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Sample records for protein surfaces reveals

  1. Proteomic Analyses Reveal Common Promiscuous Patterns of Cell Surface Proteins on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Sperms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bin; Zhang, Jiarong; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xinzong; Tan, Zhou; Lin, Yuanji; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Liangbiao; Yao, Kangshou; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Background It has long been proposed that early embryos and reproductive organs exhibit similar gene expression profiles. However, whether this similarity is propagated to the protein level remains largely unknown. We have previously characterised the promiscuous expression pattern of cell surface proteins on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. As cell surface proteins also play critical functions in human embryonic stem (hES) cells and germ cells, it is important to reveal whether a promiscuous pattern of cell surface proteins also exists for these cells. Methods and Principal Findings Surface proteins of hES cells and human mature sperms (hSperms) were purified by biotin labelling and subjected to proteomic analyses. More than 1000 transmembrane or secreted cell surface proteins were identified on the two cell types, respectively. Proteins from both cell types covered a large variety of functional categories including signal transduction, adhesion and transporting. Moreover, both cell types promiscuously expressed a wide variety of tissue specific surface proteins, and some surface proteins were heterogeneously expressed. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the promiscuous expression of functional and tissue specific cell surface proteins may be a common pattern in embryonic stem cells and germ cells. The conservation of gene expression patterns between early embryonic cells and reproductive cells is propagated to the protein level. These results have deep implications for the cell surface signature characterisation of pluripotent stem cells and germ cells and may lead the way to a new area of study, i.e., the functional significance of promiscuous gene expression in pluripotent and germ cells. PMID:21559292

  2. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  3. In vivo transcriptome of Plasmodium falciparum reveals overexpression of transcripts that encode surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daily, Johanna P; Le Roch, Karine G; Sarr, Ousmane; Ndiaye, Daouda; Lukens, Amanda; Zhou, Yingyao; Ndir, Omar; Mboup, Soulyemane; Sultan, Ali; Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Wirth, Dyann F

    2005-04-01

    Infections with the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum continue to present a great challenge to global health. Fundamental questions regarding the molecular basis of virulence and immune evasion in P. falciparum have been only partially answered. Because of the parasite's intracellular location and complex life cycle, standard genetic approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of malaria have been limited. The present study presents a novel approach to the identification of the biological processes involved in host-pathogen interactions, one that is based on the analysis of in vivo P. falciparum transcripts. We demonstrate that a sufficient quantity of P. falciparum RNA transcripts can be derived from a small blood sample from infected patients for whole-genome microarray analysis. Overall, excellent correlation was observed between the transcriptomes derived from in vivo samples and in vitro samples with ring-stage P. falciparum 3D7 reference strain. However, gene families that encode surface proteins are overexpressed in vivo. Moreover, this analysis has identified a new family of hypothetical genes that may encode surface variant antigens. Comparative studies of the transcriptomes derived from in vivo samples and in vitro 3D7 samples may identify important strategies used by the pathogen for survival in the human host and highlight, for vaccine development, new candidate antigens that were not previously identified through the use of in vitro cultures.

  4. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein: Protein Redesign to Lower Protein-lignin Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N.; Smith, Matthew D.; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Sammond, Deanne; Whitehead, Timothy A.

    2016-11-07

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue towards energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28 to 0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active

  5. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N; Smith, Matthew D; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sammond, Deanne; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue toward energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28-0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active, low

  6. Revealing the Effect of Protein Weak Adsorption to Nanoparticles on the Interaction between the Desorbed Protein and its Binding Partner by Surface-Enhanced Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zeng, Li; Wu, Lie; Jiang, Xiue

    2017-03-07

    In recent years, the properties of protein corona have attracted intense interest in the field of nanobio interface, but a long-ignored research issue is how the desorbed proteins suffering from conformational change upon weak association with nanoparticles affect their functional properties when further interacting with their downstream protein partners. In this Article, surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry were used to study the adsorption and redox properties of the soluble cytochrome c (cyt c) on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) after weakly binding to and then desorbed from nano-TiO2. For the first time, our study reveals that the weak interaction between cyt c and nano-TiO2 induces the protein to undergo a heterogeneous conformational change. More importantly, the cyt c with a largely unfolded conformation exhibits a weaker interaction with its binding partner mimics than the native-like cyt c but a faster adsorption rate even at a concentration that is much lower than that of native-like cyt c. Correspondingly, the cyt c with a large unfolding shows a greatly positive-shifted formal potential (Ef) relative to the native-like protein possibly due to the disruption of the pocket structure of heme in the vicinity of Met80. These properties could enable the largely unfolded cyt c to undergo a favorable binding but an unavailable electron transfer to cytochrome c oxidase even in the presence of high-concentration native cyt c, probably causing the disruption of electron flow.

  7. The Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein 3β Sequence Reveals Contrasting Parasite Populations in Southern and Northwestern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Kuamsab, Napaporn; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Sirichaisinthop, Jeeraphat; Jongwutiwes, Somchai; Cui, Liwang

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria control efforts have a significant impact on the epidemiology and parasite population dynamics. In countries aiming for malaria elimination, malaria transmission may be restricted to limited transmission hot spots, where parasite populations may be isolated from each other and experience different selection forces. Here we aim to examine the Plasmodium vivax population divergence in geographically isolated transmission zones in Thailand. Methodology We employed the P. vivax merozoite surface protein 3β (PvMSP3β) as a molecular marker for characterizing P. vivax populations based on the extensive diversity of this gene in Southeast Asian parasite populations. To examine two parasite populations with different transmission levels in Thailand, we obtained 45 P. vivax isolates from Tak Province, northwestern Thailand, where the annual parasite incidence (API) was more than 2%, and 28 isolates from Yala and Narathiwat Provinces, southern Thailand, where the API was less than 0.02%. We sequenced the PvMSP3β gene and examined its genetic diversity and molecular evolution between the parasite populations. Principal Findings Of 58 isolates containing single PvMSP3β alleles, 31 sequence types were identified. The overall haplotype diversity was 0.77±0.06 and nucleotide diversity 0.0877±0.0054. The northwestern vivax malaria population exhibited extensive haplotype diversity (HD) of PvMSP3β (HD = 1.0). In contrast, the southern parasite population displayed a single PvMSP3β allele (HD = 0), suggesting a clonal population expansion. This result revealed that the extent of allelic diversity in P. vivax populations in Thailand varies among endemic areas. Conclusion Malaria parasite populations in a given region may vary significantly in genetic diversity, which may be the result of control and influenced by the magnitude of malaria transmission intensity. This is an issue that should be taken into account for the implementation of P. vivax

  8. Genomic and Surface Proteomic Analysis of the Canine Pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Reveals Proteins That Mediate Adherence to the Extracellular Matrix ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bannoehr, Jeanette; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Reglinski, Mark; Inglis, Neil F.; Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Fossum, Even; Smith, David G.; Wilson, Gillian J.; Cartwright, Robyn A.; Haas, Juergen; Hook, Magnus; van den Broek, Adri H. M.; Thoday, Keith L.; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Cell wall-associated (CWA) proteins made by Gram-positive pathogens play a fundamental role in pathogenesis. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major animal pathogen responsible for the canine skin disease bacterial pyoderma. Here, we describe the bioinformatic analysis of the family of 18 predicted CWA proteins encoded in the genome of S. pseudintermedius strain ED99 and determine their distribution among a phylogenetically diverse panel of S. pseudintermedius clinical isolates and closely related species of the Staphylococcus intermedius group. In parallel, we employed a proteomic approach to identify proteins presented on the surface of strain ED99 in vitro, revealing a total of 60 surface-localized proteins in one or more phases of growth, including 6 of the 18 genome-predicted CWA proteins. Based on these analyses, we selected two CWA proteins (SpsD and SpsL) encoded by all strains examined and investigated their capacity to mediate adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. We discovered that SpsD and SpsL mediated binding of a heterologous host, Lactococcus lactis, to fibrinogen and fibronectin and that SpsD mediated binding to cytokeratin 10, a major constituent of mammalian skin. Of note, the interaction with fibrinogen was host-species dependent, suggestive of a role for SpsD and SpsL in the host tropism of S. pseudintermedius. Finally, we identified IgG specific for SpsD and SpsL in sera from dogs with bacterial pyoderma, implying that both proteins are expressed during infection. The combined genomic and proteomic approach employed in the current study has revealed novel host-pathogen interactions which represent candidate therapeutic targets for the control of bacterial pyoderma. PMID:21576333

  9. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  10. Live-cell FRET imaging reveals clustering of the prion protein at the cell surface induced by infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Paulo, Pedro M R; Tavares, Catarina; Lopes, Carlos; Melo, Eduardo P

    2014-07-01

    Prion diseases are associated to the conversion of the prion protein into a misfolded pathological isoform. The mechanism of propagation of protein misfolding by protein templating remains largely unknown. Neuroblastoma cells were transfected with constructs of the prion protein fused to both CFP-GPI-anchored and to YFP-GPI-anchored and directed to its cell membrane location. Live-cell FRET imaging between the prion protein fused to CFP or YFP was measured giving consistent values of 10±2%. This result was confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and indicates intermolecular interactions between neighbor prion proteins. In particular, considering that a maximum FRET efficiency of 17±2% was determined from a positive control consisting of a fusion CFP-YFP-GPI-anchored. A stable cell clone expressing the two fusions containing the prion protein was also selected to minimize cell-to-cell variability. In both, stable and transiently transfected cells, the FRET efficiency consistently increased in the presence of infectious prions - from 4±1% to 7±1% in the stable clone and from 10±2% to 16±1% in transiently transfected cells. These results clearly reflect an increased clustering of the prion protein on the membrane in the presence of infectious prions, which was not observed in negative control using constructs without the prion protein and upon addition of non-infected brain. Our data corroborates the recent view that the primary site for prion conversion is the cell membrane. Since our fluorescent cell clone is not susceptible to propagate infectivity, we hypothesize that the initial event of prion infectivity might be the clustering of the GPI-anchored prion protein.

  11. Surface Relaxation in Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boutet, S.; Robinson, I. K.; Hu, Z. W.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface X-ray diffraction measurements were performed on (111) growth faces of crystals of the Cellular iron-storage protein horse spleen ferritin. Crystal Trunkation Rods (CTR) were measured. A fit of the measured profile of the CTR revealed a surface roughness of 48 +/- 4.5 A and a top layer spacing contraction of 3.9 +/- 1.5%. In addition to the peak from the CTR, the rocking curves of the crystals displayed unexpected extra peaks. Multiple-scattering is demonstrated to account for them. Future applications of the method could allow the exploration of hydration effects on the growth of protein crystals.

  12. Efficient isolation and proteomic analysis of cell plasma membrane proteins in gastric cancer reveal a novel differentiation and progression related cell surface marker, R-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Luo, Qi-Cong; Chen, Jian-Bo; Lin, Li-E; Luo, Ming-Xu; Ren, Hong-Yue; Chen, Pei-Qiong; Shi, Lian-Guo

    2016-09-01

    Cell plasma membrane proteins, playing a crucial role in cell malignant transformation and development, were the main targets of tumor detection and therapy. In this study, CyDye/biotin double-labeling proteomic approach was adopted to profile the membrane proteome of gastric cancer cell line BGC-823 and paired immortalized gastric epithelial cell GES-1. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were used to validate the differential expression of a novel identified cell surface marker R-cadherin in gastric cancer cells and tissues. Clinicopathological study and survival analysis were performed to estimate its roles in tumor progression and outcome prediction. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression level of R-cadherin in gastric cancer were significantly lower than non-cancerous epithelial cell and tissues. Clinicopathological study indicated that R-cadherin was dominantly expressed on cell surface of normal gastric epithelium, and its expression deletion in gastric cancer tissues was associated with tumor site, differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and pTNM (chi-square test, P < 0.05). Those patients with R-cadherin positive expression displayed better overall survivals than negative expression group (log-rank test, P = 0.000). Cox multivariate survival analysis revealed lacking the expression of R-cadherin was a main independent predictor for poor clinical outcome in gastric cancer (RR = 5.680, 95 % CI 2.250-14.341, P < 0.01). We have established a fundamental membrane proteome database for gastric cancer and identified R-cadherin as a tumor differentiation and progression-related cell surface marker of gastric cancer. Lacking the expression of R-cadherin indicates poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer.

  13. Effective charge measurements reveal selective and preferential accumulation of anions, but not cations, at the protein surface in dilute salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gokarn, Yatin R; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Saluja, Atul; Razinkov, Vladimir; Chase, Susan F; Laue, Thomas M; Brems, David N

    2011-01-01

    Specific-ion effects are ubiquitous in nature; however, their underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Although Hofmeister-ion effects on proteins are observed at higher (>0.3M) salt concentrations, in dilute (<0.1M) salt solutions nonspecific electrostatic screening is considered to be dominant. Here, using effective charge (Q*) measurements of hen-egg white lysozyme (HEWL) as a direct and differential measure of ion-association, we experimentally show that anions selectively and preferentially accumulate at the protein surface even at low (<100 mM) salt concentrations. At a given ion normality (50 mN), the HEWL Q* was dependent on anion, but not cation (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, GdnH+, and Ca2+), identity. The Q* decreased in the order F− > Cl− > Br− > NO3− ∼ I− > SCN− > ClO4− ≫ SO42−, demonstrating progressively greater binding of the monovalent anions to HEWL and also show that the SO42− anion, despite being strongly hydrated, interacts directly with the HEWL surface. Under our experimental conditions, we observe a remarkable asymmetry between anions and cations in their interactions with the HEWL surface. PMID:21432935

  14. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  15. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  16. Nanomechanics of Yeast Surfaces Revealed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dague, Etienne; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David

    Despite the large and well-documented characterization of the microbial cell wall in terms of chemical composition, the determination of the mechanical properties of surface molecules in relation to their function remains a key challenge in cell biology.The emergence of powerful tools allowing molecular manipulations has already revolutionized our understanding of the surface properties of fungal cells. At the frontier between nanophysics and molecular biology, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and more specifically single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), has strongly contributed to our current knowledge of the cell wall organization and nanomechanical properties. However, due to the complexity of the technique, measurements on live cells are still at their infancy.In this chapter, we describe the cell wall composition and recapitulate the principles of AFM as well as the main current methodologies used to perform AFM measurements on live cells, including sample immobilization and tip functionalization.The current status of the progress in probing nanomechanics of the yeast surface is illustrated through three recent breakthrough studies. Determination of the cell wall nanostructure and elasticity is presented through two examples: the mechanical response of mannoproteins from brewing yeasts and elasticity measurements on lacking polysaccharide mutant strains. Additionally, an elegant study on force-induced unfolding and clustering of adhesion proteins located at the cell surface is also presented.

  17. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yingang; Song, Xiaxia; Lin, Jinzhong; Xuan, Jinsong; Cui, Qiu; Wang, Jinfeng

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  18. Genetic structure of Plasmodium vivax using the merozoite surface protein 1 icb5-6 fragment reveals new hybrid haplotypes in southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is a protozoan parasite with an extensive worldwide distribution, being highly prevalent in Asia as well as in Mesoamerica and South America. In southern Mexico, P. vivax transmission has been endemic and recent studies suggest that these parasites have unique biological and genetic features. The msp1 gene has shown high rate of nucleotide substitutions, deletions, insertions, and its mosaic structure reveals frequent events of recombination, maybe between highly divergent parasite isolates. Methods The nucleotide sequence variation in the polymorphic icb5-6 fragment of the msp1 gene of Mexican and worldwide isolates was analysed. To understand how genotype diversity arises, disperses and persists in Mexico, the genetic structure and genealogical relationships of local isolates were examined. To identify new sequence hybrids and their evolutionary relationships with other P. vivax isolates circulating worldwide two haplotype networks were constructed questioning that two portions of the icb5-6 have different evolutionary history. Results Twelve new msp1 icb5-6 haplotypes of P. vivax from Mexico were identified. These nucleotide sequences show mosaic structure comprising three partially conserved and two variable subfragments and resulted into five different sequence types. The variable subfragment sV1 has undergone recombination events and resulted in hybrid sequences and the haplotype network allocated the Mexican haplotypes to three lineages, corresponding to the Sal I and Belem types, and other more divergent group. In contrast, the network from icb5-6 fragment but not sV1 revealed that the Mexican haplotypes belong to two separate lineages, none of which are closely related to Sal I or Belem sequences. Conclusions These results suggest that the new hybrid haplotypes from southern Mexico were the result of at least three different recombination events. These rearrangements likely resulted from the recombination between haplotypes of

  19. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    ScienceCinema

    Greg Hura

    2016-07-12

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  20. Protein Structures Revealed at Record Pace

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Hura

    2009-07-09

    The structure of a protein in days -- not months or years -- ushers in a new era in genomics research. Berkeley Lab scientists have developed a high-throughput protein pipeline that could expedite the development of biofuels and elucidate how proteins carry out lifes vital functions.

  1. Nanoscopy Reveals Surface-Metallic Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Yohannes

    Nanolayer and two-dimensional (2D) materials............. 1 such as graphene... 2,3 , boron nitride... 1,4 , transition metal dichalcogenides... 1 , 5 - 8 (TMDCs), and black phosphorus (BP)... 1 , 9 - 13 have intriguing fundamental physical properties and bear promise of important applications in electronics and optics... 9 , 14 , 15 . Of them, BP... 11 , 12 , 16 is a novel layered material that has been theoretically predicted... 10 to acquire plasmonic behavior for frequencies below ~0.4 eV when highly doped. The electronic properties of BP are unique due to its anisotropic structure . Advantages of BP as a material for nanoelectronics and nanooptics are due to the fact that, in contrast to metals, the free carrier density in it can be dynamically controlled by chemical or electrostatic gating, which has been demonstrated by its use in field-effect transistors.... 9 , 14 , 15 Despite all the interest that BP attracts, near-field and plasmonic properties of BP have not yet been investigated experimentally. Here we report the first observation of nanoscopic near-field properties of BP. We have discovered near-field patterns of outside bright fringes and high surface polarizability of nanofilm BP consistent with its surface-metallic, plasmonic behavior at mid-infrared (mid-IR) frequencies below critical frequency ωm ~ 1176 cm -1 . This has allowed us to estimate plasma frequency ωp ~ 0 . 4 eV, carrier density n ~ 1 . 1 × 1011 nm-1 and the thickness of the surface metallic layer of ~ 1 nm . We have also observed similar behavior in other nanolayer semiconductors such as TMDC MoS 2 and topological insulator Bi 2 Te 3 but not in insulators such as boron nitride. This new phenomenon is attributed to surface band-bending and charging of the semiconductor nanofilms. The surface plasmonic behavior has been found for 10-40 nm BP thickness but absent for 4 nm BP thickness. This discovery opens up a new field of research and potential applications in nanoelectronics

  2. Dawn at Ceres reveals an ammoniated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, Carle M.; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Raponi, Andrea; Combe, Jean-Philippe; McCord, Thomas B.; McSween, Harry; McFadden, Lucy A.; Marchi, Simone; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Capria, Maria Teresa; Carrozzo, Giacomo; Ciarniello, Mauro; Longobardo, Andrea; Fonte, Sergio; Formisano, Michelangelo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Giardino, Marco; Magni, Gianfranco; Palomba, Enersto; Tosi, Federico; Turrini, Diego; Zambon, Francesca; Jaumann, Ralf; Feldman, William; Prettyman, Thomas; Toplis, Michael; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-11-01

    The Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) on board the Dawn spacecraft has observed Ceres’ surface and acquired spectra (0.5 to 5 µm) since January 2015. Here we report the average Ceres spectrum, including the important spectral range (2.6-2.9 µm) previously precluded from (telescopic) measurements due to telluric atmospheric absorptions. The VIR data confirm that the surface is very dark with an average albedo of 0.090 ±0.006 at 0.55 µm, consistent with Hubble Space Telescope data (Li et al., Icarus, 2006) and contains no prominent absorption features in the visible and near-Infrared at wavelengths less than 2.5 µm. Ceres’ average spectrum, however, is characterized by a prominent diagnostic absorption band at 2.7 µm along with weaker absorption bands observed between 3.05-3.1, 3.3-3.4 and 3.9-4 µm. We modeled the new VIR spectra of Ceres with various ices, meteorites, silicates, carbonates, and hydrates using Hapke theory. Results of the spectral modeling indicate that extensive water ice is not present in spectra representing the typical surface acquired to date at relatively low spatial resolution (<11 km/pixel). The best fit is obtained with a mixture of ammoniated phyllosilicates mixed with other clays, Mg-carbonates, serpentine, and a strongly absorbing material, such as magnetite (De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2015, in review). The presence of ammonia-bearing materials in the crust across much of the surface has implications for the origin of Ceres and its internal structure and evolution. At the time of this presentation the Dawn spacecraft will have also completed its high altitude mapping orbit to look for anticipated small-scale mineralogy variations across this remarkable dwarf planet.Acknowledgements: VIR is funded by the Italian Space Agency-ASI and was developed under the leadership of INAF, Rome-Italy. The instrument was built by Selex-Galileo, Florence-Italy. The analyses are supported by ASI, NASA, and the German Space Agency

  3. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  4. Surface manipulation of protein filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreplak, Laurent; Staple, Douglas; Loparic, Marko; Kreuzer, Hans-Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Within mammalian tissues, cells move by actively remodeling a dense network of collagen fibrils. In order to study this situation, we analyze the force response of two types of filamentous protein structures, desmin intermediate filaments 12 nm in diameter and collagen fibrils 80 nm in diameter. Both types of filaments were adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface and locally moved with an AFM tip at constant velocity against surface friction in the interfacial plane. In the case of collagen fibrils, that have an extensibility below 30% extension, we observed that microns long fibrils could be moved by the tip and deformed into shapes that could not be explain by the linear elastic theory for a stiff rod. In the case of desmin filaments that can be stretched up to 3.5 times there length, we observed local stretching of the filaments and discreet steps in the torsional force measured with the cantilever. In order to describe both types of filaments' behaviors, we described the protein filaments as a chain of beads of mass m linked together by a mass-less polymer linker. By solving the Newtonian equations of motions for the coupled beads in the presence of a point load and a viscous drag due to the surface-filament interactions we were able to reproduced our experimental data and extract information on friction.

  5. Deciphering fine molecular details of proteins' structure and function with a Protein Surface Topography (PST) method.

    PubMed

    Koromyslova, Anna D; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G

    2014-04-28

    Molecular surfaces are the key players in biomolecular recognition and interactions. Nowadays, it is trivial to visualize a molecular surface and surface-distributed properties in three-dimensional space. However, such a representation trends to be biased and ambiguous in case of thorough analysis. We present a new method to create 2D spherical projection maps of entire protein surfaces and manipulate with them--protein surface topography (PST). It permits visualization and thoughtful analysis of surface properties. PST helps to easily portray conformational transitions, analyze proteins' properties and their dynamic behavior, improve docking performance, and reveal common patterns and dissimilarities in molecular surfaces of related bioactive peptides. This paper describes basic usage of PST with an example of small G-proteins conformational transitions, mapping of caspase-1 intersubunit interface, and intrinsic "complementarity" in the conotoxin-acetylcholine binding protein complex. We suggest that PST is a beneficial approach for structure-function studies of bioactive peptides and small proteins.

  6. Fate of surface proteins of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes during phagocytosis. I. Identification of surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    To study the fate of external membrane proteins during phagocytosis, rabbit peritoneal neutrophils were labeled by enzymatic iodination. Iodine was incorporated into at least 13 proteins ranging in size from approximately 250,000 to 18,000 daltons as judged from autoradiography of gels after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of labeled cells. The major contractile proteins of neutrophils, actin and myosin, were not labeled when intact cells were iodinated but were labeled when homogenates of these cells were iodinated. Nine of the iodinated proteins were released by mild protease treatment of intact cells. A plasma membrane-rich fraction was isolated by density centrifugation. This fraction was enriched at least 10-fold for lactoperoxidase-labeled acid-insoluble proteins. It was enriched to the same extent for the presence of iodinated wheat germ agglutinin that had been bound to intact cells at 4 degrees C before homogenization. Analysis of SDS- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteins of this fraction were predominantly of high molecular weight. However, only 8 of the 13 proteins iodinated on intact cells were found in this fraction. The remaining five were enriched in a dense fraction containing nuclei, intact cells, and membranous vesicles, and may represent a specialized segment of the neutrophil cell surface. PMID:479301

  7. Hydration dynamics at fluorinated protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Othon, Christina M; Van Deventer, James A; Tirrell, David A; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2010-10-05

    Water-protein interactions dictate many processes crucial to protein function including folding, dynamics, interactions with other biomolecules, and enzymatic catalysis. Here we examine the effect of surface fluorination on water-protein interactions. Modification of designed coiled-coil proteins by incorporation of 5,5,5-trifluoroleucine or (4S)-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid enables systematic examination of the effects of side-chain volume and fluorination on solvation dynamics. Using ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy, we find that fluorinated side chains exert electrostatic drag on neighboring water molecules, slowing water motion at the protein surface.

  8. Hydration dynamics at fluorinated protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Othon, Christina M.; Van Deventer, James A.; Tirrell, David A.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    Water-protein interactions dictate many processes crucial to protein function including folding, dynamics, interactions with other biomolecules, and enzymatic catalysis. Here we examine the effect of surface fluorination on water-protein interactions. Modification of designed coiled-coil proteins by incorporation of 5,5,5-trifluoroleucine or (4S)-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid enables systematic examination of the effects of side-chain volume and fluorination on solvation dynamics. Using ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy, we find that fluorinated side chains exert electrostatic drag on neighboring water molecules, slowing water motion at the protein surface. PMID:20855583

  9. cDNA cloning reveals the molecular structure of a sperm surface protein, PH-20, involved in sperm-egg adhesion and the wide distribution of its gene among mammals

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida in mammals is a cell-cell adhesion process that is generally species specific. The guinea pig sperm protein PH-20 has a required function in sperm adhesion to the zona pellucida of guinea pig eggs. PH-20 is located on both the sperm plasma membrane and acrosomal membrane. We report here the isolation and sequence of a full-length cDNA for PH-20 (available from EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ under accession number X56332). The derived amino acid sequence shows a mature protein of 468 amino acids containing six N-linked glycosylation sites and twelve cysteines, eight of which are tightly clustered near the COOH terminus. The sequence indicates PH-20 is a novel protein with no relationship to the mouse sperm adhesion protein galactosyl transferase and no significant homology with other known proteins. The two PH-20 populations, plasma membrane and acrosomal membrane, could arise because one form of PH-20 is encoded and differentially targeted at different spermatogenic stages. Alternatively, two different forms of PH-20 could be encoded. Our evidence thus far reveals only one sequence coding for PH-20: Southern blots of guinea pig genomic DNA indicated there is a single PH-20 gene, Northern blots showed a single size PH-20 message (approximately 2.2 kb), and no sequence variants were found among the sequenced cDNA clones. Cross-species Southern blots reveal the presence of a homologue of the PH-20 gene in mouse, rat, hamster, rabbit, bovine, monkey, and human genomic DNA, showing the PH-20 gene is conserved among mammals. Since genes for zona glycoproteins are also conserved among mammals, the general features of sperm and zona proteins involved in mammalian sperm-egg adhesion may have been evolutionarily maintained. Species specificity may result from limited changes in these molecules, either in their binding domains or in other regions that affect the ability of the binding domains to interact. PMID:2269661

  10. Protein-RNA networks revealed through covalent RNA marks

    PubMed Central

    Lapointe, Christopher P.; Wilinski, Daniel; Saunders, Harriet A. J.; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-RNA networks are ubiquitous and central in biological control. We present an approach, termed “RNA Tagging,” that identifies protein-RNA interactions in vivo by analyzing purified cellular RNA, without protein purification or crosslinking. An RNA-binding protein of interest is fused to an enzyme that adds uridines to the end of RNA. RNA targets bound by the chimeric protein in vivo are covalently marked with uridines and subsequently identified from extracted RNA using high-throughput sequencing. We used this approach to identify hundreds of RNAs bound by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PUF protein, Puf3p. The method revealed that while RNA-binding proteins productively bind specific RNAs to control their function, they also “sample” RNAs without exerting a regulatory effect. We exploited the method to uncover hundreds of new and likely regulated targets for a protein without canonical RNA-binding domains, Bfr1p. The RNA Tagging approach is well-suited to detect and analyze protein-RNA networks in vivo. PMID:26524240

  11. Adhesion of mussel foot proteins to different substrate surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qingye; Danner, Eric; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Mussel foot proteins (mfps) have been investigated as a source of inspiration for the design of underwater coatings and adhesives. Recent analysis of various mfps by a surface forces apparatus (SFA) revealed that mfp-1 functions as a coating, whereas mfp-3 and mfp-5 resemble adhesive primers on mica surfaces. To further refine and elaborate the surface properties of mfps, the force–distance profiles of the interactions between thin mfp (i.e. mfp-1, mfp-3 or mfp-5) films and four different surface chemistries, namely mica, silicon dioxide, polymethylmethacrylate and polystyrene, were measured by an SFA. The results indicate that the adhesion was exquisitely dependent on the mfp tested, the substrate surface chemistry and the contact time. Such studies are essential for understanding the adhesive versatility of mfps and related/similar adhesion proteins, and for translating this versatility into a new generation of coatings and (including in vivo) adhesive materials. PMID:23173195

  12. Proteomics Reveals Novel Drosophila Seminal Fluid Proteins Transferred at Mating

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Geoffrey D; Yi, Xianhua; MacCoss, Michael J; Swanson, Willie J

    2008-01-01

    Across diverse taxa, seminal fluid proteins (Sfps) transferred at mating affect the reproductive success of both sexes. Such reproductive proteins often evolve under positive selection between species; because of this rapid divergence, Sfps are hypothesized to play a role in speciation by contributing to reproductive isolation between populations. In Drosophila, individual Sfps have been characterized and are known to alter male sperm competitive ability and female post-mating behavior, but a proteomic-scale view of the transferred Sfps has been missing. Here we describe a novel proteomic method that uses whole-organism isotopic labeling to detect transferred Sfps in mated female D. melanogaster. We identified 63 proteins, which were previously unknown to function in reproduction, and confirmed the transfer of dozens of predicted Sfps. Relative quantification of protein abundance revealed that several of these novel Sfps are abundant in seminal fluid. Positive selection and tandem gene duplication are the prevailing forces of Sfp evolution, and comparative proteomics with additional species revealed lineage-specific changes in seminal fluid content. We also report a proteomic-based gene discovery method that uncovered 19 previously unannotated genes in D. melanogaster. Our results demonstrate an experimental method to identify transferred proteins in any system that is amenable to isotopic labeling, and they underscore the power of combining proteomic and evolutionary analyses to shed light on the complex process of Drosophila reproduction. PMID:18666829

  13. Protein tagging reveals new insights into signaling in flagella.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2014-03-03

    In this issue, Oda et al. (2014. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201312014) use mutant analysis, protein tagging, and cryoelectron tomography to determine the detailed location of components in flagellar radial spokes-a complex of proteins that connect the peripheral microtubule doublets to the central pair. Remarkably, this approach revealed an interaction between radial spokes and the central pair based on geometry rather than a specific signaling mechanism, highlighting the importance of studying a system in three dimensions.

  14. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  15. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P.; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future. PMID:27311714

  16. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future.

  17. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic.

  18. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa; Freeman, Colin L; Woolley, Jos; Crisp, Molly K; Wilson, Julie; Fotakis, Anna; Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M; Rakownikow Jersie-Christensen, Rosa; Olsen, Jesper V; Haile, James; Thomas, Jessica; Marean, Curtis W; Parkington, John; Presslee, Samantha; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Ditchfield, Peter; Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Ward, Martyn W; Wang, Chunting Michelle; Shaw, Marvin D; Harrison, Terry; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; MacPhee, Ross DE; Kwekason, Amandus; Ecker, Michaela; Kolska Horwitz, Liora; Chazan, Michael; Kröger, Roland; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Harding, John H; Cappellini, Enrico; Penkman, Kirsty; Collins, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laetoli (3.8 Ma) and Olduvai Gorge (1.3 Ma) in Tanzania. By tracking protein diagenesis back in time we find consistent patterns of preservation, demonstrating authenticity of the surviving sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of struthiocalcin-1 and -2, the dominant proteins within the eggshell, reveal that distinct domains bind to the mineral surface. It is the domain with the strongest calculated binding energy to the calcite surface that is selectively preserved. Thermal age calculations demonstrate that the Laetoli and Olduvai peptides are 50 times older than any previously authenticated sequence (equivalent to ~16 Ma at a constant 10°C). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17092.001 PMID:27668515

  19. Membrane protein properties revealed through data-rich electrostatics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Grabe, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The electrostatic properties of membrane proteins often reveal many of their key biophysical characteristics, such as ion channel selectivity and the stability of charged membrane-spanning segments. The Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation is the gold standard for calculating protein electrostatics, and the software APBSmem enables the solution of the PB equation in the presence of a membrane. Here, we describe significant advances to APBSmem including: full automation of system setup, per-residue energy decomposition, incorporation of PDB2PQR, calculation of membrane induced pKa shifts, calculation of non-polar energies, and command-line scripting for large scale calculations. We highlight these new features with calculations carried out on a number of membrane proteins, including the recently solved structure of the ion channel TRPV1 and a large survey of 1,614 membrane proteins of known structure. This survey provides a comprehensive list of residues with large electrostatic penalties for being embedded in the membrane potentially revealing interesting functional information. PMID:26118532

  20. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  1. Function of the hydration layer around an antifreeze protein revealed by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nutt, David; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the mechanism by which the antifreeze protein from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana, binds to ice. Comparison of structural and dynamic properties of the water around the three faces of the triangular prism-shaped protein in aqueous solution reveals that at low temperature the water structure is ordered and the dynamics slowed down around the ice-binding face of the protein, with a disordering effect observed around the other two faces. These results suggest a dual role for the solvation water around the protein. The preconfigured solvation shell around the ice-binding face is involved in the initial recognition and binding of the antifreeze protein to ice by lowering the barrier for binding and consolidation of the protein:ice interaction surface. Thus, the antifreeze protein can bind to the molecularly rough ice surface by becoming actively involved in the formation of its own binding site. Also, the disruption of water structure around the rest of the protein helps prevent the adsorbed protein becoming covered by further ice growth.

  2. Profiling of urinary proteins in Karan Fries cows reveals more than 1550 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bathla, Shveta; Rawat, Preeti; Baithalu, Rubina; Yadav, Munna Lal; Naru, Jasmine; Tiwari, Anurag; Kumar, Sudarshan; Balhara, Ashok K; Singh, Surender; Chaudhary, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Lotfan, Masoud; Behare, Pradip; Phulia, Sushil K; Mohanty, Tushar K; Kaushik, Jai K; Nallapeta, Shivramaiah; Singh, Inderjeet; Ambatipudi, Srinivas K; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2015-09-08

    Urine is a non-invasive source of biological fluid, which reflects the physiological status of the mammals. We have profiled the cow urinary proteome and analyzed its functional significance. The urine collected from three healthy cows was concentrated by diafiltration (DF) followed by protein extraction using three methods, namely methanol, acetone, and ammonium sulphate (AS) precipitation and Proteo Spin urine concentration kit (PS). The quality of the protein was assessed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). In-gel digestion method revealed more proteins (1191) in comparison to in-solution digestion method (541). Collectively, 938, 606 and 444 proteins were identified in LC-MS/MS after in-gel and in-solution tryptic digestion of proteins prepared by AS, PS and DF methods, respectively resulting in identification of a total of 1564 proteins. Gene ontology (GO) using Panther7.0 grouped the majority of the proteins into cytoplasmic (location), catalytic activity (function), and metabolism (biological processes), while Cytoscape grouped proteins into complement and coagulation cascades; protease inhibitor activity and wound healing. Functional significance of few selected proteins seems to play important role in their physiology. Comparative analysis with human urine revealed 315 overlapping proteins. This study reports for the first time evidence of more than 1550 proteins in urine of healthy cow donors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  3. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, Claudio; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifies patches of surface residues that, when mapped on the structure of their respective complexes, reveal regions of residue-pair couplings that extend across the binding interfaces, forming continuous motifs. An enhanced effect is visible across the proteins of the dataset forming larger quaternary assemblies. The method indicates the presence of energetic signatures in the isolated proteins that are retained in the bound form, which we hypothesize to determine binding orientation upon complex formation. We propose our method, BLUEPRINT, as a complement to different approaches ranging from the ab-initio characterization of PPIs, to protein-protein docking algorithms, for the physico-chemical and functional investigation of protein-protein interactions.

  4. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J.; ...

    2015-03-23

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm formore » cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. Finally, it will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role

  5. Structure of mega-hemocyanin reveals protein origami in snails.

    PubMed

    Gatsogiannis, Christos; Hofnagel, Oliver; Markl, Jürgen; Raunser, Stefan

    2015-01-06

    Mega-hemocyanin is a 13.5 MDa oxygen transporter found in the hemolymph of some snails. Similar to typical gastropod hemocyanins, it is composed of 400 kDa building blocks but has additional 550 kDa subunits. Together, they form a large, completely filled cylinder. The structural basis for this highly complex protein packing is not known so far. Here, we report the electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) structure of mega-hemocyanin complexes from two different snail species. The structures reveal that mega-hemocyanin is composed of flexible building blocks that differ in their conformation, but not in their primary structure. Like a protein origami, these flexible blocks are optimally packed, implementing different local symmetries and pseudosymmetries. A comparison between the two structures suggests a surprisingly simple evolutionary mechanism leading to these large oxygen transporters.

  6. Structure and sequence analyses of Bacteroides proteins BVU_4064 and BF1687 reveal presence of two novel predominantly-beta domains, predicted to be involved in lipid and cell surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Natarajan, Padmaja; Punta, Marco; Kumar, Abhinav; ...

    2015-01-16

    N-terminal domains of BVU_4064 and BF1687 proteins from Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides fragilis respectively are members of the Pfam family PF12985 (DUF3869). Proteins containing a domain from this family can be found in most Bacteroides species and, in large numbers, in all human gut microbiome samples. Both BVU_4064 and BF1687 proteins have a consensus lipobox motif implying they are anchored to the membrane, but their functions are otherwise unknown. The C-terminal half of BVU_4064 is assigned to protein family PF12986 (DUF3870); the equivalent part of BF1687 was unclassified.

  7. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    PubMed

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  8. Surface-Based Protein Binding Pocket Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E.; Jain, Ajay N.

    2011-01-01

    Protein similarity comparisons may be made on a local or global basis and may consider sequence information or differing levels of structural information. We present a local 3D method that compares protein binding site surfaces in full atomic detail. The approach is based on the morphological similarity method which has been widely applied for global comparison of small molecules. We apply the method to all-by-all comparisons two sets of human protein kinases, a very diverse set of ATP-bound proteins from multiple species, and three heterogeneous benchmark protein binding site data sets. Cases of disagreement between sequence-based similarity and binding site similarity yield informative examples. Where sequence similarity is very low, high pocket similarity can reliably identify important binding motifs. Where sequence similarity is very high, significant differences in pocket similarity are related to ligand binding specificity and similarity. Local protein binding pocket similarity provides qualitatively complementary information to other approaches, and it can yield quantitative information in support of functional annotation. PMID:21769944

  9. Organising Atoms, Clusters and Proteins on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2008-10-01

    This talk will discuss new developments in the creation of nanoscale surface features and their applications in biomedicine. Electron-surface interactions and plasma methods play a crucial role in both the production and analysis of these ``atomic architectures.'' At the extreme limit, electron injection from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) enables bond-selective manipulation of individual polyatomic molecules [1]. On a more practical level, the controlled deposition of size-selected clusters [2], generated by magnetron sputtering and gas condensation followed by mass selection, represents a surprisingly efficient route to the fabrication of surface features of size 1-10 nm, the size scale of biological molecules such as proteins. STM and AFM measurements show the clusters can act as binding sites for individual protein molecules. For example, the pinning of size-selected AuN clusters (N = 1--2000) to the (hydrophobic) graphite surface presents bindings site for sulphur atoms and thus for the cysteine residues in protein molecules. Systematic studies of different proteins [3] provide ``ground rules'' for residue-specific protein immobilisation by clusters and have led to the development of a novel biochip for protein screening by a spin-off company. The 3D atomic structure of the clusters is highly relevant to such applications. We show that measurement of the scattered electron beam intensity - specifically, the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) signal - in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) allows us (a) to count the number of atoms in a cluster on the surface and (b) to determine a 3D atom-density map of the cluster when an aberration-corrected STEM is used [4]. 1. P.A. Sloan and R.E. Palmer, Nature 434 367 (2005). 2. S. Pratontep, P. Preece, C. Xirouchaki, R.E. Palmer, C.F. Sanz-Navarro, S.D. Kenny and R. Smith, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 055503 (2003). 3. R.E. Palmer, S. Pratontep and H.-G. Boyen, Nature Materials 2 443 (2003

  10. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Fetterer, R; Miska, K; Tuo, W; Kwok, O; Dubey, J P

    2015-07-30

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immune-mapped protein 1 (IMP1) that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transcription levels at 6-12h of sporulation with a considerable downregulation thereafter. Alignment of IMP1 coding sequence from Houghton, Weybridge, and APU-1 strains of E. maxima revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms that in some instances led to amino acid changes in the encoded protein sequence. The E. maxima (APU-1) IMP1 cDNA sequence was cloned and expressed in 2 different polyHis Escherichia coli expression vectors. Regardless of expression vector, recombinant E. maxima IMP1 (rEmaxIMP1) was fairly unstable in non-denaturing buffer, which is consistent with stability analysis of the primary amino acid sequence. Antisera specific for rEmaxIMP1 identified a single 72 kDa protein or a 61 kDa protein by non-reducing or reducing SDS-PAGE/immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence staining with anti-rEmaxIMP1, revealed intense surface staining of E. maxima sporozoites, with negligible staining of merozoite stages. Immuno-histochemical staining of E. maxima-infected chicken intestinal tissue revealed staining of E. maxima developmental stages in the lamnia propia and crypts at both 24 and 48 h post-infection, and negligible staining thereafter. The expression of IMP1 during early stages of in vivo development and its location on the sporozoite surface may explain in part the immunoprotective effect of this protein against E. maxima infection.

  11. Global transcriptional analysis reveals surface remodeling of Anaplasma marginale in the tick vector

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens dependent upon vectors for transmission to new hosts undergo environment specific changes in gene transcription dependent on whether they are replicating in the vector or the mammalian host. Differential gene transcription, especially of potential vaccine candidates, is of interest in Anaplasma marginale, the tick-borne causative agent of bovine anaplasmosis. Methods RNA-seq technology allowed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional status of A. marginale genes in two conditions: bovine host blood and tick derived cell culture, a model for the tick vector. Quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription of a set of genes in A. marginale infected tick midguts and salivary glands at two time points during the transmission cycle. Results Genes belonging to fourteen pathways or component groups were found to be differentially transcribed in A. marginale in the bovine host versus the tick vector. One of the most significantly altered groups was composed of surface proteins. Of the 56 genes included in the surface protein group, eight were up regulated and 26 were down regulated. The down regulated surface protein encoding genes include several that are well studied due to their immunogenicity and function. Quantitative PCR of a set of genes demonstrated that transcription in tick cell culture most closely approximates transcription in salivary glands of recently infected ticks. Conclusions The ISE6 tick cell culture line is an acceptable model for early infection in tick salivary glands, and reveals disproportionate down regulation of surface protein genes in the tick. Transcriptional profiling in other cell lines may help us simulate additional microenvironments. Understanding vector-specific alteration of gene transcription, especially of surface protein encoding genes, may aid in the development of vaccines or transmission blocking therapies. PMID:24751137

  12. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  13. Cell surface engineering with edible protein nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Drachuk, Irina; Shchepelina, Olga; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-09-23

    Natural protein (silk fibroin) nanoshells are assembled on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells without compromising their viability. The nanoshells facilitate initial protection of the cells and allow them to function in encapsulated state for some time period, afterwards being completely biodegraded and consumed by the cells. In contrast to a traditional methanol treatment, the gentle ionic treatment suggested here stabilizes the shell silk fibroin structure but does not compromise the viability of the cells, as indicated by the fast response of the encapsulated cells, with an immediate activation by the inducer molecules. Extremely high viability rates (up to 97%) and preserved activity of encapsulated cells are facilitated by cytocompatibility of the natural proteins and the formation of highly porous shells in contrast to traditional polyelectrolyte-based materials. Moreover, in a high contrast to traditional synthetic shells, the silk proteins are biodegradable and can be consumed by cells at a later stage of growth, thus releasing the cells from their temporary protective capsules. These on-demand encapsulated cells can be considered a valuable platform for biocompatible and biodegradable cell encapsulation, controlled cell protection in a synthetic environment, transfer to a device environment, and cell implantation followed by biodegradation and consumption of protective protein shells.

  14. Mild Binding of Protein to C2 N Monolayer Reveals Its Suitable Biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoyu; Li, Weifeng; Perez-Aguilar, Jose Manuel; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-03-01

    The development of biocompatible nanomaterials for smart drug delivery and bioimaging has attracted great interest in recent years in biomedical fields. Here, the interaction between the recently reported nitrogenated graphene (C2 N) and a prototypical protein (villin headpiece HP35) utilizing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations is studied. The simulations reveal that HP35 can form a stable binding with the C2 N monolayer. Although the C2 N-HP35 attractive interactions are constantly preserved, the binding strength between C2 N and the protein is mild and does not cause significant distortion in the protein's structural integrity. This intrinsic biofriendly property of native C2 N is distinct from several widely studied nanomaterials, such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, and MoS2 , which can induce severe protein denaturation. Interestingly, once the protein is adsorbed onto C2 N surface, its transverse migration is highly restricted at the binding sites. This restriction is orchestrated by C2 N's periodic porous structure with negatively charged "holes," where the basic residues-such as lysine-can form stable interactions, thus functioning as "anchor points" in confining the protein displacement. It is suggested that the mild, immobilized protein attraction and biofriendly aspects of C2 N would make it a prospective candidate in bio- and medical-related applications.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis B surface protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wei; Yang, Feng-Cai; Lu, Hui-Qiong; Zhang, Jiong-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been widely studied. HBV envelope proteins are important for the structure and life cycle of HBV, and these proteins are useful for judging the natural disease course and guiding treatment. Truncated and mutated preS/S are produced by integrated viral sequences that are defective for replication. The preS/S mutants are considered “precursor lesions” of HCC. Different preS/S mutants induce various mechanisms of tumorigenesis, such as transactivation of transcription factors and an immune inflammatory response, thereby contributing to HCC. The preS2 mutants and type II “Ground Glass” hepatocytes represent novel biomarkers of HBV-associated HCC. The preS mutants may induce the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum stress-dependent and stress-independent pathways. Treatments to inhibit hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and damage secondary to HBsAg or the preS/S mutants include antivirals and antioxidants, such as silymarin, resveratrol, and glycyrrhizin acid. Methods for the prevention and treatment of HCC should be comprehensive. PMID:26877602

  16. A Library of Plasmodium vivax Recombinant Merozoite Proteins Reveals New Vaccine Candidates and Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Jessica B.; Sharma, Sumana; Bartholdson, S. Josefin; Wright, Gavin J.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Rayner, Julian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A vaccine targeting Plasmodium vivax will be an essential component of any comprehensive malaria elimination program, but major gaps in our understanding of P. vivax biology, including the protein-protein interactions that mediate merozoite invasion of reticulocytes, hinder the search for candidate antigens. Only one ligand-receptor interaction has been identified, that between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) and the erythrocyte Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC), and strain-specific immune responses to PvDBP make it a complex vaccine target. To broaden the repertoire of potential P. vivax merozoite-stage vaccine targets, we exploited a recent breakthrough in expressing full-length ectodomains of Plasmodium proteins in a functionally-active form in mammalian cells and initiated a large-scale study of P. vivax merozoite proteins that are potentially involved in reticulocyte binding and invasion. Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 39 P. vivax proteins that are predicted to localize to the merozoite surface or invasive secretory organelles, some of which show homology to P. falciparum vaccine candidates. Of these, we were able to express 37 full-length protein ectodomains in a mammalian expression system, which has been previously used to express P. falciparum invasion ligands such as PfRH5. To establish whether the expressed proteins were correctly folded, we assessed whether they were recognized by antibodies from Cambodian patients with acute vivax malaria. IgG from these samples showed at least a two-fold change in reactivity over naïve controls in 27 of 34 antigens tested, and the majority showed heat-labile IgG immunoreactivity, suggesting the presence of conformation-sensitive epitopes and native tertiary protein structures. Using a method specifically designed to detect low-affinity, extracellular protein-protein interactions, we confirmed a predicted interaction between P. vivax 6-cysteine proteins P12 and P41, further

  17. Predictive approach for protein aggregation: Correlation of protein surface characteristics and conformational flexibility to protein aggregation propensity.

