Science.gov

Sample records for protein synthase iii

  1. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Clay, Kasi; Thompson, Stephanie S.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Andrews, Bethany J.; Zechmann, Bernd; Gibbon, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2) called “Quality Protein Maize” (QPM) have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms. PMID:26115014

  2. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Geun; Park, Chin-Ju; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa

    2015-02-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3(10)-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  3. Ralstonia solanacearum RSp0194 Encodes a Novel 3-Keto-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ya-Hui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Li, Feng; Hu, Zhe; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis (FAS), a primary metabolic pathway, is essential for survival of bacteria. Ralstonia solanacearum, a β-proteobacteria member, causes a bacterial wilt affecting more than 200 plant species, including many economically important plants. However, thus far, the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway of R. solanacearum has not been well studied. In this study, we characterized two forms of 3-keto-ACP synthase III, RsFabH and RsFabW, in R. solanacearum. RsFabH, the homologue of Escherichia coli FabH, encoded by the chromosomal RSc1050 gene, catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with malonyl-ACP in the initiation steps of fatty acid biosynthesis in vitro. The RsfabH mutant lost de novo fatty acid synthetic ability, and grows in medium containing free fatty acids. RsFabW, a homologue of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA3286, encoded by a megaplasmid gene, RSp0194, condenses acyl-CoA (C2-CoA to C10-CoA) with malonyl-ACP to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro. Although the RsfabW mutant was viable, RsfabW was responsible for RsfabH mutant growth on medium containing free fatty acids. Our results also showed that RsFabW could condense acyl-ACP (C4-ACP to C8-ACP) with malonyl-ACP, to produce 3-keto-acyl-ACP in vitro, which implies that RsFabW plays a special role in fatty acid synthesis of R. solanacearum. All of these data confirm that R. solanacearum not only utilizes acetyl-CoA, but also, utilizes medium-chain acyl-CoAs or acyl-ACPs as primers to initiate fatty acid synthesis.

  4. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-10-23

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM(-1)s(-1) and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength.

  5. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  6. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  7. Exploiting the Biosynthetic Potential of Type III Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan Ping; Go, Maybelle K; Yew, Wen Shan

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides are structurally and functionally diverse secondary metabolites that are biosynthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs) using acyl-CoA precursors. Recent studies in the engineering and structural characterization of PKSs have facilitated the use of target enzymes as biocatalysts to produce novel functionally optimized polyketides. These compounds may serve as potential drug leads. This review summarizes the insights gained from research on type III PKSs, from the discovery of chalcone synthase in plants to novel PKSs in bacteria and fungi. To date, at least 15 families of type III PKSs have been characterized, highlighting the utility of PKSs in the development of natural product libraries for therapeutic development. PMID:27338328

  8. Enhanced production of branched-chain fatty acids by replacing β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase III (FabH).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Jiang, Yanfang; Bentley, Gayle J; Liu, Di; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2015-08-01

    Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are important precursors for the production of advanced biofuels with improved cold-flow properties. Previous efforts in engineering type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) for BCFA production suffered from low titers and/or the co-production of a large amount of straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), making it nearly impossible for further conversion of BCFAs to branched biofuels. Synthesis of both SCFAs and BCFAs requires FabH, the only β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the initial condensation reaction between malonyl-ACP and a short-chain acyl-CoA. In this study, we demonstrated that replacement of the acetyl-CoA-specific E. coli FabH with a branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabH directed the flux to the synthesis of BCFAs, resulting in a significant enhancement in BCFA titer compared to a strain containing both acetyl-CoA- and branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabHs. We further demonstrated that the composition of BCFAs can be tuned by engineering the upstream pathway to control the supply of different branched-chain acyl-CoAs, leading to the production either even-chain-iso-, odd-chain-iso-, or odd-chain-anteiso-BCFAs separately. Overall, the top-performing strain from this study produced BCFAs at 126 mg/L, comprising 52% of the total free fatty acids.

  9. Enhanced production of branched-chain fatty acids by replacing β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase III (FabH).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Jiang, Yanfang; Bentley, Gayle J; Liu, Di; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2015-08-01

    Branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) are important precursors for the production of advanced biofuels with improved cold-flow properties. Previous efforts in engineering type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) for BCFA production suffered from low titers and/or the co-production of a large amount of straight-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), making it nearly impossible for further conversion of BCFAs to branched biofuels. Synthesis of both SCFAs and BCFAs requires FabH, the only β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase in Escherichia coli that catalyzes the initial condensation reaction between malonyl-ACP and a short-chain acyl-CoA. In this study, we demonstrated that replacement of the acetyl-CoA-specific E. coli FabH with a branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabH directed the flux to the synthesis of BCFAs, resulting in a significant enhancement in BCFA titer compared to a strain containing both acetyl-CoA- and branched-chain-acyl-CoA-specific FabHs. We further demonstrated that the composition of BCFAs can be tuned by engineering the upstream pathway to control the supply of different branched-chain acyl-CoAs, leading to the production either even-chain-iso-, odd-chain-iso-, or odd-chain-anteiso-BCFAs separately. Overall, the top-performing strain from this study produced BCFAs at 126 mg/L, comprising 52% of the total free fatty acids. PMID:25788017

  10. Malate synthase a membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.D.; Turley, R.B.; Hermerath, C.A.; Carrapico, F.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) is generally regarded as a peripheral membrane protein, and believed by some to be ontogenetically associated with ER. However, immuno- and cyto-chemical in situ localizations show MS throughout the matrix of cotton (and cucumber) glyoxysomes, not specifically near their boundary membranes, nor in ER. Only a maximum of 50% MS can be solubilized from cotton glyoxysomes with 1% Triton X-100, 2mM Zwittergen 14, or 10mM DOC +/- salts. Cotton MS does not incorporate /sup 3/H-glucosamine in vivo, nor does it react with Con A on columns or blots. Cotton MS banded with ER in sucrose gradients (20-40%) in Tricine after 3h, but not after 22h in Tricine or Hepes, or after 3h in Hepes or K-phosphate. Collectively the authors data are inconsistent with physiologically meaningful MS-membrane associations in ER or glyoxysomes. It appears that experimentally-induced aggregates of MS migrate in ER gradients and occur in isolated glyoxysomes. These data indicate that ER is not involved in synthesis or modification of cottonseed MS prior to its import into the glyoxysomal matrix.

  11. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2005-01-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 Å resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH. PMID:15987898

  12. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  13. Rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase. Purification and evidence for a bound folate coenzyme participating in the biosynthesis of uroporphyrinogen III.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, M; Clement, R P; Tse, J; Piper, W N

    1984-01-01

    Rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase was isolated and purified 73-fold with a 13% yield by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and sequential chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, Sephadex G-100 (superfine grade) and folate-AH-Sepharose 4B. The purified co-synthase has an Mr of approx. 42 000, and is resolved into two bands, each possessing co-synthase activity, by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A factor was dissociated from the purified co-synthase. Results of both microbiological and competitive protein-binding assays suggest that it is a pteroylpolyglutamate. The isolated pteroylpolyglutamate factor was co-eluted with authentic N5-methyltetrahydropteroylheptaglutamate on DEAE-Sephacel. Uroporphyrinogen III is formed by cosynthase-free preparations of uroporphyrinogen I synthase in the presence of tetrahydropteroylglutamate. Tetrahydropeteroylheptaglutamate is also able to direct the formation of equivalent amounts of uroporphyrinogen III at a concentration approximately one-hundredth that of tetrahydropteroylmonoglutamate. These results suggest that a reduced pteroylpolyglutamate factor is associated with rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase, and that this may function as a coenzyme for the biosynthesis of uroporphyrinogen III. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6466301

  14. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Polygonum cuspidatum bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Heshu; Yang, Mingfeng; Liu, Chunmei; Lu, Ping; Cang, Huaixing; Ma, Lanqing

    2013-08-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generate the backbones of a variety of plant secondary metabolites. An active bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase (CHS/BAS) from Polygonum cuspidatum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using polyethylene glycol 4000 as a precipitant. The production of well shaped crystals of the complex between PcPKS1 and benzalacetone was dependent on the presence of sorbitol and barium chloride as additives. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.23, b = 81.01, c = 122.89 Å, and diffracted X-rays to at least 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:23908031

  15. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance.

  16. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance. PMID:27138283

  17. The stoichiometry of the chloroplast ATP synthase oligomer III in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is not affected by the metabolic state.

    PubMed

    Meyer Zu Tittingdorf, Jürgen M W; Rexroth, Sascha; Schäfer, Eva; Schlichting, Ralf; Giersch, Christoph; Dencher, Norbert A; Seelert, Holger

    2004-11-01

    The chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase is a key component for the energy supply of higher plants and green algae. An oligomer of identical protein subunits III is responsible for the conversion of an electrochemical proton gradient into rotational motion. It is highly controversial if the oligomer III stoichiometry is affected by the metabolic state of any organism. Here, the intact oligomer III of the ATP synthase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been isolated for the first time. Due to the importance of the subunit III stoichiometry for energy conversion, a gradient gel system was established to distinguish oligomers with different stoichiometries. With this methodology, a possible alterability of the stoichiometry in respect to the metabolic state of the cells was examined. Several growth parameters, i.e., light intensity, pH value, carbon source, and CO(2) concentration, were varied to determine their effects on the stoichiometry. Contrary to previous suggestions for E. coli, the oligomer III of the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase always consists of a constant number of monomers over a wide range of metabolic states. Furthermore, mass spectrometry indicates that subunit III from C. reinhardtii is not modified posttranslationally. Data suggest a subunit III stoichiometry of the algae ATP synthase divergent from higher plants.

  18. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  19. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  20. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  1. Isoaspartate, Carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1, and Carbonic anhydrase-III as biomarkers of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Wayne G.; Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Newlaczyl, Anna; Wayne, Declan; Ahmed, Bilal; Saddington, Stephen; Brewer, Charlotte; Raut, Nikhilesh; Gerdes, Henry K.; Erdozain, Amaia M.; Tooth, David; Bolt, Edward L.; Osna, Natalie A.; Tuma, Dean J.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2015-01-01

    We had previously shown that alcohol consumption can induce cellular isoaspartate protein damage via an impairment of the activity of protein isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT), an enzyme that triggers repair of isoaspartate protein damage. To further investigate the mechanism of isoaspartate accumulation, hepatocytes cultured from control or 4-week ethanol-fed rats were incubated in vitro with tubercidin or adenosine. Both these agents, known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine levels, increased cellular isoaspartate damage over that recorded following ethanol consumption in vivo. Increased isoaspartate damage was attenuated by treatment with betaine. To characterize isoaspartate-damaged proteins that accumulate after ethanol administration, rat liver cytosolic proteins were methylated using exogenous PIMT and 3H-S-adenosylmethionine and proteins resolved by gel electrophoresis. Three major protein bands of ~75-80 kDa, ~95-100 kDa, and ~155-160 kDa were identified by autoradiography. Column chromatography used to enrich isoaspartate-damaged proteins indicated that damaged proteins from ethanol-fed rats were similar to those that accrued in the livers of PIMT knockout (KO) mice. Carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS-1) was partially purified and identified as the ~160 kDa protein target of PIMT in ethanol-fed rats and in PIMT KO mice. Analysis of the liver proteome of 4-week ethanol-fed rats and PIMT KO mice demonstrated elevated cytosolic CPS-1 and betaine homocysteine S-methyltransferase-1 when compared to their respective controls, and a significant reduction of carbonic anhydrase-III (CA-III) evident only in ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol feeding of rats for 8 weeks resulted in a larger (~2.3-fold) increase in CPS-1 levels compared to 4-week ethanol feeding indicating that CPS-1 accumulation correlated with the duration of ethanol consumption. Collectively, our results suggest that elevated isoaspartate and CPS-1, and reduced CA-III levels could serve as

