16. Genetically encoding a light switch in an ionotropic glutamate receptor reveals subunit-specific interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shujia; Riou, Morgane; Yao, C Andrea; Carvalho, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Pamela C; Bensaude, Olivier; Paoletti, Pierre; Ye, Shixin

    2014-04-22

    Reprogramming receptors to artificially respond to light has strong potential for molecular studies and interrogation of biological functions. Here, we design a light-controlled ionotropic glutamate receptor by genetically encoding a photoreactive unnatural amino acid (UAA). The photo-cross-linker p-azido-L-phenylalanine (AzF) was encoded in NMDA receptors (NMDARs), a class of glutamate-gated ion channels that play key roles in neuronal development and plasticity. AzF incorporation in the obligatory GluN1 subunit at the GluN1/GluN2B N-terminal domain (NTD) upper lobe dimer interface leads to an irreversible allosteric inhibition of channel activity upon UV illumination. In contrast, when pairing the UAA-containing GluN1 subunit with the GluN2A subunit, light-dependent inactivation is completely absent. By combining electrophysiological and biochemical analyses, we identify subunit-specific structural determinants at the GluN1/GluN2 NTD dimer interfaces that critically dictate UV-controlled inactivation. Our work reveals that the two major NMDAR subtypes differ in their ectodomain-subunit interactions, in particular their electrostatic contacts, resulting in GluN1 NTD coupling more tightly to the GluN2B NTD than to the GluN2A NTD. It also paves the way for engineering light-sensitive ligand-gated ion channels with subtype specificity through the genetic code expansion. PMID:24715733

  17. Genetically encoding a light switch in an ionotropic glutamate receptor reveals subunit-specific interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shujia; Riou, Morgane; Yao, C. Andrea; Carvalho, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Bensaude, Olivier; Paoletti, Pierre; Ye, Shixin

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming receptors to artificially respond to light has strong potential for molecular studies and interrogation of biological functions. Here, we design a light-controlled ionotropic glutamate receptor by genetically encoding a photoreactive unnatural amino acid (UAA). The photo–cross-linker p-azido-l-phenylalanine (AzF) was encoded in NMDA receptors (NMDARs), a class of glutamate-gated ion channels that play key roles in neuronal development and plasticity. AzF incorporation in the obligatory GluN1 subunit at the GluN1/GluN2B N-terminal domain (NTD) upper lobe dimer interface leads to an irreversible allosteric inhibition of channel activity upon UV illumination. In contrast, when pairing the UAA-containing GluN1 subunit with the GluN2A subunit, light-dependent inactivation is completely absent. By combining electrophysiological and biochemical analyses, we identify subunit-specific structural determinants at the GluN1/GluN2 NTD dimer interfaces that critically dictate UV-controlled inactivation. Our work reveals that the two major NMDAR subtypes differ in their ectodomain-subunit interactions, in particular their electrostatic contacts, resulting in GluN1 NTD coupling more tightly to the GluN2B NTD than to the GluN2A NTD. It also paves the way for engineering light-sensitive ligand-gated ion channels with subtype specificity through the genetic code expansion. PMID:24715733

  18. Yeast telomerase RNA: a flexible scaffold for protein subunits.

    PubMed

    Zappulla, David C; Cech, Thomas R

    2004-07-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, distinct regions of the 1.2-kb telomerase RNA (TLC1) bind to the catalytic subunit Est2p and to accessory proteins. In particular, a bulged stem structure binds the essential regulatory subunit Est1p. We now show that the Est1p-binding domain of the RNA can be moved to three distant locations with retention of telomerase function in vivo. We present the Est1p relocation experiment in the context of a working model for the secondary structure of the entire TLC1 RNA, based on thermodynamic considerations and comparative analysis of sequences from four species. The model for TLC1 has three long quasihelical arms that bind the Ku, Est1p, and Sm proteins. These arms emanate from a central catalytic core that contains the template and Est2p-binding region. Deletion mutagenesis provides evidence that the Sm arm exists in vivo and can be shortened by 42 predicted base pairs with retention of function; therefore, precise positioning of Sm proteins, like Est1p, is not required within telomerase. In the best-studied ribonucleoprotein enzyme, the ribosome, the RNAs have specific three-dimensional structures that orient the functional elements. In the case of yeast telomerase, we propose that the RNA serves a very different function, providing a flexible tether for the protein subunits. PMID:15226497

  19. Lys-315 at the Interfaces of Diagonal Subunits of δ-Crystallin Plays a Critical Role in the Reversibility of Folding and Subunit Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Hui-Chen; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Kao, Wei-Chuo; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Lee, Hwei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    δ-Crystallin is the major structural protein in avian eye lenses and is homologous to the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. This protein is structurally assembled as double dimers. Lys-315 is the only residue which is arranged symmetrically at the diagonal subunit interfaces to interact with each other. This study found that wild-type protein had both dimers and monomers present in 2–4 M urea whilst only monomers of the K315A mutant were observed under the same conditions, as judged by sedimentation velocity analysis. The assembly of monomeric K315A mutant was reversible in contrast to wild-type protein. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the dissociation of primary dimers is prior to the diagonal dimers in wild-type protein. These results suggest the critical role of Lys-315 in stabilization of the diagonal dimer structure. Guanidinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) denatured wild-type or K315A mutant protein did not fold into functional protein. However, the urea dissociated monomers of K315A mutant protein in GdmCl were reversible folding through a multiple steps mechanism as measured by tryptophan and ANS fluorescence. Two partly unfolded intermediates were detected in the pathway. Refolding of the intermediates resulted in a conformation with greater amounts of hydrophobic regions exposed which was prone to the formation of protein aggregates. The formation of aggregates was not prevented by the addition of α-crystallin. These results highlight that the conformational status of the monomers is critical for determining whether reversible oligomerization or aggregate formation occurs. PMID:26731266

  20. Lys-315 at the Interfaces of Diagonal Subunits of δ-Crystallin Plays a Critical Role in the Reversibility of Folding and Subunit Assembly.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Hui-Chen; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Kao, Wei-Chuo; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Lee, Hwei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    δ-Crystallin is the major structural protein in avian eye lenses and is homologous to the urea cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase. This protein is structurally assembled as double dimers. Lys-315 is the only residue which is arranged symmetrically at the diagonal subunit interfaces to interact with each other. This study found that wild-type protein had both dimers and monomers present in 2-4 M urea whilst only monomers of the K315A mutant were observed under the same conditions, as judged by sedimentation velocity analysis. The assembly of monomeric K315A mutant was reversible in contrast to wild-type protein. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that the dissociation of primary dimers is prior to the diagonal dimers in wild-type protein. These results suggest the critical role of Lys-315 in stabilization of the diagonal dimer structure. Guanidinium hydrochloride (GdmCl) denatured wild-type or K315A mutant protein did not fold into functional protein. However, the urea dissociated monomers of K315A mutant protein in GdmCl were reversible folding through a multiple steps mechanism as measured by tryptophan and ANS fluorescence. Two partly unfolded intermediates were detected in the pathway. Refolding of the intermediates resulted in a conformation with greater amounts of hydrophobic regions exposed which was prone to the formation of protein aggregates. The formation of aggregates was not prevented by the addition of α-crystallin. These results highlight that the conformational status of the monomers is critical for determining whether reversible oligomerization or aggregate formation occurs. PMID:26731266

  1. Interolog interfaces in protein-protein docking.

    PubMed

    Alsop, James D; Mitchell, Julie C

    2015-11-01

    Proteins are essential elements of biological systems, and their function typically relies on their ability to successfully bind to specific partners. Recently, an emphasis of study into protein interactions has been on hot spots, or residues in the binding interface that make a significant contribution to the binding energetics. In this study, we investigate how conservation of hot spots can be used to guide docking prediction. We show that the use of evolutionary data combined with hot spot prediction highlights near-native structures across a range of benchmark examples. Our approach explores various strategies for using hot spots and evolutionary data to score protein complexes, using both absolute and chemical definitions of conservation along with refinements to these strategies that look at windowed conservation and filtering to ensure a minimum number of hot spots in each binding partner. Finally, structure-based models of orthologs were generated for comparison with sequence-based scoring. Using two data sets of 22 and 85 examples, a high rate of top 10 and top 1 predictions are observed, with up to 82% of examples returning a top 10 hit and 35% returning top 1 hit depending on the data set and strategy applied; upon inclusion of the native structure among the decoys, up to 55% of examples yielded a top 1 hit. The 20 common examples between data sets show that more carefully curated interolog data yields better predictions, particularly in achieving top 1 hits. Proteins 2015; 83:1940-1946. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  3. Manipulation of Subunit Stoichiometry in Heteromeric Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Morales-Perez, Claudio L; Noviello, Colleen M; Hibbs, Ryan E

    2016-05-01

    The ability of oligomeric membrane proteins to assemble in different functional ratios of subunits is a common feature across many systems. Recombinant expression of hetero-oligomeric proteins with defined stoichiometries facilitates detailed structural and functional analyses, but remains a major challenge. Here we present two methods for overcoming this challenge: one for rapid virus titration and another for stoichiometry determination. When these methods are coupled, they allow for efficient dissection of the heteromer stoichiometry problem and optimization of homogeneous protein expression. We demonstrate the utility of the methods in a system that to date has proved resistant to atomic-scale structural study, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Leveraging these two methods, we have successfully expressed, purified, and grown diffraction-quality crystals of this challenging target.

  4. The protein composition of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits: the effects of single protein omission.

    PubMed

    Buck, M A; Olah, T V; Perrault, A R; Cooperman, B S

    1991-06-01

    Using reverse phase HPLC, we have been able to quantify the protein compositions of reconstituted 30S ribosomal subunits, formed either with the full complement of 30S proteins in the reconstitution mix or with a single protein omitted. We denote particles formed in the latter case as SPORE (single protein omission reconstitution) particles. An important goal in 30S reconstitution studies is the formation of reconstituted subunits having uniform protein composition, preferably corresponding to one copy of each protein per reconstituted particle. Here we describe procedures involving variation of the protein:rRNA ratio that approach this goal. In SPORE particles the omission of one protein often results in the partial loss in uptake of other proteins. We also describe procedures to increase the uptake of such proteins into SPORE particles, thus enhancing the utility of the SPORE approach in defining the role of specific proteins in 30S structure and function. The losses of proteins other than the omitted protein provide a measure of protein:protein interaction within the 30S subunit. Most of these losses are predictable on the basis of other such measures. However, we do find evidence for several long-range protein:protein interactions (S6:S3, S6:S12, S10:S16, and S6:S4) that have not been described previously.

  5. Mutations in G protein β subunits promote transformation and kinase inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akinori; Adelmant, Guillaume; Tamburini, Jerome; Chapuy, Bjoern; Shindoh, Nobuaki; Yoda, Yuka; Weigert, Oliver; Kopp, Nadja; Wu, Shuo-Chieh; Kim, Sunhee S; Liu, Huiyun; Tivey, Trevor; Christie, Amanda L; Elpek, Kutlu G; Card, Joseph; Gritsman, Kira; Gotlib, Jason; Deininger, Michael W; Makishima, Hideki; Turley, Shannon J; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Ebert, Benjamin L; Rodig, Scott J; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Marto, Jarrod A; Weinstock, David M; Lane, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in genes encoding G protein α (Gα) subunits occur in 4-5% of all human cancers, but oncogenic alterations in Gβ subunits have not been defined. Here we demonstrate that recurrent mutations in the Gβ proteins GNB1 and GNB2 confer cytokine-independent growth and activate canonical G protein signaling. Multiple mutations in GNB1 affect the protein interface that binds Gα subunits as well as downstream effectors and disrupt Gα interactions with the Gβγ dimer. Different mutations in Gβ proteins clustered partly on the basis of lineage; for example, all 11 GNB1 K57 mutations were in myeloid neoplasms, and seven of eight GNB1 I80 mutations were in B cell neoplasms. Expression of patient-derived GNB1 variants in Cdkn2a-deficient mouse bone marrow followed by transplantation resulted in either myeloid or B cell malignancies. In vivo treatment with the dual PI3K-mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 suppressed GNB1-induced signaling and markedly increased survival. In several human tumors, mutations in the gene encoding GNB1 co-occurred with oncogenic kinase alterations, including the BCR-ABL fusion protein, the V617F substitution in JAK2 and the V600K substitution in BRAF. Coexpression of patient-derived GNB1 variants with these mutant kinases resulted in inhibitor resistance in each context. Thus, GNB1 and GNB2 alterations confer transformed and resistance phenotypes across a range of human tumors and may be targetable with inhibitors of G protein signaling. PMID:25485910

  6. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology. PMID:27309817

  7. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  8. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  9. G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 subunits define a fourth class of G protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Strathmann, M P; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) are central to the signaling processes of multicellular organisms. We have explored the diversity of the G protein subunits in mammals and found evidence for a large family of genes that encode the alpha subunits. Amino acid sequence comparisons show that the different alpha subunits fall into at least three classes. These classes have been conserved in animals separated by considerable evolutionary distances; they are present in mammals, Drosophila, and nematodes. We have now obtained cDNA clones encoding two murine alpha subunits, G alpha 12 and G alpha 13, that define a fourth class. The translation products are predicted to have molecular masses of 44 kDa and to be insensitive to ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They share 67% amino acid sequence identity with each other and less than 45% identity with other alpha subunits. Their transcripts can be detected in every tissue examined, although the relative levels of the G alpha 13 message appear somewhat variable. Images PMID:1905812

  10. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  11. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  12. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  13. Identification of a GABAA receptor anesthetic binding site at subunit interfaces by photolabeling with an etomidate analog.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Dong; Chiara, David C; Sawyer, Gregory W; Husain, S Shaukat; Olsen, Richard W; Cohen, Jonathan B

    2006-11-01

    General anesthetics, including etomidate, act by binding to and enhancing the function of GABA type A receptors (GABA(A)Rs), which mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Here, we used a radiolabeled, photoreactive etomidate analog ([(3)H]azietomidate), which retains anesthetic potency in vivo and enhances GABA(A)R function in vitro, to identify directly, for the first time, amino acids that contribute to a GABA(A)R anesthetic binding site. For GABA(A)Rs purified by affinity chromatography from detergent extracts of bovine cortex, [(3)H]azietomidate photoincorporation was increased by GABA and inhibited by etomidate in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 30 microm). Protein microsequencing of fragments isolated from proteolytic digests established photolabeling of two residues: one within the alphaM1 transmembrane helix at alpha1Met-236 (and/or the homologous methionines in alpha2,3,5), not previously implicated in etomidate function, and one within the betaM3 transmembrane helix at beta3Met-286 (and/or the homologous methionines in beta1,2), an etomidate sensitivity determinant. The pharmacological specificity of labeling indicates that these methionines contribute to a single binding pocket for etomidate located in the transmembrane domain at the interface between beta and alpha subunits, in what is predicted by structural models based on homology with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor to be a water-filled pocket approximately 50 A below the GABA binding site. The localization of the etomidate binding site to an intersubunit, not an intrasubunit, binding pocket is a novel conclusion that suggests more generally that the localization of drug binding sites to subunit interfaces may be a feature not only for GABA and benzodiazepines but also for etomidate and other intravenous and volatile anesthetics. PMID:17093081

  14. Extra-Large G Proteins Expand the Repertoire of Subunits in Arabidopsis Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Gookin, Timothy E; Milner, Matthew J; Yu, Yunqing; Assmann, Sarah M

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are a conserved signal transduction mechanism in eukaryotes. However, G protein subunit numbers in diploid plant genomes are greatly reduced as compared with animals and do not correlate with the diversity of functions and phenotypes in which heterotrimeric G proteins have been implicated. In addition to GPA1, the sole canonical Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Gα subunit, Arabidopsis has three related proteins: the extra-large GTP-binding proteins XLG1, XLG2, and XLG3. We demonstrate that the XLGs can bind Gβγ dimers (AGB1 plus a Gγ subunit: AGG1, AGG2, or AGG3) with differing specificity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) three-hybrid assays. Our in silico structural analysis shows that XLG3 aligns closely to the crystal structure of GPA1, and XLG3 also competes with GPA1 for Gβγ binding in yeast. We observed interaction of the XLGs with all three Gβγ dimers at the plasma membrane in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Bioinformatic and localization studies identified and confirmed nuclear localization signals in XLG2 and XLG3 and a nuclear export signal in XLG3, which may facilitate intracellular shuttling. We found that tunicamycin, salt, and glucose hypersensitivity and increased stomatal density are agb1-specific phenotypes that are not observed in gpa1 mutants but are recapitulated in xlg mutants. Thus, XLG-Gβγ heterotrimers provide additional signaling modalities for tuning plant G protein responses and increase the repertoire of G protein heterotrimer combinations from three to 12. The potential for signal partitioning and competition between the XLGs and GPA1 is a new paradigm for plant-specific cell signaling.

  15. Identification of a gamma subunit associated with the adenylyl cyclase regulatory proteins Ns and Ni.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J D; Codina, J; Risinger, R; Birnbaumer, L

    1984-02-25

    The subunit composition of the Ns and Ni, the human erythrocyte stimulatory and inhibitory regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing discontinuous urea and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis system designed for the study of low molecular weight polypeptides. This system disclosed that these proteins, in addition to their known alpha and beta subunits, contain an additional small peptide of apparent molecular weight of 5,000 (5K). This "5K peptide" is also present in preparations of another protein which we termed "40K protein" on the basis of its hydrodynamic behavior and whose primary protein constituent is the Mr 35,000 beta subunit of the above regulatory proteins. Analyzing Ni, the 5K peptide was functionally related to the protein by showing that its apparent Stokes radius changes from 5.9 to 5.1 nm after treatment with guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and magnesium in parallel with the alpha and beta subunits. These data are interpreted as evidence for the existence of a third subunit associated with the regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase. We call this subunit gamma and propose a minimum subunit structure for these proteins of the alpha beta gamma type. PMID:6321456

  16. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism.

  17. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism. PMID:27496951

  18. Investigation of Phycobilisome Subunit Interaction Interfaces by Coupled Cross-linking and Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Ofir; Trabelcy, Beny; Gerchman, Yoram; Adir, Noam

    2014-01-01

    The phycobilisome (PBS) is an extremely large light-harvesting complex, common in cyanobacteria and red algae, composed of rods and core substructures. These substructures are assembled from chromophore-bearing phycocyanin and allophycocyanin subunits, nonpigmented linker proteins and in some cases additional subunits. To date, despite the determination of crystal structures of isolated PBS components, critical questions regarding the interaction and energy flow between rods and core are still unresolved. Additionally, the arrangement of minor PBS components located inside the core cylinders is unknown. Different models of the general architecture of the PBS have been proposed, based on low resolution images from electron microscopy or high resolution crystal structures of isolated components. This work presents a model of the assembly of the rods onto the core arrangement and for the positions of inner core components, based on cross-linking and mass spectrometry analysis of isolated, functional intact Thermosynechococcus vulcanus PBS, as well as functional cross-linked adducts. The experimental results were utilized to predict potential docking interactions of different protein pairs. Combining modeling and cross-linking results, we identify specific interactions within the PBS subcomponents that enable us to suggest possible functional interactions between the chromophores of the rods and the core and improve our understanding of the assembly, structure, and function of PBS. PMID:25296757

  19. Effects of regulatory subunits on the kinetics of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Price, N E; Mumby, M C

    2000-09-19

    Both the scaffold (A) and the regulatory (R) subunits of protein phosphatase 2A regulate enzyme activity and specificity. Heterotrimeric enzymes containing different R-subunits differ in their specific activities for substrates. Kinetic parameters for the dephosphorylation of a phosphopeptide by different oligomeric forms of PP2A were determined to begin to elucidate the molecular basis of regulatory subunit effects on phosphatase activity. Using steady state kinetics and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters, we have explored the effect of the A- and R-subunits on the kinetic and chemical mechanism of PP2A. The regulatory subunits affected a broad range of kinetic parameters. The C-subunit and AC dimer were qualitatively similar with respect to the product inhibition patterns and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters. However, a 22-fold decrease in rate and a 4.7-fold decrease in K(m) can be attributed to the presence of the A-subunit. The presence of the R2alpha (Balpha or PR55alpha) subunit caused an additional decrease in K(m) and changed the kinetic mechanism of peptide dephosphorylation. The R2alpha-subunit also caused significant changes in the pH dependence of kinetic parameters as compared to the free C subunit or AC heterodimer. The data support an important role for the regulatory subunits in determining both the affinity of PP2A heterotrimers for peptide substrates and the mechanism by which they are dephosphorylated.

  20. Matrix Proteins of Nipah and Hendra Viruses Interact with Beta Subunits of AP-3 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S.; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for the M proteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hinge-derived polypeptide was sufficient for M protein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding and M protein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, M protein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses cause deadly infections in humans, with a mortality rate of about 40%. Hendra virus outbreaks in Australia, all involving horses and some involving transmission to humans, have been a continuing problem. Nipah virus caused a large outbreak in Malaysia in 1998

  1. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states.

  2. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. PMID:26687711

  3. Motif-Driven Design of Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Correia, Bruno E; Procko, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces regulate many critical processes for cellular function. The ability to accurately control and regulate these molecular interactions is of major interest for biomedical and synthetic biology applications, as well as to address fundamental biological questions. In recent years, computational protein design has emerged as a tool for designing novel protein-protein interactions with functional relevance. Although attractive, these computational tools carry a steep learning curve. In order to make some of these methods more accessible, we present detailed descriptions and examples of ROSETTA computational protocols for the design of functional protein binders using seeded protein interface design. In these protocols, a motif of known structure that interacts with the target site is grafted into a scaffold protein, followed by design of the surrounding interaction surface. PMID:27094298

  4. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  5. A pH-dependent conformational change in the coat protein subunits from potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Homer, R B; Dalton, D I

    1976-10-28

    Both the circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra of the dissociated coat protein subunits from potato virus X changed substantially over the pH range 8 to 4, irreversible changes resulted below pH 4, with tyrosyl and tryptophanyl residues affected most. The titration curves show a pKa of about 5.6 and do not require cooperative interactions between the coat protein subunits, thus they are in marked contrast to titrations of tobacco mosaic virus A-protein. The spectra of the intact virus were little changed between pH 8 and 4 and suggested that the coat protein was locked into a conformation similar to that of the subunits in solution at pH 7. It is proposed that the pH induced conformational change is responsible for determining the acidic branch of the pH profile for reconstitution of potato virus X from its dissociated coat protein subunits and RNA.

  6. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  7. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  8. The G protein alpha o subunit alters morphology, growth kinetics, and phospholipid metabolism of somatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, D B; Bonventre, J V; Neer, E J; Seidman, J G

    1989-01-01

    The physiological role of the alpha o subunit of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein was investigated with a murine adrenal cell line (Y1) transfected with a rat alpha o cDNA cloned in a retroviral expression vector. The parental cell line lacked detectable alpha o subunit. Expression of the alpha o cDNA in transfected cell lines was confirmed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The rat alpha o subunit interacted with murine beta and gamma subunits and associated with cell membranes. Y1 cells containing large amounts of alpha o subunit had altered cellular morphology and reduced rate of cell division. In addition, GTP-gamma S-stimulated release of arachidonic acid from these cells was significantly increased compared with that in control cells. The alpha o subunit appears directly or indirectly to regulate cellular proliferation, morphology, and phospholipid metabolism. Images PMID:2511433

  9. Scoring docking conformations using predicted protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Since proteins function by interacting with other molecules, analysis of protein-protein interactions is essential for comprehending biological processes. Whereas understanding of atomic interactions within a complex is especially useful for drug design, limitations of experimental techniques have restricted their practical use. Despite progress in docking predictions, there is still room for improvement. In this study, we contribute to this topic by proposing T-PioDock, a framework for detection of a native-like docked complex 3D structure. T-PioDock supports the identification of near-native conformations from 3D models that docking software produced by scoring those models using binding interfaces predicted by the interface predictor, Template based Protein Interface Prediction (T-PIP). Results First, exhaustive evaluation of interface predictors demonstrates that T-PIP, whose predictions are customised to target complexity, is a state-of-the-art method. Second, comparative study between T-PioDock and other state-of-the-art scoring methods establishes T-PioDock as the best performing approach. Moreover, there is good correlation between T-PioDock performance and quality of docking models, which suggests that progress in docking will lead to even better results at recognising near-native conformations. Conclusion Accurate identification of near-native conformations remains a challenging task. Although availability of 3D complexes will benefit from template-based methods such as T-PioDock, we have identified specific limitations which need to be addressed. First, docking software are still not able to produce native like models for every target. Second, current interface predictors do not explicitly consider pairwise residue interactions between proteins and their interacting partners which leaves ambiguity when assessing quality of complex conformations. PMID:24906633

  10. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  11. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  12. Proteins at the Biomaterial Electrolyte Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengvall, Pentti

    2005-03-01

    Proteins adsorb rapidly onto solid and polymeric surfaces because the association process is in the vast majority of cases energetically favourable, i.e. exothermic. The most common exceptions to this rule are hydrophilic interfaces with low net charge and high mobility, e.g. immobilized PEGs. Current research in the research area tries to understand and control unwanted and wanted adsorption by studying the adsorption kinetics, protein surface binding specificity, protein exchange at interfaces, and surface protein repulsion mechanisms. In blood plasma model systems humoral cascade reactions such as surface mediated coagulation and immune complement raise considerable interest due to the immediate association to blood compatibility, and in tissue applications the binding between surfaces and membrane receptors in cells and tissues. Thus, the understanding of interfacial events at the protein level is of large importance in applications such as blood and tissue contacting biomaterials, in vitro medical and biological diagnostics, food industry and in marine anti-fouling technology. Well described consequences of adsorption are a lowered system energy, increased system entropy, irreversible binding, conformational changes, specific surface/protein interactions, and in biomedical materials applications surface opsonization followed by cell-surface interactions and a host tissue response. This lecture will deal with some mechanisms known to be of importance for the adsorption processes, such as the influence of surface chemistry and surface energy, the composition of the protein solution, the Vroman effect, and residence time. Examples will be shown from ellipsometric experiments using different model surfaces in single/few protein solutions, and specific attention be given to blood serum and plasma experiments on coagulation and immune complement at interfaces.

  13. Predicting protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolazzi, Paola; Guerra, Concettina; Liuzzi, Giampaolo

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with the identification of binding sites and concentrates on interactions involving small interfaces. In particular we focus our attention on two major interface types, namely protein-ligand and protein-peptide interfaces. As concerns protein-ligand binding site prediction, we classify the most interesting methods and approaches into four main categories: (a) shape-based methods, (b) alignment-based methods, (c) graph-theoretic approaches and (d) machine learning methods. Class (a) encompasses those methods which employ, in some way, geometric information about the protein surface. Methods falling into class (b) address the prediction problem as an alignment problem, i.e. finding protein-ligand atom pairs that occupy spatially equivalent positions. Graph theoretic approaches, class (c), are mainly based on the definition of a particular graph, known as the protein contact graph, and then apply some sophisticated methods from graph theory to discover subgraphs or score similarities for uncovering functional sites. The last class (d) contains those methods that are based on the learn-from-examples paradigm and that are able to take advantage of the large amount of data available on known protein-ligand pairs. As for protein-peptide interfaces, due to the often disordered nature of the regions involved in binding, shape similarity is no longer a determining factor. Then, in geometry-based methods, geometry is accounted for by providing the relative position of the atoms surrounding the peptide residues in known structures. Finally, also for protein-peptide interfaces, we present a classification of some successful machine learning methods. Indeed, they can be categorized in the way adopted to construct the learning examples. In particular, we envisage three main methods: distance functions, structure and potentials and structure alignment.

  14. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  15. Activation of Tsk and Btk tyrosine kinases by G protein beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Langhans-Rajasekaran, S A; Wan, Y; Huang, X Y

    1995-01-01

    Tsk/Itk and Btk are members of the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing tyrosine kinase family. The PH domain has been demonstrated to be able to interact with beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) (G beta gamma) and phospholipids. Using cotransfection assays, we show here that the kinase activities of Tsk and Btk are stimulated by certain G beta gamma subunits. Furthermore, using an in vitro reconstitution assay with purified bovine brain G beta gamma subunits and the immunoprecipitated Tsk, we find that Tsk kinase activity is increased by G beta gamma subunits and another membrane factor(s). These results indicate that this family of tyrosine kinases could be an effector of heterotrimeric G proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7567982

  16. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  17. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  18. G-protein. alpha. -subunit expression, myristoylation, and membrane association in COS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mumby, S.M.; Gilman, A.G. ); Heukeroth, R.O.; Gordon, J.I. )

    1990-01-01

    Myristolyation of seven different {alpha} subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) was examined by expressing these proteins in monkey kidney COS cells. Metabolic labeling studies of cells transfected with cytomegalovirus-based expression vectors indicated that ({sup 3}H)myristate was incorporated into {alpha}{sub i1}, {alpha}{sub i2}, {alpha}{sub i3}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {alpha}{sub 1}, and {alpha}{sub z} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits. The role of myristoylation in the association of {alpha} subunits with membranes was analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis and by substitution of myristate with a less hydrophobic analog, 10-(propoxy)decanoate (11-oxamyristate). Myristoylation of {alpha}{sub 0} was blocked when an alanine residue was substituted for its amino-terminal glycine, as was association of the protein with membranes. Substitution of the myristoyl group with 11-oxamyristate affected the cellular distribution of a subset of acylated {alpha} subunits. The results are consistent with a model wherein the hydrophobic interaction of myristate with the bilayer permits continued association of the protein with the plasma membrane when G-protein {alpha} subunits dissociated from {beta}{gamma}.

  19. Progress and challenges in predicting protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Konrad; Knapp, Bernhard; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of biological processes are mediated via protein–protein interactions. Determination of residues participating in such interactions improves our understanding of molecular mechanisms and facilitates the development of therapeutics. Experimental approaches to identifying interacting residues, such as mutagenesis, are costly and time-consuming and thus, computational methods for this purpose could streamline conventional pipelines. Here we review the field of computational protein interface prediction. We make a distinction between methods which address proteins in general and those targeted at antibodies, owing to the radically different binding mechanism of antibodies. We organize the multitude of currently available methods hierarchically based on required input and prediction principles to provide an overview of the field. PMID:25971595

  20. Implication of Terminal Residues at Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martin, Olivier M F; Etheve, Loïc; Launay, Guillaume; Martin, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Terminal residues of protein chains are charged and more flexible than other residues since they are constrained only on one side. Do they play a particular role in protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces? To answer this question, we considered large sets of non-redundant protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes and analyzed the status of terminal residues and their involvement in interfaces. In protein-protein complexes, we found that more than half of terminal residues (62%) are either modified by attachment of a tag peptide (10%) or have missing coordinates in the analyzed structures (52%). Terminal residues are almost exclusively located at the surface of proteins (94%). Contrary to charged residues, they are not over or under-represented in protein-protein interfaces, but strongly prefer the peripheral region of interfaces when present at the interface (83% of terminal residues). The almost exclusive location of terminal residues at the surface of the proteins or in the rim regions of interfaces explains that experimental methods relying on tail hybridization can be successfully applied without disrupting the complexes under study. Concerning conformational rearrangement in protein-protein complexes, despite their expected flexibility, terminal residues adopt similar locations between the free and bound forms of the docking benchmark. In protein-DNA complexes, N-terminal residues are twice more frequent than C-terminal residues at interfaces. Both N-terminal and C-terminal residues are under-represented in interfaces, in contrast to positively charged residues, which are strongly favored. When located in protein-DNA interfaces, terminal residues prefer the periphery. N-terminal and C-terminal residues thus have particular properties with regard to interfaces, which cannot be reduced to their charged nature. PMID:27611671

  1. Implication of Terminal Residues at Protein-Protein and Protein-DNA Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Olivier M. F.; Etheve, Loïc; Launay, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Terminal residues of protein chains are charged and more flexible than other residues since they are constrained only on one side. Do they play a particular role in protein-protein and protein-DNA interfaces? To answer this question, we considered large sets of non-redundant protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes and analyzed the status of terminal residues and their involvement in interfaces. In protein-protein complexes, we found that more than half of terminal residues (62%) are either modified by attachment of a tag peptide (10%) or have missing coordinates in the analyzed structures (52%). Terminal residues are almost exclusively located at the surface of proteins (94%). Contrary to charged residues, they are not over or under-represented in protein-protein interfaces, but strongly prefer the peripheral region of interfaces when present at the interface (83% of terminal residues). The almost exclusive location of terminal residues at the surface of the proteins or in the rim regions of interfaces explains that experimental methods relying on tail hybridization can be successfully applied without disrupting the complexes under study. Concerning conformational rearrangement in protein-protein complexes, despite their expected flexibility, terminal residues adopt similar locations between the free and bound forms of the docking benchmark. In protein-DNA complexes, N-terminal residues are twice more frequent than C-terminal residues at interfaces. Both N-terminal and C-terminal residues are under-represented in interfaces, in contrast to positively charged residues, which are strongly favored. When located in protein-DNA interfaces, terminal residues prefer the periphery. N-terminal and C-terminal residues thus have particular properties with regard to interfaces, which cannot be reduced to their charged nature. PMID:27611671

  2. Eukaryote-specific extensions in ribosomal proteins of the small subunit: Structure and function.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Komar, Anton A

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures of yeast ribosomes have improved our understanding of the architecture and organization of eukaryotic rRNA and proteins, as well as eukaryote-specific extensions present in some conserved ribosomal proteins. Despite this progress, assignment of specific functions to individual proteins and/or eukaryote-specific protein extensions remains challenging. It has been suggested that eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved proteins from the small ribosomal subunit may facilitate eukaryote-specific reactions in the initiation phase of protein synthesis. This review summarizes emerging data describing the structural and functional significance of eukaryote-specific extensions of conserved small ribosomal subunit proteins, particularly their possible roles in recruitment and spatial organization of eukaryote-specific initiation factors. PMID:26779416

  3. A hybrid NMR/SAXS-based approach for discriminating oligomeric protein interfaces using Rosetta

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Paolo; Shi, Lei; Liu, Gaohua; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Grant, Thomas D.; Luft, Joseph R.; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Snell, Edward H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David; Lange, Oliver F.; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric proteins are important targets for structure determination in solution. While in most cases the fold of individual subunits can be determined experimentally, or predicted by homology-based methods, protein-protein interfaces are challenging to determine de novo using conventional NMR structure determination protocols. Here we focus on a member of the bet-V1 superfamily, Aha1 from Colwellia psychrerythraea. This family displays a broad range of crystallographic interfaces none of which can be reconciled with the NMR and SAXS data collected for Aha1. Unlike conventional methods relying on a dense network of experimental restraints, the sparse data are used to limit conformational search during optimization of a physically realistic energy function. This work highlights a new approach for studying minor conformational changes due to structural plasticity within a single dimeric interface in solution. PMID:25388768

  4. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  5. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  6. Protein engineering of protein kinase A catalytic subunits results in the acquisition of novel inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Niswender, Colleen M; Ishihara, R Wesley; Judge, Luke M; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M; McKnight, G Stanley

    2002-08-01

    Analysis of the role of specific protein kinases in signal transduction networks has relied heavily on ATP analog inhibitors. Currently used agents, however, often do not distinguish between kinase family members. Genetic approaches can also be used to inactivate a specific kinase, but these techniques do not afford the rapid kinetics possible with pharmacological inhibitors. To circumvent this problem, modification of the structure of a particular protein kinase can be performed to engineer a drug-target interaction of choice. We have used this method to create protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits with modifications that confer sensitivity to novel ATP analog inhibitors. Mutation of methionine 120 to alanine or glycine in either the Calpha or Cbeta subunits of PKA induces sensitivity to a series of C-3 derivatized pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-based inhibitors. Modification of threonine 183 enhances this inhibitor sensitivity. The IC(50) values in cell culture of the most broadly effective agent, 1-NM, ranged from 25 to 200 nm depending upon the combination of modified amino acids and were significantly higher than the potencies observed with H-89. Despite their high sequence conservation, Cbeta enzymes with inhibitor-sensitive amino acids at position 120 showed a substantial loss of overall catalytic activity when used to induce reporter gene transcription in transfected cells. Conversion of position 46 (lysine to isoleucine) rescued the ability of position 120 mutated Cbeta enzymes to induce gene transcription. Application of this combined genetic and pharmacological approach should allow analysis of the specific roles of PKA isoforms in cell culture and in vivo. PMID:12034735

  7. A novel protein-mineral interface.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Dmitriy; Zhu, Haizhong; Guo, Maolin; Zhong, Weiqing; Hunter, Dominic J B; Yang, Weiping; Campopiano, Dominic J; Sadler, Peter J

    2003-04-01

    Transferrins transport Fe3+ and other metal ions in mononuclear-binding sites. We present the first evidence that a member of the transferrin superfamily is able to recognize multi-nuclear oxo-metal clusters, small mineral fragments that are the most abundant forms of many metals in the environment. We show that the ferric ion-binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (nFbp) readily binds clusters of Fe3+, Ti4+, Zr4+ or Hf4+ in solution. The 1.7 A resolution crystal structure of Hf-nFbp reveals three distinct types of clusters in an open, positively charged cleft between two hinged protein domains. A di-tyrosyl cluster nucleation motif (Tyr195-Tyr196) is situated at the bottom of this cleft and binds either a trinuclear oxo-Hf cluster, which is capped by phosphate, or a pentanuclear cluster, which in turn can be capped with phosphate. This first high-resolution structure of a protein-mineral interface suggests a novel metal-uptake mechanism and provides a model for protein-mediated mineralization/dissimilation, which plays a critical role in geochemical processes. PMID:12598891

  8. Effect of n-Alkanols on G-Protein α Subunits.

    PubMed

    Pentyala, Srinivas; Tanguturi, Kavita; Sawas, Anas; Veerraju, Amulya; Annam, Sandeep; Cipp, Laura; Rebecchi, Mario

    2011-08-10

    Guanine nucleotide binding (G)-proteins are GTP-driven allosteric proteins consisting of a single α subunit and a β and γ heterodimer. Gα subunits function as on/off switches based on the occupancy of the nucleotide-binding site, GTP or GDP, such that any alteration in nucleotide exchange modulates signal output. Our previous work has shown that haloalkanes and ethers inhibit GDP/GTP exchange on αi1, αi2 and αi3 subunits, but not the closely related αo. To test whether individual G-protein sensitivity correlates with n-alkanols potency and hydrophobicity, we studied the effects of n-alkanols of varied chain lengths on GDP/GTP exchange by Gαsubunits. n-alkanols (ethanol, butanol, pentanol, hexanol, heptanol, octanol and nonanol) showed differential effects on guanine nucleotide exchange by Gαi1, Gαi2 and Gαo. Based on our observations, we conclude that n-alkanols interact and modulate the activity of the G-α subunits to different extent, thereby uncoupling pathways known to modulate neuronal excitation.

  9. Phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins influences subunit association and translation of poly (U) in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Mikulík, Karel; Bobek, Jan; Ziková, Alice; Smětáková, Magdalena; Bezoušková, Silvie

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of phosphorylated proteins in ribosomes of Streptomyces coelicolor was investigated. Little is known about which biological functions these posttranslational modifications might fulfil. A protein kinase associated with ribosomes phosphorylated six ribosomal proteins of the small subunit (S3, S4, S12, S13, S14 and S18) and seven ribosomal proteins of the large subunit (L2, L3, L7/L12, L16, L17, L23 and L27). The ribosomal proteins were phosphorylated mainly on the Ser/Thr residues. Phosphorylation of the ribosomal proteins influences ribosomal subunits association. Ribosomes with phosphorylated proteins were used to examine poly (U) translation activity. Phosphorylation induced about 50% decrease in polyphenylalanine synthesis. After preincubation of ribosomes with alkaline phosphatase the activity of ribosomes was greatly restored. Small differences were observed between phosphorylated and unphosphorylated ribosomes in the kinetic parameters of the binding of Phe-tRNA to the A-site of poly (U) programmed ribosomes, suggesting that the initial binding of Phe-tRNA is not significantly affected by phosphorylation. On contrary, the rate of peptidyl transferase was about two-fold lower than that in unphosphorylated ribosomes. The data presented demonstrate that phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins affects critical steps of protein synthesis.

  10. G protein beta gamma subunits stimulate phosphorylation of Shc adapter protein.

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, K; Hawes, B E; van Biesen, T; Lefkowitz, R J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi-coupled receptors is known to involve the beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (G beta gamma), p21ras activation, and an as-yet-unidentified tyrosine kinase. To investigate the mechanism of G beta gamma-stimulated p21ras activation, G beta gamma-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation was examined by overexpressing G beta gamma or alpha 2-C10 adrenergic receptors (ARs) that couple to Gi in COS-7 cells. Immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins revealed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation of two proteins of approximately 50 kDa (designated as p52) in G beta gamma-transfected cells or in alpha 2-C10 AR-transfected cells stimulated with the agonist UK-14304. The latter response was pertussis toxin sensitive. These proteins (p52) were also specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibodies and comigrated with two Shc proteins, 46 and 52 kDa. The G beta gamma- or alpha 2-C10 AR-stimulated p52 (Shc) phosphorylation was inhibited by coexpression of the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (a G beta gamma-binding pleckstrin homology domain peptide) or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, but not by a dominant negative mutant of p21ras. Worthmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibited phosphorylation of p52 (Shc), implying involvement of PI3K. These results suggest that G beta gamma-stimulated Shc phosphorylation represents an early step in the pathway leading to p21ras activation, similar to the mechanism utilized by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7568118

  11. Pathogen mimicry of host protein-protein interfaces modulates immunity.

    PubMed

    Guven-Maiorov, Emine; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2016-10-01

    Signaling pathways shape and transmit the cell's reaction to its changing environment; however, pathogens can circumvent this response by manipulating host signaling. To subvert host defense, they beat it at its own game: they hijack host pathways by mimicking the binding surfaces of host-encoded proteins. For this, it is not necessary to achieve global protein homology; imitating merely the interaction surface is sufficient. Different protein folds often interact via similar protein-protein interface architectures. This similarity in binding surfaces permits the pathogenic protein to compete with a host target protein. Thus, rather than binding a host-encoded partner, the host protein hub binds the pathogenic surrogate. The outcome can be dire: rewiring or repurposing the host pathways, shifting the cell signaling landscape and consequently the immune response. They can also cause persistent infections as well as cancer by modulating key signaling pathways, such as those involving Ras. Mapping the rewired host-pathogen 'superorganism' interaction network - along with its structural details - is critical for in-depth understanding of pathogenic mechanisms and developing efficient therapeutics. Here, we overview the role of molecular mimicry in pathogen host evasion as well as types of molecular mimicry mechanisms that emerged during evolution.

  12. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13405.001 PMID:26949248

  13. Molecular mechanism of activation-triggered subunit exchange in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Stratton, Margaret M; Going, Catherine C; McSpadden, Ethan D; Huang, Yongjian; Susa, Anna C; Elleman, Anna; Cao, Yumeng Melody; Pappireddi, Nishant; Burkhardt, Pawel; Gee, Christine L; Barros, Tiago; Schulman, Howard; Williams, Evan R; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    Activation triggers the exchange of subunits in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an oligomeric enzyme that is critical for learning, memory, and cardiac function. The mechanism by which subunit exchange occurs remains elusive. We show that the human CaMKII holoenzyme exists in dodecameric and tetradecameric forms, and that the calmodulin (CaM)-binding element of CaMKII can bind to the hub of the holoenzyme and destabilize it to release dimers. The structures of CaMKII from two distantly diverged organisms suggest that the CaM-binding element of activated CaMKII acts as a wedge by docking at intersubunit interfaces in the hub. This converts the hub into a spiral form that can release or gain CaMKII dimers. Our data reveal a three-way competition for the CaM-binding element, whereby phosphorylation biases it towards the hub interface, away from the kinase domain and calmodulin, thus unlocking the ability of activated CaMKII holoenzymes to exchange dimers with unactivated ones. PMID:26949248

  14. Studies on ribosomal proteins in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of proteins in the 40-S and 60-S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Ramagopal, S; Ennis, H L

    1980-04-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and subunit localization of ribosomal proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum. The characterization is based on the resolution of ribosomal proteins by various methods of electrophoresis. 34 and 42 unique proteins were identified in the 40-S and 60-S ribosomal subunits respectively. The total mass of proteins in the 40-S subunit was 746,100 daltons and 981,900 daltons in the 60-S subunit. The molecular weights of individual proteins in the 40-S subunit ranged from 13,200 to 40,900 with a number-average molecular weight of 21,900. The molecular weight range for the 60-S subunit was 13,800--51,100 with a number-average molecular weight of 23,400. The 80-S ribosome contained 78 proteins, two of which were lost upon its dissociation into subunits. All the proteins of the 40-S and 60-S subunits could be identified individually in a 80-S map as well as in unfractionated proteins from whole cells. Purification of ribosomes in high-ionic-strength buffers resulted in non-specific loss of the various proteins from the 40-S and 60-S subunits. In addition, the undissociated ribosomes contained about 10 acidic proteins in the molecular weight range 50,000--100,000, which were retained after washing the ribosomes in high-salt buffers. They were found in polysomes, run-off ribosomes and could also be identified in the 40-S subunit after dissociation.

  15. Interolog interfaces in protein–protein docking

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, James D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins are essential elements of biological systems, and their function typically relies on their ability to successfully bind to specific partners. Recently, an emphasis of study into protein interactions has been on hot spots, or residues in the binding interface that make a significant contribution to the binding energetics. In this study, we investigate how conservation of hot spots can be used to guide docking prediction. We show that the use of evolutionary data combined with hot spot prediction highlights near‐native structures across a range of benchmark examples. Our approach explores various strategies for using hot spots and evolutionary data to score protein complexes, using both absolute and chemical definitions of conservation along with refinements to these strategies that look at windowed conservation and filtering to ensure a minimum number of hot spots in each binding partner. Finally, structure‐based models of orthologs were generated for comparison with sequence‐based scoring. Using two data sets of 22 and 85 examples, a high rate of top 10 and top 1 predictions are observed, with up to 82% of examples returning a top 10 hit and 35% returning top 1 hit depending on the data set and strategy applied; upon inclusion of the native structure among the decoys, up to 55% of examples yielded a top 1 hit. The 20 common examples between data sets show that more carefully curated interolog data yields better predictions, particularly in achieving top 1 hits. Proteins 2015; 83:1940–1946. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25740680

  16. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-07-16

    We have found that soybean cotyledons could be cultured in vitro and that the storage proteins were formed essentially as on a plant. When methionine was added to the medium, the cotyledons grew faster, and the methionine content of the protein fraction was increased by over 20 percent. The high methionine content of the protein fraction was found to be due to a shift in the relative amounts of the two major storage proteins. The later effect was the result of methionine treatment suppressing the expression of one storage protein subunit gene. The goal was to determine the mechanism by which methionine is able to regulate the expression of the ..beta..-subunit gene.

  17. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein sequence had no marked similarity to known fimbrial sequences, and no homologous sequences could be found in other black-pigmented Bacteroides species, suggesting that fimbrillin represents a class of fimbrial subunit protein of limited distribution. Images PMID:2895100

  18. Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum: lessons from the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddon, R. W.; Sherman, S. A.; Bedows, E.

    1996-01-01

    There have been few studies of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum of intact mammalian cells. In the one case where the in vivo and in vitro folding pathways of a mammalian secretory protein have been compared, the folding of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta subunit (hCG-beta), the order of formation of the detected folding intermediates is the same. The rate and efficiency with which multidomain proteins such as hCG-beta fold to native structure in intact cells is higher than in vitro, although intracellular rates of folding of the beta subunit can be approached in vitro in the presence of an optimal redox potential and protein disulfide isomerase. Understanding how proteins fold in vivo may provide a new way to diagnose and treat human illnesses that occur due to folding defects. PMID:8844836

  19. Replication protein A subunit 3 and the iron efficiency response in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], iron deficiency results in interveinal chlorosis and decreased photosynthetic capacity, leading to stunting and yield loss. In this study, gene expression analyses investigated the role of soybean replication protein A (RPA) subunits during iron stress. Nine RP...

  20. Fluorescence polarization and fluctuation analysis monitors subunit proximity, stoichiometry, and protein complex hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan A; Sarkar, Pabak; Veetil, Jithesh V; Koushik, Srinagesh V; Vogel, Steven S

    2012-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is frequently used to study protein interactions and conformational changes in living cells. The utility of FRET is limited by false positive and negative signals. To overcome these limitations we have developed Fluorescence Polarization and Fluctuation Analysis (FPFA), a hybrid single-molecule based method combining time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (homo-FRET) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using FPFA, homo-FRET (a 1-10 nm proximity gauge), brightness (a measure of the number of fluorescent subunits in a complex), and correlation time (an attribute sensitive to the mass and shape of a protein complex) can be simultaneously measured. These measurements together rigorously constrain the interpretation of FRET signals. Venus based control-constructs were used to validate FPFA. The utility of FPFA was demonstrated by measuring in living cells the number of subunits in the α-isoform of Venus-tagged calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase-II (CaMKIIα) holoenzyme. Brightness analysis revealed that the holoenzyme has, on average, 11.9 ± 1.2 subunit, but values ranged from 10-14 in individual cells. Homo-FRET analysis simultaneously detected that catalytic domains were arranged as dimers in the dodecameric holoenzyme, and this paired organization was confirmed by quantitative hetero-FRET analysis. In freshly prepared cell homogenates FPFA detected only 10.2 ± 1.3 subunits in the holoenzyme with values ranging from 9-12. Despite the reduction in subunit number, catalytic domains were still arranged as pairs in homogenates. Thus, FPFA suggests that while the absolute number of subunits in an auto-inhibited holoenzyme might vary from cell to cell, the organization of catalytic domains into pairs is preserved. PMID:22666486

  1. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    PubMed

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  2. Formation of fluorescent proteins by the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to R-phycoerythrin alpha and beta apo-subunits.

    PubMed

    Isailovic, Dragan; Sultana, Ishrat; Phillips, Gregory J; Yeung, Edward S

    2006-11-01

    Formation of fluorescent proteins was explored after incubation of recombinant apo-subunits of phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin with phycoerythrobilin chromophore. Alpha and beta apo-subunit genes of R-phycoerythrin from red algae Polisiphonia boldii were cloned in plasmid pET-21d(+). Hexahistidine-tagged alpha and beta apo-subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were constituted after incubation of E. coli cells with phycoerythrobilin. Holo-subunits contained both phycoerythrobilin and urobilin chromophores. Fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in bacterial cells. Cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits were several times brighter than control cells as found by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The addition of phycoerythrobilin to cells did not show cytotoxic effects, in contrast to expression of proteins in inclusion bodies. In an attempt to improve solubility, R-phycoerythrin apo-subunits were fused to maltose-binding protein and incubated with phycoerythrobilin both in vitro and in vivo. Highly fluorescent soluble fusion proteins containing phycoerythrobilin as the sole chromophore were formed. Fusion proteins were localized by fluorescence microscopy either throughout E. coli cells or at cell poles. Flow cytometry showed that cells containing fluorescent fusion proteins were up to 10 times brighter than control cells. Results indicate that fluorescent proteins formed by attachment of phycoerythrobilin to expressed apo-subunits of phycobiliproteins can be used as fluorescent probes for analysis of cells by microscopy and flow cytometry. A unique property of these fluorescent reporters is their utility in both properly folded (soluble) subunits and subunits aggregated in inclusion bodies.