    PubMed

    Galm, Lara; Amrhein, Sven; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-02-08

    The aggregation of proteins became one of the major challenges in the development of biopharmaceu-ticals since the formation of aggregates can affect drug quality and immunogenicity. However, aggregation mechanisms are highly complex and the investigation requires cost, time, and material intensive experi-mental effort. In the present work, the predictive power of protein characteristics for the phase behavior of three different proteins which are very similar in size and structure was studied. In particular, the surface hydrophobicity, zeta potential, and conformational flexibility of human lysozyme, lysozyme from chicken egg white, and α-lactalbumin at pH 3, 5, 7, and 9 were assessed and examined for correlation with experimental stability studies focusing on protein phase behavior induced by sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based study of the conformational flexibility without precipitants was able to identify highly flexible protein regions which could be associated to the less regular secondary structure elements and random coiled and terminal regions in particular. Conformational flex-ibility of the entire protein structure and protein surface hydrophobicity could be correlated to differing aggregation propensities among the studied proteins and could be identified to be applicable for predic-tion of protein phase behavior in aqueous solution without precipitants. For prediction of protein phase behavior and aggregation propensity in aqueous solution with precipitants, protein flexibility was further studied in dependency of salt concentration and species by means of human lysozyme. Even though the results of the salt dependent MD simulations could not be shown to be sufficient for prediction of salt depending phase behavior, this study revealed a more pronounced destabilizing effect of ammonium sulfate in comparison to sodium chloride and thus, was found to be in good agreement with theoretical considerations

  18. Kinetic Measurements Reveal Enhanced Protein-Protein Interactions at Intercellular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Shashikanth, Nitesh; Kisting, Meridith A.; Leckband, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    The binding properties of adhesion proteins are typically quantified from measurements with soluble fragments, under conditions that differ radically from the confined microenvironment of membrane bound proteins in adhesion zones. Using classical cadherin as a model adhesion protein, we tested the postulate that confinement within quasi two-dimensional intercellular gaps exposes weak protein interactions that are not detected in solution binding assays. Micropipette-based measurements of cadherin-mediated, cell-cell binding kinetics identified a unique kinetic signature that reflects both adhesive (trans) bonds between cadherins on opposing cells and lateral (cis) interactions between cadherins on the same cell. In solution, proposed lateral interactions were not detected, even at high cadherin concentrations. Mutations postulated to disrupt lateral cadherin association altered the kinetic signatures, but did not affect the adhesive (trans) binding affinity. Perturbed kinetics further coincided with altered cadherin distributions at junctions, wound healing dynamics, and paracellular permeability. Intercellular binding kinetics thus revealed cadherin interactions that occur within confined, intermembrane gaps but not in solution. Findings further demonstrate the impact of these revealed interactions on the organization and function of intercellular junctions. PMID:27009566

  19. Activation of nanoscale allosteric protein domain motion revealed by neutron spin echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zimei; Farago, Bela; Callaway, David

    2012-02-01

    NHERF1 is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that assembles the signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by a membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 angstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length scales and on sub-microsecond time scales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much simplified coarse-grained model is sufficient to describe inter-domain motion of a multi-domain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. The results demonstrate that propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves the activation of long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond time scales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE.

  20. Revealing the role of oxidation state in interaction between nitro/amino-derived particulate matter and blood proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Ping; Bian, Weiwei; Yu, Jingkai; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    Surface oxidation states of ultrafine particulate matter can influence the proinflammatory responses and reactive oxygen species levels in tissue. Surface active species of vehicle-emission soot can serve as electron transfer-mediators in mitochondrion. Revealing the role of surface oxidation state in particles-proteins interaction will promote the understanding on metabolism and toxicity. Here, the surface oxidation state was modeled by nitro/amino ligands on nanoparticles, the interaction with blood proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis quantitatively. The nitro shown larger affinity than amino. On the other hand, the affinity to hemoglobin is 103 times larger than that to BSA. Further, molecular docking indicated the difference of binding intensity were mainly determined by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. These will deepen the quantitative understanding of protein-nanoparticles interaction from the perspective of surface chemical state. PMID:27181651

  1. Revealing the role of oxidation state in interaction between nitro/amino-derived particulate matter and blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Li, Ping; Bian, Weiwei; Yu, Jingkai; Zhan, Jinhua

    2016-05-01

    Surface oxidation states of ultrafine particulate matter can influence the proinflammatory responses and reactive oxygen species levels in tissue. Surface active species of vehicle-emission soot can serve as electron transfer-mediators in mitochondrion. Revealing the role of surface oxidation state in particles-proteins interaction will promote the understanding on metabolism and toxicity. Here, the surface oxidation state was modeled by nitro/amino ligands on nanoparticles, the interaction with blood proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis quantitatively. The nitro shown larger affinity than amino. On the other hand, the affinity to hemoglobin is 103 times larger than that to BSA. Further, molecular docking indicated the difference of binding intensity were mainly determined by hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bonds. These will deepen the quantitative understanding of protein-nanoparticles interaction from the perspective of surface chemical state.

  2. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  3. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Watson, Eleanor; Sherry, Aileen; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Yaga, Raja; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Everest, Paul; Smith, David G E

    2014-09-01

    Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith-Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  4. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  5. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  6. Identification of pneumococcal surface protein A as a lactoferrin-binding protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, S; Bethe, G; Remane, P H; Chhatwal, G S

    1999-04-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-sequestering glycoprotein, predominates in mucosal secretions, where the level of free extracellular iron (10(-18) M) is not sufficient for bacterial growth. This represents a mechanism of resistance to bacterial infections by prevention of colonization of the host by pathogens. In this study we were able to show that Streptococcus pneumoniae specifically recognizes and binds the iron carrier protein human Lf (hLf). Pretreatment of pneumococci with proteases reduced hLf binding significantly, indicating that the hLf receptor is proteinaceous. Binding assays performed with 63 clinical isolates belonging to different serotypes showed that 88% of the tested isolates interacted with hLf. Scatchard analysis showed the existence of two hLf-binding proteins with dissociation constants of 5.7 x 10(-8) and 2.74 x 10(-7) M. The receptors were purified by affinity chromatography, and internal sequence analysis revealed that one of the S. pneumoniae proteins was homologous to pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA). The function of PspA as an hLf-binding protein was confirmed by the ability of purified PspA to bind hLf and to competitively inhibit hLf binding to pneumococci. S. pneumoniae may use the hLf-PspA interaction to overcome the iron limitation at mucosal surfaces, and this might represent a potential virulence mechanism.

  7. Principles of assembly reveal a periodic table of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Ahnert, Sebastian E; Marsh, Joseph A; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2015-12-11

    Structural insights into protein complexes have had a broad impact on our understanding of biological function and evolution. In this work, we sought a comprehensive understanding of the general principles underlying quaternary structure organization in protein complexes. We first examined the fundamental steps by which protein complexes can assemble, using experimental and structure-based characterization of assembly pathways. Most assembly transitions can be classified into three basic types, which can then be used to exhaustively enumerate a large set of possible quaternary structure topologies. These topologies, which include the vast majority of observed protein complex structures, enable a natural organization of protein complexes into a periodic table. On the basis of this table, we can accurately predict the expected frequencies of quaternary structure topologies, including those not yet observed. These results have important implications for quaternary structure prediction, modeling, and engineering.

  8. Revealing Higher Order Protein Structure Using Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chait, Brian T.; Cadene, Martine; Olinares, Paul Dominic; Rout, Michael P.; Shi, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The development of rapid, sensitive, and accurate mass spectrometric methods for measuring peptides, proteins, and even intact protein assemblies has made mass spectrometry (MS) an extraordinarily enabling tool for structural biology. Here, we provide a personal perspective of the increasingly useful role that mass spectrometric techniques are exerting during the elucidation of higher order protein structures. Areas covered in this brief perspective include MS as an enabling tool for the high resolution structural biologist, for compositional analysis of endogenous protein complexes, for stoichiometry determination, as well as for integrated approaches for the structural elucidation of protein complexes. We conclude with a vision for the future role of MS-based techniques in the development of a multi-scale molecular microscope.

  9. Development, characterization, and optimization of protein level in date bars using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables.

  10. Development, Characterization, and Optimization of Protein Level in Date Bars Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Salim-ur-Rehman; Muhammad Anjum, Faqir; Murtaza, Mian Anjum; Mueen-ud-Din, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to produce a nourishing date bar with commercial value especially for school going children to meet their body development requirements. Protein level of date bars was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Economical and underutilized sources, that is, whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates, were explored for protein supplementation. Fourteen date bar treatments were produced using a central composite design (CCD) with 2 variables and 3 levels for each variable. Date bars were then analyzed for nutritional profile. Proximate composition revealed that addition of whey protein concentrate and vetch protein isolates improved the nutritional profile of date bars. Protein level, texture, and taste were considerably improved by incorporating 6.05% whey protein concentrate and 4.35% vetch protein isolates in date bar without affecting any sensory characteristics during storage. Response surface methodology was observed as an economical and effective tool to optimize the ingredient level and to discriminate the interactive effects of independent variables. PMID:22792044

  11. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  12. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10(-4)) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10(-3)). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10(-8)). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  13. Protein structural ensembles are revealed by redefining X-ray electron density noise

    PubMed Central

    Lang, P. Therese; Holton, James M.; Fraser, James S.; Alber, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To increase the power of X-ray crystallography to determine not only the structures but also the motions of biomolecules, we developed methods to address two classic crystallographic problems: putting electron density maps on the absolute scale of e−/Å3 and calculating the noise at every point in the map. We find that noise varies with position and is often six to eight times lower than thresholds currently used in model building. Analyzing the rescaled electron density maps from 485 representative proteins revealed unmodeled conformations above the estimated noise for 45% of side chains and a previously hidden, low-occupancy inhibitor of HIV capsid protein. Comparing the electron density maps in the free and nucleotide-bound structures of three human protein kinases suggested that substrate binding perturbs distinct intrinsic allosteric networks that link the active site to surfaces that recognize regulatory proteins. These results illustrate general approaches to identify and analyze alternative conformations, low-occupancy small molecules, solvent distributions, communication pathways, and protein motions. PMID:24363322

  14. Network analysis reveals common host protein/s modulating pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sourish; Mukherjee, Sriparna; Sengupta, Nabonita; Roy, Arunava; Dey, Dhritiman; Chakraborty, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Arpan; Basu, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Network analysis through graph theory provides a quantitative approach to characterize specific proteins and their constituent assemblies that underlie host-pathogen interactions. In the present study, graph theory was used to analyze the interactome designed out of 50 differentially expressing proteins from proteomic analysis of Chandipura Virus (CHPV, Family: Rhabdoviridae) infected mouse brain tissue to identify the primary candidates for intervention. Using the measure of degree centrality, that quantifies the connectedness of a single protein within a milieu of several other interacting proteins, DJ-1 was selected for further molecular validation. To elucidate the generality of DJ-1’s role in propagating infection its role was also monitored in another RNA virus, Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, Family: Flaviviridae) infection. Concurrently, DJ-1 got over-expressed in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following viral infection which in the early phase of infection migrated to mitochondria to remove dysfunctional mitochondria through the process of mitophagy. DJ-1 was also observed to modulate the viral replication and interferon responses along with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression in neurons. Collectively these evidences reveal a comprehensive role for DJ-1 in neurotropic virus infection in the brain. PMID:27581498

  15. Ribosomal History Reveals Origins of Modern Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Ajith; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17) and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet) in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world. PMID:22427882

  16. Conformational diversity analysis reveals three functional mechanisms in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, María Silvina

    2017-01-01

    Protein motions are a key feature to understand biological function. Recently, a large-scale analysis of protein conformational diversity showed a positively skewed distribution with a peak at 0.5 Å C-alpha root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD). To understand this distribution in terms of structure-function relationships, we studied a well curated and large dataset of ~5,000 proteins with experimentally determined conformational diversity. We searched for global behaviour patterns studying how structure-based features change among the available conformer population for each protein. This procedure allowed us to describe the RMSD distribution in terms of three main protein classes sharing given properties. The largest of these protein subsets (~60%), which we call “rigid” (average RMSD = 0.83 Å), has no disordered regions, shows low conformational diversity, the largest tunnels and smaller and buried cavities. The two additional subsets contain disordered regions, but with differential sequence composition and behaviour. Partially disordered proteins have on average 67% of their conformers with disordered regions, average RMSD = 1.1 Å, the highest number of hinges and the longest disordered regions. In contrast, malleable proteins have on average only 25% of disordered conformers and average RMSD = 1.3 Å, flexible cavities affected in size by the presence of disordered regions and show the highest diversity of cognate ligands. Proteins in each set are mostly non-homologous to each other, share no given fold class, nor functional similarity but do share features derived from their conformer population. These shared features could represent conformational mechanisms related with biological functions. PMID:28192432

  17. Changes in the starch-protein interface depending on common wheat grain hardness revealed using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chichti, Emna; George, Matthieu; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Lullien-Pellerin, Valérie

    2015-10-01

    The atomic force microscope tip was used to progressively abrade the surface of non-cut starch granules embedded in the endosperm protein matrix in grain sections from wheat near-isogenic lines differing in the puroindoline b gene and thus, hardness. In the hard near-isogenic wheat lines, starch granules exhibited two distinct profiles corresponding either to abrasion in the surrounding protein layer or the starch granule. An additional profile, only identified in soft lines, revealed a marked stop in the abrasion at the protein-starch transition similar to a lipid interface playing a lubricant role. It was related to the presence of both wild-type puroindolines, already suggested to act at the starch-protein interface through their association with polar lipids. This study revealed, for the first time, in situ differences in the nano-mechanical properties at the starch-protein interface in the endosperm of wheat grains depending on the puroindoline allelic status.

  18. Spectroscopy reveals that ethyl esters interact with proteins in wine.

    PubMed

    Di Gaspero, Mattia; Ruzza, Paolo; Hussain, Rohanah; Vincenzi, Simone; Biondi, Barbara; Gazzola, Diana; Siligardi, Giuliano; Curioni, Andrea

    2017-02-15

    Impairment of wine aroma after vinification is frequently associated to bentonite treatments and this can be the result of protein removal, as recently demonstrated for ethyl esters. To evaluate the existence of an interaction between wine proteins and ethyl esters, the effects induced by these fermentative aroma compounds on the secondary structure and stability of VVTL1, a Thaumatin-like protein purified from wine, was analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) spectroscopy. The secondary structure of wine VVTL1 was not strongly affected by the presence of selected ethyl esters. In contrast, VVTL1 stability was slightly increased by the addition of ethyl-octanoate, -decanoate and -dodecanoate, but decreased by ethyl-hexanoate. This indicates the existence of an interaction between VVTL1 and at least some aroma compounds produced during fermentation. The data suggest that proteins removal from wine by bentonite can result in indirect removal of at least some aroma compounds associated with them.

  19. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-02-15

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH2 groups (CONH2-SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH2-SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  20. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  1. Effect of fullerenol surface chemistry on nanoparticle binding-induced protein misfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Slaven; Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Chen, Ran; Salonen, Emppu; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and dynamics of ubiquitin. We found that all derivatives bound to the model protein. Specifically, the more hydrophilic nanoparticles with a higher number of hydroxyl groups bound to the surface of the protein via hydrogen bonds, which stabilized the protein without inducing large conformational changes in the protein structure. In contrast, fullerene derivatives with a smaller number of hydroxyl groups buried their hydrophobic surface inside the protein, thereby causing protein denaturation. Overall, our results revealed a distinct role of surface chemistry on nanoparticle-protein binding and binding-induced protein misfolding.Fullerene and its derivatives with different surface chemistry have great potential in biomedical applications. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the impact of these carbon-based nanoparticles on protein structure, dynamics, and subsequently function. Here, we focused on the effect of hydroxylation -- a common strategy for solubilizing and functionalizing fullerene -- on protein-nanoparticle interactions using a model protein, ubiquitin. We applied a set of complementary computational modeling methods, including docking and molecular dynamics simulations with both explicit and implicit solvent, to illustrate the impact of hydroxylated fullerenes on the structure and

  2. Ultrafast Hydration Dynamics Probed by Tryptophan at Protein Surface and Protein-DNA Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yangzhong

    tightly binds to the DNA with higher fidelity. The interfacial water is about 2 times slower than the surface water. Most importantly, the ultrafast component disappeared for the interfacial water indicating a strongly confined local environment. To further inspect the surface and interfacial water property, we carried out a 4 ns MD simulation, which reveals that all the interfacial water forms only one to two hydration layers from the protein and DNA surface, and no bulk type water was discovered. For both enzymes, the interfacial water is still fluctuating on picoseconds time scales to facilitate their dynamic function including substrate binding, protein sliding on DNA and dNTP sampling. Despite many hydration dynamics were studied at room temperature, some enzymes are optimally functioning at much higher temperature. Dpo4 was originally found on Sulfolobus solfataricus, which grows in volcanic hot springs with temperature around 75-90°C. This inspired us to study its hydration temperature dependence from 1°C to 60°C. Simple Arrhenius equation can fit all the data for each mutant and determine the activation enthalpies ranging from 5 kJ/mol to 15 kJ/mol. We also found a clear correlation between the solvation and tryptophan side chain motion, strongly supporting the coupled motion between water and protein and the famous slaving model.

  3. Quantitative proteomics reveal distinct protein regulations caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within subgingival biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species "subgingival" biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute protein

  4. Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Distinct Protein Regulations Caused by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans within Subgingival Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Kai; Bostanci, Nagihan; Selevsek, Nathalie; Thurnheer, Thomas; Belibasakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an infectious disease that causes the inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting (periodontal) tissues, caused by polymicrobial biofilm communities growing on the tooth surface. Aggressive periodontitis is strongly associated with the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in the subgingival biofilms. Nevertheless, whether and how A. actinomycetemcomitans orchestrates molecular changes within the biofilm is unclear. The aim of this work was to decipher the interactions between A. actinomycetemcomitans and other bacterial species in a multi-species biofilm using proteomic analysis. An in vitro 10-species “subgingival” biofilm model, or its derivative that included additionally A. actinomycetemcomitans, were anaerobically cultivated on hydroxyapatite discs for 64 h. When present, A. actinomycetemcomitans formed dense intra-species clumps within the biofilm mass, and did not affect the numbers of the other species in the biofilm. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteomic content of the biofilm lysate. A total of 3225 and 3352 proteins were identified in the biofilm, in presence or absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. Label-free quantitative proteomics revealed that 483 out of the 728 quantified bacterial proteins (excluding those of A. actinomycetemcomitans) were accordingly regulated. Interestingly, all quantified proteins from Prevotella intermedia were up-regulated, and most quantified proteins from Campylobacter rectus, Streptococcus anginosus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis were down-regulated in presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Enrichment of Gene Ontology pathway analysis showed that the regulated groups of proteins were responsible primarily for changes in the metabolic rate, the ferric iron-binding, and the 5S RNA binding capacities, on the universal biofilm level. While the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans did not affect the numeric composition or absolute

  5. Structure of the Cell Wall Anchor of Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneewind, Olaf; Fowler, Audree; Faull, Kym F.

    1995-04-01

    Many surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and are involved in the pathogenesis of these organisms. A hybrid molecule was designed that, when expressed in Staphylococcus aureus, was anchored to the cell wall and could be released by controlled enzymatic digestion. By a combination of molecular biology and mass spectrometry techniques, the structure of the cell wall anchor of surface proteins in S. aureus was revealed. After cleavage of surface proteins between threonine and glycine of the conserved LPXTG motif, the carboxyl of threonine is amide-linked to the free amino group of the pentaglycine crossbridge in the staphylococcal cell wall.

  6. Yeast mitochondrial protein-protein interactions reveal diverse complexes and disease-relevant functional relationships.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Negroni, Jacopo; Mosca, Roberto; Malty, Ramy; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Freywald, Tanya; Phanse, Sadhna; Xiang, Qian; Freywald, Andrew; Aloy, Patrick; Zhang, Zhaolei; Babu, Mohan

    2015-02-06

    Although detailed, focused, and mechanistic analyses of associations among mitochondrial proteins (MPs) have identified their importance in varied biological processes, a systematic understanding of how MPs function in concert both with one another and with extra-mitochondrial proteins remains incomplete. Consequently, many questions regarding the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human disease remain unanswered. To address this, we compiled all existing mitochondrial physical interaction data for over 1200 experimentally defined yeast MPs and, through bioinformatic analysis, identified hundreds of heteromeric MP complexes having extensive associations both within and outside the mitochondria. We provide support for these complexes through structure prediction analysis, morphological comparisons of deletion strains, and protein co-immunoprecipitation. The integration of these MP complexes with reported genetic interaction data reveals substantial crosstalk between MPs and non-MPs and identifies novel factors in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial organization, membrane structure, and mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. More than one-third of these MP complexes are conserved in humans, with many containing members linked to clinical pathologies, enabling us to identify genes with putative disease function through guilt-by-association. Although still remaining incomplete, existing mitochondrial interaction data suggests that the relevant molecular machinery is modular, yet highly integrated with non-mitochondrial processes.

  7. Differential Labeling of Cell-surface and Internalized Proteins after Antibody Feeding of Live Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Kathryn M.; Kennedy, Matthew J.; Gunnersen, Jenny M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the cell-surface localization of a putative transmembrane receptor in cultured neurons, we labeled the protein on the surface of live neurons with a specific primary antibody raised against an extracellular portion of the protein. Given that receptors are trafficked to and from the surface, if cells are permeabilized after fixation then both cell-surface and internal protein will be detected by the same labeled secondary antibody. Here, we adapted a method used to study protein trafficking (“antibody feeding”) to differentially label protein that had been internalized by endocytosis during the antibody incubation step and protein that either remained on the cell surface or was trafficked to the surface during this period. The ability to distinguish these two pools of protein was made possible through the incorporation of an overnight blocking step with highly-concentrated unlabeled secondary antibody after an initial incubation of unpermeabilized neurons with a fluorescently-labeled secondary antibody. After the blocking step, permeabilization of the neurons allowed detection of the internalized pool with a fluorescent secondary antibody labeled with a different fluorophore. Using this technique we were able to obtain important information about the subcellular location of this putative receptor, revealing that it was, indeed, trafficked to the cell-surface in neurons. This technique is broadly applicable to a range of cell types and cell-surface proteins, providing a suitable antibody to an extracellular epitope is available. PMID:24561550

  8. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  9. Phosphoproteome reveals an atlas of protein signaling networks during osteoblast adhesion.

    PubMed

    Milani, Renato; Ferreira, Carmen V; Granjeiro, José M; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Silva, Rodrigo A; Justo, Giselle Z; Nader, Helena B; Galembeck, Eduardo; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Zambuzzi, Willian F

    2010-04-01

    Cell adhesion on surfaces is a fundamental process in the emerging biomaterials field and developmental events as well. However, the mechanisms regulating this biological process in osteoblasts are not fully understood. Reversible phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases is probably the most important regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes. Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess osteoblast adhesion through a molecular prism under a peptide array technology, revealing essential signaling proteins governing adhesion-related events. First, we showed that there are main morphological changes on osteoblast shape during adhesion up to 3 h. Second, besides classical proteins activated upon integrin activation, our results showed a novel network involving signaling proteins such as Rap1A, PKA, PKC, and GSK3beta during osteoblast adhesion on polystyrene. Third, these proteins were grouped in different signaling cascades including focal adhesion establishment, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and cell-cycle arrest. We have thus provided evidence that a global phosphorylation screening is able to yield a systems-oriented look at osteoblast adhesion, providing new insights for understanding of bone formation and improvement of cell-substratum interactions. Altogether, these statements are necessary means for further intervention and development of new approaches for the progress of tissue engineering.

  10. Adsorption of HP Lattice Proteins on Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Matthew; Shi, Guangjie; Landau, David P.; Li, Ying Wai; Wuest, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The HP lattice model[2] is a course-grained, yet useful tool for modeling protein sequences where amino acids are treated as either hydrophobic (H) or polar (P) monomers. With the use of Wang-Landau sampling and an efficient set of Monte-Carlo moves[3], HP lattice proteins adsorbed on patterned surfaces are studied. Each substrate is modeled as a periodically bounded pattern of lattice sites that interact with either H or P monomers in the lattice protein, where the energy contributions of the surface are determined by assigned coupling strengths. By analyzing energy degeneracies, along with the thermodynamic and structural quantities of the protein, both the protein folding and surface adsorption can be observed. The adsorption behavior of the lattice proteins on patterned surfaces will be compared to those interacting with uniform surfaces. Research supported by NSF.

  11. Protein surface-distribution and protein-protein interactions in the binding of peripheral proteins to charged lipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1995-01-01

    The binding of native cytochrome c to negatively charged lipid dispersions of dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol has been studied over a wide range of ionic strengths. Not only is the strength of protein binding found to decrease rapidly with increasing ionic strength, but also the binding curves reach an apparent saturation level that decreases rapidly with increasing ionic strength. Analysis of the binding isotherms with a general statistical thermodynamic model that takes into account not only the free energy of the electrostatic double layer, but also the free energy of the surface distribution of the protein, demonstrates that the apparent saturation effects could arise from a competition between the out-of-plane binding reaction and the lateral in-plane interactions between proteins at the surface. It is found that association with nonlocalized sites results in binding isotherms that display the apparent saturation effect to a much more pronounced extent than does the Langmuir adsorption isotherm for binding to localized sites. With the model for nonlocalized sites, the binding isotherms of native cytochrome c can be described adequately by taking into account only the entropy of the surface distribution of the protein, without appreciable enthalpic interactions between the bound proteins. The binding of cytochrome c to dioleoyl phosphatidylglycerol dispersions at a temperature at which the bound protein is denatured on the lipid surface, but is nondenatured when free in solution, has also been studied. The binding curves for the surface-denatured protein differ from those for the native protein in that the apparent saturation at high ionic strength is less pronounced. This indicates the tendency of the denatured protein to aggregate on the lipid surface, and can be described by the binding isotherms for nonlocalized sites only if attractive interactions between the surface-bound proteins are included in addition to the distributional entropic terms. Additionally

  12. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  13. Proteomics and glycoproteomics of pluripotent stem-cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are a unique cell type with promising potential in regenerative and personalized medicine. Yet the difficulty to understand and coax their seemingly stochastic differentiation and spontaneous self-renewal have largely limited their clinical applications. A call has been made by numerous researchers for a better characterization of surface proteins on these cells, in search of biomarkers that can dictate developmental stages and lineage specifications, and can help formulate mechanistic insight of stem-cell fate choices. In the past two decades, proteomics has gained significant recognition in profiling surface proteins at high throughput. This review will summarize the impact of these studies on stem-cell biology, and discuss the used proteomic techniques. A systematic comparison of all the techniques and their results is also attempted here to help reveal pros, cons, and the complementarity of the existing methods. This awareness should assist in selecting suitable strategies for stem-cell related research, and shed light on technical improvements that can be explored in the future.

  14. Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging Reveals in Vivo Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher; Stoneman, Michael; Raicu, Valerica; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce the Fully Quantified Spectral Imaging (FSI) method as a new tool to probe the stoichiometry and stability of protein complexes in biological membranes. The FSI method yields two dimensional membrane concentrations and FRET efficiencies in native plasma membranes. It can be used to characterize the association of membrane proteins: to differentiate between monomers, dimers, or oligomers, to produce binding (association) curves, and to measure the free energies of association in the membrane. We use the FSI method to study the lateral interactions of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) superfamily, in plasma membranes, in vivo. The knowledge gained through the use of the new method challenges the current understanding of VEGFR2 signaling. PMID:26787445

  15. What induces pocket openings on protein surface patches involved in protein-protein interactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyrisch, Susanne; Helms, Volkhard

    2009-02-01

    We previously showed for the proteins BCL-XL, IL-2, and MDM2 that transient pockets at their protein-protein binding interfaces can be identified by applying the PASS algorithm to molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots. We now investigated which aspects of the natural conformational dynamics of proteins induce the formation of such pockets. The pocket detection protocol was applied to three different conformational ensembles for the same proteins that were extracted from MD simulations of the inhibitor bound crystal conformation in water and the free crystal/NMR structure in water and in methanol. Additional MD simulations studied the impact of backbone mobility. The more efficient CONCOORD or normal mode analysis (NMA) techniques gave significantly smaller pockets than MD simulations, whereas tCONCOORD generated pockets comparable to those observed in MD simulations for two of the three systems. Our findings emphasize the influence of solvent polarity and backbone rearrangements on the formation of pockets on protein surfaces and should be helpful in future generation of transient pockets as putative ligand binding sites at protein-protein interfaces.

  16. A highly stable nonbiofouling surface with well-packed grafted zwitterionic polysulfobetaine for plasma protein repulsion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yung; Liao, Shih-Chieh; Higuchi, Akon; Ruaan, Ruoh-Chyu; Chu, Chih-Wei; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2008-05-20

    An ideal nonbiofouling surface for biomedical applications requires both high-efficient antifouling characteristics in relation to biological components and long-term material stability from biological systems. In this study we demonstrate the performance and stability of an antifouling surface with grafted zwitterionic sulfobetaine methacrylate (SBMA). The SBMA was grafted from a bromide-covered gold surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization to form well-packed polymer brushes. Plasma protein adsorption on poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) grafted surfaces was measured with a surface plasmon resonance sensor. It is revealed that an excellent stable nonbiofouling surface with grafted polySBMA can be performed with a cycling test of the adsorption of three model proteins in a wide range of various salt types, buffer compositions, solution pH levels, and temperatures. This work also demonstrates the adsorption of plasma proteins and the adhesion of platelets from human blood plasma on the polySBMA grafted surface. It was found that the polySBMA grafted surface effectively reduces the plasma protein adsorption from platelet-poor plasma solution to a level superior to that of adsorption on a surface terminated with tetra(ethylene glycol). The adhesion and activation of platelets from platelet-rich plasma solution were not observed on the polySBMA grafted surface. This work further concludes that a surface with good hemocompatibility can be achieved by the well-packed surface-grafted polySBMA brushes.

  17. GPR37 Surface Expression Enhancement via N-Terminal Truncation or Protein-Protein Interactions1

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Garcia, Erin L.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    GPR37, also known as the parkin-associated endothelin-like receptor (Pael-R), is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that exhibits poor plasma membrane expression when expressed in most cell types. We sought to find ways to enhance GPR37 trafficking to the cell surface in order to facilitate studies of GPR37 functional activity in heterologous cells. In truncation studies, we found that removing the GPR37 N-terminus (NT) dramatically enhanced the receptor’s plasma membrane insertion. Further studies on sequential NT truncations revealed that removal of the first 210 amino acids increased surface expression nearly as much as removal of the entire NT. In studies examining the effects of co-expression of GPR37 with a variety of other GPCRs, we observed significant increases in GPR37 surface expression when the receptor was co-expressed with the adenosine receptor A2AR or the dopamine receptor D2R. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that full-length GPR37 and, to a greater extent, the truncated GPR37 were capable of robustly associating with D2R, resulting in modestly-altered D2R affinity for both agonists and antagonists. In studies examining potential interactions of GPR37 with PDZ scaffolds, we observed a specific interaction between GPR37 and syntenin-1, which resulted in a dramatic increase in GPR37 surface expression in HEK-293 cells. These findings reveal three independent approaches – N-terminal truncation, co-expression with other receptors and co-expression with syntenin-1 – by which GPR37 surface trafficking in heterologous cells can be greatly enhanced to facilitate functional studies on this orphan receptor. PMID:19799451

  18. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  19. Mating pheromone-induced alteration of cell surface proteins in the heterobasidiomycetous yeast Tremella mesenterica.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, T; Kadota, T; Okubo, Y; Hatano, T; Tsuchiya, E; Fukui, S

    1984-06-01

    Mating pheromone-induced alteration of the cell surface proteins of haploid cells, presumed to play crucial roles in the specific cell-cell interactions during sexual conjugation of Tremella mesenterica , was investigated. Exposed surface proteins were revealed by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination in combination with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. From comparison of the molecular species of 125I-labeled surface proteins of the vegetative and the gamete (mating pheromone-treated) cells of the two compatible mating types (ab and AB), it was suggested that a striking change in cell surface structure occurs during the differentiation; although labeled protein species of the vegetative cells of the two mating types were indistinguishable, several new species, both mating type specific and nonspecific, appeared in the gamete cells. Turnover of the labeled proteins of the vegetative cells was negligible, whereas that of the gamete cells was rapid with release of low-molecular-weight labeled proteins in the medium. A role for the labeled surface proteins of the gamete cells in the cell-cell interactions during sexual conjugation was suggested by the following: the surface changes were induced by mating pheromone; the labeled proteins were preferentially localized on the surface of the mating tube; the labeled species appeared sequentially during the differentiation; and mating type-specific species were present in both mating types.

  20. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  1. In Silico Study of Variable Surface Proteins in Plasmodium Species: Perspectives in Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Swati, D

    2016-09-01

    The variable surface proteins expressed by P. falciparum and P. vivax are transported to the surface of infected erythrocyte and are exposed to the host immune system. The possibility of using variable surface proteins as a common drug target has been analyzed in both the Plasmodium species. Sequence analysis of variable surface proteins showed a low-level conservation within as well as between the species. Amino acid composition analysis revealed higher frequency of hydrophilic amino acids as compared with that of hydrophobic residues. In order to gain more insight into their diverse functional role, the three-dimensional structure was predicted using comparative modeling approach. These models were evaluated and validated by checking stereochemistry of underlying amino acids. Structural alignment of variable surface proteins by superimposing them shows less conservation. Due to differences at sequence as well as structural level, the variable surface proteins are expected to show difference in their degree of invasiveness. These differences were also cross-examined by evolutionary study, and the results obtained were in accordance with the aforesaid study. The existence of structural differences noticed in the present study showed that the variable surface proteins could not be used as a common drug target in both the malarial species. Therefore, species-specific strategy may be followed for drug targeting against variable surface proteins of P. falciparum and P. vivax.

  2. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

  3. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  4. Peptide Surface Display and Secretion Using Two LPXTG-Containing Surface Proteins from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Mark S.; Hafner, Louise M.; Walsh, Terry; Giffard, Philip M.

    2003-01-01

    A locus encoding two repetitive proteins that have LPXTG cell wall anchoring signals from Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 has been identified by using an antiserum raised against whole L. fermentum BR11 cells. The first protein, Rlp, is similar to the Rib surface protein from Streptococcus agalactiae, while the other protein, Mlp, is similar to the mucus binding protein Mub from Lactobacillus reuteri. It was shown that multiple copies of mlp exist in the genome of L. fermentum BR11. Regions of Rlp, Mlp, and the previously characterized surface protein BspA were used to surface display or secrete heterologous peptides in L. fermentum. The peptides tested were 10 amino acids of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator protein and a six-histidine epitope (His6). The BspA promoter and secretion signal were used in combination with the Rlp cell wall sorting signal to express, export, and covalently anchor the heterologous peptides to the cell wall. Detection of the cell surface protein fusions revealed that Rlp was a significantly better surface display vector than BspA despite having lower cellular levels (0.7 mg per liter for the Rlp fusion compared with 4 mg per liter for the BspA fusion). The mlp promoter and encoded secretion signal were used to express and export large (328-kDa at 10 mg per liter) and small (27-kDa at 0.06 mg per liter) amino-terminal fragments of the Mlp protein fused to the His6 and CFTR peptides or His6 peptide, respectively. Therefore, these newly described proteins from L. fermentum BR11 have potential as protein production and targeting vectors. PMID:14532035

  5. Comparative Genome Sequence Analysis Reveals the Extent of Diversity and Conservation for Glycan-Associated Proteins in Burkholderia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Hui San; Mohamed, Rahmah; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia family occupy diverse ecological niches. In pathogenic family members, glycan-associated proteins are often linked to functions that include virulence, protein conformation maintenance, surface recognition, cell adhesion, and immune system evasion. Comparative analysis of available Burkholderia genomes has revealed a core set of 178 glycan-associated proteins shared by all Burkholderia of which 68 are homologous to known essential genes. The genome sequence comparisons revealed insights into species-specific gene acquisitions through gene transfers, identified an S-layer protein, and proposed that significantly reactive surface proteins are associated to sugar moieties as a potential means to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The comparative analysis using a curated database of search queries enabled us to gain insights into the extent of conservation and diversity, as well as the possible virulence-associated roles of glycan-associated proteins in members of the Burkholderia spp. The curated list of glycan-associated proteins used can also be directed to screen other genomes for glycan-associated homologs. PMID:22991502

  6. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  7. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G

    2015-07-28

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein's affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states.

  8. Major membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae selectively modified by covalently bound lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Wise K.S.; Kim, M.F.

    1987-12-01

    Surface protein antigens of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae were identified by direct antibody-surface binding or by radioimmunoprecipitation of surface /sup 125/I-labeled proteins with a series of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Radioimmunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from cells labeled with (/sup 35/S) methionine, /sup 14/C-amino acids, or (/sup 3/H) palmitic acid showed that proteins p65, p50, and p44 were abundant and (with one other hydrophobic protein, p60) were selectively labeled with lipid. Alkaline hydroxylamine treatment of labeled proteins indicated linkage of lipids by amide or stable O-linked ester bonds. Proteins p65, p50, and p44 were highly immunogenic in the natural host as measured by immunoblots of TX-114-phase proteins with antisera from swine inoculated with whole organisms. These proteins were antigenically and structurally unrelated, since hyperimmune mouse antibodies to individual gel-purified proteins were monospecific and gave distinct proteolytic epitope maps. Intraspecies size variants of one surface antigen of M. hyopneumoniae were revealed by a MAb to p70 (defined in strain J, ATCC 25934), which recognized a large p73 component on strain VPP11 (ATCC 25617). In addition, MAb to internal, aqueous-phase protein p82 of strain J failed to bind an analogous antigen in strain VPP11.

  9. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Brett A.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Thomas, David D.

    2016-01-01

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0–C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein’s flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein–protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  10. Homologous expression of the Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals that the extracellular protein is glycosylated

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Bomble, Yannick J.; Vander Wall, Todd A.; Groom, Joseph; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-03-23

    Members of the bacterial genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes described with ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass without conventional pretreatment. The cellulolytic ability of different species varies dramatically and correlates with the presence of the multimodular cellulase CelA, which contains both a glycoside hydrolase family 9 endoglucanase and a glycoside hydrolase family 48 exoglucanase known to be synergistic in their activity, connected by three cellulose-binding domains via linker peptides. This architecture exploits the cellulose surface ablation driven by its general cellulase processivity as well as excavates cavities into the surface of the substrate, revealing a novel paradigm for cellulase activity. We recently reported that a deletion of celA in C. bescii had a significant effect on its ability to utilize complex biomass. To analyze the structure and function of CelA and its role in biomass deconstruction, we constructed a new expression vector for C. bescii and were able, for the first time, to express significant quantities of full-length protein in vivo in the native host. The protein, which contains a Histidine tag, was active and excreted from the cell. Expression of CelA protein with and without its signal sequence allowed comparison of protein retained intracellularly to protein transported extracellularly. Analysis of protein in culture supernatants revealed that the extracellular CelA protein is glycosylated whereas the intracellular CelA is not, suggesting that either protein transport is required for this post-translational modification or that glycosylation is required for protein export. The mechanism and role of protein glycosylation in bacteria is poorly understood and the ability to express CelA in vivo in C. bescii will allow the study of the mechanism of protein glycosylation in this thermophile. Finally, it will also allow the study of glycosylation of CelA itself and its role in the

  11. Accuracy of functional surfaces on comparatively modeled protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieling; Dundas, Joe; Kachalo, Sema; Ouyang, Zheng; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Identification and characterization of protein functional surfaces are important for predicting protein function, understanding enzyme mechanism, and docking small compounds to proteins. As the rapid speed of accumulation of protein sequence information far exceeds that of structures, constructing accurate models of protein functional surfaces and identify their key elements become increasingly important. A promising approach is to build comparative models from sequences using known structural templates such as those obtained from structural genome projects. Here we assess how well this approach works in modeling binding surfaces. By systematically building three-dimensional comparative models of proteins using Modeller, we determine how well functional surfaces can be accurately reproduced. We use an alpha shape based pocket algorithm to compute all pockets on the modeled structures, and conduct a large-scale computation of similarity measurements (pocket RMSD and fraction of functional atoms captured) for 26,590 modeled enzyme protein structures. Overall, we find that when the sequence fragment of the binding surfaces has more than 45% identity to that of the tempalte protein, the modeled surfaces have on average an RMSD of 0.5 Å, and contain 48% or more of the binding surface atoms, with nearly all of the important atoms in the signatures of binding pockets captured. PMID:21541664

  12. Translational Profiling of Clock Cells Reveals Circadianly Synchronized Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmei; Ainsley, Joshua A.; Reijmers, Leon G.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide studies of circadian transcription or mRNA translation have been hindered by the presence of heterogeneous cell populations in complex tissues such as the nervous system. We describe here the use of a Drosophila cell-specific translational profiling approach to document the rhythmic “translatome” of neural clock cells for the first time in any organism. Unexpectedly, translation of most clock-regulated transcripts—as assayed by mRNA ribosome association—occurs at one of two predominant circadian phases, midday or mid-night, times of behavioral quiescence; mRNAs encoding similar cellular functions are translated at the same time of day. Our analysis also indicates that fundamental cellular processes—metabolism, energy production, redox state (e.g., the thioredoxin system), cell growth, signaling and others—are rhythmically modulated within clock cells via synchronized protein synthesis. Our approach is validated by the identification of mRNAs known to exhibit circadian changes in abundance and the discovery of hundreds of novel mRNAs that show translational rhythms. This includes Tdc2, encoding a neurotransmitter synthetic enzyme, which we demonstrate is required within clock neurons for normal circadian locomotor activity. PMID:24348200

  13. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  14. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  15. Adsorption ability comparison of plasma proteins on amorphous carbon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Aoi; Akasaka, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Toda, Ikumi; Nakano, Masayuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2012-11-01

    To understand why amorphous carbon (a-C:H) film shows antithrombogenicity, an adsorption ability of plasma proteins on a-C:H surface was investigated. Protein adsorption is the initial process of clot formation. The protein adsorption ability on a-C:H film surface was compared by the detection using the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomenon to estimate the protein adsorption. The protein adsorption abilities of a fibrinogen (Fib) and a human γ-globulin (HGG) were estimated by the SPR method using a multilayer structure of a-C:H/Au/Cr/glass. Although the adsorption of HGG for a-C:H was saturated at 32 μM in HGG concentration, the adsorption of Fib was not saturated under the detection limit of this method. These results indicated that the adsorption ability to the a-C:H film surface of Fib was higher than HGG.

  16. The BAD project: data mining, database and prediction of protein adsorption on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vasina, Elena N; Paszek, Ewa; Nicolau, Dan V; Nicolau, Dan V

    2009-04-07

    Protein adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces is critical to many applications, including biomaterials, protein microarrays and lab-on-a-chip devices. Despite this general interest, and a large amount of research in the last half a century, protein adsorption cannot be predicted with an engineering level, design-orientated accuracy. Here we describe a Biomolecular Adsorption Database (BAD), freely available online, which archives the published protein adsorption data. Piecewise linear regression with breakpoint applied to the data in the BAD suggests that the input variables to protein adsorption, i.e., protein concentration in solution; protein descriptors derived from primary structure (number of residues, global protein hydrophobicity and range of amino acid hydrophobicity, isoelectric point); surface descriptors (contact angle); and fluid environment descriptors (pH, ionic strength), correlate well with the output variable-the protein concentration on the surface. Furthermore, neural network analysis revealed that the size of the BAD makes it sufficiently representative, with a neural network-based predictive error of 5% or less. Interestingly, a consistently better fit is obtained if the BAD is divided in two separate sub-sets representing protein adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. Based on these findings, selected entries from the BAD have been used to construct neural network-based estimation routines, which predict the amount of adsorbed protein, the thickness of the adsorbed layer and the surface tension of the protein-covered surface. While the BAD is of general interest, the prediction of the thickness and the surface tension of the protein-covered layers are of particular relevance to the design of microfluidics devices.

  17. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loong, Brandon K.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2014-08-01

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  18. Communication: Using multiple tethers to stabilize proteins on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Loong, Brandon K; Knotts, Thomas A

    2014-08-07

    Protein surface interactions are important in many applications in biotechnology including protein arrays, but these technologies have not lived up to their transformative potential because it is difficult to attach proteins to surfaces in a manner that preserves function and theoretical understanding of the relevant phenomena remains limited. Here is reported the effect of using multiple tethers to attach a protein (lysozyme) to a surface and the effects on the structure and stability of the molecule. The simulations show how using two tethers can drastically change the folding mechanism such that a protein that is initially unstable and inactive when attached using a single tether can become more stable and functional when two tethers are used. The results offer hope that the rational design of protein arrays is possible.

  19. Facing extremes: archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jerry

    2003-12-01

    Archaea are best known in their capacities as extremophiles, i.e. micro-organisms able to thrive in some of the most drastic environments on Earth. The protein-based surface layer that envelopes many archaeal strains must thus correctly assemble and maintain its structural integrity in the face of the physical challenges associated with, for instance, life in high salinity, at elevated temperatures or in acidic surroundings. Study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins has thus offered insight into the strategies employed by these proteins to survive direct contact with extreme environments, yet has also served to elucidate other aspects of archaeal protein biosynthesis, including glycosylation, lipid modification and protein export. In this mini-review, recent advances in the study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins are discussed.