  2. Identification of a cryptic type III polyketide synthase (1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Oh, Tae-Jin; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-10-31

    We identified a 1,134-bp putative type III polyketide synthase from the sequence analysis of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952, named Sp-RppA, which is characterized as 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase and shares 33% identity with SCO1206 from S. coelicolor A3(2) and 32% identity with RppA from S. griseus. The 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase is known to catalyze the sequential decarboxylative condensation, intramolecular cyclization, and aromatization of an oligoketide derived from five units of malonyl-CoA to give 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene, which spontaneously oxidizes to form 2,5,7-trihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (flaviolin). In this study, we report the in vivo expression and in vitro synthesis of flaviolin from purified gene product (Sp-RppA). PMID:18612244

  3. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6} recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

  4. Direct transfer of starter substrates from type I fatty acid synthase to type III polyketide synthases in phenolic lipid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Funa, Nobutaka; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-01

    Alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, which have a polar aromatic ring and a hydrophobic alkyl chain, are phenolic lipids found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. In the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, phenolic lipids in the membrane of dormant cysts are essential for encystment. The aromatic moieties of the phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii are synthesized by two type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), ArsB and ArsC, which are encoded by the ars operon. However, details of the synthesis of hydrophobic acyl chains, which might serve as starter substrates for the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), were unknown. Here, we show that two type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), ArsA and ArsD, which are members of the ars operon, are responsible for the biosynthesis of C22–C26 fatty acids from malonyl-CoA. In vivo and in vitro reconstitution of phenolic lipid synthesis systems with the Ars enzymes suggested that the C22–C26 fatty acids produced by ArsA and ArsD remained attached to the ACP domain of ArsA and were transferred hand-to-hand to the active-site cysteine residues of ArsB and ArsC. The type III PKSs then used the fatty acids as starter substrates and carried out two or three extensions with malonyl-CoA to yield the phenolic lipids. The phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii were thus found to be synthesized solely from malonyl-CoA by the four members of the ars operon. This is the first demonstration that a type I FAS interacts directly with a type III PKS through substrate transfer. PMID:18199837

  5. Direct transfer of starter substrates from type I fatty acid synthase to type III polyketide synthases in phenolic lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Funa, Nobutaka; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-22

    Alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, which have a polar aromatic ring and a hydrophobic alkyl chain, are phenolic lipids found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. In the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, phenolic lipids in the membrane of dormant cysts are essential for encystment. The aromatic moieties of the phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii are synthesized by two type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), ArsB and ArsC, which are encoded by the ars operon. However, details of the synthesis of hydrophobic acyl chains, which might serve as starter substrates for the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), were unknown. Here, we show that two type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), ArsA and ArsD, which are members of the ars operon, are responsible for the biosynthesis of C(22)-C(26) fatty acids from malonyl-CoA. In vivo and in vitro reconstitution of phenolic lipid synthesis systems with the Ars enzymes suggested that the C(22)-C(26) fatty acids produced by ArsA and ArsD remained attached to the ACP domain of ArsA and were transferred hand-to-hand to the active-site cysteine residues of ArsB and ArsC. The type III PKSs then used the fatty acids as starter substrates and carried out two or three extensions with malonyl-CoA to yield the phenolic lipids. The phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii were thus found to be synthesized solely from malonyl-CoA by the four members of the ars operon. This is the first demonstration that a type I FAS interacts directly with a type III PKS through substrate transfer.

  6. A type III ACC synthase, ACS7, is involved in root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates developmental processes in plants. The ethylene biosynthesis pathway is a highly regulated process at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. The transcriptional regulation of these ethylene biosynthesis genes is well known. However, post-translational modifications of the key ethylene biosynthesis enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase (ACS) are little understood. In vitro kinase assays were conducted on the type III ACS, AtACS7, fusion protein and peptides to determine whether the AtACS7 protein can be phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). AtACS7 was phosphorylated at Ser216, Thr296, and Ser299 by AtCDPK16 in vitro. To investigate further the function of the ACS7 gene in Arabidopsis, an acs7-1 loss-of-function mutant was isolated. The acs7-1 mutant exhibited less sensitivity to the inhibition of root gravitropism by treatment with the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA). Seedlings were treated with gradient concentrations of ACC. The results showed that a certain concentration of ethylene enhanced the gravity response. Moreover, the acs7-1 mutant was less sensitive to inhibition of the gravity response by treatment with the auxin polar transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, but exogenous ACC application recovered root gravitropism. Altogether, the results indicate that AtACS7 is involved in root gravitropism in a calcium-dependent manner in Arabidopsis. PMID:23943848

  7. Biosynthesis of Dictyostelium discoideum differentiation-inducing factor by a hybrid type I fatty acid-type III polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael B; Saito, Tamao; Bowman, Marianne E; Haydock, Stephen; Kato, Atsushi; Moore, Bradley S; Kay, Robert R; Noel, Joseph P

    2006-09-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are well known to modulate formation of distinct communal cell types from identical Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas, but DIF biosynthesis remains obscure. We report complimentary in vivo and in vitro experiments identifying one of two approximately 3,000-residue D. discoideum proteins, termed 'steely', as responsible for biosynthesis of the DIF acylphloroglucinol scaffold. Steely proteins possess six catalytic domains homologous to metazoan type I fatty acid synthases (FASs) but feature an iterative type III polyketide synthase (PKS) in place of the expected FAS C-terminal thioesterase used to off load fatty acid products. This new domain arrangement likely facilitates covalent transfer of steely N-terminal acyl products directly to the C-terminal type III PKS active sites, which catalyze both iterative polyketide extension and cyclization. The crystal structure of a steely C-terminal domain confirms conservation of the homodimeric type III PKS fold. These findings suggest new bioengineering strategies for expanding the scope of fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:16906151

  8. Identification and characterization of a class III chitin synthase gene of Moniliophthora perniciosa, the fungus that causes witches' broom disease of cacao.

    PubMed

    Souza, Catiane S; Oliveira, Bruno M; Costa, Gustavo G L; Schriefer, Albert; Selbach-Schnadelbach, Alessandra; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula T; Pirovani, Carlos P; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Taranto, Alex G; Cascardo, Júlio Cézar de M; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles

    2009-08-01

    Chitin synthase (CHS) is a glucosyltransferase that converts UDP-N-acetylglucosamine into chitin, one of the main components of fungal cell wall. Class III chitin synthases act directly in the formation of the cell wall. They catalyze the conversion of the immediate precursor of chitin and are responsible for the majority of chitin synthesis in fungi. As such, they are highly specific molecular targets for drugs that can inhibit the growth and development of fungal pathogens. In this work, we have identified and characterized a chitin synthase gene of Moniliophthora perniciosa (Mopchs) by primer walking. The complete gene sequence is 3,443 bp, interrupted by 13 small introns, and comprises a cDNA with an ORF with 2,739 bp, whose terminal region was experimentally determined, encoding a protein with 913 aa that harbors all the motifs and domains typically found in class III chitin synthases. This is the first report on the characterization of a chitin synthase gene, its mature transcription product, and its putative protein in basidioma and secondary mycelium stages of M. perniciosa, a basidiomycotan fungus that causes witches' broom disease of cacao.

  9. Enzymatic synthesis of bis-5-alkylresorcinols by resorcinol-producing type III polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2009-07-01

    No enzyme systems responsible for the biosynthesis of structurally and biosynthetically intriguing bis-5-alkylresorcinols produced by plants have been identified. Herein, we show that bacterial, fungal and plant alkylresorcinol-producing type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), such as ArsB in the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, ORAS in the fungus Neurospora crassa and ARAS2 in the rice plant Oryza sativa, can synthesize bis-5-alkylresorcinol from alkanedioic acid N-acetylcysteamine dithioester as a starter substrate and from malonyl-CoA as an extender substrate by two-step conversion. Plants presumably use a type III PKS for the biosynthesis of bis-5-alkylresorcinols.

  10. Phenolic lipid synthesis by type III polyketide synthases is essential for cyst formation in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Funa, Nobutaka; Ozawa, Hiroki; Hirata, Aiko; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-04-18

    Cysts of Azotobacter vinelandii are resting cells that are surrounded by a protective coat, conferring resistance to various chemical and physical agents. The major chemical components of the cyst coat are alkylresorcinols, which are amphiphilic molecules possessing an aromatic ring with a long aliphatic carbon chain. Although alkylresorcinols are widely distributed in bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, no enzyme systems for their biosynthesis are known. We report here an ars operon in A. vinelandii that is responsible for the biosynthesis of the alkylresorcinols in the cysts. The ars operon consisted of four genes, two of which encoded a type III polyketide synthase, ArsB and ArsC. In vitro experiments revealed that ArsB and ArsC, sharing 71% amino acid sequence identity, were an alkylresorcinol synthase and an alkylpyrone synthase, respectively, indicating that ArsB and ArsC are not isozymes but enzymatically distinct polyketide synthases. In addition, ArsB and ArsC accepted several acyl-CoAs with various lengths of the side chain as a starter substrate and gave corresponding alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, respectively, which suggests that the mode of the ring folding is uninfluenced by the structure of the starter substrates. The importance of the alkylresorcinols for encystment was confirmed by gene inactivation experiments; the lack of alkylresorcinols synthesis caused by ars mutations resulted in the formation of severely impaired cysts, as observed by electron microscopy.