  3. FORMATION OF FLUORESCENT PROTEINS BY THE ATTACHMENT OF PHYCOERYTHROBILIN TO R-PHYCOERYTHRIN ALPHA AND BETA APO-SUBUNITS

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Sultana, Ishrat; Phillips, Gregory J.; Yeung, Edward S.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of fluorescent proteins was explored after incubation of recombinant apo-subunits of phycobiliprotein R-phycoerythrin with phycoerythrobilin chromophore. Alpha and beta apo-subunit genes of R-phycoerythrin from red algae Polisiphonia boldii were cloned in plasmids pET-21d (+). Hexa-histidine tagged apo-alpha and apo-beta subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were constituted after incubation of Escherichia coli cells with phycoerythrobilin. Subunits contained both phycoerythrobilin and urobilin chromophores. Fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in bacterial cells. Cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits were several times brighter than control cells as found by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Addition of phycoerythrobilin to cells did not show cytotoxic effects in contrast to expression of proteins in inclusion bodies. In an attempt to improve solubility, R-phycoerythrin apo-subunits were fused to maltose binding protein and incubated with phycoerythrobilin both in vitro and in vivo. Highly-fluorescent soluble fusion proteins were formed containing phycoerythrobilin as the sole chromophore. Fusion proteins were localized by fluorescence microscopy either throughout Escherichia coli cells or at cell poles. Flow cytometry showed that cells containing fluorescent fusion proteins were up to ten times brighter than control cells. Results indicate that fluorescent proteins formed by attachment of phycoerythrobilin to expressed apo-subunits of phycobiliproteins can be used as fluorescent probes for analysis of cells by microscopy and flow cytometry. A unique property of these fluorescent reporters is their utility in both properly folded (soluble) subunits and subunits aggregated in inclusion bodies. PMID:16979575

  4. Regulatory–auxiliary subunits of CLC chloride channel–transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Gradogna, Antonella; Zanardi, Ilaria; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The CLC family of chloride channels and transporters is composed by nine members, but only three of them, ClC-Ka/b, ClC-7 and ClC-2, have been found so far associated with auxiliary subunits. These CLC regulatory subunits are small proteins that present few common characteristics among them, both structurally and functionally, and their effects on the corresponding CLC protein are different. Barttin, a protein with two transmembrane domains, is essential for the membrane localization of ClC-K proteins and their activity in the kidney and inner ear. Ostm1 is a protein with a single transmembrane domain and a highly glycosylated N-terminus. Unlike the other two CLC auxiliary subunits, Ostm1 shows a reciprocal relationship with ClC-7 for their stability. The subcellular localization of Ostm1 depends on ClC-7 and not the other way around. ClC-2 is active on its own, but GlialCAM, a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule with two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, regulates its subcellular localization and activity in glial cells. The common theme for these three proteins is their requirement for a proper homeostasis, since their malfunction leads to distinct diseases. We will review here their properties and their role in normal chloride physiology and the pathological consequences of their improper function. PMID:25762128

  5. Blind predictions of protein interfaces by docking calculations in CAPRI.

    PubMed

    Lensink, Marc F; Wodak, Shoshana J

    2010-11-15

    Reliable prediction of the amino acid residues involved in protein-protein interfaces can provide valuable insight into protein function, and inform mutagenesis studies, and drug design applications. A fast-growing number of methods are being proposed for predicting protein interfaces, using structural information, energetic criteria, or sequence conservation or by integrating multiple criteria and approaches. Overall however, their performance remains limited, especially when applied to nonobligate protein complexes, where the individual components are also stable on their own. Here, we evaluate interface predictions derived from protein-protein docking calculations. To this end we measure the overlap between the interfaces in models of protein complexes submitted by 76 participants in CAPRI (Critical Assessment of Predicted Interactions) and those of 46 observed interfaces in 20 CAPRI targets corresponding to nonobligate complexes. Our evaluation considers multiple models for each target interface, submitted by different participants, using a variety of docking methods. Although this results in a substantial variability in the prediction performance across participants and targets, clear trends emerge. Docking methods that perform best in our evaluation predict interfaces with average recall and precision levels of about 60%, for a small majority (60%) of the analyzed interfaces. These levels are significantly higher than those obtained for nonobligate complexes by most extant interface prediction methods. We find furthermore that a sizable fraction (24%) of the interfaces in models ranked as incorrect in the CAPRI assessment are actually correctly predicted (recall and precision ≥50%), and that these models contribute to 70% of the correct docking-based interface predictions overall. Our analysis proves that docking methods are much more successful in identifying interfaces than in predicting complexes, and suggests that these methods have an excellent

  6. Suppression of conformational heterogeneity at a protein-protein interface.

    PubMed

    Deis, Lindsay N; Wu, Qinglin; Wang, You; Qi, Yang; Daniels, Kyle G; Zhou, Pei; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-21

    Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is an important virulence factor from Staphylococcus aureus responsible for the bacterium's evasion of the host immune system. SpA includes five small three-helix-bundle domains that can each bind with high affinity to many host proteins such as antibodies. The interaction between a SpA domain and the Fc fragment of IgG was partially elucidated previously in the crystal structure 1FC2. Although informative, the previous structure was not properly folded and left many substantial questions unanswered, such as a detailed description of the tertiary structure of SpA domains in complex with Fc and the structural changes that take place upon binding. Here we report the 2.3-Å structure of a fully folded SpA domain in complex with Fc. Our structure indicates that there are extensive structural rearrangements necessary for binding Fc, including a general reduction in SpA conformational heterogeneity, freezing out of polyrotameric interfacial residues, and displacement of a SpA side chain by an Fc side chain in a molecular-recognition pocket. Such a loss of conformational heterogeneity upon formation of the protein-protein interface may occur when SpA binds its multiple binding partners. Suppression of conformational heterogeneity may be an important structural paradigm in functionally plastic proteins. PMID:26157136

  7. Interactions of protein content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins in relation to tofu gel properties.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew T; Yang, Aijun

    2016-03-01

    The content and globulin subunit composition of soybean proteins are known to affect tofu quality and food-grade soybeans usually have higher levels of proteins. We studied the tofu quality of soybeans with high (44.8%) or low (39.1%) protein content and with or without the 11S globulin polypeptide, 11SA4. Both protein content and 11SA4 significantly affected tofu gel properties. Soybeans containing more protein had smaller seeds which produced significantly firmer (0.663 vs.0.557 N, p<0.001) tofu gels with creamier colour. The absence of 11SA4 was positively correlated with seed size, tofu hardness and water holding capacity and led to significant changes to the profile of storage protein subunits, which may have contributed to the improvement in tofu gel properties. These results suggest that, in combination with higher protein content, certain protein subunits or their polypeptides can also be targeted in selecting soybeans to further improve soy food quality.

  8. Structure-based energetics of protein interfaces guides foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Scott, Katherine; Burman, Alison; Loureiro, Silvia; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Ginn, Helen M; Jackson, Terry; Perez-Martin, Eva; Siebert, C Alistair; Paul, Guntram; Huiskonen, Juha T; Jones, Ian M; Esnouf, Robert M; Fry, Elizabeth E; Maree, Francois F; Charleston, Bryan; Stuart, David I

    2015-10-01

    Virus capsids are primed for disassembly, yet capsid integrity is key to generating a protective immune response. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids comprise identical pentameric protein subunits held together by tenuous noncovalent interactions and are often unstable. Chemically inactivated or recombinant empty capsids, which could form the basis of future vaccines, are even less stable than live virus. Here we devised a computational method to assess the relative stability of protein-protein interfaces and used it to design improved candidate vaccines for two poorly stable, but globally important, serotypes of FMDV: O and SAT2. We used a restrained molecular dynamics strategy to rank mutations predicted to strengthen the pentamer interfaces and applied the results to produce stabilized capsids. Structural analyses and stability assays confirmed the predictions, and vaccinated animals generated improved neutralizing-antibody responses to stabilized particles compared to parental viruses and wild-type capsids.

  9. Structure-based energetics of protein interfaces guides foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Abhay; Seago, Julian; Scott, Katherine; Burman, Alison; Loureiro, Silvia; Ren, Jingshan; Porta, Claudine; Ginn, Helen M; Jackson, Terry; Perez-Martin, Eva; Siebert, C Alistair; Paul, Guntram; Huiskonen, Juha T; Jones, Ian M; Esnouf, Robert M; Fry, Elizabeth E; Maree, Francois F; Charleston, Bryan; Stuart, David I

    2015-10-01

    Virus capsids are primed for disassembly, yet capsid integrity is key to generating a protective immune response. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsids comprise identical pentameric protein subunits held together by tenuous noncovalent interactions and are often unstable. Chemically inactivated or recombinant empty capsids, which could form the basis of future vaccines, are even less stable than live virus. Here we devised a computational method to assess the relative stability of protein-protein interfaces and used it to design improved candidate vaccines for two poorly stable, but globally important, serotypes of FMDV: O and SAT2. We used a restrained molecular dynamics strategy to rank mutations predicted to strengthen the pentamer interfaces and applied the results to produce stabilized capsids. Structural analyses and stability assays confirmed the predictions, and vaccinated animals generated improved neutralizing-antibody responses to stabilized particles compared to parental viruses and wild-type capsids. PMID:26389739

  10. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine . E-mail: a.k.kvissel@basalmed.uio.no; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both C{alpha} and C{beta} are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism.

  11. Purification of chymotrypsin by subunit exchange chromatography on the denatured protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Antonini, E.; Pasta, P.

    1983-05-01

    The ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions (6M urea or 1% SDS) on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, were found to interact with soluble chymotrypsin subunits with the formation of oligomers higher than dimers. Subunits immobilized under nondenaturing conditions form only dimers. The effects of several parameters, such as organic solvents, cations, and anions of the lyotropic series, on the associating properties of the immobilized derivatives were examined. The interaction between immobilized and free enzyme was shown to be specific because extraneous proteins and compounds were not bound by the derivatives. Chymotrypsinogen, studied analogously, did not show appreciable self-associating capacity. Chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions and packed in a column proved to be suitable for the purification of chymotrypsin from both bovine and porcine pancreatic extracts. The ''subunit exchange'' chromatography of such extracts, carried out between pH 2.5 and 4, gave an eightfold purification with a 93% recovery of chymotryptic activity. The specific activity was ca. 12,000 Schwert and Takenaka units/mg. Only 6% of the tryptic activity was bound by the column. The capacity of the matrix, 6 mg chymotrypsin/mL, dropped to about 70% of the original value.

  12. Purification of chymotrypsin by subunit exchange chromatography on the denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Carrea, G; Pasta, P; Antonini, E

    1983-05-01

    The alpha-chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions (6 M urea or 1% SDS) on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, were found to interact with soluble chymotrypsin subunits with the formation of oligomers higher than dimers. Subunits immobilized under nondenaturing conditions form only dimers. The effects of several parameters, such as organic solvents, cations, and anions of the lyotropic series, on the associating properties of the immobilized derivatives were examined. The interaction between immobilized and free enzyme was shown to be specific because extraneous proteins and compounds were not bound by the derivatives. Chymotrypsinogen, studied analogously, did not show appreciable self-associating capacity. Chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions and packed in a column proved to be suitable for the purification of chymotrypsin from both bovine and porcine pancreatic extracts. The "subunit exchange" chromatography of such extracts, carried out between pH 2.5 and 4, gave an eightfold purification with a 93% recovery of chymotryptic activity. The specific activity was ca. 12,000 Schwert and Takenaka units/mg. Only 6% of the tryptic activity was bound by the column. The capacity of the matrix, 6 mg chymotrypsin/mL, dropped to about 70% of the original value after.

  13. G protein γ subunit 7 induces autophagy and inhibits cell division

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juanjuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Yang, Xingxing; Wang, Wenchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    GNG7 (G protein γ subunit 7), a subunit of heterotrimeric G protein, is ubiquitously expressed in multiple tissues but is down-regulated in various cancers. Its expression could reduce tumor volume in mice but the mechanism was not clear. Here we show that GNG7 overexpression inhibits cell proliferation and increases cell death. GNG7 level is cell cycle-dependent and it regulates actin cytoskeleton and cell division. In addition, GNG7 is an autophagy inducer, which is the first reported Gγ protein involved in autophagy. GNG7 knockdown reduces Rapamycin and starvation-induced autophagy. Further analysis reveals that GNG7 inhibits MTOR in cells, a central regulator for autophagy and cell proliferation. In conclusion, GNG7 inhibits MTOR pathway to induce autophagy and cell death, inhibits cell division by regulating actin cytoskeleton. These combined effects lead to the antitumor capacity of GNG7. PMID:27056891

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A in cardiac cell fractions of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Popova, I.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling in heart tissue of rats flown on Cosmos 2044 was used to measure the regulatory (R) subunits of adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase. A significant decrease of RII subunits in the particulate cell fraction extract (S2; P less than 0.05 in all cases) was observed when extracts of tissue samples from vivarium controls were compared with those from flight animals. Photoaffinity labeling of the soluble fraction (S1) was observed to be unaffected by spaceflight or any of the simulation conditions. Proteins of the S2 fraction constitute a minor (less than 10 percent) component of the total, whereas the S1 fraction contained most of the cell proteins. Changes in a relatively minor aspect of adenosine monophosphate-mediated reactions are considered to be representative of a metabolic effect.

  15. Enhanced factor VIIIa stability of A2 domain interface variants results from an increased apparent affinity for the A2 subunit. Results from an increased apparent affinity for the A2 subunit.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, M; Wakabayashi, H; Griffiths, A; Wintermute, J; Fay, P J

    2014-09-01

    Factor (F)VIIIa, a heterotrimer comprised of A1, A2, and A3C1C2 subunits, is labile due to the tendency of the A2 subunit to dissociate from the A1/A3C1C2 dimer. As dissociation of the A2 subunit inactivates FVIIIa activity, retention of A2 defines FVIIIa stability and thus, FXase activity. Earlier results showed that replacing residues D519, E665, and E1984 at the A2 domain interface with Ala or Val reduced rates of FVIIIa decay, increasing FXa and thrombin generation. We now show the enhanced FVIIIa stability of these variants results from increases in inter-A2 subunit affinity. Using a FVIIIa reconstitution assay to monitor inter-subunit affinity by activity regeneration, the apparent Kd value for the interaction of wild-type (WT) A2 subunit with WT A1/A3C1C2 dimer (43 ± 2 nM) was significantly higher than values observed for the A2 point mutants D519A/V, E665A/V, and E1984A/V which ranged from ~5 to ~19 nM. Val was determined to be the optimal hydrophobic residue at position 665 (apparent Kd = 5.1 ± 0.7 nM) as substitutions with Ile or Leu at this position increased the apparent Kd value by ~3- and ~7-fold, respectively. Furthermore, the double mutant (D519V/E665V) showed an ~47-fold lower apparent Kd value (0.9 ± 0.6 nM) than WT. Thus these hydrophobic mutations at the A2 subunit interfaces result in high binding affinities for the A2 subunit and correlate well with previously observed reductions in rates in FVIIIa decay. PMID:24899227

  16. Structure-function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring.

    PubMed

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure-function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not.

  17. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  18. Function and subnuclear distribution of Rpp21, a protein subunit of the human ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease P.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrous, N; Reiner, R; Wesolowski, D; Mann, H; Guerrier-Takada, C; Altman, S

    2001-01-01

    Rpp21, a protein subunit of human nuclear ribonuclease P (RNase P) was cloned by virtue of its homology with Rpr2p, an essential subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear RNase P. Rpp21 is encoded by a gene that resides in the class I gene cluster of the major histocompatibility complex, is associated with highly purified RNase P, and binds precursor tRNA. Rpp21 is predominantly localized in the nucleoplasm but is also observed in nucleoli and Cajal bodies when expressed at high levels. Intron retention and splice-site selection in Rpp21 precursor mRNA regulate the intranuclear distribution of the protein products and their association with the RNase P holoenzyme. Our study reveals that dynamic nuclear structures that include nucleoli, the perinucleolar compartment and Cajal bodies are all involved in the production and assembly of human RNase P. PMID:11497433

  19. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  20. Are protein-protein interfaces special regions on a protein's surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in many cellular processes. Experimentally obtained protein quaternary structures provide the location of protein-protein interfaces, the surface region of a given protein that interacts with another. These regions are termed half-interfaces (HIs). Canonical HIs cover roughly one third of a protein's surface and were found to have more hydrophobic residues than the non-interface surface region. In addition, the classical view of protein HIs was that there are a few (if not one) HIs per protein that are structurally and chemically unique. However, on average, a given protein interacts with at least a dozen others. This raises the question of whether they use the same or other HIs. By copying HIs from monomers with the same folds in solved quaternary structures, we introduce the concept of geometric HIs (HIs whose geometry has a significant match to other known interfaces) and show that on average they cover three quarters of a protein's surface. We then demonstrate that in some cases, these geometric HI could result in real physical interactions (which may or may not be biologically relevant). The composition of the new HIs is on average more charged compared to most known ones, suggesting that the current protein interface database is biased towards more hydrophobic, possibly more obligate, complexes. Finally, our results provide evidence for interface fuzziness and PPI promiscuity. Thus, the classical view of unique, well defined HIs needs to be revisited as HIs are another example of coarse-graining that is used by nature.

  1. Protein-Protein Interface Detection Using the Energy Centrality Relationship (ECR) Characteristic of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sudarshan, Sanjana; Kodathala, Sasi B.; Mahadik, Amruta C.; Mehta, Isha; Beck, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Specific protein interactions are responsible for most biological functions. Distinguishing Functionally Linked Interfaces of Proteins (FLIPs), from Functionally uncorrelated Contacts (FunCs), is therefore important to characterizing these interactions. To achieve this goal, we have created a database of protein structures called FLIPdb, containing proteins belonging to various functional sub-categories. Here, we use geometric features coupled with Kortemme and Baker's computational alanine scanning method to calculate the energetic sensitivity of each amino acid at the interface to substitution, identify hotspots, and identify other factors that may contribute towards an interface being FLIP or FunC. Using Principal Component Analysis and K-means clustering on a training set of 160 interfaces, we could distinguish FLIPs from FunCs with an accuracy of 76%. When these methods were applied to two test sets of 18 and 170 interfaces, we achieved similar accuracies of 78% and 80%. We have identified that FLIP interfaces have a stronger central organizing tendency than FunCs, due, we suggest, to greater specificity. We also observe that certain functional sub-categories, such as enzymes, antibody-heavy-light, antibody-antigen, and enzyme-inhibitors form distinct sub-clusters. The antibody-antigen and enzyme-inhibitors interfaces have patterns of physical characteristics similar to those of FunCs, which is in agreement with the fact that the selection pressures of these interfaces is differently evolutionarily driven. As such, our ECR model also successfully describes the impact of evolution and natural selection on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we indicate how our ECR method may be of use in reducing the false positive rate of docking calculations. PMID:24830938

  2. The low-affinity ATP binding site of the Escherichia coli SecA dimer is localized at the subunit interface.

    PubMed

    van der Wolk, J P; Boorsma, A; Knoche, M; Schäfer, H J; Driessen, A J

    1997-12-01

    The homodimeric SecA protein is the ATP-dependent force generator in the Escherichia coli precursor protein translocation cascade. SecA contains two essential nucleotide binding sites (NBSs), i.e., NBS1 and NBS2 that bind ATP with high and low affinity, respectively. The photoactivatable bifunctional cross-linking agent 3'-arylazido-8-azidoadenosine 5'-triphosphate (diN3ATP) was used to investigate the spatial arrangement of the nucleotide binding sites of SecA. DiN3ATP is an authentic ATP analogue as it supports SecA-dependent precursor protein translocation and translocation ATPase. UV-induced photo-cross-linking of the diN3ATP-bound SecA results in the formation of stable dimeric species of SecA. D209N SecA, a mutant unable to bind nucleotides at NBS1, was also photo-cross-linked by diN3ATP, whereas no cross-linking occurred with the NBS2 mutant R509K SecA. We concluded that the low-affinity NBS2, which is located in the carboxyl-terminal half of SecA, is the site of crosslinking and that NBS2 binds nucleotides at or near the subunit interface of the SecA dimer. PMID:9398216

  3. The alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Grishin, N V

    1999-08-01

    Lipidation catalyzed by protein prenyltransferases is essential for the biological function of a number of eukaryotic proteins, many of which are involved in signal transduction and vesicular traffic regulation. Sequence similarity searches reveal that the alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases (PTalpha) is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) superfamily. This finding makes the three-dimensional structure of the rat protein farnesyltransferase the first structural model of a TPR protein interacting with its protein partner. Structural comparison of the two TPR domains in protein farnesyltransferase and protein phosphatase 5 indicates that variation in TPR consensus residues may affect protein binding specificity through altering the overall shape of the TPR superhelix. A general approach to evolutionary analysis of proteins with repetitive sequence motifs has been developed and applied to the protein prenyltransferases and other TPR proteins. The results suggest that all members in PTalpha family originated from a common multirepeat ancestor, while the common ancestor of PTalpha and other members of TPR superfamily is likely to be a single repeat protein.

  4. The Drosophila kinesin-I associated protein YETI binds both kinesin subunits.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, T P; Tanzi, C L; Gindhart, J G

    2003-12-01

    The microtubule-based motor kinesin-I is essential for the intracellular transport of membrane-bound organelles in the Drosophila nervous system and female germ line. A number of studies have demonstrated that kinesin-I binds to its intracellular cargos through protein-protein interactions between the kinesin tail domain and proteins on the cargo surface. To identify proteins that mediate or regulate kinesin-cargo interactions, we have performed yeast two-hybrid screens of a Drosophila embryonic cDNA library, using the tetratricopeptide repeats of the kinesin light chain and amino acids 675-975 of the kinesin heavy chain as baits. One of the proteins we have identified is YETI. Interestingly, YETI has the unique ability to bind specifically to both subunits of the kinesin tail domain. An epitope-tagged YETI fusion protein, when expressed in Drosophila S2 cultured cells, binds to kinesin-I in copurification assays, suggesting that YETI-kinesin-I interactions are context-independent. Immunostaining of cultured cells expressing YETI shows that YETI accumulates in the nucleus and cytosol. YETI is evolutionarily conserved, and its yeast homolog (AOR1) may have a role in regulating cytoskeletal dynamics or intracellular transport. Collectively, these results demonstrate that YETI interacts with both kinesin subunits of the kinesin tail domain, and is potentially involved in kinesin-dependent transport pathways.

  5. Inhibition of Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling by a Small Molecule Acting on Gα Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Damian, Marjorie; Gespach, Christian; Ferrandis, Eric; Lavergne, Olivier; De Wever, Olivier; Banères, Jean-Louis; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prévost, Grégoire Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous activation of many distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and heterotrimeric G proteins play a major role in various pathological conditions. Pan-inhibition of GPCR signaling by small molecules thus represents a novel strategy to treat various diseases. To better understand such therapeutic approach, we have characterized the biomolecular target of BIM-46187, a small molecule pan-inhibitor of GPCR signaling. Combining bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques in living cells as well as in reconstituted receptor-G protein complexes, we observed that, by direct binding to the Gα subunit, BIM-46187 prevents the conformational changes of the receptor-G protein complex associated with GPCR activation. Such a binding prevents the proper interaction of receptors with the G protein heterotrimer and inhibits the agonist-promoted GDP/GTP exchange. These observations bring further evidence that inhibiting G protein activation through direct binding to the Gα subunit is feasible and should constitute a new strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19648112

  6. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  7. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  8. G-protein beta-subunit specificity in the fast membrane-delimited inhibition of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    García, D E; Li, B; García-Ferreiro, R E; Hernández-Ochoa, E O; Yan, K; Gautam, N; Catterall, W A; Mackie, K; Hille, B

    1998-11-15

    We investigated which subtypes of G-protein beta subunits participate in voltage-dependent modulation of N-type calcium channels. Calcium currents were recorded from cultured rat superior cervical ganglion neurons injected intranuclearly with DNA encoding five different G-protein beta subunits. Gbeta1 and Gbeta2 strongly mimicked the fast voltage-dependent inhibition of calcium channels produced by many G-protein-coupled receptors. The Gbeta5 subunit produced much weaker effects than Gbeta1 and Gbeta2, whereas Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 were nearly inactive in these electrophysiological studies. The specificity implied by these results was confirmed and extended using the yeast two-hybrid system to test for protein-protein interactions. Here, Gbeta1 or Gbeta2 coupled to the GAL4-activation domain interacted strongly with a channel sequence corresponding to the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II of a alpha1 subunit of the class B calcium channel fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. In this assay, the Gbeta5 subunit interacted weakly, and Gbeta3 and Gbeta4 failed to interact. Together, these results suggest that Gbeta1 and/or Gbeta2 subunits account for most of the voltage-dependent inhibition of N-type calcium channels and that the linker between domains I and II of the calcium channel alpha1 subunit is a principal receptor for this inhibition. PMID:9801356

  9. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Little, Sean C; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A; Kline, Crystal F; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M; Carnes, Cynthia A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Davis, Jonathan P; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α(+/-) myocytes resulted in reduced Ca(2+) waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart.

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B56α limits phosphatase activity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Little, Sean C.; Curran, Jerry; Makara, Michael A.; Kline, Crystal F.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Xu, Zhaobin; Wu, Xiangqiong; Polina, Iuliia; Musa, Hassan; Meadows, Allison M.; Carnes, Cynthia A.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Weisleder, Noah; Györke, Sandor; Wehrens, Xander H.; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-selective holoenzyme composed of a catalytic, scaffolding, and regulatory subunit. In the heart, PP2A activity is requisite for cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and central in adrenergic signaling. We found that mice deficient in the PP2A regulatory subunit B56α (1 of 13 regulatory subunits) had altered PP2A signaling in the heart that was associated with changes in cardiac physiology, suggesting that the B56α regulatory subunit had an autoinhibitory role that suppressed excess PP2A activity. The increase in PP2A activity in the mice with reduced B56α expression resulted in slower heart rates and increased heart rate variability, conduction defects, and increased sensitivity of heart rate to parasympathetic agonists. Increased PP2A activity in B56α+/− myocytes resulted in reduced Ca2+ waves and sparks, which was associated with decreased phosphorylation (and thus decreased activation) of the ryanodine receptor RyR2, an ion channel on intracellular membranes that is involved in Ca2+ regulation in cardiomyocytes. In line with an autoinhibitory role for B56α, in vivo expression of B56α in the absence of altered abundance of other PP2A subunits decreased basal phosphatase activity. Consequently, in vivo expression of B56α suppressed parasympathetic regulation of heart rate and increased RyR2 phosphorylation in cardiomyocytes. These data show that an integral component of the PP2A holoenzyme has an important inhibitory role in controlling PP2A enzyme activity in the heart. PMID:26198358

  11. Subunit Interactions and Organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Intraflagellar Transport Complex A Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Behal, Robert H.; Miller, Mark S.; Qin, Hongmin; Lucker, Ben F.; Jones, Alexis; Cole, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles can be biochemically resolved into two smaller assemblies, complexes A and B, that contain up to six and 15 protein subunits, respectively. We provide here the proteomic and immunological analyses that verify the identity of all six Chlamydomonas A proteins. Using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and antibody pulldowns, we show that all six A subunits are associated in a 16 S complex in both the cell bodies and flagella. A significant fraction of the cell body IFT43, however, exhibits a much slower sedimentation of ∼2 S and is not associated with the IFT A complex. To identify interactions between the six A proteins, we combined exhaustive yeast-based two-hybrid analysis, heterologous recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli, and analysis of the newly identified complex A mutants, ift121 and ift122. We show that IFT121 and IFT43 interact directly and provide evidence for additional interactions between IFT121 and IFT139, IFT121 and IFT122, IFT140 and IFT122, and IFT140 and IFT144. The mutant analysis further allows us to propose that a subset of complex A proteins, IFT144/140/122, can form a stable 12 S subcomplex that we refer to as the IFT A core. Based on these results, we propose a model for the spatial arrangement of the six IFT A components. PMID:22170070

  12. Size-dependent protein segregation at membrane interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Eva M.; Bakalar, Matthew H.; Choudhuri, Kaushik; Weichsel, Julian; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Geissler, Phillip L.; Dustin, Michael L.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane interfaces formed at cell-cell junctions are associated with characteristic patterns of membrane proteins whose organization is critical for intracellular signalling. To isolate the role of membrane protein size in pattern formation, we reconstituted model membrane interfaces in vitro using giant unilamellar vesicles decorated with synthetic binding and non-binding proteins. We show that size differences between membrane proteins can drastically alter their organization at membrane interfaces, with as little as a ~5 nm increase in non-binding protein size driving its exclusion from the interface. Combining in vitro measurements with Monte Carlo simulations, we find that non-binding protein exclusion is also influenced by lateral crowding, binding protein affinity, and thermally driven membrane height fluctuations that transiently limit access to the interface. This sensitive and highly effective means of physically segregating proteins has implications for cell-cell contacts such as T-cell immunological synapses (for example, CD45 exclusion) and epithelial cell junctions (for example, E-cadherin enrichment), as well as for protein sorting at intracellular contact points between membrane-bound organelles.

  13. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  14. Structure–function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring

    PubMed Central

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure–function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein–RNA and protein–protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not. PMID:27417296

  15. Molecular model of the G protein. alpha. subunit based on the crystal structure of the HRAS protein

    SciTech Connect

    Holbrook, S.R.; Kim, Sunghou )

    1989-03-01

    A structural model of guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein {alpha} subunits (G{sub {alpha}} subunits) is proposed based on the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the human HRAS protein (p21{sup ras}). Because of low overall sequence similarity, structural and functional constraints were used to align the G{sub {alpha}} consensus sequence with that of p21{sup ras}. The resulting G{sub {alpha}} model specifies the spatial relationship among the guanine nucleotide-binding site, the binding site of the {beta}{gamma} subunit complex, likely regions of effector and receptor interaction, and sites of cholera and pertussis toxin modification. The locations in the model of the experimentally determined sites of proteolytic digestion, point mutation, monoclonal antibody binding, and toxin modification are consistent with and help explain the observed biological activity. Two important findings from our model are (i) the orientation of the G{sub {alpha}} model with respect to the membrane and (ii) the identification of the spatial proximity of the N- and C-terminal regions. Furthermore, by analogy to p21{sup ras}, the model assigns specific residues in G{sub {alpha}} required for binding the guanosine (G-box) and phosphates (PO{sub 4}-box) and identifies residues potentially involved in the conformational switch mechanism (S-box). Specification of these critical regions in the G{sub {alpha}} model suggests guidelines for construction of mutants and chimeric proteins to experimentally test structural and functional hypotheses.

  16. Rice heterotrimeric G-protein gamma subunits (RGG1 and RGG2) are differentially regulated under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh Kumar; Islam, S M Shahinul; Tuteja, Narendra

    2012-07-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (α, β and γ subunits) are primarily involved in diverse signaling processes by transducing signals from an activated transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) to appropriate downstream effectors within cells. The role of α and β G-protein subunits in salinity and heat stress has been reported but the regulation of γ subunit of plant G-proteins in response to abiotic stress has not heretofore been described. In the present study we report the isolation of full-length cDNAs of two isoforms of Gγ [RGG1(I), 282 bp and RGG2(I), 453 bp] from rice (Oryza sativa cv Indica group Swarna) and described their transcript regulation in response to abiotic stresses. Protein sequence alignment and pairwise comparison of γ subunits of Indica rice [RGG(I)] with other known plant G-protein γ subunits demonstrated high homology to barley (HvGs) while soybean (GmG2) and Arabidopsis (AGG1) were least related. The numbers of the exons and introns were found to be similar between RGG1(I) and RGG2(I), but their sizes were different. Analyses of promoter sequences of RGG(I) confirmed the presence of stress-related cis-regulatory signature motifs suggesting their active and possible independent roles in abiotic stress signaling. The transcript levels of RGG1(I) and RGG2(I) were upregulated following NaCl, cold, heat and ABA treatments. However, in drought stress only RGG1(I) was upregulated. Strong support by transcript profiling suggests that γ subunits play a critical role via cross talk in signaling pathways. These findings provide first direct evidence for roles of Gγ subunits of rice G-proteins in regulation of abiotic stresses. These findings suggest the possible exploitation of γ subunits of G-protein machinery for promoting stress tolerance in plants.

  17. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Devlina; Janin, Joël; Robert, Charles H; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-11-01

    Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U) and bound (B) forms of protein structures from the Protein-Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors) and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69%) of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered) residues in the U form which are observed (ordered) in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  18. Composition of Overlapping Protein-Protein and Protein-Ligand Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ruzianisra; Degac, Jennifer; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a major role in many biological processes and they represent an important class of targets for therapeutic intervention. However, targeting PPIs is challenging because often no convenient natural substrates are available as starting point for small-molecule design. Here, we explored the characteristics of protein interfaces in five non-redundant datasets of 174 protein-protein (PP) complexes, and 161 protein-ligand (PL) complexes from the ABC database, 436 PP complexes, and 196 PL complexes from the PIBASE database and a dataset of 89 PL complexes from the Timbal database. In all cases, the small molecule ligands must bind at the respective PP interface. We observed similar amino acid frequencies in all three datasets. Remarkably, also the characteristics of PP contacts and overlapping PL contacts are highly similar. PMID:26517868

  19. Reconstructing the protein-water interface.

    PubMed

    Makarov, V A; Andrews, B K; Pettitt, B M

    1998-06-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated proteins and analysis of crystal structures contained in the Protein Data Bank, we develop a transferable set of perpendicular radial distribution functions for water molecules around globular proteins. These universal functions may be used to reconstruct the unique three-dimensional solvent density distribution around every individual protein with a modest error. We discuss potential applications of this solvent treatment in protein x-ray crystallographic refinements and in theoretical modeling. We also present a fast, grid-based algorithm for construction of the perpendicular solvent density distributions.

  20. Mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in eukaryotes: a highly conserved subunit composition highlighted by mining of protein databases.

    PubMed

    Cardol, Pierre

    2011-11-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Compared to its bacterial counterpart which encompasses 14-17 subunits, mitochondrial complex I has almost tripled its subunit composition during evolution of eukaryotes, by recruitment of so-called accessory subunits, part of them being specific to distinct evolutionary lineages. The increasing availability of numerous broadly sampled eukaryotic genomes now enables the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of this large protein complex. Here, a combination of profile-based sequence comparisons and basic structural properties analyses at the protein level enabled to pinpoint homology relationships between complex I subunits from fungi, mammals or green plants, previously identified as "lineage-specific" subunits. In addition, homologs of at least 40 mammalian complex I subunits are present in representatives of all major eukaryote assemblages, half of them having not been investigated so far (Excavates, Chromalveolates, Amoebozoa). This analysis revealed that complex I was subject to a phenomenal increase in size that predated the diversification of extant eukaryotes, followed by very few lineage-specific additions/losses of subunits. The implications of this subunit conservation for studies of complex I are discussed. PMID:21749854

  1. Evolution of protein interactions: from interactomes to interfaces.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Jessica; Guerois, Raphael

    2014-07-15

    Protein-protein interactions lie at the heart of most cellular processes. Many experimental and computational studies aim to deepen our understanding of these interactions and improve our capacity to predict them. In this respect, the evolutionary perspective is most interesting, since the preservation of structure and function puts constraints on the evolution of proteins and their interactions. However, uncovering these constraints remains a challenge, and the description and detection of evolutionary signals in protein-protein interactions is currently a very active field of research. Here, we review recent works dissecting the mechanisms of protein-protein interaction evolution and exploring how to use evolutionary information to predict interactions, both at the global level of the interactome and at the detailed level of protein-protein interfaces. We first present to what extent protein-protein interactions are found to be conserved within interactomes and which properties can influence their conservation. We then discuss the evolutionary and co-evolutionary pressures applied on protein-protein interfaces. Finally, we describe how the computational prediction of interfaces can benefit from evolutionary inputs. PMID:24853495

  2. Cloning and characterization of the G protein betagamma subunits from Trichoplusia ni (High Five cells).

    PubMed

    Vadakkadathmeethal, Kannan; Felczak, Aimee; Davignon, Isabelle; Collins, Julie; Sunahara, Roger K

    2005-04-01

    Baculoviral-mediated expression in insect cells has become a method of choice where high-level protein expression is desired and where expression in Escherichia coliform (E. coli.) is unsuitable. Genes of interest are inserted into the baculoviral genome of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) under the extremely strong, but very late polyhedron gene (PolH). The preferred host lines are derived from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9 or Sf21) or Tricoplusia ni (High Five, Invitrogen). Viral expression in insect cells is commonly used in the signal transduction field, due to the more than satisfactory capacity to express membrane proteins. However, co-association and/or co-purification of contaminating endogenous host G protein subunits, for example, may potentially threaten the functional and structural homogeneity of membrane preparations. The undefined G protein composition is complicated by the limited sequence data of either the S. frugiperda or Tricoplusia ni genomes. Here we report the isolation of cDNAs encoding two members of the heterotrimeric G protein family, Gbeta (Tn-Gbeta) and Ggamma (Tn-Ggamma), from Tricoplusia ni. Tn-Gbeta shares approximately 90% amino acid sequence identity with Gbeta from Drosophila melanogaster and 84% identity with mammalian Gbeta (human Gbeta1). Tn-Ggamma shares approximately 71% amino acid identity with D. melanogaster Ggamma1 and 42% identity with mammalian Ggamma (human Ggamma2). Tn-Gbetagamma is also functionally similar to mammalian Gbeta1gamma2 by virtue of their capacity to form a complex with mammalian Galpha subunits, support G-protein-dependent agonist binding to a mammalian G protein-coupled receptor (beta2-adrenergic receptor) and directly regulate effectors such as adenylyl cyclase. PMID:15763469

  3. Recycling of protein subunits during DNA translocation and cleavage by Type I restriction-modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Simons, Michelle; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzymes comprise three protein subunits; HsdS and HsdM that form a methyltransferase (MTase) and HsdR that associates with the MTase and catalyses Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent DNA translocation and cleavage. Here, we examine whether the MTase and HsdR components can 'turnover' in vitro, i.e. whether they can catalyse translocation and cleavage events on one DNA molecule, dissociate and then re-bind a second DNA molecule. Translocation termination by both EcoKI and EcoR124I leads to HsdR dissociation from linear DNA but not from circular DNA. Following DNA cleavage, the HsdR subunits appear unable to dissociate even though the DNA is linear, suggesting a tight interaction with the cleaved product. The MTases of EcoKI and EcoAI can dissociate from DNA following either translocation or cleavage and can initiate reactions on new DNA molecules as long as free HsdR molecules are available. In contrast, the MTase of EcoR124I does not turnover and additional cleavage of circular DNA is not observed by inclusion of RecBCD, a helicase-nuclease that degrades the linear DNA product resulting from Type I cleavage. Roles for Type I restriction endonuclease subunit dynamics in restriction alleviation in the cell are discussed.

  4. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Berthon, Annabel S; Szarek, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS) from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH). More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα), were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C) recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA's role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway. PMID:26042218

  5. PRKACA: the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Berthon, Annabel S.; Szarek, Eva; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is the main effector of cAMP signaling in all tissues. Inactivating mutations of the PRKAR1A gene, coding for the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, are responsible for Carney complex and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A inactivation and PKA dysregulation have been implicated in various types of adrenocortical pathologies associated with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (AICS) from PPNAD to adrenocortical adenomas and cancer, and other forms of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasias (BAH). More recently, mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit C alpha (Cα), were also identified in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PRKACA copy number gain was found in the germline of several patients with cortisol-producing BAH, whereas the somatic Leu206Arg (c.617A>C) recurrent PRKACA mutation was found in as many as half of all adrenocortical adenomas associated with AICS. In vitro analysis demonstrated that this mutation led to constitutive Cα activity, unregulated by its main partners, the PKA regulatory subunits. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the involvement of PRKACA in adrenocortical tumorigenesis, and our understanding of PKA's role in adrenocortical lesions. We also discuss potential therapeutic advances that can be made through targeting of PRKACA and the PKA pathway. PMID:26042218

  6. Essential ribosome assembly factor Fap7 regulates a hierarchy of RNA–protein interactions during small ribosomal subunit biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Ute A.; Weis, Benjamin L.; Lioutikov, Anatoli; Wurm, Jan Philip; Kaiser, Marco; Christ, Nina A.; Hantke, Katharina; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico; Wöhnert, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Factor activating Pos9 (Fap7) is an essential ribosome biogenesis factor important for the assembly of the small ribosomal subunit with an uncommon dual ATPase and adenylate kinase activity. Depletion of Fap7 or mutations in its ATPase motifs lead to defects in small ribosomal subunit rRNA maturation, the absence of ribosomal protein Rps14 from the assembled subunit, and retention of the nascent small subunit in a quality control complex with the large ribosomal subunit. The molecular basis for the role of Fap7 in ribosome biogenesis is, however, not yet understood. Here we show that Fap7 regulates multiple interactions between the precursor rRNA, ribosomal proteins, and ribosome assembly factors in a hierarchical manner. Fap7 binds to Rps14 with a very high affinity. Fap7 binding blocks both rRNA-binding elements of Rps14, suggesting that Fap7 inhibits premature interactions of Rps14 with RNA. The Fap7/Rps14 interaction is modulated by nucleotide binding to Fap7. Rps14 strongly activates the ATPase activity but not the adenylate kinase activity of Fap7, identifying Rps14 as an example of a ribosomal protein functioning as an ATPase-activating factor. In addition, Fap7 inhibits the RNA cleavage activity of Nob1, the endonuclease responsible for the final maturation step of the small subunit rRNA, in a nucleotide independent manner. Thus, Fap7 may regulate small subunit biogenesis at multiple stages. PMID:24003121

  7. Influence of magnesium and polyamines on the reactivity of individual ribosomal subunit proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination.

    PubMed

    Michalski, C J; Boyle, S M; Sells, B H

    1979-03-01

    30S and 50S subunits, in the presence of either 20 mM Mg2+ or 6 mM Mg2+ and 5mM spermidine plus 25 mM putrescine, were observed to completely associate to form 70S monosomes as monitored by sucrose gradient sedimentation. Subunits maintained under the above ionic conditions were compared with 30S and 50S particles at low (6 mM) magnesium concentration with respect to the reactivity of individual ribosomal proteins to lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. Altered reactivity to enzymatic iodination of ribosomal proteins S4, S9, S10, S14, S17, S19, and S20 in the small subunit of ribosomal proteins, L2, L9, L11, L27, and L30 in the large subunit following incubation with high magnesium or magnesium and polyamines suggests that a conformation change in both subunits accompanies the formation of 70S monosomes. The results further demonstrate that the effect of Mg2+ on subunit conformation is mimicked when polyamines are substituted for magnesium necessary for subunit association.

  8. Computational modeling of acrylodan-labeled cAMP dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Aleksei; Kivi, Rait; Järv, Jaak

    2016-04-01

    Structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, where the asparagine residue 326 was replaced with acrylodan-cystein conjugate to implement this fluorescence reporter group into the enzyme, was modeled by molecular dynamics (MD) method and the positioning of the dye molecule in protein structure was characterized at temperatures 300K, 500K and 700K. It was found that the acrylodan moiety, which fluorescence is very sensitive to solvating properties of its microenvironment, was located on the surface of the native protein at 300K that enabled its partial solvation with water. At high temperatures the protein structure significantly changed, as the secondary and tertiary structure elements were unfolded and these changes were sensitively reflected in positioning of the dye molecule. At 700K complete unfolding of the protein occurred and the reporter group was entirely expelled into water. However, at 500K an intermediate of the protein unfolding process was formed, where the fluorescence reporter group was directed towards the protein interior and buried in the core of the formed molten globule state. This different positioning of the reporter group was in agreement with the two different shifts of emission spectrum of the covalently bound acrylodan, observed in the unfolding process of the protein. PMID:26896699

  9. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion. PMID:26519625

  10. Evolutionary paths of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Søberg, Kristoffer; Jahnsen, Tore; Rognes, Torbjørn; Skålhegg, Bjørn S; Laerdahl, Jon K

    2013-01-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) has served as a prototype for the large family of protein kinases that are crucially important for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the two genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood and characterized human kinases. Here we have studied the evolution of this gene family in chordates, arthropods, mollusks and other animals employing probabilistic methods and show that Cα and Cβ arose by duplication of an ancestral PKA catalytic subunit in a common ancestor of vertebrates. The two genes have subsequently been duplicated in teleost fishes. The evolution of the PRKACG retroposon in simians was also investigated. Although the degree of sequence conservation in the PKA Cα/Cβ kinase family is exceptionally high, a small set of signature residues defining Cα and Cβ subfamilies were identified. These conserved residues might be important for functions that are unique to the Cα or Cβ clades. This study also provides a good example of a seemingly simple phylogenetic problem which, due to a very high degree of sequence conservation and corresponding weak phylogenetic signals, combined with problematic nonphylogenetic signals, is nontrivial for state-of-the-art probabilistic phylogenetic methods. PMID:23593352

  11. Losses, Expansions, and Novel Subunit Discovery of Adaptor Protein Complexes in Haptophyte Algae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Laura J Y; Klute, Mary J; Herman, Emily K; Read, Betsy; Dacks, Joel B

    2015-11-01

    The phylum Haptophyta (Diaphoratickes) contains marine algae that perform biomineralization, extruding large, distinctive calcium carbonate scales (coccoliths) that completely cover the cell. Coccolith production is an important part of global carbon cycling; however, the membrane trafficking pathway by which they are secreted has not yet been elucidated. In most eukaryotes, post-Golgi membrane trafficking involves five heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which impart cargo selection specificity. To better understand coccolith secretion, we performed comparative genomic, phylogenetic, and transcriptomic analyses of the AP complexes in Emiliania huxleyi strains 92A, Van556, EH2, and CCMP1516, and related haptophytes Gephyrocapsa oceanica and Isochrysis galbana; the latter has lost the ability to biomineralize. We show that haptophytes have a modified membrane trafficking system (MTS), as we found both AP subunit losses and duplications. Additionally, we identified a single conserved subunit of the AP-related TSET complex, whose expression suggests a functional role in membrane trafficking. Finally, we detected novel alpha adaptin ear and gamma adaptin ear proteins, the first of their kind to be described outside of opisthokonts. These novel ear proteins and the sculpting of the MTS may support the capacity for biomineralization in haptophytes, enhancing their ability to perform this highly specialized form of secretion.

  12. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  13. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M.; Kirti, P. B.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2–3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in

  14. Rice Ribosomal Protein Large Subunit Genes and Their Spatio-temporal and Stress Regulation.

    PubMed

    Moin, Mazahar; Bakshi, Achala; Saha, Anusree; Dutta, Mouboni; Madhav, Sheshu M; Kirti, P B

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs) are well-known for their role in mediating protein synthesis and maintaining the stability of the ribosomal complex, which includes small and large subunits. In the present investigation, in a genome-wide survey, we predicted that the large subunit of rice ribosomes is encoded by at least 123 genes including individual gene copies, distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. We selected 34 candidate genes, each having 2-3 identical copies, for a detailed characterization of their gene structures, protein properties, cis-regulatory elements and comprehensive expression analysis. RPL proteins appear to be involved in interactions with other RP and non-RP proteins and their encoded RNAs have a higher content of alpha-helices in their predicted secondary structures. The majority of RPs have binding sites for metal and non-metal ligands. Native expression profiling of 34 ribosomal protein large (RPL) subunit genes in tissues covering the major stages of rice growth shows that they are predominantly expressed in vegetative tissues and seedlings followed by meiotically active tissues like flowers. The putative promoter regions of these genes also carry cis-elements that respond specifically to stress and signaling molecules. All the 34 genes responded differentially to the abiotic stress treatments. Phytohormone and cold treatments induced significant up-regulation of several RPL genes, while heat and H2O2 treatments down-regulated a majority of them. Furthermore, infection with a bacterial pathogen, Xanthomonas oryzae, which causes leaf blight also induced the expression of 80% of the RPL genes in leaves. Although the expression of RPL genes was detected in all the tissues studied, they are highly responsive to stress and signaling molecules indicating that their encoded proteins appear to have roles in stress amelioration besides house-keeping. This shows that the RPL gene family is a valuable resource for manipulation of stress tolerance in rice

  15. Type B Heterotrimeric G Protein γ-Subunit Regulates Auxin and ABA Signaling in Tomato[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Gayathery; Trusov, Yuri; Hayashi, Satomi; Batley, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins composed of α, β, and γ subunits are central signal transducers mediating the cellular response to multiple stimuli in most eukaryotes. Gγ subunits provide proper cellular localization and functional specificity to the heterotrimer complex. Plant Gγ subunits, divided into three structurally distinct types, are more diverse than their animal counterparts. Type B Gγ subunits, lacking a carboxyl-terminal isoprenylation motif, are found only in flowering plants. We present the functional characterization of type B Gγ subunit (SlGGB1) in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). We show that SlGGB1 is the most abundant Gγ subunit in tomato and strongly interacts with the Gβ subunit. Importantly, the green fluorescent protein-SlGGB1 fusion protein as well as the carboxyl-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-SlGGB1/amino-terminal yellow fluorescent protein-Gβ heterodimer were localized in the plasma membrane, nucleus, and cytoplasm. RNA interference-mediated silencing of SlGGB1 resulted in smaller seeds, higher number of lateral roots, and pointy fruits. The silenced lines were hypersensitive to exogenous auxin, while levels of endogenous auxins were lower or similar to those of the wild type. SlGGB1-silenced plants also showed strong hyposensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination but not in other related assays. Transcriptome analysis of the transgenic seeds revealed abnormal expression of genes involved in ABA sensing, signaling, and response. We conclude that the type B Gγ subunit SlGGB1 mediates auxin and ABA signaling in tomato. PMID:26668332

  16. MtsB, a hydrophobic membrane protein of Streptococcus iniae, is an effective subunit vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lili; Wang, Jun; Huang, Baofeng; Xie, Mingquan; Li, Anxing

    2011-01-10

    Streptococcus iniae is a major bacterium that causes invasive disease in cultured fish worldwide. The protection relies mainly on anti-microbial compounds and vaccines, and there is much interest in developing S. iniae vaccine based on conserved protein immunogens. Subcellular localization of protein has important influence on its immunogenicity. The surface and extracellular proteins of pathogenic bacteria can be easily recognized by the infected host compare to intracellular proteins, which are the feasible vaccine development targets. However, a putative hydrophobic membrane protein (designated MtsB) of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter system was found to be protective against S. iniae HD-1 infection when used as an injection vaccine administered intraperitoneally into tilapia. The MtsB protein is present on the cytoplasmic membrane and is expressed in vivo during Kunming mice infection by S. iniae HD-1. This is believed to be the first report on the use of a hydrophobic membrane protein of the ABC system as an S. iniae subunit vaccine.

  17. Activity, expression and function of a second Drosophila protein kinase a catalytic subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, A.; Li, W.; Kalderon, D.

    1995-12-01

    The DC2 was isolated previously on the basis of sequence similarity to DC0, the major Drosophila protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit gene. We show here that the 67-kD Drosophila DC2 protein behaves as a PKA catalytic subunit in vitro. DC2 is transcribed in mesodermal anlagen of early embryos. This expression depends on dorsal but on neither twist nor snail activity. DC2 transcriptional fusions mimic this embryonic expression and are also expressed in subsets of cells in the optic lamina, wing disc and leg discs of third instar larvae. A saturation screen of a small deficiency interval containing DC2 for recessive lethal mutations yielded no DC2 alleles. We therefore isolated new deficiencies to generate deficiency trans-heterozygotes that lacked DC2 activity. These animals were viable and fertile. The absence of DC2 promoter did not efficiently rescue a variety of DC0 mutant phenotypes. These observations indicate that DC2 is not an essential gene and is unlikely to be functionally redundant with DC0, which has multiple unique functions during development. 62 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Ribosomal protein L7Ae is a subunit of archaeal RNase P.

    PubMed

    Cho, I-Ming; Lai, Lien B; Susanti, Dwi; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Gopalan, Venkat

    2010-08-17

    To the mounting evidence of nonribosomal functions for ribosomal proteins, we now add L7Ae as a subunit of archaeal RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) that catalyzes 5'-maturation of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). We first demonstrate that L7Ae coelutes with partially purified Methanococcus maripaludis (Mma) RNase P activity. After establishing in vitro reconstitution of the single RNA with four previously known protein subunits (POP5, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP30), we show that addition of L7Ae to this RNase P complex increases the optimal reaction temperature and k(cat)/K(m) (by approximately 360-fold) for pre-tRNA cleavage to those observed with partially purified native Mma RNase P. We identify in the Mma RNase P RNA a putative kink-turn (K-turn), the structural motif recognized by L7Ae. The large stimulatory effect of Mma L7Ae on RNase P activity decreases to

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A subunit PR70 interacts with pRb and mediates its dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Magenta, Alessandra; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Romani, Sveva; Di Stefano, Valeria; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Martelli, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation via phosphorylation-sensitive interactions with specific targets. While the role of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in the modulation of pRb phosphorylation has been extensively studied, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating phosphate removal by phosphatases. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is constituted by a core dimer bearing catalytic activity and one variable B regulatory subunit conferring target specificity and subcellular localization. We previously demonstrated that PP2A core dimer binds pRb and dephosphorylates pRb upon oxidative stress. In the present study, we identified a specific PP2A-B subunit, PR70, that was associated with pRb both in vitro and in vivo. PR70 overexpression caused pRb dephosphorylation; conversely, PR70 knockdown prevented both pRb dephosphorylation and DNA synthesis inhibition induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization was necessary and sufficient to trigger pRb dephosphorylation and PP2A phosphatase activity of PR70 was Ca(2+) induced. These data underline the importance of PR70-Ca(2+) interaction in the signal transduction mechanisms triggered by redox imbalance and leading to pRb dephosphorylation.