  20. Electrostatic Control of Protein-Surface Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-21

    2012 4.00 Annette F. Raigoza, Lauren J. Webb. Molecularly Resolved Images of Peptide-Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy ...Functionalized Gold Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy .” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 19354-19357. b) Papers published in non-peer-reviewed...ambient scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We were motivated to perform these experiments in order to look for large-scale heterogeneities in our

  1. Real-time Redox Measurements during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Reveal Interlinked Protein Folding Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merksamer, Philip I.; Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes unfolded proteins to accumulate, triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR outputs in turn decrease ER unfolded proteins to close a negative feedback loop. However, because it is infeasible to directly measure the concentration of unfolded proteins in vivo, cells are generically described as experiencing “ER stress” whenever the UPR is active. Because ER redox potential is optimized for oxidative protein folding, we reasoned that measureable redox changes should accompany unfolded protein accumulation. To test this concept, we employed fluorescent protein reporters to dynamically measure ER redox status and UPR activity in single cells. Using these tools, we show that diverse stressors, both experimental and physiological, compromise ER protein oxidation when UPR-imposed homeostatic control is lost. Using genetic analysis we uncovered redox heterogeneities in isogenic cell populations, and revealed functional interlinks between ER protein folding, modification, and quality control systems. PMID:19026441

  2. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai,R.; Kar, K.; Anthony, K.; Gould, L.; Ledizet, M.; Fikrig, E.; Marasco, W.; Koski, R.; Modis, Y.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics.

  3. Crystal Structure of West Nile Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Reveals Viral Surface Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Ryuta; Kar, Kalipada; Anthony, Karen; Gould, L. Hannah; Ledizet, Michel; Fikrig, Erol; Marasco, Wayne A.; Koski, Raymond A.; Modis, Yorgo

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus, a member of the Flavivirus genus, causes fever that can progress to life-threatening encephalitis. The major envelope glycoprotein, E, of these viruses mediates viral attachment and entry by membrane fusion. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment of West Nile virus E. The structure adopts the same overall fold as that of the E proteins from dengue and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. The conformation of domain II is different from that in other prefusion E structures, however, and resembles the conformation of domain II in postfusion E structures. The epitopes of neutralizing West Nile virus-specific antibodies map to a region of domain III that is exposed on the viral surface and has been implicated in receptor binding. In contrast, we show that certain recombinant therapeutic antibodies, which cross-neutralize West Nile and dengue viruses, bind a peptide from domain I that is exposed only during the membrane fusion transition. By revealing the details of the molecular landscape of the West Nile virus surface, our structure will assist the design of antiviral vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:16943291

  4. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  5. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data

    PubMed Central

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance‐to‐surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift‐based CS‐Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. PMID:27560616

  6. Whey protein coating efficiency on surfactant-modified hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yu D; Krochta, John M

    2005-06-15

    Whey protein oxygen-barrier coatings on peanuts are not effective, due to incomplete peanut-surface coverage, as well as some cracking and flaking of the coating. Addition of sorbitan laurate (Span 20) in the whey protein coating solution up to the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of 0.05% (w/w) significantly improved coating coverage to 88% of the peanut surface. Increasing the Span 20 concentration in the coating solution to 3 times the cmc (0.15% w/w) produced a substantial increase in peanut surface energy (>70 dyn/cm), indicating adsorption of the surfactant to the peanut surface. With this level of Span 20, the whey protein coating coverage on peanuts increased to 95%. These results suggest that a concentration of surfactant above the cmc in the coating solution is required for formation of self-assembled structures of surfactant molecules on peanut surfaces, which significantly increases the hydrophilicity, and thus coatability, of peanut surfaces.

  7. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hagemans, Dominique; van Belzen, Ianthe A. E. M.; Morán Luengo, Tania; Rüdiger, Stefan G. D.

    2015-01-01

    The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charge in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualizes hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualizes segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, the SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL. PMID:26528483

  8. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  9. Enhanced microcontact printing of proteins on nanoporous silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinka, Ellen; Loeffler, Kathryn; Hu, Ye; Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Lin, Kevin; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, John X. J.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate porous silica surface modification, combined with microcontact printing, as an effective method for enhanced protein patterning and adsorption on arbitrary surfaces. Compared to conventional chemical treatments, this approach offers scalability and long-term device stability without requiring complex chemical activation. Two chemical surface treatments using functionalization with the commonly used 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were compared with the nanoporous silica surface on the basis of protein adsorption. The deposited thickness and uniformity of porous silica films were evaluated for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled rabbit immunoglobulin G (R-IgG) protein printed onto the substrates via patterned polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) stamps. A more complete transfer of proteins was observed on porous silica substrates compared to chemically functionalized substrates. A comparison of different pore sizes (4-6 nm) and porous silica thicknesses (96-200 nm) indicates that porous silica with 4 nm diameter, 57% porosity and a thickness of 96 nm provided a suitable environment for complete transfer of R-IgG proteins. Both fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for protein layer characterizations. A porous silica layer is biocompatible, providing a favorable transfer medium with minimal damage to the proteins. A patterned immunoassay microchip was developed to demonstrate the retained protein function after printing on nanoporous surfaces, which enables printable and robust immunoassay detection for point-of-care applications.

  10. Enhanced Microcontact Printing of Proteins on Nanoporous Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Blinka, Ellen; Loeffler, Kathryn; Hu, Ye; Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Lin, Kevin; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhang, John X.J.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate porous silica surface modification, combined with microcontact printing, as an effective method for enhanced protein patterning and adsorption on arbitrary surfaces. Compared to conventional chemical treatments, this approach offers scalability and long-term device stability without requiring complex chemical activation. Two chemical surface treatments using functionalization with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were compared with the nanoporous silica surface on the basis of protein adsorption. The deposited thickness and uniformity of the porous silica films were evaluated for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled rabbit immunoglobulin G (R-IgG) protein printed onto the substrates via patterned polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) stamps. A more complete transfer of proteins was observed on porous silica substrates compared to chemically functionalized substrates. A comparison of different pore sizes (2–6 nm), and porous silica thicknesses (30–200 nm) indicates that porous silica with 4 nm diameter, 57% porosity and a thickness of 96 nm provided a suitable environment for complete transfer of R-IgG proteins. Both fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for protein layers characterizations. A porous silica layer is biocompatible, providing a favorable transfer medium with minimal damage to the proteins. A patterned immunoassay microchip was developed to demonstrate the retained protein function after printing on nanoporous surfaces, which enables printable and robust immunoassay detection for point-of-care applications. PMID:20834118

  11. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, T.M.; Boyer, M.J.; Keith, J.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.S.

    1988-02-01

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins.

  12. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A

    2013-09-07

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields-such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine--but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  13. A coarse grain model for protein-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces is important in numerous applications in many fields—such as biotechnology, proteomics, sensors, and medicine—but fundamental understanding of how protein stability and structure are affected by surfaces remains incomplete. Over the last several years, molecular simulation using coarse grain models has yielded significant insights, but the formalisms used to represent the surface interactions have been rudimentary. We present a new model for protein surface interactions that incorporates the chemical specificity of both the surface and the residues comprising the protein in the context of a one-bead-per-residue, coarse grain approach that maintains computational efficiency. The model is parameterized against experimental adsorption energies for multiple model peptides on different types of surfaces. The validity of the model is established by its ability to quantitatively and qualitatively predict the free energy of adsorption and structural changes for multiple biologically-relevant proteins on different surfaces. The validation, done with proteins not used in parameterization, shows that the model produces remarkable agreement between simulation and experiment.

  14. Cleaning of biomaterial surfaces: protein removal by different solvents.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Fabian; Grass, Simone; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scheibe, Christian; Müller-Renno, Christine; Davoudi, Neda; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The removal of biofilms or protein films from biomaterials is still a challenging task. In particular, for research investigations on real (applied) surfaces the reuse of samples is of high importance, because reuse allows the comparison of the same sample in different experiments. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cleaning efficiency of different solvents (SDS, water, acetone, isopropanol, RIPA-buffer and Tween-20) on five different biomaterials (titanium, gold, PMMA (no acetone used), ceramic, and PTFE) with different wettability which were covered by layers of two different adsorbed proteins (BSA and lysozyme). The presence of a protein film after adsorption was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After treatment of the surfaces with the different solvents, the residual proteins on the surface were determined by BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid assay). Data of the present study indicate that SDS is an effective solvent, but for several protein-substrate combinations it does not show the cleaning efficiency often mentioned in literature. RIPA-buffer and Tween-20 were more effective. They showed very low residual protein amounts after cleaning on all examined material surfaces and for both proteins, however, with small differences for the respective substrate-protein combinations. RIPA-buffer in combination with ultrasonication completely removed the protein layer as confirmed by TEM.

  15. Dissecting the proteome of pea mature seeds reveals the phenotypic plasticity of seed protein composition.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Michael; Jacquin, Françoise; Savois, Vincent; Sommerer, Nicolas; Labas, Valérie; Henry, Céline; Burstin, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is the most cultivated European pulse crop and the pea seeds mainly serve as a protein source for monogastric animals. Because the seed protein composition impacts on seed nutritional value, we aimed at identifying the determinants of its variability. This paper presents the first pea mature seed proteome reference map, which includes 156 identified proteins (http://www.inra.fr/legumbase/peaseedmap/). This map provides a fine dissection of the pea seed storage protein composition revealing a large diversity of storage proteins resulting both from gene diversity and post-translational processing. It gives new insights into the pea storage protein processing (especially 7S globulins) as a possible adaptation towards progressive mobilization of the proteins during germination. The nonstorage seed proteome revealed the presence of proteins involved in seed defense together with proteins preparing germination. The plasticity of the seed proteome was revealed for seeds produced in three successive years of cultivation, and 30% of the spots were affected by environmental variations. This work pinpoints seed proteins most affected by environment, highlighting new targets to stabilize storage protein composition that should be further analyzed.

  16. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  17. Grafting zwitterionic polymer onto cryogel surface enhances protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography on cryogel monolith.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shi-Peng; Zheng, Jie; Sun, Yan

    2015-04-10

    Cryogel monoliths with interconnected macropores (10-100μm) and hydrophilic surfaces can be employed as chromatography media for protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography (SXC). SXC is based on the principle that the exclusion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on both a hydrophilic chromatography surface and a protein favors their association, leading to the protein retention on the chromatography surface. Elution of the retained protein can be achieved by reducing PEG concentration. In this work, the surface of polyacrylamide-based cryogel monolith was modified by grafting zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), leading the increase in the surface hydrophilicity. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of the grafted pCBMA chain clusters on the cryogel surface, but pCBMA grafting did not result in the changes of the physical properties of the monolith column, and the columns maintained good recyclability in SXC. The effect of the surface grafting on the SXC behavior of γ-globulin was investigated in a wide flow rate range (0.6-12cm/min). It was found that the dynamic retention capacity increased 1.4-1.8 times by the zwitterionic polymer grafting in the flow rate range of 1.5-12cm/min. The mechanism of enhanced protein retention on the zwitterionic polymer-grafted surface was proposed. The research proved that zwitterionic polymer modification was promising for the development of new materials for SXC applications.

  18. Mechanism of Bacterial Cell-Surface Attachment Revealed by the Structure of Cellulosomal Type II Cohesin-dockerin Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Adams,J.; Pal, G.; Jia, Z.; Smith, S.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial cell-surface attachment of macromolecular complexes maintains the microorganism in close proximity to extracellular substrates and allows for optimal uptake of hydrolytic byproducts. The cellulosome is a large multienzyme complex used by many anaerobic bacteria for the efficient degradation of plant cell-wall polysaccharides. The mechanism of cellulosome retention to the bacterial cell surface involves a calcium-mediated protein-protein interaction between the dockerin (Doc) module from the cellulosomal scaffold and a cohesin (Coh) module of cell-surface proteins located within the proteoglycan layer. Here, we report the structure of an ultra-high-affinity (K{sub a} = 1.44 x 10{sup 10} M{sup 1-}) complex between type II Doc, together with its neighboring X module from the cellulosome scaffold of Clostridium thermocellum, and a type II Coh module associated with the bacterial cell surface. Identification of X module-Doc and X module-Coh contacts reveal roles for the X module in Doc stability and enhanced Coh recognition. This extremely tight interaction involves one face of the Coh and both helices of the Doc and comprises significant hydrophobic character and a complementary extensive hydrogen-bond network. This structure represents a unique mechanism for cell-surface attachment in anaerobic bacteria and provides a rationale for discriminating between type I and type II Coh modules.

  19. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein-gold nanoparticle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein-AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein "corona," modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein-AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein-AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein-NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein-AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle-protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle-protein corona compositions.

  20. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Distinct Corona Composition on Magnetic Nanoparticles with Different Surface Coatings: Implications for Interactions with Primary Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Carmen; Pernemalm, Maria; Kohonen, Pekka; Laurent, Sophie; Hultenby, Kjell; Vahter, Marie; Lehtiö, Janne; Toprak, Muhammet S; Fadeel, Bengt

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The influence of different surface coatings on the biocompatibility of SPIONs has been addressed, but the potential impact of the so-called corona of adsorbed proteins on the surface of SPIONs on their biological behavior is less well studied. Here, we determined the composition of the plasma protein corona on silica-coated versus dextran-coated SPIONs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Notably, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed distinct protein corona compositions for the two different SPIONs. Relaxivity of silica-coated SPIONs was modulated by the presence of a protein corona. Moreover, the viability of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was influenced by the protein corona on silica-coated, but not dextran-coated SPIONs, and the protein corona promoted cellular uptake of silica-coated SPIONs, but did not affect internalization of dextran-coated SPIONs.

  1. An Entropic Perspective of Protein Stability on Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Knotts, Thomas A.; Rathore, Nitin; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces regulates numerous processes in nature, science, and technology. In many applications, it is desirable to place proteins on surfaces in an active state, and tethering represents one manner in which to accomplish this. However, a clear understanding of how tether placement and design affects protein activity is lacking. Available theoretical models predict that proteins will be stabilized when tethered to substrates. Such models suggest that the surface reduces the number of states accessible to the unfolded state of the protein, thereby reducing the entropic cost of folding on the surface compared to the bulk case. Recent studies, however, have shown that this stabilization is not always seen. The purpose of this article is to determine the validity of the theory with a thorough thermodynamic analysis of the folding of peptides attached to surfaces. Configuration-temperature-density-of-states Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the behavior of four different peptides of different secondary and tertiary structure. It is found that the surface does reduce the entropic cost of folding for tethered peptides, as the theory suggests. This effect, however, does not always translate into improved stability because the surface may also have a destabilizing enthalpic effect. The theory neglects this effect and assumes that the enthalpy of folding is the same on and off the surface. Both the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability are found to be topology- and tether-placement-specific; we show that stability cannot be predicted a priori. A detailed analysis of the folding of protein A shows how the same protein can be both stabilized and destabilized on a surface depending upon how the tethering enhances or hinders the ability of the peptide to form correct tertiary structures. PMID:18326646

  2. An entropic perspective of protein stability on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Knotts, Thomas A; Rathore, Nitin; de Pablo, Juan J

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of proteins with surfaces regulates numerous processes in nature, science, and technology. In many applications, it is desirable to place proteins on surfaces in an active state, and tethering represents one manner in which to accomplish this. However, a clear understanding of how tether placement and design affects protein activity is lacking. Available theoretical models predict that proteins will be stabilized when tethered to substrates. Such models suggest that the surface reduces the number of states accessible to the unfolded state of the protein, thereby reducing the entropic cost of folding on the surface compared to the bulk case. Recent studies, however, have shown that this stabilization is not always seen. The purpose of this article is to determine the validity of the theory with a thorough thermodynamic analysis of the folding of peptides attached to surfaces. Configuration-temperature-density-of-states Monte Carlo simulations are used to examine the behavior of four different peptides of different secondary and tertiary structure. It is found that the surface does reduce the entropic cost of folding for tethered peptides, as the theory suggests. This effect, however, does not always translate into improved stability because the surface may also have a destabilizing enthalpic effect. The theory neglects this effect and assumes that the enthalpy of folding is the same on and off the surface. Both the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability are found to be topology- and tether-placement-specific; we show that stability cannot be predicted a priori. A detailed analysis of the folding of protein A shows how the same protein can be both stabilized and destabilized on a surface depending upon how the tethering enhances or hinders the ability of the peptide to form correct tertiary structures.

  3. Surfaces for competitive selective bacterial capture from protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Gon, Saugata; Nüsslein, Klaus; Santore, Maria M

    2015-05-20

    Active surfaces that form the basis for bacterial sensors for threat detection, food safety, or certain diagnostic applications rely on bacterial adhesion. However, bacteria capture from complex fluids on the active surfaces can be reduced by the competing adsorption of proteins and other large molecules. Such adsorption can also interfere with device performance. As a result, multiple upstream processing steps are frequently employed to separate macromolecules from any cells, which remain in the buffer. Here, we present an economical approach to capture bacteria, without competitive adsorption by proteins, on engineered surfaces that do not employ biomolecular recognition, antibodies, or other molecules with engineered sequences. The surfaces are based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes that, on their own, repel both proteins and bacteria. These PEG brushes backfill the surface around sparsely adsorbed cationic polymer coils (here, poly-L-lysine (PLL)). The PLL coils are effectively embedded within the brush and produce locally cationic nanoscale regions that attract negatively charged regions of proteins or cells against the steric background repulsion from the PEG brush. By carefully designing the surfaces to include just enough PLL to capture bacteria, but not enough to capture proteins, we achieve sharp selectivity where S. aureus is captured from albumin- or fibrinogen-containing solutions, but free albumin or fibrinogen molecules are rejected from the surface. Bacterial adhesion on these surfaces is not reduced by competitive protein adsorption, in contrast to performance of more uniformly cationic surfaces. Also, protein adsorption to the bacteria does not interfere with capture, at least for the case of S. aureus, to which fibrinogen binds through a specific receptor.

  4. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering reveals ligand-induced protein dynamics of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Perera, Suchithranga M. D. C.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael F.; Chu, Xiang -Qiang

    2016-09-15

    Light activation of the visual G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin leads to significant structural fluctuations of the protein embedded within the membrane yielding the activation of cognate G-protein (transducin), which initiates biological signaling. Here, we report a quasi-elastic neutron scattering study of the activation of rhodopsin as a GPCR prototype. Our results reveal a broadly distributed relaxation of hydrogen atom dynamics of rhodopsin on a picosecond–nanosecond time scale, crucial for protein function, as only observed for globular proteins previously. Interestingly, the results suggest significant differences in the intrinsic protein dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin versus the ligand-free apoprotein, opsin. These differences can be attributed to the influence of the covalently bound retinal ligand. Moreover, an idea of the generic free-energy landscape is used to explain the GPCR dynamics of ligand-binding and ligand-free protein conformations, which can be further applied to other GPCR systems.

  5. Protein-surface interaction maps for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-04-05

    In this paper, protein-surface interaction maps were generated by performing coarse-grained protein-surface calculations. This approach allowed for the rapid determination of the protein-surface interaction energies at a range of orientations and distances. Interaction maps of lysozyme indicated that there was a contiguous series of orientations corresponding to several adjacent preferred binding regions on the protein surface. Examination of these orientations provided insight into the residues involved in surface interactions, which qualitatively agreed with the retention data for single-site mutants. Interaction maps of lysozyme single-site mutants were also generated and provided significant insight into why these variants exhibited significant differences in their chromatographic behavior. This approach was also employed to study the binding behavior of CspB and related mutants. The results indicated that, in addition to describing general trends in the data, these maps provided significant insight into retention data of the single-site mutants. In particular, subtle retention trends observed with the K12 and K13 mutants were well-described using this interaction map approach. Finally, the number of interaction points with energies stronger than -2 kcal/mol was shown to be able to semi-quantitatively predict the behavior of most of the mutants. This rapid approach for calculating protein-surface interaction maps is expected to facilitate future method development for separating closely related protein variants in ion-exchange systems.

  6. Using Surface Curvature to Control the Dimerization of a Surface-Active Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylowicz, Martin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the influence of surface geometry on adsorbed proteins promises new possibilities in biophysics, such as topographical catalysis, molecular recognition of geometric cues, and modulations of oligomerization or ligand binding. We have created nano-textured hydrophobic surfaces that are stable in buffer by spin coating polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) to form patchy NP monolayers on a PS substrate, yielding flat and highly curved areas on the same sample. Moreover, we have separated surface chemistry from texture by floating a 10 nm thick film of monodisperse PS onto the NP-functionalized surface. Using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy we have compared in situ the distribution of detachment lengths for proteins on curved surfaces to that measured on flat surfaces. We have shown that β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG), a surface-active protein which helps to stabilize oil droplets in milk, forms dimers on both flat PS surfaces and surfaces with a radius of curvature of 100 nm, whereas β-LG monomers exist for more highly curved surfaces with radii of curvature of 25 and 40 nm. It is surprising that rather large radii of curvature have such a strong influence on proteins whose radius is only ˜2 nm. Furthermore, the transition from dimer to monomer with changes in surface curvature offers promising applications for proteins whose function can be modified by their oligomerization state.

  7. Identification of Surface Proteins from Lactobacillus casei BL23 Able to Bind Fibronectin and Collagen.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Provencio, Diego; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Monedero, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    Strains of lactobacilli show the capacity to attach to extracellular matrix proteins. Cell-wall fractions of Lactobacillus casei BL23 enriched in fibronectin, and collagen-binding proteins were isolated. Mass spectrometry analysis of their protein content revealed the presence of stress-related proteins (GroEL, ClpL), translational elongation factors (EF-Tu, EF-G), oligopeptide solute-binding proteins, and the glycolytic enzymes enolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The latter two enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, and their in vitro binding activity to fibronectin and collagen was confirmed. These results reinforce the idea that lactobacilli display on their surfaces a variety of moonlighting proteins that can be important in their adaptation to survive at intestinal mucosal sites and in the interaction with host cells.

  8. Proteomic Characterization of Pig Sperm Anterior Head Plasma Membrane Reveals Roles of Acrosomal Proteins in ZP3 Binding.

    PubMed

    Kongmanas, Kessiri; Kruevaisayawan, Hathairat; Saewu, Arpornrad; Sugeng, Clarissa; Fernandes, Jason; Souda, Puneet; Angel, Jonathan B; Faull, Kym F; Aitken, R John; Whitelegge, Julian; Hardy, Daniel; Berger, Trish; Baker, Mark A; Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj

    2015-02-01

    The sperm anterior head plasma membrane (APM) is the site where sperm first bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). This binding reaches the maximum following the sperm capacitation process. To gain a better understanding of the sperm-ZP binding mechanisms, we compared protein profiles obtained from mass spectrometry of APM vesicles isolated from non-capacitated and capacitated sperm. The results revealed that ZP-binding proteins were the most abundant group of proteins, with a number of them showing increased levels in capacitated sperm. Blue native gel electrophoresis and far-western blotting revealed presence of high molecular weight (HMW) protein complexes in APM vesicles of both non-capacitated and capacitated sperm, but the complexes (∼750-1300 kDa) from capacitated sperm possessed much higher binding capacity to pig ZP3 glycoprotein. Proteomic analyses indicated that a number of proteins known for their acrosome localization, including zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP, were components of capacitated APM HMW complexes, with zonadhesin being the most enriched protein. Our immunofluorescence results further demonstrated that a fraction of these acrosomal proteins was transported to the surface of live acrosome-intact sperm during capacitation. Co-immunoprecipitation indicated that zonadhesin, proacrosin/acrosin and ACRBP interacted with each other and they may traffic as a complex from the acrosome to the sperm surface. Finally, the significance of zonadhesin in the binding of APM HMW complexes to pig ZP3 was demonstrated; the binding ability was decreased following treatment of the complexes with anti-zonadhesin antibody. Our results suggested that acrosomal proteins, especially zonadhesin, played roles in the initial sperm-ZP binding during capacitation.

  9. High-resolution mapping of protein concentration reveals principles of proteome architecture and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Levy, Emmanuel D; Kowarzyk, Jacqueline; Michnick, Stephen W

    2014-05-22

    A single yeast cell contains a hundred million protein molecules. How these proteins are organized to orchestrate living processes is a central question in biology. To probe this organization in vivo, we measured the local concentration of proteins based on the strength of their nonspecific interactions with a neutral reporter protein. We first used a cytosolic reporter and measured local concentrations for ~2,000 proteins in S. cerevisiae, with accuracy comparable to that of mass spectrometry. Localizing the reporter to membranes specifically increased the local concentration measured for membrane proteins. Comparing the concentrations measured by both reporters revealed that encounter frequencies between proteins are primarily dictated by their abundances. However, to change these encounter frequencies and restructure the proteome, as in adaptation, we find that changes in localization have more impact than changes in abundance. These results highlight how protein abundance and localization contribute to proteome organization and reorganization.

  10. Observation of charge state and conformational change in immobilized protein using surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Mannen, T; Yamaguchi, S; Honda, J; Sugimoto, S; Kitayama, A; Nagamune, T

    2001-06-15

    Behaviors of proteins immobilized on a solid surface were investigated using BIACORE, a biosensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance. This sensor is usually used for analyzing binding events during biomolecular interactions. Here we propose a novel use of this sensor to monitor two kinds of intramolecular changes in immobilized proteins. Several proteins were covalently attached to dextran chains on the sensor surface in the flow cell and were then exposed to a series of buffers with varying pH. Signal changes derived from changes of refractive index around the sensor surface were detected during and after the exposure to each of these buffers, which we denoted as in situ values and postvalues, respectively. The in situ value reflects the behavior of immobilized proteins in these buffers and was revealed to have a correlation with total charge state of the proteins, while the postvalue reflects how immobilized proteins react after the exposure and was suggested to represent the degree of conformational changes of the proteins. This method is expected to be applicable to various analyses and can provide us with new information about the behavior of proteins on solid phase.

  11. Membrane surface engineering for protein separations: experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zizhao; Du, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil; Qian, Xianghong

    2014-09-09

    A bisphosphonate derived ligand was successfully synthesized and grafted from the surface of regenerated cellulose membrane using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for protein separations. This ligand has a remarkable affinity for arginine (Arg) residues on protein surface. Hydrophilic residues N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) was copolymerized to enhance the flexibility of the copolymer ligand and further improve specific protein adsorption. The polymerization of bisphosphonate derivatives was successful for the first time using ATRP. Static and dynamic binding capacities were determined for binding and elution of Arg rich lysozyme. The interaction mechanism between the copolymer ligand and lysozyme was elucidated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations.

  12. Insights into molecular plasticity of choline binding proteins (pneumococcal surface proteins) by SAXS.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Monterroso, Begoña; Menéndez, Margarita; Diakun, Greg; Chacón, Pablo; Hermoso, Juan Antonio; Díaz, J Fernando

    2007-01-12

    Phosphocholine moieties decorating the pneumococcal surface are used as a docking station for a family of modular proteins, the so-called choline binding proteins or CBPs. Choline recognition is essential for CBPs function and may also be a determinant for their quaternary structure. There is little knowledge about modular arrangement or oligomeric structures in this family. Therefore, we have used the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique combined with analytical ultracentrifugation in order to model the three-dimensional envelope of two highly different CBPs: the phage encoded Cpl-1 lysozyme and the pneumococcal phosphorylcholine esterase Pce. Both enzymes have an N-terminal catalytic module and a C-terminal choline-binding module (CBM) that attaches them to the bacterial surface and comprises six and ten sequence repeats in Cpl-1 and Pce, respectively. SAXS experiments have shown an inherent conformational plasticity in Cpl-1 that accounts for the different relative position of these regions in the solution and crystal structures. Dimerization of Cpl-1 upon choline binding has been also visualised for the first time, and monomer-monomer interactions take place through the first CBR where a non-canonical choline binding site has now been identified. This mode of association seems to be independent of the absence or presence of the Cpl-1 catalytic module and reveals that the arrangement of the monomers differs from that previously found in the isolated CBM dimer of pneumococcal LytA amidase. In contrast, Pce displays the same modular disposition in the solution and crystal structures, and remains almost invariant upon choline binding. The present results suggest that protein dimerization and duplication of CBRs may be alternative but not equivalent ways of improving cell wall recognition by CBPs, since they provide different interaction geometries for choline residues present in (lipo)teichoic acids.

  13. Global absolute quantification reveals tight regulation of protein expression in single Xenopus eggs

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Arne H.; Lindeboom, Rik G.H.; Perino, Matteo; van Heeringen, Simon J.; Veenstra, Gert Jan C.; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    While recent developments in genomic sequencing technology have enabled comprehensive transcriptome analyses of single cells, single cell proteomics has thus far been restricted to targeted studies. Here, we perform global absolute protein quantification of fertilized Xenopus laevis eggs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, quantifying over 5800 proteins in the largest single cell proteome characterized to date. Absolute protein amounts in single eggs are highly consistent, thus indicating a tight regulation of global protein abundance. Protein copy numbers in single eggs range from tens of thousands to ten trillion copies per cell. Comparison between the single-cell proteome and transcriptome reveal poor expression correlation. Finally, we identify 439 proteins that significantly change in abundance during early embryogenesis. Downregulated proteins include ribosomal proteins and upregulated proteins include basal transcription factors, among others. Many of these proteins do not show regulation at the transcript level. Altogether, our data reveal that the transcriptome is a poor indicator of the proteome and that protein levels are tightly controlled in X. laevis eggs. PMID:25056316

  14. Global absolute quantification reveals tight regulation of protein expression in single Xenopus eggs.

    PubMed

    Smits, Arne H; Lindeboom, Rik G H; Perino, Matteo; van Heeringen, Simon J; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2014-09-01

    While recent developments in genomic sequencing technology have enabled comprehensive transcriptome analyses of single cells, single cell proteomics has thus far been restricted to targeted studies. Here, we perform global absolute protein quantification of fertilized Xenopus laevis eggs using mass spectrometry-based proteomics, quantifying over 5800 proteins in the largest single cell proteome characterized to date. Absolute protein amounts in single eggs are highly consistent, thus indicating a tight regulation of global protein abundance. Protein copy numbers in single eggs range from tens of thousands to ten trillion copies per cell. Comparison between the single-cell proteome and transcriptome reveal poor expression correlation. Finally, we identify 439 proteins that significantly change in abundance during early embryogenesis. Downregulated proteins include ribosomal proteins and upregulated proteins include basal transcription factors, among others. Many of these proteins do not show regulation at the transcript level. Altogether, our data reveal that the transcriptome is a poor indicator of the proteome and that protein levels are tightly controlled in X. laevis eggs.

  15. Gated Hall effect of nanoplate devices reveals surface-state-induced surface inversion in iron pyrite semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Cabán-Acevedo, Miguel; Kaiser, Nicholas S; Jin, Song

    2014-12-10

    Understanding semiconductor surface states is critical for their applications, but fully characterizing surface electrical properties is challenging. Such a challenge is especially crippling for semiconducting iron pyrite (FeS2), whose potential for solar energy conversion has been suggested to be held back by rich surface states. Here, by taking advantage of the high surface-to-bulk ratio in nanostructures and effective electrolyte gating, we develop a general method to fully characterize both the surface inversion and bulk electrical transport properties for the first time through electrolyte-gated Hall measurements of pyrite nanoplate devices. Our study shows that pyrite is n-type in the bulk and p-type near the surface due to strong inversion and yields the concentrations and mobilities of both bulk electrons and surface holes. Further, solutions of the Poisson equation reveal a high-density of surface holes accumulated in a 1.3 nm thick strong inversion layer and an upward band bending of 0.9-1.0 eV. This work presents a general methodology for using transport measurements of nanostructures to study both bulk and surface transport properties of semiconductors. It also suggests that high-density of surface states are present on surface of pyrite, which partially explains the universal p-type conductivity and lack of photovoltage in polycrystalline pyrite.

  16. Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at protein surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellerue, S.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    2000-08-01

    Relaxational dynamics of water molecules at the surface of a C-phycocyanin protein is studied by high resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The neutron quasi-elastic spectra are well described by the α-relaxation process of mode coupling theory of supercooled liquids. The relaxation times of interfacial water exhibit a power law dependence on the wave vector Q. The average diffusion coefficient is 10 times lower than that of bulk water. This confirms that there is a retardation of water molecules at the protein surface which is in good agreement with the results of water at the surface of hydrophilic model systems.

  17. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2011-05-01

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  18. Effects of tethering a multistate folding protein to a surface.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuai; Knotts, Thomas A

    2011-05-14

    Protein/surface interactions are important in a variety of fields and devices, yet fundamental understanding of the relevant phenomena remains fragmented due to resolution limitations of experimental techniques. Molecular simulation has provided useful answers, but such studies have focused on proteins that fold through a two-state process. This study uses simulation to show how surfaces can affect proteins which fold through a multistate process by investigating the folding mechanism of lysozyme (PDB ID: 7LZM). The results demonstrate that in the bulk 7LZM folds through a process with four stable states: the folded state, the unfolded state, and two stable intermediates. The folding mechanism remains the same when the protein is tethered to a surface at most residues; however, in one case the folding mechanism changes in such a way as to eliminate one of the intermediates. An analysis of the molecular configurations shows that tethering at this site is advantageous for protein arrays because the active site is both presented to the bulk phase and stabilized. Taken as a whole, the results offer hope that rational design of protein arrays is possible once the behavior of the protein on the surface is ascertained.

  19. Comparative exoprotein profiling of different Staphylococcus epidermidis strains reveals potential link between nonclassical protein export and virulence.

    PubMed

    Siljamäki, Pia; Varmanen, Pekka; Kankainen, Matti; Sukura, Antti; Savijoki, Kirsi; Nyman, Tuula A

    2014-07-03

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) includes commensal and pathogenic strains capable of infecting humans and animals. This study reports global exoproteome profiling of bovine mastitis strain PM221 and two human strains, commensal-type ATCC12228 and sepsis-associated RP62A. We identified 451, 395, and 518 proteins from culture supernatants of PM221, ATCC12228, and RP62A, respectively. Comparison of the identified exoproteomes revealed several strain-specific differences related to secreted antigens and adhesins, higher virulence capability for RP62A, and similarities between the PM221 and RP62A exoproteomes. The majority of the identified proteins (∼80%) were predicted to be cytoplasmic, including proteins known to be associated in membrane vesicles (MVs) in Staphylococcus aureus and immunogenic/adhesive moonlighting proteins. Enrichment of MV fractions from culture supernatants and analysis of their protein composition indicated that this nonclassical protein secretion pathway was being exploited under the conditions used and that there are strain-specific differences in nonclassical protein export. In addition, several predicted cell-surface proteins were identified in the culture media. In summary, the present study is the first in-depth exoproteome analysis of SE highlighting strain-specific factors able to contribute to virulence and adaptation.

  20. Anchoring of surface proteins to the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. III. Lipid II is an in vivo peptidoglycan substrate for sortase-catalyzed surface protein anchoring.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adrienne M; Ton-That, Hung; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Schneewind, Olaf

    2002-05-03

    Surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus are anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan by a mechanism requiring a C-terminal sorting signal with an LPXTG motif. Surface proteins are first synthesized in the bacterial cytoplasm and then transported across the cytoplasmic membrane. Cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide of the cytoplasmic surface protein P1 precursor generates the extracellular P2 species, which is the substrate for the cell wall anchoring reaction. Sortase, a membrane-anchored transpeptidase, cleaves P2 between the threonine (T) and the glycine (G) of the LPXTG motif and catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of threonine and the amino group of cell wall cross-bridges. We have used metabolic labeling of staphylococcal cultures with [(32)P]phosphoric acid to reveal a P3 intermediate. The (32)P-label of immunoprecipitated surface protein is removed by treatment with lysostaphin, a glycyl-glycine endopeptidase that separates the cell wall anchor structure. Furthermore, the appearance of P3 is prevented in the absence of sortase or by the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. (32)P-Labeled cell wall anchor species bind to nisin, an antibiotic that is known to form a complex with lipid II. Thus, it appears that the P3 intermediate represents surface protein linked to the lipid II peptidoglycan precursor. The data support a model whereby lipid II-linked polypeptides are incorporated into the growing peptidoglycan via the transpeptidation and transglycosylation reactions of cell wall synthesis, generating mature cell wall-linked surface protein.

  1. Protein-induced surface structuring in myelin membrane monolayers.

    PubMed

    Rosetti, Carla M; Maggio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    Monolayers prepared from myelin conserve all the compositional complexity of the natural membrane when spread at the air-water interface. They show a complex pressure-dependent surface pattern that, on compression, changes from the coexistence of two liquid phases to a viscous fractal phase embedded in a liquid phase. We dissected the role of major myelin protein components, myelin basic protein (MBP), and Folch-Lees proteolipid protein (PLP) as crucial factors determining the structural dynamics of the interface. By analyzing mixtures of a single protein with the myelin lipids we found that MBP and PLP have different surface pressure-dependent behaviors. MBP stabilizes the segregation of two liquid phases at low pressures and becomes excluded from the film under compression, remaining adjacent to the interface. PLP, on the contrary, organizes a fractal-like pattern at all surface pressures when included in a monolayer of the protein-free myelin lipids but it remains mixed in the MBP-induced liquid phase. The resultant surface topography and dynamics is regulated by combined near to equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium effects. PLP appears to act as a surface skeleton for the whole components whereas MBP couples the structuring to surface pressure-dependent extrusion and adsorption processes.

  2. Formation of Ordered Arrays of Proteins on Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhoff, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    Van der Waals (dispersion) forces contribute to interactions of proteins with other molecules or with surfaces, but because of the structural complexity of protein molecules, the magnitude of these effects is usually estimated based on idealized models of the molecular geometry, e.g., spheres or spheroids. The calculations reported here seek to account for both the geometric irregularity of protein molecules and the material properties of the interacting media. While the latter are found to fall in the generally accepted range, the molecular shape is shown to cause the magnitudes of the interactions to differ significantly from those calculated using idealized models, with important consequences. First, the roughness of the molecular surface leads to much lower average interaction energies for both protein-protein and protein-surface cases relative to calculations in which the protein molecule is approximated as a sphere. These results indicate that a form of steric stabilization may be an important effect in protein solutions. Underlying this behavior is appreciable orientational dependence, one reflection of which is that molecules of complementary shape are found to exhibit very strong attractive dispersion interactions. Although this has been widely discussed previously in the context of molecular recognition processes, the broader implications of these phenomena may also be important at larger molecular separations, e.g., in the dynamics of aggregation, precipitation and crystal growth.

  3. Template-imprinted nanostructured surfaces for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Tsai, W B; Garrison, M D; Ferrari, S; Ratner, B D

    1999-04-15

    Synthetic materials capable of selectively recognizing proteins are important in separations, biosensors and the development of biomedical materials. The technique of molecular imprinting creates specific recognition sites in polymers by using template molecules. Molecular recognition is attributed to binding sites that complement molecules in size, shape and chemical functionality. But attempts to imprint proteins have met with only limited success. Here we report a method for imprinting surfaces with protein-recognition sites. We use radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma deposition to form polymeric thin films around proteins coated with disaccharide molecules. The disaccharides become covalently attached to the polymer film, creating polysaccharide-like cavities that exhibit highly selective recognition for a variety of template proteins, including albumin, immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, ribonuclease and streptavidin. Direct imaging of template recognition is achieved by patterning a surface at the micrometre scale with imprinted regions.

  4. Spontaneous mutation reveals influence of exopolysaccharide on Lactobacillus johnsonii surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Horn, Nikki; Wegmann, Udo; Dertli, Enes; Mulholland, Francis; Collins, Samuel R A; Waldron, Keith W; Bongaerts, Roy J; Mayer, Melinda J; Narbad, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    As a competitive exclusion agent, Lactobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has been shown to prevent the colonization of selected pathogenic bacteria from the chicken gastrointestinal tract. During growth of the bacterium a rare but consistent emergence of an altered phenotype was noted, generating smooth colonies in contrast to the wild type rough form. A smooth colony variant was isolated and two-dimensional gel analysis of both strains revealed a protein spot with different migration properties in the two phenotypes. The spot in both gels was identified as a putative tyrosine kinase (EpsC), associated with a predicted exopolysaccharide gene cluster. Sequencing of the epsC gene from the smooth mutant revealed a single substitution (G to A) in the coding strand, resulting in the amino acid change D88N in the corresponding gene product. A native plasmid of L. johnsonii was engineered to produce a novel vector for constitutive expression and this was used to demonstrate that expression of the wild type epsC gene in the smooth mutant produced a reversion to the rough colony phenotype. Both the mutant and epsC complemented strains had increased levels of exopolysaccharides compared to the wild type strain, indicating that the rough phenotype is not solely associated with the quantity of exopolysaccharide. Another gene in the cluster, epsE, that encoded a putative undecaprenyl-phosphate galactosephosphotransferase, was deleted in order to investigate its role in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. The ΔepsE strain exhibited a large increase in cell aggregation and a reduction in exopolysaccharide content, while plasmid complementation of epsE restored the wild type phenotype. Flow cytometry showed that the wild type and derivative strains exhibited clear differences in their adhesive ability to HT29 monolayers in tissue culture, demonstrating an impact of EPS on surface properties and bacteria-host interactions.

  5. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  6. Arabidopsis G-protein interactome reveals connections to cell wall carbohydrates and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Klopffleisch, Karsten; Phan, Nguyen; Augustin, Kelsey; Bayne, Robert S; Booker, Katherine S; Botella, Jose R; Carpita, Nicholas C; Carr, Tyrell; Chen, Jin-Gui; Cooke, Thomas Ryan; Frick-Cheng, Arwen; Friedman, Erin J; Fulk, Brandon; Hahn, Michael G; Jiang, Kun; Jorda, Lucia; Kruppe, Lydia; Liu, Chenggang; Lorek, Justine; McCann, Maureen C; Molina, Antonio; Moriyama, Etsuko N; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Schwarz, John; Seta, Steven; Tan, Matthew; Temp, Ulrike; Trusov, Yuri; Urano, Daisuke; Welter, Bastian; Yang, Jing; Panstruga, Ralph; Uhrig, Joachim F; Jones, Alan M

    2011-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification. PMID:21952135

  7. Combined flow cytometric analysis of surface and intracellular antigens reveals surface molecule markers of human neuropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Turaç, Gizem; Hindley, Christopher J; Thomas, Ria; Davis, Jason A; Deleidi, Michela; Gasser, Thomas; Karaöz, Erdal; Pruszak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Surface molecule profiles undergo dynamic changes in physiology and pathology, serve as markers of cellular state and phenotype and can be exploited for cell selection strategies and diagnostics. The isolation of well-defined cell subsets is needed for in vivo and in vitro applications in stem cell biology. In this technical report, we present an approach for defining a subset of interest in a mixed cell population by flow cytometric detection of intracellular antigens. We have developed a fully validated protocol that enables the co-detection of cluster of differentiation (CD) surface antigens on fixed, permeabilized neural cell populations defined by intracellular staining. Determining the degree of co-expression of surface marker candidates with intracellular target population markers (nestin, MAP2, doublecortin, TUJ1) on neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y, BE(2)-M17) yielded a combinatorial CD49f(-)/CD200(high) surface marker panel. Its application in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) generated enriched neuronal cultures from differentiated cell suspensions derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data underlines the feasibility of using the described co-labeling protocol and co-expression analysis for quantitative assays in mammalian neurobiology and for screening approaches to identify much needed surface markers in stem cell biology.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance imaging for parallelized detection of protein biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piliarik, Marek; Párová, Lucie; Vaisocherová, Hana; Homola, Jiří

    2009-05-01

    We report a novel high-throughput surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for rapid and parallelized detection of protein biomarkers. The biosensor is based on a high-performance SPR imaging sensor with polarization contrast and internal referencing which yields a considerably higher sensitivity and resolution than conventional SPR imaging systems (refractive index resolution 2 × 10-7 RIU). We combined the SPR imaging biosensor with microspotting to create an array of antibodies. DNA-directed protein immobilization was utilized for the spatially resolved attachment of antibodies. Using Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) as model protein biomarker, we demonstrated the potential for simultaneous detection of proteins in up to 100 channels.

  9. Sub-synaptic, multiplexed analysis of proteins reveals Fragile X related protein 2 is mislocalized in Fmr1 KO synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon X; Smith, Stephen J; Mourrain, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of proteins within sub-synaptic compartments is an essential aspect of their neurological function. Current methodologies, such as electron microscopy (EM) and super-resolution imaging techniques, can provide the precise localization of proteins, but are often limited to a small number of one-time observations with narrow spatial and molecular coverage. The diversity of synaptic proteins and synapse types demands synapse analysis on a scale that is prohibitive with current methods. Here, we demonstrate SubSynMAP, a fast, multiplexed sub-synaptic protein analysis method using wide-field data from deconvolution array tomography (ATD). SubSynMAP generates probability distributions for that reveal the functional range of proteins within the averaged synapse of a particular class. This enables the differentiation of closely juxtaposed proteins. Using this method, we analyzed 15 synaptic proteins in normal and Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FXS) model mouse cortex, and revealed disease-specific modifications of sub-synaptic protein distributions across synapse classes and cortical layers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20560.001 PMID:27770568

  10. Protein adsorption to graphene surfaces controlled by chemical modification of the substrate surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ogino, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated effects of the support substrate surfaces on properties of the attached graphene flakes by observing protein adsorption to the graphene surfaces on SiO2/Si substrates that are modified with self-assembled monolayers to control their hydrophilicity. Using atomic force microscopy operated in aqueous environment, we found that high-density clusters of agglomerated avidin molecules form on the graphene flakes in the areas supported by a hydrophobic substrate surface, whereas very low density of large avidin clusters form at the edge of graphene flakes in the area supported by a hydrophilic surface. These results demonstrate that hydrophilicity of the support surface affects hydrophilicity of the graphene surface also in aqueous environment and that surface modification of the support substrate is a useful technique to control protein adsorption phenomena on graphene surfaces for realization of high sensitive graphene biosensors.

  11. Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

  12. Identification of sporozoite surface proteins and antigens of Eimeria nieschulzi (Apicomplexa)

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, M.; Upton, S.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, lectin binding, and {sup 125}I surface labeling of sporozoites were used to probe sporozoites of the rat coccidian, Eimeria nieschulzi. Analysis of silver stained gels revealed greater than 50 bands. Surface iodination revealed about 14 well labeled, and about 10 weakly labeled but potential, surface proteins. The most heavily labeled surface proteins had molecular masses of 60, 53-54, 45, 28, 23-24, 17, 15, 14, 13, and 12 kD. Following electrophoresis and Western blotting, 2 of the 12 125I labeled lectin probes bound to two bands on the blots, which collectively indicated that two bands were glycosylated. Concanavalin A (ConA) specifically recognized a band at 53 kD, which may represent a surface glycoprotein, and a lectin derived from Osage orange (MPA) bound to a single band at 82-88 kD, that may also be a surface molecule. Immunoblotting using sera collected from rats inoculated orally with oocysts, as well as sera from mice hyperimmunized with sporozoites, revealed that many surface molecules appear to be immunogenic.