  11. Expression, purification and crystallization of a fungal type III polyketide synthase that produces the csypyrones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dengfeng; Mori, Takahiro; Matsui, Takashi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    CsyB from Aspergillus oryzae is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the formation of csypyrone B1 [4-(3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-pyran-6-yl)butyric acid] from fatty acyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA. Recombinant CsyB expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.0, b = 104.8, c = 73.5 Å, β = 114.4°. PMID:24915080

  12. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  13. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  14. The Evolution of Function in Strictosidine Synthase-like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Michael A.; Barber, Alan E.; Giddings, Lesley-Ann; Caldwell, Jenna; O’Connor, Sarah E.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2013-01-01

    The exponential growth of sequence data provides abundant information for the discovery of new enzyme reactions. Correctly annotating the functions of highly diverse proteins can be difficult, however, hindering use of this information. Global analysis of large superfamilies of related proteins is a powerful strategy for understanding the evolution of reactions by identifying catalytic commonalities and differences in reaction and substrate specificity, even when only a few members have been biochemically or structurally characterized. A comparison of >2500 sequences sharing the six-bladed β-propeller fold establishes sequence, structural and functional links among the three subgroups of the functionally diverse N6P superfamily: the arylesterase-like and senescence marker protein-30/gluconolactonase/luciferin-regenerating enzyme-like (SGL) subgroups, representing enzymes that catalyze lactonase and related hydrolytic reactions, and the so-called “strictosidine synthase-like” (SSL) subgroup. Metal-coordinating residues were identified as broadly conserved in the active sites of all three subgroups except for a few proteins from the SSL subgroup, which have been experimentally determined to catalyze the quite different strictosidine synthase (SS) reaction, a metal-independent condensation reaction. Despite these differences, comparison of conserved catalytic features of the arylesterase-like and SGL enzymes with the SSs identified similar structural and mechanistic attributes between the hydrolytic reactions catalyzed by the former and the condensation reaction catalyzed by SS. The results also suggest that despite their annotations, the great majority of these >500 SSL sequences do not catalyze the SS reaction; rather, they likely catalyze hydrolytic reactions typical of the other two subgroups instead. This prediction was confirmed experimentally for one of these proteins. PMID:21948213

  15. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  16. Morphological, Thermal, and Rheological Properties of Starches from Maize Mutants Deficient in Starch Synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Li, Guantian

    2016-08-31

    Morphological, thermal, and rheological properties of starches from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with a common genetic background (W64A) were studied and compared with the wild type. SSIII deficiency reduced granule size of the starches from 16.7 to ∼11 μm (volume-weighted mean). Thermal analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the enthalpy change of starch during gelatinization. Steady shear analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased the consistency coefficient and yield stress during steady shearing, whereas additional deficiency in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) increased these values. Dynamic oscillatory analysis showed that SSIII deficiency decreased G' at 90 °C during heating and increased it when the paste was cooled to 25 °C at 40 Hz during a frequency sweep. Additional GBSS deficiency further decreased the G'. Structural and compositional bases responsible for these changes in physical properties of the starches are discussed. This study highlighted the relationship between SSIII and some physicochemical properties of maize starch. PMID:27523327

  17. Phasin proteins activate Aeromonas caviae polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase but not Ralstonia eutropha PHA synthase.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Motoda, Yoko; Numata, Keiji; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo activity assays of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases (PhaCs) in the presence of phasin proteins (PhaPs), which revealed that PhaPs are activators of PhaC derived from Aeromonas caviae (PhaCAc). In in vitro assays, among the three PhaCs tested, PhaCAc was significantly activated when PhaPs were added at the beginning of polymerization (prepolymerization PhaCAc), whereas the prepolymerization PhaCRe (derived from Ralstonia eutropha) and PhaCDa (Delftia acidovorans) showed reduced activity with PhaPs. The PhaP-activated PhaCAc showed a slight shift of substrate preference toward 3-hydroxyhexanoyl-CoA (C6). PhaPAc also activated PhaCAc when it was added during polymerization (polymer-elongating PhaCAc), while this effect was not observed for PhaCRe. In an in vivo assay using Escherichia coli TOP10 as the host strain, the effect of PhaPAc expression on PHA synthesis by PhaCAc or PhaCRe was examined. As PhaPAc expression increased, PHA production was increased by up to 2.3-fold in the PhaCAc-expressing strain, whereas it was slightly increased in the PhaCRe-expressing strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that PhaPs function as activators for PhaCAc both in vitro and in vivo but do not activate PhaCRe. This activating effect may be attributed to the new role of PhaPs in the polymerization reaction by PhaCAc.

  18. Biocatalytic role of potato starch synthase III for α-glucan biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutants.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Li, Li; Perris, Shayani D N; Spalding, Martin H; Han, Sang Yun; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-11-01

    A potato starch synthase III (PSSIII) was expressed in the Synechocystis mutants deficient in either glycogen synthase I (M1) or II (M2) to replenish α-(1,4) linkage synthesizing activity, resulting in new mutants, PM1 and PM2, respectively. These mutants were applied to study the role of exogenous plant starch synthase for starch/glycogen biosynthesis mechanism established in the cyanobacteria. The remaining glycogen synthase genes in PM1 and PM2 were further disrupted to make the mutants PM12 and PM21 which contained PSSIII as the sole glycogen/starch synthase. Among wild type and mutants, there were no significant differences in the amount of α-glucan produced. All the mutants harboring active PSSIII produced α-glucans with relatively much shorter and less longer α-1,4 chains than wild-type glycogen, which was exactly in accordance with the increase in glycogen branching enzyme activity. In fact, α-glucan structure of PM1 was very similar to those of PM12 and PM21, and PM2 had more intermediate chains than M2. This result suggests PSSIII may have distributive elongation property during α-glucan synthesis. In conclusion, the Synechocystis as an expression model system of plant enzymes can be applied to determine the role of starch synthesizing enzymes and their association during α-glucan synthesis. PMID:26358554

  19. Crystal structure of TruD, a novel pseudouridine synthase with a new protein fold.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Yusuf; Del Campo, Mark; Ofengand, James; Malhotra, Arun

    2004-04-30

    TruD, a recently discovered novel pseudouridine synthase in Escherichia coli, is responsible for modifying uridine13 in tRNA(Glu) to pseudouridine. It has little sequence homology with the other 10 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli which themselves have been grouped into four related protein families. Crystal structure determination of TruD revealed a two domain structure consisting of a catalytic domain that differs in sequence but is structurally very similar to the catalytic domain of other pseudouridine synthases and a second large domain (149 amino acids, 43% of total) with a novel alpha/beta fold that up to now has not been found in any other protein.

  20. Structural Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Type I Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Qiao, Kangjian; Tang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are responsible for synthesizing a myriad of natural products with agricultural, medicinal relevance. The PKSs consist of multiple functional domains of which each can catalyze a specified chemical reaction leading to the synthesis of polyketides. Biochemical studies showed that protein-substrate and protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in these complex regio-/stereo- selective biochemical processes. Recent developments on X-ray crystallography and protein NMR techniques have allowed us to understand the biosynthetic mechanism of these enzymes from their structures. These structural studies have facilitated the elucidation of sequence-function relationship of PKSs and will ultimately contribute to the prediction of product structure. This review will focus on the current knowledge of type I PKS structures and the protein-protein interactions in this system. PMID:23249187

  1. Structural analysis of protein-protein interactions in type I polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Qiao, Kangjian; Tang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are responsible for synthesizing a myriad of natural products with agricultural, medicinal relevance. The PKSs consist of multiple functional domains of which each can catalyze a specified chemical reaction leading to the synthesis of polyketides. Biochemical studies showed that protein-substrate and protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in these complex regio-/stereo-selective biochemical processes. Recent developments on X-ray crystallography and protein NMR techniques have allowed us to understand the biosynthetic mechanism of these enzymes from their structures. These structural studies have facilitated the elucidation of the sequence-function relationship of PKSs and will ultimately contribute to the prediction of product structure. This review will focus on the current knowledge of type I PKS structures and the protein-protein interactions in this system.

  2. Mitochondrial protein sorting as a therapeutic target for ATP synthase disorders.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Raeka S; Bohnert, Maria; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Voisset, Cécile; Gagneur, Julien; Fritsch, Emilie S; Couplan, Elodie; von der Malsburg, Karina; Funaya, Charlotta; Soubigou, Flavie; Courtin, Florence; Suresh, Sundari; Kucharczyk, Roza; Evrard, Justine; Antony, Claude; St Onge, Robert P; Blondel, Marc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; van der Laan, Martin; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are systemic, prevalent and often fatal; yet treatments remain scarce. Identifying molecular intervention points that can be therapeutically targeted remains a major challenge, which we confronted via a screening assay we developed. Using yeast models of mitochondrial ATP synthase disorders, we screened a drug repurposing library, and applied genomic and biochemical techniques to identify pathways of interest. Here we demonstrate that modulating the sorting of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, mediated by the TIM23 complex, proves therapeutic in both yeast and patient-derived cells exhibiting ATP synthase deficiency. Targeting TIM23-dependent protein sorting improves an array of phenotypes associated with ATP synthase disorders, including biogenesis and activity of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our study establishes mitochondrial protein sorting as an intervention point for ATP synthase disorders, and because of the central role of this pathway in mitochondrial biogenesis, it holds broad value for the treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25519239

  3. Mitochondrial protein sorting as a therapeutic target for ATP synthase disorders

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, Raeka S.; Bohnert, Maria; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Voisset, Cécile; Gagneur, Julien; Fritsch, Emilie S.; Couplan, Elodie; von der Malsburg, Karina; Funaya, Charlotta; Soubigou, Flavie; Courtin, Florence; Suresh, Sundari; Kucharczyk, Roza; Evrard, Justine; Antony, Claude; St.Onge, Robert P.; Blondel, Marc; di Rago, Jean-Paul; van der Laan, Martin; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are systemic, prevalent and often fatal; yet treatments remain scarce. Identifying molecular intervention points that can be therapeutically targeted remains a major challenge, which we confronted via a screening assay we developed. Using yeast models of mitochondrial ATP synthase disorders, we screened a drug repurposing library, and applied genomic and biochemical techniques to identify pathways of interest. Here we demonstrate that modulating the sorting of nuclear-encoded proteins into mitochondria, mediated by the TIM23 complex, proves therapeutic in both yeast and patient-derived cells exhibiting ATP synthase deficiency. Targeting TIM23-dependent protein sorting improves an array of phenotypes associated with ATP synthase disorders, including biogenesis and activity of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Our study establishes mitochondrial protein sorting as an intervention point for ATP synthase disorders, and because of the central role of this pathway in mitochondrial biogenesis, it holds broad value for the treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:25519239

  4. A cellulose synthase-like protein involved in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbin; Chater, Keith F; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2008-07-01

    Cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like proteins, responsible for synthesizing beta-glucan-containing polysaccharides, play a fundamental role in cellular architectures, such as plant cell and tissue morphogenesis, bacterial biofilm formation, and fruiting-body development. However, the roles of the proteins involved in the developmental process are not well understood. Here, we report that a cellulose synthase-like protein (CslA(Sc)) in Streptomyces has a function in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation. The cslA(Sc) replacement mutant showed pleiotropic defects, including the severe delay of aerial-hyphal formation and altered cell wall morphology. Calcofluor white fluorescence analysis demonstrated that polysaccharide synthesis at hyphal tips was dependent on CslA(Sc). cslA(Sc) was constitutively transcribed, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein-CslA(Sc) fusion protein was mostly located at the hyphal tips. An extract enriched in morphogenetic chaplin proteins promoted formation of aerial hyphae by the mutant. Furthermore, a two-hybrid experiment indicated that the glycosyltransferase domain of CslA(Sc) interacted with the tropomyosin-like polarity-determining DivIVA protein, suggesting that the tip-located DivIVA governed tip recruitment of the CslA(Sc) membrane protein. These results imply that the cellulose synthase-like protein couples extracellular and cytoskeletal components functioning in tip growth and cell development. PMID:18487344

  5. A Cellulose Synthase-Like Protein Involved in Hyphal Tip Growth and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces▿

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongbin; Chater, Keith F.; Deng, Zixin; Tao, Meifeng

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like proteins, responsible for synthesizing β-glucan-containing polysaccharides, play a fundamental role in cellular architectures, such as plant cell and tissue morphogenesis, bacterial biofilm formation, and fruiting-body development. However, the roles of the proteins involved in the developmental process are not well understood. Here, we report that a cellulose synthase-like protein (CslASc) in Streptomyces has a function in hyphal tip growth and morphological differentiation. The cslASc replacement mutant showed pleiotropic defects, including the severe delay of aerial-hyphal formation and altered cell wall morphology. Calcofluor white fluorescence analysis demonstrated that polysaccharide synthesis at hyphal tips was dependent on CslASc. cslASc was constitutively transcribed, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein-CslASc fusion protein was mostly located at the hyphal tips. An extract enriched in morphogenetic chaplin proteins promoted formation of aerial hyphae by the mutant. Furthermore, a two-hybrid experiment indicated that the glycosyltransferase domain of CslASc interacted with the tropomyosin-like polarity-determining DivIVA protein, suggesting that the tip-located DivIVA governed tip recruitment of the CslASc membrane protein. These results imply that the cellulose synthase-like protein couples extracellular and cytoskeletal components functioning in tip growth and cell development. PMID:18487344