  20. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-07-13

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  1. RNase P protein subunit Rpp29 represses histone H3.3 nucleosome deposition

    PubMed Central

    Newhart, Alyshia; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Shastrula, Prashanth Krishna; Sierra, Isabel; Joo, Lucy M.; Hayden, James E.; Cohen, Andrew R.; Janicki, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, histone H3.3 is a critical regulator of transcription state change and heritability at both euchromatin and heterochromatin. The H3.3-specific chaperone, DAXX, together with the chromatin-remodeling factor, ATRX, regulates H3.3 deposition and transcriptional silencing at repetitive DNA, including pericentromeres and telomeres. However, the events that precede H3.3 nucleosome incorporation have not been fully elucidated. We previously showed that the DAXX-ATRX-H3.3 pathway regulates a multi-copy array of an inducible transgene that can be visualized in single living cells. When this pathway is impaired, the array can be robustly activated. H3.3 is strongly recruited to the site during activation where it accumulates in a complex with transcribed sense and antisense RNA, which is distinct from the DNA/chromatin. This suggests that transcriptional events regulate H3.3 recruited to its incorporation sites. Here we report that the nucleolar RNA proteins Rpp29, fibrillarin, and RPL23a are also components of this H3.3/RNA complex. Rpp29 is a protein subunit of RNase P. Of the other subunits, POP1 and Rpp21 are similarly recruited suggesting that a variant of RNase P regulates H3.3 chromatin assembly. Rpp29 knockdown increases H3.3 chromatin incorporation, which suggests that Rpp29 represses H3.3 nucleosome deposition, a finding with implications for epigenetic regulation. PMID:26842893

  2. Protein interfaces and intersubunit bonding. The case of tomato bushy stunt virus

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.

    1980-10-01

    An atomic model of the subunit of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) has been constructed to fit an electron density map at 2.9 A resolution. Subunit interfaces show networks of polar residues forming H-bonds and salt bridges. The way in which alternative specific bonding geometries are built into a contact are described.

  3. The DEAD box protein Mrh4 functions in the assembly of the mitochondrial large ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Dasmanthie; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Proteins in a cell are universally synthesized by ribosomes. Mitochondria contain their own ribosomes, which specialize in the synthesis of a handful of proteins required for oxidative phosphorylation. The pathway of mitoribosomal biogenesis and factors involved are poorly characterized. An example is the DEAD box proteins, widely known to participate in the biogenesis of bacterial and cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes as either RNA helicases or RNA chaperones, whose mitochondrial counterparts remain completely unknown. Here, we have identified the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial DEAD box protein Mrh4 as essential for large mitoribosome subunit biogenesis. Mrh4 interacts with the 21S rRNA, mitoribosome subassemblies, and fully assembled mitoribosomes. In the absence of Mrh4, the 21S rRNA is matured and forms part of a large on-pathway assembly intermediate missing proteins Mrpl16 and Mrpl39. We conclude that Mrh4 plays an essential role during the late stages of mitoribosome assembly by promoting remodeling of the 21S rRNA-protein interactions.

  4. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  5. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts.

  6. Acid-base chemistry of frustrated water at protein interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Water molecules at a protein interface are often frustrated in hydrogen-bonding opportunities due to subnanoscale confinement. As shown, this condition makes them behave as a general base that may titrate side-chain ammonium and guanidinium cations. Frustration-based chemistry is captured by a quantum mechanical treatment of proton transference and shown to remove same-charge uncompensated anticontacts at the interface found in the crystallographic record and in other spectroscopic information on the aqueous interface. Such observations are untenable within classical arguments, as hydronium is a stronger acid than ammonium or guanidinium. Frustration enables a directed Grotthuss mechanism for proton transference stabilizing same-charge anticontacts. PMID:26762189

  7. The small subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome. Identification of the full complement of ribosomal proteins present.

    PubMed

    Cavdar Koc, E; Burkhart, W; Blackburn, K; Moseley, A; Spremulli, L L

    2001-06-01

    Identification of all the protein components of the small subunit (28 S) of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome has been achieved by carrying out proteolytic digestions of whole 28 S subunits followed by analysis of the resultant peptides by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Peptide sequence information was used to search the human EST data bases and complete coding sequences of the proteins were assembled. The human mitochondrial ribosome has 29 distinct proteins in the small subunit. Fourteen of this group of proteins are homologs of the Escherichia coli 30 S ribosomal proteins S2, S5, S6, S7, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S21. All of these proteins have homologs in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial ribosomes. Surprisingly, three variants of ribosomal protein S18 are found in the mammalian and D. melanogaster mitochondrial ribosomes while C. elegans has two S18 homologs. The S18 homologs tend to be more closely related to chloroplast S18s than to prokaryotic S18s. No mitochondrial homologs to prokaryotic ribosomal proteins S1, S3, S4, S8, S13, S19, and S20 could be found in the peptides obtained from the whole 28 S subunit digests or by analysis of the available data bases. The remaining 15 proteins present in mammalian mitochondrial 28 S subunits (MRP-S22 through MRP-S36) are specific to mitochondrial ribosomes. Proteins in this group have no apparent homologs in bacterial, chloroplast, archaebacterial, or cytosolic ribosomes. All but two of these proteins have a clear homolog in D. melanogaster while all but three can be found in the genome of C. elegans. Five of the mitochondrial specific ribosomal proteins have homologs in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to amyloid subunit proteins for in vivo radioimmunodetection of amyloid diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Gorevic, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Fand, I.; Marshall, J.; McNally, W.; Muller, D.; Wood, D.

    1984-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils of systemic amyloidosis are low molecular weight subunit proteins with poor immunogenicity and a tendency to polymerize. Antibodies to these proteins are useful for the detection of amyloid deposits in-situ. The extracellular location of amyloid deposits and proximity to congophilic angiopathy suggest the potential of labeled monocional antibodies (MAb) for in vivo radioimmunodetection. The authors tested feasibility of this approach using two rat MAbs to mouse AA protein in casein-induced amyloidosis, a model system for human secondary amyloidosis. The antibodies were labeled with I-125, I-123, and In-111 with good specificity retention. Amyloidotic mice were pretreated with 50 ..mu..g colchicine ip 3 hr before receiving radioiodinated MAb via the tall vein. Controls included injection of MAb to normal mice and of labeled polyclonal normal rat IgG (pIg) into amyloidotic and control mice. Blood clearance of MAb was faster in amyloidotic than control groups. Fractionation studies showed that both MAb and pIg were uncomplexed. Studies up to 96 hr showed specific and high uptake at sites of amyloid deposition (saline perfused liver, spleen, kidney. Specific localization was confirmed by whole body autoradiography (I-125, 20 ..mu..Ci/animal; 50 ..mu..g MAb) and by external imaging (I-123, 200 ..mu..Ci/animal, 10-15 ..mu..g MAb) of amyloidotic mice studied at 4-72 hr. Amyloidotic animals showed perifollicular localization in spleen, periportal in liver, and glomerular in kidney; scans of controls showed diffuse early washout. These results document the feasibility of using MAbs to fibril subunit proteins for the in vivo detection and therapy of amyloidosis.

  9. Mammalian farnesyltransferase α subunit regulates vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 4A (Vps4A)--dependent intracellular trafficking through recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kubala, Marta H; Norwood, Suzanne J; Gomez, Guillermo A; Jones, Alun; Johnston, Wayne; Yap, Alpha S; Mureev, Sergey; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-12-25

    The protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) mediates posttranslational modification of proteins with isoprenoid lipids. FTase is a heterodimer and although the β subunit harbors the active site, it requires the α subunit for its activity. Here we explore the other functions of the FTase α subunit in addition to its established role in protein prenylation. We found that in the absence of the β subunit, the α subunit of FTase forms a stable autonomous dimeric structure in solution. We identify interactors of FTase α using mass spectrometry, followed by rapid in vitro analysis using the Leishmania tarentolae cell - free system. Vps4A was validated for direct binding to the FTase α subunit both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the interaction with Vps4A in Hek 293 cells demonstrated that FTase α controls trafficking of transferrin receptor upstream of this protein. These results point to the existence of previously undetected biological functions of the FTase α subunit that includes control of intracellular membrane trafficking. PMID:26551458

  10. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein-protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin-3.

    PubMed

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L; Hupp, Ted

    2016-09-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53-independent MDM2-drug responsive-binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin-3 responsive MDM2-binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH-MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin-3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin-3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin-3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin-3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin-3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein-protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin-3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein-protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein-protein complexes in drug-treated cells. PMID:27273042

  11. Case study on the evolution of hetero-oligomer interfaces based on the differences in paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Saki; Yura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We addressed the evolutionary trace of hetero-oligomer interfaces by comparing the structures of paralogous proteins; one of them is a monomer or homo-oligomer and the other is a hetero-oligomer. We found different trends in amino acid conservation pattern and hydrophobicity between homo-oligomer and hetero-oligomer. The degree of amino acid conservation in the interface of homo-oligomer has no obvious difference from that in the surface, whereas the degree of conservation is much higher in the interface of hetero-oligomer. The interface of homo-oligomer has a few very conserved residue positions, whereas the residue conservation in the interface of hetero-oligomer tends to be higher. In addition, the interface of hetero-oligomer has a tendency of being more hydrophobic compared with the one in homo-oligomer. We conjecture that these differences are related to the inherent symmetry in homo-oligomers that cannot exist in hetero-oligomers. Paucity of the structural data precludes statistical tests of these tendencies, yet the trend can be applied to the prediction of the interface of hetero-oligomer. We obtained putative interfaces of the subunits in CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor), one of the human pre-mRNA 3′-processing complexes. The locations of predicted interface residues were consistent with the known experimental data. PMID:27493859

  12. SPLINTS: small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Park, Eunyoung; Eck, Michael J; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory protein-protein interactions are ubiquitous in biology, and small molecule protein-protein interaction inhibitors are an important focus in drug discovery. Remarkably little attention has been given to the opposite strategy-stabilization of protein-protein interactions, despite the fact that several well-known therapeutics act through this mechanism. From a structural perspective, we consider representative examples of small molecules that induce or stabilize the association of protein domains to inhibit, or alter, signaling for nuclear hormone, GTPase, kinase, phosphatase, and ubiquitin ligase pathways. These SPLINTS (small-molecule protein ligand interface stabilizers) drive interactions that are in some cases physiologically relevant, and in others entirely adventitious. The diverse structural mechanisms employed suggest approaches for a broader and systematic search for such compounds in drug discovery. PMID:26829757

  13. Identification of methylated proteins in the yeast small ribosomal subunit: a role for SPOUT methyltransferases in protein arginine methylation.

    PubMed

    Young, Brian D; Weiss, David I; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Webb, Kristofor J; Clarke, Steven G; McBride, Anne E

    2012-06-26

    We have characterized the posttranslational methylation of Rps2, Rps3, and Rps27a, three small ribosomal subunit proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. We found that Rps2 is substoichiometrically modified at arginine-10 by the Rmt1 methyltransferase. We demonstrated that Rps3 is stoichiometrically modified by ω-monomethylation at arginine-146 by mass spectrometric and site-directed mutagenic analyses. Substitution of alanine for arginine at position 146 is associated with slow cell growth, suggesting that the amino acid identity at this site may influence ribosomal function and/or biogenesis. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Rps3 in S. cerevisiae shows that arginine-146 makes contacts with the small subunit rRNA. Screening of deletion mutants encoding potential yeast methyltransferases revealed that the loss of the YOR021C gene results in the absence of methylation of Rps3. We demonstrated that recombinant Yor021c catalyzes ω-monomethylarginine formation when incubated with S-adenosylmethionine and hypomethylated ribosomes prepared from a YOR021C deletion strain. Interestingly, Yor021c belongs to the family of SPOUT methyltransferases that, to date, have only been shown to modify RNA substrates. Our findings suggest a wider role for SPOUT methyltransferases in nature. Finally, we have demonstrated the presence of a stoichiometrically methylated cysteine residue at position 39 of Rps27a in a zinc-cysteine cluster. The discovery of these three novel sites of protein modification within the small ribosomal subunit will now allow for an analysis of their functional roles in translation and possibly other cellular processes.

  14. Cysteines beta93 and beta112 as probes of conformational and functional events at the human hemoglobin subunit interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, G B; Karavitis, M; Ji, X; Pechik, I; Brinigar, W S; Gilliland, G L; Fronticelli, C

    1999-01-01

    Three variants of tetrameric human hemoglobin, with changes at the alpha1beta2/alpha2beta1-interface, at the alpha1beta1/alpha2beta2-interface, and at both interfaces, have been constructed. At alpha1beta2/alpha2beta1-interface the beta93 cysteine was replaced by alanine (betaC93A), and at the alpha1beta1/alpha2beta2-interface the beta112 cysteine was replaced by glycine (betaC112G). The alpha1beta2 interface variant, betaC93A, and the alpha1beta1/alpha1beta2 double mutant, beta(C93A+C112G), were crystallized in the T-state, and the structures determined at 2. 0 and 1.8 A resolution, respectively. A comparison of the structures with that of natural hemoglobin A shows the absence of detectable changes in the tertiary folding of the protein or in the T-state quaternary assembly. At the beta112 site, the void left by the removal of the cysteine side chain is filled by a water molecule, and the functional characteristics of betaC112G are essentially those of human hemoglobin A. At the beta93 site, water molecules do not replace the cysteine side chain, and the alanine substitution increases the conformational freedom of beta146His, weakening the important interaction of this residue with beta94Asp. As a result, when Cl- is present in the solution, at a concentration 100 mM, the Bohr effect of the two mutants carrying the beta93Cys-->Ala substitution, betaC93A and beta(C93A+C112G), is significantly modified being practically absent below pH 7.4. Based on the crystallographic data, we attribute these effects to the competition between beta94Asp and Cl- in the salt link with beta146His in T-state hemoglobin. These results point to an interplay between the betaHis146-betaAsp94 salt bridge and the Cl- in solution regulated by the Cys present at position beta93, indicating yet another role of beta93 Cys in the regulation of hemoglobin function. PMID:9876125

  15. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the β-subunit gene in 7S globulin protein in soybean using RNAi technology.

    PubMed

    Qu, J; Liu, S Y; Wang, P W; Guan, S Y; Fan, Y G; Yao, D; Zhang, L; Dai, J L

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use RNA interference (RNAi) to improve protein quality and decrease anti-nutritional effects in soybean. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was conducted using RNAi and an expression vector containing the 7S globulin β-subunit gene. The BAR gene was used as the selective marker and cotyledonary nodes of soybean genotype Jinong 27 were chosen as explant material. Regenerated plants were detected by molecular biology techniques. Transformation of the β-subunit gene in the 7S protein was detected by PCR, Southern blot, and q-PCR. Positive plants (10 T0, and 6 T1, and 13 T2) were tested by PCR. Hybridization bands were detected by Southern blot analysis in two of the T1 transgenic plants. RNAi expression vectors containing the soybean 7S protein β-subunit gene were successfully integrated into the genome of transgenic plants. qRT-PCR analysis in soybean seeds showed a clear decrease in expression of the soybean β-subunit gene. The level of 7S protein β-subunit expression in transgenic plants decreased by 77.5% as compared to that of the wild-type plants. This study has established a basis for the application of RNAi to improve the anti-nutritional effects of soybean. PMID:27173254

  16. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the β-subunit gene in 7S globulin protein in soybean using RNAi technology.

    PubMed

    Qu, J; Liu, S Y; Wang, P W; Guan, S Y; Fan, Y G; Yao, D; Zhang, L; Dai, J L

    2016-04-26

    The objective of this study was to use RNA interference (RNAi) to improve protein quality and decrease anti-nutritional effects in soybean. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation was conducted using RNAi and an expression vector containing the 7S globulin β-subunit gene. The BAR gene was used as the selective marker and cotyledonary nodes of soybean genotype Jinong 27 were chosen as explant material. Regenerated plants were detected by molecular biology techniques. Transformation of the β-subunit gene in the 7S protein was detected by PCR, Southern blot, and q-PCR. Positive plants (10 T0, and 6 T1, and 13 T2) were tested by PCR. Hybridization bands were detected by Southern blot analysis in two of the T1 transgenic plants. RNAi expression vectors containing the soybean 7S protein β-subunit gene were successfully integrated into the genome of transgenic plants. qRT-PCR analysis in soybean seeds showed a clear decrease in expression of the soybean β-subunit gene. The level of 7S protein β-subunit expression in transgenic plants decreased by 77.5% as compared to that of the wild-type plants. This study has established a basis for the application of RNAi to improve the anti-nutritional effects of soybean.

  17. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Stefano; Vaira, Valentina; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Vicentini, Leonardo; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna; Lania, Andrea G

    2015-04-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in both cell growth and cell differentiation control. Mutations of the PRKAR1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the expression of different PKA regulatory subunits in benign and non benign human thyroid tumours and to correlate their expression with clinical phenotype. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant increase in PRKAR2B expression in both differentiated and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid tumors in comparison with normal thyroid tissues. Conversely, a significant increase in PRKAR1A expression was only demonstrated in undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas in comparison with normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid tumors. In thyroid cancers without lymph nodal metastases PRKAR1A expression was higher in tumours of more than 2 cm in size (T2 and T3) compared to smaller ones (T1). In conclusion, our data shows that an increased PRKAR1A expression is associated with aggressive and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. PMID:25393625

  18. Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms of Pertussis Toxin Subunit S2 (PtxB) Affect Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Millen, Scott H.; Watanabe, Mineo; Komatsu, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Nagasawa, Yuki; Suzuki, Eri; Monaco, Haleigh; Weiss, Alison A.

    2015-01-01

    Whooping cough due to Bordetella pertussis is increasing in incidence, in part due to accumulation of mutations which increase bacterial fitness in highly vaccinated populations. Polymorphisms in the pertussis toxin, ptxA and ptxB genes, and the pertactin, prn genes of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis collected in Cincinnati from 1989 through 2005 were examined. While the ptxA and prn genotypes were variable, all 48 strains had the ptxB2 genotype; ptxB1 encodes glycine at amino acid 18 of the S2 subunit of pertussis toxin, while ptxB2 encodes serine. We investigated antigenic and functional differences of PtxB1 and PtxB2. The S2 protein was not very immunogenic. Only a few vaccinated or individuals infected with B. pertussis developed antibody responses to the S2 subunit, and these sera recognized both polymorphic forms equally well. Amino acid 18 of S2 is in a glycan binding domain, and the PtxB forms displayed differences in receptor recognition and toxicity. PtxB1 bound better to the glycoprotein, fetuin, and Jurkat T cells in vitro, but the two forms were equally effective at promoting CHO cell clustering. To investigate in vivo activity of Ptx, one μg of Ptx was administered to DDY mice and blood was collected on 4 days after injection. PtxB2 was more effective at promoting lymphocytosis in mice. PMID:26375454

  19. Oestrogen receptors interact with the α-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lipovka, Yulia; Chen, Hao; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen; Konhilas, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Normal and pathological stressors engage the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling axis to protect the cell from energetic pressures. Sex steroid hormones also play a critical role in energy metabolism and significantly modify pathological progression of cardiac disease, diabetes/obesity and cancer. AMPK is targeted by 17β-oestradiol (E2), the main circulating oestrogen, but the mechanism by which E2 activates AMPK is currently unknown. Using an oestrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β) positive (T47D) breast cancer cell line, we validated E2-dependent activation of AMPK that was mediated through ERα (not ERβ) by using three experimental strategies. A series of co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that both ERs associated with AMPK in cancer and striated (skeletal and cardiac) muscle cells. We further demonstrated direct binding of ERs to the α-catalytic subunit of AMPK within the βγ-subunit-binding domain. Finally, both ERs interacted with the upstream liver kinase B 1 (LKB1) kinase complex, which is required for E2-dependent activation of AMPK. We conclude that E2 activates AMPK through ERα by direct interaction with the βγ-binding domain of AMPKα. PMID:26374855

  20. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  1. Cryptosporidium parvum possesses a short-type replication protein A large subunit that differs from its host.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; Marchewka, M J; Keithly, J S

    1999-07-15

    Replication protein A (RPA) consisting of three subunits is a eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein involved in DNA replication, repair and recombination. We report here the identification and characterization of a RPA large subunit (CpRPA1) gene from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum. The CpRPA1 gene encodes a 53.9-kDa peptide that is remarkably smaller than that from other eukaryotes (i.e. approximately 70 kDa) and is actively expressed in both free sporozoites and parasite intracellular stages. This short-type RPA large subunit has also been characterized from one other protist, Crithidia fasciculata. Three distinct domains have been identified in the RPA large subunit of humans and yeasts: an N-terminal protein interaction domain, a central ssDNA-binding area, and a C-terminal subunit-interacting region. Sequence analysis reveals that the short-type RPA large subunit differs from that of other eukaryotes in that only the domains required for ssDNA binding and heterotrimer formation are present. It lacks the N-terminal domain necessary for the binding of proteins mainly involved in DNA repair and recombination. This major structural difference suggests that the mechanism for DNA repair and recombination in some protists differs from that of other eukaryotes. Since replication proteins play an essential role in the cell cycle, the fact that RPA proteins of C. parvum differ from those of its host suggests that RPA be explored as a potential chemotherapeutic target for controlling cryptosporidiosis and/or diseases caused by other apicomplexans.

  2. Mys protein regulates protein kinase A activity by interacting with regulatory type Ialpha subunit during vertebrate development.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Kawakami, Koichi; Yamashita, Masakane

    2010-02-12

    During embryonic development, protein kinase A (PKA) plays a key role in cell fate specification by antagonizing the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains unknown. Here we show that the Misty somites (Mys) protein regulates the level of PKA activity during embryonic development in zebrafish. We isolate PKA regulatory type Ialpha subunit (Prkar1a) as a protein interacting with Mys by pulldown assay in HEK293 cells followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We show an interaction between endogenous Mys and Prkar1a in the zebrafish embryo. Mys binds to Prkar1a in its C terminus region, termed PRB domain, and activates PKA in vitro. Conversely, knockdown of Mys in zebrafish embryos results in reduction in PKA activity. We also show that knockdown of Mys induces ectopic activation of Hh target genes in the eyes, neural tube, and somites downstream of Smoothened, a protein essential for transduction of Hh signaling activity. The altered patterning of gene expression is rescued by activation of PKA. Together, our results reveal a molecular mechanism of regulation of PKA activity that is dependent on a protein-protein interaction and demonstrate that PKA activity regulated by Mys is indispensable for negative regulation of the Hh signaling pathway in Hh-responsive cells. PMID:20018846

  3. Brain Gαi2-subunit proteins and the prevention of salt sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Casey Y.; Wainford, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    To counter the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, multiple brain G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) systems are activated to facilitate sympathoinhibition, sodium homeostasis, and normotension. Currently there is a paucity of knowledge regarding the role of down-stream GPCR-activated Gα-subunit proteins in these critically important physiological regulatory responses required for long-term blood pressure regulation. We have determined that brain Gαi2-proteins mediate natriuretic and sympathoinhibitory responses produced by acute pharmacological (exogenous central nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP) and α2-adrenoceptor activation) and physiological challenges to sodium homeostasis (intravenous volume expansion and 1 M sodium load) in conscious Sprague–Dawley rats. We have demonstrated that in salt-resistant rat phenotypes, high dietary salt intake evokes site-specific up-regulation of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) Gαi2-proteins. Further, we established that PVN Gαi2 protein up-regulation prevents the development of renal nerve-dependent sympathetically mediated salt-sensitive hypertension in Sprague–Dawley and Dahl salt-resistant rats. Additionally, failure to up-regulate PVN Gαi2 proteins during high salt-intake contributes to the pathophysiology of Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) hypertension. Collectively, our data demonstrate that brain, and likely PVN specific, Gαi2 protein pathways represent a central molecular pathway mediating sympathoinhibitory renal-nerve dependent responses evoked to maintain sodium homeostasis and a salt-resistant phenotype. Further, impairment of this endogenous “anti-hypertensive” mechanism contributes to the pathophysiology of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26347659

  4. Altering the ribosomal subunit ratio in yeast maximizes recombinant protein yield

    PubMed Central

    Bonander, Nicklas; Darby, Richard AJ; Grgic, Ljuban; Bora, Nagamani; Wen, Jikai; Brogna, Saverio; Poyner, David R; O'Neill, Michael AA; Bill, Roslyn M

    2009-01-01

    Background The production of high yields of recombinant proteins is an enduring bottleneck in the post-genomic sciences that has yet to be addressed in a truly rational manner. Typically eukaryotic protein production experiments have relied on varying expression construct cassettes such as promoters and tags, or culture process parameters such as pH, temperature and aeration to enhance yields. These approaches require repeated rounds of trial-and-error optimization and cannot provide a mechanistic insight into the biology of recombinant protein production. We published an early transcriptome analysis that identified genes implicated in successful membrane protein production experiments in yeast. While there has been a subsequent explosion in such analyses in a range of production organisms, no one has yet exploited the genes identified. The aim of this study was to use the results of our previous comparative transcriptome analysis to engineer improved yeast strains and thereby gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved in high-yielding protein production hosts. Results We show that tuning BMS1 transcript levels in a doxycycline-dependent manner resulted in optimized yields of functional membrane and soluble protein targets. Online flow microcalorimetry demonstrated that there had been a substantial metabolic change to cells cultured under high-yielding conditions, and in particular that high yielding cells were more metabolically efficient. Polysome profiling showed that the key molecular event contributing to this metabolically efficient, high-yielding phenotype is a perturbation of the ratio of 60S to 40S ribosomal subunits from approximately 1:1 to 2:1, and correspondingly of 25S:18S ratios from 2:1 to 3:1. This result is consistent with the role of the gene product of BMS1 in ribosome biogenesis. Conclusion This work demonstrates the power of a rational approach to recombinant protein production by using the results of transcriptome analysis to engineer

  5. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-04-23

    We have found that the methionine repression of the ..beta..-subunit gene expression is not due to degradation of the ..beta..-subunit but is due to an effect on synthesis of the ..beta..-subunit. The effect of methionine on the synthesis of the ..beta..-is due to an inhibition of ..beta..-subunit mRNA synthesis. 3 references, 1 figure.

  6. Diversity in genomic organisation, developmental regulation and distribution of the murine PR72/B" subunits of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Louis, Justin V; Goris, Jozef; Janssens, Veerle

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine-specific phosphatase displaying vital functions in growth and development through its role in various signalling pathways. PP2A holoenzymes comprise a core dimer composed of a catalytic C and a structural A subunit, which can associate with a variable B-type subunit. The importance of the B-type subunits for PP2A regulation cannot be overestimated as they determine holoenzyme localisation, activity and substrate specificity. Three B-type subunit families have been identified: PR55/B, PR61/B' and PR72/B", of which the latter is currently the least characterised. Results We deduced the sequences and genomic organisation of the different murine PR72/B" isoforms: three genes encode nine isoforms, five of which are abundantly expressed and give rise to genuine PP2A subunits. Thereby, one novel subunit was identified. Using Northern blotting, we examined the tissue-specific and developmental expression of these subunits. All subunits are highly expressed in heart, suggesting an important cardiac function. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a striated expression pattern of PR72 and PR130 in heart and skeletal muscle, but not in bladder smooth muscle. The subcellular localisation and cell cycle regulatory ability of several PR72/B" isoforms were determined, demonstrating differences as well as similarities. Conclusion In contrast to PR55/B and PR61/B', the PR72/B" family seems evolutionary more divergent, as only two of the murine genes have a human orthologue. We have integrated these results in a more consistent nomenclature of both human and murine PR72/B" genes and their transcripts/proteins. Our results provide a platform for the future generation of PR72/B" knockout mice. PMID:18715506

  7. Kinetics of Protein Adsorption at liquid/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellion, Markus; Santen, Ludger; Nagel, Armin; Mantz, Hubert; Quinn, Anthony; Jacobs, Karin

    2006-03-01

    Protein adsorption processes are of crucial importance in many biomedical processes. From a physical point of view these processes raise a number of challenging questions, e.g.: How does the surface influence the conformation of proteins at the surface? What are the characteristics of the protein film at the liquid/solid interface? In this work we investigate the adsorption kinetics of salivary proteins on different kinds of surfaces in a liquid environment. The adsorbed protein layers are analyzed by means of ellipsometry, plasmon resonance, and SPM. It turns out that the adsorbed amount of proteins is sensitive to the long ranged interactions of the solid surface. The experimental data are compared to extensive Monte Carlo simulation of a colloidal protein model. The Monte Carlo results strongly suggest that induced conformal changes lead to the experimentally observed three step kinetics of amylase.

  8. Direct mass spectrometric analysis of intact proteins of the yeast large ribosomal subunit using capillary LC/FTICR

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Won; Berger, Scott J.; Martinović, Suzana; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry coupled with capillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography was used to characterize intact proteins from the large subunit of the yeast ribosome. High mass measurement accuracy, achieved by “mass locking” with an internal standard from a dual electrospray ionization source, allowed identification of ribosomal proteins. Analyses of the intact proteins revealed information on cotranslational and posttranslational modifications of the ribosomal proteins that included loss of the initiating methionine, acetylation, methylation, and proteolytic maturation. High-resolution separations permitted differentiation of protein isoforms having high structural similarity as well as proteins from their modified forms, facilitating unequivocal assignments. The study identified 42 of the 43 core large ribosomal subunit proteins and 58 (of 64 possible) core large subunit protein isoforms having unique masses in a single analysis. These results demonstrate the basis for the high-throughput analyses of complex mixtures of intact proteins, which we believe will be an important complement to other approaches for defining protein modifications and their changes resulting from physiological processes or environmental perturbations. PMID:11983894

  9. The giardial VPS35 retromer subunit is necessary for multimeric complex assembly and interaction with the Vacuolar protein sorting receptor

    PubMed Central

    Miras, Silvana L.; Merino, María C.; Gottig, Natalia; Rópolo, Andrea S.; Touz, María C.

    2013-01-01

    The retromer is a pentameric protein complex that mediates the retrograde transport of acid hydrolase receptors between endosomes and the trans-Golgi network and is conserved across all eukaryotes. Unlike other eukaryotes, the endomembrane system of Giardia trophozoite is simple and is composed only of the endoplasmic reticulum and peripheral vesicles (PVs), which may represent an ancient organellar system converging compartments such as early and late endosomes and lysosomes. Sorting and trafficking of membrane proteins and soluble hydrolases from the endoplasmic reticulum to the PVs has been described as specific and conserved but whether the giardial retromer participates in receptor recycling remains elusive. Homologs of the retromer Vacuolar Protein Sorting (Vps35p, Vps26p, and Vps29p) have been identified in this parasite. Cloning the GlVPS35 subunit and antisera production enabled the localization of this protein in the PVs as well as in the cytosol. Tagged expression of the subunits was used to demonstrate their association with membranes, and immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning revealed high degrees of colabeling between the retromer subunits and also with the endoplasmic reticulum and PV compartment markers. Protein-protein interaction data revealed interaction between the subunits and of GlVPS35 with the cytosolic domain of the hydrolase receptor GlVps. Altogether our data provide original information on the molecular interactions that mediate assembly of the cargo-selective retromer subcomplex and its involvement in the recycling of the acid hydrolase receptor in this parasite. PMID:23810936

  10. Spatial Arrangement of Ribosomal Proteins: Reaction of the Escherichia coli 30S Subunit with bis-Imidoesters

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T. A.; Hershey, J. W. B.; Traut, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The 30S ribosomal subunit of E. coli was treated with the bifunctional reagent bis-(methyl)suberimidate. Crosslinked ribosomal proteins were identified as bands with increased molecular weight after electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulphate. The pattern of crosslinked products was altered when unfolded subunits were used. Free ribosomal protein was not crosslinked. Several of the crosslinked products were cleaved by ammonolysis to form the original monomeric protein constituents. The low yields of the reactions necessitated the use of radioactive proteins and auto-radiographic procedures. The crosslinked proteins were tentatively identified by coelectrophoresis of the radioactive ammonolysis products with carrier 30S protein in sodium dodecyl sulphate, and coelectrophoresis at pH 4.5 in buffers containing urea. Images PMID:4556460

  11. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  12. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  13. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  14. Optical manipulation of the alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins using photoswitchable dimerization systems

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Gaigai; Onodera, Hiroyuki; Aono, Yuki; Kawano, Fuun; Ueda, Yoshibumi; Furuya, Akihiro; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Sato, Moritoshi

    2016-01-01

    Alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα) are involved in a variety of cellular functions. Here we report an optogenetic strategy to spatially and temporally manipulate Gα in living cells. More specifically, we applied the blue light-induced dimerization system, known as the Magnet system, and an alternative red light-induced dimerization system consisting of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochrome B (PhyB) and phytochrome-interacting factor 6 (PIF6) to optically control the activation of two different classes of Gα (Gαq and Gαs). By utilizing this strategy, we demonstrate successful regulation of Ca2+ and cAMP using light in mammalian cells. The present strategy is generally applicable to different kinds of Gα and could contribute to expanding possibilities of spatiotemporal regulation of Gα in mammalian cells. PMID:27767077

  15. Deficiency of the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory G protein and severe extraskeletal ossification.

    PubMed

    Eddy, M C; Jan De Beur, S M; Yandow, S M; McAlister, W H; Shore, E M; Kaplan, F S; Whyte, M P; Levine, M A

    2000-11-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is a rare disorder characterized by dermal ossification beginning in infancy followed by increasing and extensive bone formation in deep muscle and fascia. We describe two unrelated girls with typical clinical, radiographic, and histological features of POH who also have findings of another uncommon heritable disorder, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). One patient has mild brachydactyly but no endocrinopathy, whereas the other manifests brachydactyly, obesity, and target tissue resistance to thyrotropin and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Levels of the alpha-subunit of the G protein (Gsalpha) were reduced in erythrocyte membranes from both girls and a nonsense mutation (Q12X) in exon 1 of the GNAS1 gene was identified in genomic DNA from the mildly affected patient. Features of POH and AHO in two individuals suggest that these conditions share a similar molecular basis and pathogenesis and that isolated severe extraskeletal ossification may be another manifestation of Gsalpha deficiency. PMID:11092390

  16. Sequential domain assembly of ribosomal protein S3 drives 40S subunit maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mitterer, Valentin; Murat, Guillaume; Réty, Stéphane; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Stanborough, Tamsyn; Bergler, Helmut; Leulliot, Nicolas; Kressler, Dieter; Pertschy, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosomes assemble by association of ribosomal RNA with ribosomal proteins into nuclear precursor particles, which undergo a complex maturation pathway coordinated by non-ribosomal assembly factors. Here, we provide functional insights into how successive structural re-arrangements in ribosomal protein S3 promote maturation of the 40S ribosomal subunit. We show that S3 dimerizes and is imported into the nucleus with its N-domain in a rotated conformation and associated with the chaperone Yar1. Initial assembly of S3 with 40S precursors occurs via its C-domain, while the N-domain protrudes from the 40S surface. Yar1 is replaced by the assembly factor Ltv1, thereby fixing the S3 N-domain in the rotated orientation and preventing its 40S association. Finally, Ltv1 release, triggered by phosphorylation, and flipping of the S3 N-domain into its final position results in the stable integration of S3. Such a stepwise assembly may represent a new paradigm for the incorporation of ribosomal proteins. PMID:26831757

  17. Direct-reversible binding of small molecules to G protein βγ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, AMPB; Burroughs, Michael; Giralt, Ernest; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2011-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) composed of three subunits α, β, γ mediate activation of multiple intracellular signaling cascades initiated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Previously our laboratory identified small molecules that bind to Gβγ and interfere with or enhance binding of select effectors with Gβγ. To understand the molecular mechanisms of selectivity and assess binding of compounds to Gβγ, we used biophysical and biochemical approaches to directly monitor small molecule binding to Gβγ. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis indicated that multiple compounds bound directly to Gβγ with affinities in the high nanomolar to low micromolar range but with surprisingly slow on and off rate kinetics. While the koff was slow for most of the compounds in physiological buffers, they could be removed from Gβγ with mild chaotropic salts or mildly dissociating collision energy in a mass-spectrometer indicating that compound-Gβγ interactions were non-covalent. Finally, at concentrations used to observe maximal biological effects the stoichiometry of binding was 1:1. The results from this study show that small molecule modulation of Gβγ-effector interactions is by specific direct non-covalent and reversible binding of small molecules to Gβγ. This is highly relevant to development of Gβγ targeting as a therapeutic approach since reversible, direct binding is a prerequisite for drug development and important for specificity. PMID:21621014

  18. Genomic organization of the murine G protein beta subunit genes and related processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, J; Wang, X B; Kitanaka, N; Hembree, C M; Uhl, G R

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) for the many physiological processes including the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction have been described. In investigating the changes of mRNA expression after acute psychostimulant administration, we previously identified a cDNA encoding a G protein beta1 subunit (Gbeta1) that was increased up to four-fold in certain brain regions after administration of psychostimulants. The mouse Gbeta1 gene (the mouse genetic symbol, GNB1) was mapped to chromosome 4, but little was known of its genetic features. To characterize the GNB1 gene further, we have cloned and analyzed the genomic structures of the mouse GNBI gene and its homologous sequences. The GNBI gene spans at least 50 kb, and consists of 12 exons and 11 introns. The exon/intron boundaries were determined and found to follow the GT/AG rule. Exons 3-11 encode the Gbeta1 protein, and the exon 2 is an alternative, resulting in putative two splicing variants. Although intron 11 is additional for GNBI compared with GNB2 and GNB3, the intron positions within the protein coding region of GNB1, GNB2 and GNB3 are identical, suggesting that GNB1 should have diverged from the ancestral gene family earlier than the genes for GNB2 and GNB3. We also found the 5'-truncated processed pseudogenes with 71-89% similarities to GNBI mRNA sequence, suggesting that the truncated cDNA copies, which have been reverse-transcribed from a processed mRNA for GNB1, might have been integrated into several new locations in the mouse genome. PMID:11913780

  19. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Isailovic, Dragan

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  20. Disassembly of yeast 80S ribosomes into subunits is a concerted action of ribosome-assisted folding of denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Biprashekhar; Bhakta, Sayan; Sengupta, Jayati

    2016-01-22

    It has been shown by several groups that ribosome can assist folding of denatured protein in vitro and the process is conserved across the species. Domain V of large ribosomal rRNA which occupies the intersubunit side of the large subunit was identified as the key player responsible for chaperoning the folding process. Thus, it is conceivable that denatured protein needs to access the intersubunit space of the ribosome in order to get folded. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of release of the protein from the eukaryotic ribosome following reactivation. We have observed significant splitting of yeast 80S ribosome when incubated with the denatured BCAII protein. Energy-free disassembly mechanism functions in low Mg(+2) ion concentration for prokaryotic ribosomes. Eukaryotic ribosomes do not show significant splitting even at low Mg(+2) ion concentration. In this respect, denatured protein-induced disassembly of eukaryotic ribosome without the involvement of any external energy source is intriguing. For prokaryotic ribosomes, it was reported that the denatured protein induces ribosome splitting into subunits in order to access domain V-rRNA. In contrast, our results suggest an alternative mechanism for eukaryotic ribosomal rRNA-mediated protein folding and subsequent separation of the subunits by which release of the activated-protein occurs.

  1. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein/DNA interface

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bohdan; Černý, Jiří; Svozil, Daniel; Čech, Petr; Gelly, Jean-Christophe; de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the principles driving recognition between proteins and DNA, we analyzed more than thousand crystal structures of protein/DNA complexes. We classified protein and DNA conformations by structural alphabets, protein blocks [de Brevern, Etchebest and Hazout (2000) (Bayesian probabilistic approach for predicting backbone structures in terms of protein blocks. Prots. Struct. Funct. Genet., 41:271–287)] and dinucleotide conformers [Svozil, Kalina, Omelka and Schneider (2008) (DNA conformations and their sequence preferences. Nucleic Acids Res., 36:3690–3706)], respectively. Assembling the mutually interacting protein blocks and dinucleotide conformers into ‘interaction matrices’ revealed their correlations and conformer preferences at the interface relative to their occurrence outside the interface. The analyzed data demonstrated important differences between complexes of various types of proteins such as transcription factors and nucleases, distinct interaction patterns for the DNA minor groove relative to the major groove and phosphate and importance of water-mediated contacts. Water molecules mediate proportionally the largest number of contacts in the minor groove and form the largest proportion of contacts in complexes of transcription factors. The generally known induction of A-DNA forms by complexation was more accurately attributed to A-like and intermediate A/B conformers rare in naked DNA molecules. PMID:24335080

  2. The GIRK1 subunit potentiates G protein activation of cardiac GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, Kouki K; Wang, Weiwei; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    G protein gated inward rectifier potassium (GIRK) channels are gated by direct binding of G protein beta-gamma subunits (Gβγ), signaling lipids, and intracellular Na+. In cardiac pacemaker cells, hetero-tetramer GIRK1/4 channels and homo-tetramer GIRK4 channels play a central role in parasympathetic slowing of heart rate. It is known that the Na+ binding site of the GIRK1 subunit is defective, but the functional difference between GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers and GIRK4 homo-tetramers remains unclear. Here, using purified proteins and the lipid bilayer system, we characterize Gβγ and Na+ regulation of GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers and GIRK4 homo-tetramers. We find in GIRK4 homo-tetramers that Na+ binding increases Gβγ affinity and thereby increases the GIRK4 responsiveness to G protein stimulation. GIRK1/4 hetero-tetramers are not activated by Na+, but rather are in a permanent state of high responsiveness to Gβγ, suggesting that the GIRK1 subunit functions like a GIRK4 subunit with Na+ permanently bound. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15750.001 PMID:27074664

  3. Positions of proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V; Capel, M; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1984-04-01

    A map of the 30 S ribosomal subunit is presented giving the positions of 15 of its 21 proteins. The components located in the map are S1, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S18 and S20.

  4. Altered Dimer Interface Decreases Stability in an Amyloidogenic Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, Elizabeth M.; Owen, Barbara A.L.; Peterson, Francis C.; Volkman, Brian F.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Thompson, James R.

    2008-07-21

    Amyloidoses are devastating and currently incurable diseases in which the process of amyloid formation causes fatal cellular and organ damage. The molecular mechanisms underlying amyloidoses are not well known. In this study, we address the structural basis of immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis, which results from deposition of light chains produced by clonal plasma cells. We compare light chain amyloidosis protein AL-09 to its wild-type counterpart, the kl O18/O8 light chain germline. Crystallographic studies indicate that both proteins form dimers. However, AL-09 has an altered dimer interface that is rotated 90 degrees from the kl O18/O8 dimer interface. The three non-conservative mutations in AL-09 are located within the dimer interface, consistent with their role in the decreased stability of this amyloidogenic protein. Moreover, AL-09 forms amyloid fibrils more quickly than kl O18/O8 in vitro. These results support the notion that the increased stability of the monomer and delayed fibril formation, together with a properly formed dimer, may be protective against amyloidogenesis. This could open a new direction into rational drug design for amyloidogenic proteins.

  5. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; Waldner, Birgit J; Kahler, Ursula; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm "dynamics govern specificity" might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design. PMID:26496636

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Glycine Receptor β Subunit (GlyRβ)-interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Isabel; Koch, Dennis; Schemm, Rudolf; Qualmann, Britta; Betz, Heinrich; Paarmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in spinal cord and brainstem. They are clustered at inhibitory postsynapses via a tight interaction of their β subunits (GlyRβ) with the scaffolding protein gephyrin. In an attempt to isolate additional proteins interacting with GlyRβ, we performed pulldown experiments with rat brain extracts using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein encompassing amino acids 378–455 of the large intracellular loop of GlyRβ as bait. This identified syndapin I (SdpI) as a novel interaction partner of GlyRβ that coimmunoprecipitates with native GlyRs from brainstem extracts. Both SdpI and SdpII bound efficiently to the intracellular loop of GlyRβ in vitro and colocalized with GlyRβ upon coexpression in COS-7 cells. The SdpI-binding site was mapped to a proline-rich sequence of 22 amino acids within the intracellular loop of GlyRβ. Deletion and point mutation analysis disclosed that SdpI binding to GlyRβ is Src homology 3 domain-dependent. In cultured rat spinal cord neurons, SdpI immunoreactivity was found to partially colocalize with marker proteins of inhibitory and excitatory synapses. When SdpI was acutely knocked down in cultured spinal cord neurons by viral miRNA expression, postsynaptic GlyR clusters were significantly reduced in both size and number. Similar changes in GlyR cluster properties were found in spinal cultures from SdpI-deficient mice. Our results are consistent with a role of SdpI in the trafficking and/or cytoskeletal anchoring of synaptic GlyRs. PMID:24509844

  7. Characterization of Protein-Protein Interfaces through a Protein Contact Network Approach.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Luisa; Platania, Chiara Bianca Maria; Oliva, Gabriele; Setola, Roberto; Pascucci, Federica; Giuliani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax toxin comprises three different proteins, jointly acting to exert toxic activity: a non-toxic protective agent (PA), toxic edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). Binding of PA to anthrax receptors promotes oligomerization of PA, binding of EF and LF, and then endocytosis of the complex. Homomeric forms of PA, complexes of PA bound to LF and to the endogenous receptor capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2) were analyzed. In this work, we characterized protein-protein interfaces (PPIs) and identified key residues at PPIs of complexes, by means of a protein contact network (PCN) approach. Flexibility and global and local topological properties of each PCN were computed. The vulnerability of each PCN was calculated using different node removal strategies, with reference to specific PCN topological descriptors, such as participation coefficient, contact order, and degree. The participation coefficient P, the topological descriptor of the node's ability to intervene in protein inter-module communication, was the key descriptor of PCN vulnerability of all structures. High P residues were localized both at PPIs and other regions of complexes, so that we argued an allosteric mechanism in protein-protein interactions. The identification of residues, with key role in the stability of PPIs, has a huge potential in the development of new drugs, which would be designed to target not only PPIs but also residues localized in allosteric regions of supramolecular complexes.

  8. Dim2p, a KH-domain protein required for small ribosomal subunit synthesis

    PubMed Central

    VANROBAYS, EMMANUEL; GÉLUGNE, JEAN-PAUL; CAIZERGUES-FERRER, MICHÈLE; LAFONTAINE, DENIS L.J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent proteomic analyses are revealing the dynamics of preribosome assembly. Following cleavage at processing site A2, which generates the 20S pre-rRNA (the immediate precursor to the 18S rRNA), early RRPs (ribosomal RNA processing factors) are released in bulk from the preribosomes, and the resulting pre-40S subunits are left associated with a limited set of proteins that we refer to as the SSU RRP complex. Dim2p, a core constituent of the SSU RRP complex and conserved KH-domain containing protein, is required for pre-rRNA processing and is associated with early nucleolar and late cytoplasmic pre-rRNA species. Consistently, Dim2p shuttles between the nucle(ol)us and the cytoplasm, a trafficking that is tightly regulated by growth. The association of Dim2p with the 18S rRNA dimethyltransferase Dim1p, as well as its requirement for pre-rRNA processing at cleavage sites A1 and A2 and for 18S rRNA dimethylation, suggest that Dim2p may recruit Dim1p to nucleolar pre-rRNAs through its KH domain. PMID:15037774

  9. Protein Kinase A Catalytic Subunit Primed for Action: Time-Lapse Crystallography of Michaelis Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana; Parks, Jerry M; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Heller, William T

    2015-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg(2+) binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg(2+) binding to the M2 site. Concurrently, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. Lastly, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  10. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Run; Zhang, Ke; Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  11. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex.

  12. miR-200c dampens cancer cell migration via regulation of protein kinase A subunits.

    PubMed

    Sigloch, Florian Christoph; Burk, Ulrike Christina; Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Brabletz, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-09-15

    Expression of miR-200c is a molecular switch to determine cellular fate towards a mesenchymal or epithelial phenotype. miR-200c suppresses the early steps of tumor progression by preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and intravasation of tumor cells. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms might pinpoint to novel therapeutic options. To better understand these mechanisms it is crucial to identify targets of miR-200c. Here, we employ a combination of quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic strategies to identify novel miR-200c targets. We identify and confirm two subunits of the central cellular kinase protein kinase A (PKA), namely PRKAR1A and PRKACB, to be directly regulated by miR-200c. Notably, siRNA-mediated downregulation of both proteins phenocopies the migratory behavior of breast cancer cells after miR-200c overexpression. Patient data from publicly accessible databases supports a miR-200c-PKA axis. Thus, our study identifies the PKA heteroprotein as an important mediator of miR-200c induced repression of migration in breast cancer cells. By bioinformatics, we define a miRNA target cluster consisting of PRKAR1A, PRKAR2B, PRKACB, and COF2, which is targeted by a group of 14 miRNAs. PMID:26203557

  13. miR-200c dampens cancer cell migration via regulation of protein kinase a subunits

    PubMed Central

    Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Brabletz, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Expression of miR-200c is a molecular switch to determine cellular fate towards a mesenchymal or epithelial phenotype. miR-200c suppresses the early steps of tumor progression by preventing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and intravasation of tumor cells. Unraveling the underlying molecular mechanisms might pinpoint to novel therapeutic options. To better understand these mechanisms it is crucial to identify targets of miR-200c. Here, we employ a combination of quantitative proteomic and bioinformatic strategies to identify novel miR-200c targets. We identify and confirm two subunits of the central cellular kinase protein kinase A (PKA), namely PRKAR1A and PRKACB, to be directly regulated by miR-200c. Notably, siRNA-mediated downregulation of both proteins phenocopies the migratory behavior of breast cancer cells after miR-200c overexpression. Patient data from publicly accessible databases supports a miR-200c-PKA axis. Thus, our study identifies the PKA heteroprotein as an important mediator of miR-200c induced repression of migration in breast cancer cells. By bioinformatics, we define a miRNA target cluster consisting of PRKAR1A, PRKAR2B, PRKACB, and COF2, which is targeted by a group of 14 miRNAs. PMID:26203557

  14. MECHANISM AND HYDROPHOBIC FORCES DRIVING MEMBRANE PROTEIN INSERTION OF SUBUNIT II OF CYTOCHROME BO OXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Nil; Dalbey, Ross E.; Yuan, Jijun

    2009-01-01

    Subunit II (CyoA) of cytochrome bo oxidase, which spans the inner membrane twice in bacteria, has several unusual features in membrane biogenesis. It is synthesized with an amino-terminal signal peptide. In addition, distinct pathways are used to insert the two ends of the protein. The amino-terminal domain is inserted by the YidC pathway whereas the large carboxyl-terminal domain is translocated by the SecYEG pathway. Insertion of the protein is also pmf-independent. In this study we examined the topogenic requirements and mechanism of insertion of CyoA in bacteria. We find that both the signal peptide and the first membrane spanning region are required for insertion of the amino-terminal periplasmic loop. The pmf-independence of insertion of the first periplasmic loop is due to the loop’s neutral net charge. We observe also that the introduction of negatively charged residues into the periplasmic loop makes insertion pmf dependent, whereas the addition of positively charged residues prevents insertion unless the pmf is abolished. Insertion of the carboxyl-terminal domain in the full-length CyoA occurs by a sequential mechanism even when the CyoA amino and carboxyl-terminal domains are swapped with other domains. However, when a long spacer peptide is added to increase the distance between the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains, insertion no longer occurs by a sequential mechanism. PMID:18155041

  15. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  16. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, themore » target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.« less

  17. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit primed for action: Time-lapse crystallography of Michaelis complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Parks, Jerry M.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevskyi, Andrey Y.; Heller, William T.

    2015-11-12

    The catalytic subunit of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKAc) catalyzes the transfer of the γ-phosphate of bound Mg2ATP to a serine or threonine residue of a protein substrate. Here, time-lapse X-ray crystallography was used to capture a series of complexes of PKAc with an oligopeptide substrate and unreacted Mg2ATP, including the Michaelis complex, that reveal important geometric rearrangements in and near the active site preceding the phosphoryl transfer reaction. Contrary to the prevailing view, Mg2+ binds first to the M1 site as a complex with ATP and is followed by Mg2+ binding to the M2 site. Furthermore, the target serine hydroxyl of the peptide substrate rotates away from the active site toward the bulk solvent, which breaks the hydrogen bond with D166. In conclusion, the serine hydroxyl of the substrate rotates back toward D166 to form the Michaelis complex with the active site primed for phosphoryl transfer.