  13. Protein Profiling Reveals Novel Proteins in Pollen and Pistil of W22 (ga1; Ga1) in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Roy, Swapan Kumar; Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Cho, Kun; Kwon, Soo-Jeong; Cho, Seong-Woo; So, Yoon-Sup; Holland, James B.; Woo, Sun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Gametophytic factors mediate pollen-pistil interactions in maize (Zea mays L.) and play active roles in limiting gene flow among maize populations and between maize and teosinte. This study was carried out to identify proteins and investigate the mechanism of gametophytic factors using protein analysis. W22 (ga1); which did not carry a gametophytic factor and W22 (Ga1), a near iso-genic line, were used for the proteome investigation. SDS-PAGE was executed to investigate proteins in the pollen and pistil of W22 (ga1) and W22 (Ga1). A total of 44 differentially expressed proteins were identified in the pollen and pistil on SDS-PAGE using LTQ-FTICR MS. Among the 44 proteins, a total of 24 proteins were identified in the pollen of W22 (ga1) and W22 (Ga1) whereas 20 differentially expressed proteins were identified from the pistil of W22 (ga1) and W22 (Ga1). However, in pollen, 2 proteins were identified only in the W22 (ga1) and 12 proteins only in the W22 (Ga1) whereas 10 proteins were confirmed from the both of W22 (ga1) and W22 (Ga1). In contrary, 10 proteins were appeared only in the pistil of W22 (ga1) and 7 proteins from W22 (Ga1) while 3 proteins confirmed in the both of W22 (ga1) and W22 (Ga1). Moreover, the identified proteins were generally involved in hydrolase activity, nucleic acid binding and nucleotide binding. These results help to reveal the mechanism of gametophytic factors and provide a valuable clue for the pollen and pistil research in maize. PMID:28250381

  14. Identification of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Surface Proteins by Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Matthew S.; Mobley, Harry L.T.

    2009-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in humans. In the process of identifying candidate antigens for a vaccine, two methods for the identification of the UPEC surface proteome during growth in human urine were investigated. The first approach utilized a protease to ‘shave’ surface-exposed peptides from the bacterial cell surface and identify them by mass spectrometry. Although this approach has been successfully applied to a Gram-positive pathogen, the adaptation to Gram-negative UPEC resulted in cytoplasmic protein contamination. In a more direct approach, whole-cell bacteria were labeled with a biotin tag to indicate surface-exposed peptides and two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2-DLC-MS/MS) was used to identify proteins isolated from the outer membrane. This method discovered 25 predicted outer membrane proteins expressed by UPEC while growing in human urine. Nine of the 25 predicted outer membrane proteins were part of iron transport systems or putative iron-regulated virulence proteins, indicating the importance of iron acquisition during growth in urine. One of the iron transport proteins identified, Hma, appears to be a promising vaccine candidate is being further investigated. The method described here presents a system to rapidly identify the outer membrane proteome of bacteria, which may prove valuable in vaccine development. PMID:19426766

  15. Hydrophobicity of protein surfaces: Separating geometry from chemistry.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Lopez, Carlos F; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2008-02-19

    To better understand the role of surface chemical heterogeneity in natural nanoscale hydration, we study via molecular dynamics simulation the structure and thermodynamics of water confined between two protein-like surfaces. Each surface is constructed to have interactions with water corresponding to those of the putative hydrophobic surface of a melittin dimer, but is flattened rather than having its native "cupped" configuration. Furthermore, peripheral charged groups are removed. Thus, the role of a rough surface topography is removed, and results can be productively compared with those previously observed for idealized, atomically smooth hydrophilic and hydrophobic flat surfaces. The results indicate that the protein surface is less hydrophobic than the idealized counterpart. The density and compressibility of water adjacent to a melittin dimer is intermediate between that observed adjacent to idealized hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces. We find that solvent evacuation of the hydrophobic gap (cavitation) between dimers is observed when the gap has closed to sterically permit a single water layer. This cavitation occurs at smaller pressures and separations than in the case of idealized hydrophobic flat surfaces. The vapor phase between the melittin dimers occupies a much smaller lateral region than in the case of the idealized surfaces; cavitation is localized in a narrow central region between the dimers, where an apolar amino acid is located. When that amino acid is replaced by a polar residue, cavitation is no longer observed.

  16. Energy landscape of all-atom protein-protein interactions revealed by multiscale enhanced sampling.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape.

  17. The surface layer protein of Bacillus thuringiensis CTC forms unique intracellular parasporal inclusion body.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenguang; Yu, Ziniu

    2008-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain CTC forms round parasporal inclusion body. The inclusion body protein gene ctc has been cloned and characterized. Sequence homology analysis reveals that the amino acid sequence of CTC protein shows 87% identity with the surface layer (S-layer) protein Sap (GenBank Z36946) in B. anthracis. In this report, transmission electron microscope observation showed that CTC formed intracellular parasporal inclusion body and sheet structure of S-layer-like protein at the spore phase. Furthermore, the ctc gene was transformed into an acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. The resulting transformant could form parasporal body which had the same shape and molecular weight of protein with that of B. thuringiensis CTC. These results, together with the sequence homology analysis of ctc gene, confirmed that the unique intracellular parasporal inclusion body of B. thuringiensis was comprised of S-layer protein.

  18. Short LOV Proteins in Methylocystis Reveal Insight into LOV Domain Photocycle Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    El-Arab, Kaley K.; Pudasaini, Ashutosh; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) proteins are widely used in optogenetic devices, however universal signal transduction pathways and photocycle mechanisms remain elusive. In particular, short-LOV (sLOV) proteins have been discovered in bacteria and fungi, containing only the photoresponsive LOV element without any obvious signal transduction domains. These sLOV proteins may be ideal models for LOV domain function due to their ease of study as full-length proteins. Unfortunately, characterization of such proteins remains limited to select systems. Herein, we identify a family of bacterial sLOV proteins present in Methylocystis. Sequence analysis of Methylocystis LOV proteins (McLOV) demonstrates conservation with sLOV proteins from fungal systems that employ competitive dimerization as a signaling mechanism. Cloning and characterization of McLOV proteins confirms functional dimer formation and reveal unexpected photocycle mechanisms. Specifically, some McLOV photocycles are insensitive to external bases such as imidazole, in contrast to previously characterized LOV proteins. Mutational analysis identifies a key residue that imparts insensitivity to imidazole in two McLOV homologs and affects adduct decay by two orders of magnitude. The resultant data identifies a new family of LOV proteins that indicate a universal photocycle mechanism may not be present in LOV proteins. PMID:25933162

  19. Archaeal surface layer proteins contain beta propeller, PKD, and beta helix domains and are related to metazoan cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Takagi, Junichi; Liu, Jin-huan; Lindgren, Sara; Zhang, Rong-guang; Joachimiak, A; Wang, Jia-huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    The surface layer of archaeobacteria protects cells from extreme environments and, in Methanosarcina, may regulate cell adhesion. We identify three domain types that account for the complete architecture of numerous Methanosarcina surface layer proteins (SLPs). We solve the crystal structure for two of these domains, which correspond to the two N-terminal domains of an M. mazei SLP. One domain displays a unique, highly symmetrical, seven-bladed beta propeller fold, and the other belongs to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) superfamily fold. The third domain is predicted to adopt a beta helix fold. These domains have homologs in metazoan cell surface proteins, suggesting remarkable relationships between domains in archaeal SLPs and metazoan cell surface proteins.

  20. Targeting protein–protein interactions by rational design: mimicry of protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2006-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions play key roles in a range of biological processes, and are therefore important targets for the design of novel therapeutics. Unlike in the design of enzyme active site inhibitors, the disruption of protein–protein interactions is far more challenging, due to such factors as the large interfacial areas involved and the relatively flat and featureless topologies of these surfaces. Nevertheless, in spite of such challenges, there has been considerable progress in recent years. In this review, we discuss this progress in the context of mimicry of protein surfaces: targeting protein–protein interactions by rational design. PMID:16849232

  1. Crystal structure of the Borna disease virus matrix protein (BDV-M) reveals ssRNA binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Piotr; Lieber, Diana; Meyer, Sylke; Dautel, Philipp; Kerth, Andreas; Kraus, Ina; Garten, Wolfgang; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2009-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic enveloped RNA virus that causes a noncytolytic, persistent infection of the central nervous system in mammals. BDV belongs to the order Mononegavirales, which also includes the negative-strand RNA viruses (NSVs) Ebola, Marburg, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, mumps, and measles. BDV-M, the matrix protein (M-protein) of BDV, is the smallest M-protein (16.2 kDa) among the NSVs. M-proteins play a critical role in virus assembly and budding, mediating the interaction between the viral capsid, envelope, and glycoprotein spikes, and are as such responsible for the structural stability and individual form of virus particles. Here, we report the 3D structure of BDV-M, a full-length M-protein structure from a nonsegmented RNA NSV. The BDV-M monomer exhibits structural similarity to the N-terminal domain of the Ebola M-protein (VP40), while the surface charge of the tetramer provides clues to the membrane association of BDV-M. Additional electron density in the crystal reveals the presence of bound nucleic acid, interpreted as cytidine-5′-monophosphate. The heterologously expressed BDV-M copurifies with and protects ssRNA oligonucleotides of a median length of 16 nt taken up from the expression host. The results presented here show that BDV-M would be able to bind RNA and lipid membranes simultaneously, expanding the repertoire of M-protein functionalities. PMID:19237566

  2. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; ...

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  3. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  4. Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4

    SciTech Connect

    Amos, Charles D.; Roldan, Manuel A.; Varela, Maria; Goodenough, John B.; Ferreira, Paulo J.

    2016-03-29

    The spinel Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 is a candidate cathode for a Li-ion battery, but its capacity fades over a charge/discharge cycle of Li1–x[Mn2]O4 (0 < x < 1) that is associated with a loss of Mn to the organic-liquid electrolyte. It is known that the disproportionation reaction 2Mn3+ = Mn2+ + Mn4+ occurs at the surface of a Mn spinel, and it is important to understand the atomic structure and composition of the surface of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 in order to understand how Mn loss occurs. We report a study of the surface reconstruction of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure coupled with Mn-valence and the distribution of the atomic ratio of oxygen obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals a thin, stable surface layer of Mn3O4, a subsurface region of Li1+x[Mn2]O4 with retention of bulk Li[Mn2]O4. We conclude that this observation is compatible with the disproportionation reaction coupled with oxygen deficiency and a displacement of surface Li+ from the Mn3O4 surface phase. These results provide a critical step toward understanding how Mn is lost from Li[Mn2]O4, once inside a battery.

  5. Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4

    DOE PAGES

    Amos, Charles D.; Roldan, Manuel A.; Varela, Maria; ...

    2016-03-29

    The spinel Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 is a candidate cathode for a Li-ion battery, but its capacity fades over a charge/discharge cycle of Li1–x[Mn2]O4 (0 < x < 1) that is associated with a loss of Mn to the organic-liquid electrolyte. It is known that the disproportionation reaction 2Mn3+ = Mn2+ + Mn4+ occurs at the surface of a Mn spinel, and it is important to understand the atomic structure and composition of the surface of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 in order to understand how Mn loss occurs. We report a study of the surface reconstructionmore » of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure coupled with Mn-valence and the distribution of the atomic ratio of oxygen obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals a thin, stable surface layer of Mn3O4, a subsurface region of Li1+x[Mn2]O4 with retention of bulk Li[Mn2]O4. We conclude that this observation is compatible with the disproportionation reaction coupled with oxygen deficiency and a displacement of surface Li+ from the Mn3O4 surface phase. These results provide a critical step toward understanding how Mn is lost from Li[Mn2]O4, once inside a battery.« less

  6. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  7. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Aramesh, M; Shimoni, O; Ostrikov, K; Prawer, S; Cervenka, J

    2015-03-19

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.

  8. Proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anne; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Crossett, Ben; Nagy, Judit; Brown, Katherine; Fairweather, Neil

    2005-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that causes disease of the large intestine, particularly after treatment with antibiotics. The bacterium produces two toxins (A and B) that are responsible for the pathology of the disease. In addition, a number of bacterial virulence factors associated with adhesion to the gut have previously been identified, including the cell wall protein Cwp66, the high-molecular weight surface layer protein (HMW-SLP) and the flagella. As the genome sequence predicts many other cell wall associated proteins, we have investigated the diversity of proteins in cell wall extracts, with the aim of identifying further virulence factors. We have used a number of methods to remove the proteins associated with the cell wall of C. difficile. Two of the resulting extracts, obtained using low pH glycine treatment and lysozyme digestion of the cell wall, have been analysed in detail by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. One hundred and nineteen spots, comprising 49 different proteins, have been identified. The two surface layer proteins (SLPs) are the most abundant proteins, and we have also found components of the flagellum. Interestingly, we have also determined that a number of paralogs of the HMW-SLP are expressed, and these could represent targets for further investigation as virulence factors.

  9. Comparison of surface and hydrogel-based protein microchips.

    PubMed

    Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Rubina, A Yu; Pan'kov, S V; Konovalova, E V; Moiseeva, O V; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2007-09-15

    Protein microchips are designed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. The rapid advance in microchip technology and a wide variety of existing techniques pose the problem of unified approach to the assessment and comparison of different platforms. Here we compare the characteristics of protein microchips developed for quantitative immunoassay with those of antibodies immobilized on glass surfaces and in hemispherical gel pads. Spotting concentrations of antibodies used for manufacturing of microchips of both types and concentrations of antigen in analyte solution were identical. We compared the efficiency of antibody immobilization, the intensity of fluorescence signals for both direct and sandwich-type immunoassays, and the reaction-diffusion kinetics of the formation of antibody-antigen complexes for surface and gel-based microchips. Our results demonstrate higher capacity and sensitivity for the hydrogel-based protein microchips, while fluorescence saturation kinetics for the two types of microarrays was comparable.

  10. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L.

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  11. The role of flexibility and molecular shape in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Devedjiev, Yancho D.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are dynamic systems and interact with their environment. The analysis of crystal contacts in the most accurately determined protein structures (d < 1.5 Å) reveals that in contrast to current views, static disorder and high side-chain entropy are common in the crystal contact area. These observations challenge the validity of the theory that presumes that the occurrence of well ordered patches of side chains at the surface is an essential prerequisite for a successful crystallization event. The present paper provides evidence in support of the approach for understanding protein crystallization as a process dependent on multiple factors, each with its relative contribution, rather than a phenomenon driven by a few dominant physicochemical characteristics. The role of the molecular shape as a factor in the crystallization of proteins by surface mutagenesis is discussed. PMID:25664789

  12. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 Å), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 Å. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  13. Molecular basis for polyol-induced protein stability revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Ji, Luo; Zhang, Lin; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2010-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 in different polyols (glycerol, xylitol, sorbitol, trehalose, and sucrose) at 363 K were performed to probe the molecular basis of the stabilizing effect, and the data in water, ethanol, and glycol were compared. It is found that protein protection by polyols is positively correlated with both the molecular volume and the fractional polar surface area, and the former contributes more significantly to the protein's stability. Polyol molecules have only a few direct hydrogen bonds with the protein, and the number of hydrogen bonds between a polyol and the protein is similar for different polyols. Thus, it is concluded that the direct interactions contribute little to the stabilizing effect. It is clarified that the preferential exclusion of the polyols is the origin of their protective effects, and it increases with increasing polyol size. Namely, there is preferential hydration on the protein surface (2 A), and polyol molecules cluster around the protein at a distance of about 4 A. The preferential exclusion of polyols leads to indirect interactions that prevent the protein from thermal unfolding. The water structure becomes more ordered with increasing the polyol size. So, the entropy of water in the first hydration shell decreases, and a larger extent of decrease is observed with increasing polyol size, leading to larger transfer free energy. The findings suggest that polyols protect the protein from thermal unfolding via indirect interactions. The work has thus elucidated the molecular mechanism of structural stability of the protein in polyol solutions.

  14. Triggering protein adsorption on tailored cationic cellulose surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Zarth, Cíntia Salomão Pinto; Kargl, Rupert; Köstler, Stefan; Ribitsch, Volker; Heinze, Thomas; Spirk, Stefan; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin

    2014-11-10

    The equipment of cellulose ultrathin films with BSA (bovine serum albumin) via cationization of the surface by tailor-made cationic celluloses is described. In this way, matrices for controlled protein deposition are created, whereas the extent of protein affinity to these surfaces is controlled by the charge density and solubility of the tailored cationic cellulose derivative. In order to understand the impact of the cationic cellulose derivatives on the protein affinity, their interaction capacity with fluorescently labeled BSA is investigated at different concentrations and pH values. The amount of deposited material is quantified using QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, wet mass) and MP-SPR (multi-parameter surface plasmon resonance, dry mass), and the mass of coupled water is evaluated by combination of QCM-D and SPR data. It turns out that adsorption can be tuned over a wide range (0.6-3.9 mg dry mass m(-2)) depending on the used conditions for adsorption and the type of employed cationic cellulose. After evaluation of protein adsorption, patterned cellulose thin films have been prepared and the cationic celluloses were adsorbed in a similar fashion as in the QCM-D and SPR experiments. Onto these cationic surfaces, fluorescently labeled BSA in different concentrations is deposited by an automatized spotting apparatus and a correlation between the amount of the deposited protein and the fluorescence intensity is established.

  15. Spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of biosensor surfaces with protein/amino-organosilane/silicon structure.

    PubMed

    Awsiuk, K; Bernasik, A; Kitsara, M; Budkowski, A; Petrou, P; Kakabakos, S; Prauzner-Bechcicki, S; Rysz, J; Raptis, I

    2012-02-01

    Composition and structure of biorecognition protein layers created on silicon substrates modified with amino-organosilanes determine the sensitivity and specificity of silicon based biosensing devices. In the present work, diverse spectroscopic and microscopic methods were applied to characterize model biosensor surfaces, formed on Si(3)N(4) or SiO(2) by modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, coating with rabbit gamma-globulins (IgGs) through physical adsorption, blocking with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and specific binding of an anti-rabbit IgG antibody. In addition, silanized substrates with directly adsorbed BSA or anti-rabbit IgG antibody were examined as reference surfaces. The protein/amino-organosilane/silicon structure of all surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Homogeneity of protein coverage was verified with near-field scanning optical microscope, working in reflection and fluorescence mode. Surface coverage with proteins was determined with angle-resolved XPS using a previously established bilayer approach. Inner structure of protein layers was examined with atomic force microscopy. Vertical arrangement of carbon functional groups was revealed by high resolution ARXPS. Combined spectroscopic and microscopic data reveal the complex character of interactions with the immobilized IgG molecules during blocking with BSA and immunoreaction with anti-IgG antibody. Within experimental error, neither surface coverage nor lateral structural scales of protein layer (provided by Fourier and auto-correlation analysis of topographic and phase images) increase during blocking procedure. On the other hand, coverage and all structural measures rise considerably after immunoreaction. In addition, it was found that polar functional groups orient towards substrate for all protein layers, independently of coverage, prior to and after both blocking and specific binding.

  16. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  17. Unique surface adsorption behaviors of serum proteins on chemically uniform and alternating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng

    With increasing interests of studying proteins adsorption on the surfaces with nanoscale features in biomedical field, it is crucial to have fundamental understandings on how the proteins are adsorbed on such a surface and what factors contribute to the driving forces of adsorption. Besides, exploring more available nanoscale templates would greatly offer more possibilities one could design surface bio-detection methods with favorable protein-surface interactions. Thus, to fulfill the purpose, the work in this dissertation has been made into three major sections. First, to probe the intermediate states which possibly exist between stable and unstable phases described in mean-field theory diagram, a solvent vapor annealing method is chosen to slowly induce the copolymer polystyrene-block-polyvinylpyridine (PS-b-PVP)'s both blocks undergoing micro-phase separations from initial spherical nanodomains into terminal cylindrical nanodomains. During this process, real time atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been conducted to capture other six intermediate states with different morphologies on the polymeric film surfaces. Secondly, upon recognizing each intermediate state, the solution of immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) proteins has been deposited on the surface and been rinsed off with buffer solution before the protein-bounded surface is imaged by AFM. It has been found IgG showing a strong adsorption preference on PS over P4VP block. Among all the six intermediate states, the proteins are almost exclusively adsorbed on PS nanodomains regardless the concentration and deposition time. Thirdly, a trinodular shape protein fibrinogen (Fg) is selected for investigating how geometry and surface charge of proteins would interplay with cylindrical nanodomains on a surface developed from Polystyrene -block-Poly-(methyl methacrylate) PS-b-PMMA. Also, Fg adsorptions on chemically homogeneous surfaces are included here to have a better contrast of showing how much difference it can make

  18. Identification and characterization of a cell surface protein of Prevotella intermedia 17 with broad-spectrum binding activity for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fan; Iyer, Divya; Anaya, Cecilia; Lewis, Janina P

    2006-11-01

    Prevotella intermedia binds and invades a variety of host cells. This binding is most probably mediated through cell surface proteins termed adhesins. To identify proteins binding to the host extracellular matrix (ECM) component, fibronectin, and study the molecular mechanism underlying bacterial colonization, we applied proteomic approaches to perform a global investigation of P. intermedia strain 17 outer membrane proteins. 2-DE followed by Far Western Blot analysis using fibronectin as a probe revealed a 29-kDa fibronectin-binding protein, designated here AdpB. The molecular identity of the protein was determined using PMF followed by a search of the P. intermedia 17 protein database. Database searches revealed the similarity of AdpB to multiple bacterial outer membrane proteins including the fibronectin-binding protein from Campylobacter jejuni. A recombinant AdpB protein bound fibronectin as well as other host ECM components, including fibrinogen and laminin, in a saturable, dose-dependent manner. Binding of AdpB to immobilized fibronectin was also inhibited by soluble fibronectin, laminin, and fibrinogen, indicating the binding was specific. Finally, immunoelectron microscopy with anti-AdpB demonstrated the cell surface location of the protein. This is the first cell surface protein with a broad-spectrum ECM-binding abilities identified and characterized in P. intermedia 17.

  19. The effect of nanoscale surface curvature on the oligomerization of surface-bound proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, M.; Paulin, H.; Mogyoros, J.; Giuliani, M.; Dutcher, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of surface topography on protein conformation and association is used routinely in biological cells to orchestrate and coordinate biomolecular events. In the laboratory, controlling the surface curvature at the nanoscale offers new possibilities for manipulating protein–protein interactions and protein function at surfaces. We have studied the effect of surface curvature on the association of two proteins, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), which perform their function at the oil–water interface in milk emulsions. To control the surface curvature at the nanoscale, we have used a combination of polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) and ultrathin PS films to fabricate chemically pure, hydrophobic surfaces that are highly curved and are stable in aqueous buffer. We have used single-molecule force spectroscopy to measure the contour lengths Lc for α-LA and β-LG adsorbed on highly curved PS surfaces (NP diameters of 27 and 50 nm, capped with a 10 nm thick PS film), and we have compared these values in situ with those measured for the same proteins adsorbed onto flat PS surfaces in the same samples. The Lc distributions for β-LG adsorbed onto a flat PS surface contain monomer and dimer peaks at 60 and 120 nm, respectively, while α-LA contains a large monomer peak near 50 nm and a dimer peak at 100 nm, with a tail extending out to 200 nm, corresponding to higher order oligomers, e.g. trimers and tetramers. When β-LG or α-LA is adsorbed onto the most highly curved surfaces, both monomer peaks are shifted to much smaller values of Lc. Furthermore, for β-LG, the dimer peak is strongly suppressed on the highly curved surface, whereas for α-LA the trimer and tetramer tail is suppressed with no significant change in the dimer peak. For both proteins, the number of higher order oligomers is significantly reduced as the curvature of the underlying surface is increased. These results suggest that the surface curvature provides a new

  20. Characterization of the Eimeria maxima sporozoite surface protein IMP1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to characterize Eimeria maxima immunoprotective protein IMP1 that is hypothesized to play a role in eliciting protective immunity against E. maxima infection in chickens. RT-PCR analysis of RNA from unsporulated and sporulating E. maxima oocysts revealed highest transc...

  1. Using surface-bound rubidium ions for protein phasing.

    PubMed

    Korolev, S; Dementieva, I; Sanishvili, R; Minor, W; Otwinowski, Z; Joachimiak, A

    2001-07-01

    Rubidium is a monovalent metal that can be used as a counterion in protein solutions. X-ray anomalous scattering from rubidium ions bound to the protein surface was used for phasing of the crystal structure of the hsp60 apical domain from Thermus thermophilus. Multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data were collected from a crystal obtained from a solution containing 0.2 M rubidium salt. One molecule of protein (147 amino acids) binds one well ordered and one poorly ordered Rb atom. Phases calculated with the program SHARP were sufficient for automatic tracing and side-chain assignment using the program ARP/wARP. The data show that bound rubidium ions can be used to determine protein structures and to study the interaction of monovalent metal ions with proteins and other macromolecules.

  2. Proteomic Profiling of Cereal Aphid Saliva Reveals Both Ubiquitous and Adaptive Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Tom L.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113. PMID:23460852

  3. Proteomic profiling of cereal aphid saliva reveals both ubiquitous and adaptive secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Rao, Sohail A K; Carolan, James C; Wilkinson, Tom L

    2013-01-01

    The secreted salivary proteins from two cereal aphid species, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum, were collected from artificial diets and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry. Protein identification was performed by searching MS data against the official protein set from the current pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) genome assembly and revealed 12 and 7 proteins in the saliva of S. avenae and M. dirhodum, respectively. When combined with a comparable dataset from A. pisum, only three individual proteins were common to all the aphid species; two paralogues of the GMC oxidoreductase family (glucose dehydrogenase; GLD) and ACYPI009881, an aphid specific protein previously identified as a putative component of the salivary sheath. Antibodies were designed from translated protein sequences obtained from partial cDNA sequences for ACYPI009881 and both saliva associated GLDs. The antibodies detected all parent proteins in secreted saliva from the three aphid species, but could only detect ACYPI009881, and not saliva associated GLDs, in protein extractions from the salivary glands. This result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using whole and sectioned salivary glands, and in addition, localised ACYPI009881 to specific cell types within the principal salivary gland. The implications of these findings for the origin of salivary components and the putative role of the proteins identified are discussed in the context of our limited understanding of the functional relationship between aphid saliva and the plants they feed on. The mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange and can be accessed under the identifier PXD000113.

  4. Protein-surface interactions on stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cross, Michael C; Toomey, Ryan G; Gallant, Nathan D

    2016-03-04

    Responsive surfaces: a review of the dependence of protein adsorption on the reversible volume phase transition in stimuli-responsive polymers. Specifically addressed are a widely studied subset: thermoresponsive polymers. Findings are also generalizable to other materials which undergo a similarly reversible volume phase transition. As of 2015, over 100,000 articles have been published on stimuli-responsive polymers and many more on protein-biomaterial interactions. Significantly, fewer than 100 of these have focused specifically on protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers. These report a clear trend of increased protein adsorption in the collapsed state compared to the swollen state. This control over protein interactions makes stimuli-responsive polymers highly useful in biomedical applications such as wound repair scaffolds, on-demand drug delivery, and antifouling surfaces. Outstanding questions are whether the protein adsorption is reversible with the volume phase transition and whether there is a time-dependence. A clear understanding of protein interactions with stimuli-responsive polymers will advance theoretical models, experimental results, and biomedical applications.

  5. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  6. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  7. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  8. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  9. Chemical Functionalization of Germanium with Dextran Brushes for Immobilization of Proteins Revealed by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Difference Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Jonas; Hoeck, Nina; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Mavarani, Laven; Nabers, Andreas; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-07-21

    Protein immobilization studied by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) difference spectroscopy is an emerging field enabling the study of proteins at atomic detail. Gold or glass surfaces are frequently used for protein immobilization. Here, we present an alternative method for protein immobilization on germanium. Because of its high refractive index and broad spectral window germanium is the best material for ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy of thin layers. So far, this technique was mainly used for protein monolayers, which lead to a limited signal-to-noise ratio. Further, undesired protein-protein interactions can occur in a dense layer. Here, the germanium surface was functionalized with thiols and stepwise a dextran brush was generated. Each step was monitored by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. We compared a 70 kDa dextran with a 500 kDa dextran regarding the binding properties. All surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy, revealing thicknesses between 40 and 110 nm. To analyze the capability of our system we utilized N-Ras on mono-NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) functionalized dextran, and the amount of immobilized Ras corresponded to several monolayers. The protein stability and loading capacity was further improved by means of tris-NTA for immobilization. Small-molecule-induced changes were revealed with an over 3 times higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to monolayers. This improvement may allow the observation of very small and so far hidden changes in proteins upon stimulus. Furthermore, we immobilized green fluorescent protein (GFP) and mCherry simultaneously enabling an analysis of the surface by fluorescence microscopy. The absence of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal demonstrated a large protein-protein distance, indicating an even distribution of the protein within the dextran.

  10. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  11. Diversity of environmental single-stranded DNA phages revealed by PCR amplification of the partial major capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Max; Kailasan, Shweta; Cohen, Allison; Roux, Simon; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Shevenell, Amelia; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Breitbart, Mya

    2014-10-01

    The small single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bacteriophages of the subfamily Gokushovirinae were traditionally perceived as narrowly targeted, niche-specific viruses infecting obligate parasitic bacteria, such as Chlamydia. The advent of metagenomics revealed gokushoviruses to be widespread in global environmental samples. This study expands knowledge of gokushovirus diversity in the environment by developing a degenerate PCR assay to amplify a portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of gokushoviruses. Over 500 amplicons were sequenced from 10 environmental samples (sediments, sewage, seawater and freshwater), revealing the ubiquity and high diversity of this understudied phage group. Residue-level conservation data generated from multiple alignments was combined with a predicted 3D structure, revealing a tendency for structurally internal residues to be more highly conserved than surface-presenting protein-protein or viral-host interaction domains. Aggregating this data set into a phylogenetic framework, many gokushovirus MCP clades contained samples from multiple environments, although distinct clades dominated the different samples. Antarctic sediment samples contained the most diverse gokushovirus communities, whereas freshwater springs from Florida were the least diverse. Whether the observed diversity is being driven by environmental factors or host-binding interactions remains an open question. The high environmental diversity of this previously overlooked ssDNA viral group necessitates further research elucidating their natural hosts and exploring their ecological roles.

  12. The Crystal Structure of Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals a New Family of Fatty Acid-Binding Protein-Like Proteins in Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, William; Haouz, Ahmed; Graña, Martin; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Betton, Jean-Michel; Cole, Stewart T.; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2007-01-01

    The gene Rv0813c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is conserved within the order Actinomycetales but absent elsewhere. The crystal structure of Rv0813c reveals a new family of proteins that resemble the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) found in eukaryotes. Rv0813c adopts the 10-stranded β-barrel fold typical of FABPs but lacks the double-helix insert that covers the entry to the binding site in the eukaryotic proteins. The barrel encloses a deep cavity, at the bottom of which a small cyclic ligand was found to bind to the hydroxyl group of Tyr192. This residue is part of a conserved Arg-X-Tyr motif much like the triad that binds the carboxylate group of fatty acids in FABPs. Most of the residues forming the internal surface of the cavity are conserved in homologous protein sequences found in CG-rich prokaryotes, strongly suggesting that Rv0813c is a member of a new family of bacterial FABP-like proteins that may have roles in the recognition, transport, and/or storage of small molecules in the bacterial cytosol. PMID:17172346

  13. The effect of surface tethering on the folding of the src-SH3 protein domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhuoyun; Jewett, Andrew I.; Soto, Patricia; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2009-03-01

    The effect of surface tethering on the folding mechanism of the src-SH3 protein domain was investigated using a coarse-grained Gō-type protein model. The protein was tethered at various locations along the protein chain and the thermodynamics and kinetics of folding were studied using replica exchange and constant temperature Langevin dynamics. Our simulations reveal that tethering in a structured part of the transition state can dramatically alter the folding mechanism, while tethering in an unstructured part leaves the folding mechanism unaltered as compared to bulk folding. Interestingly, there is only modest correlation between the tethering effect on the folding mechanism and its effect on thermodynamic stability and folding rates. We suggest locations on the protein at which tethering could be performed in single-molecule experiments so as to leave the folding mechanism unaltered from the bulk.

  14. Fluorescence mapping of mitochondrial TIM23 complex reveals a water-facing, substrate-interacting helix surface.

    PubMed

    Alder, Nathan N; Jensen, Robert E; Johnson, Arthur E

    2008-08-08

    Protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by the TIM23 complex. While its central component, Tim23, is believed to form a protein-conducting channel, the regions of this subunit that face the imported protein are unknown. To examine Tim23 structure and environment in intact membranes at high resolution, various derivatives, each with a single, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe positioned at a specific site, were assembled into functional TIM23 complexes in active mitochondria and analyzed by multiple spectral techniques. Probes placed sequentially throughout a transmembrane region that was identified by crosslinking as part of the protein-conducting channel revealed an alpha helix in an amphipathic environment. Probes on the aqueous-facing helical surface specifically underwent spectral changes during protein import, and their accessibility to hydrophilic quenching agents is considered in terms of channel gating. This approach has therefore provided an unprecedented view of a translocon channel structure in an intact, fully operational, membrane-embedded complex.

  15. NMR Identification of the Binding Surfaces Involved in the Salmonella and Shigella Type III Secretion Tip-Translocon Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    McShan, Andrew C.; Kaur, Kawaljit; Chatterjee, Srirupa; Knight, Kevin M.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2017-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential for the pathogenesis of many bacteria including Salmonella and Shigella, which together are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide each year. The structural component of the T3SS consists of the needle apparatus, which is assembled in part by the protein-protein interaction between the tip and the translocon. The atomic detail of the interaction between the tip and the translocon proteins is currently unknown. Here, we used NMR methods to identify that the N-terminal domain of the Salmonella SipB translocon protein interacts with the SipD tip protein at a surface at the distal region of the tip formed by the mixed α/β domain and a portion of its coiled-coil domain. Likewise, the Shigella IpaB translocon protein and the IpaD tip protein interact with each other using similar surfaces identified for the Salmonella homologs. Furthermore, removal of the extreme N-terminal residues of the translocon protein, previously thought to be important for the interaction, had little change on the binding surface. Finally, mutations at the binding surface of SipD reduced invasion of Salmonella into human intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these results reveal the binding surfaces involved in the tip-translocon protein-protein interaction and advance our understanding of the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. PMID:27093649

  16. RNA-protein distance patterns in ribosomes reveal the mechanism of translational attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yu, DongMei; Zhang, Chao; Qin, PeiWu; Cornish, Peter V; Xu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Elucidating protein translational regulation is crucial for understanding cellular function and drug development. A key molecule in protein translation is ribosome, which is a super-molecular complex extensively studied for more than a half century. The structure and dynamics of ribosome complexes were resolved recently thanks to the development of X-ray crystallography, Cryo-EM, and single molecule biophysics. Current studies of the ribosome have shown multiple functional states, each with a unique conformation. In this study, we analyzed the RNA-protein distances of ribosome (2.5 MDa) complexes and compared these changes among different ribosome complexes. We found that the RNA-protein distance is significantly correlated with the ribosomal functional state. Thus, the analysis of RNA-protein binding distances at important functional sites can distinguish ribosomal functional states and help understand ribosome functions. In particular, the mechanism of translational attenuation by nascent peptides and antibiotics was revealed by the conformational changes of local functional sites.

  17. Comparative proteome analysis reveals four novel polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule-associated proteins in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Sznajder, Anna; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Identification of proteins that were present in a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granule fraction isolated from Ralstonia eutropha but absent in the soluble, membrane, and membrane-associated fractions revealed the presence of only 12 polypeptides with PHB-specific locations plus 4 previously known PHB-associated proteins with multiple locations. None of the previously postulated PHB depolymerase isoenzymes (PhaZa2 to PhaZa5, PhaZd1, and PhaZd2) and none of the two known 3-hydroxybutyrate oligomer hydrolases (PhaZb and PhaZc) were significantly present in isolated PHB granules. Four polypeptides were found that had not yet been identified in PHB granules. Three of the novel proteins are putative α/β-hydrolases, and two of those (A0671 and B1632) have a PHB synthase/depolymerase signature. The third novel protein (A0225) is a patatin-like phospholipase, a type of enzyme that has not been described for PHB granules of any PHB-accumulating species. No function has been ascribed to the fourth protein (A2001), but its encoding gene forms an operon with phaB2 (acetoacetyl-coenzyme A [CoA] reductase) and phaC2 (PHB synthase), and this is in line with a putative function in PHB metabolism. The localization of the four new proteins at the PHB granule surface was confirmed in vivo by fluorescence microscopy of constructed fusion proteins with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP). Deletion of A0671 and B1632 had a minor but detectable effect on the PHB mobilization ability in the stationary growth phase of nutrient broth (NB)-gluconate cells, confirming the functional involvement of both proteins in PHB metabolism.

  18. Differential surface deposition of complement proteins on logarithmic and stationary phase Leishmania chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Lei, Soi Meng; Bellaire, Bryan H; Beetham, Jeffrey K

    2012-12-01

    Previous works demonstrated that various species of Leishmania promastigotes exhibit differential sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis (CML) during development. Upon exposure to normal human serum (NHS), cultures of Leishmania chagasi promastigotes recently isolated from infected hamsters (fewer than 5 in vitro passages) are CML-sensitive when in the logarithmic growth phase but become CML-resistant upon transition to the stationary culture phase. Visualization by light and electron microscopy revealed dramatic morphological differences between promastigotes from the 2 culture phases following exposure to NHS. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that surface deposition of the complement components C3, C5, and C9 correlated inversely with promastigote CML-resistance. The highest levels of complement protein surface accumulation were observed for logarithmic phase promastigotes, while stationary phase promastigotes adsorbed the least amount of complement proteins. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy revealed that C3 and C5 localized in a fairly uniform pattern to the plasma membrane of promastigotes from logarithmic phase cultures, while the staining of promastigotes from stationary phase cultures was indistinguishable from background. By Western blot analysis, high levels of the complement proteins C3, C5, and C9 were detected in the total lysates of NHS-exposed logarithmic phase L. chagasi promastigotes, relative to NHS-exposed stationary phase promastigotes; this finding indicates that the low levels of C3 and C5 seen on the surface of stationary phase promastigotes were not due to protein uptake/internalization. Together, these data demonstrate the differential deposition of complement proteins on the surfaces of logarithmic and stationary phase L. chagasi promastigotes. The data support a model wherein stationary phase L. chagasi promastigotes resist CML by limiting the deposition of C3 and its derivatives, which, in turn, limit surface levels of

  19. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering reveals ligand-induced protein dynamics of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Perera, Suchithranga M. D. C.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; ...

    2016-09-15

    Light activation of the visual G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin leads to significant structural fluctuations of the protein embedded within the membrane yielding the activation of cognate G-protein (transducin), which initiates biological signaling. Here, we report a quasi-elastic neutron scattering study of the activation of rhodopsin as a GPCR prototype. Our results reveal a broadly distributed relaxation of hydrogen atom dynamics of rhodopsin on a picosecond–nanosecond time scale, crucial for protein function, as only observed for globular proteins previously. Interestingly, the results suggest significant differences in the intrinsic protein dynamics of the dark-state rhodopsin versus the ligand-free apoprotein, opsin. These differencesmore » can be attributed to the influence of the covalently bound retinal ligand. Moreover, an idea of the generic free-energy landscape is used to explain the GPCR dynamics of ligand-binding and ligand-free protein conformations, which can be further applied to other GPCR systems.« less

  20. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals cooperative regulation of alternative splicing by hnRNP proteins.

    PubMed

    Huelga, Stephanie C; Vu, Anthony Q; Arnold, Justin D; Liang, Tiffany Y; Liu, Patrick P; Yan, Bernice Y; Donohue, John Paul; Shiue, Lily; Hoon, Shawn; Brenner, Sydney; Ares, Manuel; Yeo, Gene W

    2012-02-23

    Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here, we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq), and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and autoregulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells.

  1. Integrative genome-wide analysis reveals cooperative regulation of alternative splicing by hnRNP proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huelga, Stephanie C.; Vu, Anthony Q.; Arnold, Justin D.; Liang, Tiffany Y.; Liu, Patrick P.; Yan, Bernice Y.; Donohue, John Paul; Shiue, Lily; Hoon, Shawn; Brenner, Sydney; Ares, Manuel; Yeo, Gene W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding how RNA binding proteins control the splicing code is fundamental to human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive study to elucidate how heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoparticle (hnRNP) proteins, among the most abundant RNA binding proteins, coordinate to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) in human cells. Using splicing-sensitive microarrays, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing, and cDNA sequencing, we find that more than half of all AS events are regulated by multiple hnRNP proteins, and that some combinations of hnRNP proteins exhibit significant synergy, whereas others act antagonistically. Our analyses reveal position-dependent RNA splicing maps, in vivo consensus binding sites, a surprising level of cross- and auto-regulation among hnRNP proteins, and the coordinated regulation by hnRNP proteins of dozens of other RNA binding proteins and genes associated with cancer. Our findings define an unprecedented degree of complexity and compensatory relationships among hnRNP proteins and their splicing targets that likely confer robustness to cells. PMID:22574288

  2. An Improved Protein Surface Extraction Method Using Rotating Cylinder Probe.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kalpana; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2017-03-01

    For extraction of information on binding sites of a protein, the commonly known geometry-based methods utilize the corresponding PDB file to extract its surface as a first step. Finally, the surface is used to find the binding site atoms. As shown in this paper work, since none of the mostly used surface extraction methods can retrieve a sizeable percentage of the binding site atoms, the scope of development of a better method remains. In this direction, this paper presents a new benchmarking criteria based on utilization of binding site information to compare performance of these surface extraction methods. Also, a new surface extraction method is introduced based on the use of a rotating cylinder probe adapting from the work of Weisel et al. (Chem Cent J 1:7-23, 2007. doi: 10.1186/1752-153X-1-7 ). The result of the new method shows a significant improvement of performance in comparison to the existing methods.

  3. Silica surface characterization as a function of formation and surface treatment using traditional methods and proteins as surface probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korwin-Edson, Michelle Lynn

    Previous works have shown that cells proliferate differently depending on the chemistry of the glass on which they are growing. Since proteins form the bonds between cells and glass, the hypothesis of this study is that proteins can distinguish between surface chemical variations of glass. This theory was examined through the use of various silica forms, a few select proteins, four surface treatment procedures, and a variety of characterization techniques. The silica forms include amorphous slides, cane, fiber, microspheres, fumed silica and quartz crystal terminals. The proteins selected were human serum albumin, mouse Immunoglobulin G, streptavidin, antimouse IgG, and biotin. The surface treatments utilized to bring about chemical variation on the silica surface were HF acid etching, ethanol cleaning, water plasma treatments, and 1000°C heat treatments. The characterization techniques encompassed both traditional material techniques and biological methods. The techniques studied were atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical force microscopy (CFM), glancing incidence X-ray analysis (GIXA), fluorescence spectrometry, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. It was the main goal of this project to determine the feasibility of these techniques in utilizing proteins as glass surface probes. Proteins were adsorbed to all of the various forms and the binding ability was studied by either stripping off the protein and quantifying them, or by deductive reasoning through the use of "depleted" protein solutions. Fluorimetry and BCA assay both utilized the depleted solutions, but the high error associated with this protocol was prohibitive. SDS-PAGE with streptavidin was very difficult due to staining problems, however the IgG proteins were able to be quantified with some success. GIXA showed that the protein layer thickness is monolayer in nature, which agrees well with the AFM fluid tapping data on protein height, but in addition

  4. Surface phenomena revealed by in situ imaging: studies from adhesion, wear and cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Mahato, Anirban; Yeung, Ho; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2017-03-01

    Surface deformation and flow phenomena are ubiquitous in mechanical processes. In this work we present an in situ imaging framework for studying a range of surface mechanical phenomena at high spatial resolution and across a range of time scales. The in situ framework is capable of resolving deformation and flow fields quantitatively in terms of surface displacements, velocities, strains and strain rates. Three case studies are presented demonstrating the power of this framework for studying surface deformation. In the first, the origin of stick-slip motion in adhesive polymer interfaces is investigated, revealing a intimate link between stick-slip and surface wave propagation. Second, the role of flow in mediating formation of surface defects and wear particles in metals is analyzed using a prototypical sliding process. It is shown that conventional post-mortem observation and inference can lead to erroneous conclusions with regard to formation of surface cracks and wear particles. The in situ framework is shown to unambiguously capture delamination wear in sliding. Third, material flow and surface deformation in a typical cutting process is analyzed. It is shown that a long-standing problem in the cutting of annealed metals is resolved by the imaging, with other benefits such as estimation of energy dissipation and power from the flow fields. In closure, guidelines are provided for profitably exploiting in situ observations to study large-strain deformation, flow and friction phenomena at surfaces that display a variety of time-scales.

  5. Binding of globular proteins to DNA from surface tension measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A; Chattoraj, D K; Chakraborty, P

    2001-10-01

    Extent of binding (gammap) of globular proteins to calf-thymus DNA have been measured in mole per mole of nucleotide as function of equilibrium protein concentration. We have exploited measurement of the surface tension of the protein solution in the presence and absence of DNA to calculate the binding ration (gammap). Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH, ionic strength and in presence of Ca2+. Interaction of BSA with denatured DNA has also been investigated. Binding isotherms for other globular proteins like beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme have been compared under identical physicochemical condition. It has been noted with considerable interest that globular form of protein is important to some extent in protein-DNA interaction. An attempt has been made to explain the significance of difference in binding ratios of these two biopolymers in aqueous medium for different systems in the light of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects. Values of maximum binding ration (gammap(m)) at saturated level for different systems have been also presented. The Gibb's free energy decrease (-deltaG0) of the binding of proteins to DNA has been compared more precisely for the saturation of binding sites in the DNA with the change of activity of protein in solution from zero to unity in the rational mole fraction scale.

  6. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed.

  7. Phagocytosis escape by a Staphylococcus aureus protein that connects complement and coagulation proteins at the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Kuipers, Annemarie; Freitag, Claudia M; Jongerius, Ilse; Medina, Eva; van Rooijen, Willemien J; Spaan, András N; van Kessel, Kok P M; Höök, Magnus; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2013-01-01

    Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a 'capsule'-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein.

  8. Surface Induced nanofiber growth by self-assembly of a silk-elastin-like protein polymer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Wonseok; Kim, Bo-Hyun; Dandu, Ramesh; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Seog, Joonil

    2009-11-03

    Many synthetic and natural peptides are known to self-assemble to form various nanostructures. During the self-assembling process, environmental conditions such as salt concentration, pH, temperature, and surface characteristics play a critical role by influencing intermolecular interactions, and hence the process of self-assembly. Here we studied the self-assembly of a genetically engineered protein polymer composed of silk-like and elastin-like repeats on a mica surface. Silk-elastin-like protein polymers (SELPs) consist of tandem repeats of Gly-Ala-Gly-Ala-Gly-Ser from Bombyx mori (silkworm) and Gly-Val-Gly-Val-Pro from mammalian elastin. At a very low polymer concentration of 1 mug/mL, SELPs self-assembled into nanofibrous structures on a mica surface. Examination using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering techniques showed that SELPs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of the mica surface but not in the bulk state. Ionic strength had a significant influence on nanofiber growth, indicating the importance of electrostatic interactions between the polymer and the mica surface. At low ionic strength, the kinetics of nanofiber growth showed that the mica surface effectively removed a lag phase by providing nucleating sites, facilitating nanofiber self-assembly of SELPs. Furthermore, self-assembly on additional substrates such as silicon and a hydrophobic pyrolytic carbon surface revealed that the charged hydrophilic surface provides the optimal surface to facilitate self-assembly of SELPs.