  6. Identification of a cellulose synthase-associated protein required for cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Kaplinsky, Nick; Bringmann, Martin; Cobb, Alex; Carroll, Andrew; Sampathkumar, Arun; Baskin, Tobias I; Persson, Staffan; Somerville, Chris R

    2010-07-20

    Cellulose synthase-interactive protein 1 (CSI1) was identified in a two-hybrid screen for proteins that interact with cellulose synthase (CESA) isoforms involved in primary plant cell wall synthesis. CSI1 encodes a 2,150-amino acid protein that contains 10 predicted Armadillo repeats and a C2 domain. Mutations in CSI1 cause defective cell elongation in hypocotyls and roots and reduce cellulose content. CSI1 is associated with CESA complexes, and csi1 mutants affect the distribution and movement of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. PMID:20616083

  7. 14-3-3 protein is a regulator of the mitochondrial and chloroplast ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, Tom D.; van Walraven, Hendrika S.; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial and chloroplast ATP synthases are key enzymes in plant metabolism, providing cells with ATP, the universal energy currency. ATP synthases use a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient to drive synthesis of ATP. The enzyme complexes function as miniature rotary engines, ensuring energy coupling with very high efficiency. Although our understanding of the structure and functioning of the synthase has made enormous progress in recent years, our understanding of regulatory mechanisms is still rather preliminary. Here we report a role for 14-3-3 proteins in the regulation of ATP synthases. These 14-3-3 proteins are highly conserved phosphoserine/phosphothreonine-binding proteins that regulate a wide range of enzymes in plants, animals, and yeast. Recently, the presence of 14-3-3 proteins in chloroplasts was illustrated, and we show here that plant mitochondria harbor 14-3-3s within the inner mitochondrial-membrane compartment. There, the 14-3-3 proteins were found to be associated with the ATP synthases, in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, through direct interaction with the F1 β-subunit. The activity of the ATP synthases in both organelles is drastically reduced by recombinant 14-3-3. The rapid reduction in chloroplast ATPase activity during dark adaptation was prevented by a phosphopeptide containing the 14-3-3 interaction motif, demonstrating a role for endogenous 14-3-3 in the down-regulation of the CFoF1 activity. We conclude that regulation of the ATP synthases by 14-3-3 represents a mechanism for plant adaptation to environmental changes such as light/dark transitions, anoxia in roots, and fluctuations in nutrient supply. PMID:11274449

  8. Protein phosphorylation and membrane association of sucrose synthase in developing tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Anguenot, Raphaël; Nguyen-Quoc, Binh; Yelle, Serge; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) activities were detected both in the soluble and the membrane fraction of various tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) organs, using a synthetic peptide mimicking the serine 11 phosphorylation site of a tomato sucrose synthase (SS, EC 2.4.1.13) isoform as substrate. The levels of membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were differentially regulated during fruit development. The membrane Ser-CDPK activity was maximal in young fruit but decreased as the fruit developed, suggesting a specific role during fruit growth. Using an in gel assay with purified tomato SS as substrate, we showed that partially purified soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK preparations both contained a SS-kinase polypeptide of 55 kDa. The membrane and soluble Ser-CDPK activities were largely inactivated in the absence of calcium or when MgCl(2) was replaced by MnCl(2). Both soluble and membrane Ser-CDPK activities were very sensitive to staurosporine. Using Fe(III)-immobilized metal chromatography to determine the apparent phosphorylation status of the enzyme in vivo, we showed that soluble SS was largely dephosphorylated in fruits fed EGTA or staurosporine, compared to fruits fed water or sucrose. Moreover, the level of SS increased by about two-fold in the membrane fraction of fruits fed the Ser-CDPK inhibitors, compared to the control. The level of SS protein in the membrane and soluble fractions of tomato fruit was developmentally regulated, the membrane form being specifically detected in actively growing fruits. Together, our results suggest that a mechanism involving protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and/or calcium would in part control the association of SS isoforms with membranes in developing tomato fruit.

  9. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion.

  10. Bacteriocin release protein-mediated secretory expression of recombinant chalcone synthase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2011-09-01

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites synthesized by plants shown to exhibit health benefits such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor effects. Thus, due to the importance of this compound, several enzymes involved in the flavonoid pathway have been cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. However, the formation of inclusion bodies has become a major disadvantage of this approach. As an alternative, chalcone synthase from Physcomitrella patens was secreted into the medium using a bacteriocin release protein expression vector. Secretion of P. patens chalcone synthase into the culture media was achieved by co-expression with a psW1 plasmid encoding bacteriocin release protein in E. coli Tuner (DE3) plysS. The optimized conditions, which include the incubation of cells for 20 h with 40 ng/ml mitomycin C at OD(600) induction time of 0.5 was found to be the best condition for chalcone synthase secretion. PMID:21633820

  11. Study of Class I and Class III Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthases with Substrates Containing a Modified Side Chain.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kaimin; Cao, Ruikai; Hua, Duy H; Li, Ping

    2016-04-11

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are carbon and energy storage polymers produced by a variety of microbial organisms under nutrient-limited conditions. They have been considered as an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based plastics due to their renewability, versatility, and biodegradability. PHA synthase (PhaC) plays a central role in PHA biosynthesis, in which its activity and substrate specificity are major factors in determining the productivity and properties of the produced polymers. However, the effects of modifying the substrate side chain are not well understood because of the difficulty to accessing the desired analogues. In this report, a series of 3-(R)-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A (HACoA) analogues were synthesized and tested with class I synthases from Chromobacterium sp. USM2 (PhaCCs and A479S-PhaCCs) and Caulobacter crescentus (PhaCCc) as well as class III synthase from Allochromatium vinosum (PhaECAv). It was found that, while different PHA synthases displayed distinct preference with regard to the length of the alkyl side chains, they could withstand moderate side chain modifications such as terminal unsaturated bonds and the azide group. Specifically, the specific activity of PhaCCs toward propynyl analogue (HHxyCoA) was only 5-fold less than that toward the classical substrate HBCoA. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of PhaECAv toward azide analogue (HABCoA) was determined to be 2.86 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which was 6.2% of the value of HBCoA (4.62 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) measured in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). These side chain modifications may be employed to introduce new material functions to PHAs as well as to study PHA biogenesis via click-chemistry, in which the latter remains unknown and is important for metabolic engineering to produce PHAs economically. PMID:26974339

  12. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes. PMID:25681694

  13. The molecular motor F-ATP synthase is targeted by the tumoricidal protein HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Ho, James; Sielaff, Hendrik; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina; Grüber, Gerhard

    2015-05-22

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interacts with multiple tumor cell compartments, affecting cell morphology, metabolism, proteasome function, chromatin structure and viability. This study investigated if these diverse effects of HAMLET might be caused, in part, by a direct effect on the ATP synthase and a resulting reduction in cellular ATP levels. A dose-dependent reduction in cellular ATP levels was detected in A549 lung carcinoma cells, and by confocal microscopy, co-localization of HAMLET with the nucleotide-binding subunits α (non-catalytic) and β (catalytic) of the energy converting F1F0 ATP synthase was detected. As shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, HAMLET binds to the F1 domain of the F1F0 ATP synthase with a dissociation constant (KD) of 20.5μM. Increasing concentrations of the tumoricidal protein HAMLET added to the enzymatically active α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase lowered its ATPase activity, demonstrating that HAMLET binding to the F-ATP synthase effects the catalysis of this molecular motor. Single-molecule analysis was applied to study HAMLET-α3β3γ complex interaction. Whereas the α3β3γ complex of the F-ATP synthase rotated in a counterclockwise direction with a mean rotational rate of 3.8±0.7s(-1), no rotation could be observed in the presence of bound HAMLET. Our findings suggest that direct effects of HAMLET on the F-ATP synthase may inhibit ATP-dependent cellular processes.

  14. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  15. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  16. The role of protein dynamics in thymidylate synthase catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Zachary; Lee, Tom T.; Morse, Richard J.; Liu, Lu; Liu, Yaoquan; Venkatraman, Prasanna; Santi, Daniel V.; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Stroud, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TS) catalyzes the reductive methylation of 2′-deoxyuridine 5′-monophosphate (dUMP) to 2′-deoxythymidine 5′-monophosphate. Using kinetic and x-ray crystallography experiments, we have examined the role of the highly conserved Tyr-261 in the catalytic mechanism of TS. While Tyr-261 is distant from the site of methyl transfer, mutants at this position show a marked decrease in enzymatic activity. Given that Tyr-261 forms a hydrogen bond with the dUMP 3′-O, we hypothesized that this interaction would be important for substrate binding, orientation, and specificity. Our results, surprisingly, show that Tyr-261 contributes little to these features of the mechanism of TS. However, the residue is part of the structural core of closed ternary complexes of TS, and conservation of the size and shape of the Tyr side chain is essential for maintaining wild-type values of kcat/Km. Moderate increases in Kms for both substrate and the cofactor upon mutation of Tyr-261 arise mainly from destabilization of the active conformation of a loop containing a dUMP-binding arginine. Besides binding dUMP, this loop has a key role in stabilizing the closed conformation of the enzyme and in shielding the active site from bulk solvent during catalysis. Changes to atomic vibrations in crystals of a ternary complex of E. coli Tyr261Trp are associated with a greater than 2000-fold drop in kcat/Km. These results underline the important contribution of dynamics to catalysis in TS. PMID:16768437

  17. Identification of a novel protein binding motif within the T-synthase for the molecular chaperone Cosmc.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Rajindra P; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-04-25

    Prior studies suggested that the core 1 β3-galactosyltransferase (T-synthase) is a specific client of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone Cosmc, whose function is required for T-synthase folding, activity, and consequent synthesis of normal O-glycans in all vertebrate cells. To explore whether the T-synthase encodes a specific recognition motif for Cosmc, we used deletion mutagenesis to identify a cryptic linear and relatively hydrophobic peptide in the N-terminal stem region of the T-synthase that is essential for binding to Cosmc (Cosmc binding region within T-synthase, or CBRT). Using this sequence information, we synthesized a peptide containing CBRT and found that it directly interacts with Cosmc and also inhibits Cosmc-assisted in vitro refolding of denatured T-synthase. Moreover, engineered T-synthase carrying mutations within CBRT exhibited diminished binding to Cosmc that resulted in the formation of inactive T-synthase. To confirm the general recognition of CBRT by Cosmc, we performed a domain swap experiment in which we inserted the stem region of the T-synthase into the human β4GalT1 and found that the CBRT element can confer Cosmc binding onto the β4GalT1 chimera. Thus, CBRT is a unique recognition motif for Cosmc to promote its regulation and formation of active T-synthase and represents the first sequence-specific chaperone recognition system in the ER/Golgi required for normal protein O-glycosylation. PMID:24616093

  18. A bacterial virulence protein promotes pathogenicity by inhibiting the bacterium's own F1Fo ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, require the virulence protein MgtC to survive within macrophages and to cause a lethal infection in mice. We now report that, unlike secreted virulence factors that target the host vacuolar ATPase to withstand phagosomal acidity, the MgtC protein acts on Salmonella's own F1Fo ATP synthase. This complex couples proton translocation to ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and is required for virulence. We establish that MgtC interacts with the a subunit of the F1Fo ATP synthase, hindering ATP-driven proton translocation and NADH-driven ATP synthesis in inverted vesicles. An mgtC null mutant displays heightened ATP levels and an acidic cytoplasm, whereas mgtC overexpression decreases ATP levels. A single amino acid substitution in MgtC that prevents binding to the F1Fo ATP synthase abolishes control of ATP levels and attenuates pathogenicity. MgtC provides a singular example of a virulence protein that promotes pathogenicity by interfering with another virulence protein.