  18. Analysis of r-protein and RNA conformation of 30S subunit intermediates in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Napper, Nathan; Culver, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large macromolecular complex that must be assembled efficiently and accurately for the viability of all organisms. In bacteria, this process must be robust and tunable to support life in diverse conditions from the ice of arctic glaciers to thermal hot springs. Assembly of the Small ribosomal SUbunit (SSU) of Escherichia coli has been extensively studied and is highly temperature-dependent. However, a lack of data on SSU assembly for other bacteria is problematic given the importance of the ribosome in bacterial physiology. To broaden the understanding of how optimal growth temperature may affect SSU assembly, in vitro SSU assembly of two thermophilic bacteria, Geobacillus kaustophilus and Thermus thermophilus, was compared with that of E. coli. Using these phylogenetically, morphologically, and environmentally diverse bacteria, we show that SSU assembly is highly temperature-dependent and efficient SSU assembly occurs at different temperatures for each organism. Surprisingly, the assembly landscape is characterized by at least two distinct intermediate populations in the organisms tested. This novel, second intermediate, is formed in the presence of the full complement of r-proteins, unlike the previously observed RI* particle formed in the absence of late-binding r-proteins in E. coli. This work reveals multiple distinct intermediate populations are present during SSU assembly in vitro for several bacteria, yielding insights into RNP formation and possible antimicrobial development toward this common SSU target. PMID:25999315

  19. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  20. Topography and stoichiometry of acidic proteins in large ribosomal subunits from Artemia salina as determined by crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiumi, T.; Wahba, A.J.; Traut, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    The 60S subunits isolated from Artemia salina ribosomes were treated with the crosslinking reagent 2-iminothiolane under mild conditions. Proteins were extracted and fractions containing crosslinked acidic proteins were obtained by stepwise elution from CM-cellulose. Each fraction was analyzed by diagonal (two-dimensional nonreducing-reducing) NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked proteins below the diagonal were radioiodinated and identified by two-dimensional acidic urea-NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis. Each of the acidic proteins P1 and P2 was crosslinked individually to the same third protein, PO. The fractions containing acidic proteins were also analyzed by two-dimensional nonequilibrium isoelectric focusing-NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two crosslinked complexes were observed that coincide in isoelectric positions with monomeric P1 and P2, respectively. Both P1 and P2 appear to form crosslinked homodimers. These results suggest the presence in the 60S subunit of (P1)/sub 2/ and (P2)/sub 2/ dimers, each of which is anchored to PO. Protein PO appears to play the same role as L10 in Escherichia coli ribosomes and may form a pentameric complex with the two dimers in the 60S subunits.

  1. Proteins at fluid interfaces: adsorption layers and thin liquid films.

    PubMed

    Yampolskaya, Galina; Platikanov, Dimo

    2006-12-21

    A review in which many original published results of the authors as well as many other papers are discussed. The structure and some properties of the globular proteins are shortly presented, special accent being put on the alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-ChT), lysozyme (LZ), human serum albumin (HSA), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) which have been used in the experiments with thin liquid films. The behaviour of protein adsorption layers (PAL) is extensively discussed. The dynamics of PAL formation, including the kinetics of adsorption as well as the time evolution of the surface tension of protein aqueous solutions, are considered. A considerable place is devoted to the surface tension and adsorption isotherms of the globular protein solutions, the simulation of PAL by interacting hard spheres, the experimental surface tension isotherms of the above mentioned proteins, and the interfacial tension isotherms for the protein aqueous solution/oil interface. The rheological properties of PAL at fluid interfaces are shortly reviewed. After a brief information about the experimental methods for investigation of protein thin liquid (foam or emulsion) films, the properties of the protein black foam films are extensively discussed: the conditions for their formation, the influence of the electrolytes and pH on the film type and stability, the thermodynamic properties of the black foam films, the contact angles film/bulk and their dynamic hysteresis. The next center of attention concerns some properties of the protein emulsion films: the conditions for formation of emulsion black films, the formation and development of a dimpling in microscopic, circular films. The protein-phospholipid mixed foam films are also briefly considered.

  2. Intracellular targeting and import of an F1-ATPase beta-subunit-beta-galactosidase hybrid protein into yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, M G; Geller, B L; Emr, S D

    1984-01-01

    The gene coding for the yeast mitochondrial F1-ATPase beta subunit (ATP2) has been fused to the Escherichia coli lacZ gene. The chimeric ATP2-lacZ gene codes for a hybrid protein consisting of some 350 amino acids of the F1-ATPase beta subunit at its amino terminus and a large enzymatically active portion of the lacZ gene product, beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), at its carboxyl terminus. The beta-subunit-beta-galactosidase hybrid protein is expressed in both E. coli and yeast. In yeast, this hybrid molecule is targeted to the mitochondrion and is protected in isolated mitochondria from added protease under conditions in which an outer membrane enzymatic marker is digested. Yeast cells carrying the ATP2-lacZ gene fusion on plasmid p beta Z1 are unable to grow on a nonfermentable carbon source. Upon loss of the p beta Z1 plasmid, growth of the cured host strain on the nonfermentable substrate is restored. In the presence of the beta-subunit-beta-galactosidase hybrid protein, the energy-transducing capacity of the mitochondrial membrane as measured by the 32Pi-ATP exchange reaction is only 9% of that measured in the absence of the gene fusion product. The results indicate that it is the presence of the beta-subunit-beta-galactosidase hybrid protein within mitochondria that interferes with function(s) essential for respiratory growth. These observations open up the prospect of genetic characterization of the signals and cellular machinery responsible for mitochondrial protein delivery. Images PMID:6330727

  3. Subunit and amino acid interactions in the Escherichia coli mannitol permease: a functional complementation study of coexpressed mutant permease proteins.

    PubMed

    Saraceni-Richards, C A; Jacobson, G R

    1997-08-01

    Mannitol-specific enzyme II, or mannitol permease, of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli carries out the transport and phosphorylation of D-mannitol and is most active as a dimer in the membrane. We recently reported the importance of a glutamate residue at position 257 in the binding and transport of mannitol by this protein (C. Saraceni-Richards and G. R. Jacobson, J. Bacteriol. 179:1135-1142, 1997). Replacing Glu-257 with alanine (E257A) or glutamine (E257Q) eliminated detectable mannitol binding and transport by the permease. In contrast, an E257D mutant protein was able to bind and phosphorylate mannitol in a manner similar to that of the wild-type protein but was severely defective in mannitol uptake. In this study, we have coexpressed proteins containing mutations at position 257 with other inactive permeases containing mutations in each of the three domains of this protein. Activities of any active heterodimers resulting from this coexpression were measured. The results show that various inactive mutant permease proteins can complement proteins containing mutations at position 257. In addition, we show that both Glu at position 257 and His at position 195, both of which are in the membrane-bound C domain of the protein, must be on the same subunit of a permease dimer in order for efficient mannitol phosphorylation and uptake to occur. The results also suggest that mannitol bound to the opposite subunit within a permease heterodimer can be phosphorylated by the subunit containing the E257A mutation (which cannot bind mannitol) and support a model in which there are separate binding sites on each subunit within a permease dimer. Finally, we provide evidence from these studies that high-affinity mannitol binding is necessary for efficient transport by mannitol permease.

  4. Moving Iron through ferritin protein nanocages depends on residues throughout each four α-helix bundle subunit.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Suranjana; Bevers, Loes E; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2011-07-22

    Eukaryotic H ferritins move iron through protein cages to form biologically required, iron mineral concentrates. The biominerals are synthesized during protein-based Fe²⁺/O₂ oxidoreduction and formation of [Fe³⁺O](n) multimers within the protein cage, en route to the cavity, at sites distributed over ~50 Å. Recent NMR and Co²⁺-protein x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies identified the entire iron path and new metal-protein interactions: (i) lines of metal ions in 8 Fe²⁺ ion entry channels with three-way metal distribution points at channel exits and (ii) interior Fe³⁺O nucleation channels. To obtain functional information on the newly identified metal-protein interactions, we analyzed effects of amino acid substitution on formation of the earliest catalytic intermediate (diferric peroxo-A(650 nm)) and on mineral growth (Fe³⁺O-A(350 nm)), in A26S, V42G, D127A, E130A, and T149C. The results show that all of the residues influenced catalysis significantly (p < 0.01), with effects on four functions: (i) Fe²⁺ access/selectivity to the active sites (Glu¹³⁰), (ii) distribution of Fe²⁺ to each of the three active sites near each ion channel (Asp¹²⁷), (iii) product (diferric oxo) release into the Fe³⁺O nucleation channels (Ala²⁶), and (iv) [Fe³⁺O](n) transit through subunits (Val⁴², Thr¹⁴⁹). Synthesis of ferritin biominerals depends on residues along the entire length of H subunits from Fe²⁺ substrate entry at 3-fold cage axes at one subunit end through active sites and nucleation channels, at the other subunit end, inside the cage at 4-fold cage axes. Ferritin subunit-subunit geometry contributes to mineral order and explains the physiological impact of ferritin H and L subunits. PMID:21592958

  5. Specific Subunits of Heterotrimeric G Proteins Play Important Roles during Nodulation in Soybean1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins comprising Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits regulate many fundamental growth and development processes in all eukaryotes. Plants possess a relatively limited number of G-protein components compared with mammalian systems, and their detailed functional characterization has been performed mostly in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa). However, the presence of single Gα and Gβ proteins in both these species has significantly undermined the complexity and specificity of response regulation in plant G-protein signaling. There is ample pharmacological evidence for the role of G proteins in regulation of legume-specific processes such as nodulation, but the lack of genetic data from a leguminous species has restricted its direct assessment. Our recent identification and characterization of an elaborate G-protein family in soybean (Glycine max) and the availability of appropriate molecular-genetic resources have allowed us to directly evaluate the role of G-protein subunits during nodulation. We demonstrate that all G-protein genes are expressed in nodules and exhibit significant changes in their expression in response to Bradyrhizobium japonicum infection and in representative supernodulating and nonnodulating soybean mutants. RNA interference suppression and overexpression of specific G-protein components results in lower and higher nodule numbers, respectively, validating their roles as positive regulators of nodule formation. Our data further show preferential usage of distinct G-protein subunits in the presence of an additional signal during nodulation. Interestingly, the Gα proteins directly interact with the soybean nodulation factor receptors NFR1α and NFR1β, suggesting that the plant G proteins may couple with receptors other than the canonical heptahelical receptors common in metazoans to modulate signaling. PMID:23569109

  6. Identification of the subunit proteins of 10-nm neurofilaments isolated from axoplasm of squid and Myxicola giant axons.

    PubMed

    Lasek, R J; Krishnan, N; Kaiserman-Abramof, I R

    1979-08-01

    Neurofilaments were isolated from the axoplasm of the giant axons of Myxicola infundibulum and squid. The axoplasm was fractionated by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation and gel filtration on Sepharose 4B. The fractions were monitored for neurofilaments by electron microscopy. When isolated in the presence of chelating agents, the neurofilaments of Myxicola are composed almost entirely of protein subunits with mol wt of 150,000 and 160,000. Squid neurofilaments contain two major proteins with mol wt of 200,000 and 60,000. These proteins are compared with other intermediate filament proteins which have been reported in the literature.

  7. SLIRP stabilizes LRPPRC via an RRM-PPR protein interface.

    PubMed

    Spåhr, Henrik; Rozanska, Agata; Li, Xinping; Atanassov, Ilian; Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Rackham, Oliver; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2016-08-19

    LRPPRC is a protein that has attracted interest both for its role in post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial gene expression and more recently because numerous mutated variants have been characterized as causing severe infantile mitochondrial neurodegeneration. LRPPRC belongs to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family, originally defined by their RNA binding capacity, and forms a complex with SLIRP that harbours an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain. We show here that LRPPRC displays a broad and strong RNA binding capacity in vitro in contrast to SLIRP that associates only weakly with RNA. The LRPPRC-SLIRP complex comprises a hetero-dimer via interactions by polar amino acids in the single RRM domain of SLIRP and three neighbouring PPR motifs in the second quarter of LRPPRC, which critically contribute to the LRPPRC-SLIRP binding interface to enhance its stability. Unexpectedly, specific amino acids at this interface are located within the PPRs of LRPPRC at positions predicted to interact with RNA and within the RNP1 motif of SLIRP's RRM domain. Our findings thus unexpectedly establish that despite the prediction that these residues in LRPPRC and SLIRP should bind RNA, they are instead used to facilitate protein-protein interactions, enabling the formation of a stable complex between these two proteins.

  8. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  9. Regulation of Myogenesis by Fibroblast Growth Factors Requires Beta-Gamma Subunits of Pertussis Toxin-Sensitive G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fedorov, Yuri V.; Jones, Nathan C.; Olwin, Bradley B.

    1998-01-01

    Terminal differentiation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is inhibited by a number of different growth factors whose subsequent intracellular signaling events are poorly understood. In this study, we have investigated the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in mediating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-dependent signals that regulate myogenic differentiation. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates susceptible G proteins, promotes terminal differentiation in the presence of FGF-2, suggesting that Gα or Gβγ subunits or both are involved in transducing the FGF-dependent signal(s) that inhibits myogenesis. We found that Gβγ subunits are likely to be involved since the expression of the C terminus of β-adrenergic receptor kinase 1, a Gβγ subunit-sequestering agent, promotes differentiation in the presence of FGF-2, and expression of the free Gβγ dimer can replace FGF-2, rescuing cells from pertussis toxin-induced differentiation. Addition of pertussis toxin also blocked FGF-2-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Ectopic expression of dominant active mutants in the Ras/MAPK pathway rescued cells from pertussis toxin-induced terminal differentiation, suggesting that the Gβγ subunits act upstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway. It is unlikely that the pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway is activated by other, as yet unidentified FGF receptors since PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor)-stimulated MM14 cells expressing a chimeric receptor containing the FGF receptor-1 intracellular domain and the PDGF receptor extracellular domain were sensitive to pertussis toxin. Our data suggest that FGF-mediated signals involved in repression of myogenic differentiation are transduced by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled mechanism. This signaling pathway requires the action of Gβγ subunits and activation of MAPKs to repress skeletal muscle differentiation. PMID:9742095

  10. Regulatory subunit B'gamma of protein phosphatase 2A prevents unnecessary defense reactions under low light in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Wrzaczek, Michael; Scharte, Judith; Tikkanen, Mikko; Konert, Grzegorz; Rahikainen, Moona; Holmström, Maija; Hiltunen, Hanna-Maija; Rips, Stephan; Sipari, Nina; Mulo, Paula; Weis, Engelbert; von Schaewen, Antje; Aro, Eva-Mari; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2011-07-01

    Light is an important environmental factor that modulates acclimation strategies and defense responses in plants. We explored the functional role of the regulatory subunit B'γ (B'γ) of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in light-dependent stress responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The predominant form of PP2A consists of catalytic subunit C, scaffold subunit A, and highly variable regulatory subunit B, which determines the substrate specificity of PP2A holoenzymes. Mutant leaves of knockdown pp2a-b'γ plants show disintegration of chloroplasts and premature yellowing conditionally under moderate light intensity. The cell-death phenotype is accompanied by the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide through a pathway that requires CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSION OF PR GENES5 (CPR5). Moreover, the pp2a-b'γ cpr5 double mutant additionally displays growth suppression and malformed trichomes. Similar to cpr5, the pp2a-b'γ mutant shows constitutive activation of both salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent defense pathways. In contrast to cpr5, however, pp2a-b'γ leaves do not contain increased levels of salicylic acid or jasmonic acid. Rather, the constitutive defense response associates with hypomethylation of DNA and increased levels of methionine-salvage pathway components in pp2a-b'γ leaves. We suggest that the specific B'γ subunit of PP2A is functionally connected to CPR5 and operates in the basal repression of defense responses under low irradiance.

  11. Expression of protein kinase A regulatory subunits in benign and malignant human thyroid tissues: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Lania, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms and prognostic implications of the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in human tumors, with special emphasis on the malignant thyroid. The PKA signaling pathway is differentially activated by the expression of regulatory subunits 1 (R1) and 2 (R2), whose levels change during development, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Following the identification of gene mutations within the PKA regulatory subunit R1A (PRKAR1A) that cause Carney complex-associated neoplasms, several investigators have studied PRKAR1A expression in sporadic thyroid tumors. The PKA regulatory subunit R2B (PRKAR2B) is highly expressed in benign, as well as in malignant differentiated and undifferentiated lesions. PRKAR1A is highly expressed in follicular adenomas and malignant lesions with a statistically significant gradient between benign and malignant tumors; however, it is not expressed in hyperplastic nodules. Although the importance of PKA in human malignancy outcomes is not completely understood, PRKAR1A expression correlates with tumor dimension in malignant lesions. Additional studies are needed to determine whether a relationship exists between PKA subunit expression and clinical outcomes, particularly in undifferentiated tumors. In conclusion, the R1A subunit might be a good molecular candidate for the targeted treatment of malignant thyroid tumors. PMID:27321957

  12. The conserved Bud20 zinc finger protein is a new component of the ribosomal 60S subunit export machinery.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Jochen; Klein, Isabella; Schmidt, Claudia; Kallas, Martina; Thomson, Emma; Wagner, Maria Anna; Bradatsch, Bettina; Rechberger, Gerald; Strohmaier, Heimo; Hurt, Ed; Bergler, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    The nuclear export of the preribosomal 60S (pre-60S) subunit is coordinated with late steps in ribosome assembly. Here, we show that Bud20, a conserved C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger protein, is an unrecognized shuttling factor required for the efficient export of pre-60S subunits. Bud20 associates with late pre-60S particles in the nucleoplasm and accompanies them into the cytoplasm, where it is released through the action of the Drg1 AAA-ATPase. Cytoplasmic Bud20 is then reimported via a Kap123-dependent pathway. The deletion of Bud20 induces a strong pre-60S export defect and causes synthetic lethality when combined with mutant alleles of known pre-60S subunit export factors. The function of Bud20 in ribosome export depends on a short conserved N-terminal sequence, as we observed that mutations or the deletion of this motif impaired 60S subunit export and generated the genetic link to other pre-60S export factors. We suggest that the shuttling Bud20 is recruited to the nascent 60S subunit via its central zinc finger rRNA binding domain to facilitate the subsequent nuclear export of the preribosome employing its N-terminal extension.

  13. Proteins at flowing interfaces: From understanding structure to treating disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Young, James; Hirsa, Amir

    2012-11-01

    The field of soft matter offers vast opportunities for scientific and technological developments, with many challenges that need to be addressed by various disciplines. Fluid dynamics has a tremendous potential for greater impact, from broadening fundamental understanding to treating disease. Here we demonstrate the use of fluid dynamics in two biotechnology problems involving proteins at the air/water interface: a) 2-Dimensional protein crystallization and b) amyloid fibril formation. Protein crystallization is usually the most challenging step in X-ray diffraction analysis of protein structure. Recently it was demonstrated that flow can induce 2-D protein crystallization at conditions under which quiescent systems do not form crystals. A different form of protein structuring, namely amyloid fibrillization, is also of interest due to its association with several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein denaturation, which is the root of the fibrillization process, is also a significant concern in biotherapeutics production. Both problems are studied by using shearing free-surface flows in simple geometries. The common finding is that flow can significantly enhance the growth of protein structures.

  14. The use of dissolved oxygen-controlled, fed-batch aerobic cultivation for recombinant protein subunit vaccine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Patrick; Sun, Jacob; Champagne, Paul-Philippe; Lau, Heron; Gao, Meg; Sun, Hong; Zeiser, Arno; D'Amore, Tony

    2015-11-27

    A simple "off-the-shelf" fed-batch approach to aerobic bacterial cultivation for recombinant protein subunit vaccine manufacturing is presented. In this approach, changes in the dissolved oxygen levels are used to adjust the nutrient feed rate (DO-stat), so that the desired dissolved oxygen level is maintained throughout cultivation. This enables high Escherichia coli cell densities and recombinant protein titers. When coupled to a kLa-matched scale-down model, process performance is shown to be consistent at the 2L, 20L, and 200L scales for two recombinant E. coli strains expressing different protein subunit vaccine candidates. Additionally, by mining historical DO-stat nutrient feeding data, a method to transition from DO-stat to a pre-determined feeding profile suitable for larger manufacturing scales without using feedback control is demonstrated at the 2L, 20L, and 200L scales.

  15. Glucagon induces disaggregation of polymer-like structures of the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory G protein in liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Rodbell, M. )

    1991-08-15

    The hydrodynamic behavior of G{alpha}{sub s}, the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein), in octyl glucoside extracts of rat liver membranes was investigated. As was previously shown for G proteins similarly extracted from brain synaptoneurosomes, G{alpha}{sub s} behaved as polydisperse structures with S values higher than that of heterotrimeric G proteins. When G{alpha}{sub s} in its membrane-bound form was ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin and the treated membranes were extracted with octyl glucoside, > 35% of the labeled G{alpha}{sub s} was found in material that sedimented through sucrose gradients and contained relatively low levels of immunoreactive G{alpha}{sub s}. These finding suggest that the glucagon receptor selectivity interacts with polymer-like structures of G{alpha}{sub 2} and that activation by GTP({gamma}S) results in disaggregation. The role of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of G proteins in the hormone-induced process is not clear since the polymer-like structures extracted with octyl glucoside are devoid of {beta} and {gamma} subunits.

  16. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  17. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, the thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.

  18. Phosphoryl transfer reaction snapshots in crystals: Insights into the mechanism of protein kinase a catalytic subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Das, Amit; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Heller, William T.; Kovalevskyi, Andrii Y.; Langan, Paul; Tian, Jianhui

    2015-06-19

    To study the catalytic mechanism of phosphorylation catalyzed by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) a structure of the enzyme-substrate complex representing the Michaelis complex is of specific interest as it can shed light on the structure of the transition state. However, all previous crystal structures of the Michaelis complex mimics of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) were obtained with either peptide inhibitors or ATP analogs. Here we utilized Ca2+ ions and sulfur in place of the nucleophilic oxygen in a 20-residue pseudo-substrate peptide (CP20) and ATP to produce a close mimic of the Michaelis complex. In the ternary reactant complex, themore » thiol group of Cys-21 of the peptide is facing Asp-166 and the sulfur atom is positioned for an in-line phosphoryl transfer. Replacement of Ca2+ cations with Mg2+ ions resulted in a complex with trapped products of ATP hydrolysis: phosphate ion and ADP. As a result, the present structural results in combination with the previously reported structures of the transition state mimic and phosphorylated product complexes complete the snapshots of the phosphoryl transfer reaction by PKAc, providing us with the most thorough picture of the catalytic mechanism to date.« less

  19. Expression of a Ricin Toxin B Subunit: Insulin Fusion Protein in Edible Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James E.; Odumosu, Oludare; Langridge, William H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Onset of juvenile Type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs when autoreactive lymphocytes progressively destroy the insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreatic Islets of Langerhans. The increasing lack of insulin and subsequent onset of hyperglycemia results in increased damage to nerves, blood vessels, and tissues leading to the development of a host of severe disease symptoms resulting in premature morbidity and mortality. To enhance restoration of normoglycemia and immunological homeostasis generated by lymphocytes that mediate the suppression of autoimmunity, the non-toxic B chain of the plant AB enterotoxin ricin (RTB), a castor bean lectin binding a variety of epidermal cell receptors, was genetically linked to the coding region of the proinsulin gene (INS) and expressed as a fusion protein (INS–RTB) in transformed potato plants. This study is the first documented example of a plant enterotoxin B subunit linked to an autoantigen and expressed in transgenic plants for enhanced immunological suppression of T1D autoimmunity. PMID:19898971

  20. Evolution, Expression Differentiation and Interaction Specificity of Heterotrimeric G-Protein Subunit Gene Family in the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Gulab C.; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID

  1. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Arya, Gulab C; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species.

  2. Evolution, expression differentiation and interaction specificity of heterotrimeric G-protein subunit gene family in the mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Arya, Gulab C; Kumar, Roshan; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprising of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits, are important signal transducers which regulate many aspects of fundamental growth and developmental processes in all eukaryotes. Initial studies in model plants Arabidopsis and rice suggest that the repertoire of plant G-protein is much simpler than that observed in metazoans. In order to assess the consequence of whole genome triplication events within Brassicaceae family, we investigated the multiplicity of G-protein subunit genes in mesohexaploid Brassica rapa, a globally important vegetable and oilseed crop. We identified one Gα (BraA.Gα1), three Gβ (BraA.Gβ1, BraA.Gβ2, and BraA.Gβ3), and five Gγ (BraA.Gγ1, BraA.Gγ2, BraA.Gγ3, BraA.Gγ4, and BraA.Gγ5) genes from B. rapa, with a possibility of 15 Gαβγ heterotrimer combinations. Our analysis suggested that the process of genome triplication coupled with gene-loss (gene-fractionation) phenomenon have shaped the quantitative and sequence diversity of G-protein subunit genes in the extant B. rapa genome. Detailed expression analysis using qRT-PCR assays revealed that the G-protein genes have retained ubiquitous but distinct expression profiles across plant development. The expression of multiple G-protein genes was differentially regulated during seed-maturation and germination stages, and in response to various phytohormone treatments and stress conditions. Yeast-based interaction analysis showed that G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, with some degree of subunit-specific interaction specificity, to control the functional selectivity of G-protein heterotrimer in different cell and tissue-types or in response to different environmental conditions. Taken together, this research identifies a highly diverse G-protein signaling network known to date from B. rapa, and provides a clue about the possible complexity of G-protein signaling networks present across globally important Brassica species. PMID

  3. The sequential addition of ribosomal proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I T; Noll, F; Hadjiolov, A A

    1983-03-15

    Nucleolar '80-S' and '40-S' preribosomes (containing 45-S and 21-S pre-rRNA, respectively), as well as cytoplasmic ribosomes, were isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. The presence of structural ribosomal proteins in the isolated particles was studied by using antisera against individual rat liver small ribosomal subunit proteins. The analysis is based on the established crossreactivity between rat and mouse ribosomes [F. Noll and H. Bielka (1970) Mol. Gen. Genet. 106, 106-113]. The identification of the proteins was achieved by two independent immunological techniques: the passive haemagglutination test and the enzyme immunoassay of electrophoretically fractionated proteins, blotted on nitrocellulose. All 17 proteins tested are present in cytoplasmic ribosomes. A large number of proteins (S3a, S6, S7, S8, S11, S14, S18, S20, S23/24 and S25) are present in the '80-S' preribosome. Only two proteins (S3 and S21) are added during the formation of the '40-S' preribosome in the nucleolus. Four proteins (S2, S19, S26 and S29) are added at later, possibly extranucleolar, stages of ribosome formation. The results obtained provide evidence for the sequential addition of proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

  4. Cables1 controls p21/Cip1 protein stability by antagonizing proteasome subunit alpha type 3.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Li, Z; Li, Z J; Cheng, K; Du, Y; Fu, H; Khuri, F R

    2015-05-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor 1A, p21/Cip1, is a vital cell cycle regulator, dysregulation of which has been associated with a large number of human malignancies. One critical mechanism that controls p21 function is through its degradation, which allows the activation of its associated cell cycle-promoting kinases, CDK2 and CDK4. Thus delineating how p21 is stabilized and degraded will enhance our understanding of cell growth control and offer a basis for potential therapeutic interventions. Here we report a novel regulatory mechanism that controls the dynamic status of p21 through its interaction with Cdk5 and Abl enzyme substrate 1 (Cables1). Cables1 has a proposed role as a tumor suppressor. We found that upregulation of Cables1 protein was correlated with increased half-life of p21 protein, which was attributed to Cables1/p21 complex formation and supported by their co-localization in the nucleus. Mechanistically, Cables1 interferes with the proteasome (Prosome, Macropain) subunit alpha type 3 (PSMA3) binding to p21 and protects p21 from PSMA3-mediated proteasomal degradation. Moreover, silencing of p21 partially reverses the ability of Cables1 to induce cell death and inhibit cell proliferation. In further support of a potential pathophysiological role of Cables1, the expression level of Cables1 is tightly associated with p21 in both cancer cell lines and human lung cancer patient tumor samples. Together, these results suggest Cables1 as a novel p21 regulator through maintaining p21 stability and support the model that the tumor-suppressive function of Cables1 occurs at least in part through enhancing the tumor-suppressive activity of p21. PMID:24975575

  5. G-protein beta subunit of Cochliobolus heterostrophus involved in virulence, asexual and sexual reproductive ability, and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Sherif; Lu, Shun-Wen; Lee, Bee-Na; Chou, David Yu-Te; Hadar, Ruthi; Turgeon, B Gillian; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2004-12-01

    Previous work established that mutations in mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (CHK1) and heterotrimeric G-protein alpha (Galpha) subunit (CGA1) genes affect the development of several stages of the life cycle of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The effects of mutating a third signal transduction pathway gene, CGB1, encoding the Gbeta subunit, are reported here. CGB1 is the sole Gbeta subunit-encoding gene in the genome of this organism. cgb1 mutants are nearly wild type in vegetative growth rate; however, Cgb1 is required for appressorium formation, female fertility, conidiation, regulation of hyphal pigmentation, and wild-type virulence on maize. Young hyphae of cgb1 mutants grow in a straight path, in contrast to those of the wild type, which grow in a wavy pattern. Some of the phenotypes conferred by mutations in CGA1 are found in cgb1 mutants, suggesting that Cgb1 functions in a heterotrimeric G protein; however, there are also differences. In contrast to the deletion of CGA1, the loss of CGB1 is not lethal for ascospores, evidence that there is a Gbeta subunit-independent signaling role for Cga1 in mating. Furthermore, not all of the phenotypes conferred by mutations in the MAP kinase CHK1 gene are found in cgb1 mutants, implying that the Gbeta heterodimer is not the only conduit for signals to the MAP kinase CHK1 module. The additional phenotypes of cgb1 mutants, including severe loss of virulence on maize and of the ability to produce conidia, are consistent with CGB1 being unique in the genome. Fluorescent DNA staining showed that there is often nuclear degradation in mature hyphae of cgb1 mutants, while comparable wild-type cells have intact nuclei. These data may be genetic evidence for a novel cell death-related function of the Gbeta subunit in filamentous fungi.

  6. The carboxyl terminus of the Galpha-subunit is the latch for triggered activation of heterotrimeric G proteins.

    PubMed

    Nanoff, Christian; Koppensteiner, Romana; Yang, Qiong; Fuerst, Elisabeth; Ahorn, Horst; Freissmuth, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The receptor-mimetic peptide D2N, derived from the cytoplasmic domain of the D(2) dopamine receptor, activates G protein alpha-subunits (G(i) and G(o)) directly. Using D2N, we tested the current hypotheses on the mechanism of receptor-mediated G protein activation, which differ by the role assigned to the Gbetagamma-subunit: 1) a receptor-prompted movement of Gbetagamma is needed to open up the nucleotide exit pathway ("gear-shift" and "lever-arm" model) or 2) the receptor first engages Gbetagamma and then triggers GDP release by interacting with the carboxyl (C) terminus of Galpha (the "sequential-fit" model). Our results with D2N were compatible with the latter hypothesis. D2N bound to the extreme C terminus of the alpha-subunit and caused a conformational change that was transmitted to the switch regions. Hence, D2N led to a decline in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, increased the guanine nucleotide exchange rate, and modulated the Mg(2+) control of nucleotide binding. A structural alteration in the outer portion of helix alpha5 (substitution of an isoleucine by proline) blunted the stimulatory action of D2N. This confirms that helix alpha5 links the guanine nucleotide binding pocket to the receptor contact site on the G protein. However, neither the alpha-subunit amino terminus (as a lever-arm) nor Gbetagamma was required for D2N-mediated activation; conversely, assembly of the Galphabetagamma heterotrimer stabilized the GDP-bound species and required an increased D2N concentration for activation. We propose that the receptor can engage the C terminus of the alpha-subunit to destabilize nucleotide binding from the "back side" of the nucleotide binding pocket.

  7. An atypical heterotrimeric G-protein γ-subunit is involved in guard cell K⁺-channel regulation and morphological development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, David; Trusov, Yuri; Zhang, Wei; Acharya, Biswa R; Sheahan, Michael B; McCurdy, David W; Assmann, Sarah M; Botella, José Ramón

    2011-09-01

    Currently, there are strong inconsistencies in our knowledge of plant heterotrimeric G-proteins that suggest the existence of additional members of the family. We have identified a new Arabidopsis G-protein γ-subunit (AGG3) that modulates morphological development and ABA-regulation of stomatal aperture. AGG3 strongly interacts with the Arabidopsis G-protein β-subunit in vivo and in vitro. Most importantly, AGG3-deficient mutants account for all but one of the 'orphan' phenotypes previously unexplained by the two known γ-subunits in Arabidopsis. AGG3 has unique characteristics never before observed in plant or animal systems, such as its size (more than twice that of canonical γ-subunits) and the presence of a C-terminal Cys-rich domain. AGG3 thus represent a novel class of G-protein γ-subunits, widely spread throughout the plant kingdom but not present in animals. Homologues of AGG3 in rice have been identified as important quantitative trait loci for grain size and yield, but due to the atypical nature of the proteins their identity as G-protein subunits was thus far unknown. Our work demonstrates a similar trend in seeds of Arabidopsis agg3 mutants, and implicates G-proteins in such a crucial agronomic trait. The discovery of this highly atypical subunit reinforces the emerging notion that plant and animal G-proteins have distinct as well as shared evolutionary pathways. PMID:21575088

  8. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dygut, Jacek; Kalinowska, Barbara; Banach, Mateusz; Piwowar, Monika; Konieczny, Leszek; Roterman, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific) hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1) Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer); (2) Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above) and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model. PMID:27763556

  9. The plant-specific G protein γ subunit AGG3 influences organ size and shape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengjun; Liu, Yaju; Zheng, Leiying; Chen, Liangliang; Li, Na; Corke, Fiona; Lu, Yaru; Fu, Xiangdong; Zhu, Zhengge; Bevan, Michael W; Li, Yunhai

    2012-05-01

    • Control of organ size and shape by cell proliferation and cell expansion is a fundamental developmental process, but the mechanisms that set the size and shape of determinate organs are largely unknown in plants. • Molecular, genetic, cytological and biochemical approaches were used to characterize the roles of the Arabidopsis thaliana G protein γ subunit (AGG3) gene in organ growth. • Here, we describe A. thaliana AGG3, which promotes petal growth by increasing the period of cell proliferation. Both the N-terminal region and the C-terminal domains of AGG3 are necessary for the function of AGG3. By contrast, analysis of a series of AGG3 derivatives with deletions in specific domains showed that the deletion of any of these domains cannot completely abolish the function of AGG3. The GFP-AGG3 fusion protein is localized to the plasma membrane. The predicted transmembrane domain plays an important role in the plasma membrane localization of AGG3. Genetic analyses revealed that AGG3 action requires a functional G protein α subunit (GPA1) and G protein β subunit (AGB1). • Our findings demonstrate that AGG3, GPA1 and AGB1 act in the same genetic pathway to influence organ size and shape in A. thaliana.

  10. The human WBSCR22 protein is involved in the biogenesis of the 40S ribosomal subunits in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Õunap, Kadri; Käsper, Ly; Kurg, Ants; Kurg, Reet

    2013-01-01

    The human WBSCR22 protein was previously shown to be up-regulated in invasive breast cancer and its ectopic expression enhances tumor cell survival in the vasculature. In the current study, we show that the WBSCR22 protein is important for cell growth. Knock-down of WBSCR22 with siRNA results in slower growth of WBSCR22-depleted cells. Treatment with siWBSCR22 causes defects in the processing of pre-rRNAs and reduces the level of free 40S ribosomal subunit, suggesting that WBSCR22 is involved in ribosome small subunit biosynthesis. The human WBSCR22 partially complements the growth of WBSCR22 yeast homologue, bud23 deletion mutant suggesting that the human WBSCR22 is a functional homologue of yeast Bud23. WBSCR22 is localized throughout the cell nucleus and is not stably associated with ribosomal subunits within the cell nucleus. We also show that the WBSCR22 protein level is decreased in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from William-Beuren Syndrome (WBS) patients compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that the WBSCR22 protein is a ribosome biogenesis factor involved in the biosynthesis of 40S ribosomal particles in mammalian cells.

  11. Optical control of endogenous proteins with a photoswitchable conditional subunit reveals a role for TREK1 in GABA(B) signaling.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Levitz, Joshua; Kramer, Richard H; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2012-06-21

    Selective ligands are lacking for many neuronal signaling proteins. Photoswitched tethered ligands (PTLs) have enabled fast and reversible control of specific proteins containing a PTL anchoring site and have been used to remote control overexpressed proteins. We report here a scheme for optical remote control of native proteins using a "photoswitchable conditional subunit" (PCS), which contains the PTL anchoring site as well as a mutation that prevents it from reaching the plasma membrane. In cells lacking native subunits for the protein, the PCS remains nonfunctional internally. However, in cells expressing native subunits, the native subunit and PCS coassemble, traffic to the plasma membrane, and place the native protein under optical control provided by the coassembled PCS. We apply this approach to the TREK1 potassium channel, which lacks selective, reversible blockers. We find that TREK1, typically considered to be a leak channel, contributes to the hippocampal GABA(B) response. PMID:22726831

  12. Posttranscriptional down-regulation of small ribosomal subunit proteins correlates with reduction of 18S rRNA in RPS19 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Davey, Edward; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-06-18

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is mutated in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). We hypothesized that decreased levels of RPS19 lead to a coordinated down-regulation of other ribosomal (r-)proteins at the subunit level. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of small subunit (SSU) r-proteins (S20, S21 and S24) when compared to large subunit (LSU) r-proteins (L3, L9, L30 and L38). This correlates with a relative decrease in 18S rRNA with respect to 28S rRNA. The r-protein mRNA levels remain relatively unchanged indicating a post transcriptional regulation of r-proteins at the level of subunit formation.

  13. Hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits of the F1-ATPase allow communication between the catalytic site and the interface of the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Kathryn W; Frasch, Wayne D

    2006-09-19

    F(1)-ATPase mutations in Escherichia coli that changed the strength of hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits in a location that links the catalytic site to the interface between the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit were examined. Loss of the ability to form the hydrogen bonds involving alphaS337, betaD301, and alphaD335 lowered the k(cat) of ATPase and decreased its susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition, while mutations that maintain or strengthen these bonds increased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition and lowered the k(cat) of ATPase. These data suggest that hydrogen bonds connecting alphaS337 to betaD301 and betaR323 and connecting alphaD335 to alphaS337 are important to transition state stabilization and catalytic function that may result from the proper alignment of catalytic site residues betaR182 and alphaR376 through the VISIT sequence (alpha344-348). Mutations betaD301E, betaR323K, and alphaR282Q changed the rate-limiting step of the reaction as determined by an isokinetic plot. Hydrophobic mutations of betaR323 decreased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n)() inhibition and lowered the number of interactions required in the rate-limiting step yet did not affect the k(cat) of ATPase, suggesting that betaR323 is important to transition state formation. The decreased rate of ATP synthase-dependent growth and decreased level of lactate-dependent quenching observed with alphaD335, betaD301, and alphaE283 mutations suggest that these residues may be important to the formation of an alternative set of hydrogen bonds at the interface of the alpha and beta subunits that permits the release of intersubunit bonds upon the binding of ATP, allowing gamma rotation in the escapement mechanism. PMID:16964980

  14. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors: Relationship with cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovani, G.; Lania, A.G.; Bondioni, S.; Peverelli, E.; Pedroni, C.; Ferrero, S.; Pellegrini, C.; Vicentini, L.; Arnaldi, G.; Bosari, S.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Spada, A.

    2008-01-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in growth control. Mutations of the R1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PKA regulatory subunits in non-PPNAD adrenocortical tumors causing ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and to test the impact of differential expression of these subunits on cell growth. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a defective expression of R2B in all cortisol-secreting adenomas (n = 16) compared with the normal counterpart, while both R1A and R2A were expressed at high levels in the same tissues. Conversely, carcinomas (n = 5) showed high levels of all subunits. Sequencing of R1A and R2B genes revealed a wild type sequence in all tissues. The effect of R1/R2 ratio on proliferation was assessed in mouse adrenocortical Y-1 cells. The R2-selective cAMP analogue 8-Cl-cAMP dose-dependently inhibited Y-1 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, while the R1-selective cAMP analogue 8-HA-cAMP stimulated cell proliferation. Finally, R2B gene silencing induced up-regulation of R1A protein, associated with an increase in cell proliferation. In conclusion, we propose that a high R1/R2 ratio favors the proliferation of well differentiated and hormone producing adrenocortical cells, while unbalanced expression of these subunits is not required for malignant transformation.

  15. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root.

  16. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. PMID:27457987

  17. A chemical biology approach demonstrates G protein βγ subunits are sufficient to mediate directional neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Surve, Chinmay R; Lehmann, David; Smrcka, Alan V

    2014-06-20

    Our laboratory has identified a number of small molecules that bind to G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) by competing for peptide binding to the Gβγ "hot spot." M119/Gallein were identified as inhibitors of Gβγ subunit signaling. Here we examine the activity of another molecule identified in this screen, 12155, which we show that in contrast to M119/Gallein had no effect on Gβγ-mediated phospholipase C or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) γ activation in vitro. Also in direct contrast to M119/Gallein, 12155 caused receptor-independent Ca(2+) release, and activated other downstream targets of Gβγ including extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase B (Akt) in HL60 cells differentiated to neutrophils. We show that 12155 releases Gβγ in vitro from Gαi1β1γ2 heterotrimers by causing its dissociation from GαGDP without inducing nucleotide exchange in the Gα subunit. We used this novel probe to examine the hypothesis that Gβγ release is sufficient to direct chemotaxis of neutrophils in the absence of receptor or G protein α subunit activation. 12155 directed chemotaxis of HL60 cells and primary neutrophils in a transwell migration assay with responses similar to those seen for the natural chemotactic peptide n-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. These data indicate that release of free Gβγ is sufficient to drive directional chemotaxis in a G protein-coupled receptor signaling-independent manner.

  18. The alternate AP-1 adaptor subunit Apm2 interacts with the Mil1 regulatory protein and confers differential cargo sorting

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Shawn T.; Burston, Helen E.; Bean, Björn D. M.; Raghuram, Nandini; Maldonado-Báez, Lymarie; Davey, Michael; Wendland, Beverly; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Heterotetrameric adaptor protein complexes are important mediators of cargo protein sorting in clathrin-coated vesicles. The cell type–specific expression of alternate μ chains creates distinct forms of AP-1 with altered cargo sorting, but how these subunits confer differential function is unclear. Whereas some studies suggest the μ subunits specify localization to different cellular compartments, others find that the two forms of AP-1 are present in the same vesicle but recognize different cargo. Yeast have two forms of AP-1, which differ only in the μ chain. Here we show that the variant μ chain Apm2 confers distinct cargo-sorting functions. Loss of Apm2, but not of Apm1, increases cell surface levels of the v-SNARE Snc1. However, Apm2 is unable to replace Apm1 in sorting Chs3, which requires a dileucine motif recognized by the γ/σ subunits common to both complexes. Apm2 and Apm1 colocalize at Golgi/early endosomes, suggesting that they do not associate with distinct compartments. We identified a novel, conserved regulatory protein that is required for Apm2-dependent sorting events. Mil1 is a predicted lipase that binds Apm2 but not Apm1 and contributes to its membrane recruitment. Interactions with specific regulatory factors may provide a general mechanism to diversify the functional repertoire of clathrin adaptor complexes. PMID:26658609

  19. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  20. The Pertussis Toxin S1 Subunit Is a Thermally Unstable Protein Susceptible to Degradation by the 20S Proteasome†

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Abhay H.; Moe, David; Jamnadas, Maneesha; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) is an AB-type protein toxin that consists of a catalytic A subunit (PT S1) and an oligomeric, cell-binding B subunit. It belongs to a subset of AB toxins that move from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before A chain passage into the cytosol. Toxin translocation is thought to involve A chain unfolding in the ER and the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The absence of lysine residues in PT S1 may allow the translocated toxin to avoid ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the 26S proteasome, which is the usual fate of exported ERAD substrates. As the conformation of PT S1 appears to play an important role in toxin translocation, we used biophysical and biochemical methods to examine the structural properties of PT S1. Our in vitro studies found that the isolated PT S1 subunit is a thermally unstable protein that can be degraded in a ubiquitin-independent fashion by the core 20S proteasome. The thermal denaturation of PT S1 was inhibited by its interaction with NAD, a donor molecule used by PT S1 for the ADP-ribosylation of target G proteins. These observations support a model of intoxication in which toxin translocation, degradation, and activity are all influenced by the heat-labile nature of the isolated toxin A chain. PMID:17105192

  1. Downregulation of GABA[Subscript A] Receptor Protein Subunits a6, ß2, d, e, ?2, ?, and ?2 in Superior Frontal Cortex of Subjects with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Rustan, Oyvind G.; Rooney, Robert J.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    We measured protein and mRNA levels for nine gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptor subunits in three brain regions (cerebellum, superior frontal cortex, and parietal cortex) in subjects with autism versus matched controls. We observed changes in mRNA for a number of GABA[subscript A] and GABA[subscript B] subunits and overall…

  2. Mutations in HADHB, which encodes the β-subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional protein, cause infantile onset hypoparathyroidism and peripheral polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Naiki, Misako; Ochi, Nobuhiko; Kato, Yusuke S; Purevsuren, Jamiyan; Yamada, Kenichiro; Kimura, Reiko; Fukushi, Daisuke; Hara, Shinya; Yamada, Yasukazu; Kumagai, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) is a hetero-octamer composed of four α- and four β-subunits that catalyzes the final three steps of mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids. HADHA and HADHB encode the α-subunit and the β-subunit of MTP, respectively. To date, only two cases with MTP deficiency have been reported to be associated with hypoparathyroidism and peripheral polyneuropathy. Here, we report on two siblings with autosomal recessive infantile onset hypoparathyroidism, peripheral polyneuropathy, and rhabdomyolysis. Sequence analysis of HADHA and HADHB in both siblings shows that they were homozygous for a mutation in exon 14 of HADHB (c.1175C>T, [p.A392V]) and the parents were heterozygous for the mutation. Biochemical analysis revealed that the patients had MTP deficiency. Structural analysis indicated that the A392V mutation identified in this study and the N389D mutation previously reported to be associated with hypoparathyroidism are both located near the active site of MTP and affect the conformation of the β-subunit. Thus, the present patients are the second and third cases of MTP deficiency associated with missense HADHB mutation and infantile onset hypoparathyroidism. Since MTP deficiency is a treatable disease, MTP deficiency should be considered when patients have hypoparathyroidism as the initial presenting feature in infancy.

  3. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-01

    T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1γ), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1γ of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1γ), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1γ revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1γ. However, leishmanial TCP1γ represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1γ exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1γ as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1γ was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1γ with actin suggests that, this gene may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of cytoskeleton of parasite. PMID:23137535

  4. Dominant-negative Gα subunits are a mechanism of dysregulated heterotrimeric G protein signaling in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Marivin, Arthur; Leyme, Anthony; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Cheung, Anthony Y.; Nguyen, Lien T.; Dominguez, Isabel; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Auriculo-Condylar Syndrome (ACS), a rare condition that impairs craniofacial development, is caused by mutations in a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. In mice, disruption of signaling by the endothelin type A receptor (ETAR), which is mediated by the G protein subunit Gαq/11 and subsequently phospholipase C (PLC), impairs neural crest cell differentiation that is required for normal craniofacial development. Some ACS patients have mutations in GNAI3, which encodes Gαi3, but it is unknown whether this G protein has a role within the ETAR pathway. Here, we used a Xenopus model of vertebrate development, in vitro biochemistry, and biosensors of G protein activity in mammalian cells to systematically characterize the phenotype and function of all known ACS-associated Gαi3 mutants. We found that ACS-associated mutations in GNAI3 produce dominant-negative Gαi3 mutant proteins that couple to ETAR but cannot bind and hydrolyze guanosine triphosphate, resulting in the prevention of endothelin-mediated activation of Gαq/11 and PLC. Thus, ACS is caused by functionally dominant-negative mutations in a heterotrimeric G protein subunit. PMID:27072656

  5. A Strategy Based on Protein-Protein Interface Motifs May Help in Identifying Drug Off-Targets

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Keskin, Ozlem; Nussinov, Ruth; Gursoy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Networks are increasingly used to study the impact of drugs at the systems level. From the algorithmic standpoint, a drug can ‘attack’ nodes or edges of a protein-protein interaction network. In this work, we propose a new network strategy, “The Interface Attack”, based on protein-protein interfaces. Similar interface architectures can occur between unrelated proteins. Consequently, in principle, a drug that binds to one has a certain probability of binding others. The interface attack strategy simultaneously removes from the network all interactions that consist of similar interface motifs. This strategy is inspired by network pharmacology and allows inferring potential off-targets. We introduce a network model which we call “Protein Interface and Interaction Network (P2IN)”, which is the integration of protein-protein interface structures and protein interaction networks. This interface-based network organization clarifies which protein pairs have structurally similar interfaces, and which proteins may compete to bind the same surface region. We built the P2IN of p53 signaling network and performed network robustness analysis. We show that (1) ‘hitting’ frequent interfaces (a set of edges distributed around the network) might be as destructive as eleminating high degree proteins (hub nodes); (2) frequent interfaces are not always topologically critical elements in the network; and (3) interface attack may reveal functional changes in the system better than attack of single proteins. In the off-target detection case study, we found that drugs blocking the interface between CDK6 and CDKN2D may also affect the interaction between CDK4 and CDKN2D. PMID:22817115

  6. N-terminal domain of the V-ATPase a2-subunit displays integral membrane protein properties.

    PubMed

    Merkulova, Maria; McKee, Mary; Dip, Phat Vinh; Grüber, Gerhard; Marshansky, Vladimir

    2010-10-01

    V-ATPase is a multisubunit membrane complex that functions as nanomotor coupling ATP hydrolysis with proton translocation across biological membranes. Recently, we uncovered details of the mechanism of interaction between the N-terminal tail of the V-ATPase a2-subunit isoform (a2N(1-402)) and ARNO, a GTP/GDP exchange factor for Arf-family small GTPases. Here, we describe the development of two methods for preparation of the a2N(1-402) recombinant protein in milligram quantities sufficient for further biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. We found two alternative amphiphilic chemicals that were required for protein stability and solubility during purification: (i) non-detergent sulfobetaine NDSB-256 and (ii) zwitterionic detergent FOS-CHOLINE®12 (FC-12). Moreover, the other factors including mild alkaline pH, the presence of reducing agents and the absence of salt were beneficial for stabilization and solubilization of the protein. A preparation of a2N(1-402) in NDSB-256 was successfully used in pull-down and BIAcore™ protein-protein interaction experiments with ARNO, whereas the purity and quality of the second preparation in FC-12 was validated by size-exclusion chromatography and CD spectroscopy. Surprisingly, the detergent requirement for stabilization and solubilization of a2N(1-402) and its cosedimentation with liposomes were different from peripheral domains of other transmembrane proteins. Thus, our data suggest that in contrast to current models, so called "cytosolic" tail of the a2-subunit might actually be embedded into and/or closely associated with membrane phospholipids even in the absence of any obvious predicted transmembrane segments. We propose that a2N(1-402) should be categorized as an integral monotopic domain of the a2-subunit isoform of the V-ATPase.

  7. Computational prediction of protein interfaces: A review of data driven methods.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li C; Dobbs, Drena; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Honavar, Vasant

    2015-11-30

    Reliably pinpointing which specific amino acid residues form the interface(s) between a protein and its binding partner(s) is critical for understanding the structural and physicochemical determinants of protein recognition and binding affinity, and has wide applications in modeling and validating protein interactions predicted by high-throughput methods, in engineering proteins, and in prioritizing drug targets. Here, we review the basic concepts, principles and recent advances in computational approaches to the analysis and prediction of protein-protein interfaces. We point out caveats for objectively evaluating interface predictors, and discuss various applications of data-driven interface predictors for improving energy model-driven protein-protein docking. Finally, we stress the importance of exploiting binding partner information in reliably predicting interfaces and highlight recent advances in this emerging direction.