  9. Polymer surface functionalities that control human embryoid body cell adhesion revealed by high throughput surface characterization of combinatorial material microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L; Taylor, Michael; Urquhart, Andrew J; Bogatyrev, Said R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-12-01

    High throughput materials discovery using combinatorial polymer microarrays to screen for new biomaterials with new and improved function is established as a powerful strategy. Here we combine this screening approach with high throughput surface characterization (HT-SC) to identify surface structure-function relationships. We explore how this combination can help to identify surface chemical moieties that control protein adsorption and subsequent cellular response. The adhesion of human embryoid body (hEB) cells to a large number (496) of different acrylate polymers synthesized in a microarray format is screened using a high throughput procedure. To determine the role of the polymer surface properties on hEB cell adhesion, detailed HT-SC of these acrylate polymers is carried out using time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pico litre drop sessile water contact angle (WCA) measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A structure-function relationship is identified between the ToF SIMS analysis of the surface chemistry after a fibronectin (Fn) pre-conditioning step and the cell adhesion to each spot using the multivariate analysis technique partial least squares (PLS) regression. Secondary ions indicative of the adsorbed Fn correlate with increased cell adhesion whereas glycol and other functionalities from the polymers are identified that reduce cell adhesion. Furthermore, a strong relationship between the ToF SIMS spectra of bare polymers and the cell adhesion to each spot is identified using PLS regression. This identifies a role for both the surface chemistry of the bare polymer and the pre-adsorbed Fn, as-represented in the ToF SIMS spectra, in controlling cellular adhesion. In contrast, no relationship is found between cell adhesion and wettability, surface roughness, elemental or functional surface composition. The correlation between ToF SIMS data of the surfaces and the cell adhesion demonstrates

  10. Enhancement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate physiological responses to a diverse array of stimuli and are the molecular targets for numerous therapeutic drugs. GPCRs primarily signal from the plasma membrane, but when expressed in heterologous cells many GPCRs exhibit poor trafficking to the cell surface. Multiple approaches have been taken to enhance GPCR surface expression in heterologous cells, including addition/deletion of receptor sequences, co-expression with interacting proteins, and treatment with pharmacological chaperones. In addition to allowing for enhanced surface expression of certain GPCRs in heterologous cells, these approaches have also shed light on the control of GPCR trafficking in vivo and in some cases have led to new therapeutic approaches for treating human diseases that result from defects in GPCR trafficking. PMID:19679364

  11. Revealing the potential pathogenesis of glioma by utilizing a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weiran; Li, Gang; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Miao, Jinming

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to explore the potential mechanism of glioma through bioinformatic approaches. The gene expression profile (GSE4290) of glioma tumor and non-tumor samples was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 180 samples were available, including 23 non-tumor and 157 tumor samples. Then the raw data were preprocessed using robust multiarray analysis, and 8,890 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by using t-test (false discovery rate < 0.0005). Furthermore, 16 known glioma related genes were abstracted from Genetic Association Database. After mapping 8,890 DEGs and 16 known glioma related genes to Human Protein Reference Database, a glioma associated protein-protein interaction network (GAPN) was constructed. In addition, 51 sub-networks in GAPN were screened out through Molecular Complex Detection (score ≥ 1), and sub-network 1 was found to have the closest interaction (score = 3). What' more, for the top 10 sub-networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis (p value < 0.05) was performed, and DEGs involved in sub-network 1 and 2, such as BRMS1L and CCNA1, were predicted to regulate cell growth, cell cycle, and DNA replication via interacting with known glioma related genes. Finally, the overlaps of DEGs and human essential, housekeeping, tissue-specific genes were calculated (p value = 1.0, 1.0, and 0.00014, respectively) and visualized by Venn Diagram package in R. About 61% of human tissue-specific genes were DEGs as well. This research shed new light on the pathogenesis of glioma based on DEGs and GAPN, and our findings might provide potential targets for clinical glioma treatment.

  12. Genetic and antigenic diversity of the surface protective antigen proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Nagai, Shinya

    2007-07-01

    The surface protective antigen (Spa) protein of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has been shown to be highly immunogenic and is a potential candidate for a new vaccine against erysipelas. In this study, we cloned and sequenced spa genes from all E. rhusiopathiae serovar reference strains as well as from a serovar 18 strain which was not classified as any species in the genus Erysipelothrix. Sequence analysis revealed that the Spa proteins could be classified into three molecular species, including SpaA, which was previously found in serovars 1a and 2, and the newly designated SpaB and SpaC proteins. The SpaA protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, and N, the SpaB protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 4, 6, 11, 19, and 21, and the SpaC protein is produced only by serovar 18. The amino acid sequence similarity was high among members of each Spa type (96 to 99%) but low between different Spa types ( approximately 60%). The greatest diversity in Spa proteins was found in the N-terminal half of the molecule (50 to 57% similarity), which was shown to be involved in immunoprotection. Coinciding with this, immunoblot analysis revealed that rabbit antisera specific to each Spa reacted strongly with the homologous Spa protein but weakly with heterologous Spa proteins. A mouse cross-protection study showed that the three recombinant Spa (rSpa) proteins elicited complete protection against challenge with homologous strains but that the level of protection against challenge with heterologous strains varied depending on the rSpa protein used for immunization. Our study is the first to demonstrate sequence and antigenic diversity in Spa proteins and to indicate that rSpaC may be the most promising antigen for use as a vaccine component because of its broad cross-protectiveness.

  13. Cell surface differentiation of Mycoplasma mobile visualized by surface protein localization.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Akiko; Seto, Shintaro; Jaffe, Jacob D; Miyata, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a flask-shaped cell morphology and glides toward its tapered end at a rate of 3-7 cell lengths per s (2.0-4.5 microm s(-1)) by an unknown mechanism. Gliding requires that the surface of the cell is in contact with a solid substrate, such as glass or plastic. In order to characterize the nature of the outer surface of M. mobile, monoclonal antibodies were raised against intact cells and screened for their ability to recognize surface proteins. Four antibodies were identified and their protein targets were determined. One antibody recognized the Gli349 protein, which is known to be involved in glass binding and gliding. This antibody was also able to displace attached M. mobile cells from glass, suggesting that Gli349 is the major adhesion protein in M. mobile. The other three antibodies recognized members of the Mvsp family of proteins, which are presumably the major surface antigens of M. mobile. Immunofluorescence studies were performed to localize these proteins on the surface of M. mobile cells. Gli349 localized to the proximal region of the tapered part of the cell (the 'neck'), while the various Mvsp family members showed several distinct patterns of subcellular localization. MvspN and MvspO localized to the distal end of the tapered part of the cell (the 'head'), MvspK localized to the main part of the cell (the 'body'), and MvspI localized to both the head and body but not the neck. This analysis shows that M. mobile surprisingly expresses multiple versions of its major surface antigen at once but differentiates its surface by differential localization of the various paralogues.

  14. Are protein-protein interfaces special regions on a protein’s surface?

    PubMed Central

    Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are involved in many cellular processes. Experimentally obtained protein quaternary structures provide the location of protein-protein interfaces, the surface region of a given protein that interacts with another. These regions are termed half-interfaces (HIs). Canonical HIs cover roughly one third of a protein’s surface and were found to have more hydrophobic residues than the non-interface surface region. In addition, the classical view of protein HIs was that there are a few (if not one) HIs per protein that are structurally and chemically unique. However, on average, a given protein interacts with at least a dozen others. This raises the question of whether they use the same or other HIs. By copying HIs from monomers with the same folds in solved quaternary structures, we introduce the concept of geometric HIs (HIs whose geometry has a significant match to other known interfaces) and show that on average they cover three quarters of a protein’s surface. We then demonstrate that in some cases, these geometric HI could result in real physical interactions (which may or may not be biologically relevant). The composition of the new HIs is on average more charged compared to most known ones, suggesting that the current protein interface database is biased towards more hydrophobic, possibly more obligate, complexes. Finally, our results provide evidence for interface fuzziness and PPI promiscuity. Thus, the classical view of unique, well defined HIs needs to be revisited as HIs are another example of coarse-graining that is used by nature. PMID:26723634

  15. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  16. Protein-nanoparticle interactions: the effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity are scale dependent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rixiang; Carney, Randy P.; Stellacci, Francesco; Lau, Boris L. T.

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) in the biological environment are exposed to a large variety and concentration of proteins. Proteins are known to adsorb in a `corona' like structure on the surface of NPs. In this study, we focus on the effects of surface compositional and structural heterogeneity on protein adsorption by examining the interaction of self-assembled monolayer coated gold NPs (AuNPs) with two types of proteins: ubiquitin and fibrinogen. This work was designed to systematically investigate the role of surface heterogeneity in nanoparticle-protein interaction. We have chosen the particles as well as the proteins to provide different types (in distribution and length-scale) of heterogeneity. The goal was to unveil the role of heterogeneity and of its length-scale in the particle-protein interaction. Dynamic light scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to reveal different interactions at pH above and below the isoelectric points of the proteins, which is related to the charge heterogeneity on the protein surface. At pH 7.4, there was only a monolayer of proteins adsorbed onto the NPs and the secondary structure of proteins remained intact. At pH 4.0, large aggregates of nanoparticle-protein complexes were formed and the secondary structures of the proteins were significantly disrupted. In terms of interaction thermodynamics, results from isothermal titration calorimetry showed that ubiquitin adsorbed differently onto (1) AuNPs with charged and nonpolar terminals organized into nano-scale structure (66-34 OT), (2) AuNPs with randomly distributed terminals (66-34 brOT), and (3) AuNPs with homogeneously charged terminals (MUS). This difference in adsorption behavior was not observed when AuNPs interacted with fibrinogen. The results suggested that the interaction between the proteins and AuNPs was influenced by the surface heterogeneity on the AuNPs, and this influence depends on the scale of surface heterogeneity and the size of the proteins

  17. Quantitative proteomics reveals the effect of protein glycosylation in soybean root under flooding stress

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-01-01

    Flooding stress has a negative impact on soybean cultivation because it severely impairs growth and development. To understand the flooding responsive mechanism in early stage soybeans, a glycoproteomic technique was used. Two-day-old soybeans were treated with flooding for 2 days and roots were collected. Globally, the accumulation level of glycoproteins, as revealed by cross-reaction with concanavalin A decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. Glycoproteins were enriched from total protein extracts using concanavalin A lectin resin and analyzed using a gel-free proteomic technique. One-hundred eleven and 69 glycoproteins were identified without and with 2 days of flooding stress, respectively. Functional categorization of these identified glycoproteins indicated that the accumulation level of proteins related to protein degradation, cell wall, and glycolysis increased, while stress-related proteins decreased under flooding stress. Also the accumulation level of glycoproteins localized in the secretory pathway decreased under flooding stress. Out of 23 common glycoproteins between control and flooding conditions, peroxidases and glycosyl hydrolases were decreased by 2 days of flooding stress. mRNA expression levels of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and N-glycosylation related proteins were downregulated by flooding stress. These results suggest that flooding might negatively affect the process of N-glycosylation of proteins related to stress and protein degradation; however glycoproteins involved in glycolysis are activated. PMID:25477889

  18. Protein sequence conservation and stable molecular evolution reveals influenza virus nucleoprotein as a universal druggable target.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf

    2015-08-01

    The high mutation rate in influenza virus genome and appearance of drug resistance calls for a constant effort to identify alternate drug targets and develop new antiviral strategies. The internal proteins of the virus can be exploited as a potential target for therapeutic interventions. Among these, the nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant protein that provides structural and functional support to the viral replication machinery. The current study aims at analysis of protein sequence polymorphism patterns, degree of molecular evolution and sequence conservation as a function of potential druggability of nucleoprotein. We analyzed a universal set of amino acid sequences, (n=22,000) and, in order to identify and correlate the functionally conserved, druggable regions across different parameters, classified them on the basis of host organism, strain type and continental region of sample isolation. The results indicated that around 95% of the sequence length was conserved, with at least 7 regions conserved across the protein among various classes. Moreover, the highly variable regions, though very limited in number, were found to be positively selected indicating, thereby, the high degree of protein stability against various hosts and spatio-temporal references. Furthermore, on mapping the conserved regions on the protein, 7 drug binding pockets in the functionally important regions of the protein were revealed. The results, therefore, collectively indicate that nucleoprotein is a highly conserved and stable viral protein that can potentially be exploited for development of broadly effective antiviral strategies.

  19. The leucine rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) adsorbs as monomers or dimers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2010-03-15

    Amelogenin and amelogenin splice variants are believed to be involved in controlling the formation of the highly anisotropic and ordered hydroxyapatite crystallites that form enamel. The adsorption behavior of amelogenin proteins onto substrates is very important because protein-surface interactions are critical to it’s function. We have studied the adsorption of LRAP, a splice variant of amelogenin which may also contribute to enamel function, onto model self-assembled monolayers on gold containing of COOH, CH3, and NH2 end groups. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments indicated that LRAP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and solutions at saturation with calcium phosphate contained aggregates of nanospheres. Null ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to study protein adsorption amounts and structures. Relatively high amounts of adsorption occurred onto the CH3 and NH2 surfaces from both calcium phosphate and PBS solutions. Adsorption was also promoted onto COOH surfaces when calcium was present in the solutions suggesting an interaction that involves calcium bridging with the negatively charged C-terminus. The ellipsometry and AFM studies suggested that the protein adsorbed onto all surfaces as LRAP monomers. We propose that the monomers adsorb onto the surfaces by disassembling or “shedding” from the nanospheres that are present in solution. This work reveals the importance of small subnanosphere-sized structures of LRAP at interfaces, structures that may be important in the biomineralization of tooth enamel.

  20. Zinc-dependent mechanical properties of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-forming surface protein SasG.

    PubMed

    Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2016-01-12

    Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SasG promotes cell-cell adhesion during the accumulation phase of biofilm formation, but the molecular basis of this interaction remains poorly understood. Here, we unravel the mechanical properties of SasG on the surface of living bacteria, that is, in its native cellular environment. Nanoscale multiparametric imaging of living bacteria reveals that Zn(2+) strongly increases cell wall rigidity and activates the adhesive function of SasG. Single-cell force measurements show that SasG mediates cell-cell adhesion via specific Zn(2+)-dependent homophilic bonds between β-sheet-rich G5-E domains on neighboring cells. The force required to unfold individual domains is remarkably strong, up to ∼500 pN, thus explaining how SasG can withstand physiological shear forces. We also observe that SasG forms homophilic bonds with the structurally related accumulation-associated protein of Staphylococcus epidermidis, suggesting the possibility of multispecies biofilms during host colonization and infection. Collectively, our findings support a model in which zinc plays a dual role in activating cell-cell adhesion: adsorption of zinc ions to the bacterial cell surface increases cell wall cohesion and favors the projection of elongated SasG proteins away from the cell surface, thereby enabling zinc-dependent homophilic bonds between opposing cells. This work demonstrates an unexpected relationship between mechanics and adhesion in a staphylococcal surface protein, which may represent a general mechanism among bacterial pathogens for activating cell association.

  1. Lipid and protein composition of the surface tegument from larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Mills, G L; Coley, S C; Williams, J F

    1984-04-01

    A tegumental fraction from fully developed larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis was recovered by low speed centrifugation following incubation of the parasites in a 0.1% solution of digitonin. Scanning electron microscopy of the parasite carcass revealed no surface microtrichs, and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the subtegumental layer was undamaged. The tegumental fraction, judging from the distribution of 3H-Concanavalin A, was enriched for surface components, exhibited low succinic dehydrogenase activity, and an electron microscopic examination of the pellet showed a slightly expanded but intact distal tegumental layer. The fraction, which made up 3.0% of the dry weight of the parasite, consisted of 52% protein and 32% lipid. Thirty-three proteins, ranging in Mr from 9,000 to 276,000 daltons, were detected after sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilization and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seven of these proteins were glycoproteins. Cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and glycosphingolipids were the major lipids.

  2. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome Resource Reveals Markers, Extracellular Epitopes, and Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Boheler, Kenneth R.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Kropp, Erin M.; Chuppa, Sandra; Riordon, Daniel R.; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Burridge, Paul W.; Wu, Joseph C.; Wersto, Robert P.; Chan, Godfrey Chi Fung; Rao, Sridhar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Detailed knowledge of cell-surface proteins for isolating well-defined populations of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) would significantly enhance their characterization and translational potential. Through a chemoproteomic approach, we developed a cell-surface proteome inventory containing 496 N-linked glycoproteins on human embryonic (hESCs) and induced PSCs (hiPSCs). Against a backdrop of human fibroblasts and 50 other cell types, >100 surface proteins of interest for hPSCs were revealed. The >30 positive and negative markers verified here by orthogonal approaches provide experimental justification for the rational selection of pluripotency and lineage markers, epitopes for cell isolation, and reagents for the characterization of putative hiPSC lines. Comparative differences between the chemoproteomic-defined surfaceome and the transcriptome-predicted surfaceome directly led to the discovery that STF-31, a reported GLUT-1 inhibitor, is toxic to hPSCs and efficient for selective elimination of hPSCs from mixed cultures. PMID:25068131

  3. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kober, Daniel L.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Karch, Celeste M.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Thomas J.

    2016-12-20

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Neurodegenerative disease mutations in TREM2 reveal a functional surface and distinct loss-of-function mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Daniel L; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M; Karch, Celeste M; Cruchaga, Carlos; Colonna, Marco; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in the myeloid immune receptor TREM2 are linked to several neurodegenerative diseases. To determine how TREM2 variants contribute to these diseases, we performed structural and functional studies of wild-type and variant proteins. Our 3.1 Å TREM2 crystal structure revealed that mutations found in Nasu-Hakola disease are buried whereas Alzheimer’s disease risk variants are found on the surface, suggesting that these mutations have distinct effects on TREM2 function. Biophysical and cellular methods indicate that Nasu-Hakola mutations impact protein stability and decrease folded TREM2 surface expression, whereas Alzheimer’s risk variants impact binding to a TREM2 ligand. Additionally, the Alzheimer’s risk variants appear to epitope map a functional surface on TREM2 that is unique within the larger TREM family. These findings provide a guide to structural and functional differences among genetic variants of TREM2, indicating that therapies targeting the TREM2 pathway should be tailored to these genetic and functional differences with patient-specific medicine approaches for neurodegenerative disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20391.001 PMID:27995897

  5. Determination of Protein Surface Hydration by Systematic Charge Mutations.

    PubMed

    Jia, Menghui; Yang, Jin; Qin, Yangzhong; Wang, Dihao; Pan, Haifeng; Wang, Lijuan; Xu, Jianhua; Zhong, Dongping

    2015-12-17

    Protein surface hydration is critical to its structural stability, flexibility, dynamics, and function. Recent observations of surface solvation on picosecond time scales have evoked debate on the origin of such relatively slow motions, from hydration water or protein charged side chains, especially with molecular dynamics simulations. Here we used a unique nuclease with a single tryptophan as a local probe and systematically mutated three neighboring charged residues to differentiate the contributions from hydration water and charged side chains. By various mutations of one, two, and all three charged residues, we observed slight increases in the total tryptophan Stokes shifts with fewer neighboring charged residue(s) and found insensitivity of charged side chains to the relaxation patterns. The dynamics is correlated with hydration water relaxation with the slowest time in a dense charged environment and the fastest time at a hydrophobic site. On such picosecond time scales, the protein surface motion is restricted. The total Stokes shifts are dominantly from hydration water relaxation and the slow dynamics is from water-driven relaxation, coupled to local protein fluctuations.

  6. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins

    PubMed Central

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results. PMID:27312768

  7. Protein Surface Matching by Combining Local and Global Geometric Information

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Leif; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the binding sites of proteins is an effective means for predicting protein functions based on their structure information. Despite the importance of this problem and much research in the past, it is still very challenging to predict the binding ligands from the atomic structures of protein binding sites. Here, we designed a new algorithm, TIPSA (Triangulation-based Iterative-closest-point for Protein Surface Alignment), based on the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. TIPSA aims to find the maximum number of atoms that can be superposed between two protein binding sites, where any pair of superposed atoms has a distance smaller than a given threshold. The search starts from similar tetrahedra between two binding sites obtained from 3D Delaunay triangulation and uses the Hungarian algorithm to find additional matched atoms. We found that, due to the plasticity of protein binding sites, matching the rigid body of point clouds of protein binding sites is not adequate for satisfactory binding ligand prediction. We further incorporated global geometric information, the radius of gyration of binding site atoms, and used nearest neighbor classification for binding site prediction. Tested on benchmark data, our method achieved a performance comparable to the best methods in the literature, while simultaneously providing the common atom set and atom correspondences. PMID:22815760

  8. Organic bioelectronics probing conformational changes in surface confined proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Alberga, Domenico; Manoli, Kyriaki; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Giordano, Francesco; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Torsi, Luisa

    2016-06-01

    The study of proteins confined on a surface has attracted a great deal of attention due to its relevance in the development of bio-systems for laboratory and clinical settings. In this respect, organic bio-electronic platforms can be used as tools to achieve a deeper understanding of the processes involving protein interfaces. In this work, biotin-binding proteins have been integrated in two different organic thin-film transistor (TFT) configurations to separately address the changes occurring in the protein-ligand complex morphology and dipole moment. This has been achieved by decoupling the output current change upon binding, taken as the transducing signal, into its component figures of merit. In particular, the threshold voltage is related to the protein dipole moment, while the field-effect mobility is associated with conformational changes occurring in the proteins of the layer when ligand binding occurs. Molecular Dynamics simulations on the whole avidin tetramer in presence and absence of ligands were carried out, to evaluate how the tight interactions with the ligand affect the protein dipole moment and the conformation of the loops surrounding the binding pocket. These simulations allow assembling a rather complete picture of the studied interaction processes and support the interpretation of the experimental results.

  9. Zika virus NS1 structure reveals diversity of electrostatic surfaces among flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Qi, Jianxun; Haywood, Joel; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2016-05-01

    The association of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections with microcephaly has resulted in an ongoing public-health emergency. Here we report the crystal structure of a C-terminal fragment of ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), a major host-interaction molecule that functions in flaviviral replication, pathogenesis and immune evasion. Comparison with West Nile and dengue virus NS1 structures reveals conserved features but diverse electrostatic characteristics at host-interaction interfaces, thus possibly implying different modes of flavivirus pathogenesis.

  10. Structure of a PE-PPE-EspG complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals molecular specificity of ESX protein secretion.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, Damian C; Cox, Jeffery S

    2014-10-14

    Nearly 10% of the coding capacity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is devoted to two highly expanded and enigmatic protein families called PE and PPE, some of which are important virulence/immunogenicity factors and are secreted during infection via a unique alternative secretory system termed "type VII." How PE-PPE proteins function during infection and how they are translocated to the bacterial surface through the five distinct type VII secretion systems [ESAT-6 secretion system (ESX)] of M. tuberculosis is poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of a PE-PPE heterodimer bound to ESX secretion-associated protein G (EspG), which adopts a novel fold. This PE-PPE-EspG complex, along with structures of two additional EspGs, suggests that EspG acts as an adaptor that recognizes specific PE-PPE protein complexes via extensive interactions with PPE domains, and delivers them to ESX machinery for secretion. Surprisingly, secretion of most PE-PPE proteins in M. tuberculosis is likely mediated by EspG from the ESX-5 system, underscoring the importance of ESX-5 in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Moreover, our results indicate that PE-PPE domains function as cis-acting targeting sequences that are read out by EspGs, revealing the molecular specificity for secretion through distinct ESX pathways.

  11. Structure of a PE-PPE-EspG complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals molecular specificity of ESX protein secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2014-10-01

    Nearly 10% of the coding capacity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is devoted to two highly expanded and enigmatic protein families called PE and PPE, some of which are important virulence/immunogenicity factors and are secreted during infection via a unique alternative secretory system termed "type VII." How PE-PPE proteins function during infection and how they are translocated to the bacterial surface through the five distinct type VII secretion systems [ESAT-6 secretion system (ESX)] of M. tuberculosis is poorly understood. Here in this paper, we report the crystal structure of a PE-PPE heterodimer bound to ESX secretion-associated protein G (EspG), whichmore » adopts a novel fold. This PE-PPE-EspG complex, along with structures of two additional EspGs, suggests that EspG acts as an adaptor that recognizes specific PE-PPE protein complexes via extensive interactions with PPE domains, and delivers them to ESX machinery for secretion. Surprisingly, secretion of most PE-PPE proteins in M. tuberculosis is likely mediated by EspG from the ESX-5 system, underscoring the importance of ESX-5 in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Furthermore, our results indicate that PE-PPE domains function as cis-acting targeting sequences that are read out by EspGs, revealing the molecular specificity for secretion through distinct ESX pathways.« less

  12. Heterogenous turnover of sperm and seminal vesicle proteins in the mouse revealed by dynamic metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Claydon, Amy J; Ramm, Steven A; Pennington, Andrea; Hurst, Jane L; Stockley, Paula; Beynon, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Plasticity in ejaculate composition is predicted as an adaptive response to the evolutionary selective pressure of sperm competition. However, to respond rapidly to local competitive conditions requires dynamic modulation in the production of functionally relevant ejaculate proteins. Here we combine metabolic labeling of proteins with proteomics to explore the opportunity for such modulation within mammalian ejaculates. We assessed the rate at which proteins are synthesized and incorporated in the seminal vesicles of male house mice (Mus musculus domesticus), where major seminal fluid proteins with potential roles in sperm competition are produced. We compared rates of protein turnover in the seminal vesicle with those during spermatogenesis, the timing of which is well known in mice. The subjects were fed a diet containing deuterated valine ([(2)H(8)]valine) for up to 35 days, and the incorporation of dietary-labeled amino acid into seminal vesicle- or sperm-specific proteins was assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of samples recovered from the seminal vesicle lumen and cauda epididymis, respectively. Analyses of epididymal contents were consistent with the known duration of spermatogenesis and sperm maturation in this species and in addition revealed evidence for a subset of epididymal proteins subject to rapid turnover. For seminal vesicle proteins, incorporation of the stable isotope was evident from day 2 of labeling, reaching a plateau of labeling by day 24. Hence, even in the absence of copulation, the seminal vesicle proteins and certain epididymal proteins demonstrate considerable turnover, a response that is consonant with the capacity to rapidly modulate protein production. These techniques can now be used to assess the extent of phenotypic plasticity in mammalian ejaculate production and allocation according to social and environmental cues of sperm competition.

  13. Restricted mobility of side chains on concave surfaces of solenoid proteins may impart heightened potential for intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L; Gautham, N; Chaloin, Laurent; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-01

    Significant progress has been made in the determination of the protein structures with their number today passing over a hundred thousand structures. The next challenge is the understanding and prediction of protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. In this work we address this problem by analyzing curved solenoid proteins. Many of these proteins are considered as "hub molecules" for their high potential to interact with many different molecules and to be a scaffold for multisubunit protein machineries. Our analysis of these structures through molecular dynamics simulations reveals that the mobility of the side-chains on the concave surfaces of the solenoids is lower than on the convex ones. This result provides an explanation to the observed preferential binding of the ligands, including small and flexible ligands, to the concave surface of the curved solenoid proteins. The relationship between the landscapes and dynamic properties of the protein surfaces can be further generalized to the other types of protein structures and eventually used in the computer algorithms, allowing prediction of protein-ligand interactions by analysis of protein surfaces.

  14. Cuticle surface proteins of wild type and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Blaxter, M L

    1993-03-25

    The molecular components of the surface of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have been identified by surface-specific radioiodination. Four compartments were defined by fractionation of labeled wild type (N2 strain) adult hermaphrodites. Organic solvents extracted cuticular lipids. Homogenization in detergents released a single, non-collagenous, hydrophobic protein. This is not glycosylated and is a heterodimer of 6.5- and 12-kDa subunits. The third compartment, proteins solubilized by reducing agents, included both the cuticular collagens and the heterodimer. Residual material corresponds to the cuticlin fraction. Larval stages showed a similar pattern, except that the dauer larva had an additional 37-kDa detergent-soluble protein. Other species of rhabditid nematodes displayed similar profiles, and comparison with parasitic species suggests that this simple pattern may be primitive in the Nematoda. A C. elegans strain mutant in cuticular collagen (rol-6) had a pattern identical to that of wild type, but another morphological mutant (dpy-3) [corrected] and several mutants that differ in surface reactivity to antibody and lectins (srf mutants) also had striking differences in surface labeling patterns.

  15. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover

    PubMed Central

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  16. Protein Surface Mimetics: Understanding How Ruthenium Tris(Bipyridines) Interact with Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Sarah H.; Filby, Maria H.; Hayes, Ed; Kuhn, Lars T.; Kalverda, Arnout P.; Webb, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protein surface mimetics achieve high‐affinity binding by exploiting a scaffold to project binding groups over a large area of solvent‐exposed protein surface to make multiple cooperative noncovalent interactions. Such recognition is a prerequisite for competitive/orthosteric inhibition of protein–protein interactions (PPIs). This paper describes biophysical and structural studies on ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) surface mimetics that recognize cytochrome (cyt) c and inhibit the cyt c/cyt c peroxidase (CCP) PPI. Binding is electrostatically driven, with enhanced affinity achieved through enthalpic contributions thought to arise from the ability of the surface mimetics to make a greater number of noncovalent interactions than CCP with surface‐exposed basic residues on cyt c. High‐field natural abundance 1H,15N HSQC NMR experiments are consistent with surface mimetics binding to cyt c in similar manner to CCP. This provides a framework for understanding recognition of proteins by supramolecular receptors and informing the design of ligands superior to the protein partners upon which they are inspired. PMID:27860106

  17. High polymorphism in Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-5 (MSP5).

    PubMed

    Gomez, A; Suarez, C F; Martinez, P; Saravia, C; Patarroyo, M A

    2006-12-01

    A key issue relating to developing multi-component anti-malarial vaccines, lies in studying Plasmodium vivax surface proteins' genetic variation. The present work was aimed at amplifying, cloning and sequencing the gene encoding P. vivax merozoite surface protein 5 (PvMSP5) in samples obtained from infected patients from Colombian areas having varying malaria transmission rates. Nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper are available in the GenBank, EMBL and DDBJ databases under Accessions numbers DQ341586 to DQ341601. Our results have revealed that PvMSP5 is one of the P. vivax surface proteins having greater polymorphism, this being restricted to specific protein regions. The intron and exon II (which includes the GPI anchor and EGF-like domain) were both highly conserved when compared to exon I; exon I displayed the greatest variation and most of the recombination events occurred within it. No geographical grouping was observed. The Nei-Gojobori test revealed significant positive selection in the samples analysed here, whereas Tajima and Fu and Li tests presented a neutral selection pattern. The results reflected a localized variation pattern, recombination between PvMSP5 alleles and also functional and immune pressures, where stronger selective forces might be acting on exon I than on exon II, suggesting that the latter could be an important region to be included in an anti-malarial vaccine.

  18. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Kakabakos, Sotirios; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos

    2011-09-01

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm-1), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH2, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73×10-9Jand623 J m-2, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 μm spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  19. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2011-09-15

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm{sup -1}), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH{sub 2}, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73x10{sup -9} Jand623 J m{sup -2}, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 {mu}m spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  20. Structure of the 'Escherichia Coli' Leucine-Responsive Regulatory Protein Lrp Reveals a Novel Octameric Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    de los Rios, S.; Perona, J.J.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-07-09

    The structure of Escherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) cocrystallized with a short duplex oligodeoxynucleotide reveals a novel quaternary assembly in which the protein octamer forms an open, linear array of four dimers. In contrast, structures of the Lrp homologs LrpA, LrpC and AsnC crystallized in the absence of DNA show that these proteins instead form highly symmetrical octamers in which the four dimers form a closed ring. Although the DNA is disordered within the Lrp crystal, comparative analyses suggest that the observed differences in quaternary state may arise from DNA interactions during crystallization. Interconversion of these conformations, possibly in response to DNA or leucine binding, provides an underlying mechanism to alter the relative spatial orientation of the DNA-binding domains. Breaking of the closed octamer symmetry may be a common essential step in the formation of active DNA complexes by all members of the Lrp/AsnC family of transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  1. Multilayered films fabricated from an oligoarginine-conjugated protein promote efficient surface-mediated protein transduction.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Christopher M; Fuchs, Stephen M; Flessner, Ryan M; Raines, Ronald T; Lynn, David M

    2007-03-01

    The conjugation of cationic protein transduction domains to proteins results in an increase in the extent to which proteins are internalized by cells. This investigation sought to determine whether the conjugation of a protein transduction domain to a functional protein could be used to facilitate the incorporation of the protein into multilayered polyelectrolyte films and, subsequently, whether these films could be used to promote surface-mediated protein transduction. We demonstrate that it is possible to fabricate multilayered assemblies 80 nm thick using sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) and bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) conjugated to the cationic protein transduction domain nonaarginine (R(9)) using an entirely aqueous layer-by-layer process. We demonstrate further that the conjugation of R(9) to RNase A permits the assembly of multilayered films under conditions that do not allow for the incorporation of the unmodified protein. This result suggests that R(9) functions as a cationic anchor and serves to increase the strength of electrostatic interactions with SPS and facilitate layer-by-layer assembly. We also demonstrate that RNase A-R(9)/SPS films dissolve rapidly in physiologically relevant media and that macroscopic objects coated with these materials can be used to mediate high levels of protein transduction in mammalian cells. These results suggest the basis of general methods that could contribute to the design of materials that permit spatial and temporal control over the delivery of therapeutic proteins to cells and tissues.

  2. Complex structure of cytochrome c-cytochrome c oxidase reveals a novel protein-protein interaction mode.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Satoru; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Baba, Junpei; Aoe, Shimpei; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Yamashita, Eiki; Kang, Jiyoung; Tateno, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) transfers electrons from cytochrome c (Cyt.c) to O2 to generate H2O, a process coupled to proton pumping. To elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer, we determined the structure of the mammalian Cyt.c-CcO complex at 2.0-Å resolution and identified an electron transfer pathway from Cyt.c to CcO. The specific interaction between Cyt.c and CcO is stabilized by a few electrostatic interactions between side chains within a small contact surface area. Between the two proteins are three water layers with a long inter-molecular span, one of which lies between the other two layers without significant direct interaction with either protein. Cyt.c undergoes large structural fluctuations, using the interacting regions with CcO as a fulcrum. These features of the protein-protein interaction at the docking interface represent the first known example of a new class of protein-protein interaction, which we term "soft and specific". This interaction is likely to contribute to the rapid association/dissociation of the Cyt.c-CcO complex, which facilitates the sequential supply of four electrons for the O2 reduction reaction.

  3. Surfactant protein-C chromatin-bound green fluorescence protein reporter mice reveal heterogeneity of surfactant protein C-expressing lung cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Hyeon; Kim, Jonghwan; Gludish, David; Roach, Rebecca R; Saunders, Arven H; Barrios, Juliana; Woo, Andrew Jonghan; Chen, Huaiyong; Conner, David A; Fujiwara, Yuko; Stripp, Barry R; Kim, Carla F

    2013-03-01

    The regeneration of alveolar epithelial cells is a critical aspect of alveolar reorganization after lung injury. Although alveolar Type II (AT2) cells have been described as progenitor cells for alveolar epithelia, more remains to be understood about how their progenitor cell properties are regulated. A nuclear, chromatin-bound green fluorescence protein reporter (H2B-GFP) was driven from the murine surfactant protein-C (SPC) promoter to generate SPC H2B-GFP transgenic mice. The SPC H2B-GFP allele allowed the FACS-based enrichment and gene expression profiling of AT2 cells. Approximately 97% of AT2 cells were GFP-labeled on Postnatal Day 1, and the percentage of GFP-labeled AT2 cells decreased to approximately 63% at Postnatal Week 8. Isolated young adult SPC H2B-GFP(+) cells displayed proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal capacity in the presence of lung fibroblasts in a Matrigel-based three-dimensional culture system. Heterogeneity within the GFP(+) population was revealed, because cells with distinct alveolar and bronchiolar gene expression arose in three-dimensional cultures. CD74, a surface marker highly enriched on GFP(+) cells, was identified as a positive selection marker, providing 3-fold enrichment for AT2 cells. In vivo, GFP expression was induced within other epithelial cell types during maturation of the distal lung. The utility of the SPC H2B-GFP murine model for the identification of AT2 cells was greatest in early postnatal lungs and more limited with age, when some discordance between SPC and GFP expression was observed. In adult mice, this allele may allow for the enrichment and future characterization of other SPC-expressing alveolar and bronchiolar cells, including putative stem/progenitor cell populations.

  4. Proteomics Analysis of Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines and Tissues Reveals Drug Resistance-associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    CRUZ*, ISA N.; COLEY*, HELEN M.; KRAMER, HOLGER B.; MADHURI, THUMULURU KAVITAH; SAFUWAN, NUR A.M.; ANGELINO, ANA RITA; YANG, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carboplatin and paclitaxel form the cornerstone of chemotherapy for epithelial ovarian cancer, however, drug resistance to these agents continues to present challenges. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms underlying this resistance remain unclear. Materials and Methods: A 2D-gel proteomics method was used to analyze protein expression levels of three human ovarian cancer cell lines and five biopsy samples. Representative proteins identified were validated via western immunoblotting. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed metabolomic pathway changes. Results: A total of 189 proteins were identified with restricted criteria. Combined treatment targeting the proteasome-ubiquitin pathway resulted in re-sensitisation of drug-resistant cells. In addition, examination of five surgical biopsies of ovarian tissues revealed α-enolase (ENOA), elongation factor Tu, mitochondrial (EFTU), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3P), stress-70 protein, mitochondrial (GRP75), apolipoprotein A-1 (APOA1), peroxiredoxin (PRDX2) and annexin A (ANXA) as candidate biomarkers of drug-resistant disease. Conclusion: Proteomics combined with pathway analysis provided information for an effective combined treatment approach overcoming drug resistance. Analysis of cell lines and tissues revealed potential prognostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer. *These Authors contributed equally to this study. PMID:28031236

  5. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  6. Revealing Surface States in In-Doped SnTe Nanoplates with Low Bulk Mobility.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Xie, Yujun; Cha, Judy J

    2015-06-10

    Indium (In) doping in topological crystalline insulator SnTe induces superconductivity, making In-doped SnTe a candidate for a topological superconductor. SnTe nanostructures offer well-defined nanoscale morphology and high surface-to-volume ratios to enhance surface effects. Here, we study In-doped SnTe nanoplates, In(x)Sn(1-x)Te, with x ranging from 0 to 0.1 and show they superconduct. More importantly, we show that In doping reduces the bulk mobility of In(x)Sn(1-x)Te such that the surface states are revealed in magnetotransport despite the high bulk carrier density. This is manifested by two-dimensional linear magnetoresistance in high magnetic fields, which is independent of temperature up to 10 K. Aging experiments show that the linear magnetoresistance is sensitive to ambient conditions, further confirming its surface origin. We also show that the weak antilocalization observed in In(x)Sn(1-x)Te nanoplates is a bulk effect. Thus, we show that nanostructures and reducing the bulk mobility are effective strategies to reveal the surface states and test for topological superconductors.

  7. The CWB2 Cell Wall-Anchoring Module Is Revealed by the Crystal Structures of the Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Proteins Cwp8 and Cwp6.

    PubMed

    Usenik, Aleksandra; Renko, Miha; Mihelič, Marko; Lindič, Nataša; Borišek, Jure; Perdih, Andrej; Pretnar, Gregor; Müller, Uwe; Turk, Dušan

    2017-03-07

    Bacterial cell wall proteins play crucial roles in cell survival, growth, and environmental interactions. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell wall proteins include several types that are non-covalently attached via cell wall binding domains. Of the two conserved surface-layer (S-layer)-anchoring modules composed of three tandem SLH or CWB2 domains, the latter have so far eluded structural insight. The crystal structures of Cwp8 and Cwp6 reveal multi-domain proteins, each containing an embedded CWB2 module. It consists of a triangular trimer of Rossmann-fold CWB2 domains, a feature common to 29 cell wall proteins in Clostridium difficile 630. The structural basis of the intact module fold necessary for its binding to the cell wall is revealed. A comparison with previously reported atomic force microscopy data of S-layers suggests that C. difficile S-layers are complex oligomeric structures, likely composed of several different proteins.

  8. Proteomic analysis of a segregant population reveals candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andréa Miyasaka; Urra, Claudio; Moraga, Carol; Jego, Marcela; Flores, Alejandra; Meisel, Lee; González, Mauricio; Infante, Rodrigo; Defilippi, Bruno G; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Orellana, Ariel

    2016-01-10

    Peaches are stored at low temperatures to delay ripening and increase postharvest life. However some varieties are susceptible to chilling injury,which leads to fruit mealiness, browning and flesh bleeding. In order to identify potentialmarkers associated with chilling injury,we performed proteomic analyses on a segregating population with contrasting susceptibility to chilling-induced mealiness. Chilling-induced mealiness was assessed by measuring juiciness in fruits that have been stored in cold and then allowed to ripen. Fruitmesocarp and leaf proteome from contrasting segregants were analyzed using 2-DE gels. Comparison of protein abundance between segregants revealed 133 spots from fruit mesocarp and 36 from leaf. Thirty four fruit mesocarp proteins were identified from these spots. Most of these proteins were related to ethylene synthesis, ABA response and stress response. Leaf protein analyses identified 22 proteins, most of which related to energy metabolism. Some of the genes that code for these proteins have been previously correlated with chilling injury through transcript analyses and co-segregation with mealiness QTLs. The results from this study, further deciphers the molecular mechanisms associated with chilling response in peach fruit, and identifies candidate proteins linked to mealiness in peach which may be used as putative markers for this trait.

  9. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J Bruce; Raybould, Helen E; Mills, David A

    2011-03-15

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  10. Revealing Atomic-Level Mechanisms of Protein Allostery with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hertig, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have become a powerful and popular method for the study of protein allostery, the widespread phenomenon in which a stimulus at one site on a protein influences the properties of another site on the protein. By capturing the motions of a protein’s constituent atoms, simulations can enable the discovery of allosteric binding sites and the determination of the mechanistic basis for allostery. These results can provide a foundation for applications including rational drug design and protein engineering. Here, we provide an introduction to the investigation of protein allostery using molecular dynamics simulation. We emphasize the importance of designing simulations that include appropriate perturbations to the molecular system, such as the addition or removal of ligands or the application of mechanical force. We also demonstrate how the bidirectional nature of allostery—the fact that the two sites involved influence one another in a symmetrical manner—can facilitate such investigations. Through a series of case studies, we illustrate how these concepts have been used to reveal the structural basis for allostery in several proteins and protein complexes of biological and pharmaceutical interest. PMID:27285999

  11. Genome-wide search for eliminylating domains reveals novel function for BLES03-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2014-07-24

    Bacterial phosphothreonine lyases catalyze a novel posttranslational modification involving formation of dehydrobutyrine/dehyroalanine by β elimination of the phosphate group of phosphothreonine or phosphoserine residues in their substrate proteins. Though there is experimental evidence for presence of dehydro amino acids in human proteins, no eukaryotic homologs of these lyases have been identified as of today. A comprehensive genome-wide search for identifying phosphothreonine lyase homologs in eukaryotes was carried out. Our fold-based search revealed structural and catalytic site similarity between bacterial phosphothreonine lyases and BLES03 (basophilic leukemia-expressed protein 03), a human protein with unknown function. Ligand induced conformational changes similar to bacterial phosphothreonine lyases, and movement of crucial arginines in the loop region to the catalytic pocket upon binding of phosphothreonine-containing peptides was seen during docking and molecular dynamics studies. Genome-wide search for BLES03 homologs using sensitive profile-based methods revealed their presence not only in eukaryotic classes such as chordata and fungi but also in bacterial and archaebacterial classes. The synteny of these archaebacterial BLES03-like proteins was remarkably similar to that of type IV lantibiotic synthetases which harbor LanL-like phosphothreonine lyase domains. Hence, context-based analysis reinforced our earlier sequence/structure-based prediction of phosphothreonine lyase catalytic function for BLES03. Our in silico analysis has revealed that BLES03-like proteins with previously unknown function are novel eukaryotic phosphothreonine lyases involved in biosynthesis of dehydro amino acids, whereas their bacterial and archaebacterial counterparts might be involved in biosynthesis of natural products similar to lantibiotics.

  12. Identification of Surface Protein Biomarkers of Listeria monocytogenes via Bioinformatics and Antibody-Based Protein Detection Tools

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cathy X. Y.; Brooks, Brian W.; Huang, Hongsheng; Pagotto, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes a significant percentage of the fatalities among foodborne illnesses in humans. Surface proteins specifically expressed in a wide range of L. monocytogenes serotypes under selective enrichment culture conditions could serve as potential biomarkers for detection and isolation of this pathogen via antibody-based methods. Our study aimed to identify such biomarkers. Interrogation of the L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strain F2365 genome identified 130 putative or known surface proteins. The homologues of four surface proteins, LMOf2365_0578, LMOf2365_0581, LMOf2365_0639, and LMOf2365_2117, were assessed as biomarkers due to the presence of conserved regions among strains of L. monocytogenes which are variable among other Listeria species. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the four recombinant proteins revealed the expression of only LMOf2365_0639 on the surface of serotype 4b strain LI0521 cells despite PCR detection of mRNA transcripts for all four proteins in the organism. Three of 35 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to LMOf2365_0639, MAbs M3643, M3644, and M3651, specifically recognized 42 (91.3%) of 46 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates grown in nonselective brain heart infusion medium. While M3644 and M3651 reacted with 14 to 15 (82.4 to 88.2%) of 17 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates, M3643 reacted with 22 (91.7%) of 24 lineage I, II, and III isolates grown in selective enrichment media (UVM1, modified Fraser, Palcam, and UVM2 media). The three MAbs exhibited only weak reactivities (the optical densities at 414 nm were close to the cutoff value) to some other Listeria species grown in selective enrichment media. Collectively, the data indicate the potential of LMOf2365_0639 as a surface biomarker of L. monocytogenes, with the aid of specific MAbs, for pathogen detection, identification, and isolation in clinical, environmental, and food samples. IMPORTANCE L. monocytogenes is

  13. Systematic protein interactome analysis of glycosaminoglycans revealed YcbS as a novel bacterial virulence factor

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Felix Shih-Hsiang; Sutandy, FX Reymond; Syu, Guan-Da; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Jun-Mu; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogens have evolved several strategies for interacting with host cell components, such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Some microbial proteins involved in host–GAG binding have been described; however, a systematic study on microbial proteome–mammalian GAG interactions has not been conducted. Here, we used Escherichia coli proteome chips to probe four typical mammalian GAGs, heparin, heparan sulphate (HS), chondroitin sulphate B (CSB), and chondroitin sulphate C (CSC), and identified 185 heparin-, 62 HS-, 98 CSB-, and 101 CSC-interacting proteins. Bioinformatics analyses revealed the unique functions of heparin- and HS-specific interacting proteins in glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among all the GAG-interacting proteins, three were outer membrane proteins (MbhA, YcbS, and YmgH). Invasion assays confirmed that mutant E. coli lacking ycbS could not invade the epithelial cells. Introducing plasmid carrying ycbS complemented the invading defects at ycbS lacking E. coli mutant, that can be further improved by overexpressing ycbS. Preblocking epithelial cells with YcbS reduced the percentage of E. coli invasions. Moreover, we observed that whole components of the ycb operon were crucial for invasion. The displacement assay revealed that YcbS binds to the laminin-binding site of heparin and might affect the host extracellular matrix structure by displacing heparin from laminin. PMID:27323865

  14. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  15. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  16. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; ...