  19. Radiolabeling of a wound-inducible pyridoxal phosphate utilizing protein from tomato: evidence for its identification as ACC synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Privalle, L.S.; Graham, J.S.; Caughey, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    Aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase, a pyridoxal phosphate utilizing enzyme, catalyzes the conversion of S-adenosylmethionine to ACC, the rate limiting step in the biosynthesis of the plant hormone, ethylene. Ethylene, besides being involved in normal plant growth processes, is also produced in response to stress, e.g. wounding, pathogen infection, etc. The authors report the partial purification (400 fold) of ACC synthase from wounded pink tomato pericarp by classical techniques including ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and phenyl sepharose chromatography. Further purification results in a decrease in specific activity apparently due to the instability of the enzyme and the low levels present in plant tissue. Radiolabeling of a pyridoxal phosphate-utilizing protein in the ACC synthase enriched fraction was achieved. Evidence that this radiolabeled protein is ACC synthase will be presented. Amino acid sequence determination of putative ACC synthase-derived peptides is underway.

  20. The Dictyostelium discoideum cellulose synthase: Structure/function analysis and identification of interacting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Richard L. Blanton

    2004-02-19

    OAK-B135 The major accomplishments of this project were: (1) the initial characterization of dcsA, the gene for the putative catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum; (2) the detection of a developmentally regulated event (unidentified, but perhaps a protein modification or association with a protein partner) that is required for cellulose synthase activity (i.e., the dcsA product is necessary, but not sufficient for cellulose synthesis); (3) the continued exploration of the developmental context of cellulose synthesis and DcsA; (4) the isolation of a GFP-DcsA-expressing strain (work in progress); and (5) the identification of Dictyostelium homologues for plant genes whose products play roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although our progress was slow and many of our results negative, we did develop a number of promising avenues of investigation that can serve as the foundation for future projects.

  1. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Francesco; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Salvi, Sandra; Puzone, Roberto; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Fontana, Vincenzo; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Sini, Claudio; Ratto, Giovanni Battista; Taviani, Mario; Truini, Mauro; Merlo, Domenico Franco

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2), subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS), and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3). Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients. PMID:26663950

  2. Methylene bridge regulated geometrical preferences of ligands in cobalt(III) coordination chemistry and phenoxazinone synthase mimicking activity.

    PubMed

    Panja, Anangamohan; Shyamal, Milan; Saha, Amrita; Mandal, Tarun Kanti

    2014-04-14

    Two new azide bound cobalt(III) complexes, [Co(L(1))(N3)3] (fac-1) and [Co(L(2))(N3)3] (mer-2), where L(1) is bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine and L(2) is (2-pyridylmethyl)(2-pyridylethyl)amine, derived from tridentate reduced Schiff-base ligands have been reported. Interestingly, a methylene bridge regulated preferential coordination mode of ligands is noticed in their crystal structures: it is found in a facial arrangement in fac-1 and has a meridional disposition in mer-2. Both complexes show phenoxazinone synthase-like activity and the role of the structural factor on the catalytic activity is also explored. Moreover, the easily reducible cobalt(III) center in mer-2 favors the oxidation of o-aminophenol. The ESI-MS positive spectra together with UV-vis spectroscopy clearly suggest the formation of a catalyst-substrate adduct by substitution of the coordinated azide ions in the catalytic cycle.

  3. A cyanobacterial protein with similarity to phytochelatin synthases catalyzes the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine and lacks phytochelatin synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Harada, Emiko; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Clemens, Stephan

    2004-12-01

    Phytochelatins are glutathione-derived, non-translationally synthesized peptides essential for cadmium and arsenic detoxification in plant, fungal and nematode model systems. Recent sequencing programs have revealed the existence of phytochelatin synthase-related genes in a wide range of organisms that have not been reported yet to produce phytochelatins. Among those are several cyanobacteria. We have studied one of the encoded proteins (alr0975 from Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120) and demonstrate here that it does not possess phytochelatin synthase activity. Instead, this protein catalyzes the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine. The thiol spectrum of yeast cells expressing alr0975 shows the disappearance of glutathione and the formation of a compound that by LC-MSMS analysis was unequivocally identified as gamma-glutamylcysteine. Purified recombinant protein catalyzes the respective reaction. Unlike phytochelatin synthesis, the conversion of glutathione to gamma-glutamylcysteine is not dependent on activation by metal cations. No evidence was found for the accumulation of phytochelatins in cyanobacteria even after prolonged exposure to toxic Cd2+ concentrations. Expression of alr0975 was detected in Nostoc sp. cells with an antiserum raised against the protein. No indication for a responsiveness of expression to toxic metal exposure was found. Taken together, these data provide further evidence for possible additional functions of phytochelatin synthase-related proteins in glutathione metabolism and provide a lead as to the evolutionary history of phytochelatin synthesis.

  4. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S; Mortimer, Jenny C; Brown, Steven P; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus. PMID:27277162

  5. Golgi-localized STELLO proteins regulate the assembly and trafficking of cellulose synthase complexes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Nikolovski, Nino; Sorieul, Mathias; Vellosillo, Tamara; McFarlane, Heather E.; Dupree, Ray; Kesten, Christopher; Schneider, René; Driemeier, Carlos; Lathe, Rahul; Lampugnani, Edwin; Yu, Xiaolan; Ivakov, Alexander; Doblin, Monika S.; Mortimer, Jenny C.; Brown, Steven P.; Persson, Staffan; Dupree, Paul

    2016-01-01

    As the most abundant biopolymer on Earth, cellulose is a key structural component of the plant cell wall. Cellulose is produced at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes (CSCs), which are assembled in the endomembrane system and trafficked to the plasma membrane. While several proteins that affect CesA activity have been identified, components that regulate CSC assembly and trafficking remain unknown. Here we show that STELLO1 and 2 are Golgi-localized proteins that can interact with CesAs and control cellulose quantity. In the absence of STELLO function, the spatial distribution within the Golgi, secretion and activity of the CSCs are impaired indicating a central role of the STELLO proteins in CSC assembly. Point mutations in the predicted catalytic domains of the STELLO proteins indicate that they are glycosyltransferases facing the Golgi lumen. Hence, we have uncovered proteins that regulate CSC assembly in the plant Golgi apparatus. PMID:27277162

  6. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  7. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Roldán, Angela; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  8. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2.

    PubMed

    Lavado-Roldán, Angela; Fernández-Chacón, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation.

  9. Two for the Price of One: A Neuroprotective Chaperone Kit within NAD Synthase Protein NMNAT2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fascinating properties of the brain is the ability to function smoothly across decades of a lifespan. Neurons are nondividing mature cells specialized in fast electrical and chemical communication at synapses. Often, neurons and synapses operate at high levels of activity through sophisticated arborizations of long axons and dendrites that nevertheless stay healthy throughout years. On the other hand, aging and activity-dependent stress strike onto the protein machineries turning proteins unfolded and prone to form pathological aggregates associated with neurodegeneration. How do neurons protect from those insults and remain healthy for their whole life? Ali and colleagues now present a molecular mechanism by which the enzyme nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 2 (NMNAT2) acts not only as a NAD synthase involved in axonal maintenance but as a molecular chaperone helping neurons to overcome protein unfolding and protein aggregation. PMID:27454736

  10. Suppression of the Barley uroporphyrinogen III synthase Gene by a Ds Activation Tagging Element Generates Developmental Photosensitivity[W

    PubMed Central

    Ayliffe, Michael A.; Agostino, Anthony; Clarke, Bryan C.; Furbank, Robert; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Pryor, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorophyll production involves the synthesis of photoreactive intermediates that, when in excess, are toxic due to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). A novel, activation-tagged barley (Hordeum vulgare) mutant is described that results from antisense suppression of a uroporphyrinogen III synthase (Uros) gene, the product of which catalyzes the sixth step in the synthesis of chlorophyll and heme. In homozygous mutant plants, uroporphyrin(ogen) I accumulates by spontaneous cyclization of hydroxyl methylbilane, the substrate of Uros. Accumulation of this tetrapyrrole intermediate results in photosensitive cell death due to the production of ROS. The efficiency of Uros gene suppression is developmentally regulated, being most effective in mature seedling leaves compared with newly emergent leaves. Reduced transcript accumulation of a number of nuclear-encoded photosynthesis genes occurs in the mutant, even under 3% light conditions, consistent with a retrograde plastid-nuclear signaling mechanism arising from Uros gene suppression. A similar set of nuclear genes was repressed in wild-type barley following treatment with a singlet oxygen-generating herbicide, but not by a superoxide generating herbicide, suggesting that the retrograde signaling apparent in the mutant is specific to singlet oxygen. PMID:19336693

  11. Sequence-Based Prediction of Type III Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Roland; Brandmaier, Stefan; Kleine, Frederick; Tischler, Patrick; Heinz, Eva; Behrens, Sebastian; Niinikoski, Antti; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The type III secretion system (TTSS) is a key mechanism for host cell interaction used by a variety of bacterial pathogens and symbionts of plants and animals including humans. The TTSS represents a molecular syringe with which the bacteria deliver effector proteins directly into the host cell cytosol. Despite the importance of the TTSS for bacterial pathogenesis, recognition and targeting of type III secreted proteins has up until now been poorly understood. Several hypotheses are discussed, including an mRNA-based signal, a chaperon-mediated process, or an N-terminal signal peptide. In this study, we systematically analyzed the amino acid composition and secondary structure of N-termini of 100 experimentally verified effector proteins. Based on this, we developed a machine-learning approach for the prediction of TTSS effector proteins, taking into account N-terminal sequence features such as frequencies of amino acids, short peptides, or residues with certain physico-chemical properties. The resulting computational model revealed a strong type III secretion signal in the N-terminus that can be used to detect effectors with sensitivity of ∼71% and selectivity of ∼85%. This signal seems to be taxonomically universal and conserved among animal pathogens and plant symbionts, since we could successfully detect effector proteins if the respective group was excluded from training. The application of our prediction approach to 739 complete bacterial and archaeal genome sequences resulted in the identification of between 0% and 12% putative TTSS effector proteins. Comparison of effector proteins with orthologs that are not secreted by the TTSS showed no clear pattern of signal acquisition by fusion, suggesting convergent evolutionary processes shaping the type III secretion signal. The newly developed program EffectiveT3 (http://www.chlamydiaedb.org) is the first universal in silico prediction program for the identification of novel TTSS effectors. Our findings will

  12. Purification and characterization of the acyl carrier protein of the Streptomyces glaucescens tetracenomycin C polyketide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, B; Summers, R G; Gramajo, H; Bibb, M J; Hutchinson, C R

    1992-01-01

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) of the tetracenomycin C polyketide synthase, encoded by the tcmM gene, has been expressed in both Streptomyces glaucescens and Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Expression of the tcmM gene in E. coli results mainly in the TcmM apo-ACP, whereas expression in S. glaucescens yields solely the holo-ACP. The purified holo-TcmM is active in a malonyl coenzyme A:ACP transacylase assay and is labeled by radioactive beta-alanine, confirming that it carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group. Images PMID:1592832

  13. Membrane association of sucrose synthase: changes during the graviresponse and possible control by protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) plays an important role in sucrose degradation and occurs both as a soluble and as a membrane-associated enzyme in higher plants. We show that membrane association can vary in vivo in response to gravistimulation, apparently involving SuSy dephosphorylation, and is a reversible process in vitro. Phosphorylation of SuSy has little effect on its activity but decreases its surface hydrophobicity as reported with the fluorescent probe bis-ANS. We postulate that phosphorylation of SuSy (and perhaps other membrane proteins) is involved in the release of the membrane-bound enzyme in part as a result of decreased surface hydrophobicity.