  8. Template-based identification of protein-protein interfaces using eFindSitePPI.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Surabhi; Brylinski, Michal

    2016-01-15

    Protein-protein interactions orchestrate virtually all cellular processes, therefore, their exhaustive exploration is essential for the comprehensive understanding of cellular networks. A reliable identification of interfacial residues is vital not only to infer the function of individual proteins and their assembly into biological complexes, but also to elucidate the molecular and physicochemical basis of interactions between proteins. With the exponential growth of protein sequence data, computational approaches for detecting protein interface sites have drawn an increased interest. In this communication, we discuss the major features of eFindSite(PPI), a recently developed template-based method for interface residue prediction available at http://brylinski.cct.lsu.edu/efindsiteppi. We describe the requirements and installation procedures for the stand-alone version, and explain the content and format of output data. Furthermore, the functionality of the eFindSite(PPI) web application that is designed to provide a simple and convenient access for the scientific community is presented with illustrative examples. Finally, we discuss common problems encountered in predicting protein interfaces and set forth directions for the future development of eFindSite(PPI). PMID:26235816

  9. Inhibition of the interaction of G protein G(o) with calcium channels by the calcium channel beta-subunit in rat neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, V; Berrow, N S; Fitzgerald, E M; Brickley, K; Dolphin, A C

    1995-01-01

    1. The beta-subunit has marked effects on the biophysical and pharmacological properties of voltage-dependent calcium channels. In the present study we examined the ability of the GABAB agonist (-) -baclofen to inhibit calcium channel currents in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurones following depletion of beta-subunit immunoreactivity, 108-116 h after microinjection of a beta-subunit antisense oligonucleotide. 2.We observed that, although the calcium channel current was markedly reduced in amplitude following beta-subunit depletion, the residual current (comprising both N- and L-type calcium channel currents) showed an enhanced response to application of (-) -baclofen. Therefore, it is possible that there is normally competition between activated G protein G(o) and the calcium channel beta-subunit for binding to the calcium channel alpha 1-subunit; and this competition shifts in favour of the binding of activated G(o) following depletion of the beta-subunit, resulting in increased inhibition. 3. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that an antibody against the calcium channel beta-subunit completely abolishes stimulation of the GTPase activity of G(o) by the dihydropyridine agonist S-(-) -Bay K 8644 in brain membranes. This stimulation of GTPase is thought to result from an interaction of G(o) alpha-subunit (G alpha o) with its calcium channel effector which may operate as a GTPase-activating protein. 4. These data suggest that the calcium channel beta-subunit when complexed with the beta 1-subunit normally inhibits its association with activated G(o). It may function as a GTPase-activating protein to reduce the ability of activated G(o) to associate with the calcium channel, and thus limit the efficacy of agonists such as (-) -baclofen. Images Figure 1 PMID:7666364

  10. Piscine (Sparus aurata) alpha subunit of the G-protein transducin is homologous to mammalian cone and rod transducin.

    PubMed

    Funkenstein, B; Jakowlew, S B

    1997-09-01

    A novel cDNA encoding alpha subunit of the GTP-binding protein, transducin, has been cloned from a marine fish, Sparus aurata. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1050 nt (encoding 350 amino acid residues). A high degree of identity was found with known mammalian transducin proteins of cones (Gt2 alpha) or rods (Gt1 alpha): human Gt2 alpha (80.2%), bovine Gt2 alpha (79.3%), mouse Tt1 alpha (78.2%), mouse Gt2 alpha (78%) and bovine Gt1 alpha (77.9%). Northern blot analysis of different tissues revealed a transcript of about 2.5 kb, which is expressed only in the fish eye and not in other tissues from adult fish, supporting its identification as transducin. Ontogeny of transducin mRNA expression during early development of Sparus aurata, determined by Northern blot analysis, showed very low levels in larvae 3 days after hatching but not earlier. Levels increased 3- and 6-fold on days 4 and 6 (respectively) compared with those on day 3 and remained essentially unchanged thereafter, until day 21 after hatching (the last day studied). Our results suggest that in fish only one alpha subunit of transducin is found, which shows similar identity with cone and rod alpha subunits of mammals.

  11. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions by Detecting Correlated Mutation at the Interface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fei; Ding, Yijie; Li, Zhao; Tang, Jijun

    2015-09-28

    Protein-protein interactions play key roles in a multitude of biological processes, such as de novo drug design, immune response, and enzymatic activity. It is of great interest to understand how proteins in a complex interact with each other. Here, we present a novel method for identifying protein-protein interactions, based on typical co-evolutionary information. Correlated mutation analysis can be used to predict interface residues. In this paper, we propose a non-redundant database to detect correlated mutation at the interface. First, we construct structure alignments for one input protein, based on all aligned proteins in the database. Evolutionary distance matrices, one for each input protein, can be calculated through geometric similarity and evolutionary information. Then, we use evolutionary distance matrices to estimate correlation coefficient between each pair of fragments from two input proteins. Finally, we extract interacting residues with high values of correlation coefficient, which can be grouped as interacting patches. Experiments illustrate that our method achieves better results than some existing co-evolution-based methods. Applied to SK/RR interaction between sensor kinase and response regulator proteins, our method has accuracy and coverage values of 53% and 45%, which improves upon accuracy and coverage values of 50% and 30% for DCA method. We evaluate interface prediction on four protein families, and our method has overall accuracy and coverage values of 34% and 30%, which improves upon overall accuracy and coverage values of 27% and 21% for PIFPAM. Our method has overall accuracy and coverage values of 59% and 63% on Benchmark v4.0, and 50% and 49% on CAPRI targets. Comparing to existing methods, our method improves overall accuracy value by at least 2%. PMID:26284382

  12. Cloning of a Cryptococcus neoformans gene, GPA1, encoding a G-protein alpha-subunit homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Tolkacheva, T; McNamara, P; Piekarz, E; Courchesne, W

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a gene, GPA1, from Cryptococcus neoformans by the PCR technique. DNA sequencing of the GPA1 clone suggested that it encodes a protein homologous to the G-protein alpha-subunit family. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the GPA1-encoded protein revealed that it is about 45% identical to several mammalian Gi alpha subunits and 48% identical to the G alpha protein Gpa2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. G alpha proteins are known to be involved in mating of other yeasts, such as S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Southern analysis demonstrated that GPA1 is present in a single copy within the Cryptococcus genome. Isolation of the cDNA for GPA1 confirmed that the gene contains six introns within the coding region. The GPA1 transcript was identified by Northern (RNA) analysis as a 1.6-kb RNA present in exponentially growing cells of both the alpha and a mating types. Moreover, the abundance of this transcript increased in cells shifted to starvation medium. Coincubation of alpha and a cells on starvation medium is required for mating of cryptococcal cells. Thus, our results are consistent with the involvement of C. neoformans GPA1 in mating. Images PMID:8005675

  13. Subunit composition of G(o) proteins functionally coupling galanin receptors to voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Kalkbrenner, F; Degtiar, V E; Schenker, M; Brendel, S; Zobel, A; Heschler, J; Wittig, B; Schultz, G

    1995-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in the central nervous system and other tissues and induces different cellular reactions, e.g. hormone release from pituitary and inhibition of insulin release from pancreatic B cells. By microinjection of antisense oligonucleotides we studied the question as to which G proteins mediate the galanin-induced inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in the rat pancreatic B-cell line RINm5F and in the rat pituitary cell line GH3. Injection of antisense oligonucleotides directed against alpha 01, beta 2, beta 3, gamma 2 and gamma 4 G protein subunits reduced the inhibition of Ca2+ channel current which was induced by galanin, whereas no change was seen after injection of cells with antisense oligonucleotides directed against alpha i, alpha q, alpha 11, alpha 14, alpha 15, beta 1, beta 4, gamma 1, gamma 3, gamma 5, or gamma 7 G protein subunits or with sense control oligonucleotides. In view of these data and of previous results, we conclude that the galanin receptors in GH3 and in RINm5F cells couple mainly to the G(0) protein consisting of alpha 01 beta 2 gamma 2 to inhibit Ca2+ channels and use alpha 01beta 3 gamma 4 less efficiently. The latter G protein composition was previously shown to be used by muscarinic M4 receptors to inhibit Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:7588602

  14. Cold stress-induced protein Rbm3 binds 60S ribosomal subunits, alters microRNA levels, and enhances global protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Dresios, John; Aschrafi, Armaz; Owens, Geoffrey C; Vanderklish, Peter W; Edelman, Gerald M; Mauro, Vincent P

    2005-02-01

    The expression of Rbm3, a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein, is enhanced under conditions of mild hypothermia, and Rbm3 has been postulated to facilitate protein synthesis at colder temperatures. To investigate this possibility, Rbm3 was overexpressed as a c-Myc fusion protein in mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cells expressing this fusion protein showed a 3-fold increase in protein synthesis at both 37 degrees C and 32 degrees C compared with control cells. Although polysome profiles of cells expressing the fusion protein and control cells were similar, several differences were noted, suggesting that Rbm3 might enhance the association of 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits at 32 degrees C. Studies to assess a direct interaction of Rbm3 with ribosomes showed that a fraction of Rbm3 was associated with 60S ribosomal subunits in an RNA-independent manner. It appeared unlikely that this association could explain the global enhancement of protein synthesis, however, because cells expressing the Rbm3 fusion protein showed no substantial increase in the size of their monosome and polysome peaks, suggesting that similar numbers of mRNAs were being translated at approximately the same rates. In contrast, a complex that sedimented between the top of the gradient and 40S subunits was less abundant in cells expressing recombinant Rbm3. Further analysis showed that the RNA component of this fraction was microRNA. We discuss the possibility that Rbm3 expression alters global protein synthesis by affecting microRNA levels and suggest that both Rbm3 and microRNAs are part of a homeostatic mechanism that regulates global levels of protein synthesis under normal and cold-stress conditions.

  15. Specific sequences in the fragile X syndrome protein FMR1 and the FXR proteins mediate their binding to 60S ribosomal subunits and the interactions among them.

    PubMed Central

    Siomi, M C; Zhang, Y; Siomi, H; Dreyfuss, G

    1996-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of hereditary mental retardation, usually results from lack of expression of the FMR1 gene. The FMR1 protein is a cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein. The RNA-binding activity of FMR1 is an essential feature of FMR1, as fragile X syndrome can also result from the expression of mutant FMR1 protein that is impaired in RNA binding. Recently, we described two novel cytoplasmic proteins, FXR1 and FXR2, which are both very similar in amino acid sequence to FMR1 and which also interact strongly with FMR1 and with each other. To understand the function of FMR1 and the FXR proteins, we carried out cell fractionation and sedimentation experiments with monoclonal antibodies to these proteins to characterize the complexes they form. Here, we report that the FMR1 and FXR proteins are associated with ribosomes, predominantly with 60S large ribosomal subunits. The FXR proteins are associated with 60S ribosomal subunits even in cells that lack FMR1 and that are derived from a fragile X syndrome patient, indicating that FMR1 is not required for this association. We delineated the regions of FMR1 that mediate its binding to 60S ribosomal subunits and the interactions among the FMR1-FXR family members. Both regions contain sequences predicted to have a high propensity to form coiled coil interactions, and the sequences are highly evolutionarily conserved in this protein family. The association of the FMR1, FXR1, and FXR2 proteins with ribosomes suggests they have functions in translation or mRNA stability. PMID:8668200

  16. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  17. Computational Simulation of the Activation Cycle of Gα Subunit in the G Protein Cycle Using an Elastic Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Ryung; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jae Boong; Chung, Ka Young; Kim, Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) interact with GDP-bound G protein heterotrimers (Gαβγ) promoting GDP/GTP exchange, which results in dissociation of Gα from the receptor and Gβγ. The GTPase activity of Gα hydrolyzes GTP to GDP, and the GDP-bound Gα interacts with Gβγ, forming a GDP-bound G protein heterotrimer. The G protein cycle is allosterically modulated by conformational changes of the Gα subunit. Although biochemical and biophysical methods have elucidated the structure and dynamics of Gα, the precise conformational mechanisms underlying the G protein cycle are not fully understood yet. Simulation methods could help to provide additional details to gain further insight into G protein signal transduction mechanisms. In this study, using the available X-ray crystal structures of Gα, we simulated the entire G protein cycle and described not only the steric features of the Gα structure, but also conformational changes at each step. Each reference structure in the G protein cycle was modeled as an elastic network model and subjected to normal mode analysis. Our simulation data suggests that activated receptors trigger conformational changes of the Gα subunit that are thermodynamically favorable for opening of the nucleotide-binding pocket and GDP release. Furthermore, the effects of GTP binding and hydrolysis on mobility changes of the C and N termini and switch regions are elucidated. In summary, our simulation results enabled us to provide detailed descriptions of the structural and dynamic features of the G protein cycle. PMID:27483005

  18. Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1, a new Annexin A7 interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yue; Meng, Jinyi; Huang, Yuhong; Wu, Jun; Wang, Bo; Ibrahim, Mohammed M.; Tang, Jianwu

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RACK1 formed a complex with Annexin A7. • Depletion of RACK1 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion. • RACK1 RNAi abolished RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction. • RACK1-Annexin A7 may play a role in regulating the metastatic potentials. - Abstract: We report for the first time that Guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-2-like 1 (RACK1) formed a complex with Annexin A7. Hca-F and Hca-P are a pair of syngeneic mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines established and maintained in our laboratory. Our previous study showed that both Annexin A7 and RACK1 were expressed higher in Hca-F (lymph node metastasis >70%) than Hca-P (lymph node metastasis <30%). Suppression of Annexin A7 expression in Hca-F cells induced decreased migration and invasion ability. In this study, knockdown of RACK1 by RNA interference (RNAi) had the same impact on metastasis potential of Hca-F cells as Annexin A7 down-regulation. Furthermore, by co-immunoprecipitation and double immunofluorescence confocal imaging, we found that RACK1 was in complex with Annexin A7 in control cells, but not in the RACK1-down-regulated cells, indicating the abolishment of RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction in Hca-F cells by RACK1 RNAi. Taken together, these results suggest that RACK1-Annexin A7 interaction may be one of the means by which RACK1 and Annexin A7 influence the metastasis potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells in vitro.

  19. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D. G.; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D. S.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Moreira, Irina S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set. PMID:27472327

  20. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Moreira, Irina S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set. PMID:27472327

  1. Protein painting reveals solvent-excluded drug targets hidden within native protein–protein interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the contact regions between a protein and its binding partners is essential for creating therapies that block the interaction. Unfortunately, such contact regions are extremely difficult to characterize because they are hidden inside the binding interface. Here we introduce protein painting as a new tool that employs small molecules as molecular paints to tightly coat the surface of protein–protein complexes. The molecular paints, which block trypsin cleavage sites, are excluded from the binding interface. Following mass spectrometry, only peptides hidden in the interface emerge as positive hits, revealing the functional contact regions that are drug targets. We use protein painting to discover contact regions between the three-way interaction of IL1β ligand, the receptor IL1RI and the accessory protein IL1RAcP. We then use this information to create peptides and monoclonal antibodies that block the interaction and abolish IL1β cell signalling. The technology is broadly applicable to discover protein interaction drug targets. PMID:25048602

  2. Expression of a foreign Rubisco small subunit in tobacco with reduced levels of the native protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cDNA, ArRbcS3, for the small subunit of Rubisco from Amaranthus retroflexus (pigweed) was expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the control of a strong leaf-specific Lhcb promoter. The coding region of the ArRbcS3 was fused to the plastid targeting sequence of the native tobacco rbcS to...

  3. The Thermal Structural Transition of Alpha-Crystallin Modulates Subunit Interactions and Increases Protein Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; De Spirito, Marco; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract), is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K). Methods/Results To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ) and the interfacial tension (γ) of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. Conclusions/General Significance The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing. PMID:22347398

  4. Use of dimethyl suberimidate, a cross-linking reagent, in studying the subunit structure of oligomeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, G E; Stark, G R

    1970-07-01

    Amidination of aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, tryptophan synthetase B protein, L-arabinose isomerase, and the catalytic subunit of E. coli aspartate transcarbamylase with the bifunctional reagent dimethyl suberimidate produces cross-linked proteins, with reaction predominating within oligomers. Disc electrophoresis of a modified protein on polyacrylamide gel in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate resolves a set of species with molecular weights equal to integral multiples of the protomer molecular weight. For oligomers composed of identical protomers, the number of principal species observed is identical to the number of protomers in the oligomer. Application of the method to two proteins composed of dissimilar protomers, native aspartate transcarbamylase and tryptophan synthetase alpha(2)beta(2) complex of E. coli, revealed differences in the reactivities of the different kinds of protomer within each oligomer.

  5. A determinant of odorant specificity is located at the extracellular loop 2-transmembrane domain 4 interface of an Anopheles gambiae odorant receptor subunit.

    PubMed

    Hughes, David T; Wang, Guirong; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Luetje, Charles W

    2014-11-01

    To explore the structural basis for odorant specificity in odorant receptors of the human malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, odorant-binding subunits (Agam\\Ors) expressed in Xenopus oocytes in combination with Agam\\Orco (coreceptor subunit) were assayed by 2-electrode voltage clamp against 25 structurally related odorants. Agam\\Or13 and Agam\\Or15 display 82% amino acid identity and had similar, but somewhat distinct odorant response profiles. The ratio of acetophenone to 4-methylphenol responses was used in a mutation-based analysis of Agam\\Or15, interchanging 37 disparate residues between Agam\\Or15 and Agam\\Or13. Eleven mutations caused significant changes in odorant responsiveness. Mutation of alanine 195 resulted in the largest shift in response ratio from Agam\\Or15 toward Agam\\Or13. Concentration-response analysis for a series of mutations of residue 195 revealed a large effect on acetophenone sensitivity, with EC50 values varying by >1800-fold and correlating with residue side chain length. Similar results were obtained for propiophenone and benzaldehyde. But, for other odorants, such as 4-methylphenol, 4-methylbenzaldehyde, and 4-methylpropiophenone, the effect of mutation was much smaller (EC50 values varied by ≤16-fold). These results show that alanine 195, putatively located at the second extracellular loop/fourth transmembrane domain interface, plays a critical role in determining the odorant response specificity of Agam\\Or15. PMID:25270378

  6. Immunogenicity Analysis of a Novel Subunit Vaccine Candidate Molecule-Recombinant L7/L12 Ribosomal Protein of Brucella suis.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Xin; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2016-08-01

    Brucella was an intracellular parasite, which could infect special livestock and humans. After infected by Brucella, livestock's reproductive system could be affected and destroyed resulting in huge economic losses. More seriously, it could be contagious from livestock to humans. So far, there is no available vaccine which is safe enough for humans. On this point, subunit vaccine has become the new breakthrough of conquering brucellosis. In this study, Brucella rL7/L12-BLS fusion protein was used as an antigen to immunize rabbits to detect the immunogenicity. The results of antibody level testing assay of rabbit antiserum indicated rL7/L12-BLS fusion protein could elicit rabbits to produce high-level IgG. And gamma interferon (IFN-γ) concentrations in rabbit antiserum were obviously up-regulated in both the rL7/L12 group and rL7/L12-BLS group. Besides, the results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed the IFN-γ gene's expression levels of both the rL7/L12 group and rL7/L12-BLS group were obviously up-regulated. All these results suggested Brucella L7/L12 protein was an ideal subunit vaccine candidate and possessed good immunogenicity. And Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS) molecule was a favorable transport vector for antigenic protein. PMID:27075455

  7. The effect of GABA stimulation on GABAA receptor subunit protein and mRNA expression in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, K. P.; Zwartjes, R. E.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. After 8 days in vitro, rat cerebellar granule cells were exposed to 1 mM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days. The effect of the GABA exposure on GABAA receptor alpha 1, alpha 6 and beta 2,3 subunit protein expression and alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit steady-state mRNA levels, was examined using Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. 2. GABA exposure for 2 days decreased alpha 1 (35 +/- 10%, mean +/- s.e.mean), beta 2,3 (21 +/- 9%) and alpha 6 (28 +/- 10%) subunit protein expression compared to control levels. The GABA-mediated reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression after 2 days treatment was abolished in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist, Ru 5135 (10 microM). 3. GABA exposure for 8 days increased alpha 1 (26 +/- 10%, mean +/- s.e.mean) and beta 2,3 (56 +/- 23%) subunit protein expression over control levels, whereas alpha 6 subunit protein expression remained below control levels (by 38 +/- 10%). However, after 10 days GABA exposure, alpha 6 subunit protein expression was also increased over control levels by 65 +/- 29% (mean +/- s.e.mean). 4. GABA exposure did not change the alpha 1 or alpha 6 subunit steady-state mRNA levels over and 8 day period, nor did it alter the expression of cyclophilin mRNA over 1-8 days. 5. These results suggest that chronic GABA exposure of rat cerebellar granule cells has a bi-phasic effect on GABAA receptor subunit expression that is independent of changes to mRNA levels. Therefore, the regulation of the GABAA receptor expression by chronic agonist treatment appears to involve post-transcriptional and/or post-translational processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8968548

  8. Cloning, characterization and sub-cellular localization of gamma subunit of T-complex protein-1 (chaperonin) from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskar,; Kumari, Neeti; Goyal, Neena

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study presents cloning and characterization of TCP1{gamma} gene from L. donovani. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCP1{gamma} is a subunit of T-complex protein-1 (TCP1), a chaperonin class of protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LdTCP{gamma} co-localized with actin, a cytoskeleton protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The data suggests that this gene may have a role in differentiation/biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on this chapronin in Leishmania. -- Abstract: T-complex protein-1 (TCP1) complex, a chaperonin class of protein, ubiquitous in all genera of life, is involved in intracellular assembly and folding of various proteins. The gamma subunit of TCP1 complex (TCP1{gamma}), plays a pivotal role in the folding and assembly of cytoskeleton protein(s) as an individual or complexed with other subunits. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and expression of the TCP1{gamma} of Leishmania donovani (LdTCP1{gamma}), the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdTCP1{gamma} revealed the presence of all the characteristic features of TCP1{gamma}. However, leishmanial TCP1{gamma} represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. LdTCP1{gamma} exhibited differential expression in different stages of promastigotes. The non-dividing stationary phase promastigotes exhibited 2.5-fold less expression of LdTCP1{gamma} as compared to rapidly dividing log phase parasites. The sub-cellular distribution of LdTCP1{gamma} was studied in log phase promastigotes by employing indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. The protein was present not only in cytoplasm but it was also localized in nucleus, peri-nuclear region, flagella, flagellar pocket and apical region. Co-localization of LdTCP1{gamma} with actin suggests

  9. AlphaSpace: Fragment-Centric Topographical Mapping To Target Protein-Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rooklin, David; Wang, Cheng; Katigbak, Joseph; Arora, Paramjit S; Zhang, Yingkai

    2015-08-24

    Inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy despite the difficulty in targeting such interfaces with drug-like small molecules. PPIs generally feature large and flat binding surfaces as compared to typical drug targets. These features pose a challenge for structural characterization of the surface using geometry-based pocket-detection methods. An attractive mapping strategy--that builds on the principles of fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD)--is to detect the fragment-centric modularity at the protein surface and then characterize the large PPI interface as a set of localized, fragment-targetable interaction regions. Here, we introduce AlphaSpace, a computational analysis tool designed for fragment-centric topographical mapping (FCTM) of PPI interfaces. Our approach uses the alpha sphere construct, a geometric feature of a protein's Voronoi diagram, to map out concave interaction space at the protein surface. We introduce two new features--alpha-atom and alpha-space--and the concept of the alpha-atom/alpha-space pair to rank pockets for fragment-targetability and to facilitate the evaluation of pocket/fragment complementarity. The resulting high-resolution interfacial map of targetable pocket space can be used to guide the rational design and optimization of small molecule or biomimetic PPI inhibitors. PMID:26225450

  10. Escherichia coli rimM and yjeQ null strains accumulate immature 30S subunits of similar structure and protein complement

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Vivian; Kent, Meredith; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits proceeds through multiple parallel pathways. The protein factors RimM, YjeQ, RbfA, and Era work in conjunction to assist at the late stages of the maturation process of the small subunit. However, it is unclear how the functional interplay between these factors occurs in the context of multiple parallel pathways. To understand how these factors work together, we have characterized the immature 30S subunits that accumulate in ΔrimM cells and compared them with immature 30S subunits from a ΔyjeQ strain. The cryo-EM maps obtained from these particles showed that the densities representing helices 44 and 45 in the rRNA were partially missing, suggesting mobility of these motifs. These 30S subunits were also partially depleted in all tertiary ribosomal proteins, particularly those binding in the head domain. Using image classification, we identified four subpopulations of ΔrimM immature 30S subunits differing in the amount of missing density for helices 44 and 45, as well as the amount of density existing in these maps for the underrepresented proteins. The structural defects found in these immature subunits resembled those of the 30S subunits that accumulate in the ΔyjeQ strain. These findings are consistent with an “early convergency model” in which multiple parallel assembly pathways of the 30S subunit converge into a late assembly intermediate, as opposed to the mature state. Functionally related factors will bind to this intermediate to catalyze the last steps of maturation leading to the mature 30S subunit. PMID:23611982

  11. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treatment. Chronic flunitrazepam treatment did not significantly alter the GABAA receptor alpha 6 subunit protein over the 2-12 day period. 2. GABA treatment for 2 days down-regulates the alpha 1 subunit protein in a dose-dependent (10 microM-1 mM) manner that was prevented by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). At 10 microM and 1 mM GABA the reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression compared to controls was 31% and 66%, respectively. 3. The flunitrazepam-induced decrease in alpha 1 subunit protein is independent of GABA, which suggests that it involves a mechanism distinct from the GABA-dependent action of benzodiazepines on GABAA receptor channel activity. 4. Simultaneous treatment with flunitrazepam and GABA did not produce an additive down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein, but produced an effect of the same magnitude as that of flunitrazepam alone. This down-regulation induced by the combination of flunitrazepam and GABA was inhibited by flumazenil (78%), but unaffected by bicuculline. 5. The flunitrazepam-induced down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein at 2 days was completely reversed by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine (0.3 microM). 6. This study has shown that both flunitrazepam and GABA treatment, via their respective binding sites, caused a reduction in the expression of the GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein; an effect mediated through the same neurochemical mechanism. The results also imply that the benzodiazepine effect

  12. Tail-anchored Protein Insertion in Mammals: FUNCTION AND RECIPROCAL INTERACTIONS OF THE TWO SUBUNITS OF THE TRC40 RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara Francesca; Cardani, Silvia; Maroli, Annalisa; Vitiello, Adriana; Soffientini, Paolo; Crespi, Arianna; Bram, Richard F; Benfante, Roberta; Borgese, Nica

    2016-07-15

    The GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins)/TRC (transmembrane recognition complex) pathway for tail-anchored protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been characterized in detail in yeast and is thought to function similarly in mammals, where the orthologue of the central ATPase, Get3, is known as TRC40 or Asna1. Get3/TRC40 function requires an ER receptor, which in yeast consists of the Get1/Get2 heterotetramer and in mammals of the WRB protein (tryptophan-rich basic protein), homologous to yeast Get1, in combination with CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand), which is not homologous to Get2. To better characterize the mammalian receptor, we investigated the role of endogenous WRB and CAML in tail-anchored protein insertion as well as their association, concentration, and stoichiometry in rat liver microsomes and cultured cells. Functional proteoliposomes, reconstituted from a microsomal detergent extract, lost their activity when made with an extract depleted of TRC40-associated proteins or of CAML itself, whereas in vitro synthesized CAML and WRB together were sufficient to confer insertion competence to liposomes. CAML was found to be in ∼5-fold excess over WRB, and alteration of this ratio did not inhibit insertion. Depletion of each subunit affected the levels of the other one; in the case of CAML silencing, this effect was attributable to destabilization of the WRB transcript and not of WRB protein itself. These results reveal unanticipated complexity in the mutual regulation of the TRC40 receptor subunits and raise the question as to the role of the excess CAML in the mammalian ER.

  13. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    PubMed

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  14. Tail-anchored Protein Insertion in Mammals: FUNCTION AND RECIPROCAL INTERACTIONS OF THE TWO SUBUNITS OF THE TRC40 RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara Francesca; Cardani, Silvia; Maroli, Annalisa; Vitiello, Adriana; Soffientini, Paolo; Crespi, Arianna; Bram, Richard F; Benfante, Roberta; Borgese, Nica

    2016-07-15

    The GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins)/TRC (transmembrane recognition complex) pathway for tail-anchored protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been characterized in detail in yeast and is thought to function similarly in mammals, where the orthologue of the central ATPase, Get3, is known as TRC40 or Asna1. Get3/TRC40 function requires an ER receptor, which in yeast consists of the Get1/Get2 heterotetramer and in mammals of the WRB protein (tryptophan-rich basic protein), homologous to yeast Get1, in combination with CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand), which is not homologous to Get2. To better characterize the mammalian receptor, we investigated the role of endogenous WRB and CAML in tail-anchored protein insertion as well as their association, concentration, and stoichiometry in rat liver microsomes and cultured cells. Functional proteoliposomes, reconstituted from a microsomal detergent extract, lost their activity when made with an extract depleted of TRC40-associated proteins or of CAML itself, whereas in vitro synthesized CAML and WRB together were sufficient to confer insertion competence to liposomes. CAML was found to be in ∼5-fold excess over WRB, and alteration of this ratio did not inhibit insertion. Depletion of each subunit affected the levels of the other one; in the case of CAML silencing, this effect was attributable to destabilization of the WRB transcript and not of WRB protein itself. These results reveal unanticipated complexity in the mutual regulation of the TRC40 receptor subunits and raise the question as to the role of the excess CAML in the mammalian ER. PMID:27226539

  15. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms—either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins—the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5′ or 3′ extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  16. Steady-state levels of G-protein beta-subunit expression are regulated by treatment of cells with bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.C.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    Cultures of 3T3-L1 cells were incubated with either 10 ng/ml cholera toxin or 10 ng/ml pertussis toxin from 4 days prior to the initiation of differentiation and throughout the subsequent incubation. Toxin concentrations were sufficient to completely prevent the labelling of alpha-subunits with (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and pertussis toxin and to prevent by more than 90% the labelling with (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and cholera toxin in membranes prepared from these cells. Neither toxin prevented the differentiation to the adipocyte phenotype. Neither toxin prevented the increases in the relative amounts of G-proteins which occur upon differentiation. Both toxins dramatically decreased the amount of beta-subunits. As measured by quantitative immunoblotting with antisera specific for both the 35 kDa and 36 kDa beta-subunits, levels of beta-subunit were decreased by more than 50% of steady-state level of control cells. Thus, bacterial toxins which modifies G-protein alpha-subunits are capable of modulating the levels of beta-subunits in vivo. The basis for the regulation of G-protein subunit expression by bacterial toxins is under study.

  17. Examination of an active-site electrostatic node in the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, B. D.; Tsigelny, I.; Adams, J. A.; Taylor, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The active site of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit harbors a cluster of acidic residues-Asp 127, Glu 170, Glu 203, Glu 230, and Asp 241-that are not conserved throughout the protein kinase family. Based on crystal structures of the catalytic subunit, these amino acids are removed from the site of phosphoryl transfer and are implicated in substrate recognition. Glu 230, the most buried of these acidic residues, was mutated to Ala (rC[E230A]) and Gln (rC[E230Q]) and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In contrast to the mostly insoluble and destabilized rC[E230A], rC[E230Q] is largely soluble, purifies like wild-type enzyme, and displays wild-type-like thermal stability. The mutation in rC[E230Q] causes an order of magnitude decrease in the affinity for a heptapeptide substrate, Kemptide. In addition, two independent kinetic techniques were used to dissect phosphoryl transfer and product release steps in the reaction pathway. Viscosometric and pre-steady-state quench-flow analyses revealed that the phosphoryl transfer rate constant decreases by an order of magnitude, whereas the product release rate constant remains unperturbed. Electrostatic alterations in the rC[E230Q] active site were assessed using modeling techniques that provide molecular interpretations for the substrate affinity and phosphoryl transfer rate decreases observed experimentally. These observations indicate that subsite recognition elements in the catalytic subunit make electrostatic contributions that are important not only for peptide affinity, but also for catalysis. Protein kinases may, therefore, discriminate substrates by not only binding them tightly, but also by only turning over ones that complement the electrostatic character of the active site. PMID:8819164

  18. Functional analysis of the glycogen binding subunit CG9238/Gbs-70E of protein phosphatase 1 in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kerekes, Éva; Kókai, Endre; Páldy, Ferenc Sándor; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2014-06-01

    The product of the CG9238 gene that we termed glycogen binding subunit 70E (Gbs-70E) was characterized by biochemical and molecular genetics methods. The interaction between Gbs-70E and all catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (Pp1-87B, Pp1-9C, Pp1-96A and Pp1-13C) of Drosophila melanogaster was confirmed by pairwise yeast two-hybrid tests, co-immunoprecipitation and pull down experiments. The binding of Gbs-70E to glycogen was demonstrated by sedimentation analysis. With RT-PCR we found that the mRNAs coding for the longer Gbs-70E PB/PC protein were expressed in all developmental stages of the fruit flies while the mRNA for the shorter Gbs-70E PA was restricted to the eggs and the ovaries of the adult females. The development specific expression of the shorter splice variant was not conserved in different Drosophila species. The expression level of the gene was manipulated by P-element insertions and gene deletion to analyze the functions of the gene product. A small or moderate reduction in the gene expression resulted in no significant changes, however, a deletion mutant expressing very low level of the transcript lived shorter and exhibited reduced glycogen content in the imagos. In addition, the gene deletion decreased the fertility of the fruit flies. Our results prove that Gbs-70E functions as the glycogen binding subunit of protein phosphatase 1 that regulates glycogen content and plays a role in the development of eggs in D. melanogaster.

  19. [Interface domain of hepatitis E virus capsid protein homodimer].

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Wei; He, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Ying-Bin; Chen, Yi-Xin; Liu, Ru-Shi; Lin, Jian; Gu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis E is a main cause of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries where it occurs as sporadic cases and in epidemics form. The causative agent, hepatitis E virus, is transmitted primarily by the fecal-oral route. The approximately 7.5 kb positive-sense single-strand RNA genome includes three open reading frames (ORFs), one of which (ORF2) is postulated to encode the major viral capsid protein (pORF2) of 660 amino acid residues. We earlier showed that a bacterially expressed peptide, designated as NE2, located from amino acid residues 394 to 606 of ORF2, was found to aggregate into homodimer to at least hexamer. To understand the interface domains within this peptide vital for dimerization and formation of major neutralizing epitopes, NE2 protein underwent terminal-truncated and site-directed mutation. The hydrophobic region, ORF2 aa597-aa602 (AVAVLA), played a key role in oligomerization. Any amino acid residue of this region replaced with glutamic acid residue, the peptide can not refold as homodimer and/or oligomer. The immunoreactivities of these mutant peptides, blotted with anti-HEV neutralizing monoclonal antibody (8C11) and convalescent human sera, show associated to the formation of homodimer. The intermolecular contact region on homodimer was investigated by chemical cross-linking of two site-directed cysteines. When the alanine on aa597 site mutated with cysteine, two different homodimers were found in SDS-PAGE analysis. One (42kD) can be disassociated with 8mol/L urea, which is postulated to form by virtue of hydrophobic interaction, and the other (60kD) falls apart with the reductant DTT present. The exact conformation, generating the cross-linking reaction of cysteines, was further investigated by induced-oxidation on monomer and hydrophobic homodimer of A597C protein with GSH/GSSG. And the results revealed, it is the conformation of hydrophobic homodimer that induces the disulfide bond come into being, instead of the one of monomer. So the

  20. Different tissue distribution properties for glycosylation variants of fusion proteins containing the p40 subunit of murine interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Bootz, F; Venetz, D; Ziffels, B; Neri, D

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-based fusion proteins are gaining increasing importance for therapeutic applications, but the impact of glycosylation on in vivo biopharmaceutical performance is not always completely understood. In this article, we have analyzed biochemical and pharmaceutical properties of fusion proteins, consisting of the F8 antibody (specific to the EDA domain of fibronectin, a marker of tissue remodeling and of angiogenesis) and of the p40 subunit of interleukin-12, an inhibitor of inflammation. The corresponding fusion protein (F8-IL12p40), which inhibits colitis development in mice, is a glycosylated protein with suboptimal disease targeting properties in vivo Since the protein was extensively glycosylated, as evidenced by PNGase F treatment and mass spectrometric analysis, we mutated four asparagine residues in various combinations. The corresponding proteins exhibited similar biochemical and antigen-binding properties, but differences in thermal stability and bioactivity. Asparagine mutations did not lead to recovery of disease targeting performance in vivo, as evidenced by quantitative biodistribution studies with radioiodinated protein preparations in tumor-bearing mice. By contrast, an almost complete recovery of targeting was achieved with an enzymatically deglycosylated protein preparation. These findings reinforce the concept that different glycostructures can have an impact on tissue distribution properties.

  1. The G protein β subunit controls virulence and multiple growth- and development-related traits in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Tzima, Aliki K; Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Kang, Seogchan

    2012-04-01

    To gain insight into the role of G protein-mediated signaling in virulence and development of the soilborne, wilt causing fungus Verticillium dahliae, the G protein β subunit gene (named as VGB) was disrupted in tomato race 1 strain of V. dahliae. A resulting mutant strain, 70ΔGb15, displayed drastic reduction in virulence, increased microsclerotia formation and conidiation, and decreased ethylene production compared to the corresponding wild type (wt) strain 70wt-r1. Moreover, 70ΔGb15 exhibited an elongated rather than radial growth pattern on agar media. A transformant of 70ΔGb15 (named as 70ΔGbPKAC1) that carries an extra copy of VdPKAC1, a V. dahliae gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, exhibited wt growth pattern and conidiation, was unable to form microsclerotia, produced high amounts of ethylene, and exhibited virulence between that of 70ΔGb15 and 70wt-r1 on tomato plants. Phenotypical changes observed in 70ΔGb15 and 70ΔGbPKAC1 correlated with transcriptional changes in several genes involved in signaling (MAP kinase VMK1) and development (hydrophobin VDH1 and ACC synthase ACS1) of V. dahliae. Results from the present work suggest a linkage between VGB and VdPKAC1 signaling pathways in regulating virulence, hormone production and development in V. dahliae.

  2. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  3. EPR Studies of Functionally Active, Nitroxide Spin-Labeled Peptide Analogs of the C-terminus of a G-Protein Alpha Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Van Eps, Ned; Anderson, Lori L.; Kisselev, Oleg G.; Baranski, Thomas J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail of the transducin alpha subunit, Gtα(340–350), is known to bind and stabilize the active conformation of rhodopsin upon photoactivation (R*). Five spin-labeled analogs of Gtα(340–350) demonstrated native-like activity in their ability to bind and stabilize R*. The spin label 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was employed at interior sites within the peptide, whereas a Proxyl (3-carboxyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidinyloxy) spin label was employed at the amino terminus of the peptide. Upon binding to R*, the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of TOAC343-Gtα(340–350) revealed greater immobilization of the nitroxide when compared to that of the N-terminal modified Proxyl-Gtα(340–350) analog. A double-labeled Proxyl/TOAC348-Gtα(340–350) was examined by DEER spectroscopy to determine the distribution of distances between the two nitroxides in the peptides when in solution and when bound to R*. TOAC and Proxyl spin labels in this GPCR-G-protein α-peptide system provide unique biophysical probes that can be used to explore the structure and conformational changes at the rhodopsin-G-protein interface. PMID:20695526

  4. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Alexander S.; Zachariae, Ulrich; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Scheerer, Patrick; Hildebrand, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ) through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R*) to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP). To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty), however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT) forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket. PMID:26606751

  5. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking.

    PubMed

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  6. GalaxyRefineComplex: Refinement of protein-protein complex model structures driven by interface repacking

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Lim; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein docking methods have been widely used to gain an atomic-level understanding of protein interactions. However, docking methods that employ low-resolution energy functions are popular because of computational efficiency. Low-resolution docking tends to generate protein complex structures that are not fully optimized. GalaxyRefineComplex takes such low-resolution docking structures and refines them to improve model accuracy in terms of both interface contact and inter-protein orientation. This refinement method allows flexibility at the protein interface and in the overall docking structure to capture conformational changes that occur upon binding. Symmetric refinement is also provided for symmetric homo-complexes. This method was validated by refining models produced by available docking programs, including ZDOCK and M-ZDOCK, and was successfully applied to CAPRI targets in a blind fashion. An example of using the refinement method with an existing docking method for ligand binding mode prediction of a drug target is also presented. A web server that implements the method is freely available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/refinecomplex. PMID:27535582

  7. Broad-Bandwidth Chiral Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy for Probing the Kinetics of Proteins at Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuguang; Fu, Li; Ma, Gang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-10-27

    The kinetics of proteins at interfaces plays an important role in biological functions and inspires solutions to fundamental problems in biomedical sciences and engineering. Nonetheless, due to the lack of surface-specific and structural-sensitive biophysical techniques, it still remains challenging to probe protein kinetics in situ and in real time without the use of spectroscopic labels at interfaces. Broad-bandwidth chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been recently developed for protein kinetic studies at interfaces by tracking the chiral vibrational signals of proteins. In this article, we review our recent progress in kinetic studies of proteins at interfaces using broad-bandwidth chiral SFG spectroscopy. We illustrate the use of chiral SFG signals of protein side chains in the C-H stretch region to monitor self-assembly processes of proteins at interfaces. We also present the use of chiral SFG signals from the protein backbone in the N-H stretch region to probe the real-time kinetics of proton exchange between protein and water at interfaces. In addition, we demonstrate the applications of spectral features of chiral SFG that are typical of protein secondary structures in both the amide I and the N-H stretch regions for monitoring the kinetics of aggregation of amyloid proteins at membrane surfaces. These studies exhibit the power of broad-bandwidth chiral SFG to study protein kinetics at interfaces and the promise of this technique in research areas of surface science to address fundamental problems in biomedical and material sciences.

  8. Identification of neighbouring protein pairs in the rat liver 40-S ribosomal subunits cross-linked with dimethyl suberimidate.

    PubMed

    Terao, K; Uchiumi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Ogata, K

    1980-01-24

    (1) The 40-S ribosomal subunits of rat liver were treated with a bifunctional cross-linking reagent, dimethyl suberimidate. Cross-linked protein-protein dimers were separated by two-dimensional acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The stained cross-linked complexes within the gel were radioiodinated without the elution of proteins from the gel and were cloven into the original monomeric protein constituents by ammonolysis. The proteins in each dimer were finally identified by two-dimensional acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cloven monomeric proteins, followed by radioautography of the stained gel. (2) The molecular weights of cross-linked complexes were determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and were compared with those of their constituent proteins. (3) The following dimers were proposed from these results: S3-S12 (S3 or S3a-S11), S4-S12 (S3b-S11, S5-S7 (S4-S6), S5-S22 (S4-S23 or S24), S6-S8 (S5-S7), S8-S16 (S7-S18), S17-S21 (S16--S19) and S22A-S22B (S23-S24), designated according to our numbering system [1]. The designations according to the proposed uniform nomenclature [2] are described in parentheses.

  9. The protein kinase homologue Ste20p is required to link the yeast pheromone response G-protein beta gamma subunits to downstream signalling components.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Harcus, D; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    1992-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the G-protein beta gamma subunits have been shown to trigger downstream events of the pheromone response pathway. We have identified a new gene, designated STE20, which encodes a protein kinase homologue with sequence similarity to protein kinase C, which is required to transmit the pheromone signal from G beta gamma to downstream components of the signalling pathway. Overproduction of the kinase suppresses the mating defect of dominant-negative G beta mutations providing genetic evidence for an interaction with G beta, and epistasis experiments show that this kinase functions after or at the same point as G beta gamma, but before any of the other currently identified components of the signalling pathway. This points to a potentially new mechanism of G-protein mediated signal transduction, the activation of a protein kinase through G beta gamma. Images PMID:1464311

  10. Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Isoforms Regulate Growth and Differentiation in Mucor circinelloides: Essential Role of PKAR4

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, J.; McCormack, B.; Navarro, E.; Moreno, S.; Garre, V.

    2012-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides. PKA holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (C) and two regulatory (R) subunits. In M. circinelloides, four genes encode the PKAR1, PKAR2, PKAR3, and PKAR4 isoforms of R subunits. We have constructed null mutants and demonstrate that each isoform has a different role in growth and differentiation. The most striking finding is that pkaR4 is an essential gene, because only heterokaryons were obtained in knockout experiments. Heterokaryons with low levels of wild-type nuclei showed an impediment in the emission of the germ tube, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in germ tube emergence. The remaining null strains showed different alterations in germ tube emergence, sporulation, and volume of the mother cell. The pkaR2 null mutant showed an accelerated germ tube emission and was the only mutant that germinated under anaerobic conditions when glycine was used as a nitrogen source, suggesting that pkaR2 participates in germ tube emergence by repressing it. From the measurement of the mRNA and protein levels of each isoform in the wild-type and knockout strains, it can be concluded that the expression of each subunit has its own mechanism of differential regulation. The PKAR1 and PKAR2 isoforms are posttranslationally modified by ubiquitylation, suggesting another regulation point in the specificity of the signal transduction. The results indicate that each R isoform has a different role in M. circinelloides physiology, controlling the dimorphism and contributing to the specificity of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway. PMID:22635921

  11. Immunogenic properties of trivalent recombinant protein composed of B-subunits of LT, STX-2, and CT toxins.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Rouhollah; Akhavian, Asal; Amani, Jafar; Salimian, Jafar; Motamedi, Mohammad-Javad; Mousavi, Amir; Jafari, Mahyat; Salmanian, Ali-Hatef

    2016-06-01

    Infectious diarrhoea remains an emerging problem in the world health program. Among diarrheagenic agents, Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli are critical enteropathogens. AB5 toxin produced by these bacteria, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), cholera enterotoxin (CT), and shiga-like cytotoxin (STX) can target the immune system and are subunit vaccine candidates. A chemically-synthesized chimeric construct composed of the binding subunits of these toxins (LTB, STXB, and CTXB) was developed based on bioinformatics studies. The whole chimeric protein (rLSC) and each of the segments (rLTB, rSTXB, and rCTXB) were expressed in a prokaryotic expression system (E. coli), purified, and analysed for their immunogenic properties. The results indicate that these recombinant proteins were effectively able to present appropriate epitopes to an animal model of the immune system which could result in and increase IgG in serum and immune responses that protect against the binding activity of these toxins. The immunological assays revealed that the sera of immunized mice prevented toxins from binding to their specific receptors and neutralized their toxic effects. The proposed construct should be considered as a potent immunogen to prevent toxicity and diarrhoea. PMID:26970204

  12. Immunogenic properties of trivalent recombinant protein composed of B-subunits of LT, STX-2, and CT toxins.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Rouhollah; Akhavian, Asal; Amani, Jafar; Salimian, Jafar; Motamedi, Mohammad-Javad; Mousavi, Amir; Jafari, Mahyat; Salmanian, Ali-Hatef

    2016-06-01

    Infectious diarrhoea remains an emerging problem in the world health program. Among diarrheagenic agents, Vibrio cholerae and enterotoxigenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli are critical enteropathogens. AB5 toxin produced by these bacteria, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), cholera enterotoxin (CT), and shiga-like cytotoxin (STX) can target the immune system and are subunit vaccine candidates. A chemically-synthesized chimeric construct composed of the binding subunits of these toxins (LTB, STXB, and CTXB) was developed based on bioinformatics studies. The whole chimeric protein (rLSC) and each of the segments (rLTB, rSTXB, and rCTXB) were expressed in a prokaryotic expression system (E. coli), purified, and analysed for their immunogenic properties. The results indicate that these recombinant proteins were effectively able to present appropriate epitopes to an animal model of the immune system which could result in and increase IgG in serum and immune responses that protect against the binding activity of these toxins. The immunological assays revealed that the sera of immunized mice prevented toxins from binding to their specific receptors and neutralized their toxic effects. The proposed construct should be considered as a potent immunogen to prevent toxicity and diarrhoea.

  13. A Broad Anti-influenza Hybrid Small Molecule That Potently Disrupts the Interaction of Polymerase Acidic Protein-Basic Protein 1 (PA-PB1) Subunits.

    PubMed

    Massari, Serena; Nannetti, Giulio; Desantis, Jenny; Muratore, Giulia; Sabatini, Stefano; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Cecchetti, Violetta; Palù, Giorgio; Cruciani, Gabriele; Loregian, Arianna; Goracci, Laura; Tabarrini, Oriana

    2015-05-14

    In continuing our efforts to identify small molecules able to disrupt the interaction of the polymerase acidic protein-basic protein 1 (PA-PB1) subunits of influenza virus (Flu) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, this paper is devoted to the optimization of a dihydrotriazolopyrimidine derivative, previously identified through structure-based drug discovery. The structure modifications performed around the bicyclic core led to the identification of compounds endowed with both the ability to disrupt PA-PB1 subunits interaction and anti-Flu activity with no cytotoxicity. Very interesting results were obtained with the hybrid molecules 36 and 37, designed by merging some peculiar structural features known to impart PA-PB1 interaction inhibition, with compound 36 that emerged as the most potent PA-PB1 interaction inhibitor (IC50 = 1.1 μM) among all the small molecules reported so far. Calculations showed a very favored H-bonding between the 2-amidic carbonyl of 36 and Q408, which seems to justify its potent ability to interfere with the interaction of the polymerase subunits.

  14. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  15. The Multiple Personalities of the Regulatory Subunit of Protein Kinase CK2: CK2 Dependent and CK2 Independent Roles Reveal a Secret Identity for CK2β

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (formerly casein kinase II), an enzyme that participates in a wide variety of cellular processes, has traditionally been classified as a stable tetrameric complex consisting of two catalytic CK2α or CK2α' subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. While consideration of CK2 as a tetrameric complex remains relevant, significant evidence has emerged to challenge the view that its individual subunits exist exclusively within these complexes. This review will summarize biochemical and genetic evidence indicating that the regulatory CK2β subunit exists and performs functions independently of CK2 tetramers. For example, unbalanced expression of catalytic and regulatory CK2 subunits has been observed in a variety of tissues and tumors. Furthermore, localization studies including live cell imaging have demonstrated that while the catalytic and regulatory subunits of CK2 exhibit extensive co-localization, independent mobility of the individual CK2 subunits can also be observed within cells. Identification of proteins that interact with CK2β in the absence of catalytic CK2 subunits reinforces the notion that CK2β has functions distinct from CK2 and begins to offer insights into these CK2-independent functions. In this respect, the discovery that CK2β can interact with and modulate the activity of a number of other serine/threonine protein kinases including A-Raf, c-Mos and Chk1 is particularly striking. This review will discuss the interactions between CK2β and these protein kinases with special emphasis on the properties of CK2β that mediate these interactions and on the implications of these interactions in yielding new prospects for elucidation of the cellular functions of CK2β. PMID:15951851

  16. Protein Interaction between Ameloblastin and Proteasome Subunit α Type 3 Can Facilitate Redistribution of Ameloblastin Domains within Forming Enamel.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shuhui; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L; Snead, Malcolm L

    2015-08-21

    Enamel is a bioceramic tissue composed of thousands of hydroxyapatite crystallites aligned in parallel within boundaries fabricated by a single ameloblast cell. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body; however, it starts development as a self-organizing assembly of matrix proteins that control crystallite habit. Here, we examine ameloblastin, a protein that is initially distributed uniformly across the cell boundary but redistributes to the lateral margins of the extracellular matrix following secretion thus producing cell-defined boundaries within the matrix and the mineral phase. The yeast two-hybrid assay identified that proteasome subunit α type 3 (Psma3) interacts with ameloblastin. Confocal microscopy confirmed Psma3 co-distribution with ameloblastin at the ameloblast secretory end piece. Co-immunoprecipitation assay of mouse ameloblast cell lysates with either ameloblastin or Psma3 antibody identified each reciprocal protein partner. Protein engineering demonstrated that only the ameloblastin C terminus interacts with Psma3. We show that 20S proteasome digestion of ameloblastin in vitro generates an N-terminal cleavage fragment consistent with the in vivo pattern of ameloblastin distribution. These findings suggest a novel pathway participating in control of protein distribution within the extracellular space that serves to regulate the protein-mineral interactions essential to biomineralization.

  17. Protein Interaction between Ameloblastin and Proteasome Subunit α Type 3 Can Facilitate Redistribution of Ameloblastin Domains within Forming Enamel*

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shuhui; White, Shane N.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.