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  17. Cloning, expression, and characterisation of a Plasmodium vivax MSP7 family merozoite surface protein.

    PubMed

    Mongui, Alvaro; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Soto, Sara C; Cortes, Jimena; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2006-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax remains the most widespread Plasmodium parasite species around the world, producing about 75 million malaria cases, mainly in South America and Asia. A vaccine against this disease is of urgent need, making the identification of new antigens involved in target cell invasion, and thus potential vaccine candidates, a priority. A protein belonging to the P. vivax merozoite surface protein 7 (PvMSP7) family was identified in this study. This protein (named PvMSP7(1)) has 311 amino acids displaying an N-terminal region sharing high identity with P. falciparum MSP7, as well as a similar proteolytical cleavage pattern. This protein's expression in P. vivax asexual blood stages was revealed by immuno-histochemical and molecular techniques.

  18. Identification of novel surface-exposed proteins of Rickettsia rickettsii by affinity purification and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenping; Xiong, Xiaolu; Qi, Yong; Jiao, Jun; Duan, Changsong; Wen, Bohai

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is the most pathogenic member among Rickettsia spp. Surface-exposed proteins (SEPs) of R. rickettsii may play important roles in its pathogenesis or immunity. In this study, R. rickettsii organisms were surface-labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin and the labeled proteins were affinity-purified with streptavidin. The isolated proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and 10 proteins were identified among 23 protein spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Five (OmpA, OmpB, GroEL, GroES, and a DNA-binding protein) of the 10 proteins were previously characterized as surface proteins of R. rickettsii. Another 5 proteins (Adr1, Adr2, OmpW, Porin_4, and TolC) were first recognized as SEPs of R. rickettsii herein. The genes encoding the 5 novel SEPs were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, resulting in 5 recombinant SEPs (rSEPs), which were used to immunize mice. After challenge with viable R. rickettsii cells, the rickettsial load in the spleen, liver, or lung of mice immunized with rAdr2 and in the lungs of mice immunized with other rSEPs excluding rTolC was significantly lower than in mice that were mock-immunized with PBS. The in vitro neutralization test revealed that sera from mice immunized with rAdr1, rAdr2, or rOmpW reduced R. rickettsii adherence to and invasion of vascular endothelial cells. The immuno-electron microscopic assay clearly showed that the novel SEPs were located in the outer and/or inner membrane of R. rickettsii. Altogether, the 5 novel SEPs identified herein might be involved in the interaction of R. rickettsii with vascular endothelial cells, and all of them except TolC were protective antigens.

  19. Surface forces in model oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Tatiana D; Leal-Calderon, Fernando; Gurkov, Theodor D; Campbell, Bruce

    2004-05-20

    We have employed two complementary techniques, namely, the magnetic chaining technique (MCT) and a variant of the Mysels cell to obtain data concerning the repulsive interaction profiles between protein layers formed at liquid-liquid interfaces. For BSA-stabilized systems, a long-ranged repulsion is operative. It is not of an electrostatic origin, but originates most probably from the formation of multiple protein layers at the interface. The interactions between beta-casein layers formed at the water/oil interface are governed by electrostatic repulsion. Due to the relatively large final thickness of approximately 20 nm, the van der Waals contribution to the total disjoining pressure is inferior. The oscillatory component is also negligible for the studied protein concentration of 0.1 wt.%. For both proteins, the extracted information describes the situation where the protein-covered surfaces are approached/manipulated in a quasi-static manner. We observe a very good agreement between the data obtained from MCT and Mysels cell. The comparison of our results with literature data from surface force apparatus (SFA) experiments reveals a substantial difference in the force laws existing between protein-stabilized liquid droplets and mica surfaces covered by proteins. We explain this discrepancy in terms of the different protein absorption on solid and liquid interfaces. We also measured the threshold force necessary to induce irreversible flocculation in beta-casein and beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) stabilized emulsions. Under similar conditions, the threshold flocculation force is higher for beta-casein than for BLG stabilized droplets. The flocs formed from BLG covered droplets are tight and remain without visible change for at least 48 h. We speculate that the flocculation is due to formation of protein aggregates between the approaching droplets.

  20. Cryovolcanic Features on Titan's Surface as Revealed by the Cassini RADAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, R. M.; Elachi, C.; Stofan, E.; Paganelli, F.; Wood, C.; Kirk, R.; Lorenz, R.; Fortes, A. D.; Lunine, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture radar images of about 1.1% of Titan's surface during the spacecraft s first targeted fly-by on October 26, 2004 (referred to as the Ta fly-by). These images revealed that Titan is very complex geologically. Features identified include a possible volcanic dome or shield, craters that appear to be of volcanic origin, and extensive flows. We will discuss these features and others that will likely be revealed during Cassini s T3 Titan fly-by of February 15, 2005, during which a swath covering comparable amount of the surface will be obtained. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Specific and Nonspecific Interactions in Ultraweak Protein–Protein Associations Revealed by Solvent Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Weak and transient protein–protein interactions underlie numerous biological processes. However, the location of the interaction sites of the specific complexes and the effect of transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions often remain elusive. We have investigated the weak self-association of human growth hormone (hGH, KD = 0.90 ± 0.03 mM) at neutral pH by the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) of the amide protons induced by the soluble paramagnetic relaxation agent, gadodiamide (Gd(DTPA-BMA)). Primarily, it was found that the PREs are in agreement with the general Hwang-Freed model for relaxation by translational diffusion (J. Chem. Phys.1975, 63, 4017–4025), only if crowding effects on the diffusion in the protein solution are taken into account. Second, by measuring the PREs of the amide protons at increasing hGH concentrations and a constant concentration of the relaxation agent, it is shown that a distinction can be made between residues that are affected only by transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions and residues that are involved in specific protein–protein associations. Thus, the PREs of the former residues increase linearly with the hGH concentration in the entire concentration range because of a reduction of the diffusion caused by the transient, nonspecific protein–protein interactions, while the PREs of the latter residues increase only at the lower hGH concentrations but decrease at the higher concentrations because of specific protein–protein associations that impede the access of gadodiamide to the residues of the interaction surface. Finally, it is found that the ultraweak aggregation of hGH involves several interaction sites that are located in patches covering a large part of the protein surface. PMID:24969589

  2. Diversity of environmental single-stranded DNA phages revealed by PCR amplification of the partial major capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Max; Kailasan, Shweta; Cohen, Allison; Roux, Simon; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Shevenell, Amelia; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Breitbart, Mya

    2014-01-01

    The small single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bacteriophages of the subfamily Gokushovirinae were traditionally perceived as narrowly targeted, niche-specific viruses infecting obligate parasitic bacteria, such as Chlamydia. The advent of metagenomics revealed gokushoviruses to be widespread in global environmental samples. This study expands knowledge of gokushovirus diversity in the environment by developing a degenerate PCR assay to amplify a portion of the major capsid protein (MCP) gene of gokushoviruses. Over 500 amplicons were sequenced from 10 environmental samples (sediments, sewage, seawater and freshwater), revealing the ubiquity and high diversity of this understudied phage group. Residue-level conservation data generated from multiple alignments was combined with a predicted 3D structure, revealing a tendency for structurally internal residues to be more highly conserved than surface-presenting protein–protein or viral–host interaction domains. Aggregating this data set into a phylogenetic framework, many gokushovirus MCP clades contained samples from multiple environments, although distinct clades dominated the different samples. Antarctic sediment samples contained the most diverse gokushovirus communities, whereas freshwater springs from Florida were the least diverse. Whether the observed diversity is being driven by environmental factors or host-binding interactions remains an open question. The high environmental diversity of this previously overlooked ssDNA viral group necessitates further research elucidating their natural hosts and exploring their ecological roles. PMID:24694711

  3. Protein sequences from mastodon and Tyrannosaurus rex revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asara, John M; Schweitzer, Mary H; Freimark, Lisa M; Phillips, Matthew; Cantley, Lewis C

    2007-04-13

    Fossilized bones from extinct taxa harbor the potential for obtaining protein or DNA sequences that could reveal evolutionary links to extant species. We used mass spectrometry to obtain protein sequences from bones of a 160,000- to 600,000-year-old extinct mastodon (Mammut americanum) and a 68-million-year-old dinosaur (Tyrannosaurus rex). The presence of T. rex sequences indicates that their peptide bonds were remarkably stable. Mass spectrometry can thus be used to determine unique sequences from ancient organisms from peptide fragmentation patterns, a valuable tool to study the evolution and adaptation of ancient taxa from which genomic sequences are unlikely to be obtained.

  4. Protein antifouling and fouling-release in perfluoropolyether surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molena, Elena; Credi, Caterina; De Marco, Carmela; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Simeone, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Perfluoropolyether polymers have been described as high performance fouling-release materials for marine coatings. Moreover, they have a good potential to be exploited in the biomedical field too. In this article several perfuoropolyether photopolymers were characterized in terms of surface and mechanical properties outlining the relationship between these properties and the polymer molecular structure. In particular the anti-fouling and fouling-release performances, evaluated using Bovine Serum Albumin as testing protein, was correlated to other material properties, like a parameter considering both surface tension components γ and elastic modulus E. A good correlation between the anti-fouling/fouling-release of perfluoropolyethers and (E*γpolar)1/2 can actually be established. Our results show that perfluoropolyether photopolymers are good protein anti-fouling/fouling-release materials.

  5. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    decrease in solvation free energy, harnessing the monomer solvation free energy earned during the misfolding. The second step, where a compact dimer structure is formed, is driven by direct protein-protein interactions, but again it is accompanied by an increase in solvation free energy. The increased solvation free energy of the dimer will function as the driving force to recruit another Aβ protein in the approach stage of subsequent oligomerizations. The fluctuating thermodynamics analysis of the misfolding and dimerization of the Aβ protein indicates that the interaction of the protein with surrounding water plays a critical role in protein aggregation. Such a water-centric perspective is further corroborated by demonstrating that, for a large number of Aβ mutants and mutants of other protein systems, the change in the experimental aggregation propensity upon mutation has a significant correlation with the protein solvation free energy change. We also find striking discrimination between the positively and negatively charged residues on the protein surface by surrounding water molecules, which is shown to play a crucial role in determining the protein aggregation propensity. We argue that the protein total charge dictates such striking behavior of the surrounding water molecules. Our results provide new insights for understanding and predicting the protein aggregation propensity, thereby offering novel design principles for producing aggregation-resistant proteins for biotherapeutics.

  6. Alluvial Fans on Titan Reveal Atmosphere and Surface Interactions and Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; Ventra, D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Farr, T. G.; Kirk, R. L.; Hayes, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Birch, S.; Liu, Z. Y. C.; Lunine, J. I.; Barnes, J. W.; Le Gall, A. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Paillou, P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial fans, important depositional systems that record how sediment is stored and moved on planetary surfaces, are found on the surface of Titan, a body of significantly different materials and process rates than Earth. As seen by Cassini's Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images at 350 m resolution, fans on Titan are found globally and are variable in size, shape and relationship to adjacent landforms. Their morphologies and SAR characteristics, which reveal roughness, textural patterns and other material properties, show similarities with fans in Death Valley seen by SAR and indicate there are regions of high relative relief locally, in the Ganesa, Xanadu and equatorial mountain belt regions. The Leilah Fluctus fans near Ganesa are ~30 km x 15 km, similar to the largest Death Valley fans, and revealing mountainous topography adjacent to plains. Others have gentle slopes over hundreds of kilometers, as in the high southern latitude lakes regions or the Mezzoramia southern midlatitudes, where a fan system is 200 km x 150 km, similar to the Qarn Alam fan emerging into the Rub al Khali in Oman. Additionally, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes, from relatively coarse (~2 cm or more) to fine, revealing long-term duration and variability in erosion by methane rainfall and transport. Some features have morphologies consistent with proximality to high-relief source areas and highly ephemeral runoff, while others appear to draw larger catchment areas and are perhaps characterized by more prolonged episodes of flow. The presence of many fans indicates the longevity of rainfall and erosion in Titan's surface processes and reveals that sediment transport and the precipitation that drives it are strongly episodic. Alluvial fans join rivers, lakes, eroded mountains, sand dunes and dissolution features in the list of surface morphologies derived from atmospheric and fluvial processes similar to those on Earth, strengthening comparisons between the two planetary

  7. The heterogeneity of human antibody responses to vaccinia virus revealed through use of focused protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S.; Wollenick, Kristin; Witten, Elizabeth A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Baden, Lindsey R.; Dolin, Raphael; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2009-01-01

    The renewed interest in strategies to combat infectious agents with epidemic potential has led to a re-examination of vaccination protocols against smallpox. To help define which antigens elucidate a human antibody response, we have targeted proteins known or predicted to be presented on the surface of the intracellular mature virion (IMV) or the extracellular enveloped virion (EEV). The predicted ectodomains were expressed in a mammalian in vitro coupled transcription/translation reaction using tRNAlys precharged with lysine-ε-biotin followed by solid phase immobilization on 384 well neutravidin-coated plates. The generated array is highly specific and sensitive in a microELISA format. By comparison of binding of vaccinia-immune sera to the reticulocyte lysate-produced proteins and to secreted post-translationally-modified proteins, we demonstrate that for several proteins including the EEV proteins B5 and A33, proper recognition is dependent upon appropriate folding, with little dependence upon glycosylation per se. We further demonstrate that the humoral immune response to vaccinia among different individuals is not uniform in specificity or strength, as different IMV and EEV targets predominate within the group of immunogenic proteins. This heterogeneity likely results from the diversity of HLA Class II alleles and CD4 T helper cell epitopes stimulating B cell antibody production. Our findings have important implications both for design of new recombinant subunit vaccines as well as for methods of assaying the human antibody response utilizing recombinant proteins produced in vitro. PMID:19146908

  8. An extracellular interactome of immunoglobulin and LRR proteins reveals receptor-ligand networks.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Engin; Carrillo, Robert A; Eastman, Catharine L; Weiszmann, Richard; Waghray, Deepa; Johnson, Karl G; Zinn, Kai; Celniker, Susan E; Garcia, K Christopher

    2013-07-03

    Extracellular domains of cell surface receptors and ligands mediate cell-cell communication, adhesion, and initiation of signaling events, but most existing protein-protein "interactome" data sets lack information for extracellular interactions. We probed interactions between receptor extracellular domains, focusing on a set of 202 proteins composed of the Drosophila melanogaster immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), fibronectin type III (FnIII), and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) families, which are known to be important in neuronal and developmental functions. Out of 20,503 candidate protein pairs tested, we observed 106 interactions, 83 of which were previously unknown. We "deorphanized" the 20 member subfamily of defective-in-proboscis-response IgSF proteins, showing that they selectively interact with an 11 member subfamily of previously uncharacterized IgSF proteins. Both subfamilies interact with a single common "orphan" LRR protein. We also observed interactions between Hedgehog and EGFR pathway components. Several of these interactions could be visualized in live-dissected embryos, demonstrating that this approach can identify physiologically relevant receptor-ligand pairs.

  9. An extracellular interactome of Immunoglobulin and LRR proteins reveals receptor-ligand networks

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Engin; Carrillo, Robert A.; Eastman, Catharine L.; Weiszmann, Richard; Waghray, Deepa; Johnson, Karl G.; Zinn, Kai; Celniker, Susan E.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular domains of cell-surface receptors and ligands mediate cell-cell communication, adhesion, and initiation of signaling events, but most existing protein-protein “interactome” datasets lack information for extracellular interactions. We probed interactions between receptor extracellular domains, focusing on the Immunoglobulin Superfamily (IgSF), Fibronectin type-III (FnIII) and Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) families of Drosophila, a set of 202 proteins, many of which are known to be important in neuronal and developmental functions. Out of 20503 candidate protein pairs tested, we observed 106 interactions, 83 of which were previously unknown. We ‘deorphanized’ the 20-member subfamily of defective in proboscis IgSF proteins, showing that they selectively interact with an 11-member subfamily of previously uncharacterized IgSF proteins. Both subfamilies interact with a single common ‘orphan’ LRR protein. We also observed new interactions between Hedgehog and EGFR pathway components. Several of these interactions could be visualized in live-dissected embryos, demonstrating that this approach can identify physiologically relevant receptor-ligand pairs. PMID:23827685

  10. A Novel MHC-I Surface Targeted for Binding by the MCMV m06 Immunoevasin Revealed by Solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; May, Nathan A; Boyd, Lisa F; Ying, Jinfa; Bax, Ad; Margulies, David H

    2015-11-27

    As part of its strategy to evade detection by the host immune system, murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) encodes three proteins that modulate cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules: the MHC-I homolog m152/gp40 as well as the m02-m16 family members m04/gp34 and m06/gp48. Previous studies of the m04 protein revealed a divergent Ig-like fold that is unique to immunoevasins of the m02-m16 family. Here, we engineer and characterize recombinant m06 and investigate its interactions with full-length and truncated forms of the MHC-I molecule H2-L(d) by several techniques. Furthermore, we employ solution NMR to map the interaction footprint of the m06 protein on MHC-I, taking advantage of a truncated H2-L(d), "mini-H2-L(d)," consisting of only the α1α2 platform domain. Mini-H2-L(d) refolded in vitro with a high affinity peptide yields a molecule that shows outstanding NMR spectral features, permitting complete backbone assignments. These NMR-based studies reveal that m06 binds tightly to a discrete site located under the peptide-binding platform that partially overlaps with the β2-microglobulin interface on the MHC-I heavy chain, consistent with in vitro binding experiments showing significantly reduced complex formation between m06 and β2-microglobulin-associated MHC-I. Moreover, we carry out NMR relaxation experiments to characterize the picosecond-nanosecond dynamics of the free mini-H2-L(d) MHC-I molecule, revealing that the site of interaction is highly ordered. This study provides insight into the mechanism of the interaction of m06 with MHC-I, suggesting a structural manipulation of the target MHC-I molecule at an early stage of the peptide-loading pathway.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to reovirus reveal structure/function relationships between capsid proteins and genetics of susceptibility to antibody action.

    PubMed Central

    Virgin, H W; Mann, M A; Fields, B N; Tyler, K L

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen newly isolated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were used to study relationships between reovirus outer capsid proteins sigma 3, mu 1c, and lambda 2 (core spike) and the cell attachment protein sigma 1. We focused on sigma 1-associated properties of serotype specificity and hemagglutination (HA). Competition between MAbs revealed two surface epitopes on mu 1c that were highly conserved between reovirus serotype 1 Lang (T1L) and serotype 3 Dearing (T3D). There were several differences between T1L and T3D sigma 3 epitope maps. Studies using T1L x T3D reassortants showed that primary sequence differences between T1L and T3D sigma 3 proteins accounted for differences in sigma 3 epitope maps. Four of 12 non-sigma 1 MAbs showed a serotype-associated pattern of binding to 25 reovirus field isolates. Thus, for reovirus field isolates, different sigma 1 proteins are associated with preferred epitopes on other outer capsid proteins. Further evidence for a close structural and functional interrelationship between sigma 3/mu 1c and sigma 1 included (i) inhibition by sigma 3 and mu 1c MAbs of sigma 1-mediated HA, (ii) enhancement of sigma 1-mediated HA by proteolytic cleavage of sigma 3 and mu 1c, and (iii) genetic studies demonstrating that sigma 1 controlled the capacity of sigma 3 MAbs to inhibit HA. These data suggest that (i) epitopes on sigma 3 and mu 1c lie in close proximity to sigma 1 and that MAbs to these epitopes can modulate sigma 1-mediated functions, (ii) these spatial relationships have functional significance, since removal of sigma 3 and/or cleavage of mu 1c to delta can enhance sigma 1 function, (iii) in nature, the sigma 1 protein places selective constraints on the epitope structure of the other capsid proteins, and (iv) viral susceptibility to antibody action can be determined by genes other than that encoding an antibody's epitope. PMID:1719233

  12. Molecular Dynamics in Mixed Solvents Reveals Protein-Ligand Interactions, Improves Docking, and Allows Accurate Binding Free Energy Predictions.

    PubMed

    Arcon, Juan Pablo; Defelipe, Lucas A; Modenutti, Carlos P; López, Elias D; Alvarez-Garcia, Daniel; Barril, Xavier; Turjanski, Adrián G; Martí, Marcelo A

    2017-03-31

    One of the most important biological processes at the molecular level is the formation of protein-ligand complexes. Therefore, determining their structure and underlying key interactions is of paramount relevance and has direct applications in drug development. Because of its low cost relative to its experimental sibling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the presence of different solvent probes mimicking specific types of interactions have been increasingly used to analyze protein binding sites and reveal protein-ligand interaction hot spots. However, a systematic comparison of different probes and their real predictive power from a quantitative and thermodynamic point of view is still missing. In the present work, we have performed MD simulations of 18 different proteins in pure water as well as water mixtures of ethanol, acetamide, acetonitrile and methylammonium acetate, leading to a total of 5.4 μs simulation time. For each system, we determined the corresponding solvent sites, defined as space regions adjacent to the protein surface where the probability of finding a probe atom is higher than that in the bulk solvent. Finally, we compared the identified solvent sites with 121 different protein-ligand complexes and used them to perform molecular docking and ligand binding free energy estimates. Our results show that combining solely water and ethanol sites allows sampling over 70% of all possible protein-ligand interactions, especially those that coincide with ligand-based pharmacophoric points. Most important, we also show how the solvent sites can be used to significantly improve ligand docking in terms of both accuracy and precision, and that accurate predictions of ligand binding free energies, along with relative ranking of ligand affinity, can be performed.

  13. Protein binding properties of surface-modified porous polyethylene membranes.

    PubMed

    Greene, George; Radhakrishna, Harish; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we quantified the adsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein onto several polyelectrolyte-modified sintered porous polyethylene (PPE) membranes. The polymer surfaces had both cationic and anionic charges obtained via the adsorption of polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyacrylic acid (PAA), respectively, onto plasma-activated PPE. The amount of IgG adsorption was determined by measuring the gamma radiation emitted by [125I]-IgG radio labeled protein. By studying the impact of pH and ionic strength on IgG adsorption, we attempted to characterize the role and nature of the electrostatic interactions involved in the adsorption process to better understand how these interactions were influenced by the charge and structure of immobilized polyelectrolyte complexes at modified membrane surfaces. We were able to show that surface modification of PPE membranes with adsorbed PEI monolayers and PEI-PAA bilayers can greatly improve the IgG binding ability of the membrane under optimized conditions. We also showed that the observed improvement in the IgG binding is derived from electrostatic interactions between IgG and the polyelectrolyte surface. In addition, we found that the greatest IgG adsorption occurred when the IgG and the surface possessed predominantly opposite charges, rather than when the surface possessed the greatest electrostatic charge. Finally, we have found that the molecular weight of the terminating polyelectrolyte has a noticeable effect upon the electrostatic interactions between IgG and the PEI-PAA bilayer-modified PPE surfaces.

  14. The crystal structure of human protein α1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yangli; Gao, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Miao; Hou, Haifeng; Huang, Ailong; Dong, Yuhui; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human α1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin α1-microglobulin (α1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. α1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including α1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between α1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human α1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of α1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between α1M and its partners.

  15. Protein adhesion on dental surfaces-a combined surface analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Wald, Johanna; Hoth-Hannig, Wiebke; Umanskaya, Natalia; Scholz, Daniel; Hannig, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a field of huge interest in a number of application fields. Information on protein adhesion is accessible by a variety of methods. However, the results obtained are significantly influenced by the applied technique. The objective of this work was to understand the role of adhesion forces (obtained by scanning force spectroscopy, SFS) in the process of protein adsorption and desorption. In SFS, the protein is forced to and retracted from the surface, even under unfavorable conditions, in contrast to the natural situation. Furthermore, adhesion forces are correlated with adhesion energies, neglecting the entropic part in the Gibbs enthalpy. In this context, dynamic contact angle (DCA) measurements were performed to identify the potential of this method to complement SFS data. In DCA measurements, the protein diffuses voluntarily to the surface and information on surface coverage and reversibility of adsorption is obtained, including entropic effects (conformational changes and hydrophobic effect). It could be shown that the surface coverage (by DCA) of bovine serum albumin on dental materials correlates well with the adhesion forces (by SFS) if no hydrophobic surface is involved. On those, the entropic hydrophobic effect plays a major role. As a second task, the reversibility of the protein adsorption, i.e., the voluntary desorption as studied by DCA, was compared to the adhesion forces. Here, a correlation between low adhesion forces and good reversibility could be found as long as no covalent bonds were involved. The comparative study of DCA and SFS, thus, leads to a more detailed picture of the complete adsorption/desorption cycle.

  16. Effects of excluded surface area and adsorbate clustering on surface adsorption of proteins. II. Kinetic models.

    PubMed Central

    Minton, A P

    2001-01-01

    Models for equilibrium surface adsorption of proteins have been recently proposed (Minton, A. P., 2000. Biophys. Chem. 86:239-247) in which negative cooperativity due to area exclusion by adsorbate molecules is compensated to a variable extent by the formation of a heterogeneous population of monolayer surface clusters of adsorbed protein molecules. In the present work this concept is extended to treat the kinetics of protein adsorption. It is postulated that clusters may grow via two distinct kinetic pathways. The first pathway is the diffusion of adsorbed monomer to the edge of a preexisting cluster and subsequent accretion. The second pathway consists of direct deposition of a monomer in solution onto the upper (solution-facing) surface of a preexisting cluster ("piggyback" deposition) and subsequent incorporation into the cluster. Results of calculations of the time course of adsorption, carried out for two different limiting models of cluster structure and energetics, show that in the absence of piggyback deposition, enhancement of the tendency of adsorbate to cluster can reduce, but not eliminate, the negative kinetic cooperativity due to surface area exclusion by adsorbate. Apparently noncooperative (Langmuir-like) and positively cooperative adsorption progress curves, qualitatively similar to those reported in several published experimental studies, require a significant fraction of total adsorption flux through the piggyback deposition pathway. According to the model developed here and in the above-mentioned reference, the formation of surface clusters should be a common concomitant of non-site-specific surface adsorption of proteins, and may provide an important mechanism for assembly of organized "protein machines" in vivo. PMID:11259279

  17. Bap, a Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein Involved in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cucarella, Carme; Solano, Cristina; Valle, Jaione; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Íñigo; Penadés, José R.

    2001-01-01

    Identification of new genes involved in biofilm formation is needed to understand the molecular basis of strain variation and the pathogenic mechanisms implicated in chronic staphylococcal infections. A biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus isolate was used to generate biofilm-negative transposon (Tn917) insertion mutants. Two mutants were found with a significant decrease in attachment to inert surfaces (early adherence), intercellular adhesion, and biofilm formation. The transposon was inserted at the same locus in both mutants. This locus (bap [for biofilm associated protein]) encodes a novel cell wall associated protein of 2,276 amino acids (Bap), which shows global organizational similarities to surface proteins of gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi) and gram-positive (Enteroccocus faecalis) microorganisms. Bap's core region represents 52% of the protein and consists of 13 successive nearly identical repeats, each containing 86 amino acids. bap was present in a small fraction of bovine mastitis isolates (5% of the 350 S. aureus isolates tested), but it was absent from the 75 clinical human S. aureus isolates analyzed. All staphylococcal isolates harboring bap were highly adherent and strong biofilm producers. In a mouse infection model bap was involved in pathogenesis, causing a persistent infection. PMID:11292810

  18. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64%) consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial) proteins (mt-cy families) while the remaining 33 (36%) were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families). Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1) relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2) from cytosol to mitochondria and 3) multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on the genomic scale was

  19. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGES

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; ...

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  20. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  1. Kinetic and Conformational Insights of Protein Adsorption onto Montmorillonite Revealed Using in Situ ATR-FTIR/2D-COS.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael P; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2016-08-09

    Protein adsorption onto clay minerals is a process with wide-ranging impacts on the environmental cycling of nutrients and contaminants. This process is influenced by kinetic and conformational factors that are often challenging to probe in situ. This study represents an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption of a model protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) onto a clay mineral (montmorillonite) at four concentrations (1.50, 3.75, 7.50, and 15.0 μM) under environmentally relevant conditions. At all concentrations probed, FTIR spectra show that BSA readily adsorbs onto montmorillonite. Adsorption kinetics follow an Elovich model, suggesting that primary limitations on adsorption rates are surface-related heterogeneous energetic restrictions associated with protein rearrangement and lateral protein-protein interaction. BSA adsorption onto montmorillonite fits the Langmuir model, yielding K = 5.97 × 10(5) M(-1). Deconvolution and curve fitting of the amide I band at the end of the adsorption process (∼120 min) shows a large extent of BSA unfolding upon adsorption at 1.50 μM, with extended chains and turns increasing at the expense of α-helices. At higher concentrations/surface coverages, BSA unfolding is less pronounced and a more compact structure is assumed. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2D-COS) analysis reveals three different pathways corresponding to adsorbed conformations. At 1.50 μM, adsorption increases extended chains, followed by a loss in α-helices and a subsequent increase in turns. At 3.75 μM, extended chains decrease and then aggregated strands increase and side chains decrease, followed by a decrease in turns. With 7.50 and 15.0 μM BSA, the loss of side-chain vibrations is followed by an increase in aggregated strands and a subsequent decrease in turns and extended chains. Overall, the BSA concentration and resultant surface coverage have a profound

  2. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, J L; Stott, I; Davies, Z G; Gaston, K J; Leake, J R

    2016-09-19

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  3. Bacterial community analysis of beef cattle feedlots reveals that pen surface is distinct from feces.

    PubMed

    Durso, Lisa M; Harhay, Gregory P; Smith, Timothy P L; Bono, James L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Clawson, Michael L

    2011-05-01

    The surface of beef cattle feedlot pens is commonly conceptualized as being packed uncomposted manure. Despite the important role that the feedlot pen may play in the transmission of veterinary and zoonotic pathogens, the bacterial ecology of feedlot surface material is not well understood. Our present study characterized the bacterial communities of the beef cattle feedlot pen surface material using 3647 full-length 16S rDNA sequences, and we compared the community composition of feedlot pens to the fecal source material. The feedlot surface composite was represented by members of the phylum Actinobacteria (42%), followed by Firmicutes (24%), Bacteroidetes (24%), and Proteobacteria (9%). The feedlot pen surface material bacterial communities were clearly distinct from those of the feces from animals in the same pen. Comparisons with previously published results of feces from the animals in the same pen reveal that, of 139 genera identified, only 25 were present in both habitats. These results indicate that, microbiologically, the feedlot pen surface material is separate and distinct from the fecal source material, suggesting that bacteria that originate in cattle feces face different selection pressures and survival challenges during their tenure in the feedlot pen, as compared to their residence in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health. PMID:27641002

  5. Soil surface temperatures reveal moderation of the urban heat island effect by trees and shrubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, J. L.; Stott, I.; Davies, Z. G.; Gaston, K. J.; Leake, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Urban areas are major contributors to air pollution and climate change, causing impacts on human health that are amplified by the microclimatological effects of buildings and grey infrastructure through the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Urban greenspaces may be important in reducing surface temperature extremes, but their effects have not been investigated at a city-wide scale. Across a mid-sized UK city we buried temperature loggers at the surface of greenspace soils at 100 sites, stratified by proximity to city centre, vegetation cover and land-use. Mean daily soil surface temperature over 11 months increased by 0.6 °C over the 5 km from the city outskirts to the centre. Trees and shrubs in non-domestic greenspace reduced mean maximum daily soil surface temperatures in the summer by 5.7 °C compared to herbaceous vegetation, but tended to maintain slightly higher temperatures in winter. Trees in domestic gardens, which tend to be smaller, were less effective at reducing summer soil surface temperatures. Our findings reveal that the UHI effects soil temperatures at a city-wide scale, and that in their moderating urban soil surface temperature extremes, trees and shrubs may help to reduce the adverse impacts of urbanization on microclimate, soil processes and human health.

  6. Investigation of SnSPR1, a novel and abundant surface protein of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deqing; Howe, Daniel K

    2008-04-15

    An expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project has produced over 15,000 partial cDNA sequences from the equine pathogen Sarcocystis neurona. While many of the sequences are clear homologues of previously characterized genes, a significant number of the S. neurona ESTs do not exhibit similarity to anything in the extensive sequence databases that have been generated. In an effort to characterize parasite proteins that are novel to S. neurona, a seemingly unique gene was selected for further investigation based on its abundant representation in the collection of ESTs and the predicted presence of a signal peptide and glycolipid anchor addition on the encoded protein. The gene was expressed in E. coli, and monospecific polyclonal antiserum against the recombinant protein was produced by immunization of a rabbit. Characterization of the native protein in S. neurona merozoites and schizonts revealed that it is a low molecular weight surface protein that is expressed throughout intracellular development of the parasite. The protein was designated Surface Protein 1 (SPR1) to reflect its display on the outer surface of merozoites and to distinguish it from the ubiquitous SAG/SRS surface antigens of the heteroxenous Coccidia. Interestingly, infection assays in the presence of the polyclonal antiserum suggested that SnSPR1 plays some role in attachment and/or invasion of host cells by S. neurona merozoites. The work described herein represents a general template for selecting and characterizing the various unidentified gene sequences that are plentiful in the EST databases for S. neurona and other apicomplexans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the value of investigating these novel sequences since it can offer new candidates for diagnostic or vaccine development while also providing greater insight into the biology of these parasites.

  7. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  8. Identification of long-lived proteins reveals exceptional stability of essential cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyu; Harris, Michael S.; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Yates, John R.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular proteins with long lifespans have recently been linked to age-dependent defects, ranging from decreased fertility to the functional decline of neurons. Why long-lived proteins exist in metabolically active cellular environments and how they are maintained over time remains poorly understood. Here we provide a system-wide identification of proteins with exceptional lifespans in the rat brain. These proteins are inefficiently replenished despite being translated robustly throughout adulthood. Using nucleoporins as a paradigm for long-term protein persistence, we found that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are maintained over a cell’s life through slow but finite exchange of even its most stable subcomplexes. This maintenance is limited, however, as some nucleoporin levels decrease during aging, providing a rationale for the previously observed age-dependent deterioration of NPC function. Our identification of a long-lived proteome reveals cellular components that are at increased risk for damage accumulation, linking long-term protein persistence to the cellular aging process. PMID:23993091

  9. A supramolecular bioactive surface for specific binding of protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changming; Qu, Yangcui; Zhan, Wenjun; Wei, Ting; Cao, Limin; Yu, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Bioactive surfaces with immobilized bioactive molecules aimed specifically at promoting or supporting particular interactions are of great interest for application of biosensors and biological detection. In this work, we fabricated a supramolecular bioactive surface with specific protein binding capability using two noncovalent interactions as the driving forces. The substrates were first layer-by-layer (LbL) deposited with a multilayered polyelectrolyte film containing "guest" adamantane groups via electrostatic interactions, followed by incorporation of "host" β-cyclodextrin derivatives bearing seven biotin units (CD-B) into the films via host-guest interactions. The results of fluorescence microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance measurement demonstrated that these surfaces exhibited high binding capacity and high selectivity for avidin due to the high density of biotin residues. Moreover, since host-guest interactions are inherently reversible, the avidin-CD-B complex is easily released by treatment with the sodium dodecyl sulfate, and the "regenerated" surfaces, after re-introducing fresh CD-B, can be used repeatedly for avidin binding. Given the generality and versatility of this approach, it may pave a way for development of re-usable biosensors for the detection and measurement of specific proteins.

  10. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    PubMed

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge.

  11. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  12. Controlling Protein Oligomerization with Surface Curvature on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylowicz, Marty; Dutcher, John

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the effect of surface curvature on the conformation of beta-lactoglobulin (β LG) using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy. β LG is a model interfacial protein which stabilizes oil droplets in milk and is known to undergo structural rearrangement when adsorbed onto a surface. We reliably control nanoscale surface curvature by creating close-packed monolayers of monodisperse polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles with diameters of 20, 40, 60, 80 and 140 nm, which are stable in aqueous buffer. By adsorbing β LG onto these hydrophobic surfaces and collecting force-extension curves in the fluid phase we can compare the conformation of β LG on 5 different surface curvatures with that on a flat PS film. We demonstrate a transition from oligomeric to monomeric β LG as the surface curvature is increased. Histograms of contour length from fits to peaks in the force-extension curves show a single maximum near 30 nm for β LG adsorbed onto nanoparticles with diameters less than 80 nm. For the larger nanoparticles, the histogram approaches that observed for β LG adsorbed onto a flat PS film, with maxima indicative of β LG dimers and trimers.

  13. The Structure of the Poxvirus A33 Protein Reveals a Dimer of Unique C-Type Lectin-Like Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Singh, Kavita; Gittis, Apostolos G.; Garboczi, David N.

    2010-11-03

    The current vaccine against smallpox is an infectious form of vaccinia virus that has significant side effects. Alternative vaccine approaches using recombinant viral proteins are being developed. A target of subunit vaccine strategies is the poxvirus protein A33, a conserved protein in the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily of Poxviridae that is expressed on the outer viral envelope. Here we have determined the structure of the A33 ectodomain of vaccinia virus. The structure revealed C-type lectin-like domains (CTLDs) that occur as dimers in A33 crystals with five different crystal lattices. Comparison of the A33 dimer models shows that the A33 monomers have a degree of flexibility in position within the dimer. Structural comparisons show that the A33 monomer is a close match to the Link module class of CTLDs but that the A33 dimer is most similar to the natural killer (NK)-cell receptor class of CTLDs. Structural data on Link modules and NK-cell receptor-ligand complexes suggest a surface of A33 that could interact with viral or host ligands. The dimer interface is well conserved in all known A33 sequences, indicating an important role for the A33 dimer. The structure indicates how previously described A33 mutations disrupt protein folding and locates the positions of N-linked glycosylations and the epitope of a protective antibody.

  14. Human apo-SRP72 and SRP68/72 complex structures reveal the molecular basis of protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yina; Zhang, Qi; Lang, Yue; Liu, Yang; Dong, Xiaofei; Chen, Zhenhang; Tian, Wenli; Tang, Jun; Wu, Wei; Tong, Yufeng; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2017-03-20

    The co-translational targeting or insertion of secretory and membrane proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a key biological process mediated by the signal recognition particle (SRP). In eukaryotes, the SRP68-SRP72 (SRP68/72) heterodimer plays an essential role in protein translocation. However, structural information on the two largest SRP proteins, SRP68 and SRP72, is limited, especially regarding their interaction. Herein, we report the first crystal structures of human apo-SRP72 and the SRP68/72 complex at 2.91Å and 1.7Å resolution, respectively. The SRP68-binding domain of SRP72 contains four atypical tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) and a flexible C-terminal cap. Apo-SRP72 exists mainly as dimers in solution. To bind to SRP68, the SRP72 homodimer disassociates, and the indispensable C-terminal cap undergoes a pronounced conformational change to assist formation of the SRP68/72 heterodimer. A 23-residue polypeptide of SRP68 is sufficient for tight binding to SRP72 through its unusually hydrophobic and extended surface. Structural, biophysical, and mutagenesis analyses revealed that cancer-associated mutations disrupt the SRP68-SRP72 interaction and their co-localization with ER in mammalian cells. The results highlight the essential role of the SRP68-SRP72 interaction in SRP-mediated protein translocation and provide a structural basis for disease diagnosis, pathophysiology, and drug design.

  15. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group

    PubMed Central

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the ‘Thaumarchaeota’ and ‘Korarchaeota’. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus ‘Caldiarchaeum subterraneum’ that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea. PMID:21169198

  16. Insights into the evolution of Archaea and eukaryotic protein modifier systems revealed by the genome of a novel archaeal group.

    PubMed

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kakuta, Jungo; Nishi, Shinro; Sugahara, Junichi; Kazama, Hiromi; Chee, Gab-Joo; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Akio; Atomi, Haruyuki; Takai, Ken; Takami, Hideto

    2011-04-01

    The domain Archaea has historically been divided into two phyla, the Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Although regarded as members of the Crenarchaeota based on small subunit rRNA phylogeny, environmental genomics and efforts for cultivation have recently revealed two novel phyla/divisions in the Archaea; the 'Thaumarchaeota' and 'Korarchaeota'. Here, we show the genome sequence of Candidatus 'Caldiarchaeum subterraneum' that represents an uncultivated crenarchaeotic group. A composite genome was reconstructed from a metagenomic library previously prepared from a microbial mat at a geothermal water stream of a sub-surface gold mine. The genome was found to be clearly distinct from those of the known phyla/divisions, Crenarchaeota (hyperthermophiles), Euryarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota and Korarchaeota. The unique traits suggest that this crenarchaeotic group can be considered as a novel archaeal phylum/division. Moreover, C. subterraneum harbors an ubiquitin-like protein modifier system consisting of Ub, E1, E2 and small Zn RING finger family protein with structural motifs specific to eukaryotic system proteins, a system clearly distinct from the prokaryote-type system recently identified in Haloferax and Mycobacterium. The presence of such a eukaryote-type system is unprecedented in prokaryotes, and indicates that a prototype of the eukaryotic protein modifier system is present in the Archaea.

  17. Favorable Influence of Hydrophobic Surfaces on Protein Structure in Porous Organically-modified Silica Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Menaa, Bouzid; Herrero, Mar; Rives, Vicente; Lavrenko, Mayya; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2008-01-01

    Organically-modified siloxanes were used as host materials to examine the influence of surface chemistry on protein conformation in a crowded environment. The sol-gel materials were prepared from tetramethoxysilane and a series of monosubstituted alkoxysilanes, RSi(OR′)3, featuring alkyl groups of increasing chain length in the R-position. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy in the far-UV region, apomyoglobin was found to transit from an unfolded state to a native-like helical state as the content of the hydrophobic precursor increased from 0–15%. At a fixed molar content of 5% RSi(OR’)3, the helical structure of apomyoglobin increased with the chain length of the R-group, i.e. methyl < ethyl < n-propyl < n-butyl < n-hexyl. This trend also was observed for the tertiary structure of ribonuclease A, suggesting that protein folding and biological activity are sensitive to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of neighboring surfaces. The observed changes in protein structure did not correlate with total surface area or the average pore size of the modified glasses, but scanning electron microscopy images revealed an interesting relationship between surface morphology and alkyl chain length. The unexpected benefit of incorporating a low content of hydrophobic groups into a hydrophilic surface may lead to materials with improved biocompatibility for use in biosensors and implanted devices. PMID:18359512

  18. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-08

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  19. VASP: A Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties Yields Insights into Protein-Ligand Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian Y.; Honig, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP), a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer (START) domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity. PMID:20814581

  20. Structure of AP205 Coat Protein Reveals Circular Permutation in ssRNA Bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Shishovs, Mihails; Rumnieks, Janis; Diebolder, Christoph; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Andreas, Loren B; Stanek, Jan; Kazaks, Andris; Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Pintacuda, Guido; Koning, Roman I; Tars, Kaspars

    2016-10-23

    AP205 is a single-stranded RNA bacteriophage that has a coat protein sequence not similar to any other known single-stranded RNA phage. Here, we report an atomic-resolution model of the AP205 virus-like particle based on a crystal structure of an unassembled coat protein dimer and a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the assembled particle, together with secondary structure information from site-specific solid-state NMR data. The AP205 coat protein dimer adopts the conserved Leviviridae coat protein fold except for the N-terminal region, which forms a beta-hairpin in the other known single-stranded RNA phages. AP205 has a similar structure at the same location formed by N- and C-terminal beta-strands, making it a circular permutant compared to the other coat proteins. The permutation moves the coat protein termini to the most surface-exposed part of the assembled particle, which explains its increased tolerance to long N- and C-terminal fusions.

  1. Phaseolin expression in tobacco chloroplast reveals an autoregulatory mechanism in heterologous protein translation.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele; Pompa, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    Plastid DNA engineering is a well-established research area of plant biotechnology, and plastid transgenes often give high expression levels. However, it is still almost impossible to predict the accumulation rate of heterologous protein in transplastomic plants, and there are many cases of unsuccessful transgene expression. Chloroplasts regulate their proteome at the post-transcriptional level, mainly through translation control. One of the mechanisms to modulate the translation has been described in plant chloroplasts for the chloroplast-encoded subunits of multiprotein complexes, and the autoregulation of the translation initiation of these subunits depends on the availability of their assembly partners [control by epistasy of synthesis (CES)]. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, autoregulation of endogenous proteins recruited in the assembly of functional complexes has also been reported. In this study, we revealed a self-regulation mechanism triggered by the accumulation of a soluble recombinant protein, phaseolin, in the stroma of chloroplast-transformed tobacco plants. Immunoblotting experiments showed that phaseolin could avoid this self-regulation mechanism when targeted to the thylakoids in transplastomic plants. To inhibit the thylakoid-targeted phaseolin translation as well, this protein was expressed in the presence of a nuclear version of the phaseolin gene with a transit peptide. Pulse-chase and polysome analysis revealed that phaseolin mRNA translation on plastid ribosomes was repressed due to the accumulation in the stroma of the same soluble polypeptide imported from the cytosol. We suggest that translation autoregulation in chloroplast is not limited to heteromeric protein subunits but also involves at least some of the foreign soluble recombinant proteins, leading to the inhibition of plastome-encoded transgene expression in chloroplast.