  14. Impaired cognitive performance in neuronal nitric oxide synthase knockout mice is associated with hippocampal protein derangements.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Liselotte; Weitzdoerfer, Rachel; Hoeger, Harald; Url, Angelika; Schmidt, Peter; Engelmann, Mario; Villar, Santiago Rosell; Fountoulakis, Michael; Lubec, Gert; Lubec, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    Nitric oxide is implicated in modulation of memory and pharmacological as well as genetic inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) leads to impaired cognitive function. We therefore decided to study learning and memory functions and cognitive flexibility in the Morris water maze (MWM) in 1-month-old male mice lacking nNOS (nNOS KO). Hippocampal protein profiling was carried out to possibly link protein derangement to impaired cognitive function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of spots and subsequent MALDI-TOF identification of proteins and quantification of proteins using specific software was applied. In the memory as well as in the relearning task of the MWM, most of the nNOS KO failed to find the submerged platform within a given time. Proteomic evaluation of hippocampus, the main anatomical structure computing cognitive functions, revealed aberrant expression of a synaptosomal associated protein of the exocytotic machinery (NSF), glycolytic enzymes, chaperones 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, T-complex protein 1; the signaling structure guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H of the splicing machinery. We conclude that nNOS knockout mice show impaired spatial performance in the MWM, a finding that may be either linked to direct effects of nNOS/NO and/or to specific hippocampal protein derangements.

  15. Novel protein–protein interaction between spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Agnihotri, Pragati; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • L. donovani spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase have been cloned and purified. • S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has autocatalytic property. • GST pull down assay shows the two proteins to form a metabolon. • Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that binding was exothermic having K{sub d} value of 0.4 μM. • Interaction confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. - Abstract: Polyamine biosynthesis pathway has long been considered an essential drug target for trypanosomatids including Leishmania. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDc) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn) are enzymes of this pathway that catalyze successive steps, with the product of the former, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM), acting as an aminopropyl donor for the latter enzyme. Here we have explored the possibility of and identified the protein–protein interaction between SpdSyn and AdoMetDc. The protein–protein interaction has been identified using GST pull down assay. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that the interaction is thermodynamically favorable. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies also confirms the interaction, with SpdSyn exhibiting a change in tertiary structure with increasing concentrations of AdoMetDc. Size exclusion chromatography suggests the presence of the complex as a hetero-oligomer. Taken together, these results suggest that the enzymes indeed form a heteromer. Computational analyses suggest that this complex differs significantly from the corresponding human complex, implying that this complex could be a better therapeutic target than the individual enzymes.

  16. Recognition of Acyl Carrier Proteins by Ketoreductases in Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Matthew P.; Cane, David E.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-01-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed a ca. 10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed a ca. 10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  17. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-04-11

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  18. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, E.A.; Bannon, G.A.; Glenn, K.C.; Jeong, S.S.; Sturman, E.J.; Rydel, T.J.

    2008-11-21

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  19. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David M.; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C.; Bunt, Joy C.; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = −0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:18056794

  20. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mott, David M; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C; Bunt, Joy C; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism.

  1. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein III and transducer gene trg.

    PubMed Central

    Hazelbauer, G L; Engström, P; Harayama, S

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of the two-dimensional gel patterns of methyl-3H- and 35S-labeled membrane proteins from trg+ and trg null mutant strains of Escherichia coli indicated that the product of trg is probably methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein III. Like the other known methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, the trg product is a membrane protein that migrates as more than one species in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, implying that it too is multiple methylated. It appears likely that all chemoreceptors are linked to the tumble regulator through a single class of membrane protein transducers which are methyl-accepting proteins. Three transducers are coded for by genes tsr, tar, and, probably, trg. Another methyl-accepting protein, which is not related to any of these genes, was observed. Images PMID:7007323

  2. Expression of Fusion Proteins of Aspergillus terreus Reveals a Novel Allene Oxide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Inga; Jernerén, Fredrik; Oliw, Ernst H.

    2013-01-01

    Aspergilli oxidize C18 unsaturated fatty acids by dioxygenase-cytochrome P450 fusion proteins to signal molecules involved in reproduction and host-pathogen interactions. Aspergillus terreus expresses linoleate 9R-dioxygenase (9R-DOX) and allene oxide synthase (AOS) activities in membrane fractions. The genome contains five genes (ATEG), which may code for a 9R-DOX-AOS fusion protein. The genes were cloned and expressed, but none of them oxidized 18:2n-6 to 9R-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (9R-HPODE). ATEG_02036 transformed 9R-HPODE to an unstable allene oxide, 9(R),10-epoxy-10,12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid. A substitution in the P450 domain (C1073S) abolished AOS activity. The N964V and N964D mutants both showed markedly reduced AOS activity, suggesting that Asn964 may facilitate homolytic cleavage of the dioxygen bond of 9R-HPODE with formation of compound II in analogy with plant AOS (CYP74) and prostacyclin synthase (CYP8A1). ATEG_03992 was identified as 5,8-linoleate diol synthase (5,8-LDS). Replacement of Asn878 in 5,8-LDS with leucine (N878L) mainly shifted ferryl oxygen insertion from C-5 toward C-6, but replacements of Gln881 markedly affected catalysis. The Q881L mutant virtually abolished the diol synthase activity. Replacement of Gln881 with Asn, Glu, Asp, or Lys residues augmented the homolytic cleavage of 8R-HPODE with formation of 10-hydroxy-8(9)-epoxy-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (erythro/threo, 1–4:1) and/or shifted ferryl oxygen insertion from C-5 toward C-11. We conclude that homolysis and heterolysis of the dioxygen bond with formation of compound II in AOS and compound I in 5,8-LDS are influenced by Asn and Gln residues, respectively, of the I-helices. AOS of A. terreus appears to have evolved independently of CYP74 but with an analogous reaction mechanism. PMID:23479731

  3. Structural And Mechanistic Analysis of Protein Interactions in Module 3 of the 6-Deoxyerythronolide B Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y.; Chen, A.Y.; Kim, C.-Y.; Cane, D.E.; Khosla, C.

    2009-06-04

    We report the 2.6 A X-ray crystal structure of a 190 kDa homodimeric fragment from module 3 of the 6-deoxyerthronolide B synthase covalently bound to the inhibitor cerulenin. The structure shows two well-organized interdomain linker regions in addition to the full-length ketosynthase (KS) and acyltransferase (AT) domains. Analysis of the substrate-binding site of the KS domain suggests that a loop region at the homodimer interface influences KS substrate specificity. We also describe a model for the interaction of the catalytic domains with the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. The ACP is proposed to dock within a deep cleft between the KS and AT domains, with interactions that span both the KS homodimer and AT domain. In conjunction with other recent data, our results provide atomic resolution pictures of several catalytically relevant protein interactions in this remarkable family of modular megasynthases.

  4. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  5. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  6. Identification of protein-protein interactions of isoflavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.).

    PubMed

    Waki, Toshiyuki; Yoo, DongChan; Fujino, Naoto; Mameda, Ryo; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Yamashita, Satoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic enzymes, including those involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, are proposed to form weakly bound, ordered protein complexes, called "metabolons". Some hypothetical models of flavonoid biosynthetic metabolons have been proposed, in which metabolic enzymes are believed to anchor to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via ER-bound cytochrome P450 isozymes (P450s). However, no convincing evidence for the interaction of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with P450s has been reported previously. Here, we analyzed binary protein-protein interactions of 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase 1 (GmIFS1), a P450 (CYP93C), with cytoplasmic enzymes involved in isoflavone biosynthesis in soybean. We identified binary interactions between GmIFS1 and chalcone synthase 1 (GmCHS1) and between GmIFS1 and chalcone isomerases (GmCHIs) by using a split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid system. These binary interactions were confirmed in planta by means of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) using tobacco leaf cells. In these BiFC analyses, fluorescence signals that arose from the interaction of these cytoplasmic enzymes with GmIFS1 generated sharp, network-like intracellular patterns, which was very similar to the ER-localized fluorescence patterns of GmIFS1 labeled with a fluorescent protein. These observations provide strong evidence that, in planta, interaction of GmCHS1 and GmCHIs with GmIFS1 takes place on ER on which GmIFS1 is located, and also provide important clues to understand how enzymes and proteins form metabolons to establish efficient metabolic flux of (iso)flavonoid biosynthesis.

  7. Identification of protein-protein interactions of isoflavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.).

    PubMed

    Waki, Toshiyuki; Yoo, DongChan; Fujino, Naoto; Mameda, Ryo; Denessiouk, Konstantin; Yamashita, Satoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Aoki, Toshio; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic enzymes, including those involved in flavonoid biosynthesis, are proposed to form weakly bound, ordered protein complexes, called "metabolons". Some hypothetical models of flavonoid biosynthetic metabolons have been proposed, in which metabolic enzymes are believed to anchor to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via ER-bound cytochrome P450 isozymes (P450s). However, no convincing evidence for the interaction of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes with P450s has been reported previously. Here, we analyzed binary protein-protein interactions of 2-hydroxyisoflavanone synthase 1 (GmIFS1), a P450 (CYP93C), with cytoplasmic enzymes involved in isoflavone biosynthesis in soybean. We identified binary interactions between GmIFS1 and chalcone synthase 1 (GmCHS1) and between GmIFS1 and chalcone isomerases (GmCHIs) by using a split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid system. These binary interactions were confirmed in planta by means of bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) using tobacco leaf cells. In these BiFC analyses, fluorescence signals that arose from the interaction of these cytoplasmic enzymes with GmIFS1 generated sharp, network-like intracellular patterns, which was very similar to the ER-localized fluorescence patterns of GmIFS1 labeled with a fluorescent protein. These observations provide strong evidence that, in planta, interaction of GmCHS1 and GmCHIs with GmIFS1 takes place on ER on which GmIFS1 is located, and also provide important clues to understand how enzymes and proteins form metabolons to establish efficient metabolic flux of (iso)flavonoid biosynthesis. PMID:26694697

  8. A DNA-binding protein factor recognizes two binding domains within the octopine synthase enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Singh, K; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1990-01-01