    2015-01-01

    Enamel is a bioceramic tissue composed of thousands of hydroxyapatite crystallites aligned in parallel within boundaries fabricated by a single ameloblast cell. Enamel is the hardest tissue in the vertebrate body; however, it starts development as a self-organizing assembly of matrix proteins that control crystallite habit. Here, we examine ameloblastin, a protein that is initially distributed uniformly across the cell boundary but redistributes to the lateral margins of the extracellular matrix following secretion thus producing cell-defined boundaries within the matrix and the mineral phase. The yeast two-hybrid assay identified that proteasome subunit α type 3 (Psma3) interacts with ameloblastin. Confocal microscopy confirmed Psma3 co-distribution with ameloblastin at the ameloblast secretory end piece. Co-immunoprecipitation assay of mouse ameloblast cell lysates with either ameloblastin or Psma3 antibody identified each reciprocal protein partner. Protein engineering demonstrated that only the ameloblastin C terminus interacts with Psma3. We show that 20S proteasome digestion of ameloblastin in vitro generates an N-terminal cleavage fragment consistent with the in vivo pattern of ameloblastin distribution. These findings suggest a novel pathway participating in control of protein distribution within the extracellular space that serves to regulate the protein-mineral interactions essential to biomineralization. PMID:26070558

  18. Protein kinase A type II-α regulatory subunit regulates the response of prostate cancer cells to taxane treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan R; Matveev, Vitaliy; Makhanov, Michael; Chenchik, Alexander; Kandel, Eugene S

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade taxane-based therapy has emerged as a standard of care for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of tumors show no appreciable response to the treatment, while the others develop resistance and recur. Despite years of intense research, the mechanisms of taxane resistance in prostate cancer and other malignancies are poorly understood and remain a topic of intense investigation. We have used improved mutagenesis via random insertion of a strong promoter to search for events, which enable survival of prostate cancer cells after Taxol exposure. High-throughput mapping of the integration sites pointed to the PRKAR2A gene, which codes for a type II-α regulatory subunit of protein kinase A, as a candidate modulator of drug response. Both full-length and N-terminally truncated forms of the PRKAR2A gene product markedly increased survival of prostate cancer cells lines treated with Taxol and Taxotere. Suppression of protein kinase A enzymatic activity is the likely mechanism of action of the overexpressed proteins. Accordingly, protein kinase A inhibitor PKI (6–22) amide reduced toxicity of Taxol to prostate cancer cells. Our findings support the role of protein kinase A and its constituent proteins in cell response to chemotherapy. PMID:25485509

  19. The C-terminal tail of the polycystin-1 protein interacts with the Na,K-ATPase alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Zatti, Alessandra; Chauvet, Veronique; Rajendran, Vanathy; Kimura, Thoru; Pagel, Phillip; Caplan, Michael J

    2005-11-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC-1) is the product of the PKD1 gene, which is mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. We show that the Na,K-ATPase alpha-subunit interacts in vitro and in vivo with the final 200 amino acids of the polycystin-1 protein, which constitute its cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. Functional studies suggest that this association may play a role in the regulation of the Na,K-ATPase activity. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the entire PC-1 protein exhibit a dramatic increase in Na,K-ATPase activity, although the kinetic properties of the enzyme remain unchanged. These data indicate that polycystin-1 may contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity in kidneys in situ, thus modulating renal tubular fluid and electrolyte transport.

  20. The C-Terminal Tail of the Polycystin-1 Protein Interacts with the Na,K-ATPase α-Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Zatti, Alessandra; Chauvet, Veronique; Rajendran, Vanathy; Kimura, Thoru; Pagel, Phillip; Caplan, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC-1) is the product of the PKD1 gene, which is mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. We show that the Na,K-ATPase α-subunit interacts in vitro and in vivo with the final 200 amino acids of the polycystin-1 protein, which constitute its cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. Functional studies suggest that this association may play a role in the regulation of the Na,K-ATPase activity. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the entire PC-1 protein exhibit a dramatic increase in Na,K-ATPase activity, although the kinetic properties of the enzyme remain unchanged. These data indicate that polycystin-1 may contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity in kidneys in situ, thus modulating renal tubular fluid and electrolyte transport. PMID:16107561

  1. Differential expression of alpha-subunits of G-proteins in human neuroblastoma-derived cell clones.

    PubMed

    Klinz, F J; Yu, V C; Sadée, W; Costa, T

    1987-11-16

    The distribution of alpha- and beta-subunits of G-proteins was analyzed in membranes of three cell clones which are derived from the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH. The neuroblast-like clone SH-SY5Y shows a pattern of G-proteins very similar to that of human brain cortex with high levels of Gi alpha and Go alpha but low levels of G40 alpha. The intermediate clone SH-IN contains high levels of Go alpha and Gi alpha and moderate levels of G40 alpha. The non-neuronal clone SH-EP shows high levels of G40 alpha but lacks Go alpha. Differentiation of the neuroblast-like clone SH-SY5Y by retinoic acid or nerve growth factor does not change the amount of Gi alpha or Go alpha in the membrane. PMID:3119368

  2. The 'regulatory' beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 negatively influences p53-mediated allosteric effects on Chk2 activation.

    PubMed

    Bjørling-Poulsen, Marina; Siehler, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Meek, David; Niefind, Karsten; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2005-09-01

    The 'regulatory' beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 has previously been shown to interact with protein kinases such as A-Raf, c-Mos, Lyn and Chk1 in addition to the catalytic subunit of CK2. Sequence alignments suggest that these interactions have a structural basis, and hence other protein kinases harboring corresponding sequences may be potential interaction partners for CK2beta. We show here that Chk2 specifically interacts with CK2beta in vitro and in cultured cells, and that activation of Chk2 leads to a reduction of this interaction. Additionally, we show that the presence of the CK2beta-subunit significantly reduces the Chk2-catalysed phosphorylation of p53 in vitro. These findings support the notion that CK2beta can act as a general modulator of remote docking sites in protein kinase--substrate interactions.

  3. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.

  4. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  5. Oncogenic activation of the human trk proto-oncogene by recombination with the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.

    PubMed Central

    Ziemiecki, A; Müller, R G; Fu, X C; Hynes, N E; Kozma, S

    1990-01-01

    The trk-2h oncogene, isolated from the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB 231 by genomic DNA-transfection into NIH3T3 cells, consists of the trk proto-oncogene receptor kinase domain fused to a N-terminal 41 amino acid activating sequence (Kozma, S.C., Redmond, S.M.S., Xiao-Chang, F., Saurer, S.M., Groner, B. and Hynes, N.E. (1988) EMBO J., 7, 147-154). Antibodies raised against a bacterially produced beta gal-trk receptor kinase fusion protein recognized a 44 kd phosphoprotein phosphorylated on serine, threonine and tyrosine in extracts of trk-2h transformed NIH3T3 cells. In vitro, in the presence of Mn2+/gamma ATP, this protein became phosphorylated extensively on tyrosine. Cells transformed by trk-2h did not, however, show an elevation in total phosphotyrosine. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA encoding the amino terminal activating sequences of trk-2h (Kozma et al., 1988). The encoded protein has a high basic amino acid content and the gene is expressed as an abundant 1.2 kb mRNA in human, rat and mouse cells. Antipeptide antibodies raised against a C-terminal peptide recognized specifically a 30 kd protein on Western blots of human, rat and mouse cell extracts. Immunofluorescence revealed, in addition to granular cytoplasmic fluorescence, intense nucleolar staining. The high basic amino acid content and nucleolar staining prompted us to investigate whether the 30 kd protein could be a ribosomal protein. Western immunoblotting analysis of 2D-electrophoretically resolved ribosomal proteins indicated that the 30 kd protein is the ribosomal large subunit protein L7a.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 9. PMID:2403926

  6. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  8. Phytoestrogens regulate mRNA and protein levels of guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta-1 subunit (GNB1) in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Naragoni, Srivatcha; Sankella, Shireesha; Harris, Kinesha; Gray, Wesley G

    2009-06-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are non-steroidal ligands, which regulate the expression of number of estrogen receptor-dependent genes responsible for a variety of biological processes. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of action of these compounds is of great importance because it would increase our understanding of the role(s) these bioactive chemicals play in prevention and treatment of estrogen-based diseases. In this study, we applied suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes that are regulated by PEs through either the classic nuclear-based estrogen receptor or membrane-based estrogen receptor pathways. SSH, using mRNA from genistein (GE) treated MCF-7 cells as testers, resulted in a significant increase in GNB1 mRNA expression levels as compared with 10 nM 17beta estradiol or the no treatment control. GNB1 mRNA expression was up regulated two- to fivefold following exposure to 100.0 nM GE. Similarly, GNB1 protein expression was up regulated 12- to 14-fold. GE regulation of GNB1 was estrogen receptor-dependent, in the presence of the anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, both GNB1 mRNA and protein expression were inhibited. Analysis of the GNB1 promoter using ChIP assay showed a PE-dependent association of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and beta (ERbeta) to the GNB1 promoter. This association was specific for ERalpha since association was not observed when the cells were co-incubated with GE and the ERalpha antagonist, ICI. Our data demonstrate that the levels of G-protein, beta-1 subunit are regulated by PEs through an estrogen receptor pathway and further suggest that PEs may control the ratio of alpha-subunit to beta/gamma-subunits of the G-protein complex in cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 584-594, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19170076

  9. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  10. Function in protein folding of TRiC, a cytosolic ring complex containing TCP-1 and structurally related subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, J; Nimmesgern, E; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Wall, J S; Tempst, P; Hartl, F U

    1992-01-01

    T-complex polypeptide 1 (TCP-1) was analyzed as a potential chaperonin (GroEL/Hsp60) equivalent of the eukaryotic cytosol. We found TCP-1 to be part of a hetero-oligomeric 970 kDa complex containing several structurally related subunits of 52-65 kDa. These members of a new protein family are assembled into a TCP-1 ring complex (TRiC) which resembles the GroEL double ring. The main function of TRiC appears to be in chaperoning monomeric protein folding: TRiC binds unfolded polypeptides, thereby preventing their aggregation, and mediates the ATP-dependent renaturation of unfolded firefly luciferase and tubulin. At least in vitro, TRiC appears to function independently of a small co-chaperonin protein such as GroES. Folding of luciferase is mediated by TRiC but not by GroEL/ES. This suggests that the range of substrate proteins interacting productively with TRiC may differ from that of GroEL. We propose that TRiC mediates the folding of cytosolic proteins by a mechanism distinct from that of the chaperonins in specific aspects. Images PMID:1361170

  11. Complex stability and dynamic subunit interchange modulates the disparate activities of the yeast moonlighting proteins Hal3 and Vhs3

    PubMed Central

    Abrie, J. Albert; Molero, Cristina; Ariño, Joaquín; Strauss, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hal3 and Vhs3 are moonlighting proteins, acting both as inhibitors of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase Ppz1 and as subunits (together with Cab3) of the unique heterotrimeric phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme of Hemiascomycetous yeast. Both these roles are essential: PPCDC catalyses the third step of coenzyme A biosynthesis, while Ppz1 inhibition is required for regulation of monovalent cation homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which these proteins’ disparate activities are regulated are not well understood. The PPCDC domains (PDs) of Hal3, Vhs3 and Cab3 constitute the minimum requirement for these proteins to show both PPCDC activity and, in the case of Hal3 and Vhs3, to bind to Ppz1. Using these PD proteins as a model system to study the possibility of dynamic interchange between these roles, we provide evidence that Hal3 binds Ppz1 as a monomer (1:1 stoichiometry), requiring it to de-oligomerize from its usual homo- and heterotrimeric states (the latter having PPCDC activity). This de-oligomerization is made possible by structural features that set Hal3 apart from Vhs3, increasing its ability to undergo monomer exchange. These findings suggest that oligomer interchange may be a significant factor in the functional regulation of these proteins and their various unrelated (moonlighting) functions. PMID:26514574

  12. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  13. FastRNABindR: Fast and Accurate Prediction of Protein-RNA Interface Residues.

    PubMed

    El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Abbas, Mostafa; Malluhi, Qutaibah; Honavar, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes, including regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and replication and assembly of many viruses are mediated by RNA-protein interactions. However, experimental determination of the structures of protein-RNA complexes is expensive and technically challenging. Hence, a number of computational tools have been developed for predicting protein-RNA interfaces. Some of the state-of-the-art protein-RNA interface predictors rely on position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM)-based encoding of the protein sequences. The computational efforts needed for generating PSSMs severely limits the practical utility of protein-RNA interface prediction servers. In this work, we experiment with two approaches, random sampling and sequence similarity reduction, for extracting a representative reference database of protein sequences from more than 50 million protein sequences in UniRef100. Our results suggest that random sampled databases produce better PSSM profiles (in terms of the number of hits used to generate the profile and the distance of the generated profile to the corresponding profile generated using the entire UniRef100 data as well as the accuracy of the machine learning classifier trained using these profiles). Based on our results, we developed FastRNABindR, an improved version of RNABindR for predicting protein-RNA interface residues using PSSM profiles generated using 1% of the UniRef100 sequences sampled uniformly at random. To the best of our knowledge, FastRNABindR is the only protein-RNA interface residue prediction online server that requires generation of PSSM profiles for query sequences and accepts hundreds of protein sequences per submission. Our approach for determining the optimal BLAST database for a protein-RNA interface residue classification task has the potential of substantially speeding up, and hence increasing the practical utility of, other amino acid sequence based predictors of protein-protein and protein

  14. Curcumin treatment recovery the decrease of protein phosphatase 2A subunit B induced by focal cerebral ischemia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Fawad-Ali; Park, Dong-Ju; Gim, Sang-Ah

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin provides various biological effects through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Moreover, curcumin exerts a neuroprotective effect against ischemic condition-induced brain damage. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a ubiquitous serine and threonine phosphatase with various cell functions and broad substrate specificity. Especially PP2A subunit B plays an important role in nervous system. This study investigated whether curcumin regulates PP2A subunit B expression in focal cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia was induced surgically by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Adult male rats were injected with either vehicle or curcumin (50 mg/kg) 1 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex tissues were isolated 24 h after MCAO. A proteomics study, reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses were performed to examine PP2A subunit B expression levels. We identified a reduction in PP2A subunit B expression in MCAO-operated animals using a proteomic approach. However, curcumin treatment prevented injury-induced reductions in PP2A subunit B levels. Reverse transverse-PCR and Western blot analyses confirmed that curcumin treatment attenuated the injury-induced reduction in PP2A subunit B levels. These findings can suggest that the possibility that curcumin maintains levels of PP2A subunit B in response to cerebral ischemia, which likely contributes to the neuroprotective function of curcumin in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:26472966

  15. Binomial distribution for quantification of protein subunits in biological nanoassemblies and functional nanomachines.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huaming; Zhang, Peng; Huang, Lisa P; Zhao, Zhengyi; Pi, Fengmei; Montemagno, Carlo; Guo, Peixuan

    2014-10-01

    Living systems produce ordered structures and nanomachines that inspire the development of biomimetic nanodevices such as chips, MEMS, actuators, sensors, sorters, and apparatuses for single-pore DNA sequencing, disease diagnosis, drug or therapeutic RNA delivery. Determination of the copy numbers of subunits that build these machines is challenging due to small size. Here we report a simple mathematical method to determine the stoichiometry, using phi29 DNA-packaging nanomotor as a model to elucidate the application of a formula ∑M=0(Z)((Z)M)p(Z-M)q(M), where p and q are the percentage of wild-type and inactive mutant in the empirical assay; M is the copy numbers of mutant and Z is the stoichiometry in question. Variable ratios of mutants and wild-type were mixed to inhibit motor function. Empirical data were plotted over the theoretical curves to determine the stoichiometry and the value of K, which is the number of mutant needed in each machine to block the function, all based on the condition that wild-type and mutant are equal in binding affinity. Both Z and K from 1-12 were investigated. The data precisely confirmed that phi29 motor contains six copies (Z) of the motor ATPase gp16, and K=1. From the clinical editor: To determine copy numbers of subunits that form nanomachines in living organisms is a daunting task due to the complexities and the inherently small sizes associated with such systems. In this paper, a simple mathematical method is described how to determine the stoichiometry of copies in biomimetic nanodevices, using phi29 DNA-packaging nanomotor as a model.

  16. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts.

    PubMed

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C

    2016-02-15

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein-protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein-protein docking.

  17. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein–protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability of photoreceptors to transmit signals to the downstream ON-bipolar neurons in the retina is indispensible for vision. In this study, we delineate the molecular organization of the central regulatory complex, the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex, that drives postsynaptic responses in ON-bipolar cells. Here, we identify an unexpected

  18. Structural sequences are conserved in the genes coding for the alpha, alpha' and beta-subunits of the soybean 7S seed storage protein.

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, M A; Ladin, B F; Pollaco, J C; Freyer, G; Beachy, R N

    1982-01-01

    Cloned DNAs encoding four different proteins have been isolated from recombinant cDNA libraries constructed with Glycine max seed mRNAs. Two cloned DNAs code for the alpha and alpha'-subunits of the 7S seed storage protein (conglycinin). The other cloned cDNAs code for proteins which are synthesized in vitro as 68,000 d., 60,000 d. or 53,000 d. polypeptides. Hybrid selection experiments indicate that, under low stringency hybridization conditions, all four cDNAs hybridize with mRNAs for the alpha and alpha'-subunits and the 68,000 d., 60,000 d. and 53,000 d. in vitro translation products. Within three of the mRNA, there is a conserved sequence of 155 nucleotides which is responsible for this hybridization. The conserved nucleotides in the alpha and alpha'-subunit cDNAs and the 68,000 d. polypeptide cDNAs span both coding and noncoding sequences. The differences in the coding nucleotides outside the conserved region are extensive. This suggests that selective pressure to maintain the 155 conserved nucleotides has been influenced by the structure of the seed mRNA. RNA blot hybridizations demonstrate that mRNA encoding the other major subunit (beta) of the 7S seed storage protein also shares sequence homology with the conserved 155 nucleotide sequence of the alpha and alpha'-subunit mRNAs, but not with other coding sequences. Images PMID:6897678

  19. Autoantibodies that stabilize the molecular interaction of Ku antigen with DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Satoh, M; Ajmani, A K; Stojanov, L; Langdon, J J; Ogasawara, T; Wang, J; Dooley, M A; Richards, H B; Winfield, J B; Carter, T H; Reeves, W H

    1996-09-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of a DNA binding subunit (Ku autoantigen), and a catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). In the present study, human autoantibodies that recognize novel antigenic determinants of DNA-PK were identified. One type of autoantibody stabilized the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and recognized the DNA-PKcs -Ku complex, but not bio-chemically purified DNA-PKcs. Another type recognized purified DNA-PKcs. Autoantibodies to Ku (p70/p80 heterodimer), 'stabilizing' antibodies, and antibodies to DNA-PKcs comprise a linked autoantibody set, since antibodies recognizing purified DNA-PKcs were strongly associated with stabilizing antibodies, whereas stabilizing antibodies were strongly associated with anti-Ku. This hierarchical pattern of autoantibodies specific for components of DNA-PK (anti-Ku > stabilizing antibodies > anti-DNA-PKcs) may have implications for the pathogenesis of autoimmunity to DNA-PK and other chromatin particles. The data raise the possibility that altered antigen processing and/or stabilization of the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex due to autoantibody binding could play a role in spreading autoimmunity from Ku to the weakly associated antigen DNA-PKcs.

  20. Increased protein kinase A type Iα regulatory subunit expression in parathyroid gland adenomas of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yatsuka; Kambe, Fukushi; Imai, Tsuneo; Ogawa, Kimio; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Shibata, Masahiro; Kagawa, Chikara; Mizuno, Yutaka; Ito, Asako; Iwase, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) is a major regulatory subunit that functions as an inhibitor of PKA kinase activity. We have previously demonstrated that elevated RIα expression is associated with diffuse-to-nodular transformation of hyperplasia in parathyroid glands of renal hyperparathyroidism. The aim of the current study was to determine whether or not RIα expression is increased in adenomas of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), because monoclonal proliferation has been demonstrated in both adenomas and nodular hyperplasia. Surgical specimens comprising 22 adenomas and 11 normal glands, obtained from 22 patients with PHPT, were analyzed. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were employed to evaluate RIα expression. PKA activities were determined in several adenomas highly expressing RIα. RIα expression was also separately evaluated in chief and oxyphilic cells using the "Allred score" system. Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a proliferation marker, was also immunohistochemically examined. Western blot analysis revealed that 5 out of 8 adenomas highly expressed RIα, compared with normal glands. PKA activity in adenomas was significantly less than in normal glands. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated high expression of RIα in 20 out of 22 adenomas. In adenomas, the greater RIα expression and more PCNA positive cells were observed in both chief and oxyphilic cells. The present study suggested that high RIα expression could contribute to monoclonal proliferation of parathyroid cells by impairing the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23197043

  1. Late-assembly of human ribosomal protein S20 in the cytoplasm is essential for the functioning of the small subunit ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Lin-Ru; Chou, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jing-Ying; Kirby, Ralph; Lin, Alan

    2013-11-15

    Using immuno-fluorescent probing and Western blotting analysis, we reveal the exclusive cytoplasm nature of the small subunit ribosomal protein S20. To illustrate the importance of the cellular compartmentation of S20 to the function of small subunit 40S, we created a nuclear resident S20{sub NLS} mutant gene and examined polysome profile of cells that had been transfected with the S20{sub NLS} gene. As a result, we observed the formation of recombinant 40S carried S20{sub NLS} but this recombinant 40S was never found in the polysome, suggesting such a recombinant 40S was translation incompetent. Moreover, by the tactic of the energy depletion and restoration, we were able to restrain the nuclear-resided S20{sub NLS} in the cytoplasm. Yet, along a progressive energy restoration, we observed the presence of recombinant 40S subunits carrying the S20{sub NLS} in the polysome. This proves that S20 needs to be cytoplasmic in order to make a functional 40S subunit. Furthermore, it also implies that the assembly order of ribosomal protein in eukaryote is orderly regulated. - Highlights: • The step of S20 assembled on 40S is happened in the cytoplasm. • A small subunit assembled with a nuclear S20{sub NLS} is translational incompetence. • Using energy depletion and recovery to manipulate the cellular compartment of S20{sub NLS}. • Cytoplasm-retained S20{sub NLS} is crucial for creating a functional small subunit.

  2. ATP-independent reversal of a membrane protein aggregate by a chloroplast SRP subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Jaru-Ampornpan, Peera; Shen, Kuang; Lam, Vinh Q.; Ali, Mona; Doniach, Sebastian; Jia, Tony Z.; Shan, Shu-ou

    2010-07-23

    Membrane proteins impose enormous challenges to cellular protein homeostasis during their post-translational targeting, and they require chaperones to keep them soluble and translocation competent. Here we show that a novel targeting factor in the chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP), cpSRP43, is a highly specific molecular chaperone that efficiently reverses the aggregation of its substrate proteins. In contrast to 'ATPases associated with various cellular activities' (AAA{sup +}) chaperones, cpSRP43 uses specific binding interactions with its substrate to mediate its 'disaggregase' activity. This disaggregase capability can allow targeting machineries to more effectively capture their protein substrates and emphasizes a close connection between protein folding and trafficking processes. Moreover, cpSRP43 provides the first example to our knowledge of an ATP-independent disaggregase and shows that efficient reversal of protein aggregation can be attained by specific binding interactions between a chaperone and its substrate.

  3. Proteins, Pathogens, and Failure at the Composite-Tooth Interface

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, P.; Ye, Q.; Misra, A.; Goncalves, S.E.P.; Laurence, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, composites accounted for nearly 70% of the 173.2 million composite and amalgam restorations placed in 2006 (Kingman et al., 2012), and it is likely that the use of composite will continue to increase as dentists phase out dental amalgam. This trend is not, however, without consequences. The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more secondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite-tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure. Binding by proteins, particularly gp340, from the salivary pellicle leads to biofilm attachment, which accelerates degradation of the interfacial bond and demineralization of the tooth by recruiting the pioneer bacterium Streptococcus mutans to the surface. Bacterial production of lactic acid lowers the pH of the oral microenvironment, erodes hydroxyapatite in enamel and dentin, and promotes hydrolysis of the adhesive. Secreted esterases further hydrolyze the adhesive polymer, exposing the soft underlying collagenous dentinal matrix and allowing further infiltration by the pathogenic biofilm. Manifold approaches are being pursued to increase the longevity of composite dental restorations based on the major contributing factors responsible for degradation. The key material and biological components and the interactions involved in the destructive processes, including recent advances in understanding the structural and molecular basis of biofilm recruitment, are described in this review. Innovative strategies to mitigate these pathogenic effects and slow deterioration are discussed. PMID:25190266

  4. Design of Bioelectronic Interfaces by Exploiting Hinge-Bending Motions in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, David E.; Conrad, David W.; de Lorimier, Robert M.; Trammell, Scott A.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2001-08-01

    We report a flexible strategy for transducing ligand-binding events into electrochemical responses for a wide variety of proteins. The method exploits ligand-mediated hinge-bending motions, intrinsic to the bacterial periplasmic binding protein superfamily, to establish allosterically controlled interactions between electrode surfaces and redox-active, Ru(II)-labeled proteins. This approach allows the development of protein-based bioelectronic interfaces that respond to a diverse set of analytes. Families of these interfaces can be generated either by exploiting natural binding diversity within the superfamily or by reengineering the specificity of individual proteins. These proteins may have numerous medical, environmental, and defense applications.

  5. Conformational dynamics of nonsynonymous variants at protein interfaces reveals disease association.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brandon M; Gerek, Z Nevin; Kumar, Sudhir; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the protein interface sites between individual monomeric units in biological assemblies are enriched in disease-associated non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs). To elucidate the mechanistic underpinning of this observation, we investigated the conformational dynamic properties of protein interface sites through a site-specific structural dynamic flexibility metric (dfi) for 333 multimeric protein assemblies. dfi measures the dynamic resilience of a single residue to perturbations that occurred in the rest of the protein structure and identifies sites contributing the most to functionally critical dynamics. Analysis of dfi profiles of over a thousand positions harboring variation revealed that amino acid residues at interfaces have lower average dfi (31%) than those present at non-interfaces (50%), which means that protein interfaces have less dynamic flexibility. Interestingly, interface sites with disease-associated nsSNVs have significantly lower average dfi (23%) as compared to those of neutral nsSNVs (42%), which directly relates structural dynamics to functional importance. We found that less conserved interface positions show much lower dfi for disease nsSNVs as compared to neutral nsSNVs. In this case, dfi is better as compared to the accessible surface area metric, which is based on the static protein structure. Overall, our proteome-wide conformational dynamic analysis indicates that certain interface sites play a critical role in functionally related dynamics (i.e., those with low dfi values), therefore mutations at those sites are more likely to be associated with disease.

  6. Secondary Structure and Subunit Composition of Soy Protein In Vitro Digested by Pepsin and Its Relation with Digestibility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Zhongjiang; Wang, Rui; Sui, Xiaonan; Qi, Baokun; Han, Feifei; Li, Yang; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, in vitro digestibility and structure of soybean protein isolates (SPIs) prepared from five soybean varieties were investigated in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), using FT-IR microspectroscopy and SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that β-conformations were prone to be hydrolyzed by pepsin preferentially and transformed to unordered structure during in vitro digestion, followed by the digestion of α-helix and unordered structure. A negative linear correlation coefficient was found between the β-conformation contents of five SPIs and their in vitro digestibility values. The intensities of the protein bands corresponding to 7S and 11S fractions were decreased and many peptide bands appeared at 11~15 kDa during enzymatic hydrolysis. β-conglycinin was poorly hydrolyzed with pepsin, especially the β-7S subunit. On the other hand, basic polypeptides of glycinin degraded slower than acidic polypeptides and represented a large proportion of the residual protein after digestion. 11S-A3 of all SPIs disappeared after 1 h digestion. Moreover, a significant negative linear correlation coefficient (r = −0.89) was found between the β-7S contents of five SPIs and their in vitro digestibility values. These results are useful for further studies of the functional properties and bioactive properties of these varieties and laid theoretical foundations for the development of the specific functional soy protein isolate. PMID:27298825

  7. Secondary Structure and Subunit Composition of Soy Protein In Vitro Digested by Pepsin and Its Relation with Digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wang, Zhongjiang; Wang, Rui; Sui, Xiaonan; Qi, Baokun; Han, Feifei; Li, Yang; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, in vitro digestibility and structure of soybean protein isolates (SPIs) prepared from five soybean varieties were investigated in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), using FT-IR microspectroscopy and SDS-PAGE. The result indicated that β-conformations were prone to be hydrolyzed by pepsin preferentially and transformed to unordered structure during in vitro digestion, followed by the digestion of α-helix and unordered structure. A negative linear correlation coefficient was found between the β-conformation contents of five SPIs and their in vitro digestibility values. The intensities of the protein bands corresponding to 7S and 11S fractions were decreased and many peptide bands appeared at 11~15 kDa during enzymatic hydrolysis. β-conglycinin was poorly hydrolyzed with pepsin, especially the β-7S subunit. On the other hand, basic polypeptides of glycinin degraded slower than acidic polypeptides and represented a large proportion of the residual protein after digestion. 11S-A3 of all SPIs disappeared after 1 h digestion. Moreover, a significant negative linear correlation coefficient (r = -0.89) was found between the β-7S contents of five SPIs and their in vitro digestibility values. These results are useful for further studies of the functional properties and bioactive properties of these varieties and laid theoretical foundations for the development of the specific functional soy protein isolate. PMID:27298825

  8. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A; Gregg, Ronald G; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein-protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling.

  9. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A; Gregg, Ronald G; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein-protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling. PMID:26961947

  10. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  11. Radiolabeled Adenoviral Sub-unit Proteins for Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Applications in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.; Meinken, G.; Springer, K. Awasthi, V.; Freimuth, P.

    2004-10-06

    The objective of this project was to develop and optimize new ligand systems, based on adenoviral vectors (intact adenovirus, adeno-viral fiber protein, and the knob protein), for delivering suitable radionuclides into tumor cells for molecular imaging and combined gene/radionuclide therapy of cancer.

  12. Mapping the domain structure of the influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA) and its interaction with the basic protein 1 (PB1) subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Dong Liping; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2008-09-15

    The influenza A virus polymerase consists of three subunits (PA, PB1, and PB2) necessary for viral RNA synthesis. The heterotrimeric polymerase complex forms through PA interacting with PB1 and PB1 interacting with PB2. PA has been shown to play critical roles in the assembly, catalysis, and nuclear localization of the polymerase. To probe the structure of PA, we isolated recombinant PA from insect cells. Limited proteolysis revealed that PA contained two domains connected by a 20-residue linker (residues 257-276). Far-UV circular dichroism established that the two domains folded into a mixed {alpha}/{beta} structure when separately expressed. In vitro pull-down assays showed that neither individually nor cooperatively expressed PA domains, without the linker, could assure PA-PB1 interaction. Protease treatment of PA-PB1 complex indicated that its PA subunit was significantly more stable than free PA, suggesting that the linker is protected and it constitutes an essential component of the PA-PB1 interface.

  13. N-terminal constraint activates the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in the absence of DNA or Ku

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Modesti, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) was identified as an activity and as its three component polypeptides 25 and 15 years ago, respectively. It has been exhaustively characterized as being absolutely dependent on free double stranded DNA ends (to which it is directed by its regulatory subunit, Ku) for its activation as a robust nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase. Here, we report the unexpected finding of robust DNA-PKcs activation by N-terminal constraint, independent of either DNA or its regulatory subunit Ku. These data suggest that an N-terminal conformational change (likely induced by DNA binding) induces enzymatic activation. PMID:22167471

  14. Microsporidia are related to Fungi: Evidence from the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and other proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Robert P.; Logsdon, John M.; Healy, Bryan; Dorey, Michael W.; Doolittle, W. Ford; Embley, T. Martin

    1999-01-01

    We have determined complete gene sequences encoding the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RBP1) from two Microsporidia, Vairimorpha necatrix and Nosema locustae. Phylogenetic analyses of these and other RPB1 sequences strongly support the notion that Microsporidia are not early-diverging eukaryotes but instead are specifically related to Fungi. Our reexamination of elongation factors EF-1α and EF-2 sequence data that had previously been taken as support for an early (Archezoan) divergence of these amitochondriate protists show such support to be weak and likely caused by artifacts in phylogenetic analyses. These EF data sets are, in fact, not inconsistent with a Microsporidia + Fungi relationship. In addition, we show that none of these proteins strongly support a deep divergence of Parabasalia and Metamonada, the other amitochondriate protist groups currently thought to compose early branches. Thus, the phylogenetic placement among eukaryotes for these protist taxa is in need of further critical examination. PMID:9892676

  15. Microsporidia are related to Fungi: evidence from the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II and other proteins.

    PubMed

    Hirt, R P; Logsdon, J M; Healy, B; Dorey, M W; Doolittle, W F; Embley, T M

    1999-01-19

    We have determined complete gene sequences encoding the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RBP1) from two Microsporidia, Vairimorpha necatrix and Nosema locustae. Phylogenetic analyses of these and other RPB1 sequences strongly support the notion that Microsporidia are not early-diverging eukaryotes but instead are specifically related to Fungi. Our reexamination of elongation factors EF-1alpha and EF-2 sequence data that had previously been taken as support for an early (Archezoan) divergence of these amitochondriate protists show such support to be weak and likely caused by artifacts in phylogenetic analyses. These EF data sets are, in fact, not inconsistent with a Microsporidia + Fungi relationship. In addition, we show that none of these proteins strongly support a deep divergence of Parabasalia and Metamonada, the other amitochondriate protist groups currently thought to compose early branches. Thus, the phylogenetic placement among eukaryotes for these protist taxa is in need of further critical examination.

  16. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  17. Hydrophobicity and subunit interactions of rod outer segment proteins investigated using Triton X-114 phase partitioning.

    PubMed

    Justice, J M; Murtagh, J J; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1995-07-28

    Triton X-114 phase partitioning, a procedure used for purifying integral membrane proteins, was used to study protein components of the mammalian visual transduction cascade. An integral membrane protein, rhodopsin, and two isoprenylated protein complexes, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase and Gt beta gamma, partitioned into the detergent-rich phase. Arrestin, a soluble protein, accumulated in the aqueous phase. Gt alpha distributed about equally between phases whether GDP (Gt alpha.GDP) or GTP (Gt alpha.GTP) was bound. Gt beta gamma increased recovery of Gt alpha.GDP but not Gt alpha.GTP in the detergent phase. Trypsin-treated Gt alpha, which lacks the fatty acylated amino-terminal 2-kDa region, accumulated to a greater extent in the aqueous phase than did intact Gt alpha. Trypsinized cGMP phosphodiesterase, which lacks the isoprenyl group, partitioned into the aqueous phase. A carboxyl-terminal truncated mutant (Val-331 stop) of Gt alpha accumulated more in the aqueous phase then did recombinant full-length Gt alpha, supporting the role of the carboxyl terminus in increasing its hydrophobicity. N-Myristoylated recombinant Go alpha was more hydrophobic than recombinant Go alpha without myristate. ADP-ribosylation of Gt alpha catalyzed by NAD:arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase, but not by pertussis toxin, increased hydrophilicity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning can thus semiquantify the hydrophobic nature of proteins and protein domains. It may aid in evaluating changes associated with post-translational protein modification and protein-protein interactions in a defined system.

  18. Ref2, a regulatory subunit of the yeast protein phosphatase 1, is a novel component of cation homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Dalmau, Jofre; González, Asier; Platara, Maria; Navarrete, Clara; Martínez, José L; Barreto, Lina; Ramos, José; Ariño, Joaquín; Casamayor, Antonio

    2010-02-24

    Maintenance of cation homoeostasis is a key process for any living organism. Specific mutations in Glc7, the essential catalytic subunit of yeast protein phosphatase 1, result in salt and alkaline pH sensitivity, suggesting a role for this protein in cation homoeostasis. We screened a collection of Glc7 regulatory subunit mutants for altered tolerance to diverse cations (sodium, lithium and calcium) and alkaline pH. Among 18 candidates, only deletion of REF2 (RNA end formation 2) yielded increased sensitivity to these conditions, as well as to diverse organic toxic cations. The Ref2F374A mutation, which renders it unable to bind Glc7, did not rescue the salt-related phenotypes of the ref2 strain, suggesting that Ref2 function in cation homoeostasis is mediated by Glc7. The ref2 deletion mutant displays a marked decrease in lithium efflux, which can be explained by the inability of these cells to fully induce the Na+-ATPase ENA1 gene. The effect of lack of Ref2 is additive to that of blockage of the calcineurin pathway and might disrupt multiple mechanisms controlling ENA1 expression. ref2 cells display a striking defect in vacuolar morphogenesis, which probably accounts for the increased calcium levels observed under standard growth conditions and the strong calcium sensitivity of this mutant. Remarkably, the evidence collected indicates that the role of Ref2 in cation homoeostasis may be unrelated to its previously identified function in the formation of mRNA via the APT (for associated with Pta1) complex.

  19. G-protein βγ subunits in vasorelaxing and anti-endothelinergic effects of calcitonin gene-related peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meens, MJPMT; Mattheij, NJA; van Loenen, PB; Spijkers, LJA; Lemkens, P; Nelissen, J; Compeer, MG; Alewijnse, AE; De Mey, JGR

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been proposed to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) via cAMP and can promote dissociation of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from ETA receptors. The latter is not mimicked by other stimuli of adenylate cyclases. Therefore, we evaluated the involvement of G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) in the arterial effects of CGRP receptor stimulation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To test the hypothesis that instead of α subunits of G-proteins (Gαs), Gβγ mediates the effects of CGRP receptor activation, we used (i) rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA), (ii) pharmacological modulators of cyclic nucleotides; and (iii) low molecular weight inhibitors of the functions of Gβγ, gallein and M119. To validate these tools with respect to CGRP receptor function, we performed organ bath studies with rat isolated MRA, radioligand binding on membranes from CHO cells expressing human CGRP receptors and cAMP production assays in rat cultured VSMC. KEY RESULTS In isolated arteries contracted with K+ or ET-1, IBMX (PDE inhibitor) increased sodium nitroprusside (SNP)- and isoprenaline (ISO)- but not CGRP-induced relaxations. While fluorescein (negative control) was without effects, gallein increased binding of [125I]-CGRP in the absence and presence of GTPγS. Gallein also increased CGRP-induced cAMP production in VSMC. Despite these stimulating effects, gallein and M119 selectively inhibited the relaxing and anti-endothelinergic effects of CGRP in isolated arteries while not altering contractile responses to K+ or ET-1 or relaxing responses to ISO or SNP. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Activated CGRP receptors induce cyclic nucleotide-independent relaxation of VSMC and terminate arterial effects of ET-1 via Gβγ. PMID:22074193

  20. Crystallization of the glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated protein kinase β subunit and preliminary X-ray analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Polekhina, Galina Feil, Susanne C.; Gupta, Abhilasha; O’Donnell, Paul; Stapleton, David; Parker, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    The glycogen-binding domain of the AMP-activated kinase β subunit has been crystallized in the presence of β-cyclodextrin. The structure has been determined by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from selenomethionine-substituted protein. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an intracellular energy sensor that regulates metabolism in response to energy demand and supply by adjusting the ATP-generating and ATP-consuming pathways. AMPK potentially plays a critical role in diabetes and obesity as it is known to be activated by metforin and rosiglitazone, drugs used for the treatment of type II diabetes. AMPK is a heterotrimer composed of a catalytic α subunit and two regulatory subunits, β and γ. Mutations in the γ subunit are known to cause glycogen accumulation, leading to cardiac arrhythmias. Recently, a functional glycogen-binding domain (GBD) has been identified in the β subunit. Here, the crystallization of GBD in the presence of β-cyclodextrin is reported together with preliminary X-ray data analysis allowing the determination of the structure by single isomorphous replacement and threefold averaging using in-house X-ray data collected from a selenomethionine-substituted protein.

  1. Understanding the fabric of protein crystals: computational classification of biological interfaces and crystal contacts

    PubMed Central

    Capitani, Guido; Duarte, Jose M.; Baskaran, Kumaran; Bliven, Spencer; Somody, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Modern structural biology still draws the vast majority of information from crystallography, a technique where the objects being investigated are embedded in a crystal lattice. Given the complexity and variety of those objects, it becomes fundamental to computationally assess which of the interfaces in the lattice are biologically relevant and which are simply crystal contacts. Since the mid-1990s, several approaches have been applied to obtain high-accuracy classification of crystal contacts and biological protein–protein interfaces. This review provides an overview of the concepts and main approaches to protein interface classification: thermodynamic estimation of interface stability, evolutionary approaches based on conservation of interface residues, and co-occurrence of the interface across different crystal forms. Among the three categories, evolutionary approaches offer the strongest promise for improvement, thanks to the incessant growth in sequence knowledge. Importantly, protein interface classification algorithms can also be used on multimeric structures obtained using other high-resolution techniques or for protein assembly design or validation purposes. A key issue linked to protein interface classification is the identification of the biological assembly of a crystal structure and the analysis of its symmetry. Here, we highlight the most important concepts and problems to be overcome in assembly prediction. Over the next few years, tools and concepts of interface classification will probably become more frequently used and integrated in several areas of structural biology and structural bioinformatics. Among the main challenges for the future are better addressing of weak interfaces and the application of interface classification concepts to prediction problems like protein–protein docking. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: guido.capitani@psi.ch PMID:26508758

  2. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S.; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL × h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety. PMID:25862515

  3. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-06-10

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL x h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety.

  4. cDNA of YP4, a follicular epithelium yolk protein subunit, in the moth, Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Perera, O P; Shirk, P D

    1999-01-01

    YP4, a subunit of the follicular epithelium yolk protein in the moth, Plodia interpunctella, is produced in the follicle cells during vitellogenesis and after secretion is taken up into the oocyte and stored in the yolk spheres for utilization during embryogenesis. In order to identify the cDNA clones for YP4, a degenerate PCR primer was designed to six amino acid residues identified in the NH2-terminal sequence of mature YP4. The YP4 degenerate primer plus T7 reverse PCR primer produced a PCR product from a cDNA library for the majority of the YP4 coding sequence. Combined cDNA and 5' RACE sequencing showed the YP4 transcript to be 991 bp in length with a single open reading frame for a predicted polypeptide of 299 amino acids. Northern analysis showed a single YP4 transcript was present in ovarian RNA that was approximately 1 kb in length. The predicted amino acid sequence for YP4 from P. interpunctella was most closely related to the predicted YP4 protein from the moth, Galleria mellonella, and the spherulin 2a protein from the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum.

  5. Modulation of GluK2a subunit-containing kainate receptors by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changcheng; Qiao, Haifa; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yuying; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yong

    2013-08-23

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are one of the ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with characteristically slow kinetics. Although mechanisms for the slow kinetics of KAR-EPSCs are not totally understood, recent evidence has implicated a regulatory role of KAR-associated proteins. Here, we report that decay kinetics of GluK2a-containing receptors is modulated by closely associated 14-3-3 proteins. 14-3-3 binding requires PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine residues localized in the carboxyl tail of the GluK2a subunit. In transfected cells, 14-3-3 binding to GluK2a slows desensitization kinetics of both homomeric GluK2a and heteromeric GluK2a/GluK5 receptors. Moreover, KAR-EPSCs at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses decay significantly faster in the 14-3-3 functional knock-out mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate that 14-3-3 proteins are an important regulator of GluK2a-containing KARs and may contribute to the slow decay kinetics of native KAR-EPSCs. PMID:23861400

  6. Broad-Bandwidth Chiral Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy for Probing the Kinetics of Proteins at Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics of proteins at interfaces plays an important role in biological functions and inspires solutions to fundamental problems in biomedical sciences and engineering. Nonetheless, due to the lack of surface-specific and structural-sensitive biophysical techniques, it still remains challenging to probe protein kinetics in situ and in real time without the use of spectroscopic labels at interfaces. Broad-bandwidth chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been recently developed for protein kinetic studies at interfaces by tracking the chiral vibrational signals of proteins. In this article, we review our recent progress in kinetic studies of proteins at interfaces using broad-bandwidth chiral SFG spectroscopy. We illustrate the use of chiral SFG signals of protein side chains in the C–H stretch region to monitor self-assembly processes of proteins at interfaces. We also present the use of chiral SFG signals from the protein backbone in the N–H stretch region to probe the real-time kinetics of proton exchange between protein and water at interfaces. In addition, we demonstrate the applications of spectral features of chiral SFG that are typical of protein secondary structures in both the amide I and the N–H stretch regions for monitoring the kinetics of aggregation of amyloid proteins at membrane surfaces. These studies exhibit the power of broad-bandwidth chiral SFG to study protein kinetics at interfaces and the promise of this technique in research areas of surface science to address fundamental problems in biomedical and material sciences. PMID:26196215

  7. A separable domain of the p150 subunit of human chromatin assembly factor-1 promotes protein and chromosome associations with nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corey L.; Matheson, Timothy D.; Trombly, Daniel J.; Sun, Xiaoming; Campeau, Eric; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R.; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF-1) is a three-subunit protein complex conserved throughout eukaryotes that deposits histones during DNA synthesis. Here we present a novel role for the human p150 subunit in regulating nucleolar macromolecular interactions. Acute depletion of p150 causes redistribution of multiple nucleolar proteins and reduces nucleolar association with several repetitive element–containing loci. Of note, a point mutation in a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) within p150 abolishes nucleolar associations, whereas PCNA or HP1 interaction sites within p150 are not required for these interactions. In addition, acute depletion of SUMO-2 or the SUMO E2 ligase Ubc9 reduces α-satellite DNA association with nucleoli. The nucleolar functions of p150 are separable from its interactions with the other subunits of the CAF-1 complex because an N-terminal fragment of p150 (p150N) that cannot interact with other CAF-1 subunits is sufficient for maintaining nucleolar chromosome and protein associations. Therefore these data define novel functions for a separable domain of the p150 protein, regulating protein and DNA interactions at the nucleolus. PMID:25057015

  8. A Pan-Cancer Catalogue of Cancer Driver Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Garcia-Alonso, Luz; Hrabe, Thomas; Dopazo, Joaquin; Godzik, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Despite their importance in maintaining the integrity of all cellular pathways, the role of mutations on protein-protein interaction (PPI) interfaces as cancer drivers has not been systematically studied. Here we analyzed the mutation patterns of the PPI interfaces from 10,028 proteins in a pan-cancer cohort of 5,989 tumors from 23 projects of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to find interfaces enriched in somatic missense mutations. To that end we use e-Driver, an algorithm to analyze the mutation distribution of specific protein functional regions. We identified 103 PPI interfaces enriched in somatic cancer mutations. 32 of these interfaces are found in proteins coded by known cancer driver genes. The remaining 71 interfaces are found in proteins that have not been previously identified as cancer drivers even that, in most cases, there is an extensive literature suggesting they play an important role in cancer. Finally, we integrate these findings with clinical information to show how tumors apparently driven by the same gene have different behaviors, including patient outcomes, depending on which specific interfaces are mutated. PMID:26485003

  9. A Pan-Cancer Catalogue of Cancer Driver Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Thomas; Dopazo, Joaquin; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Despite their importance in maintaining the integrity of all cellular pathways, the role of mutations on protein-protein interaction (PPI) interfaces as cancer drivers has not been systematically studied. Here we analyzed the mutation patterns of the PPI interfaces from 10,028 proteins in a pan-cancer cohort of 5,989 tumors from 23 projects of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to find interfaces enriched in somatic missense mutations. To that end we use e-Driver, an algorithm to analyze the mutation distribution of specific protein functional regions. We identified 103 PPI interfaces enriched in somatic cancer mutations. 32 of these interfaces are found in proteins coded by known cancer driver genes. The remaining 71 interfaces are found in proteins that have not been previously identified as cancer drivers even that, in most cases, there is an extensive literature suggesting they play an important role in cancer. Finally, we integrate these findings with clinical information to show how tumors apparently driven by the same gene have different behaviors, including patient outcomes, depending on which specific interfaces are mutated. PMID:26485003

  10. Cortical geometry may influence placement of interface between Par protein domains in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Adriana T; Iron, David

    2013-09-21

    During polarization, proteins and other polarity determinants segregate to the opposite ends of the cell (the poles) creating biochemically and dynamically distinct regions. Embryos of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) polarize shortly after fertilization, creating distinct regions of Par protein family members. These regions are maintained through to first cleavage when the embryo divides along the plane specified by the interface between regions, creating daughter cells with different protein content. In wild type single cell embryos the interface between these Par protein regions is reliably positioned at approximately 60% egg length, however, it is not known what mechanisms are responsible for specifying the position of the interface. In this investigation, we use two mathematical models to investigate the movement and positioning of the interface: a biologically based reaction-diffusion model of Par protein dynamics, and the analytically tractable perturbed Allen-Cahn equation. When we numerically simulate the models on a static 2D domain with constant thickness, both models exhibit a persistently moving interface that specifies the boundary between distinct regions. When we modify the simulation domain geometry, movement halts and the interface is stably positioned where the domain thickness increases. Using asymptotic analysis with the perturbed Allen-Cahn equation, we show that interface movement depends explicitly on domain geometry. Using a combination of analytic and numeric techniques, we demonstrate that domain geometry, a historically overlooked aspect of cellular simulations, may play a significant role in spatial protein patterning during polarization.

  11. The primary structure of component 8c-1, a subunit protein of intermediate filaments in wool keratin. Relationships with proteins from other intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, L M; Crewther, W G; Inglis, A S

    1986-01-01

    Component 8c-1, one of four highly homologous component-8 subunit proteins present in the microfibrils of wool, was isolated as its S-carboxymethyl derivative and its amino acid sequence was determined. Large peptides were isolated after cleaving the protein chemically or enzymically and the sequence of each was determined with an automatic Sequenator. The peptides were ordered by sequence overlaps and, in some instances, by homology with known sequences from other component-8 subunits. The C-terminal residues were identified by three procedures. Full details of the various procedures used have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50133 (4 pp.) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. The result showed that the protein comprises 412 residues and has an Mr, including the N-terminal acetyl group, of 48,300. The sequence of residues 98-200 of component 8c-1 was found to correspond to the partial or complete sequences of four homologous type I helical segments previously isolated from helical fragments recovered from chymotryptic digests of microfibrillar proteins of wool [Crewther & Dowling (1971) Appl. Polym. Symp. 18, 1-20; Crewther, Gough, Inglis & McKern (1978) Text. Res. J. 48, 160-162; Gough, Inglis & Crewther (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 385]. Considered in relation to amino acid sequences of other intermediate-filament proteins, the sequence is in accord with the view that keratin filament proteins are of two types [Hanukoglu & Fuchs (1983) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 33, 915-924]. Filament proteins from non-keratinous tissues, such as desmin, vimentin, neurofilament proteins and the glial fibrillary acidic protein, which form monocomponent filaments, constitute a third type. It is suggested that as a whole the proteins from intermediate filaments be classed as filamentins, the three types at present identified forming

  12. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the alpha-subunit of CAAX-prenyltransferases from Catharanthus roseus and the expression of the active recombinant protein farnesyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Burlat, Vincent; St-Pierre, Benoit; Gantet, Pascal; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Crfta/ggt_Ia (AF525030), a cDNA encoding the ?-subunit of the two types of CaaX-prenyltransferase (CaaX-PTase), i.e. protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) and type I protein geranylgeranyltransferase, was cloned from Catharanthus roseus via a PCR strategy. Crfta/ggt_Ia is 1381-bp long and bears a 999-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 332 residues (FTA) that shares 66% identity with its Lycopersicon esculentum orthologue. Southern blot analysis revealed that FTA is encoded by a single gene copy per haploid genome. Co-expression of Crfta/ggt_Ia and Crftb encoding the beta-subunit of PFT yielded purified active recombinant PFT. This enzyme is able to prenylate proteins from C. roseus, and could be used as a potent tool for prenylated protein identification.

  13. γ-Tubulin complex in Trypanosoma brucei: molecular composition, subunit interdependence and requirement for axonemal central pair protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Li, Ziyin

    2015-11-01

    γ-Tubulin complex constitutes a key component of the microtubule-organizing center and nucleates microtubule assembly. This complex differs in complexity in different organisms: the budding yeast contains the γ-tubulin small complex (γTuSC) composed of γ-tubulin, gamma-tubulin complex protein (GCP)2 and GCP3, whereas animals contain the γ-tubulin ring complex (γTuRC) composed of γTuSC and three additional proteins, GCP4, GCP5 and GCP6. In Trypanosoma brucei, the composition of the γ-tubulin complex remains elusive, and it is not known whether it also regulates assembly of the subpellicular microtubules and the spindle microtubules. Here we report that the γ-tubulin complex in T. brucei is composed of γ-tubulin and three GCP proteins, GCP2-GCP4, and is primarily localized in the basal body throughout the cell cycle. Depletion of GCP2 and GCP3, but not GCP4, disrupted the axonemal central pair microtubules, but not the subpellicular microtubules and the spindle microtubules. Furthermore, we showed that the γTuSC is required for assembly of two central pair proteins and that γTuSC subunits are mutually required for stability. Together, these results identified an unusual γ-tubulin complex in T. brucei, uncovered an essential role of γTuSC in central pair protein assembly, and demonstrated the interdependence of individual γTuSC components for maintaining a stable complex.