  2. The structure of BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus reveals a superfamily of bacterial periplasmic proteins with possible inhibitory function

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debanu; Finn, Robert D.; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that contain the DUF2874 domain constitute a new Pfam family PF11396. Members of this family have predominantly been identified in microbes found in the human gut and oral cavity. The crystal structure of one member of this family, BVU2987 from Bacteroides vulgatus, has been determined, revealing a β-lactamase inhibitor protein-like structure with a tandem repeat of domains. Sequence analysis and structural comparisons reveal that BVU2987 and other DUF2874 proteins are related to β-lactamase inhibitor protein, PepSY and SmpA_OmlA proteins and hence are likely to function as inhibitory proteins. PMID:20944221

  3. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  4. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  5. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its potential roles in hypercholesterolemia revealed by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Jugnam-ang, Watcharapong; Pannengpetch, Supitcha; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Patcharee; Thippakorn, Chadinee; Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Lawung, Ratana; Prachayasittiku, Virapong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of hypercholesterolemia on alterations of serum proteins have not been fully elucidated. Herein, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in conjunction with LC-MS searching has successfully been carried out to investigate the change of protein expression profiles as consequences of raised blood cholesterol at different levels (normal group: total cholesterol 200 mg/dL; borderline high group: total cholesterol 200-239 mg/dL; and high group: total cholesterol ≥ 240 mg/dL) (n = 45). Results revealed that down-regulation of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) (-2.26 fold), transthyretin (-1.25 fold) and gelsolin (-1.47 fold) was observed in the high group. Meanwhile, the other proteins such as haptoglobin, complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein were up-regulated upto +3.24, +1.96 and +2.04 fold, respectively. Confirmation by Western blotting revealed a significant reduction of RBP4 (approximately 50 %) in individual samples derived from the high group. Presumptive conclusion can be drawn that down-regulation of RBP4 might be attributable to the inflammation of adipocytes caused by the release of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β) from adipose tissues. Moreover, the decrease of transthyretin might also be taken into accounts since it is known that the transthyretin usually forms complex with RBP4 to prevent glomerular filtration and excretion through the kidney. The suppressing effect on RBP4 should be potentiated by the increase of complement factor B and CD5 antigen-like protein, which rendered the adipose tissues to overwhelm the liberation of RBP4 to blood circulation by metabolic and inflammatory processes. Such inflammation could further modulate the induction of cytokine release (e.g. IL-6 and IL-1β), resulting in the synthesis of acute phase protein, in particular, haptoglobin and C-reactive proteins from hepatocytes. However, the mechanism of gelsolin reduction remains unclear. Among these

  6. Fermi surface of underdoped cuprate revealed by quantum oscillations and Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, Cyril

    2008-03-01

    Despite twenty years of research, the phase diagram of high temperature superconductors remains enigmatic. A central issue is the origin of the differences in the physical properties of these copper oxides doped to opposite sides of the superconducting region. In the overdoped regime, the material behaves as a reasonably conventional metal, with a large Fermi surface [1]. The underdoped regime, however, is highly anomalous and appears to have no coherent Fermi surface, but only disconnected `Fermi arcs' [2]. We have reported the observation of quantum oscillations in the electrical resistance of the oxygen-ordered copper oxides YBa2Cu3O6.5 [3] and YBa2Cu4O8 [4], establishing the existence of a coherent closed Fermi surface at low temperature in the underdoped side of the phase diagram of cuprates, once superconductivity is suppressed by a large magnetic field. The low oscillation frequency reveals a Fermi surface made of small pockets, in contrast to the large cylinder characteristic of the overdoped regime. Moreover, the negative sign of the Hall effect at low temperature reveals that these pockets are electron-like rather than hole-like. We propose that the Fermi surface of these Y-based cuprates consists of both electron and hole pockets, probably arising from a reconstruction of the FS [5]. Work in collaboration with N Doiron-Leyraud, D. LeBoeuf and L. Taillefer from the University of Sherbrooke, J. Levallois and B. Vignolle from the LNCMP, A. Bangura and N. Hussey from the University of Bristol and R. Liang, D. Bonn, W. Hardy from the University of British Columbia. [1] N Hussey et al, Nature 425, 814 (2003) [2] M. Norman et al, Nature 392, 157 (1998) [3] N. Doiron-Leyraud et al, Nature 447, 565 (2007) [4] A. Bangura et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett (arXiv: 0707.4461) [5] D. LeBoeuf et al, Nature 450, 533 (2007)

  7. Crystal Structure of Vaccinia Viral A27 Protein Reveals a Novel Structure Critical for Its Function and Complex Formation with A26 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lin, Cheng-Tse; Ho, Meng-Ru; Wang, Iren; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Guo, Rey-Ting; Chang, Wen; Wang, Andrew H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccinia virus envelope protein A27 has multiple functions and is conserved in the Orthopoxvirus genus of the poxvirus family. A27 protein binds to cell surface heparan sulfate, provides an anchor for A26 protein packaging into mature virions, and is essential for egress of mature virus (MV) from infected cells. Here, we crystallized and determined the structure of a truncated form of A27 containing amino acids 21–84, C71/72A (tA27) at 2.2 Å resolution. tA27 protein uses the N-terminal region interface (NTR) to form an unexpected trimeric assembly as the basic unit, which contains two parallel α-helices and one unusual antiparallel α-helix; in a serpentine way, two trimers stack with each other to form a hexamer using the C-terminal region interface (CTR). Recombinant tA27 protein forms oligomers in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro in gel filtration. Analytical ultracentrifugation and multi-angle light scattering revealed that tA27 dimerized in solution and that Leu47, Leu51, and Leu54 at the NTR and Ile68, Asn75, and Leu82 at the CTR are responsible for tA27 self-assembly in vitro. Finally, we constructed recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing full length mutant A27 protein defective in either NTR, CTR, or both interactions; the results demonstrated that wild type A27 dimer/trimer formation was impaired in NTR and CTR mutant viruses, resulting in small plaques that are defective in MV egress. Furthermore, the ability of A27 protein to form disulfide-linked protein complexes with A26 protein was partially or completely interrupted by NTR and CTR mutations, resulting in mature virion progeny with increased plasma membrane fusion activity upon cell entry. Together, these results demonstrate that A27 protein trimer structure is critical for MV egress and membrane fusion modulation. Because A27 is a neutralizing target, structural information will aid the development of inhibitors to block A27 self-assembly or complex formation against vaccinia virus

  8. Atmospheric Drivers of Greenland Surface Melt Revealed by Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduszewski, J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A. C.; Tedesco, M.; Noble, E. U.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent acceleration in summer surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has occurred concurrently with a rapidly warming Arctic and has been connected to persistent, anomalous circulation patterns over Greenland. To identify patterns that favor enhanced GrIS surface melt and their decadal changes, we first develop a summer Arctic synoptic climatology by employing a nonlinear classification technique known as the self organizing map (SOM). This is applied to daily JJA sea level pressure (SLP) and 500 hPa geopotential height fields obtained from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis product from 1979 to 2014. Model output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) is used to relate meteorological conditions and subsequent Greenland surface melt anomalies to particular circulation regimes. Results demonstrate that circulation patterns featuring positive SLP anomalies from Greenland to the Beaufort Sea support the largest positive surface melt anomalies, particularly over western Greenland. These patterns facilitate strong meridional transport of heat and moisture, contrasted by a dominant zonal flow across the North Atlantic during periods of low surface melt. Additionally, composites of energy balance components reveal that melt events are favored under clear conditions generating positive shortwave radiation anomalies rather than increased downwelling longwave radiation occurring with increased cloud cover. Sea surface temperature anomalies suggest that there may be a linkage between surface melt and recent sea ice loss around Greenland, though a causal relationship is not established. We assess decadal shifts in the SOM nodes, finding an increased frequency of upper level patterns favoring higher 500 hPa geopotential heights primarily over Greenland. The observed increases in GrIS melt through the time period coincides with this shift in SOM node frequency.

  9. [Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium].

    PubMed

    Dylus, Ewa; Buda, Barbara; Górska-Frączek, Sabina; Brzozowska, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-05-13

    Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  10. High confidence proteomic analysis of yeast LDs identifies additional droplet proteins and reveals connections to dolichol synthesis and sterol acetylation[S

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Erin; Guo, Xiuling; Christiano, Romain; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kory, Nora; Harrison, Kenneth; Haas, Joel; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate protein inventories are essential for understanding an organelle’s functions. The lipid droplet (LD) is a ubiquitous intracellular organelle with major functions in lipid storage and metabolism. LDs differ from other organelles because they are bounded by a surface monolayer, presenting unique features for protein targeting to LDs. Many proteins of varied functions have been found in purified LD fractions by proteomics. While these studies have become increasingly sensitive, it is often unclear which of the identified proteins are specific to LDs. Here we used protein correlation profiling to identify 35 proteins that specifically enrich with LD fractions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of these candidates, 30 fluorophore-tagged proteins localize to LDs by microscopy, including six proteins, several with human orthologs linked to diseases, which we newly identify as LD proteins (Cab5, Rer2, Say1, Tsc10, YKL047W, and YPR147C). Two of these proteins, Say1, a sterol deacetylase, and Rer2, a cis-isoprenyl transferase, are enzymes involved in sterol and polyprenol metabolism, respectively, and we show their activities are present in LD fractions. Our results provide a highly specific list of yeast LD proteins and reveal that the vast majority of these proteins are involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:24868093

  11. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  12. Simulation of NMR data reveals that proteins' local structures are stabilized by electronic polarization.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yan; Ji, Chang G; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z H

    2009-06-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of NMR backbone relaxation order parameters have been carried out to investigate the polarization effect on the protein's local structure and dynamics for five benchmark proteins (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, immunoglobulin-binding domain (B1) of streptococcal protein G, bovine apo-calbindin D9K, human interleukin-4 R88Q mutant, and hen egg white lysozyme). In order to isolate the polarization effect from other interaction effects, our study employed both the standard AMBER force field (AMBER03) and polarized protein-specific charges (PPCs) in the MD simulations. The simulated order parameters, employing both the standard nonpolarizable and polarized force fields, are directly compared with experimental data. Our results show that residue-specific order parameters at some specific loop and turn regions are significantly underestimated by the MD simulations using the standard AMBER force field, indicating hyperflexibility of these local structures. Detailed analysis of the structures and dynamic motions of individual residues reveals that the hyperflexibility of these local structures is largely related to the breaking or weakening of relevant hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the agreement with the experimental results is significantly improved and more stable local structures are observed in the MD simulations using the polarized force field. The comparison between theory and experiment provides convincing evidence that intraprotein hydrogen bonds in these regions are stabilized by electronic polarization, which is critical to the dynamical stability of these local structures in proteins.

  13. A Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif revealed in an adenovirus capsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Christoph; Bru, Thierry; McBride, Ryan; Robison, Elizabeth; Nycholat, Corwin M; Kremer, Eric J; Paulson, James C

    2012-01-01

    Sialic-acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of transmembrane receptors that are well documented to play roles in regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. To see whether the features that define the molecular recognition of sialic acid were found in other sialic-acid-binding proteins, we analyzed 127 structures with bound sialic acids found in the Protein Data Bank database. Of these, the canine adenovirus 2-fiber knob protein showed close local structural relationship to Siglecs despite low sequence similarity. The fiber knob harbors a noncanonical sialic-acid recognition site, which was then explored for detailed specificity using a custom glycan microarray comprising 58 diverse sialosides. It was found that the adenoviral protein preferentially recognizes the epitope Neu5Acα2-3[6S]Galβ1-4GlcNAc, a structure previously identified as the preferred ligand for Siglec-8 in humans and Siglec-F in mice. Comparison of the Siglec and fiber knob sialic-acid-binding sites reveal conserved structural elements that are not clearly identifiable from the primary amino acid sequence, suggesting a Siglec-like sialic-acid-binding motif that comprises the consensus features of these proteins in complex with sialic acid. PMID:22522600

  14. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  15. Surface proteins, ERAD and antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Muratore, Katherine A; Bangs, James D

    2016-11-01

    Variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) is central to antigenic variation in African trypanosomes. Although much prior work documents that VSG is efficiently synthesized and exported to the cell surface, it was recently claimed that 2-3 fold more is synthesized than required, the excess being eliminated by ER-Associated Degradation (ERAD) (Field et al., ). We now reinvestigate VSG turnover and find no evidence for rapid degradation, consistent with a model whereby VSG synthesis is precisely regulated to match requirements for a functional surface coat on each daughter cell. However, using a mutated version of the ESAG7 subunit of the transferrin receptor (E7:Ty) we confirm functional ERAD in trypanosomes. E7:Ty fails to assemble into transferrin receptors and accumulates in the ER, consistent with retention of misfolded protein, and its turnover is selectively rescued by the proteasomal inhibitor MG132. We also show that ER accumulation of E7:Ty does not induce an unfolded protein response. These data, along with the presence of ERAD orthologues in the Trypanosoma brucei genome, confirm ERAD in trypanosomes. We discuss scenarios in which ERAD could be critical to bloodstream parasites, and how these may have contributed to the evolution of antigenic variation in trypanosomes.

  16. Protein Composition of Infectious Spores Reveals Novel Sexual Development and Germination Factors in Cryptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingwei; Hebert, Alexander S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Hull, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Spores are an essential cell type required for long-term survival across diverse organisms in the tree of life and are a hallmark of fungal reproduction, persistence, and dispersal. Among human fungal pathogens, spores are presumed infectious particles, but relatively little is known about this robust cell type. Here we used the meningitis-causing fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to determine the roles of spore-resident proteins in spore biology. Using highly sensitive nanoscale liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, we compared the proteomes of spores and vegetative cells (yeast) and identified eighteen proteins specifically enriched in spores. The genes encoding these proteins were deleted, and the resulting strains were evaluated for discernable phenotypes. We hypothesized that spore-enriched proteins would be preferentially involved in spore-specific processes such as dormancy, stress resistance, and germination. Surprisingly, however, the majority of the mutants harbored defects in sexual development, the process by which spores are formed. One mutant in the cohort was defective in the spore-specific process of germination, showing a delay specifically in the initiation of vegetative growth. Thus, by using this in-depth proteomics approach as a screening tool for cell type-specific proteins and combining it with molecular genetics, we successfully identified the first germination factor in C. neoformans. We also identified numerous proteins with previously unknown functions in both sexual development and spore composition. Our findings provide the first insights into the basic protein components of infectious spores and reveal unexpected molecular connections between infectious particle production and spore composition in a pathogenic eukaryote. PMID:26313153

  17. Iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins of Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; Heilbronner, Simon; Speziale, Pietro; Foster, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is the only coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species with a locus encoding iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins. In Staphylococcus aureus, the Isd proteins capture heme from hemoglobin and transfer it across the wall to a membrane-bound transporter, which delivers it into the cytoplasm, where heme oxygenases release iron. The Isd proteins of S. lugdunensis are expressed under iron-restricted conditions. We propose that S. lugdunensis IsdB and IsdC proteins perform the same functions as those of S. aureus. S. lugdunensis IsdB is the only hemoglobin receptor within the isd locus. It specifically binds human hemoglobin with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 23 nM and transfers heme on IsdC. IsdB expression promotes bacterial growth in an iron-limited medium containing human hemoglobin but not mouse hemoglobin. This correlates with weak binding of IsdB to mouse hemoglobin in vitro. Unlike IsdB and IsdC, the proteins IsdJ and IsdK are not sorted to the cell wall in S. lugdunensis. In contrast, IsdJ expressed in S. aureus and Lactococcus lactis is anchored to peptidoglycan, suggesting that S. lugdunensis sortases may differ in signal recognition or could be defective. IsdJ and IsdK are present in the culture supernatant, suggesting that they could acquire heme from the external milieu. The IsdA protein of S. aureus protects bacteria from bactericidal lipids due to its hydrophilic C-terminal domain. IsdJ has a similar region and protected S. aureus and L. lactis as efficiently as IsdA but, possibly due to its location, was less effective in its natural host.

  18. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  19. Development of a new yeast surface display system based on Spi1 as an anchor protein.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Cecilia; Del Olmo, Marcel Lí

    2017-01-01

    Yeast surface display is a powerful tool widely used for many biotechnological and biomedical applications. It consists in exposing peptides and proteins of interest on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts. These molecules are fused to the amino or carboxy terminus of an appropriate cell wall protein, usually bound by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. Several systems for this purpose have been reported to date. In this work, we describe a new yeast surface display strategy based on cell wall protein Spi1 as an anchor, which is expressed in centromeric and episomal plasmids under the control of its own promoter or that corresponding to the PGK1 glycolytic gene. Exposure efficiency was demonstrated by western blot, flow cytometry analyses, and fluorescence microscopy by taking advantage of including the V5 epitope. We also demonstrated the ability of this new strategy for the exposure of several peptides and proteins of different sizes. The regulation of the SPI1 promoter by the stationary phase and other stress conditions reveals interesting potential applications of systems based on it for industrial and biotechnological processes.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  1. Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein 8 cloning, expression, and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Leal, Oscar; Sierra, Adriana Y; Barrero, Carlos A; Moncada, Camilo; Martinez, Pilar; Cortes, Jimena; Lopez, Yolanda; Torres, Elizabeth; Salazar, Luz M; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2004-11-26

    Plasmodium vivax, one of the four parasite species causing malaria in humans, is the most widespread throughout the world, leading to nearly 80 million cases per year, mainly in Latin-America and Asia. An open reading frame encoding the Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 8 P. vivax homologue has been identified in the present study by screening the current data obtained from this parasite's partially sequenced genome. This new protein contains 487 amino-acids, two epidermal growth factor like domains, hydrophobic regions at the N- and C-termini compatible with a signal peptide, and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor site, respectively. This gene's transcription and its encoded protein expression have been assessed, as well as its recognition by P. vivax-infected patients' sera. Based on this recognition, and a previous study showing that mice immunised with the Plasmodium yoelii homologous protein were protected, we consider the PvMSP8 a good candidate to be included in a multi-stage multi-antigen P. vivax vaccine.

  2. Long-term storage of surface-adsorbed protein machines.

    PubMed

    Albet-Torres, Nuria; Månsson, Alf

    2011-06-07

    The effective and simple long-term storage of complex functional proteins is critical in achieving commercially viable biosensors. This issue is particularly challenging in recently proposed types of nanobiosensors, where molecular-motor-driven transportation substitutes microfluidics and forms the basis for novel detection schemes. Importantly, therefore, we here describe that delicate heavy meromyosin (HMM)-based nanodevices (HMM motor fragments adsorbed to silanized surfaces and actin bound to HMM) fully maintain their function when stored at -20 °C for more than a month. The mechanisms for the excellent preservation of acto-HMM motor function upon repeated freeze-thaw cycles are discussed. The results are important to the future commercial implementation of motor-based nanodevices and are of more general value to the long-term storage of any protein-based bionanodevice.

  3. The Volumetric Diversity of Misfolded Prion Protein Oligomers Revealed by Pressure Dissociation*

    PubMed Central

    Torrent, Joan; Lange, Reinhard; Rezaei, Human

    2015-01-01

    Protein oligomerization has been associated with a wide range of diseases. High pressure approaches offer a powerful tool for deciphering the underlying molecular mechanisms by revealing volume changes associated with the misfolding and assembly reactions. We applied high pressure to induce conformational changes in three distinct β-sheet-rich oligomers of the prion protein PrP, a protein characterized by a variety of infectious quaternary structures that can propagate stably and faithfully and cause diseases with specific phenotypic traits. We show that pressure induces dissociation of the oligomers and leads to a lower volume monomeric PrP state that refolds into the native conformation after pressure release. By measuring the different pressure and temperature sensitivity of the tested PrP oligomers, we demonstrate significantly different void volumes in their quaternary structure. In addition, by focusing on the kinetic and energetic behavior of the pressure-induced dissociation of one specific PrP oligomer, we reveal a large negative activation volume and an increase in both apparent activation enthalpy and entropy. This suggests a transition state ensemble that is less structured and significantly more hydrated than the oligomeric state. Finally, we found that site-specific fluorescent labeling allows monitoring of the transient population of a kinetic intermediate in the dissociation reaction. Our results indicate that defects in atomic packing may deserve consideration as a new factor that influences differences between PrP assemblies and that could be relevant also for explaining the origin of prion strains. PMID:26126829

  4. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  5. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-07-12

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling.

  6. Mars surface diversity as revealed by the OMEGA/Mars Express observations.

    PubMed

    Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Gendrin, Aline; Gondet, Brigitte; Poulet, François; Berthé, Michel; Soufflot, Alain; Arvidson, Ray; Mangold, Nicolas; Mustard, John; Drossart, P

    2005-03-11

    The Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces, et l'Activité (OMEGA) investigation, on board the European Space Agency Mars Express mission, is mapping the surface composition of Mars at a 0.3- to 5-kilometer resolution by means of visible-near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imagery. The data acquired during the first 9 months of the mission already reveal a diverse and complex surface mineralogy, offering key insights into the evolution of Mars. OMEGA has identified and mapped mafic iron-bearing silicates of both the northern and southern crust, localized concentrations of hydrated phyllosilicates and sulfates but no carbonates, and ices and frosts with a water-ice composition of the north polar perennial cap, as for the south cap, covered by a thin carbon dioxide-ice veneer.

  7. An Underwater Surface-Drying Peptide Inspired by a Mussel Adhesive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Petrone, Luigi; Tan, YerPeng; Cai, Hao; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Miserez, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Water hampers the formation of strong and durable bonds between adhesive polymers and solid surfaces, in turn hindering the development of adhesives for biomedical and marine applications. Inspired by mussel adhesion, a mussel foot protein homologue (mfp3S-pep) is designed, whose primary sequence is designed to mimic the pI, polyampholyte, and hydrophobic characteristics of the native protein. Noticeably, native protein and synthetic peptide exhibit similar abilities to self-coacervate at given pH and ionic strength. 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (Dopa) proves necessary for irreversible peptide adsorption to both TiO2 (anatase) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) surfaces, as confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, with the coacervate showing superior adsorption. The adsorption of Dopa-containing peptides is investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, revealing initially bidentate coordinative bonds on TiO2, followed by H-bonded and eventually long-ranged electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions. On HAP, mfp3s-pep-3Dopa adsorption occurs predominantly via H-bond and outer-sphere complexes of the catechol groups. Importantly, only the Dopa-bearing compounds are able to remove interfacial water from the target surfaces, with the coacervate achieving the highest water displacement arising from its superior wetting properties. These findings provide an impetus for developing coacervated Dopa-functionalized peptides/polymers adhesive formulations for a variety of applications on wet polar surfaces. PMID:27840600

  8. The enterococcal surface protein, Esp, is involved in Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Arana, A; Valle, J; Solano, C; Arrizubieta, M J; Cucarella, C; Lamata, M; Amorena, B; Leiva, J; Penadés, J R; Lasa, I

    2001-10-01

    The enterococcal surface protein, Esp, is a high-molecular-weight surface protein of unknown function whose frequency is significantly increased among infection-derived Enterococcus faecalis isolates. In this work, a global structural similarity was found between Bap, a biofilm-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus, and Esp. Analysis of the relationship between the presence of the Esp-encoding gene (esp) and the biofilm formation capacity in E. faecalis demonstrated that the presence of the esp gene is highly associated (P < 0.0001) with the capacity of E. faecalis to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface, since 93.5% of the E. faecalis esp-positive isolates were capable of forming a biofilm. Moreover, none of the E. faecalis esp-deficient isolates were biofilm producers. Depending on the E. faecalis isolate, insertional mutagenesis of esp caused either a complete loss of the biofilm formation phenotype or no apparent phenotypic defect. Complementation studies revealed that Esp expression in an E. faecalis esp-deficient strain promoted primary attachment and biofilm formation on polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride plastic from urine collection bags. Together, these results demonstrate that (i) biofilm formation capacity is widespread among clinical E. faecalis isolates, (ii) the biofilm formation capacity is restricted to the E. faecalis strains harboring esp, and (iii) Esp promotes primary attachment and biofilm formation of E. faecalis on abiotic surfaces.

  9. The Enterococcal Surface Protein, Esp, Is Involved in Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Valle, Jaione; Solano, Cristina; Arrizubieta, María Jesús; Cucarella, Carme; Lamata, Marta; Amorena, Beatriz; Leiva, José; Penadés, José Rafael; Lasa, Iñigo

    2001-01-01

    The enterococcal surface protein, Esp, is a high-molecular-weight surface protein of unknown function whose frequency is significantly increased among infection-derived Enterococcus faecalis isolates. In this work, a global structural similarity was found between Bap, a biofilm-associated protein of Staphylococcus aureus, and Esp. Analysis of the relationship between the presence of the Esp-encoding gene (esp) and the biofilm formation capacity in E. faecalis demonstrated that the presence of the esp gene is highly associated (P < 0.0001) with the capacity of E. faecalis to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface, since 93.5% of the E. faecalis esp-positive isolates were capable of forming a biofilm. Moreover, none of the E. faecalis esp-deficient isolates were biofilm producers. Depending on the E. faecalis isolate, insertional mutagenesis of esp caused either a complete loss of the biofilm formation phenotype or no apparent phenotypic defect. Complementation studies revealed that Esp expression in an E. faecalis esp-deficient strain promoted primary attachment and biofilm formation on polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride plastic from urine collection bags. Together, these results demonstrate that (i) biofilm formation capacity is widespread among clinical E. faecalis isolates, (ii) the biofilm formation capacity is restricted to the E. faecalis strains harboring esp, and (iii) Esp promotes primary attachment and biofilm formation of E. faecalis on abiotic surfaces. PMID:11571153

  10. Revealing obliterated engraved marks on high strength aluminium alloy (AA7010) surfaces by etching technique.

    PubMed

    Bong, Yeu Uei; Kuppuswamy, R

    2010-02-25

    Restoration of obliterated engraved marks on high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA7010) surfaces by etching technique was studied. The alloy surfaces were mechanically engraved with some identification marks using "Gravograph". The marks were then erased by removing the metal to different levels up to and below the depth of engraving. Five metallographic reagents were tested on the obliterated surfaces by etching. The following two methods (i) immersion in 10% aq. phosphoric acid and (ii) alternate swabbing of 60% HCl and 40% NaOH were found to be quite effective to reveal the obliterated marks. These two procedures were also able to show effectively the marks obliterated by over-engraving and centre punching. Of the two techniques immersion in phosphoric acid provided more contrast. Interestingly, alternate swabbing of 60% HCl and 40% NaOH presented itself to be the common reagent for restoration on pure aluminium as well as its alloy surfaces. This is evident from our own current experiments and those of earlier researchers [G. Peeler, S. Gutowski, H. Wrobel, G. Dower, The restoration of impressed characters on aluminium alloy motor cycle frames, J. Forensic Ident. 58 (1) (2008) 27-32; M. Izhar M. Baharum, R. Kuppuswamy, A.A. Rahman, Restoration of engraved marks on aluminium surfaces by etching technique, Forensic Sci. Int. 177 (2008) 221-227]. The findings have assumed importance as engines and chassis of cars and frames of firearms are currently made of high strength aluminium alloys and recovery on these surfaces by current methods is not satisfactory.

  11. Cell-material interactions revealed via material techniques of surface patterning.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiang; Peng, Rong; Ding, Jiandong

    2013-10-04

    Cell-material interactions constitute a key fundamental topic in biomaterials study. Various cell cues and matrix cues as well as soluble factors regulate cell behaviors on materials. These factors are coupled with each other as usual, and thus it is very difficult to unambiguously elucidate the role of each regulator. The recently developed material techniques of surface patterning afford unique ways to reveal the underlying science. This paper reviews the pertinent material techniques to fabricate patterns of microscale and nanoscale resolutions, and corresponding cell studies. Some issues are emphasized, such as cell localization on patterned surfaces of chemical contrast, and effects of cell shape, cell size, cell-cell contact, and seeding density on differentiation of stem cells. Material cues to regulate cell adhesion, cell differentiation and other cell events are further summed up. Effects of some physical properties, such as surface topography and matrix stiffness, on cell behaviors are also discussed; nanoscaled features of substrate surfaces to regulate cell fate are summarized as well. The pertinent work sheds new insight into the cell-material interactions, and is stimulating for biomaterial design in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and high-throughput detection, diagnosis, and drug screening.

  12. Nanoscale electrochemical patterning reveals the active sites for catechol oxidation at graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; McKelvey, Kim; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-12-19

    Graphite-based electrodes (graphite, graphene, and nanotubes) are used widely in electrochemistry, and there is a long-standing view that graphite step edges are needed to catalyze many reactions, with the basal surface considered to be inert. In the present work, this model was tested directly for the first time using scanning electrochemical cell microscopy reactive patterning and shown to be incorrect. For the electro-oxidation of dopamine as a model process, the reaction rate was measured at high spatial resolution across a surface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Oxidation products left behind in a pattern defined by the scanned electrochemical cell served as surface-site markers, allowing the electrochemical activity to be correlated directly with the graphite structure on the nanoscale. This process produced tens of thousands of electrochemical measurements at different locations across the basal surface, unambiguously revealing it to be highly electrochemically active, with step edges providing no enhanced activity. This new model of graphite electrodes has significant implications for the design of carbon-based biosensors, and the results are additionally important for understanding electrochemical processes on related sp(2)-hybridized materials such as pristine graphene and nanotubes.

  13. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  14. The Structure of the BfrB-Bfd Complex Reveals Protein-Protein Interactions Enabling Iron Release from Bacterioferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Huili; Wang, Yan; Lovell, Scott; Kumar, Ritesh; Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Battaile, Kevin P; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2012-09-11

    Ferritin-like molecules are unique to cellular iron homeostasis because they can store iron at concentrations much higher than those dictated by the solubility of Fe3+. Very little is known about the protein interactions that deliver iron for storage or promote the mobilization of stored iron from ferritin-like molecules. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (Pa-BfrB) in complex with bacterioferritin-associated ferredoxin (Pa-Bfd) at 2.0 Å resolution. As the first example of a ferritin-like molecule in complex with a cognate partner, the structure provides unprecedented insight into the complementary interface that enables the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Pa-Bfd to promote heme-mediated electron transfer through the BfrB protein dielectric (~18 Å), a process that is necessary to reduce the core ferric mineral and facilitate mobilization of Fe2+. The Pa-BfrB-Bfd complex also revealed the first structure of a Bfd, thus providing a first view to what appears to be a versatile metal binding domain ubiquitous to the large Fer2_BFD family of proteins and enzymes with diverse functions. Residues at the Pa-BfrB-Bfd interface are highly conserved in Bfr and Bfd sequences from a number of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting that the specific recognition between Pa-BfrB and Pa-Bfd is of widespread significance to the understanding of bacterial iron homeostasis.

  15. Cell-surface prion protein interacts with glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Wong, Boon-Seng; Liu, Tong; Li, Ruliang; Petersen, Robert B; Sy, Man-Sun

    2002-11-15

    We used ELISA and flow cytometry to study the binding of prion protein PrP to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). We found that recombinant human PrP (rPrP) binds GAGs including chondroitin sulphate A, chondroitin sulphate B, hyaluronic acid, and heparin. rPrP binding to GAGs occurs via the N-terminus, a region known to bind divalent cations. Additionally, rPrP binding to GAGs is enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ and Zn2+, but not Ca2+ and Mn2+. rPrP binds heparin strongest, and the binding is inhibited by certain heparin analogues, including heparin disaccharide and sulphate-containing monosaccharides, but not by acetylated heparin. Full-length normal cellular prion protein (PrPC), but not N-terminally truncated PrPC species, from human brain bind GAGs in a similar Cu2+/Zn2+-enhanced fashion. We found that GAGs specifically bind to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 23-35 in the N-terminus of rPrP. We further demonstrated that while both wild-type PrPC and an octapeptide-repeat-deleted mutant PrP produced by transfected cells bound heparin at the cell surface, the PrP N-terminal deletion mutant and non-transfectant control failed to bind heparin. Binding of heparin to wild-type PrPC on the cell surface results in a reduction of the level of cell-surface PrPC. These results provide strong evidence that PrPC is a surface receptor for GAGs.

  16. The Lipid-Droplet Proteome Reveals that Droplets Are a Protein-Storage Depot

    SciTech Connect

    Cermelli, Silvia; Guo, Yi; Gross, Steven P.; Welte, Michael

    2006-09-19

    Lipid droplets are ubiquitous organelles that are among the basic building blocks of eukaryotic cells. Despite central roles for cholesterol homeostasis and lipid metabolism, their function and protein composition are poorly understood. Results: We purified lipid droplets from Drosophila embryos and analyzed the associated proteins by capillary LC-MS-MS. Important functional groups include enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, signaling molecules, and proteins related to membrane trafficking. Unexpectedly, histones H2A, H2Av, and H2B were present. Using biochemistry, genetics, real-time imaging, and cell biology, we confirm that roughly 50% of certain embryonic histones are physically attached to lipid droplets, a localization conserved in other fly species. Histone association with droplets starts during oogenesis and is prominent in early embryos, but it is undetectable in later stages or in cultured cells. Histones on droplets are not irreversibly trapped; quantitation of droplet histone levels and transplantation experiments suggest that histones are transferred from droplets to nuclei as development proceeds. When this maternal store of histones is unavailable because lipid droplets are mislocalized, zygotic histone production starts prematurely. Conclusions: Because we uncover a striking proteomic similarity of Drosophila droplets to mammalian lipid droplets, Drosophila likely provides a good model for understanding droplet function in general. Our analysis also reveals a new function for these organelles; the massive nature of histone association with droplets and its developmental time-course suggest that droplets sequester maternally provided proteins until they are needed. We propose that lipid droplets can serve as transient storage depots for proteins that lack appropriate binding partners in the cell. Such sequestration may provide a general cellular strategy for handling excess proteins.

  17. Evolutionarily Conserved Pattern of Interactions in a Protein Revealed by Local Thermal Expansion Properties.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Caro, Jose A; Roche, Julien; Fossat, Martin; Barthe, Philippe; García-Moreno E, Bertrand; Royer, Catherine A; Roumestand, Christian

    2015-07-29

    The way in which the network of intramolecular interactions determines the cooperative folding and conformational dynamics of a protein remains poorly understood. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy is uniquely suited to examine this problem because it combines the site-specific resolution of the NMR experiments with the local character of pressure perturbations. Here we report on the temperature dependence of the site-specific volumetric properties of various forms of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), including three variants with engineered internal cavities, as measured with high-pressure NMR spectroscopy. The strong temperature dependence of pressure-induced unfolding arises from poorly understood differences in thermal expansion between the folded and unfolded states. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the global thermal expansion of the folded proteins and the number of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds, as determined by the temperature coefficient of the backbone amide chemical shifts. Comparison of the identity of these strong H-bonds with the co-evolution of pairs of residues in the SNase protein family suggests that the architecture of the interactions detected in the NMR experiments could be linked to a functional aspect of the protein. Moreover, the temperature dependence of the residue-specific volume changes of unfolding yielded residue-specific differences in expansivity and revealed how mutations impact intramolecular interaction patterns. These results show that intramolecular interactions in the folded states of proteins impose constraints against thermal expansion and that, hence, knowledge of site-specific thermal expansivity offers insight into the patterns of strong intramolecular interactions and other local determinants of protein stability, cooperativity, and potentially also of function.

  18. Interplay of protein and DNA structure revealed in simulations of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Luke; Grosner, Michael A; Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli Lac repressor is the classic textbook example of a protein that attaches to widely spaced sites along a genome and forces the intervening DNA into a loop. The short loops implicated in the regulation of the lac operon suggest the involvement of factors other than DNA and repressor in gene control. The molecular simulations presented here examine two likely structural contributions to the in-vivo looping of bacterial DNA: the distortions of the double helix introduced upon association of the highly abundant, nonspecific nucleoid protein HU and the large-scale deformations of the repressor detected in low-resolution experiments. The computations take account of the three-dimensional arrangements of nucleotides and amino acids found in crystal structures of DNA with the two proteins, the natural rest state and deformational properties of protein-free DNA, and the constraints on looping imposed by the conformation of the repressor and the orientation of bound DNA. The predicted looping propensities capture the complex, chain-length-dependent variation in repression efficacy extracted from gene expression studies and in vitro experiments and reveal unexpected chain-length-dependent variations in the uptake of HU, the deformation of repressor, and the folding of DNA. Both the opening of repressor and the presence of HU, at levels approximating those found in vivo, enhance the probability of loop formation. HU affects the global organization of the repressor and the opening of repressor influences the levels of HU binding to DNA. The length of the loop determines whether the DNA adopts antiparallel or parallel orientations on the repressor, whether the repressor is opened or closed, and how many HU molecules bind to the loop. The collective behavior of proteins and DNA is greater than the sum of the parts and hints of ways in which multiple proteins may coordinate the packaging and processing of genetic information.

  19. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  20. Nullspace Sampling with Holonomic Constraints Reveals Molecular Mechanisms of Protein Gαs

    PubMed Central

    Pachov, Dimitar V.; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Proteins perform their function or interact with partners by exchanging between conformational substates on a wide range of spatiotemporal scales. Structurally characterizing these exchanges is challenging, both experimentally and computationally. Large, diffusional motions are often on timescales that are difficult to access with molecular dynamics simulations, especially for large proteins and their complexes. The low frequency modes of normal mode analysis (NMA) report on molecular fluctuations associated with biological activity. However, NMA is limited to a second order expansion about a minimum of the potential energy function, which limits opportunities to observe diffusional motions. By contrast, kino-geometric conformational sampling (KGS) permits large perturbations while maintaining the exact geometry of explicit conformational constraints, such as hydrogen bonds. Here, we extend KGS and show that a conformational ensemble of the α subunit Gαs of heterotrimeric stimulatory protein Gs exhibits structural features implicated in its activation pathway. Activation of protein Gs by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is associated with GDP release and large conformational changes of its α-helical domain. Our method reveals a coupled α-helical domain opening motion while, simultaneously, Gαs helix α5 samples an activated conformation. These motions are moderated in the activated state. The motion centers on a dynamic hub near the nucleotide-binding site of Gαs, and radiates to helix α4. We find that comparative NMA-based ensembles underestimate the amplitudes of the motion. Additionally, the ensembles fall short in predicting the accepted direction of the full activation pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that nullspace sampling with explicit, holonomic constraints yields ensembles that illuminate molecular mechanisms involved in GDP release and protein Gs activation, and further establish conformational coupling between key structural

  1. Comparative analysis of SET domain proteins in maize and Arabidopsis reveals multiple duplications preceding the divergence of monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M; Napoli, Carolyn A; Selinger, David A; Pandey, Ritu; Cone, Karen C; Chandler, Vicki L; Kaeppler, Heidi F; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2003-06-01

    Histone proteins play a central role in chromatin packaging, and modification of histones is associated with chromatin accessibility. SET domain [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] proteins are one class of proteins that have been implicated in regulating gene expression through histone methylation. The relationships of 22 SET domain proteins from maize (Zea mays) and 32 SET domain proteins from Arabidopsis were evaluated by phylogenetic analysis and domain organization. Our analysis reveals five classes of SET domain proteins in plants that can be further divided into 19 orthology groups. In some cases, such as the Enhancer of zeste-like and trithorax-like proteins, plants and animals contain homologous proteins with a similar organization of domains outside of the SET domain. However, a majority of plant SET domain proteins do not have an animal homolog with similar domain organization, suggesting that plants have unique mechanisms to establish and maintain chromatin states. Although the domains present in plant and animal SET domain proteins often differ, the domains found in the plant proteins have been generally implicated in protein-protein interactions, indicating that most SET domain proteins operate in complexes. Combined analysis of the maize and Arabidopsis SET domain proteins reveals that duplication of SET domain proteins in plants is extensive and has occurred via multiple mechanisms that preceded the divergence of monocots and dicots.

  2. Coat formation of surface-active proteins on aqueous surfaces during drying.

    PubMed

    Nijdam, J; Trouillet, V; Kachel, S; Scharfer, P; Schabel, W; Kind, M

    2014-11-01

    Segregation of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lactose in thin aqueous films during drying was investigated by examining the composition of the dried films using inverse micro Raman spectroscopy (IMRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) sputter-depth profiling. The composition was uniform through the thickness of the dried films except within a 10nm region at the exposed surface where BSA had accumulated, most likely due to its surface activity. The thickness of the BSA layer was similar to the diameter of a BSA molecule, which suggests that a single monolayer of BSA adsorbed at the exposed surface. The BSA surface concentration of the dried films was constant over a wide range of BSA bulk concentrations, indicating that the aqueous surface became saturated with BSA during drying. The BSA surface layer of order 10nm was significantly thinner than the film thickness of order 10 μm, which implies that BSA formed a surface coating rather than a shell, and thus lent no structural rigidity to the film.

  3. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  4. Anharmonic behavior in the multisubunit protein apoferritin as revealed by quasi-elastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Telling, Mark T F; Neylon, Cameron; Kilcoyne, Susan H; Arrighi, Valeria

    2008-09-04

    Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) has been used to study the deviation from Debye-law harmonic behavior in lyophilized and hydrated apoferritin, a naturally occurring, multisubunit protein. Whereas analysis of the measured mean squared displacement (msd) parameter reveals a hydration-dependent inflection above 240 K, characteristic of diffusive motion, a hydration-independent inflection is observed at 100 K. The mechanism responsible for this low-temperature anharmonic response is further investigated, via analysis of the elastic incoherent neutron scattering intensity, by applying models developed to describe side-group motion in glassy polymers. Our results suggest that the deviation from harmonic behavior is due to the onset of methyl group rotations which exhibit a broad distribution of activated processes ( E a,ave = 12.2 kJ.mol (-1), sigma = 5.0 kJ x mol (-1)). Our results are likened to those reported for other proteins.

  5. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  6. Irradiation-induced protein inactivation reveals Golgi enzyme cycling to cell periphery

    PubMed Central

    Jarvela, Timothy; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2012-01-01

    Acute inhibition is a powerful technique to test proteins for direct roles and order their activities in a pathway, but as a general gene-based strategy, it is mostly unavailable in mammalian systems. As a consequence, the precise roles of proteins in membrane trafficking have been difficult to assess in vivo. Here we used a strategy based on a genetically encoded fluorescent protein that generates highly localized and damaging reactive oxygen species to rapidly inactivate exit from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during live-cell imaging and address the long-standing question of whether the integrity of the Golgi complex depends on constant input from the ER. Light-induced blockade of ER exit immediately perturbed Golgi membranes, and surprisingly, revealed that cis-Golgi-resident proteins continuously cycle to peripheral ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) membranes and depend on ER exit for their return to the Golgi. These experiments demonstrate that ER exit and extensive cycling of cis-Golgi components to the cell periphery sustain the mammalian Golgi complex. PMID:22421362

  7. Structure of the Yeast DEAD Box Protein Mss116p Reveals Two Wedges that Crimp RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Del Campo, Mark; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2010-01-12

    The yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in mitochondrial group I and II intron splicing, translational activation, and RNA end processing. Here we determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p complexed with an RNA oligonucleotide and ATP analogs AMP-PNP, ADP-BeF{sub 3}, or ADP-AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structures show the entire helicase core acting together with a functionally important C-terminal extension. In all structures, the helicase core is in a closed conformation with a wedge {alpha} helix bending RNA 3' of the central bound nucleotides, as in previous DEAD box protein structures. Notably, Mss116p's C-terminal extension also bends RNA 5' of the central nucleotides, resulting in RNA crimping. Despite reported functional differences, we observe few structural changes in ternary complexes with different ATP analogs. The structures constrain models of DEAD box protein function and reveal a strand separation mechanism in which a protein uses two wedges to act as a molecular crimper.

  8. Proteomic Investigation of Aphid Honeydew Reveals an Unexpected Diversity of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haubruge, Eric; Hance, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe; De Pauw, Edwin; Francis, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Aphids feed on the phloem sap of plants, and are the most common honeydew-producing insects. While aphid honeydew is primarily considered to comprise sugars and amino acids, its protein diversity has yet to be documented. Here, we report on the investigation of the honeydew proteome from the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Using a two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-Dige) approach, more than 140 spots were isolated, demonstrating that aphid honeydew also represents a diverse source of proteins. About 66% of the isolated spots were identified through mass spectrometry analysis, revealing that the protein diversity of aphid honeydew originates from several organisms (i.e. the host aphid and its microbiota, including endosymbiotic bacteria and gut flora). Interestingly, our experiments also allowed to identify some proteins like chaperonin, GroEL and Dnak chaperones, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and flagellin that might act as mediators in the plant-aphid interaction. In addition to providing the first aphid honeydew proteome analysis, we propose to reconsider the importance of this substance, mainly acknowledged to be a waste product, from the aphid ecology perspective. PMID:24086359

  9. Novel centrosomal protein reveals the presence of multiple centrosomes in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) bnbn binucleated erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Woods, C M; Zhu, J; Coleman, T; Bloom, S E; Lazarides, E

    1995-02-01

    The phenotype of the bnbn hemolytic anemia mutation in the domestic turkey is manifested as binucleation specifically in the definitive erythrocyte lineage, most likely as the consequence of anomolous centrosomal activity (Bloom et al., 1970; Searle and Bloom, 1979). Here we have identified in turkey two variants of the novel, centrosomally-associated erythroid-specific protein p23. One variant is Ca(2+)-sensitive and is highly homologous to its chick counterpart (Zhu et al., 1995, accompanying paper). The other, p21 is a truncated form resulting from a 62 amino acid deletion from the 3' end and a 40 amino acid insertion at the 5' end, and appears to lack Ca(2+)-sensitivity. These proteins are localized at the marginal band, centrosomes and nuclear membrane of differentiated erythrocytes. Anti-p23/p21 immunofluorescence revealed the presence of multiple centrosomes in bnbn erythrocytes. We therefore undertook a detailed genetic analysis to determine whether the p21 variant represented the bn mutation. Initial tests of normal BnBn and mutant bnbn individuals suggested that the p23/p21 proteins might be encoded by the Bn/bn genes. However, further genetic tests demonstrated independent segregation for these two genetic loci. Thus, these proteins are encoded by the heretofore undescribed genes, p23/p21, mapping to an autosomal locus in the turkey genome.

  10. Potato virus X movement in Nicotiana benthamiana: new details revealed by chimeric coat protein variants.

    PubMed

    Betti, Camilla; Lico, Chiara; Maffi, Dario; D'Angeli, Simone; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Faoro, Franco; Baschieri, Selene

    2012-02-01

    Potato virus X coat protein is necessary for both cell-to-cell and phloem transfer, but it has not been clarified definitively whether it is needed in both movement phases solely as a component of the assembled particles or also of differently structured ribonucleoprotein complexes. To clarify this issue, we studied the infection progression of a mutant carrying an N-terminal deletion of the coat protein, which was used to construct chimeric virus particles displaying peptides selectively affecting phloem transfer or cell-to-cell movement. Nicotiana benthamiana plants inoculated with expression vectors encoding the wild-type, mutant and chimeric viral genomes were examined by microscopy techniques. These experiments showed that coat protein-peptide fusions promoting cell-to-cell transfer only were not competent for virion assembly, whereas long-distance movement was possible only for coat proteins compatible with virus particle formation. Moreover, the ability of the assembled PVX to enter and persist into developing xylem elements was revealed here for the first time.

  11. The laminA/NF-Y protein complex reveals an unknown transcriptional mechanism on cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cicchillitti, Lucia; Manni, Isabella; Mancone, Carmine; Regazzo, Giulia; Spagnuolo, Manuela; Alonzi, Tonino; Carlomosti, Fabrizio; Dell'Anna, Maria Lucia; Dell'Omo, Giulia; Picardo, Mauro; Ciana, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Tripodi, Marco; Magenta, Alessandra; Rizzo, Maria Giulia; Gurtner, Aymone; Piaggio, Giulia

    2017-01-10

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear matrix that also controls proliferation by largely unknown mechanisms. NF-Y is a ubiquitous protein involved in cell proliferation composed of three subunits (-YA -YB -YC) all required for the DNA binding and transactivation activity. To get clues on new NF-Y partner(s) we performed a mass spectrometry screening of proteins that co-precipitate with the regulatory subunit of the complex, NF-YA. By this screening we identified lamin A as a novel putative NF-Y interactor. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and confocal analysis confirmed the interaction between the two endogenous proteins. Interestingly, this association occurs on euchromatin regions, too. ChIP experiments demonstrate lamin A enrichment in several promoter regions of cell cycle related genes in a NF-Y dependent manner. Gain and loss of function experiments reveal that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity. Taking advantage of a recently generated transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc, in which an NF-Y-dependent promoter controls luciferase expression, we demonstrate that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity not only in culture cells but also in living animals. Altogether, our data demonstrate the occurrence of lamin A/NF-Y interaction and suggest a possible role of this protein complex in regulation of NF-Y function in cell proliferation.