    A protein that binds to the enhancing element of the octopine synthase gene has been identified in nuclear extracts from maize cell suspension cultures. Two protein-DNA complexes are distinguishable by electrophoretic mobility in gel retardation assays. Footprint analyses of these low and high molecular weight complexes show, respectively, half and complete protection of the ocs-element DNA from cleavage by methidiumpropyl-EDTA.FE(II). Two lines of evidence indicate that the element has two recognition sites, each of which can bind identical protein units. Elements that are mutated in one or the other half and form only the low molecular weight complex interfere with the formation of both the low and high molecular weight complexes by the wild-type element. Protein isolated from a complex with only one binding site occupied can bind to the wild-type ocs-element and generate complexes with protein occupying one or both binding sites. Occupation of both sites of the ocs-element is a prerequisite for transcriptional enhancement. PMID:2152113

  9. Citrate synthase proteins in extremophilic organisms: Studies within a structure-based model

    SciTech Connect

    Różycki, Bartosz Cieplak, Marek

    2014-12-21

    We study four citrate synthase homodimeric proteins within a structure-based coarse-grained model. Two of these proteins come from thermophilic bacteria, one from a cryophilic bacterium and one from a mesophilic organism; three are in the closed and two in the open conformations. Even though the proteins belong to the same fold, the model distinguishes the properties of these proteins in a way which is consistent with experiments. For instance, the thermophilic proteins are more stable thermodynamically than their mesophilic and cryophilic homologues, which we observe both in the magnitude of thermal fluctuations near the native state and in the kinetics of thermal unfolding. The level of stability correlates with the average coordination number for amino acid contacts and with the degree of structural compactness. The pattern of positional fluctuations along the sequence in the closed conformation is different than in the open conformation, including within the active site. The modes of correlated and anticorrelated movements of pairs of amino acids forming the active site are very different in the open and closed conformations. Taken together, our results show that the precise location of amino acid contacts in the native structure appears to be a critical element in explaining the similarities and differences in the thermodynamic properties, local flexibility, and collective motions of the different forms of the enzyme.

  10. Automating gene library synthesis by structure-based combinatorial protein engineering: examples from plant sesquiterpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Dokarry, Melissa; Laurendon, Caroline; O'Maille, Paul E

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based combinatorial protein engineering (SCOPE) is a homology-independent recombination method to create multiple crossover gene libraries by assembling defined combinations of structural elements ranging from single mutations to domains of protein structure. SCOPE was originally inspired by DNA shuffling, which mimics recombination during meiosis, where mutations from parental genes are "shuffled" to create novel combinations in the resulting progeny. DNA shuffling utilizes sequence identity between parental genes to mediate template-switching events (the annealing and extension of one parental gene fragment on another) in PCR reassembly reactions to generate crossovers and hence recombination between parental genes. In light of the conservation of protein structure and degeneracy of sequence, SCOPE was developed to enable the "shuffling" of distantly related genes with no requirement for sequence identity. The central principle involves the use of oligonucleotides to encode for crossover regions to choreograph template-switching events during PCR assembly of gene fragments to create chimeric genes. This approach was initially developed to create libraries of hybrid DNA polymerases from distantly related parents, and later developed to create a combinatorial mutant library of sesquiterpene synthases to explore the catalytic landscapes underlying the functional divergence of related enzymes. This chapter presents a simplified protocol of SCOPE that can be integrated with different mutagenesis techniques and is suitable for automation by liquid-handling robots. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of SCOPE to create gene libraries using plant sesquiterpene synthases as the model system. In the first example, we outline how to create an active-site library as a series of complex mixtures of diverse mutants. In the second example, we outline how to create a focused library as an array of individual clones to distil minimal combinations of

  11. Uroporphyrinogen III Synthase Knock-In Mice Have the Human Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria Phenotype, Including the Characteristic Light-Induced Cutaneous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, David F.; Johansson, Annika; Phelps, Robert; Shady, Amr A.; Ramirez, Maria C. M.; Yasuda, Makiko; Caro, Andres; Desnick, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive inborn error, results from the deficient but not absent activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase), the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. The major clinical manifestations include severe anemia, erythrodontia, and disfiguring cutaneous involvement due to the accumulation of phototoxic porphyrin I isomers. Murine models of CEP could facilitate studies of disease pathogenesis and the evaluation of therapeutic endeavors. However, URO-synthase null mice were early embryonic lethals. Therefore, knock-in mice were generated with three missense mutations, C73R, V99A, and V99L, which had in vitro–expressed activities of 0.24%, 5.9%, and 14.8% of expressed wild-type activity, respectively. Homozygous mice for all three mutations were fetal lethals, except for mice homozygous for a spontaneous recombinant allele, V99AT/V99AT, a head-to-tail concatemer of three V99A targeting constructs. Although V99AT/V99AT and C73R/V99AT mice had ∼2% hepatic URO-synthase activity and normal hepatic microsomal heme and hemoprotein levels, they had 20% and 13% of wild-type activity in erythrocytes, respectively, which indicates that sufficient erythroid URO-synthase was present for fetal development and survival. Both murine genotypes showed marked porphyrin I isomer accumulation in erythrocytes, bone, tissues, and excreta and had fluorescent erythrodontia, hemolytic anemia with reticulocytosis and extramedullary erythropoiesis, and, notably, the characteristic light-induced cutaneous involvement. These mice provide insight into why CEP is an erythroid porphyria, and they should facilitate studies of the disease pathogenesis and therapeutic endeavors for CEP. PMID:16532394

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  13. Arabidopsis OR proteins are the major post-transcriptional regulators of phytoene synthase in mediating carotenoid biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carotenoids are indispensable natural pigments to plants and humans. Phytoene synthase (PSY), the rate-limiting enzyme in carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, and ORANGE (OR), a regulator of chromoplast differentiation and enhancer of carotenoid biosynthesis, represent two key proteins that control caro...

  14. Rapid preparation of (methyl)malonyl coenzyme A and enzymatic formation of unusual polyketides by type III polyketide synthase from Aquilaria sinensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo-Wen; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao; Shi, She-Po; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2015-03-15

    (Methyl)malonyl coenzyme A was rapidly and effectively synthesized by a two-step procedure involving preparation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (methyl)malonate from (methyl)Meldrum's acid, and followed by transesterification with coenzyme A. The synthesized (methyl)malonyl coenzyme A could be well accepted and assembled to 4-hydroxy phenylpropionyl coenzyme A by type III polyketide synthase from Aquilaria sinensis to produce dihydrochalcone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethyl-6-(4-hydroxyphenethyl)-2H-pyrone as well as 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethyl-6-(5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-oxopentan-2-yl)-2H-pyrone.

  15. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  16. Pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    Hamma, Tomoko; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2006-11-01

    Pseudouridine synthases are the enzymes responsible for the most abundant posttranscriptional modification of cellular RNAs. These enzymes catalyze the site-specific isomerization of uridine residues that are already part of an RNA chain, and appear to employ both sequence and structural information to achieve site specificity. Crystallographic analyses have demonstrated that all pseudouridine synthases share a common core fold and active site structure and that this core is modified by peripheral domains, accessory proteins, and guide RNAs to give rise to remarkable substrate versatility.

  17. The Thylakoid Membrane Protein CGL160 Supports CF1CF0 ATP Synthase Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Martins, Nádia Figueira; Strenkert, Daniela; Clarke, Cornelia A.; Suchoszek, Monika; Thiele, Wolfram; Schöttler, Mark Aurel; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the major thylakoid protein complexes of the photosynthetic apparatus requires auxiliary proteins supporting individual assembly steps. Here, we identify a plant lineage specific gene, CGL160, whose homolog, atp1, co-occurs with ATP synthase subunits in an operon-like arrangement in many cyanobacteria. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutants, which no longer accumulate the nucleus-encoded CGL160 protein, accumulate less than 25% of wild-type levels of the chloroplast ATP synthase. Severe cosmetic or growth phenotypes result under either short day or fluctuating light growth conditions, respectively, but this is ameliorated under long day constant light growth conditions where the growth, ATP synthase activity and photosynthetic electron transport of the mutants are less affected. Accumulation of other photosynthetic complexes is largely unaffected in cgl160 mutants, suggesting that CGL160 is a specific assembly or stability factor for the CF1CF0 complex. CGL160 is not found in the mature assembled complex but it does interact specifically with subunits of ATP synthase, predominantly those in the extrinsic CF1 sub-complex. We suggest therefore that it may facilitate the assembly of CF1 into the holocomplex. PMID:25835989

  18. Heteromeric geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint: construction of a functional fusion protein and inhibition by bisphosphonate substrate analogs.

    PubMed

    Burke, Charles; Klettke, Karin; Croteau, Rodney

    2004-02-01

    Geranyl diphosphate synthase catalyzes the condensation of dimethylallyl diphosphate (C(5)) with isopentenyl diphosphate (C(5)) to produce geranyl diphosphate (C(10)), the essential precursor of monoterpenes. The enzyme from peppermint and spearmint (Menthaxpiperita and Mentha spicata, respectively) functions as a heterodimer or heterotetramer consisting of a 40kDa subunit and 33kDa subunit. The DNAs encoding each subunit were joined with different sized linkers and in both possible orders, and expressed in Escherichia coli to yield the corresponding fused protein. The properties of the recombinant fused version, in which the small subunit was followed by the large subunit with a 10 amino acid linker, resembled those of the native heteromeric enzyme in kinetics, product chain-length specificity, and architecture, and this form thus provided a suitable single gene transcript for biotechnological purposes. Bisphosphonate substrate analogs of the type that inhibit farnesyl diphosphate synthase (C(15)) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (C(20)) also inhibited the fused geranyl diphosphate synthase, apparently by interacting at both the allylic and homoallylic co-substrate binding sites. The results of inhibition studies, along with the previously established role of the small subunit and related mutagenesis experiments, suggest that geranyl diphosphate synthase employs a different mechanism for chain-length determination than do other short-chain prenyltransferases.

  19. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton.