  14. Synergistic Induction of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β-Subunit Gene Expression by Gonadal Steroid Hormone Receptors and Smad Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    LH and FSH play crucial roles in mammalian reproduction by mediating steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Gonadal steroid hormones influence gonadotropin production via feedback to the hypothalamus and pituitary. We previously demonstrated that progesterone and testosterone can stimulate expression of the FSH β-subunit gene in immortalized gonadotrope-derived LβT2 cells. Herein, we investigate how these gonadal steroids modulate activin signaling in the gonadotrope. Cotreatment of LβT2 cells or mouse primary pituitary cells with steroids and activin results in a synergistic induction of FSHβ gene expression. This synergy decreases when DNA-binding mutations are introduced into the steroid receptors or when mutations that reduce steroid hormone responsiveness are introduced into the FSHβ promoter, indicating that synergy requires direct DNA binding of the steroid receptors. Furthermore, classical activin signaling via Smad proteins is necessary for this synergy. In addition, these steroid receptors physically interact with Smads and are sufficient for the synergism to occur on the FSHβ promoter. Disruption of Smad binding to the promoter with a Smad protein lacking the DNA-binding domain or an FSHβ promoter containing mutated activin-response elements prevents the synergistic enhancement of FSHβ transcription. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the molecular mechanism for gonadal steroid hormone action on the FSHβ promoter involves cross-talk between the steroid and activin signaling pathways. They also reveal that this synergism requires binding of both the steroid receptors and Smad proteins to their cognate DNA-binding elements and likely involves a direct protein-protein interaction between the two types of transcription factors. PMID:18079204

  15. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein-Protein Interfaces to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2015-08-28

    Missense mutations at protein-protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, "core" and "rim", which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues ("hot spots") is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein-protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p<0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p=0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein-protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  16. Expression of protein phosphatase 2A mutants and silencing of the regulatory B alpha subunit induce a selective loss of acetylated and detyrosinated microtubules.

    PubMed

    Nunbhakdi-Craig, Viyada; Schuechner, Stefan; Sontag, Jean-Marie; Montgomery, Lisa; Pallas, David C; Juno, Claudia; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon; Sontag, Estelle

    2007-05-01

    Carboxymethylation and phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic C subunit are evolutionary conserved mechanisms that critically control PP2A holoenzyme assembly and substrate specificity. Down-regulation of PP2A methylation and PP2A enzymes containing the B alpha regulatory subunit occur in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we show that expressed wild-type and methylation- (L309 Delta) and phosphorylation- (T304D, T304A, Y307F, and Y307E) site mutants of PP2A C subunit differentially bind to B, B', and B''-type regulatory subunits in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and neuro-2a (N2a) neuroblastoma cells. They also display distinct binding affinity for microtubules (MTs). Relative to controls, expression of the wild-type, T304A and Y307F C subunits in N2a cells promotes the accumulation of acetylated and detyrosinated MTs. However, expression of the Y307E, L309 Delta, and T304D mutants, which are impaired in their ability to associate with the B alpha subunit, induces their loss. Silencing of B alpha subunit in N2a and NIH 3T3 cells is sufficient to induce a similar breakdown of acetylated and detyrosinated MTs. It also confers increased sensitivity to nocodazole-induced MT depolymerization. Our findings suggest that changes in intracellular PP2A subunit composition can modulate MT dynamics. They support the hypothesis that reduced amounts of neuronal B alpha-containing PP2A heterotrimers contribute to MT destabilization in Alzheimer's disease.

  17. EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Kv4 POTASSIUM CHANNEL SUBUNITS AND POTASSIUM CHANNEL INTERACTING PROTEINS IN SUBPOPULATIONS OF INTERNEURONS IN THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA

    PubMed Central

    DABROWSKA, J.; RAINNIE, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Kv4 potassium channel α subunits, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3, determine some of the fundamental physiological properties of neurons in the CNS. Kv4 subunits are associated with auxiliary β-subunits, such as the potassium channel interacting proteins (KChIP1 – 4), which are thought to regulate the trafficking and gating of native Kv4 potassium channels. Intriguingly, KChIP1 is thought to show cell type-selective expression in GABA-ergic inhibitory interneurons, while other β-subunits (KChIP2–4) are associated with principal glutamatergic neurons. However, nothing is known about the expression of Kv4 family α- and β-subunits in specific interneurons populations in the BLA. Here, we have used immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and Western Blotting to determine the relative expression of KChIP1 in the different interneuron subtypes within the BLA, and its co-localization with one or more of the Kv4 α subunits. We show that all three α-subunits of Kv4 potassium channel are found in rat BLA neurons, and that the immuno-reactivity of KChIP1 closely resembles that of Kv4.3. Indeed, Kv4.3 showed almost complete co-localization with KChIP1 in the soma and dendrites of a distinct subpopulation of BLA neurons. Dual-immunofluorescence studies revealed this to be in BLA interneurons immunoreactive for parvalbumin, cholecystokin-8, and somatostatin. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that KChIP1 was associated with all three Kv4 α subunits. Together our results suggest that KChIP1 is selectively expressed in BLA interneurons where it may function to regulate the activity of A-type potassium channels. Hence, KChIP1 might be considered as a cell type-specific regulator of GABAergic inhibitory circuits in the BLA. PMID:20849929

  18. Adsorption and rheological behavior of an amphiphilic protein at oil/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Richter, Marina J; Schulz, Alexander; Subkowski, Thomas; Böker, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Hydrophobins are highly surface active proteins which self-assemble at hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces into amphipathic membranes. We investigate hydrophobin self-assembly at oil/water interfaces to deepen the understanding of protein behavior in order to improve our biomimetic synthesis. Therefore, we carried out pendant drop measurements of hydrophobin stabilized oil/water systems determining the time-dependent IFT and the dilatational rheology with additional adaptation to the Serrien protein model. We show that the class I hydrophobin H(∗)Protein B adsorbs at an oil/water interface where it forms a densely-packed interfacial protein layer, which dissipates energy during droplet oscillation. Furthermore, the interfacial protein layer exhibits shear thinning behavior. PMID:27388134

  19. Binding interface between the Salmonella σS/RpoS subunit of RNA polymerase and Crl: hints from bacterial species lacking crl

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Paola; Sizun, Christina; Levi-Acobas, Fabienne; Nowakowski, Mireille; Monteil, Véronique; Bontems, François; Bellalou, Jacques; Mayer, Claudine; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In many Gram-negative bacteria, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), the sigma factor RpoS/σS accumulates during stationary phase of growth, and associates with the core RNA polymerase enzyme (E) to promote transcription initiation of genes involved in general stress resistance and starvation survival. Whereas σ factors are usually inactivated upon interaction with anti-σ proteins, σS binding to the Crl protein increases σS activity by favouring its association to E. Taking advantage of evolution of the σS sequence in bacterial species that do not contain a crl gene, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we identified and assigned a critical arginine residue in σS to the S. Typhimurium σS-Crl binding interface. We solved the solution structure of S. Typhimurium Crl by NMR and used it for NMR binding assays with σS and to generate in silico models of the σS-Crl complex constrained by mutational analysis. The σS-Crl models suggest that the identified arginine in σS interacts with an aspartate of Crl that is required for σS binding and is located inside a cavity enclosed by flexible loops, which also contribute to the interface. This study provides the basis for further structural investigation of the σS-Crl complex. PMID:26338235

  20. Rice G-protein subunits qPE9-1 and RGB1 play distinct roles in abscisic acid responses and drought adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Jian-Feng; Yan, Xue-Jiao; Lin, Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Baluška, František; Wang, Yi-Ping; Xia, Yi-Ji; Liang, Guo-hua; Liang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-mediated abscisic acid (ABA) and drought-stress responses have been documented in numerous plant species. However, our understanding of the function of rice G-protein subunits in ABA signalling and drought tolerance is limited. In this study, the function of G-protein subunits in ABA response and drought resistance in rice plants was explored. It was found that the transcription level of qPE9-1 (rice Gγ subunit) gradually decreased with increasing ABA concentration and the lack of qPE9-1 showed an enhanced drought tolerance in rice plants. In contrast, mRNA levels of RGB1 (rice Gβ subunit) were significantly upregulated by ABA treatment and the lack of RGB1 led to reduced drought tolerance. Furthermore, the results suggested that qPE9-1 negatively regulates the ABA response by suppressing the expression of key transcription factors involved in ABA and stress responses, while RGB1 positively regulates ABA biosynthesis by upregulating NCED gene expression under both normal and drought stress conditions. Taken together, it is proposed that RGB1 is a positive regulator of the ABA response and drought adaption in rice plants, whereas qPE9-1 is modulated by RGB1 and functions as a negative regulator in the ABA-dependent drought-stress responses.

  1. Rice G-protein subunits qPE9-1 and RGB1 play distinct roles in abscisic acid responses and drought adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Jian-Feng; Yan, Xue-Jiao; Lin, Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Baluška, František; Wang, Yi-Ping; Xia, Yi-Ji; Liang, Guo-hua; Liang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-mediated abscisic acid (ABA) and drought-stress responses have been documented in numerous plant species. However, our understanding of the function of rice G-protein subunits in ABA signalling and drought tolerance is limited. In this study, the function of G-protein subunits in ABA response and drought resistance in rice plants was explored. It was found that the transcription level of qPE9-1 (rice Gγ subunit) gradually decreased with increasing ABA concentration and the lack of qPE9-1 showed an enhanced drought tolerance in rice plants. In contrast, mRNA levels of RGB1 (rice Gβ subunit) were significantly upregulated by ABA treatment and the lack of RGB1 led to reduced drought tolerance. Furthermore, the results suggested that qPE9-1 negatively regulates the ABA response by suppressing the expression of key transcription factors involved in ABA and stress responses, while RGB1 positively regulates ABA biosynthesis by upregulating NCED gene expression under both normal and drought stress conditions. Taken together, it is proposed that RGB1 is a positive regulator of the ABA response and drought adaption in rice plants, whereas qPE9-1 is modulated by RGB1 and functions as a negative regulator in the ABA-dependent drought-stress responses. PMID:26175353

  2. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-09-19

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  3. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D. PMID:27422873

  4. The eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension of ribosomal protein S31 contributes to the assembly and function of 40S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Martín-Villanueva, Sara; Murat, Guillaume; Lacombe, Thierry; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2016-09-19

    The archaea-/eukaryote-specific 40S-ribosomal-subunit protein S31 is expressed as an ubiquitin fusion protein in eukaryotes and consists of a conserved body and a eukaryote-specific N-terminal extension. In yeast, S31 is a practically essential protein, which is required for cytoplasmic 20S pre-rRNA maturation. Here, we have studied the role of the N-terminal extension of the yeast S31 protein. We show that deletion of this extension partially impairs cell growth and 40S subunit biogenesis and confers hypersensitivity to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Moreover, the extension harbours a nuclear localization signal that promotes active nuclear import of S31, which associates with pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleus. In the absence of the extension, truncated S31 inefficiently assembles into pre-40S particles and two subpopulations of mature small subunits, one lacking and another one containing truncated S31, can be identified. Plasmid-driven overexpression of truncated S31 partially suppresses the growth and ribosome biogenesis defects but, conversely, slightly enhances the hypersensitivity to aminoglycosides. Altogether, these results indicate that the N-terminal extension facilitates the assembly of S31 into pre-40S particles and contributes to the optimal translational activity of mature 40S subunits but has only a minor role in cytoplasmic cleavage of 20S pre-rRNA at site D.

  5. PKA catalytic subunit mutations in adrenocortical Cushing's adenoma impair association with the regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Hannawacker, Annette; Lyga, Sandra; Bathon, Kerstin; Zabel, Ulrike; Ronchi, Cristina; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Lorenz, Kristina; Allolio, Bruno; Kisker, Caroline; Fassnacht, Martin; Lohse, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a high prevalence of mutations affecting the catalytic (Cα) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. The two identified mutations (Leu206Arg and Leu199_Cys200insTrp) are associated with increased PKA catalytic activity, but the underlying mechanisms are highly controversial. Here we utilize a combination of biochemical and optical assays, including fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells, to analyze the consequences of the two mutations with respect to the formation of the PKA holoenzyme and its regulation by cAMP. Our results indicate that neither mutant can form a stable PKA complex, due to the location of the mutations at the interface between the catalytic and the regulatory subunits. We conclude that the two mutations cause high basal catalytic activity and lack of regulation by cAMP through interference of complex formation between the regulatory and the catalytic subunits of PKA. PMID:25477193

  6. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies. PMID:26506533

  7. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles.

    PubMed

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies.

  8. Host Physiology and Pathogenic Variation of Cochliobolus heterostrophus Strains with Mutations in the G Protein Alpha Subunit, CGA1

    PubMed Central

    Degani, Ofir; Maor, Rudy; Hadar, Ruthi; Sharon, Amir; Horwitz, Benjamin A.

    2004-01-01

    Conserved eukaryotic signaling proteins participate in development and disease in plant-pathogenic fungi. Strains with mutations in CGA1, a heterotrimeric G protein G alpha subunit gene of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus, are defective in several developmental pathways. Conidia from CGA1 mutants germinate as abnormal, straight-growing germ tubes that form few appressoria, and the mutants are female sterile. Nevertheless, these mutants can cause normal lesions on plants, unlike other filamentous fungal plant pathogens in which functional homologues of CGA1 are required for full virulence. Δcga1 mutants of C. heterostrophus were less infective of several maize varieties under most conditions, but not all, as virulence was nearly normal on detached leaves. This difference could be related to the rapid senescence of detached leaves, since delaying senescence with cytokinin also had differential effects on the virulence of the wild type and the Δcga1 mutant. In particular, detached leaves may provide a more readily available nutrient source than attached leaves. Decreased fitness of Δcga1 as a pathogen may reflect conditions under which full virulence requires signal transduction through CGA1-mediated pathways. The virulence of these signal transduction mutants is thus affected differentially by the physiological state of the host. PMID:15294841

  9. A Mitochondrial ATP synthase Subunit Interacts with TOR Signaling to Modulate Protein Homeostasis and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wheeler, Charles T.; Yolitz, Jason; Laslo, Mara; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Yaning; Song, Qisheng; Zou, Sige

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Diet composition is a critical determinant of lifespan and nutrient imbalance is detrimental health. However, how nutrients interact with genetic factors to modulate lifespan remains elusive. We investigated how diet composition influences mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit d (ATPsyn-d) in modulating lifespan in Drosophila. ATPsyn-d knockdown extended lifespan in females fed low carbohydrate-to-protein (C:P) diets, but not the high C:P ratio diet. This extension was associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress, transcriptional changes in metabolism, proteostasis and immune genes, reduced protein damage and aggregation, and reduced phosphorylation of S6K and ERK in TOR and MAPK signaling, respectively. ATPsyn-d knockdown did not extend lifespan in females with reduced TOR signaling induced genetically by Tsc2 overexpression or pharmacologically by rapamycin. Our data reveal a link among diet, mitochondria, MAPK and TOR signaling in aging and stresses the importance of considering genetic background and diet composition in implementing interventions for promoting healthy aging. PMID:25220459

  10. The protein kinase A regulatory subunit R1A (Prkar1a) plays critical roles in peripheral nerve development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Lee, Audrey A; Rizvi, Tilat A; Ratner, Nancy; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2013-11-13

    Signaling through cAMP has been implicated in Schwann cell (SC) proliferation and myelination, but the signaling pathway components downstream of cAMP required for SC function remain unknown. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a potential downstream effector of cAMP. Here, we induced loss of Prkar1a, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of PKA, in SC to study its role in nerve development; loss of Prkar1a is predicted to elevate PKA activity. Conditional Prkar1a knock-out in mouse SC (Prkar1a-SCKO) resulted in a dramatic and persistent axonal sorting defect, and unexpectedly decreased SC proliferation in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves in vivo. Effects were cell autonomous as they were recapitulated in vitro in Prkar1a-SCKO SC, which showed elevated PKA activity. In the few SCs sorted into 1:1 relationships with axons in vivo, SC myelination was premature in Prkar1a-SCKO nerves, correlating with global increase in the cAMP-regulated transcription factor Oct-6 and expression of myelin basic protein. These data reveal a previously unknown role of PKA in axon sorting, an unexpected inhibitory role of PKA on SC cell proliferation in vivo and define the importance of Prkar1a in peripheral nerve development. PMID:24227708

  11. Drosophila Condensin II subunit Chromosome-associated protein D3 regulates cell fate determination through non-cell-autonomous signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klebanow, Lindsey R.; Peshel, Emanuela C.; Schuster, Andrew T.; De, Kuntal; Sarvepalli, Kavitha; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Lenoir, Jessica J.; Moore, Adrian W.; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of the Drosophila melanogaster adult wing is heavily influenced by the expression of proteins that dictate cell fate decisions between intervein and vein during development. dSRF (Blistered) expression in specific regions of the larval wing disc promotes intervein cell fate, whereas EGFR activity promotes vein cell fate. Here, we report that the chromatin-organizing protein CAP-D3 acts to dampen dSRF levels at the anterior/posterior boundary in the larval wing disc, promoting differentiation of cells into the anterior crossvein. CAP-D3 represses KNOT expression in cells immediately adjacent to the anterior/posterior boundary, thus blocking KNOT-mediated repression of EGFR activity and preventing cell death. Maintenance of EGFR activity in these cells depresses dSRF levels in the neighboring anterior crossvein progenitor cells, allowing them to differentiate into vein cells. These findings uncover a novel transcriptional regulatory network influencing Drosophila wing vein development, and are the first to identify a Condensin II subunit as an important regulator of EGFR activity and cell fate determination in vivo. PMID:27317808

  12. Molecular counting by photobleaching in protein complexes with many subunits: best practices and application to the cellulose synthesis complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yalei; Deffenbaugh, Nathan C.; Anderson, Charles T.; Hancock, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The constituents of large, multisubunit protein complexes dictate their functions in cells, but determining their precise molecular makeup in vivo is challenging. One example of such a complex is the cellulose synthesis complex (CSC), which in plants synthesizes cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on Earth. In growing plant cells, CSCs exist in the plasma membrane as six-lobed rosettes that contain at least three different cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms, but the number and stoichiometry of CESAs in each CSC are unknown. To begin to address this question, we performed quantitative photobleaching of GFP-tagged AtCESA3-containing particles in living Arabidopsis thaliana cells using variable-angle epifluorescence microscopy and developed a set of information-based step detection procedures to estimate the number of GFP molecules in each particle. The step detection algorithms account for changes in signal variance due to changing numbers of fluorophores, and the subsequent analysis avoids common problems associated with fitting multiple Gaussian functions to binned histogram data. The analysis indicates that at least 10 GFP-AtCESA3 molecules can exist in each particle. These procedures can be applied to photobleaching data for any protein complex with large numbers of fluorescently tagged subunits, providing a new analytical tool with which to probe complex composition and stoichiometry. PMID:25232006

  13. An Intriguing Correlation Based on the Superimposition of Residue Pairs with Inhibitors that Target Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nakadai, Masakazu; Tomida, Shuta; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Druggable sites on protein-protein interfaces are difficult to predict. To survey inhibitor-binding sites onto which residues are superimposed at protein-protein interfaces, we analyzed publicly available information for 39 inhibitors that target the protein-protein interfaces of 8 drug targets. By focusing on the differences between residues that were superimposed with inhibitors and non-superimposed residues, we observed clear differences in the distances and changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas (∆SASA). Based on the observation that two or more residues were superimposed onto inhibitors in 37 (95%) of 39 protein-inhibitor complexes, we focused on the two-residue relationships. Application of a cross-validation procedure confirmed a linear negative correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASAs of the residues. Finally, we applied the regression equation of this correlation to four inhibitors that bind to new sites not bound by the 39 inhibitors as well as additional inhibitors of different targets. Our results shed light on the two-residue correlation between the absolute value of the dihedral angle and the sum of the ∆SASA, which may be a useful relationship for identifying the key two-residues as potential targets of protein-protein interfaces. PMID:26730437

  14. Cholera toxin B subunit-five-stranded α-helical coiled-coil fusion protein: "five-to-five" molecular chimera displays robust physicochemical stability.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Takeshi; Harakuni, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    To create a physicochemically stable cholera toxin (CT) B subunit (CTB), it was fused to the five-stranded α-helical coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). The chimeric fusion protein (CTB-COMP) was expressed in Pichia pastoris, predominantly as a pentamer, and retained its affinity for the monosialoganglioside GM1, a natural receptor of CT. The fusion protein displayed thermostability, tolerating the boiling temperature of water for 10min, whereas unfused CTB readily dissociated to its monomers and lost its affinity for GM1. The fusion protein also displayed resistance to strong acid at pHs as low as 0.1, and to the protein denaturant sodium dodecyl sulfate at concentrations up to 10%. Intranasal administration of the fusion protein to mice induced anti-B subunit serum IgG, even after the protein was boiled, whereas unfused CTB showed no thermostable mucosal immunogenicity. This study demonstrates that CTB fused to a pentameric α-helical coiled coil has a novel physicochemical phenotype, which may provide important insight into the molecular design of enterotoxin-B-subunit-based vaccines and vaccine delivery molecules. PMID:25045819

  15. Sequence Analysis and Comparative Study of the Protein Subunits of Archaeal RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Lai, Stella M.; Daniels, Charles J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    RNase P, a ribozyme-based ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that catalyzes tRNA 5′-maturation, is ubiquitous in all domains of life, but the evolution of its protein components (RNase P proteins, RPPs) is not well understood. Archaeal RPPs may provide clues on how the complex evolved from an ancient ribozyme to an RNP with multiple archaeal and eukaryotic (homologous) RPPs, which are unrelated to the single bacterial RPP. Here, we analyzed the sequence and structure of archaeal RPPs from over 600 available genomes. All five RPPs are found in eight archaeal phyla, suggesting that these RPPs arose early in archaeal evolutionary history. The putative ancestral genomic loci of archaeal RPPs include genes encoding several members of ribosome, exosome, and proteasome complexes, which may indicate coevolution/coordinate regulation of RNase P with other core cellular machineries. Despite being ancient, RPPs generally lack sequence conservation compared to other universal proteins. By analyzing the relative frequency of residues at every position in the context of the high-resolution structures of each of the RPPs (either alone or as functional binary complexes), we suggest residues for mutational analysis that may help uncover structure-function relationships in RPPs. PMID:27104580

  16. Piezo proteins are pore-forming subunits of mechanically activated channels.

    PubMed

    Coste, Bertrand; Xiao, Bailong; Santos, Jose S; Syeda, Ruhma; Grandl, Jörg; Spencer, Kathryn S; Kim, Sung Eun; Schmidt, Manuela; Mathur, Jayanti; Dubin, Adrienne E; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2012-02-19

    Mechanotransduction has an important role in physiology. Biological processes including sensing touch and sound waves require as-yet-unidentified cation channels that detect pressure. Mouse Piezo1 (MmPiezo1) and MmPiezo2 (also called Fam38a and Fam38b, respectively) induce mechanically activated cationic currents in cells; however, it is unknown whether Piezo proteins are pore-forming ion channels or modulate ion channels. Here we show that Drosophila melanogaster Piezo (DmPiezo, also called CG8486) also induces mechanically activated currents in cells, but through channels with remarkably distinct pore properties including sensitivity to the pore blocker ruthenium red and single channel conductances. MmPiezo1 assembles as a ∼1.2-million-dalton homo-oligomer, with no evidence of other proteins in this complex. Purified MmPiezo1 reconstituted into asymmetric lipid bilayers and liposomes forms ruthenium-red-sensitive ion channels. These data demonstrate that Piezo proteins are an evolutionarily conserved ion channel family involved in mechanotransduction.

  17. The CAD-score web server: contact area-based comparison of structures and interfaces of proteins, nucleic acids and their complexes.

    PubMed

    Olechnovič, Kliment; Venclovas, Ceslovas

    2014-07-01

    The Contact Area Difference score (CAD-score) web server provides a universal framework to compute and analyze discrepancies between different 3D structures of the same biological macromolecule or complex. The server accepts both single-subunit and multi-subunit structures and can handle all the major types of macromolecules (proteins, RNA, DNA and their complexes). It can perform numerical comparison of both structures and interfaces. In addition to entire structures and interfaces, the server can assess user-defined subsets. The CAD-score server performs both global and local numerical evaluations of structural differences between structures or interfaces. The results can be explored interactively using sortable tables of global scores, profiles of local errors, superimposed contact maps and 3D structure visualization. The web server could be used for tasks such as comparison of models with the native (reference) structure, comparison of X-ray structures of the same macromolecule obtained in different states (e.g. with and without a bound ligand), analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural ensemble or structures obtained in the course of molecular dynamics simulation. The web server is freely accessible at: http://www.ibt.lt/bioinformatics/cad-score.

  18. Nicotinic pharmacophore: the pyridine N of nicotine and carbonyl of acetylcholine hydrogen bond across a subunit interface to a backbone NH.

    PubMed

    Blum, Angela P; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2010-07-27

    Pharmacophore models for nicotinic agonists have been proposed for four decades. Central to these models is the presence of a cationic nitrogen and a hydrogen bond acceptor. It is now well-established that the cationic center makes an important cation-pi interaction to a conserved tryptophan, but the donor to the proposed hydrogen bond acceptor has been more challenging to identify. A structure of nicotine bound to the acetylcholine binding protein predicted that the binding partner of the pharmacophore's second component was a water molecule, which also hydrogen bonds to the backbone of the complementary subunit of the receptors. Here we use unnatural amino acid mutagenesis coupled with agonist analogs to examine whether such a hydrogen bond is functionally significant in the alpha4beta2 neuronal nAChR, the receptor most associated with nicotine addiction. We find evidence for the hydrogen bond with the agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, carbamylcholine, and epibatidine. These data represent a completed nicotinic pharmacophore and offer insight into the design of new therapeutic agents that selectively target these receptors.

  19. Knowledge of Native Protein-Protein Interfaces Is Sufficient To Construct Predictive Models for the Selection of Binding Candidates.

    PubMed

    Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2015-10-26

    Selection of putative binding poses is a challenging part of virtual screening for protein-protein interactions. Predictive models to filter out binding candidates with the highest binding affinities comprise scoring functions that assign a score to each binding pose. Existing scoring functions are typically deduced by collecting statistical information about interfaces of native conformations of protein complexes along with interfaces of a large generated set of non-native conformations. However, the obtained scoring functions become biased toward the method used to generate the non-native conformations, i.e., they may not recognize near-native interfaces generated with a different method. The present study demonstrates that knowledge of only native protein-protein interfaces is sufficient to construct well-discriminative predictive models for the selection of binding candidates. Here we introduce a new scoring method that comprises a knowledge-based potential called KSENIA deduced from structural information about the native interfaces of 844 crystallographic protein-protein complexes. We derive KSENIA using convex optimization with a training set composed of native protein complexes and their near-native conformations obtained using deformations along the low-frequency normal modes. As a result, our knowledge-based potential has only marginal bias toward a method used to generate putative binding poses. Furthermore, KSENIA is smooth by construction, which allows it to be used along with rigid-body optimization to refine the binding poses. Using several test benchmarks, we demonstrate that our method discriminates well native and near-native conformations of protein complexes from non-native ones. Our methodology can be easily adapted to the recognition of other types of molecular interactions, such as protein-ligand, protein-RNA, etc. KSENIA will be made publicly available as a part of the SAMSON software platform at https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software . PMID

  20. Heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) subunit promotes oral cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chai Phei; Patel, Vyomesh; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a propensity to spread to the cervical lymph nodes (LN). The presence of cervical LN metastases severely impacts patient survival, whereby the two-year survival for oral cancer patients with involved LN is ~30% compared to over 80% in patients with non-involved LN. Elucidation of key molecular mechanisms underlying OSCC metastasis may afford an opportunity to target specific genes, to prevent the spread of OSCC and to improve patient survival. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of the heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) is highly up-regulated in primary tumors and LN of OSCC patients, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also found that exogenous expression of the constitutively activated-form of Gα12 promoted cell migration and invasion in OSCC cell lines. Correspondingly, inhibition of Gα12 expression by shRNA consistently inhibited OSCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Further, the inhibition of G12 signaling by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) inhibited Gα12-mediated RhoA activation, which in turn resulted in reduced LN metastases in a tongue-orthotopic xenograft mouse model of oral cancer. This study provides a rationale for future development and evaluation of drug candidates targeting Gα12-related pathways for metastasis prevention. PMID:25275299

  1. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of charge-reduced protein complexes reveals general trends in the collisional ejection of compact subunits.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Russell E; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-10-21

    Multiprotein complexes have been shown to play critical roles across a wide range of cellular functions, but most probes of protein quaternary structure are limited in their ability to analyze complex mixtures and polydisperse structures using small amounts of total protein. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry offers a solution to many of these challenges, but relies upon gas-phase measurements of intact multiprotein complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits that correlate well with solution structures. The greatest bottleneck in such workflows is the generation of representative subcomplexes and subunits. Collisional activation of complexes can act to produce product ions reflective of protein complex composition, but such product ions are typically challenging to interpret in terms of their relationship to solution structure due to their typically string-like conformations following activation and subsequent dissociation. Here, we used ion-ion chemistry to perform a broad survey of the gas-phase dissociation of charge-reduced protein complex ions, revealing general trends associated with the collisional ejection of compact, rather than unfolded, protein subunits. Furthermore, we also discover peptide and co-factor dissociation channels that dominate the product ion populations generated for such charge reduced complexes. We assess both sets of observations and discuss general principles that can be extended to the analysis of protein complex ions having unknown structures.

  2. Escherichia coli Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein: NanoESI-MS Studies of Salt-Modulated Subunit Exchange and DNA Binding Transactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Claire E.; Jergic, Slobodan; Lo, Allen T. Y.; Wang, Yao; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2013-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are ubiquitous oligomeric proteins that bind with very high affinity to single-stranded DNA and have a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) was used to monitor subunit exchange in full-length and truncated forms of the homotetrameric SSB from Escherichia coli. Subunit exchange in the native protein was found to occur slowly over a period of hours, but was significantly more rapid in a truncated variant of SSB from which the eight C-terminal residues were deleted. This effect is proposed to result from C-terminus mediated stabilization of the SSB tetramer, in which the C-termini interact with the DNA-binding cores of adjacent subunits. NanoESI-MS was also used to examine DNA binding to the SSB tetramer. Binding of single-stranded oligonucleotides [one molecule of (dT)70, one molecule of (dT)35, or two molecules of (dT)35] was found to prevent SSB subunit exchange. Transfer of SSB tetramers between discrete oligonucleotides was also observed and is consistent with predictions from solution-phase studies, suggesting that SSB-DNA complexes can be reliably analyzed by ESI mass spectrometry.

  3. Alteration of Na,K-ATPase subunit mRNA and protein levels in hypertrophied rat heart.

    PubMed

    Charlemagne, D; Orlowski, J; Oliviero, P; Rannou, F; Sainte Beuve, C; Swynghedauw, B; Lane, L K

    1994-01-14

    To determine if an altered expression of the Na,K-ATPase alpha isoform genes is responsible for an observed increase in cardiac glycoside sensitivity in compensatory hypertrophy, we performed Northern and slot blot analyses of RNA and specific immunological detection of Na,K-ATPase isoforms in rat hearts from normal and pressure overload-treated animals induced by abdominal aortic constriction. During the early phase of hypertrophy, the only alteration is a decrease in the alpha 2 mRNA isoform. In the compensated hypertrophied heart, the levels of the predominant alpha 1 isoform (mRNA and protein) and the beta 1 subunit mRNA are unchanged. In contrast, the alpha 2 isoform (mRNA and protein) is decreased by 35% and up to 61-64% in mild (< 55%) and severe (> 55%) hypertrophy, respectively. The alpha 3 isoform (mRNA and protein), which is extremely low in adult heart, is increased up to 2-fold during hypertrophy but accounts for only approximately equal to 5% of the total alpha isoform mRNA. These findings demonstrate that, in cardiac hypertrophy, the three alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase are independently regulated and that regulation occurs at a pretranslational level. The pattern of expression in hypertrophied adult heart is similar to that of the neonatal heart where the inverse regulation between the alpha 2 and alpha 3 ouabain high affinity isoforms has been reported. This suggests that distinct regulatory mechanisms controlling Na,K-ATPase isoform expression may, at least in part, be involved in the sensitivity to cardiac glycosides. PMID:8288620

  4. Honeycomb structured porous interfaces as templates for protein adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, J.; Muñoz-Bonilla, A.; Ibarboure, E.; Bordegé, V.; Fernández-García, M.

    2010-11-01

    We prepared breath figure patterns decorated with a statistical glycopolymer, (styrene-co-2-{[(D-glucosamin-2-N-yl)carbonyl]oxy}ethyl methacrylate, S-HEMAGl). The preparation of the glycopolymer occurs in one single step by using styrene and S-HEMAGl. Blends of this copolymer and high molecular weight polystyrene were spin coated from THF solutions leading to the formation of surfaces with both controlled functionality and topography. AFM studies revealed that both the composition of the blend and the relative humidity play a key role on the size and distribution of the pores at the interface. The porous films shows the hydrophilic glycomonomer units are oriented towards the pore interface since upon soft annealing in water, the holes are partially swelled. The self-organization of the glycopolymer within the pores was additionally confirmed both by reaction of carbohydrate hydroxyl groups with rhodamine-isocyanate and by means of the lectin binding test using Concanavalin A (Con A).

  5. Subunit 2 (or beta) of retinal rod cGMP-gated cation channel is a component of the 240-kDa channel-associated protein and mediates Ca(2+)-calmodulin modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T Y; Illing, M; Molday, L L; Hsu, Y T; Yau, K W; Molday, R S

    1994-01-01

    The cGMP-gated cation channel mediating visual transduction in retinal rods was recently found to comprise at least two subunits, 1 and 2 (or alpha and beta). SDS gels of the purified channel show, in addition to a 63-kDa protein band (subunit 1), a 240-kDa protein band that binds Ca(2+)-calmodulin, a modulator of the channel. To examine any connection between subunit 2 and the 240-kDa protein, cGMP-gated channels formed from the expressed cloned subunits in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were tested for Ca(2+)-calmodulin effect. Homooligomeric channels formed by subunit 1 alone showed no sensitivity to Ca(2+)-calmodulin, and neither did heterooligomeric channels formed by subunit 1 and the short alternatively spliced form of subunit 2 (2a). By contrast, the cGMP half-activation constant (K1/2) for heterooligomeric channels formed from subunit 1 and the long form of subunit 2 (2b) was increased 1.5- to 2-fold by Ca(2+)-calmodulin, similar to the increase observed for the native channel. In Western blots of rod outer segment membranes, a subunit 2-specific antibody also recognized the 240-kDa protein. Finally, amino acid sequences derived from peptide fragments of the bovine 240-kDa protein showed approximately 80% identity to regions of subunit 2b of the human channel. These results together suggest that subunit 2b of the rod channel is a component of the 240-kDa protein and that it mediates the Ca(2+)-calmodulin modulation of the channel. Images PMID:7526403

  6. Standard atomic volumes in double-stranded DNA and packing in protein--DNA interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nadassy, K; Tomás-Oliveira, I; Alberts, I; Janin, J; Wodak, S J

    2001-08-15

    Standard volumes for atoms in double-stranded B-DNA are derived using high resolution crystal structures from the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) and compared with corresponding values derived from crystal structures of small organic compounds in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). Two different methods are used to compute these volumes: the classical Voronoi method, which does not depend on the size of atoms, and the related Radical Planes method which does. Results show that atomic groups buried in the interior of double-stranded DNA are, on average, more tightly packed than in related small molecules in the CSD. The packing efficiency of DNA atoms at the interfaces of 25 high resolution protein-DNA complexes is determined by computing the ratios between the volumes of interfacial DNA atoms and the corresponding standard volumes. These ratios are found to be close to unity, indicating that the DNA atoms at protein-DNA interfaces are as closely packed as in crystals of B-DNA. Analogous volume ratios, computed for buried protein atoms, are also near unity, confirming our earlier conclusions that the packing efficiency of these atoms is similar to that in the protein interior. In addition, we examine the number, volume and solvent occupation of cavities located at the protein-DNA interfaces and compared them with those in the protein interior. Cavities are found to be ubiquitous in the interfaces as well as inside the protein moieties. The frequency of solvent occupation of cavities is however higher in the interfaces, indicating that those are more hydrated than protein interiors. Lastly, we compare our results with those obtained using two different measures of shape complementarity of the analysed interfaces, and find that the correlation between our volume ratios and these measures, as well as between the measures themselves, is weak. Our results indicate that a tightly packed environment made up of DNA, protein and solvent atoms plays a significant role in

  7. The nuclear matrix protein p255 is a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit which associates with spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M; Lauriault, P; Dubois, M F; Lavoie, S; Bensaude, O; Chabot, B

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody CC-3 recognizes a phosphodependent epitope on a 255 kDa nuclear matrix protein (p255) recently shown to associate with splicing complexes as part of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP particle [Chabot et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3206-3213]. In mouse and Drosophila cultured cells the electrophoretic mobility of p255, faster in the latter species, was identical to that of the hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (IIo). The CC-3 immunoreactivity of p255 was abolished by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, which is known to cause the dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of subunit IIo by inhibiting the TFIIH-associated kinase. The identity of p255 was confirmed by showing that CC-3-immunoprecipitated p255 was recognized by POL3/3 and 8WG16, two antibodies specific to RNA polymerase II largest subunit. Lastly, the recovery of RNA polymerase II largest subunit from HeLa splicing mixtures was compromised by EDTA, which prevents the interaction of p255 with splicing complexes and inhibits splicing. Our results indicate that p255 represents a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit physically associated with spliceosomes and possibly involved in coupling transcription to RNA processing. PMID:8972849

  8. Interfacing synthetic DNA logic operations with protein outputs.

    PubMed

    Prokup, Alexander; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-11-24

    DNA logic gates are devices composed entirely of DNA that perform Boolean logic operations on one or more oligonucleotide inputs. Typical outputs of DNA logic gates are oligonucleotides or fluorescent signals. Direct activation of protein function has not been engineered as an output of a DNA-based computational circuit. Explicit control of protein activation enables the immediate triggering of enzyme function and could yield DNA computation outputs that are otherwise difficult to generate. By using zinc-finger proteins, AND, OR, and NOR logic gates were created that respond to short oligonucleotide inputs and lead to the activation or deactivation of a split-luciferase enzyme. The gate designs are simple and modular, thus enabling integration with larger multigate circuits, and the modular structure gives flexibility in the choice of protein output. The gates were also modified with translator circuits to provide protein activation in response to microRNA inputs as potential cellular cancer markers. PMID:25283524

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha subunit gene by cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and p53.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian; Grand, Roger J A; McCabe, Christopher J; Franklyn, Jayne A; Gallimore, Phillip H; Turnell, Andrew S

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the functional interactions between adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) protein, the co-activators cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 and SUG1, and the transcriptional repressor retinoblastoma (Rb) in mediating T3-dependent repression. Utilizing the human glycoprotein hormone common alpha-subunit (alpha-subunit) promoter and AdE1A mutants with selective binding capacity to these molecules we have determined an essential role for CBP/p300. In normal circumstances, wild-type 12 S AdE1A inhibited alpha-subunit activity. In contrast, adenovirus mutants that retain both the SUG1- and Rb-binding sites, but lack the CBP/p300-binding site, were unable to repress promoter activity. We have also identified a role for the tumour-suppressor gene product p53 in regulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. Akin to 12 S AdE1A, exogenous p53 expression repressed alpha-subunit activity. This function resided in the ability of p53 to interact with CBP/p300; an N-terminal mutant incapable of interacting with CBP/p300 did not inhibit alpha-subunit activity. Stabilization of endogenous p53 by UV irradiation also correlated positively with reduced alpha-subunit activity. Intriguingly, T3 stimulated endogenous p53 transcriptional activity, implicating p53 in T3-dependent signalling pathways. These data indicate that CBP/p300 and p53 are key regulators of alpha-subunit activity. PMID:12164786

  10. Identification of residues crucial for the interaction between human neuroglobin and the α-subunit of heterotrimeric Gi protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian neuroglobin (Ngb) protects neuronal cells under conditions of oxidative stress. We previously showed that human Ngb acts as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for the α-subunits of heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins and inhibits the decrease in cAMP concentration, leading to protection against cell death. In the present study, we used an eukaryotic expression vector driving high-level expression of human wild-type Ngb or Ngb mutants that either exhibit or lack GDI activities in human cells. We demonstrate that the GDI activity of human Ngb is tightly correlated with its neuroprotective activity. We further demonstrate that Glu53, Glu60, and Glu118 of human Ngb are crucial for both the neuroprotective activity and interaction with Gαi1. Moreover, we show that Lys46, Lys70, Arg208, Lys209, and Lys210 residues of Gαi1 are important for binding to human Ngb. We propose a molecular docking model of the complex between human Ngb and Gαi1.

  11. Tabulation as a high-resolution alternative to coarse-graining protein interactions: Initial application to virus capsid subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiriti, Justin; Zuckerman, Daniel M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional coarse-graining based on a reduced number of interaction sites often entails a significant sacrifice of chemical accuracy. As an alternative, we present a method for simulating large systems composed of interacting macromolecules using an energy tabulation strategy previously devised for small rigid molecules or molecular fragments [S. Lettieri and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Comput. Chem. 33, 268-275 (2012); J. Spiriti and D. M. Zuckerman, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 5161-5177 (2014)]. We treat proteins as rigid and construct distance and orientation-dependent tables of the interaction energy between them. Arbitrarily detailed interactions may be incorporated into the tables, but as a proof-of-principle, we tabulate a simple α-carbon Gō-like model for interactions between dimeric subunits of the hepatitis B viral capsid. This model is significantly more structurally realistic than previous models used in capsid assembly studies. We are able to increase the speed of Monte Carlo simulations by a factor of up to 6700 compared to simulations without tables, with only minimal further loss in accuracy. To obtain further enhancement of sampling, we combine tabulation with the weighted ensemble (WE) method, in which multiple parallel simulations are occasionally replicated or pruned in order to sample targeted regions of a reaction coordinate space. In the initial study reported here, WE is able to yield pathways of the final ˜25% of the assembly process.

  12. Cloning of subunits of convulxin, a collagen-like platelet-aggregating protein from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom.

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, M; Bon, C

    1998-01-01

    Convulxin (CVX) is a potent platelet-aggregating glycoprotein from the venom of the snake Crotalus durissus terrificus. It consists of two subunits, alpha and beta, joined by disulphide bridges in a hexameric structure. A cDNA library from venom gland was constructed in the vector pT3T7. The cloned cDNAs encoding the two chains of CVX were sequenced. Both are preceded by an identical 23-amino acid peptide signal sequence and encode sequences of 135 amino acids for the alpha chain and 125 amino acids for the beta chain. These polypeptides include a carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) in which some of the specific amino acids required for binding Ca2+ and galactose or mannose are absent. The presence of such a domain means that CVX can be included in the family of C-type lectins along with other snake venom proteins, although it is not a true lectin. Assuming that the localization of intracatenary disulphide bridges of each CVX chain is similar to that of the CRD and that an intercatenary bridge between the alpha and beta chains is similar to that of the C-type lectin botrocetin, we postulate the existence of an additional intercatenary bridge, which explains the tridimeric structure (alphabeta)3 of CVX. PMID:9657980

  13. Identification of residues crucial for the interaction between human neuroglobin and the α-subunit of heterotrimeric Gi protein

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Nozomu; Wakasugi, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian neuroglobin (Ngb) protects neuronal cells under conditions of oxidative stress. We previously showed that human Ngb acts as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for the α-subunits of heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins and inhibits the decrease in cAMP concentration, leading to protection against cell death. In the present study, we used an eukaryotic expression vector driving high-level expression of human wild-type Ngb or Ngb mutants that either exhibit or lack GDI activities in human cells. We demonstrate that the GDI activity of human Ngb is tightly correlated with its neuroprotective activity. We further demonstrate that Glu53, Glu60, and Glu118 of human Ngb are crucial for both the neuroprotective activity and interaction with Gαi1. Moreover, we show that Lys46, Lys70, Arg208, Lys209, and Lys210 residues of Gαi1 are important for binding to human Ngb. We propose a molecular docking model of the complex between human Ngb and Gαi1. PMID:27109834

  14. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  15. The RNA-binding protein Musashi-1 regulates proteasome subunit expression in breast cancer- and glioma-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Lagadec, Chann; Vlashi, Erina; Frohnen, Patricia; Alhiyari, Yazeed; Chan, Mabel; Pajonk, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells, similar to normal tissue stem cells, rely on developmental pathways, such as the Notch pathway, to maintain their stem cell state. One of the regulators of the Notch pathway is Musashi-1, a mRNA-binding protein. Musashi-1 promotes Notch signaling by binding to the mRNA of Numb, the negative regulator of Notch signaling, thus preventing its translation. Cancer stem cells have also been shown to down-regulate their 26S proteasome activity in several types of solid tumors, thus making them resistant to proteasome-inhibitors used as anti-cancer agents in the clinic. Interestingly, the Notch pathway can be inhibited by proteasomal degradation of the Notch intracellular domain (Notch-ICD), therefore down-regulation of the 26S proteasome activity can lead to stabilization of Notch-ICD. Here we present evidence that the down-regulation of the 26S proteasome in CSCs constitutes another level of control by which Musashi-1 promotes signaling through the Notch pathway and maintenance of the stem cell phenotype of this subpopulation of cancer cells. We demonstrate that Musashi-1 mediates the down-regulation of the 26S proteasome by binding to the mRNA of NF-YA, the transcriptional factor regulating 26S proteasome subunit expression, thus providing an additional route by which the degradation of Notch-ICD is prevented, and Notch signaling is sustained. PMID:24022895

  16. The Adaptor Protein-1 μ1B Subunit Expands the Repertoire of Basolateral Sorting Signal Recognition in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Mattera, Rafael; Ren, Xuefeng; Chen, Yu; Retamal, Claudio; González, Alfonso; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An outstanding question in protein sorting is why polarized epithelial cells express two isoforms of the μ1 subunit of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex: the ubiquitous μ1A and the epithelial-specific μ1B. Previous studies led to the notion that μ1A and μ1B mediate basolateral sorting predominantly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and recycling endosomes, respectively. Using improved analytical tools, however, we find that μ1A and μ1B largely colocalize with each other. They also colocalize to similar extents with TGN and recycling endosome markers, as well as with basolateral cargoes transiting biosynthetic and endocytic-recycling routes. Instead, the two isoforms differ in their signal-recognition specificity. In particular, μ1B preferentially binds a subset of signals from cargoes that are sorted basolaterally in a μ1B-dependent manner. We conclude that expression of distinct μ1 isoforms in epithelial cells expands the repertoire of signals recognized by AP-1 for sorting of a broader range of cargoes to the basolateral surface. PMID:24229647

  17. Phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunits by protein kinase C in arcuate nucleus contributes to inflammatory pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Fan; Tian, Huiyu; Gong, Shan; Zhu, Qi; Xu, Guang-Yin; Tao, Jin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2015-01-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus plays a key role in pain processing. Although it is well known that inhibition of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) in ARC attenuates hyperalgesia induced by peripheral inflammation, the underlying mechanism of NMDAR activation in ARC remains unclear. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in several signalling cascades activated in physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, we hypothesised that upregulation of PKC activates NMDARs in the ARC, thus contributing to inflammatory hyperalgesia. Intra-ARC injection of chelerythrine (CC), a specific PKC inhibitor, attenuated complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) induced thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo extracellular recordings showed that microelectrophoresis of CC or MK-801 (a NMDAR antagonist) significantly reduced the enhancement of spontaneous discharges and pain-evoked discharges of ARC neurons. In addition, CFA injection greatly enhanced the expression of total and phosphorylated PKCγ in the ARC. Interestingly, CFA injection also remarkably elevated the level of phosphorylated NR2B (Tyr1472) without affecting the expression of total NR2B. Importantly, intra-ARC injection of CC reversed the upregulation of phosphorylated NR2B subunits in the ARC. Taken together, peripheral inflammation leads to an activation of NMDARs mediated by PKC activation in the ARC, thus producing thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia. PMID:26515544

  18. Isolation and sequencing of a putative promoter region of the murine G protein beta 1 subunit (GNB1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Hembree, Cambria M; Goodman, Nancy L; Uhl, George R

    2002-02-01

    The expression of the heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein beta 1 subunit gene (GNB1) is regulated by psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines. Since the up-regulation appears to be one of the candidate processes of sensitization, it is necessary to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of the GNB1 gene regulation for a better understanding the establishment of sensitization. In the present study, we describe the isolation and nucleotide sequence analysis of the GNB1 gene promoter region. We have isolated approximately 10 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse of GNB1 gene and found potential elements involved in putative transcriptional control of the GNB1, such as AP1, AP2, Sp1, cyclic AMP response element, and nuclear factor kappa B recognition sites, within the sequences 0.3 kb upstream from the putative transcription start site. This region was highly rich in G + C content, but lacked TATA or CATT boxes. Comparing the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA clone with the human genome databases using the BLAST program a region containing putative exon 1 and promoter of the human GNB1 gene in chromosome 1 was found. The cloning and sequence analysis of an extensive portion of the 5'-flanking regulatory region of the GNB1 gene provides new insights into the factors involved in the regulation by psychostimulants of GNB1 expression. PMID:12180136

  19. Enhanced bradykinin-stimulated phospholipase C activity in murine embryonic stem cells lacking the G-protein alphaq-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Ricupero, D A; Polgar, P; Taylor, L; Sowell, M O; Gao, Y; Bradwin, G; Mortensen, R M

    1997-01-01

    The gene coding for the G-protein alphaq subunit was interrupted by homologous recombination in murine embryonic stem cells (alphaq-null ES cells) as detected by Southern analysis and reverse-transcriptase PCR. The bradykinin (BK) B2 receptor was stably transfected into wild-type (WT) alphai-2-null and alphaq-null ES cells. The B2 receptor bound BK with high affinity and mobilized Ca2+. BK also activated phospholipase C (PLC), as determined by total inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation in a Bordetella pertussis toxin- and genistein-insensitive manner. In WT and alphai-2-null ES cells, BK increased IP levels approx. 4-fold above baseline. Most interestingly, in alphaq-null ES cells, BK increased IP accumulation approx. 9-fold above baseline. Re-expression of alphaq in alphaq-null ES cells resulted in normalization of the BK-stimulated IP accumulation (4-fold above baseline). These results suggest that the B2 receptor activates PLC through more than one member of the Gq family. Additionally, the absence of alphaq alters the kinetics of IP generation, which may reflect intrinsic characteristics of individual members of the Gq family or a decreased susceptibility to heterologous regulation in the alphaq-null ES cells, thus allowing for a more sustained generation of IP. PMID:9581559

  20. The Ustilago maydis regulatory subunit of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase is required for gall formation in maize.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, S E; Brogdon, S M; Mayorga, M E; Kronstad, J W

    1997-01-01

    In the plant, filamentous growth is required for pathogenicity of the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis. Earlier, we identified a role for the cAMP signal transduction pathway in the switch between budding and filamentous growth for this fungus. A gene designated ubc1 (for Ustilago bypass of cyclase) was found to be required for filamentous growth and to encode the regulatory subunit of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Here, we show that ubc1 is important for the virulence of the pathogen. Specifically, ubc1 mutants are able to colonize maize plants and, like the wild-type pathogen, cause localized symptoms in association with the presence of hyphae. However, in contrast to plants infected with wild-type cells that often developed galls from initially chlorotic tissue, plants infected with the ubc1 mutant did not produce galls. These data suggest that PKA regulation is critical for the transition from saprophytic to pathogenic growth and from vegetative to reproductive development. Plate mating assays in which exogenous cAMP was applied suggested that the cAMP and b mating-type morphogenetic pathways may be coordinated. PMID:9338961

  1. Weak conservation of structural features in the interfaces of homologous transient protein–protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Govindarajan; Singh, Prashant; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Residue types at the interface of protein–protein complexes (PPCs) are known to be reasonably well conserved. However, we show, using a dataset of known 3-D structures of homologous transient PPCs, that the 3-D location of interfacial residues and their interaction patterns are only moderately and poorly conserved, respectively. Another surprising observation is that a residue at the interface that is conserved is not necessarily in the interface in the homolog. Such differences in homologous complexes are manifested by substitution of the residues that are spatially proximal to the conserved residue and structural differences at the interfaces as well as differences in spatial orientations of the interacting proteins. Conservation of interface location and the interaction pattern at the core of the interfaces is higher than at the periphery of the interface patch. Extents of variability of various structural features reported here for homologous transient PPCs are higher than the variation in homologous permanent homomers. Our findings suggest that straightforward extrapolation of interfacial nature and inter-residue interaction patterns from template to target could lead to serious errors in the modeled complex structure. Understanding the evolution of interfaces provides insights to improve comparative modeling of PPC structures. PMID:26311309

  2. Determination of disulfide array and subunit structure of taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Igeta, H; Tamura, Y; Nakaya, K; Nakamura, Y; Kurihara, Y

    1991-09-20

    The taste-modifying protein, miraculin (Theerasilp, S. et al. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 6655-6659) has seven cysteine residues in a molecule composed of 191 amino acid residues. The formation of three intrachain disulfide bridges at Cys-47-Cys-92, Cys-148-Cys-159 and Cys-152-Cys-155 and one interchain disulfide bridge at Cys-138 was determined by amino acid sequencing and composition analysis of cystine-containing peptides isolated by HPLC. The presence of an interchain disulfide bridge was also supported by the fact that the cystine peptide containing Cys-138 showed a negative color test for the free sulfhydryl group and a positive test after reduction with dithiothreitol. The molecular mass of non-reduced miraculin (43 kDa) in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was nearly twice the calculated molecular mass based on the amino acid sequence and the carbohydrate content of reduced miraculin (25 kDa). The molecular mass of native miraculin determined by low-angle laser light scattering was 90 kDa. Application of a crude extract of miraculin to a Sephadex G-75 column indicated that the taste-modifying activity appears at 52 kDa. It was concluded that native miraculin in pure form is a tetramer of the 25 kDa-peptide and native miraculin in crude state or denatured, non-reduced miraculin in pure form is a dimer of the peptide. Both tetramer miraculin and native dimer miraculin in crude state had the taste-modifying activity. PMID:1911854

  3. β-Arrestin interacts with the beta/gamma subunits of trimeric G-proteins and dishevelled in the Wnt/Ca(2+) pathway in xenopus gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Katharina; Dürsch, Verena; Harnoš, Jakub; Bryja, Vitezslav; Gentzel, Marc; Schambony, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    β-Catenin independent, non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways play a major role in the regulation of morphogenetic movements in vertebrates. The term non-canonical Wnt signaling comprises multiple, intracellularly divergent, Wnt-activated and β-Catenin independent signaling cascades including the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and the Wnt/Ca(2+) cascades. Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity and Wnt/Ca(2+) pathways share common effector proteins, including the Wnt ligand, Frizzled receptors and Dishevelled, with each other and with additional branches of Wnt signaling. Along with the aforementioned proteins, β-Arrestin has been identified as an essential effector protein in the Wnt/β-Catenin and the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity pathway. Our results demonstrate that β-Arrestin is required in the Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling cascade upstream of Protein Kinase C (PKC) and Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II (CamKII). We have further characterized the role of β-Arrestin in this branch of non-canonical Wnt signaling by knock-down and rescue experiments in Xenopus embryo explants and analyzed protein-protein interactions in 293T cells. Functional interaction of β-Arrestin, the β subunit of trimeric G-proteins and Dishevelled is required to induce PKC activation and membrane translocation. In Xenopus gastrulation, β-Arrestin function in Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling is essential for convergent extension movements. We further show that β-Arrestin physically interacts with the β subunit of trimeric G-proteins and Dishevelled, and that the interaction between β-Arrestin and Dishevelled is promoted by the beta/gamma subunits of trimeric G-proteins, indicating the formation of a multiprotein signaling complex.