  12. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rusin, Scott F.; Schlosser, Kate A.; Adamo, Mark E.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry–based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c–dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2–dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. PMID:26462736

  14. Integrated strategy reveals the protein interface between cancer targets Bcl-2 and NAF-1

    PubMed Central

    Tamir, Sagi; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Katz, Chen; Morcos, Faruck; Hailey, Kendra L.; Zuris, John A.; Wang, Charles; Conlan, Andrea R.; Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Mittler, Ron; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.; Friedler, Assaf; Nechushtai, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Life requires orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell maintenance, and cell death. Involved in these decisions are protein complexes that assimilate a variety of inputs that report on the status of the cell and lead to an output response. Among the proteins involved in this response are nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1)- and Bcl-2. NAF-1 is a homodimeric member of the novel Fe-S protein NEET family, which binds two 2Fe-2S clusters. NAF-1 is an important partner for Bcl-2 at the endoplasmic reticulum to functionally antagonize Beclin 1-dependent autophagy [Chang NC, Nguyen M, Germain M, Shore GC (2010) EMBO J 29(3):606–618]. We used an integrated approach involving peptide array, deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS), and functional studies aided by the power of sufficient constraints from direct coupling analysis (DCA) to determine the dominant docked conformation of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex. NAF-1 binds to both the pro- and antiapoptotic regions (BH3 and BH4) of Bcl-2, as demonstrated by a nested protein fragment analysis in a peptide array and DXMS analysis. A combination of the solution studies together with a new application of DCA to the eukaryotic proteins NAF-1 and Bcl-2 provided sufficient constraints at amino acid resolution to predict the interaction surfaces and orientation of the protein–protein interactions involved in the docked structure. The specific integrated approach described in this paper provides the first structural information, to our knowledge, for future targeting of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex in the regulation of apoptosis/autophagy in cancer biology. PMID:24706857

  15. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    PubMed

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  16. Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    10-1-0422 TITLE: Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early PRINCIPAL...molecular imaging 7 cdrescher@fhcrc.org Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Page 3...Targeting Cell Surface Proteins in Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging to Detect Ovarian Cancer Early Charles W Drescher, MD, Principle Investigator

  17. Population dynamics of two antilisterial cheese surface consortia revealed by temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Surface contamination of smear cheese by Listeria spp. is of major concern for the industry. Complex smear ecosystems have been shown to harbor antilisterial potential but the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the inhibition mostly remain unclear, and are likely related to complex interactions than to production of single antimicrobial compounds. Bacterial biodiversity and population dynamics of complex smear ecosystems exhibiting antilisterial properties in situ were investigated by Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE), a culture independent technique, for two microbial consortia isolated from commercial Raclette type cheeses inoculated with defined commercial ripening cultures (F) or produced with an old-young smearing process (M). Results TTGE revealed nine bacterial species common to both F and M consortia, but consortium F exhibited a higher diversity than consortium M, with thirteen and ten species, respectively. Population dynamics were studied after application of the consortia on fresh-produced Raclette cheeses. TTGE analyses revealed a similar sequential development of the nine species common to both consortia. Beside common cheese surface bacteria (Staphylococcus equorum, Corynebacterium spp., Brevibacterium linens, Microbacterium gubbeenense, Agrococcus casei), the two consortia contained marine lactic acid bacteria (Alkalibacterium kapii, Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans) that developed early in ripening (day 14 to 20), shortly after the growth of staphylococci (day 7). A decrease of Listeria counts was observed on cheese surface inoculated at day 7 with 0.1-1 × 102 CFU cm-2, when cheeses were smeared with consortium F or M. Listeria counts went below the detection limit of the method between day 14 and 28 and no subsequent regrowth was detected over 60 to 80 ripening days. In contrast, Listeria grew to high counts (105 CFU cm-2) on cheeses smeared with a defined surface culture. Conclusions This work reports

  18. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  19. Attomolar protein detection using a magnetic bead surface coverage assay.

    PubMed

    Tekin, H Cumhur; Cornaglia, Matteo; Gijs, Martin A M

    2013-03-21

    We demonstrate a microfluidic method for ultra-sensitive protein detection in serum. First, 'large' (2.8 μm) antibody-functionalized magnetic beads specifically capture antigen from a serum matrix under active microfluidic mixing. Subsequently, the large beads loaded with the antigens are gently exposed to a surface pattern of fixed 'small' (1.0 μm) antibody-coated magnetic beads. During the exposure, attractive magnetic bead dipole-dipole interactions improve the contact between the two bead types and help the antigen-antibody immunocomplex formation, while non-specific large bead adsorption is limited by exploiting viscous drag forces in the microfluidic channel on the small-bead pattern. This efficient antigen-antibody recognition and binding mechanism mimics a biological process of selective recognition of tissue molecules, like is the case when leukocytes roll and slow down on blood vessel walls by selectin-mediated adhesion. After exposure of the large beads to the pattern of small beads, the antigen concentration is detected by simply counting the number of surface pattern-bound large magnetic beads. The new technique allows detection of proteins down to the sub-zeptomole range. In particular, we demonstrate detection of only 200 molecules of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) in a serum sample volume of 5 μL, corresponding to a concentration of 60 attomolar or 1 fg mL(-1).

  20. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaohu; Jiang, Mengtian; Yu, Ziniu; Cai, Hao; Li, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM) domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg), as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn), C-terminus (Mbgc), LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD) was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn)2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria, the strategy

  1. Identification of surface proteins involved in the adhesion of a probiotic Bacillus cereus strain to mucin and fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, B; Arias, S; Chaignepain, S; Denayrolles, M; Schmitter, J M; Bressollier, P; Urdaci, M C

    2009-05-01

    Several Bacillus strains isolated from commercial probiotic preparations were identified at the species level, and their adhesion capabilities to three different model intestinal surfaces (mucin, Matrigel and Caco-2 cells) were assessed. In general, adhesion of spores was higher than that of vegetative cells to the three matrices, and overall strain Bacillus cereus(CH) displayed the best adhesion. Different biochemical treatments revealed that surface proteins of B. cereus(CH) were involved in the adhesion properties of the strain. Surface-associated proteins from vegetative cells and spores of B. cereus(CH) were extracted and identified, and some proteins such as S-layer components, flagellin and cell-bound proteases were found to bind to mucin or fibronectin. These facts suggest that those proteins might play important roles in the interaction of this probiotic Bacillus strain within the human gastrointestinal tract.

  2. Encephalitis and antibodies to synaptic and neuronal cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The identification of encephalitis associated with antibodies against cell surface and synaptic proteins, although recent, has already had a substantial impact in clinical neurology and neuroscience. The target antigens are receptors and proteins that have critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity, including the NMDA receptor, the AMPA receptor, the GABAB receptor, and the glycine receptor. Other autoantigens, such as leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2, form part of trans-synaptic complexes and neuronal cell adhesion molecules involved in fine-tuning synaptic transmission and nerve excitability. Syndromes resulting from these immune responses resemble those of pharmacologic or genetic models in which the antigens are disrupted. For some immune responses, there is evidence that the antibodies alter the structure and function of the antigen, suggesting a direct pathogenic effect. These disorders are important because they can affect children and young adults, are severe and protracted, occur with or without tumor association, and respond to treatment but may relapse. This review provides an update on these syndromes and autoantigens with special emphasis on clinical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21747075

  3. Molecular characterization of Mycoplasma arthritidis variable surface protein MAA2.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, K E; Weaver, E J; Donelan, W; Al-Sheboul, S

    1998-06-01

    Earlier studies implied a role for Mycoplasma arthritidis surface protein MAA2 in cytadherence and virulence and showed that it exhibited both size and phase variability. Here we report the further analysis of MAA2 and the cloning and sequencing of the maa2 gene from two M. arthritidis strains, 158p10p9 and H606, expressing two size variants of MAA2. Triton X-114 partitioning and metabolic labeling with [3H]palmitic acid suggested lipid modification of MAA2. Surface exposure of the C terminus was indicated by cleavage of monoclonal antibody-specific epitopes from intact cells by carboxypeptidase Y. The maa2 genes from both strains were highly conserved, consisting largely of six (for 158p10p9) or five (for H606) nearly identical, 264-bp tandem direct repeats. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted a largely hydrophilic, highly basic protein with a 29-amino-acid lipoprotein signal peptide. The maa2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli from the lacZ promoter of vector pGEM-T. The recombinant product was approximately 3 kDa larger than the native protein, suggesting that the signal peptide was not processed in E. coli. The maa2 gene and upstream DNA sequences were cloned from M. arthritidis clonal variants differing in MAA2 expression state. Expression state correlated with the length of a poly(T) tract just upstream of a putative -10 box. Full-sized recombinant MAA2 was expressed in E. coli from genes derived from both ON and OFF expression variants, indicating that control of expression did not include alterations within the coding region.

  4. The Treponema denticola Major Sheath Protein Is Predominantly Periplasmic and Has Only Limited Surface Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Bourell, Kenneth W.; Bannister, Teresa D.; Cox, David L.; Radolf, Justin D.

    1999-01-01

    The recent discovery that the Treponema pallidum genome encodes 12 orthologs of the Treponema denticola major sheath protein (Msp) prompted us to reexamine the cellular location and topology of the T. denticola polypeptide. Experiments initially were conducted to ascertain whether Msp forms an array on or within the T. denticola outer membrane. Transmission electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained and ultrathin-sectioned organisms failed to identify a typical surface layer, whereas freeze-fracture EM revealed that the T. denticola outer membrane contains heterogeneous transmembrane proteins but no array. In contrast, a lattice-like structure was observed in vesicles released from mildly sonicated treponemes; combined EM and biochemical analyses demonstrated that this structure was the peptidoglycan sacculus. Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) subsequently was performed to localize Msp in T. denticola. Examination of negatively stained whole mounts identified substantial amounts of Msp in sonicated organisms. IEM of ultrathin-sectioned, intact treponemes also demonstrated that the preponderance of antigen was unassociated with the outer membrane. Lastly, immunofluorescence analysis of treponemes embedded in agarose gel microdroplets revealed that only minor portions of Msp are surface exposed. Taken as a whole, our findings challenge the widely held belief that Msp forms an array within the T. denticola outer membrane and demonstrate, instead, that it is predominantly periplasmic with only limited surface exposure. These findings also have implications for our evolving understanding of the contribution(s) of Msp/Tpr orthologs to treponemal physiology and disease pathogenesis. PMID:10417176

  5. Modulation of Protein Fouling and Interfacial Properties at Carbon Surfaces via Immobilization of Glycans Using Aryldiazonium Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zen, Federico; Angione, M. Daniela; Behan, James A.; Cullen, Ronan J.; Duff, Thomas; Vasconcelos, Joana M.; Scanlan, Eoin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon materials and nanomaterials are of great interest for biological applications such as implantable devices and nanoparticle vectors, however, to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. In this work, protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance were used to study adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption was found to decrease by 30–90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces; notably, enhanced rejection was observed in the case of the tested di-saccharide vs. simple mono-saccharides for near-physiological protein concentration values. ζ-potential measurements revealed that aryldiazonium chemistry results in the immobilization of phenylglycosides without a change in surface charge density, which is known to be important for protein adsorption. Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model: results indicate that protein resistance in these phenylglycoside layers correlates positively with wetting behavior and Lewis basicity. PMID:27108562

  6. Modulation of Protein Fouling and Interfacial Properties at Carbon Surfaces via Immobilization of Glycans Using Aryldiazonium Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Federico; Angione, M. Daniela; Behan, James A.; Cullen, Ronan J.; Duff, Thomas; Vasconcelos, Joana M.; Scanlan, Eoin M.; Colavita, Paula E.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon materials and nanomaterials are of great interest for biological applications such as implantable devices and nanoparticle vectors, however, to realize their potential it is critical to control formation and composition of the protein corona in biological media. In this work, protein adsorption studies were carried out at carbon surfaces functionalized with aryldiazonium layers bearing mono- and di-saccharide glycosides. Surface IR reflectance absorption spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance were used to study adsorption of albumin, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Protein adsorption was found to decrease by 30–90% with respect to bare carbon surfaces; notably, enhanced rejection was observed in the case of the tested di-saccharide vs. simple mono-saccharides for near-physiological protein concentration values. ζ-potential measurements revealed that aryldiazonium chemistry results in the immobilization of phenylglycosides without a change in surface charge density, which is known to be important for protein adsorption. Multisolvent contact angle measurements were used to calculate surface free energy and acid-base polar components of bare and modified surfaces based on the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model: results indicate that protein resistance in these phenylglycoside layers correlates positively with wetting behavior and Lewis basicity.

  7. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods.

  8. Soil-surface genotoxicity of military and urban territories in Lithuania, as revealed by Tradescantia bioassays.

    PubMed

    Cesniene, Tatjana; Kleizaite, Violeta; Ursache, Robertas; Zvingila, Donatas; Radzevicius, Alfredas; Patamsyte, Jolanta; Rancelis, Vytautas

    2010-03-29

    The soil surface is a major natural system that accumulates pollutants and allows researchers to disclose the history and the present state of contamination of an area with toxic pollutants. This conclusion is based on the comparison of genotoxicity of aqueous extracts and DMSO extracts of topsoil from military territories in various locations left behind after the retreat of the Soviet Army from Lithuania, and several sites in the city of Vilnius, characterized by different history and current traffic intensity. The specific character of the soil-surface contamination was shown in a series of Tradescantia micronucleus (Trad-MN) and stamen-hair mutation (Trad-SHM) bioassays and tests. The most effective ones were the Trad-MN and, unexpectedly, the branched-hair tests. A preliminary result of the study is the somaclonal variation of individual Tradescantia plants revealed by the RAPD method of DNA analysis. A comparison of aqueous extracts and DMSO extracts of the soil showed the permanent character of the mobile forms of genotoxic pollutants in the soil surface, despite the fact that several military territories were already closed 20 years ago.

  9. Surface induced dissociation: dissecting noncovalent protein complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2014-04-15

    The quaternary structures of proteins are both important and of interest to chemists, because many proteins exist as complexes in vivo, and probing these structures allows us to better understand their biological functions. Conventional structural biology methods such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance provide high-resolution information on the structures of protein complexes and are the gold standards in the field. However, other emerging biophysical methods that only provide low-resolution data (e.g. stoichiometry and subunit connectivity) on the structures of the protein complexes are also becoming more important to scientists. Mass spectrometry is one of these approaches that provide lower than atomic structural resolution, but the approach is higher throughput and provides not only better mass information than other techniques but also stoichiometry and topology. Fragile noncovalent interactions within the protein complexes can be preserved in the gas phase of MS under gentle ionization and transfer conditions. Scientists can measure the masses of the complexes with high confidence to reveal the stoichiometry and composition of the proteins. What makes mass spectrometry an even more powerful method is that researchers can further isolate the protein complexes and activate them in the gas phase to release subunits for more structural information. The caveat is that, upon gas-phase activation, the released subunits need to faithfully reflect the native topology so that useful information on the proteins can be extracted from mass spectrometry experiments. Unfortunately, many proteins tend to favor unfolding upon collision with neutral gas (the most common activation method in mass spectrometers). Therefore, this typically results in limited insights on the quaternary structure of the precursor without further manipulation of other experimental factors. Scientists have observed, however, that valuable structural information can be obtained

  10. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  11. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  12. Proteins in the electric field near the surface of mica.

    PubMed

    Starzyk, Anna; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-07-28

    We elucidate the nature of the electric field produced by a model mica surface and show that above some 0.4 nm it is nearly uniform and of order 12 V/nm. The presence of ions in the solvent above the surface, up to the concentration of about 300 mM, does not modify the nature of the field much. We study the conformational changes of a small protein, the tryptophan cage, as induced by (a) uniform electric field and (b) the electric field near mica. We use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and provide evidence for the existence of unfolded and deformed conformations in each of these cases. The two behaviors are characterized by distinct properties of the radius of gyration and of the distortion parameter that distinguishes between elongated and globular shapes. The overall geometry of the conformations shifts with the strengths of the uniform field in a manner that depends on the nature of the simulation box--whether it is bounded by neutral walls or not--and on the ionic concentration. Near the mica surface, on the other hand, the fraction of unfolded conformations is close to 1/6 at the ionic strength of 350 mM compared to 1/2 at 20 mM. When the electric charge on the mica is fully neutralized by bringing more ions of the opposite charge then unfolded conformations stay unfolded but an evolution from the native state does not lead to any unfolding.

  13. Proteins in the electric field near the surface of mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starzyk, Anna; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-07-01

    We elucidate the nature of the electric field produced by a model mica surface and show that above some 0.4 nm it is nearly uniform and of order 12 V/nm. The presence of ions in the solvent above the surface, up to the concentration of about 300 mM, does not modify the nature of the field much. We study the conformational changes of a small protein, the tryptophan cage, as induced by (a) uniform electric field and (b) the electric field near mica. We use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and provide evidence for the existence of unfolded and deformed conformations in each of these cases. The two behaviors are characterized by distinct properties of the radius of gyration and of the distortion parameter that distinguishes between elongated and globular shapes. The overall geometry of the conformations shifts with the strengths of the uniform field in a manner that depends on the nature of the simulation box — whether it is bounded by neutral walls or not — and on the ionic concentration. Near the mica surface, on the other hand, the fraction of unfolded conformations is close to 1/6 at the ionic strength of 350 mM compared to 1/2 at 20 mM. When the electric charge on the mica is fully neutralized by bringing more ions of the opposite charge then unfolded conformations stay unfolded but an evolution from the native state does not lead to any unfolding.

  14. Plasmalemmal proteins of cultured vascular endothelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity: analysis by surface-selective iodination

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Vascular endothelium in vivo appears to function as a polarized epithelium. To determine whether cellular polarity exists at the level of the plasma membrane, we have examined cultured endothelial monolayers for evidence of differential distribution of externally disposed plasmalemmal proteins at apical and basal cell surfaces. Lactoperoxidase beads were used to selectively label the apical surfaces of confluent endothelial monolayers, the total surfaces of nonenzymatically resuspended cells, and the basal surfaces of monolayers inverted on poly-L-lysine-coated coverslips, while maintaining greater than 98% viability in all samples. Comparison of the SDS PAGE radioiodination patterns obtained for each surface revealed a number of specific bands markedly enriched on either apical or basal surface. This polarized distribution involved membrane- associated as well as integral membrane proteins and was observed in several strains of bovine aortic endothelial cells, as well as in both primary and passaged human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In contrast, two morphologically nonpolarized cell types, bovine aortic smooth muscle and mouse peritoneal macrophages, did not display differential localization of integral membrane proteins. Polarized distribution of integral membrane proteins was established before the formation of a confluent monolayer. When inverted (basal-side-up) monolayers were returned to culture, the apical-side-up pattern was reexpressed within a few days. These results demonstrate that cell surface-selective expression of plasmalemmal proteins is an intrinsic property of viable endothelial cells in vitro. This apical/basal asymmetry of membrane structure may provide a basis for polarized endothelial functions in vivo. PMID:3782302

  15. A minimalist approach toward protein recognition by epitope transfer from functionally evolved beta-sheet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Srivats; Meyer, Scott C; Goldman, Aaron; Zhou, Min; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2006-11-08

    New approaches for identifying small molecules that specifically target protein surfaces as opposed to active site clefts are of much current interest. Toward this goal, we describe a three-step methodology: in step one, we target a protein of interest by directed evolution of a small beta-sheet scaffold; in step two, we identify residues on the scaffold that are implicated in binding; and in step three, we transfer the chemical information from the beta-sheet to a small molecule mimic. As a case study, we targeted the proteolytic enzyme thrombin, involved in blood coagulation, utilizing a library of beta-sheet epitopes displayed on phage that were previously selected for conservation of structure. We found that the thrombin-binding, beta-sheet displaying mini-proteins retained their structure and stability while inhibiting thrombin at low micromolar inhibition constants. A conserved dityrosine recognition motif separated by 9.2 A was found to be common among the mini-protein inhibitors and was further verified by alanine scanning. A molecule containing two tyrosine residues separated by a linker that matched the spacing on the beta-sheet scaffold inhibited thrombin, whereas a similar dityrosine molecule separated by a shorter 6 A linker could not. Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that both the mini-protein as well as its minimalist mimic with only two functional residues exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of thrombin. Thus, this reductionist approach affords a simple methodology for transferring information from structured protein scaffolds to yield small molecule leads for targeting protein surfaces with novel mechanisms of action.

  16. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    SciTech Connect

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D.L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-21

    Several bacterial pathogens require the 'twitching' motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified {beta}-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner - by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility.

  17. Crystal structure analysis reveals Pseudomonas PilY1 as an essential calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial surface motility

    PubMed Central

    Orans, Jillian; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Coggan, Kimberly A.; Sperlazza, Justin R.; Heiniger, Ryan W.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens require the “twitching” motility produced by filamentous type IV pili (T4P) to establish and maintain human infections. Two cytoplasmic ATPases function as an oscillatory motor that powers twitching motility via cycles of pilus extension and retraction. The regulation of this motor, however, has remained a mystery. We present the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pilus-biogenesis factor PilY1, and identify a single site on this protein required for bacterial translocation. The structure reveals a modified β-propeller fold and a distinct EF-hand-like calcium-binding site conserved in pathogens with retractile T4P. We show that preventing calcium binding by PilY1 using either an exogenous calcium chelator or mutation of a single residue disrupts Pseudomonas twitching motility by eliminating surface pili. In contrast, placing a lysine in this site to mimic the charge of a bound calcium interferes with motility in the opposite manner—by producing an abundance of nonfunctional surface pili. Our data indicate that calcium binding and release by the unique loop identified in the PilY1 crystal structure controls the opposing forces of pilus extension and retraction. Thus, PilY1 is an essential, calcium-dependent regulator of bacterial twitching motility. PMID:20080557

  18. The Arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 Genome Sequence Reveals Its Genetic Adaptation to the Surface of Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Christophe; Loux, Valentin; Gibrat, Jean-François; Spinnler, Eric; Barbe, Valérie; Vacherie, Benoit; Gavory, Frederick; Gourbeyre, Edith; Siguier, Patricia; Chandler, Michaël; Elleuch, Rayda

    2010-01-01

    Arthrobacter arilaitensis is one of the major bacterial species found at the surface of cheeses, especially in smear-ripened cheeses, where it contributes to the typical colour, flavour and texture properties of the final product. The A. arilaitensis Re117 genome is composed of a 3,859,257 bp chromosome and two plasmids of 50,407 and 8,528 bp. The chromosome shares large regions of synteny with the chromosomes of three environmental Arthrobacter strains for which genome sequences are available: A. aurescens TC1, A. chlorophenolicus A6 and Arthrobacter sp. FB24. In contrast however, 4.92% of the A. arilaitensis chromosome is composed of ISs elements, a portion that is at least 15 fold higher than for the other Arthrobacter strains. Comparative genomic analyses reveal an extensive loss of genes associated with catabolic activities, presumably as a result of adaptation to the properties of the cheese surface habitat. Like the environmental Arthrobacter strains, A. arilaitensis Re117 is well-equipped with enzymes required for the catabolism of major carbon substrates present at cheese surfaces such as fatty acids, amino acids and lactic acid. However, A. arilaitensis has several specificities which seem to be linked to its adaptation to its particular niche. These include the ability to catabolize D-galactonate, a high number of glycine betaine and related osmolyte transporters, two siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters and a high number of Fe3+/siderophore transport systems. In model cheese experiments, addition of small amounts of iron strongly stimulated the growth of A. arilaitensis, indicating that cheese is a highly iron-restricted medium. We suggest that there is a strong selective pressure at the surface of cheese for strains with efficient iron acquisition and salt-tolerance systems together with abilities to catabolize substrates such as lactic acid, lipids and amino acids. PMID:21124797

  19. Hydrogen bonding at the water surface revealed by isotopic dilution spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiopkin, Igor V; Weeraman, Champika; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Shalhout, Fadel Y; Skinner, James L; Benderskii, Alexander V

    2011-06-08

    The air-water interface is perhaps the most common liquid interface. It covers more than 70 per cent of the Earth's surface and strongly affects atmospheric, aerosol and environmental chemistry. The air-water interface has also attracted much interest as a model system that allows rigorous tests of theory, with one fundamental question being just how thin it is. Theoretical studies have suggested a surprisingly short 'healing length' of about 3 ångströms (1 Å = 0.1 nm), with the bulk-phase properties of water recovered within the top few monolayers. However, direct experimental evidence has been elusive owing to the difficulty of depth-profiling the liquid surface on the ångström scale. Most physical, chemical and biological properties of water, such as viscosity, solvation, wetting and the hydrophobic effect, are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. This can be probed by observing the lineshape of the OH-stretch mode, the frequency shift of which is related to the hydrogen-bond strength. Here we report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the air-water interface using surface-selective heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy to focus on the 'free OD' transition found only in the topmost water layer. By using deuterated water and isotopic dilution to reveal the vibrational coupling mechanism, we find that the free OD stretch is affected only by intramolecular coupling to the stretching of the other OD group on the same molecule. The other OD stretch frequency indicates the strength of one of the first hydrogen bonds encountered at the surface; this is the donor hydrogen bond of the water molecule straddling the interface, which we find to be only slightly weaker than bulk-phase water hydrogen bonds. We infer from this observation a remarkably fast onset of bulk-phase behaviour on crossing from the air into the water phase.

  20. Genome Mining for Radical SAM Protein Determinants Reveals Multiple Sactibiotic-Like Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kiera; O'Sullivan, Orla; Rea, Mary C.; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Thuricin CD is a two-component bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis that kills a wide range of clinically significant Clostridium difficile. This bacteriocin has recently been characterized and consists of two distinct peptides, Trnβ and Trnα, which both possess 3 intrapeptide sulphur to α-carbon bridges and act synergistically. Indeed, thuricin CD and subtilosin A are the only antimicrobials known to possess these unusual structures and are known as the sactibiotics (sulplur to alpha carbon-containing antibiotics). Analysis of the thuricin CD-associated gene cluster revealed the presence of genes encoding two highly unusual SAM proteins (TrnC and TrnD) which are proposed to be responsible for these unusual post-translational modifications. On the basis of the frequently high conservation among enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of specific antimicrobials, we performed an in silico screen for novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters using the TrnC and TrnD radical SAM proteins as driver sequences to perform an initial homology search against the complete non-redundant database. Fifteen novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters were identified, based on the presence of TrnC and TrnD homologues in the context of neighbouring genes encoding potential bacteriocin structural peptides. Moreover, metagenomic analysis revealed that TrnC or TrnD homologs are present in a variety of metagenomic environments, suggesting a widespread distribution of thuricin-like operons in a variety of environments. In-silico analysis of radical SAM proteins is sufficient to identify novel putative sactibiotic clusters. PMID:21760885

  1. Synaptic protein ubiquitination in rat brain revealed by antibody-based ubiquitome analysis.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Jones, Drew R; Yang, Yanling; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Yanji; Peng, Junmin

    2012-09-07

    Protein ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification regulating neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory, and its dysregulation contributes to the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Here we report a systematic analysis of ubiquitinated proteome (ubiquitome) in rat brain using a newly developed monoclonal antibody that recognizes the diglycine tag on lysine residues in trypsinized peptides (K-GG peptides). Initial antibody specificity analysis showed that the antibody can distinguish K-GG peptides from linear GG peptides or pseudo K-GG peptides derived from iodoacetamide. To evaluate the false discovery rate of K-GG peptide matches during database search, we introduced a null experiment using bacterial lysate that contains no such peptides. The brain ubiquitome was then analyzed by this antibody enrichment with or without strong cation exchange (SCX) prefractionation. During SCX chromatography, although the vast majority of K-GG peptides were detected in the fractions containing at least three positive charged peptides, specific K-GG peptides with two positive charges (e.g., protein N-terminal acetylated and C-terminal non-K/R peptides) were also identified in early fractions. The reliability of C-terminal K-GG peptides was also extensively investigated. Finally, we collected a data set of 1786 K-GG sites on 2064 peptides in 921 proteins and estimated their abundance by spectral counting. The study reveals a wide range of ubiquitination events on key components in presynaptic region (e.g., Bassoon, NSF, SNAP25, synapsin, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin) and postsynaptic density (e.g., PSD-95, GKAP, CaMKII, as well as receptors for NMDA, AMPA, GABA, serotonin, and acetylcholine). We also determined ubiquitination sites on amyloid precursor protein and alpha synuclein that are thought to be causative agents in Alzhermer's and Parkinson's disorders, respectively. As K-GG peptides can also be produced from Nedd8 or ISG15 modified

  2. Interactome of E. piscicida and grouper liver proteins reveals strategies of bacterial infection and host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Qing-feng; Peng, Xuan-xian; Peng, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of infectious diseases is related to heterogeneous protein interactions between a host and a microbe. Therefore, elucidating the host-pathogen interplay is essential. We previously revealed the protein interactome between Edwardsiella piscicida and fish gill cells, and the present study identified the protein interactome between E. piscicida and E. drummondhayi liver cells. E. drummondhayi liver cells and bacterial pull-down approaches were used to identify E. piscicida outer membrane proteins that bind to liver cells and fish liver cell proteins that interact with bacterial cells, respectively. Eight bacterial proteins and 11 fish proteins were characterized. Heterogeneous protein-protein interactions between these bacterial cells and fish liver cells were investigated through far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. A network was constructed based on 42 heterogeneous protein-protein interactions between seven bacterial proteins and 10 fish proteins. A comparison of the new interactome with the previously reported interactome showed that four bacterial proteins overlapped, whereas all of the identified fish proteins were new, suggesting a difference between bacterial tricks for evading host immunity and the host strategy for combating bacterial infection. Furthermore, these bacterial proteins were found to regulate the expression of host innate immune-related proteins. These findings indicate that the interactome contributes to bacterial infection and host immunity. PMID:28045121

  3. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction.

  4. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Hidden Complexity in a Protein Energy Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M.; Rowling, Pamela J.E.; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured “safety pin” or “staple” from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated. PMID:25565106

  5. Single-molecule FRET reveals hidden complexity in a protein energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Tsytlonok, Maksym; Ibrahim, Shehu M; Rowling, Pamela J E; Xu, Wenshu; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Klenerman, David; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2015-01-06

    Here, using single-molecule FRET, we reveal previously hidden conformations of the ankyrin-repeat domain of AnkyrinR, a giant adaptor molecule that anchors integral membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton through simultaneous binding of multiple partner proteins. We show that the ankyrin repeats switch between high-FRET and low-FRET states, controlled by an unstructured "safety pin" or "staple" from the adjacent domain of AnkyrinR. Opening of the safety pin leads to unravelling of the ankyrin repeat stack, a process that will dramatically affect the relative orientations of AnkyrinR binding partners and, hence, the anchoring of the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton to the membrane. Ankyrin repeats are one of the most ubiquitous molecular recognition platforms in nature, and it is therefore important to understand how their structures are adapted for function. Our results point to a striking mechanism by which the order-disorder transition and, thereby, the activity of repeat proteins can be regulated.

  6. Phosphorylation site mapping of soluble proteins: bioinformatical filtering reveals potential plastidic phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lohrig, Katharina; Müller, Bernd; Davydova, Joulia; Leister, Dario; Wolters, Dirk Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mode of regulation of metabolism, gene expression, and cell architecture. A combination of phosphopeptide enrichment strategies based on TiO(2) and IMAC in addition to our MudPIT strategy revealed the detection of 181 phosphorylation sites which are located on 125 potentially plastidic proteins predicted by GoMiner, TargetP/Predotar in Arabidopsis thaliana. In our study phosphorylation on serine is favored over threonine and this in turn over phosphorylation on tyrosine residues, showing a percentage of 67.4% to 24.3% to 8.3% for pS:pT:pY. Four phosphorylated residues (S208, Y239, T246 and T330), identified by our approach have been fitted to the structure of the activated form of spinach RuBisCO, which are located in close proximity to the substrate binding site for ribulosebisphosphate. Potentially, these phosphorylation sites exert a direct influence on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Such examples show nicely the value of the presented mass spectrometric dataset for further biochemical applications, since alternative mutation analysis often turns out to be unsuccessful, caused by mutations in essential proteins which result in lethal phenotypes.

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging Reveals the Activation Dynamics of Intracellular Protein Smad3 on Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yang, Yong; He, Kangmin; Zhang, Fayun; Zhao, Libo; Zhou, Wei; Yuan, Jinghe; Liang, Wei; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Smad3 is an intracellular protein that plays a key role in propagating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals from cell membrane to nucleus. However whether the transient process of Smad3 activation occurs on cell membrane and how it is regulated remains elusive. Using advanced live-cell single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to image and track fluorescent protein-labeled Smad3, we observed and quantified, for the first time, the dynamics of individual Smad3 molecules docking to and activation on the cell membrane. It was found that Smad3 docked to cell membrane in both unstimulated and stimulated cells, but with different diffusion rates and dissociation kinetics. The change in its membrane docking dynamics can be used to study the activation of Smad3. Our results reveal that Smad3 binds with type I TGF-β receptor (TRI) even in unstimulated cells. Its activation is regulated by TRI phosphorylation but independent of receptor endocytosis. This study offers new information on TGF-β/Smad signaling, as well as a new approach to investigate the activation of intracellular signaling proteins for a better understanding of their functions in signal transduction. PMID:27641076

  8. Quantum dot single molecule tracking reveals a wide range of diffusive motions of membrane transport proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Jonathan M.; Haggie, Peter M.; Verkman, A. S.

    2009-02-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) provides information about the microscopic motions of individual particles in live cells. We applied SPT to study the diffusion of membrane transport proteins in cell plasma membranes in which individual proteins are labeled with quantum dots at engineered extracellular epitopes. Software was created to deduce particle diffusive modes from quantum dot trajectories. SPT of aquaporin (AQP) water channels and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels revealed several types of diffusion. AQP1 was freely mobile in cell membranes, showing rapid, Brownian-type diffusion. The full-length (M1) isoform of AQP4 also diffused rapidly, though the diffusion of a shorter (M23) isoform of AQP4 was highly restricted due to its supermolecular assembly in raft-like orthogonal arrays. CFTR mobility was also highly restricted, in a spring-like potential, due to its tethering to the actin cytoskeleton through PDZ-domain C-terminus interactions. The biological significance of regulated diffusion of membrane transport proteins is a subject of active investigation.

  9. Quantitative proteomics reveal proteins enriched in tubular endoplasmic reticulum of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinbo; Li, Shanshan; Wang, Haicheng; Shui, Wenqing; Hu, Junjie

    2017-01-01

    The tubular network is a critical part of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The network is shaped by the reticulons and REEPs/Yop1p that generate tubules by inducing high membrane curvature, and the dynamin-like GTPases atlastin and Sey1p/RHD3 that connect tubules via membrane fusion. However, the specific functions of this ER domain are not clear. Here, we isolated tubule-based microsomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae via classical cell fractionation and detergent-free immunoprecipitation of Flag-tagged Yop1p, which specifically localizes to ER tubules. In quantitative comparisons of tubule-derived and total microsomes, we identified a total of 79 proteins that were enriched in the ER tubules, including known proteins that organize the tubular ER network. Functional categorization of the list of proteins revealed that the tubular ER network may be involved in membrane trafficking, lipid metabolism, organelle contact, and stress sensing. We propose that affinity isolation coupled with quantitative proteomics is a useful tool for investigating ER functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23816.001 PMID:28287394

  10. A crayfish insulin-like-binding protein: another piece in the androgenic gland insulin-like hormone puzzle is revealed.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ohad; Weil, Simy; Manor, Rivka; Roth, Ziv; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2013-08-02

    Across the animal kingdom, the involvement of insulin-like peptide (ILP) signaling in sex-related differentiation processes is attracting increasing attention. Recently, a gender-specific ILP was identified as the androgenic sex hormone in Crustacea. However, moieties modulating the actions of this androgenic insulin-like growth factor were yet to be revealed. Through molecular screening of an androgenic gland (AG) cDNA library prepared from the crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, we have identified a novel insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) termed Cq-IGFBP. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the deduced Cq-IGFBP was shown to share high sequence homology with IGFBP family members from both invertebrates and vertebrates. The protein also includes a sequence determinant proven crucial for ligand binding, which according to three-dimensional modeling is assigned to the exposed outer surface of the protein. Recombinant Cq-IGFBP (rCq-IGFBP) protein was produced and, using a "pulldown" methodology, was shown to specifically interact with the insulin-like AG hormone of the crayfish (Cq-IAG). Particularly, using both mass spectral analysis and an immunological tool, rCq-IGFBP was shown to bind the Cq-IAG prohormone. Furthermore, a peptide corresponding to residues 23-38 of the Cq-IAG A-chain was found sufficient for in vitro recognition by rCq-IGFBP. Cq-IGFBP is the first IGFBP family member shown to specifically interact with a gender-specific ILP. Unlike their ILP ligands, IGFBPs are highly conserved across evolution, from ancient arthropods, like crustaceans, to humans. Such conservation places ILP signaling at the center of sex-related phenomena in early animal development.

  11. Integrative proteomic profiling of ovarian cancer cell lines reveals precursor cell associated proteins and functional status

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, F.; Watters, K. M.; Curtis, M.; Eckert, M. A.; Chiang, C. Y.; Tyanova, S.; Montag, A.; Lastra, R. R.; Lengyel, E.; Mann, M.

    2016-01-01

    A cell line representative of human high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) should not only resemble its tumour of origin at the molecular level, but also demonstrate functional utility in pre-clinical investigations. Here, we report the integrated proteomic analysis of 26 ovarian cancer cell lines, HGSOC tumours, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and fallopian tube epithelial cells via a single-run mass spectrometric workflow. The in-depth quantification of >10,000 proteins results in three distinct cell line categories: epithelial (group I), clear cell (group II) and mesenchymal (group III). We identify a 67-protein cell line signature, which separates our entire proteomic data set, as well as a confirmatory publicly available CPTAC/TCGA tumour proteome data set, into a predominantly epithelial and mesenchymal HGSOC tumour cluster. This proteomics-based epithelial/mesenchymal stratification of cell lines and human tumours indicates a possible origin of HGSOC either from the fallopian tube or from the ovarian surface epithelium. PMID:27561551

  12. Combinatorial electrostatic collision-induced dissociative chemical cross-linking reagents for probing protein surface topology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Goshe, Michael B

    2010-07-15

    To ascertain more information on protein domain orientation and complex structure associations using chemical cross-linking, we have developed a combination of electrostatic collision-induced dissociative cross-linking reagents that differentially react with protein surfaces which are effectively analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using ion trap multistage collision-induced dissociation. Implementing our original design and methodology based on disuccinimidyl-succinamyl-aspartyl-proline (SuDP) (Soderblom, E. J.; Goshe, M. B. Anal. Chem 2006, 78, 8059-8068. Soderblom, E. J.; Bobay, B. G.; Cavanagh, J.; Goshe, M. B. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 2007, 21, 3395-3408.), disuccinimidyl-succinamyl-valyl-proline (SuVP) was synthesized. The SuDP and SuVP reagents are the same except for the valyl and aspartyl groups which provide a distinctive chemical feature to each reagent. When performing labeling reactions using various protein-to-cross-linker ratios at pH 7.5, the negatively charged SuDP and neutral SuVP were used to label bovine serum albumin and hemoglobin. After protein digestion, the resulting peptides were analyzed using four different ion trap LC/MS(3) acquisition methods incorporating multistage CID. The more polar BSA surface resulted in a number of unique interpeptide and intrapeptide cross-links for each reagent whereas the less polarized surface of hemoglobin produced similar results for both reagents. Based on the identification of dead-end products (i.e., a cross-link modification containing a hydrolyzed end) for each protein, the aminolysis reactivity of each modified lysyl side chain revealed a preference for reacting with each reagent according to its local electrostatic surface environment. Overall, combinatorial application of SuDP and SuVP chemical labeling produces a set of unique interpeptide, intrapeptide, and dead-end cross-linked products that provides protein structural information according to its electrostatic surface

  13. Ligand-induced structural changes in the Escherichia coli ferric citrate transporter reveal modes for regulating protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mokdad, Audrey; Herrick, Dawn Z; Kahn, Ali K; Andrews, Emily; Kim, Miyeon; Cafiso, David S

    2012-11-09

    Outer-membrane TonB-dependent transporters, such as the Escherichia coli ferric citrate transporter FecA, interact with the inner-membrane protein TonB through an energy-coupling segment termed the Ton box. In FecA, which regulates its own transcription, the Ton box is preceded by an N-terminal extension that interacts with the inner-membrane protein FecR. Here, site-directed spin labeling was used to examine the structural basis for transcriptional signaling and Ton box regulation in FecA. EPR spectroscopy indicates that regions of the N-terminal domain are in conformational exchange, consistent with its role as a protein binding element; however, the local fold and dynamics of the domain are not altered by substrate or TonB. Distance restraints derived from pulse EPR were used to generate models for the position of the extension in the apo, substrate-, and TonB-bound states. In the apo state, this domain is positioned at the periplasmic surface of FecA, where it interacts with the Ton box and blocks access of the Ton box to the periplasm. Substrate addition rotates the transcriptional domain and exposes the Ton box, leading to a disorder transition in the Ton box that may facilitate interactions with TonB. When a soluble fragment of TonB is bound to FecA, the transcriptional domain is displaced to one edge of the barrel, consistent with a proposed β-strand exchange mechanism. However, neither substrate nor TonB displaces the N-terminus further into the periplasm. This result suggests that the intact TonB system mediates both signaling and transport by unfolding portions of the transporter.

  14. Nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins revealed by single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chamma, Ingrid; Levet, Florian; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    The advent of superresolution imaging has created a strong need for both optimized labeling strategies and analysis methods to probe the nanoscale organization of complex biological structures. We present a thorough description of the distribution of synaptic adhesion proteins at the nanoscopic scale, namely presynaptic neurexin-[Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]), and its two postsynaptic binding partners neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2). We monitored these proteins in the membrane of neurons by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, after live surface labeling with Alexa647-conjugated monomeric streptavidin. The small probe ([Formula: see text]) efficiently penetrates into crowded synaptic junctions and reduces the distance to target. We quantified the organization of the single-molecule localization data using a tesselation-based analysis technique. We show that Nlg1 exhibits a fairly disperse organization within dendritic spines, while LRRTM2 is organized in compact domains, and [Formula: see text] in presynaptic terminals displays a dual-organization pattern intermediate between that of Nlg1 and LRRTM2. These results suggest that part of [Formula: see text] interacts transsynaptically with Nlg1 and the other part with LRRTM2.

  15. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE PAGES

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; ...

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  16. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  17. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  18. COCMP Surface Current Mapping Reveals Eddy and Upwelling Jet off Cape Mendocino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, G. B.; Halle, C.; Largier, J.; Stone, S.

    2008-12-01

    Ocean surface currents are now being measured continuously over a roughly 2000 km stretch of the western US continental shelf from south of Tijuana, Mexico to the Columbia River. A long-standing gap in this coverage was finally filled on August 12, 2008, with the installation of a long-range Seasonde radar system at Shelter Cove, California (as a part of California's COCMP project). During its first three weeks of operation, this radar has revealed a large (~170 km diameter), stable, anticyclonic eddy southwest of Cape Mendocino in this poorly studied region. Upwelling-favorable winds appear to create an upwelling jet along the eastern edge of the eddy, leading to maximum daily-averaged current speeds up to 80 cm/s, and MODIS-derived chlorophyll concentrations up to 30 mg/m3 in the jet (compared to ~1 mg/m3 in the eddy center). AVHRR data reveal SST differences between the jet and the eddy center of 1.5 to 2.5 °C during these 3 weeks. These complex circulation structures modify water pathways and may interrupt nutrient delivery to locations farther south. We discuss the spatial and temporal evolution of these features.

  19. Surface plasmon delocalization in silver nanoparticle aggregates revealed by subdiffraction supercontinuum hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Borys, Nicholas J.; Shafran, Eyal; Lupton, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmonic resonances of nanostructured silver films produce exceptional surface enhancement, enabling reproducible single-molecule Raman scattering measurements. Supporting a broad range of plasmonic resonances, these disordered systems are difficult to investigate with conventional far-field spectroscopy. Here, we use nonlinear excitation spectroscopy and polarization anisotropy of single optical hot spots of supercontinuum generation to track the transformation of these plasmon modes as the mesoscopic structure is tuned from a film of discrete nanoparticles to a semicontinuous layer of aggregated particles. We demonstrate how hot spot formation from diffractively-coupled nanoparticles with broad spectral resonances transitions to that from spatially delocalized surface plasmon excitations, exhibiting multiple excitation resonances as narrow as 13 meV. Photon-localization microscopy reveals that the delocalized plasmons are capable of focusing multiple narrow radiation bands over a broadband range to the same spatial region within 6 nm, underscoring the existence of novel plasmonic nanoresonators embedded in highly disordered systems. PMID:23807624

  20. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  1. Detection of multiscale pockets on protein surfaces using mathematical morphology.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Detection of pockets on protein surfaces is an important step toward finding the binding sites of small molecules. In a previous study, we defined a pocket as a space into which a small spherical probe can enter, but a large probe cannot. The radius of the large probes corresponds to the shallowness of pockets. We showed that each type of binding molecule has a characteristic shallowness distribution. In this study, we introduced fundamental changes to our previous algorithm by using a 3D grid representation of proteins and probes, and the theory of mathematical morphology. We invented an efficient algorithm for calculating deep and shallow pockets (multiscale pockets) simultaneously, using several different sizes of spherical probes (multiscale probes). We implemented our algorithm as a new program, ghecom (grid-based HECOMi finder). The statistics of calculated pockets for the structural dataset showed that our program had a higher performance of detecting binding pockets, than four other popular pocket-finding programs proposed previously. The ghecom also calculates the shallowness of binding ligands, R(inaccess) (minimum radius of inaccessible spherical probes) that can be obtained from the multiscale molecular volume. We showed that each part of the binding molecule had a bias toward a specific range of shallowness. These findings will be useful for predicting the types of molecules that will be most likely to bind putative binding pockets, as well as the configurations of binding molecules. The program ghecom is available through the Web server (http://biunit.naist.jp/ghecom).

  2. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  3. fMRI Analysis-by-Synthesis Reveals a Dorsal Hierarchy That Extracts Surface Slant.

    PubMed

    Ban, Hiroshi; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-07-08

    The brain's skill in estimating the 3-D orientation of viewed surfaces supports a range of behaviors, from placing an object on a nearby table, to planning the best route when hill walking. This ability relies on integrating depth signals across extensive regions of space that exceed the receptive fields of early sensory neurons. Although hierarchical selection and pooling is central to understanding of the ventral visual pathway, the successive operations in the dorsal stream are poorly understood. Here we use computational modeling of human fMRI signals to probe the computations that extract 3-D surface orientation from binocular disparity. To understand how representations evolve across the hierarchy, we developed an inference approach using a series of generative models to explain the empirical fMRI data in different cortical areas. Specifically, we simulated the responses of candidate visual processing algorithms and tested how well they explained fMRI responses. Thereby we demonstrate a hierarchical refinement of visual representations moving from the representation of edges and figure-ground segmentation (V1, V2) to spatially extensive disparity gradients in V3A. We show that responses in V3A are little affected by low-level image covariates, and have a partial tolerance to the overall depth position. Finally, we show that responses in V3A parallel perceptual judgments of slant. This reveals a relatively short computational hierarchy that captures key information about the 3-D structure of nearby surfaces, and more generally demonstrates an analysis approach that may be of merit in a diverse range of brain