  4. Exploring protein interfaces with a general photochemical reagent.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Gabriela E; Cauerhff, Ana; Craig, Patricio O; Goldbaum, Fernando A; Delfino, José M

    2006-04-01

    Protein folding, natural conformational changes, or interaction between partners involved in recognition phenomena brings about differences in the solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain. This primary event can be monitored by the differential chemical reactivity of functional groups along the protein sequence. Diazirine (DZN), a photoreactive gas similar in size to water, generates methylene carbene (:CH(2)). The extreme chemical reactivity of this species allows the almost instantaneous and indiscriminate modification of its immediate molecular cage. (3)H-DZN was successfully used in our laboratory for studying protein structure and folding. Here we address for the first time the usefulness of this probe to examine the area of interaction in protein-protein complexes. For this purpose we chose the complex formed between hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and the monoclonal antibody IgG(1) D1.3. :CH(2) labeling of free HEWL or complexed with IgG(1) D1.3 yields 2.76 and 2.32 mmol CH(2) per mole protein at 1 mM DZN concentration, respectively. This reduction (15%) becomes consistent with the expected decrement in the SASA of HEWL occurring upon complexation derived from crystallographic data (11%), in agreement with the known unspecific surface labeling reaction of :CH(2). Further comparative analysis at the level of tryptic peptides led to the identification of the sites involved in the interaction. Remarkably, those peptides implicated in the contact area show the highest differential labeling: H(15)GLDNYR(21), G(117)TDVQAWIR(125), andG(22)YSLGNWVCAAK(33). Thus, protein footprinting with DZN emerges as a feasible methodology useful for mapping contact regions of protein domains involved in macromolecular assemblies.

  5. Role of bulk and of interface contacts in the behavior of lattice model dimeric proteins.

    PubMed

    Tiana, G; Provasi, D; Broglia, R A

    2003-05-01

    Some dimeric proteins first fold and then dimerize (three-state dimers) while others first dimerize and then fold (two-state dimers). Within the framework of a minimal lattice model, we can distinguish between sequences following one or the other mechanism on the basis of the distribution of the ground state energy between bulk and interface contacts. The topology of contacts is very different for the bulk than for the interface: while the bulk displays a rich network of interactions, the dimer interface is built up of a set of essentially independent contacts. Consequently, the two sets of interactions play very different roles both, in the folding and in the evolutionary history of the protein. Three-state dimers, where a large fraction of energy is concentrated in few contacts buried in the bulk, and where the relative contact energy of interface contacts is considerably smaller than that associated with bulk contacts, fold according to a hierarchical pathway controlled by local elementary structures, as also happens in the folding of single-domain monomeric proteins. On the other hand, two-state dimers display a relative contact energy of interface contacts, which is larger than the corresponding quantity associated with the bulk. In this case, the assembly of the interface stabilizes the system and leads the two chains to fold. The specific properties of three-state dimers acquired through evolution are expected to be more robust than those of two-state dimers; a fact that has consequences on proteins connected with viral diseases.

  6. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches.

  7. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches. PMID:26357227

  8. Protein oxidation at the air-lung interface.

    PubMed

    Kelly, F J; Mudway, I S

    2003-12-01

    Whilst performing its normal functions the lung is required to deal with a range of toxic insults. Whether these are infectious agents, allergens or air pollutants they subject the lung to a range of direct and indirect oxidative stresses. In many instances these challenges lead to oxidative alterations of peptides and proteins within the lung. Measurement of protein oxidation products permits the degree of oxidative stress to be assessed and indicates that endogenous antioxidant defences are overwhelmed. The range of protein oxidation products observed is diverse and the nature and extent of specific oxidation products may inform us about the nature of the damaging ROS and NOS. Recently, there has been a significant shift away from the measurement of these oxidation products simply to establish the presence of oxidative stress, to a focus on identifying specific proteins sensitive to oxidation and establishing the functional consequences of these modifications. In addition the identification of specific enzyme systems to repair these oxidative modifications has lead to the belief that protein function may be regulated through these oxidation reactions. In this review we focus primarily on the soluble protein components of within the surface liquid layer in the lung and the consequence of their undue oxidation.

  9. Identification of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a Novel Target of Bisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100–300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK. PMID:23227178

  10. Subunit vaccination of mice against new world cutaneous leishmaniasis: comparison of three proteins expressed in amastigotes and six adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Aebischer, T; Wolfram, M; Patzer, S I; Ilg, T; Wiese, M; Overath, P

    2000-03-01

    A mixture of well-defined recombinant antigens together with an adjuvant that preferentially stimulates specific gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-secreting helper type 1 CD4(+) T cells (Th1 cells) presents a rational option for a vaccine against leishmaniasis. The potential of this approach was investigated in murine infections with Leishmania mexicana, which are characterized by the absence of a parasite-specific Th1 response and uncontrolled parasite proliferation. A mixture of three antigens (glycoprotein 63, cysteine proteinases, and a membrane-bound acid phosphatase), which are all expressed in amastigotes, the mammalian stage of the parasite, were used for the immunization of C57BL/6 mice in combination with six adjuvants (interleukin 12 [IL-12], Detox, 4'-monophosphoryl lipid A, QS-21, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and Corynebacterium parvum). All six vaccine formulations containing the mixture of recombinant antigens were protective against challenge infections with promastigotes, the insect stage of the parasite, in that mice controlled and healed infections but developed transient and, in certain cases, accentuated disease. The most effective adjuvants were IL-12 followed by Detox. Further studies using these two adjuvants showed that a similar protective effect was observed with a mixture of the corresponding native proteins, and mice which had controlled the infection showed a preponderance of IFN-gamma-secreting CD4(+) T cells in the lymph nodes draining the lesion. Using the recombinant proteins individually, it is shown that the relatively abundant cysteine proteinases and glycoprotein 63, but not the acid phosphatase, are able to elicit a protective response. The results are discussed in comparison to previous studies with subunit vaccines and with respect to cell biological aspects of antigen presentation in Leishmania-infected macrophages. PMID:10678945

  11. Extracellular protein kinase A as a cancer biomarker: Its expression by tumor cells and reversal by a myristate-lacking Cα and RIIβ subunit overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yee Sook; Park, Yun Gyu; Lee, Youl Nam; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Bates, Susan; Tan, Langzhu; Cho-Chung, Yoon S.

    2000-01-01

    Overexpression of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) type I isozyme is associated with cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation. The presence of PKA on the external surface of LS-174T human colon carcinoma cells has been shown. Here, we show that cancer cells of various cell types excrete PKA into the conditioned medium. This extracellular PKA (ECPKA) is present in active, free catalytic subunit (C subunit) form, and its activity is specifically inhibited by PKA inhibitory protein, PKI. Overexpression of the Cα or RIα subunit gene of PKA in an expression vector, which up-regulates intracellular PKA type I, markedly up-regulates ECPKA expression. In contrast, overexpression of the RIIβ subunit, which eliminates PKA type I, up-regulates PKA type II, and reverts the transformed phenotype, down-regulates ECPKA. A mutation in the Cα gene that prevents myristylation allows the intracellular PKA up-regulation but blocks the ECPKA increase, suggesting that the NH2-terminal myristyl group of Cα is required for the ECPKA expression. In serum of cancer patients, the ECPKA expression is up-regulated 10-fold as compared with normal serum. These results indicate that the ECPKA expression is an ordered cellular response of a living cell to actively exclude excess intracellular PKA molecules from the cell. This phenomenon is up-regulated in tumor cells and has an inverse relationship with the hormone dependency of breast cancer. Thus, the extracellular PKA may serve as a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for cancer. PMID:10639166

  12. Loss of F-box Only Protein 2 (Fbxo2) Disrupts Levels and Localization of Select NMDA Receptor Subunits, and Promotes Aberrant Synaptic Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Atkin, Graham; Moore, Shannon; Lu, Yuan; Nelson, Rick F.; Tipper, Nathan; Rajpal, Gautam; Hunt, Jack; Tennant, William; Hell, Johannes W.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play an essential role in some forms of synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Therefore, these receptors are highly regulated with respect to their localization, activation, and abundance both within and on the surface of mammalian neurons. Fundamental questions remain, however, regarding how this complex regulation is achieved. Using cell-based models and F-box Only Protein 2 (Fbxo2) knock-out mice, we found that the ubiquitin ligase substrate adaptor protein Fbxo2, previously reported to facilitate the degradation of the NMDAR subunit GluN1 in vitro, also functions to regulate GluN1 and GluN2A subunit levels in the adult mouse brain. In contrast, GluN2B subunit levels are not affected by the loss of Fbxo2. The loss of Fbxo2 results in greater surface localization of GluN1 and GluN2A, together with increases in the synaptic markers PSD-95 and Vglut1. These synaptic changes do not manifest as neurophysiological differences or alterations in dendritic spine density in Fbxo2 knock-out mice, but result instead in increased axo-dendritic shaft synapses. Together, these findings suggest that Fbxo2 controls the abundance and localization of specific NMDAR subunits in the brain and may influence synapse formation and maintenance. PMID:25878288

  13. Neuron-specific specificity protein 4 bigenomically regulates the transcription of all mitochondria- and nucleus-encoded cytochrome c oxidase subunit genes in neurons.

    PubMed

    Johar, Kaid; Priya, Anusha; Dhar, Shilpa; Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-11-01

    Neurons are highly dependent on oxidative metabolism for their energy supply, and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a key energy-generating enzyme in the mitochondria. A unique feature of COX is that it is one of only four proteins in mammalian cells that are bigenomically regulated. Of its thirteen subunits, three are encoded in the mitochondrial genome and ten are nuclear-encoded on nine different chromosomes. The mechanism of regulating this multisubunit, bigenomic enzyme poses a distinct challenge. In recent years, we found that nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) mediate such bigenomic coordination. The latest candidate is the specificity factor (Sp) family of proteins. In N2a cells, we found that Sp1 regulates all 13 COX subunits. However, we discovered recently that in primary neurons, it is Sp4 and not Sp1 that regulates some of the key glutamatergic receptor subunit genes. The question naturally arises as to the role of Sp4 in regulating COX in primary neurons. The present study utilized multiple approaches, including chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutational analysis, knockdown and over-expression of Sp4, as well as functional assays to document that Sp4 indeed functionally regulate all 13 subunits of COX as well as mitochondrial transcription factors A and B. The present study discovered that among the specificity family of transcription factors, it is the less known neuron-specific Sp4 that regulates the expression of all 13 subunits of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) enzyme in primary neurons. Sp4 also regulates the three mitochondrial transcription factors (TFAM, TFB1M, and TFB2M) and a COX assembly protein SURF-1 in primary neurons.

  14. Unlocking the secrets to protein–protein interface drug targets using structural mass spectrometry techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dailing, Angela; Luchini, Alessandra; Liotta, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) drive all biologic systems at the subcellular and extracellular level. Changes in the specificity and affinity of these interactions can lead to cellular malfunctions and disease. Consequently, the binding interfaces between interacting protein partners are important drug targets for the next generation of therapies that block such interactions. Unfortunately, protein–protein contact points have proven to be very difficult pharmacological targets because they are hidden within complex 3D interfaces. For the vast majority of characterized binary PPIs, the specific amino acid sequence of their close contact regions remains unknown. There has been an important need for an experimental technology that can rapidly reveal the functionally important contact points of native protein complexes in solution. In this review, experimental techniques employing mass spectrometry to explore protein interaction binding sites are discussed. Hydrogen–deuterium exchange, hydroxyl radical footprinting, crosslinking and the newest technology protein painting, are compared and contrasted. PMID:26400464

  15. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling. PMID:27390266

  16. The N-terminal extension of yeast ribosomal protein L8 is involved in two major remodeling events during late nuclear stages of 60S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Tutuncuoglu, Beril; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Wu, Shan; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2016-09-01

    Assaying effects on pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly upon depleting individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) provided an initial paradigm for assembly of eukaryotic ribosomes in vivo-that each structural domain of ribosomal subunits assembles in a hierarchical fashion. However, two features suggest that a more complex pathway may exist: (i) Some r-proteins contain extensions that reach long distances across ribosomes to interact with multiple rRNA domains as well as with other r-proteins. (ii) Individual r-proteins may assemble in a stepwise fashion. For example, the globular domain of an r-protein might assemble separately from its extensions. Thus, these extensions might play roles in assembly that could not be revealed by depleting the entire protein. Here, we show that deleting or mutating extensions of r-proteins L7 (uL30) and L35 (uL29) from yeast reveal important roles in early and middle steps during 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. Detailed analysis of the N-terminal terminal extension of L8 (eL8) showed that it is necessary for late nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly involving two major remodeling events: removal of the ITS2 spacer; and reorganization of the central protuberance (CP) containing 5S rRNA and r-proteins L5 (uL18) and L11 (uL5). Mutations in the L8 extension block processing of 7S pre-rRNA, prevent release of assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 from pre-ribosomes, which is required for rotation of the CP, and block association of Sda1, the Rix1 complex, and the Rea1 ATPase involved in late steps of remodeling.

  17. Viscoelastic Characterization of Gels at Metal-Protein Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elizabeth; Shull, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    The interfacial gelation of proteins at metallic surfaces was investigated with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). When Cr electrodes were corroded in proteinaceous solutions, it was found that gels will form at the Cr surfaces if molybdate ions are also present in the solution. A similar film will form on Cr when the proteins are replaced with a poly(allylamine) polyelectrolyte, suggesting that the gelation is due to a cross-linking reaction between the protein amine groups and the molybdate ions. Further, a method was developed to characterize the viscoelastic properties of thin polymeric films in liquid media using the QCM as a high frequency rheometer. By measuring the frequency and dissipation at multiple harmonics of the resonant frequency, the viscoelastic phase angle, density --modulus product, and mass per unit area of a film can be determined. The method was applied to characterize the protein films, demonstrating that they have a phase angle near 80° and a density --modulus product of ~107 Pa-g/cm3. Data imply that the gels are comprised of a weak proteinaceous network and exhibit similar mechanical properties as solutions containing 50 wt% protein. This project was funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1200529.

  18. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  19. Identification of protein-protein interactions between the TatB and TatC subunits of the twin-arginine translocase system and respiratory enzyme specific chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kuzniatsova, Lalita; Winstone, Tara M L; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-04-01

    The Twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway serves for translocation of fully folded proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane in bacterial and chloroplast thylakoid membranes. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three core components: TatA, TatB, and TatC. The TatB and TatC subunits form the receptor complex for Tat dependent proteins. The TatB protein is composed of a single transmembrane helix and cytoplasmic domain. The structure of TatC revealed six transmembrane helices. Redox Enzyme Maturation Proteins (REMPs) are system specific chaperones, which play roles in the maturation of Tat dependent respiratory enzymes. Here we applied the in vivo bacterial two-hybrid technique to investigate interaction of REMPs with the TatBC proteins, finding that all but the formate dehydrogenase REMP dock to TatB or TatC. We focused on the NarJ subfamily, where DmsD--the REMP for dimethyl sulfoxide reductase in E. coli--was previously shown to interact with TatB and TatC. We found that these REMPs interact with TatC cytoplasmic loops 1, 2 and 4, with the exception of NarJ, that only interacts with 1 and 4. An in vitro isothermal titration calorimetry study was applied to confirm the evidence of interactions between TatC fragments and DmsD chaperone. Using a peptide overlapping array, it was shown that the different NarJ subfamily REMPs interact with different regions of the TatB cytoplasmic domains. The results demonstrate a role of REMP chaperones in targeting respiratory enzymes to the Tat system. The data suggests that the different REMPs may have different mechanisms for this task.

  20. A conserved phenylalanine as a relay between the α5 helix and the GDP binding region of heterotrimeric Gi protein α subunit.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, Tina M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2014-08-29

    G protein activation by G protein-coupled receptors is one of the critical steps for many cellular signal transduction pathways. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix in the G protein α subunit plays a major role during this activation process. However, the precise signaling pathway between the α5 helix and the guanosine diphosphate (GDP) binding pocket remains elusive. Here, using structural, biochemical, and computational techniques, we probed different residues around the α5 helix for their role in signaling. Our data showed that perturbing the Phe-336 residue disturbs hydrophobic interactions with the β2-β3 strands and α1 helix, leading to high basal nucleotide exchange. However, mutations in β strands β5 and β6 do not perturb G protein activation. We have highlighted critical residues that leverage Phe-336 as a relay. Conformational changes are transmitted starting from Phe-336 via β2-β3/α1 to Switch I and the phosphate binding loop, decreasing the stability of the GDP binding pocket and triggering nucleotide release. When the α1 and α5 helices were cross-linked, inhibiting the receptor-mediated displacement of the C-terminal α5 helix, mutation of Phe-336 still leads to high basal exchange rates. This suggests that unlike receptor-mediated activation, helix 5 rotation and translocation are not necessary for GDP release from the α subunit. Rather, destabilization of the backdoor region of the Gα subunit is sufficient for triggering the activation process.

  1. How good are state-of-the-art docking tools in predicting ligand binding modes in protein-protein interfaces?

    PubMed

    Krüger, Dennis M; Jessen, Gisela; Gohlke, Holger

    2012-11-26

    Protein-protein interfaces (PPIs) are an important class of drug targets. We report on the first large-scale validation study on docking into PPIs. DrugScore-adapted AutoDock3 and Glide showed good success rates with a moderate drop-off compared to docking to "classical targets". An analysis of the binding energetics in a PPI allows identifying those interfaces that are amenable for docking. The results are important for deciding if structure-based design approaches can be applied to a particular PPI.

  2. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. {yields} Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1{Delta} cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1{Delta} cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1{sup +} or cyr1{Delta} S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  3. Characterization of Thylakoid-Derived Lipid-Protein Particles Bearing the Large Subunit of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. D.; Ghosh, S.; Dumbroff, E. B.; Thompson, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles bearing the 55-kD ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (EC 4.1.1.39) large subunit (RLSU) and no detectable corresponding Rubisco small subunit (RSSU) were isolated from the stroma of intact chloroplasts by flotation centrifugation. Stromal RLSU-bearing particles appear to originate from thylakoids because they can also be generated in vitro by illumination of isolated thylakoids. Their formation in vitro is largely heat denaturable and is facilitated by light or ATP. RLSU-containing lipid-protein particles range from 0.05 to 0.10 [mu]m in radius, contain the same fatty acids as thylakoids, but have a 10- to 15-fold higher free-to-esterified fatty acid ratio than thylakoids. RLSU-bearing lipid-protein particles with no detectable RSSU were also immunopurified from the populations of both stromal lipid-protein particles and those generated in vitro from illuminated thylakoids. Protease shaving indicated that the RLSU is embedded in the lipid-protein particles and that there is also a protease-protected RLSU in thylakoids. These observations collectively indicate that the RLSU associated with thylakoids is released into the stroma by light-facilitated blebbing of lipid-protein particles. The release of RLSU-containing particles may in turn be coordinated with the assembly of Rubisco holoenzyme because chaperonin 60 is also associated with lipid-protein particles isolated from stroma. PMID:12223858

  4. Protein Solvation in Membranes and at Water-Membrane Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Wilson, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Different salvation properties of water and membranes mediate a host of biologically important processes, such as folding, insertion into a lipid bilayer, associations and functions of membrane proteins. These processes will be discussed in several examples involving synthetic and natural peptides. In particular, a mechanism by which a helical peptide becomes inserted into a model membrane will be described. Further, the molecular mechanism of recognition and association of protein helical segments in membranes will be discussed. These processes are crucial for proper functioning of a cell. A membrane-spanning domain of glycophorin A, which exists as a helical dimer, serves as the model system. For this system, the free energy of dissociation of the helices is being determined for both the wild type and a mutant, in which dimerization is disrupted.

  5. Influence of the C terminus of the small protein subunit of bean pod mottle virus on the antigenicity of the virus determined using monoclonal antibodies and anti-peptide antiserum.

    PubMed

    Joisson, C; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1991-09-01

    Middle component particles of bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) containing small protein subunits with a cleaved C terminus were used to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All MAbs were specific for cryptotopes, i.e. epitopes present only on dissociated BPMV protein. The MAbs reacted more strongly with virus protein preparations containing the cleaved form of the small subunit than with preparations containing only the uncleaved form. It seems that the presence of additional residues at the C terminus of the intact small subunit interferes with antibody binding. Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to the C terminus of the uncleaved small subunit reacted with both intact virions and dissociated subunits. This C-terminal region seems to play a dominant role in the antigenicity of the virus.

  6. The μ Subunit of Arabidopsis Adaptor Protein-2 Is Involved in Effector-Triggered Immunity Mediated by Membrane-Localized Resistance Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel; Yamaoka, Shohei; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2016-05-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be important in the cellular processes of plant immune responses. However, our understanding of its role during effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is still limited. We have previously shown that plant endocytosis, especially clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the plasma membrane, is mediated by the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex and that loss of the μ subunit of AP-2 (AP2M) affects plant growth and floral organ development. Here, we report that AP2M is required for full-strength ETI mediated by the disease resistance (R) genes RPM1 and RPS2 in Arabidopsis. Reduced ETI was observed in an ap2m mutant plant, measured by growth of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strains carrying the corresponding effector genes avrRpm1 or avrRpt2 and by hypersensitive cell death response and defense gene expression triggered by these strains. In contrast, RPS4-mediated ETI and its associated immune responses were not affected by the ap2m mutation. While RPM1 and RPS2 are localized to the plasma membrane, RPS4 is localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our results suggest that AP2M is involved in ETI mediated by plasma membrane-localized R proteins, possibly by mediating endocytosis of the immune receptor complex components from the plasma membrane.

  7. Molecular Recognition at the Protein-Hydroxyapatite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Stayton, Partick S.; Drobny, G. P.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Long, Joanna R.; Gilbert, Michelle R.

    2003-09-01

    Proteins found in mineralized tissues act as nature's crystal engineers, where they play a key role in promoting or inhibiting the growth of minerals, such as hydroxyapitite (bones/teeth) and calcium oxalate (kidney stones). Despite their importance in hard-tissue formation and remodeling, and in pathological processes such as stone formation and arterial calcification, there is little known of the protein structure-function relationships that govern hard-tissue engineering. Here we review early studies that have utilized solid-state NMR (ssNMR) techniques to provide in situ secondary-structure determination of statherin and statherin peptides on their biologically relevant hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces. In addition to direct structural study, molecular dynamics studies have provided considerable insight into the protein-binding footprint on hydroxyapatite. The molecular insight provided by these studies has also led to the design of biomimetic fusion peptides that utilize nature's crystal-recognition mechanism to display accessible and dynamic bioactive sequences from the HAP surface. These peptides selectively engage adhesion receptors and direct specific outside-in signaling pathway activation in osteoblast-like cells.

  8. Blunted apoptosis of erythrocytes in mice deficient in the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Elisabeth; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Fehrenbacher, Birgit; Honisch, Sabina; Chen, Hong; Fakhri, Hajar; Umbach, Anja T; Liu, Guilai; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Liu, Guoxing; Schaller, Martin; Mack, Andreas F; Lupescu, Adrian; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M

    2016-01-01

    Putative functions of the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2-dependent signaling include ion channel regulation, cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Erythrocytes may, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, undergo eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Eryptosis may be triggered by increased cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and ceramide. In the present study, we show that Gαi2 is expressed in both murine and human erythrocytes and further examined the survival of erythrocytes drawn from Gαi2-deficient mice (Gαi2(-/-)) and corresponding wild-type mice (Gαi2(+/+)). Our data show that plasma erythropoietin levels, erythrocyte maturation markers, erythrocyte counts, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were similar in Gαi2(-/-) and Gαi2(+/+) mice but the mean corpuscular volume was significantly larger in Gαi2(-/-) mice. Spontaneous PS exposure of circulating Gαi2(-/-) erythrocytes was significantly lower than that of circulating Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes. PS exposure was significantly lower in Gαi2(-/-) than in Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes following ex vivo exposure to hyperosmotic shock, bacterial sphingomyelinase or C6 ceramide. Erythrocyte Gαi2 deficiency further attenuated hyperosmotic shock-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) activity and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Gαi2(-/-) erythrocytes were more resistant to osmosensitive hemolysis as compared to Gαi2(+/+) erythrocytes. In conclusion, Gαi2 deficiency in erythrocytes confers partial protection against suicidal cell death. PMID:27499046

  9. Blunted apoptosis of erythrocytes in mice deficient in the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2

    PubMed Central

    Bissinger, Rosi; Lang, Elisabeth; Ghashghaeinia, Mehrdad; Singh, Yogesh; Zelenak, Christine; Fehrenbacher, Birgit; Honisch, Sabina; Chen, Hong; Fakhri, Hajar; Umbach, Anja T.; Liu, Guilai; Rexhepaj, Rexhep; Liu, Guoxing; Schaller, Martin; Mack, Andreas F.; Lupescu, Adrian; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lang, Florian; Qadri, Syed M.

    2016-01-01

    Putative functions of the heterotrimeric G-protein subunit Gαi2-dependent signaling include ion channel regulation, cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Erythrocytes may, similar to apoptosis of nucleated cells, undergo eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Eryptosis may be triggered by increased cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ceramide. In the present study, we show that Gαi2 is expressed in both murine and human erythrocytes and further examined the survival of erythrocytes drawn from Gαi2-deficient mice (Gαi2−/−) and corresponding wild-type mice (Gαi2+/+). Our data show that plasma erythropoietin levels, erythrocyte maturation markers, erythrocyte counts, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration were similar in Gαi2−/− and Gαi2+/+ mice but the mean corpuscular volume was significantly larger in Gαi2−/− mice. Spontaneous PS exposure of circulating Gαi2−/− erythrocytes was significantly lower than that of circulating Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes. PS exposure was significantly lower in Gαi2−/− than in Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes following ex vivo exposure to hyperosmotic shock, bacterial sphingomyelinase or C6 ceramide. Erythrocyte Gαi2 deficiency further attenuated hyperosmotic shock-induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity and cell shrinkage. Moreover, Gαi2−/− erythrocytes were more resistant to osmosensitive hemolysis as compared to Gαi2+/+ erythrocytes. In conclusion, Gαi2 deficiency in erythrocytes confers partial protection against suicidal cell death. PMID:27499046

  10. Role of SefA subunit protein of SEF14 fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, A D; Kotlarski, I; Morona, R; Manning, P A

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the role of the SefA subunit protein of SEF14 fimbriae in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis was investigated. This was accomplished by mutating the sefA gene in the chromosome of two strains of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis by allelic exchange with a copy that has been inactivated by interruption with a nonpolar kanamycin resistance (aphA-3) cassette. The effect of this mutation on the ability of the S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strains to colonize the intestinal epithelium and to invade other tissues was assessed in BALB/c mice and in vitro by adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. Our results show that an avirulent S. enterica serovar Enteritidis vaccine strain, 11RX (no somatic antigen; flagellum antigen phase 1, g,m; flagellum antigen phase 2, -), colonized better and persisted longer in the Peyer's patches of these mice than did its SefA-deficient counterpart. However, no such difference was observed between a highly virulent S. enterica serovar Enteritidis strain, 7314 (somatic antigen, O1, O9, O12; flagellum antigen phase 1, g,m; flagellum antigen phase 2 [1,7]), and its SefA-deficient isogenic mutant. These findings were correlated with in vitro adherence and invasion of HeLa cells. Furthermore, we could not demonstrate a role for SefA in the virulence of S. enterica serovar Enteritidis as assessed by 50% lethal dose determinations. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:9009334

  11. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S R; Kurimasa, A; Oshimura, M; Dynan, W S; Bradbury, E M; Chen, D J

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an approximately 350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway.

  12. The fission yeast Cdc1 protein, a homologue of the small subunit of DNA polymerase delta, binds to Pol3 and Cdc27.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeill, S A; Moreno, S; Reynolds, N; Nurse, P; Fantes, P A

    1996-01-01

    cdc1+ is required for cell cycle progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc1 mutants undergo cell cycle arrest when shifted to the restrictive temperature, becoming highly elongated. Here we describe the cloning and sequencing of cdc1+, which is shown to encode a 462 residue protein that displays significant sequence similarity to the small subunit of mammalian DNA polymerase delta. cdc1+ interacts genetically with pol3+, which encodes the large subunit of DNA polymerase delta in fission yeast, and the Cdc1 protein binds to Pol3 in vitro, strongly suggesting that Cdc1 is likely to be the small subunit of Pol delta. In addition, we show that cdc1+ overexpression is sufficient to rescue cells carrying temperature-sensitive cdc27 alleles and that the Cdc1 and Cdc27 proteins interact in vivo and in vitro. Deletion of either cdc1+ or cdc27+ results in cell cycle arrest with the arrested cells having a single nucleus with 2C DNA content. No evidence was obtained for a cut phenotype, indicating that neither cdc1+ nor cdc27+ is required for checkpoint function. cdc1 mutant cells are supersensitive to the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea and to the DNA damaging agent MMS, display increased frequency of mini-chromosome loss and have an extended S phase. Images PMID:8887553

  13. Loss of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase in DNA double-strand-break-repair mutant mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S.R. |; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Dynan, W.S.; Bradbury, E.M. |; Chen, D.J.

    1995-04-11

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of three polypeptide components: Ku-70, Ku-80, and an {approx}350-kDa catalytic subunit (p350). The gene encoding the Ku-80 subunit is identical to the x-ray-sensitive group 5 complementing gene XRCC5. Expression of the Ku-80 cDNA rescues both DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and V(D)J recombination in group 5 mutant cells. The involvement of Ku-80 in these processes suggests that the underlying defect in these mutant cells may be disruption of the DNA-PK holoenzyme. In this report we show that the p350 kinase subunit is deleted in cells derived from the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse and in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line V-3, both of which are defective in DSB repair and V(D)J recombination. A centromeric fragment of human chromosome 8 that complements the scid defect also restores p350 protein expression and rescues in vitro DNA-PK activity. These data suggest the scid gene may encode the p350 protein or regulate its expression and are consistent with a model whereby DNA-PK is a critical component of the DSB-repair pathway. 38 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Ion-Specific Induced Fluctuations and Free Energetics of Aqueous Protein Hydrophobic Interfaces: Toward Connecting to Specific-Ion Behaviors at Aqueous Liquid–Vapor Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We explore anion-induced interface fluctuations near protein–water interfaces using coarse-grained representations of interfaces as proposed by Willard and Chandler (J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 1954−195820055377). We use umbrella sampling molecular dynamics to compute potentials of mean force along a reaction coordinate bridging the state where the anion is fully solvated and one where it is biased via harmonic restraints to remain at the protein–water interface. Specifically, we focus on fluctuations of an interface between water and a hydrophobic region of hydrophobin-II (HFBII), a 71 amino acid residue protein expressed by filamentous fungi and known for its ability to form hydrophobically mediated self-assemblies at interfaces such as a water/air interface. We consider the anions chloride and iodide that have been shown previously by simulations as displaying specific-ion behaviors at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces. We find that as in the case of a pure liquid–vapor interface, at the hydrophobic protein–water interface, the larger, less charge-dense iodide anion displays a marginal interfacial stability compared with that of the smaller, more charge-dense chloride anion. Furthermore, consistent with the results at aqueous liquid–vapor interfaces, we find that iodide induces larger fluctuations of the protein–water interface than chloride. PMID:24701961

  15. Evidence for showing gene/protein name suggestions in bioscience literature search interfaces.

    PubMed

    Divoli, Anna; Hearst, Marti A; Wooldridge, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of two questionnaires asking biologists about the incorporation of text-extracted entity information, specifically gene and protein names, into bioscience literature search user interfaces. Among the findings are that study participants want to see gene/protein metadata in combination with organism information; that a significant proportion would like to see gene names grouped by type (synonym, homolog, etc.), and that most participants want to see information that the system is confident about immediately, and see less certain information after taking additional action. These results inform future interface designs.

  16. Signaling specificity provided by the Arabidopsis thaliana heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits AGG1 and AGG2 is partially but not exclusively provided through transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Thung, Leena; Chakravorty, David; Trusov, Yuri; Jones, Alan M; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of one α, one ß and three γ subunits. While two of the γ subunits, AGG1 and AGG2 have been shown to provide functional selectivity to the Gßγ dimer in Arabidopsis, it is unclear if such selectivity is embedded in their molecular structures or conferred by the different expression patterns observed in both subunits. In order to study the molecular basis for such selectivity we tested genetic complementation of AGG1- and AGG2 driven by the respectively swapped gene promoters. When expressed in the same tissues as AGG1, AGG2 rescues some agg1 mutant phenotypes such as the hypersensitivity to Fusarium oxysporum and D-mannitol as well as the altered levels of lateral roots, but does not rescue the early flowering phenotype. Similarly, AGG1 when expressed in the same tissues as AGG2 rescues the osmotic stress and lateral-root phenotypes observed in agg2 mutants but failed to rescue the heat-stress induction of flowering. The fact that AGG1 and AGG2 are functionally interchangeable in some pathways implies that, at least for those pathways, signaling specificity resides in the distinctive spatiotemporal expression patterns exhibited by each γ subunit. On the other hand, the lack of complementation for some phenotypes indicates that there are pathways in which signaling specificity is provided by differences in the primary AGG1 and AGG2 amino acid sequences. PMID:23520518

  17. Protection of rat liver 80 S ribosomes against ricin A chain inactivation by proteins extracted from rat liver and wheat germ ribosomal subunits with ammonium chloride/magnesium chloride.

    PubMed

    Chang, M S; Houston, L L

    1981-09-28

    Proteins extracted from wheat germ 60 S ribosomal subunits and rat liver 60 S and 40 S ribosomal subunits with 3 M NH4Cl/75 mM MgCl2 were able to prevent the ricin A chain-mediated inactivation of untreated 80 S rat liver ribosomes. The protection of polyphenylalanine synthetic capability of 80 S ribosomes was saturable and reached 100% protection in the presence of about 20 micrograms of extracted protein using a uniform set of assay conditions. No protection was observed using proteins extracted from wheat germ 40 S subunits or the core fraction of rat liver 60 S subunits or protein extracted from Escherichia coli ribosomes or ribosomal subunits. The conclusion that the protective effect of extracted 60 S subunit proteins was specific, was further strengthened by showing that unrelated proteins such as alpha-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin and lysozyme, and polypeptides such as polylysine and poly(aspartic acid), also showed no protection. If 80 S ribosomes were first treated with ricin A chain and then incubated with proteins extracted from rat liver 60 S subunits, no protection was observed. Proteins extracted with NH4Cl/MgCl2 from 60 S rat liver subunits were applied to carboxymethylcellulose column equilibrated with 6 M urea. Stepwise elution with increasing concentrations of LiCl resulted in seven fractions. One fraction (D) contained most of the protective factor; one fraction (E) contained a lesser amount of the protective factor. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of fraction D showed the presence of ten proteins. These data are consistent with the idea that the enzymatic target of ricin A chain is protein is nature and that fraction D contains one or more proteins that appear to act as a inhibitor against ricin A chain.

  18. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  19. Solid-solid interface adsorption of proteins and enzymes in nanophase-separated amphiphilic conetworks.

    PubMed

    Dech, Stephan; Cramer, Tobias; Ladisch, Reinhild; Bruns, Nico; Tiller, Joerg C

    2011-05-01

    Amphiphilic polymer conetworks (APCNs) are materials with a very large interface between their hydrophilic and hydrophobic phases due to their nanophase-separated morphologies. Proteins were found to enrich in APCNs by up to 2 orders of magnitude when incubated in aqueous protein solutions, raising the question of the driving force of protein uptake into APCNs. The loading of poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate)-linked by-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PHEA-l-PDMS) with heme proteins (myoglobin, horseradish peroxidase, hemoglobin) and lipases was studied under variation of parameters such as incubation time, pH, concentration of the protein solution, and conetwork composition. Adsorption of enzymes to the uncharged interface is the main reason for protein uptake, resulting in protein loading of up to 23 wt %. Experimental results were supported by computation of electrostatic potential maps of a lipase, indicating that hydrophobic patches are responsible for the adsorption to the interface. The findings underscore the potential of enzyme-loaded APCNs in biocatalysis and as sensors.

  20. PRince: a web server for structural and physicochemical analysis of protein-RNA interface.

    PubMed

    Barik, Amita; Mishra, Abhishek; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a web server, PRince, which analyzes the structural features and physicochemical properties of the protein-RNA interface. Users need to submit a PDB file containing the atomic coordinates of both the protein and the RNA molecules in complex form (in '.pdb' format). They should also mention the chain identifiers of interacting protein and RNA molecules. The size of the protein-RNA interface is estimated by measuring the solvent accessible surface area buried in contact. For a given protein-RNA complex, PRince calculates structural, physicochemical and hydration properties of the interacting surfaces. All these parameters generated by the server are presented in a tabular format. The interacting surfaces can also be visualized with software plug-in like Jmol. In addition, the output files containing the list of the atomic coordinates of the interacting protein, RNA and interface water molecules can be downloaded. The parameters generated by PRince are novel, and users can correlate them with the experimentally determined biophysical and biochemical parameters for better understanding the specificity of the protein-RNA recognition process. This server will be continuously upgraded to include more parameters. PRince is publicly accessible and free for use. Available at http://www.facweb.iitkgp.ernet.in/~rbahadur/prince/home.html.

  1. Protein–Protein Interfaces from Cytochrome c Oxidase I Evolve Faster than Nonbinding Surfaces, yet Negative Selection Is the Driving Force

    PubMed Central

    Aledo, Juan Carlos; Valverde, Héctor; Ruíz-Camacho, Manuel; Morilla, Ian; López, Francisco Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory complexes are encoded by two genomes (mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] and nuclear DNA [nDNA]). Although the importance of intergenomic coadaptation is acknowledged, the forces and constraints shaping such coevolution are largely unknown. Previous works using cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as a model enzyme have led to the so-called “optimizing interaction” hypothesis. According to this view, mtDNA-encoded residues close to nDNA-encoded residues evolve faster than the rest of positions, favoring the optimization of protein–protein interfaces. Herein, using evolutionary data in combination with structural information of COX, we show that failing to discern the effects of interaction from other structural and functional effects can lead to deceptive conclusions such as the “optimizing hypothesis.” Once spurious factors have been accounted for, data analysis shows that mtDNA-encoded residues engaged in contacts are, in general, more constrained than their noncontact counterparts. Nevertheless, noncontact residues from the surface of COX I subunit are a remarkable exception, being subjected to an exceptionally high purifying selection that may be related to the maintenance of a suitable heme environment. We also report that mtDNA-encoded residues involved in contacts with other mtDNA-encoded subunits are more constrained than mtDNA-encoded residues interacting with nDNA-encoded polypeptides. This differential behavior cannot be explained on the basis of predicted thermodynamic stability, as interactions between mtDNA-encoded subunits contribute more weakly to the complex stability than those interactions between subunits encoded by different genomes. Therefore, the higher conservation observed among mtDNA-encoded residues involved in intragenome interactions is likely due to factors other than structural stability. PMID:25359921

  2. Assembly of the central domain of the 30S ribosomal subunit: roles for the primary binding ribosomal proteins S15 and S8.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Indu; Culver, Gloria M

    2003-07-01

    Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit occurs in a highly ordered and sequential manner. The ordered addition of ribosomal proteins to the growing ribonucleoprotein particle is initiated by the association of primary binding proteins. These proteins bind specifically and independently to 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Two primary binding proteins, S8 and S15, interact exclusively with the central domain of 16S rRNA. Binding of S15 to the central domain results in a conformational change in the RNA and is followed by the ordered assembly of the S6/S18 dimer, S11 and finally S21 to form the platform of the 30S subunit. In contrast, S8 is not part of this major platform assembly branch. Of the remaining central domain binding proteins, only S21 association is slightly dependent on S8. Thus, although S8 is a primary binding protein that extensively contacts the central domain, its role in assembly of this domain remains unclear. Here, we used directed hydroxyl radical probing from four unique positions on S15 to assess organization of the central domain of 16S rRNA as a consequence of S8 association. Hydroxyl radical probing of Fe(II)-S15/16S rRNA and Fe(II)-S15/S8/16S rRNA ribonucleoprotein particles reveal changes in the 16S rRNA environment of S15 upon addition of S8. These changes occur predominantly in helices 24 and 26 near previously identified S8 binding sites. These S8-dependent conformational changes are consistent with 16S rRNA folding in complete 30S subunits. Thus, while S8 binding is not absolutely required for assembly of the platform, it appears to affect significantly the 16S rRNA environment of S15 by influencing central domain organization.

  3. Isolation, in silico characterization, localization and expression analysis of abiotic stress-responsive rice G-protein β subunit (RGB1)

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dinesh K; Shukla, Devesh; Tuteja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins constitute the classical signaling paradigm along with their cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and appropriate downstream effectors. G-protein complex is composed of highly conserved Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits. In the present study, we have characterized the cis-regulatory elements of the promoter, signature motifs, transcript profile in response to abiotic stresses, and sub-cellular localization of G-protein β subunit RGB1(I) from Indica rice. The RGB1(I) promoter sequence has various stress-related cis-regulatory elements suggesting its role in abiotic stress signaling. Presence of six WD-40 repeat signature motifs in RGB1(I) suggest its role in exchange of GDP by GTP in Gα subunit and receptor recognition. Presence of multiple N-myristoylation consensus sites in RGB1(I) protein sequence, which is necessary for membrane localization of protein, confirms the association of RGB1(I) in plasma membrane. Extrinsic association of RGB1(I) with plasma membrane seems essential for its role in regulation of signaling pathways and adaptation to high salt stress. We report the sub-cellular localization of RGB1(I) in plasma membrane, cytosol and nucleus. The localization of RGB1(I) in nucleus supports its possible interaction with transcription factors regulating the expression of salt stress responsive genes. The RGB1(I) transcript was upregulated under KCl, cold, dehydration and micronutrient (Mn2+ and Zn2+) stress. However, transcript variation under elevated temperature, ABA, NaCl, and toxic heavy metals (viz. arsenite, arsenate, cadmium and lead) was not encouraging. These evidences indicate an active and significant role of RGB1(I) in the regulation of abiotic stresses in rice and propound its possible exploitation in the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. PMID:24739238

  4. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  5. Rapana thomasiana grosse (gastropoda) haemocyanin: spectroscopic studies of the structure in solution and the conformational stability of the native protein and its structural subunits.

    PubMed

    Dolashka, P; Genov, N; Parvanova, K; Voelter, W; Geiger, M; Stoeva, S

    1996-04-01

    1. The stability towards pH changes, thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation of the oxy- and apo-forms of the native Rapana thomasiana haemocyanin and its structural subunits, RHSS1 and RHSS2, has been investigated using fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. The association of the subunits into haemocyanin aggregates increases considerably the melting temperature and the free energy of stabilization in water. The guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of the aggregated oxygen-transporting protein depends slightly on the protein concentration. The denaturation of the individual subunits is concentration-independent. Rapana haemocyanin is 5.9-7.5 kJ/mol more stable than the constituent polypeptide chains. 2. Upon excitation of the native haemocyanin and the subunits at 295 or 280 nm the fluorescence emission is determined by tryptophyl residues 'buried' deeply in the hydrophobic interior of the protein globules. This is confirmed by quenching experiments with acrylamide, caesium and iodide ions. The efficiency of the radiationless energy transfer between the phenol (donor) and indole (acceptor) fluorophores in the three species, native haemocyanin, RHSS1 and RHSS2, has been determined. An efficient 'interchain' energy transfer between tyrosyl and tryptophyl residues from different polypeptide chains occurs in the non-dissociated form of the haemocyanin. 3. The tryptophan emission of the oxyhaemocyanin, oxy-RHSS1 and oxy-RHSS 2 is strongly quenched by the copper-dioxygen complex at the active site and the respective quantum yields of fluorescence of the oxygenated species are 4-7 times lower than those of the apo-forms. Protonated imidazole groups quench the fluorescence of neighbouring exited indole rings, probably by charge-transfer complex formation. PMID:8670098

  6. Studies of mice with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) defects reveal the critical role of PKA's catalytic subunits in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, George; Keil, Margaret F; Naved, Bilal; Liu, Sophie; Starost, Matthew F; Nesterova, Maria; Gokarn, Nirmal; Batistatos, Anna; Wu, T John; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is critically involved in the regulation of behavioral responses. Previous studies showed that PKA's main regulatory subunit, R1α, is involved in anxiety-like behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine how the catalytic subunit, Cα, might affect R1α's function and determine its effects on anxiety-related behaviors. The marble bury (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests were used to assess anxiety-like behavior and the hotplate test to assess nociception in wild type (WT) mouse, a Prkar1a heterozygote (Prkar1a(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the regulatory subunit (R1α), a Prkaca heterozygote (Prkaca(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the catalytic subunit (Cα), and a double heterozygote mouse (Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-)) with haploinsufficiency for both R1α and Cα. We then examined specific brain nuclei involved in anxiety. Results of MB test showed a genotype effect, with increased anxiety-like behavior in Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) compared to WT mice. In the EPM, Prkar1a(+/-) spent significantly less time in the open arms, while Prkaca(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice displayed less exploratory behavior compared to WT mice. The loss of one Prkar1a allele was associated with a significant increase in PKA activity in the basolateral (BLA) and central (CeA) amygdala and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) in both Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice. Alterations of PKA activity induced by haploinsufficiency of its main regulatory or most important catalytic subunits result in anxiety-like behaviors. The BLA, CeA, and VMH are implicated in mediating these PKA effects in brain. PMID:26992826

  7. Haploinsufficiency for either one of the type-II regulatory subunits of protein kinase A improves the bone phenotype of Prkar1a+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sisi; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Mertz, Edward L; Tsang, Kitman; Starost, Matthew F; Salpea, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R; Szarek, Eva; Nesterova, Maria; Leikin, Sergey; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-11-01

    Carney Complex (CNC), a human genetic syndrome predisposing to multiple neoplasias, is associated with bone lesions such as osteochondromyxomas (OMX). The most frequent cause for CNC is PRKAR1A deficiency; PRKAR1A codes for type-I regulatory subunit of protein kinase A (PKA). Prkar1a(+/-) mice developed OMX, fibrous dysplasia-like lesions (FDL) and other tumors. Tumor tissues in these animals had increased PKA activity due to an unregulated PKA catalytic subunit and increased PKA type II (PKA-II) activity mediated by the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B subunits. To better understand the effect of altered PKA activity on bone, we studied Prkar2a and Prkar2b knock out (KO) and heterozygous mice; none of these mice developed bone lesions. When Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar2b(+/-) mice were used to generate Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) animals, bone lesions formed that looked like those of the Prkar1a(+/-) mice. However, better overall bone organization and mineralization and fewer FDL lesions were found in both double heterozygote groups, indicating a partial restoration of the immature bone structure observed in Prkar1a(+/-) mice. Further investigation indicated increased osteogenesis and higher new bone formation rates in both Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)Prkar2b(+/-) mice with some minor differences between them. The observations were confirmed with a variety of markers and studies. PKA activity measurements showed the expected PKA-II decrease in both double heterozygote groups. Thus, haploinsufficiency for either of PKA-II regulatory subunits improved bone phenotype of mice haploinsufficient for Prkar1a, in support of the hypothesis that the PRKAR2A and PRKAR2B regulatory subunits were in part responsible for the bone phenotype of Prkar1a(+/-) mice. PMID:26246497

  8. Specificity protein 4 functionally regulates the transcription of NMDA receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B.

    PubMed

    Priya, Anusha; Johar, Kaid; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2013-12-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are major glutamatergic receptors involved in most excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. The transcriptional regulation of NMDA receptors is not fully understood. Previously, we found that the GluN1 and GluN2B subunits of the NMDA receptor are regulated by nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2). NRF-1 and NRF-2 also regulate all 13 subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), a critical energy-generating enzyme, thereby coupling neuronal activity and energy metabolism at the transcriptional level. Specificity protein (Sp) is a family of transcription factors that bind to GC-rich regions, with Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 all binding to the same cis- motifs. Sp1 and Sp3 are ubiquitously expressed, whereas Sp4 expression is restricted to neurons and testicular cells. Recently, we found that the Sp1 factor regulates all subunits of COX. The goal of the present study was to test our hypothesis that the Sp factors also regulate specific subunits of NMDA receptors, and that they function with NRF-1 and NRF-2 via one of three mechanisms: complementary, concurrent and parallel, or a combination of complementary and concurrent/parallel. By means of multiple approaches we found that Sp4 functionally regulated GluN1, GluN2A, and GluN2B, but not GluN2C. On the other hand, Sp1 and Sp3 did not regulate these subunits as previously thought. Our data suggest that Sp4 operates in a complementary and concurrent/parallel manner with NRF-1 and NRF-2 to mediate the tight coupling between energy metabolism and neuronal activity at the molecular level.

  9. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form.

  10. Protein-Backbone Thermodynamics across the Membrane Interface.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamics of insertion of a protein in a membrane depends on the fine interplay between backbone and side-chain contributions interacting with the lipid environment. Using computer simulations, we probe how different descriptions of the backbone glycyl unit affect the thermodynamics of insertion of individual residues, dipeptides, and entire transmembrane helices. Due to the lack of reference data, we first introduce an efficient methodology to estimate atomistic potential of mean force (PMF) curves from a series of representative and uncorrelated coarse-grained (CG) snapshots. We find strong discrepancies between two CG models, Martini and PLUM, against reference atomistic PMFs and experiments. Atomistic simulations suggest a weak free energy of insertion between water and a POPC membrane for the glycyl unit, in overall agreement with experimental results despite severe assumptions in our calculations. We show that refining the backbone contribution in PLUM significantly improves the PMF of insertion of the WALP16 transmembrane peptide. An improper balance between the glycyl backbone and the attached side chain will lead to energetic artifacts, rationalizing Martini's overstabilization of WALP's adsorbed interfacial state. It illustrates difficulties associated with free-energy-based parametrizations of single-residue models, as the relevant free energy of partitioning used for force-field parametrization does not arise from the entire residue but rather the solvent-accessible chemical groups. PMID:27138459