  20. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton. PMID:20018879

  1. Cruentaren A Binds F1F0 ATP Synthase To Modulate the Hsp90 Protein Folding Machinery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 requires the assistance of immunophilins, co-chaperones, and partner proteins for the conformational maturation of client proteins. Hsp90 inhibition represents a promising anticancer strategy due to the dependence of numerous oncogenic signaling pathways upon Hsp90 function. Historically, small molecules have been designed to inhibit ATPase activity at the Hsp90 N-terminus; however, these molecules also induce the pro-survival heat shock response (HSR). Therefore, inhibitors that exhibit alternative mechanisms of action that do not elicit the HSR are actively sought. Small molecules that disrupt Hsp90-co-chaperone interactions can destabilize the Hsp90 complex without induction of the HSR, which leads to inhibition of cell proliferation. In this article, selective inhibition of F1F0 ATP synthase by cruentaren A was shown to disrupt the Hsp90-F1F0 ATP synthase interaction and result in client protein degradation without induction of the HSR. PMID:24450340

  2. Assembly of the cysteine synthase complex and the regulatory role of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Sangaralingam; Yi, Hankuil; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2009-04-10

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), acts as a sensor and modulator of thiol metabolism by responding to changes in nutrient conditions. Here we examine the oligomerization and energetics of formation of the soybean CSC. Biophysical examination of the CSC by size exclusion chromatography and sedimentation ultracentrifugation indicates that this assembly (complex M(r) approximately 330,000) consists of a single SAT trimer (trimer M(r) approximately 110,000) and three OASS dimers (dimer M(r) approximately 70,000). Analysis of the SAT-OASS interaction by isothermal titration calorimetry reveals negative cooperativity with three distinct binding events during CSC formation with K(d) values of 0.3, 7.5, and 78 nm. The three binding events are also observed using surface plasmon resonance with comparable affinities. The stability of the CSC derives from rapid association and extremely slow dissociation of OASS with SAT and requires the C terminus of SAT for the interaction. Steady-state kinetic analysis shows that CSC formation enhances SAT activity and releases SAT from substrate inhibition and feedback inhibition by cysteine, the final product of the biosynthesis pathway. Cysteine inhibits SAT and the CSC with K(i) values of 2 and 70 microm, respectively. These results suggest a new model for the architecture of this regulatory complex and additional control mechanisms for biochemically controlling plant cysteine biosynthesis. Based on previous work and our results, we suggest that OASS acts as an enzyme chaperone of SAT in the CSC. PMID:19213732

  3. Fatty acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is initiated by the FabY class of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Sachdeva, Meena; Leeds, Jennifer A; Meredith, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    The prototypical type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway in bacteria utilizes two distinct classes of β-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) domains to assemble long-chain fatty acids, the KASIII domain for initiation and the KASI/II domain for elongation. The central role of FAS in bacterial viability and virulence has stimulated significant effort toward developing KAS inhibitors, particularly against the KASIII domain of the β-acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase FabH. Herein, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not utilize a FabH ortholog but rather a new class of divergent KAS I/II enzymes to initiate the FAS pathway. When a P. aeruginosa cosmid library was used to rescue growth in a fabH downregulated strain of Escherichia coli, a single unannotated open reading frame, PA5174, complemented fabH depletion. While deletion of all four KASIII domain-encoding genes in the same P. aeruginosa strain resulted in a wild-type growth phenotype, deletion of PA5174 alone specifically attenuated growth due to a defect in de novo FAS. Siderophore secretion and quorum-sensing signaling, particularly in the rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems, was significantly muted in the absence of PA5174. The defect could be repaired by intergeneric complementation with E. coli fabH. Characterization of recombinant PA5174 confirmed a preference for short-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates, supporting the identification of PA5174 as the predominant enzyme catalyzing the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A with malonyl-ACP in P. aeruginosa. The identification of the functional role for PA5174 in FAS defines the new FabY class of β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain condensation enzymes.

  4. Inhibition of Type III Interferon Activity by Orthopoxvirus Immunomodulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) family elicits an antiviral response that is nearly identical to that evoked by IFN-α/β. However, these cytokines (known as IFN-λ1, 2, and 3) signal through a distinct receptor, and thus may be resistant to the evasion strategies used by some viruses to avoid the IFN-α/β response. Orthopoxviruses are highly resistant to IFN-α/β because they encode well-characterized immunomodulatory proteins that inhibit IFN activity. These include a secreted receptor (B18R) that neutralizes IFN-α/β, and a cytoplasmic protein (E3L) that blocks IFN-α/β effector functions in infected cells. We therefore determined the ability of these immunomodulators to abrogate the IFN-λ–induced antiviral response. We found that (i) vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is resistant to IFN-λ antiviral activity; (ii) neither VACV B18R nor the variola virus homolog B20R neutralizes IFN-λ; (iii) VACV E3L inhibits the IFN-λ–mediated antiviral response through a PKR-dependent pathway; (iv) VACV infection inhibits IFN-λR–mediated signal transduction and gene expression. These results demonstrate differential sensitivity of IFN-λ to multiple distinct evasion mechanisms employed by a single virus. PMID:20038204

  5. Structure/Function Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase in the Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus Reveals a Biochemical Pathway in Phlorotannin Monomer Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Delage, Ludovic; Leroux, Cédric J.-J.; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Creis, Emeline; Gall, Erwan Ar; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie; Czjzek, Mirjam; Potin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Brown algal phlorotannins are structural analogs of condensed tannins in terrestrial plants and, like plant phenols, they have numerous biological functions. Despite their importance in brown algae, phlorotannin biosynthetic pathways have been poorly characterized at the molecular level. We found that a predicted type III polyketide synthase in the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus, PKS1, catalyzes a major step in the biosynthetic pathway of phlorotannins (i.e., the synthesis of phloroglucinol monomers from malonyl-CoA). The crystal structure of PKS1 at 2.85-Å resolution provided a good quality electron density map showing a modified Cys residue, likely connected to a long chain acyl group. An additional pocket not found in other known type III PKSs contains a reaction product that might correspond to a phloroglucinol precursor. In vivo, we also found a positive correlation between the phloroglucinol content and the PKS III gene expression level in cells of a strain of Ectocarpus adapted to freshwater during its reacclimation to seawater. The evolution of the type III PKS gene family in Stramenopiles suggests a lateral gene transfer event from an actinobacterium. PMID:23983220

  6. GTP synthases. Proton pumping and phosphorylation in ligand-receptor-G alpha-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Donné-Op Den Kelder, G M; Timms, D; Wilkinson, A J; Kelly, D R; Broadley, K J; Davies, R H

    1996-01-01

    A structural model for a ligand-receptor-Gs alpha-protein complex to function as a GTP synthase is presented. The mechanism which is dependent on the movement and rotation of the G alpha-protein alpha 2-helix is seen to involve the delivery of, at least, one proton to the phosphorylation site in the rotation of this helix. The cycle is driven by a ligand-mediated proton pump through the alpha-helices of the receptor, attachment of the conserved Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle being made to an aspartate group on the Gs alpha-protein terminal sidechain, which is itself linked to the Asn-Gln interaction known to control movement and rotation of the alpha 2-helix between .GDP and .GTP structures. The energetics of proton transfer through the shuttle mechanism and delivery of a proton to the aspartate group are shown to be sufficient to rupture this controlling interaction and its associated backbone bond. The complex leads to full spatial and energetic definition of the receptor proton shuttle mechanism, while there is a striking association of further Tyrosine and Arginine residues in the vicinity of the Gs alpha-protein Asn-Gln interaction. Calculations at the HF 6-31G** level confirm that a critical balance between ion pair and neutral forms of Tyr-Arg interactions under multiply hydrogen bonded conditions in a hydrophobic environment controls proton transfer and recovery mechanisms. The intrinsic preference of the neutral Tyr-Arg form over the ion-pair is 14.0 kcal/mol. Activation of the Tyrosine oxygen atom in the neutral form by single-NH or -OH groups reduces this difference by some 6.4-8.6 kcal/mol but the dominance of the neutral form is maintained. The expected slight overestimates are consistent with the maximum activation enthalpy of 11.0-12.0 kcal/ mol required to initiate proton transfer through the shuttle. The extended form of the shuttle with the Arginine acting competitively between the two Tyrosine residues allows interpretation of observed

  7. Protein-protein interactions within the Fatty Acid Synthase-II system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for mycobacterial viability.

    PubMed

    Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Guerrini, Olivier; Mourey, Lionel; Daffé, Mamadou; Zerbib, Didier

    2004-12-01

    Despite the existence of efficient chemotherapy, tuberculosis remains a leading cause of mortality worldwide. New drugs are urgently needed to reduce the potential impact of the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The front-line antibiotic isoniazid (INH), and several other drugs, target the biosynthesis of mycolic acids and especially the Fatty Acid Synthase-II (FAS-II) elongation system. This biosynthetic pathway is essential and specific for mycobacteria and still represents a valuable system for the search of new anti-tuberculous agents. Several data, in the literature, suggest the existence of protein-protein interactions within the FAS-II system. These interactions themselves might serve as targets for a new generation of drugs directed against Mtb. By using an extensive in vivo yeast two-hybrid approach and in vitro co-immunoprecipitation, we have demonstrated the existence of both homotypic and heterotypic interactions between the known components of FAS-II. The condensing enzymes KasA, KasB and mtFabH interact with each other and with the reductases MabA and InhA. Furthermore, we have designed and constructed point mutations of the FAS-II reductase MabA, able to disrupt its homotypic interactions and perturb the interaction pattern of this protein within FAS-II. Finally, we showed by a transdominant genetic approach that these mutants are dominant negative in both non-pathogenic and pathogenic mycobacteria. These data allowed us to draw a dynamic model of the organization of FAS-II. They also represent an important step towards the design of a new generation of anti-tuberculous agents, as being inhibitors of essential protein-protein interactions. PMID:15554959

  8. A Novel Class of Plant Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Orsellinic Acid Biosynthesis from Rhododendron dauricum

    PubMed Central

    Taura, Futoshi; Iijima, Miu; Yamanaka, Eriko; Takahashi, Hironobu; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Saeki, Haruna; Morimoto, Satoshi; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Kurosaki, Fumiya; Morita, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rhododendron dauricum L. produces daurichromenic acid, the anti-HIV meroterpenoid consisting of sesquiterpene and orsellinic acid (OSA) moieties. To characterize the enzyme responsible for OSA biosynthesis, a cDNA encoding a novel polyketide synthase (PKS), orcinol synthase (ORS), was cloned from young leaves of R. dauricum. The primary structure of ORS shared relatively low identities to those of PKSs from other plants, and the active site of ORS had a unique amino acid composition. The bacterially expressed, recombinant ORS accepted acetyl-CoA as the preferable starter substrate, and produced orcinol as the major reaction product, along with four minor products including OSA. The ORS identified in this study is the first plant PKS that generates acetate-derived aromatic tetraketides, such as orcinol and OSA. Interestingly, OSA production was clearly enhanced in the presence of Cannabis sativa olivetolic acid cyclase, suggesting that the ORS is involved in OSA biosynthesis together with an unidentified cyclase in R. dauricum. PMID:27729920

  9. Orange protein has a role in phytoene synthase stabilization in sweetpotato.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon; Kim, Ho Soo; Jung, Young Jun; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Wang, Zhi; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have essential roles in light-harvesting processes and protecting the photosynthetic machinery from photo-oxidative damage. Phytoene synthase (PSY) and Orange (Or) are key plant proteins for carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. We previously isolated the sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) Or gene (IbOr), which is involved in carotenoid accumulation and salt stress tolerance. The molecular mechanism underlying IbOr regulation of carotenoid accumulation was unknown. Here, we show that IbOr has an essential role in regulating IbPSY stability via its holdase chaperone activity both in vitro and in vivo. This protection results in carotenoid accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance. IbOr transcript levels increase in sweetpotato stem, root, and calli after exposure to heat stress. IbOr is localized in the nucleus and chloroplasts, but interacts with IbPSY only in chloroplasts. After exposure to heat stress, IbOr predominantly localizes in chloroplasts. IbOr overexpression in transgenic sweetpotato and Arabidopsis conferred enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress. These results indicate that IbOr holdase chaperone activity protects IbPSY stability, which leads to carotenoid accumulation, and confers enhanced heat and oxidative stress tolerance in plants. This study provides evidence that IbOr functions as a molecular chaperone, and suggests a novel mechanism regulating carotenoid accumulation and stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27633588

  10. A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Lee, Byeong-Ha; Dellinger, Mike; Cui, Xinping; Zhang, Changqing; Wu, Shang; Nothnagel, Eugene A.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. PMID:20409003

  11. Orange protein has a role in phytoene synthase stabilization in sweetpotato

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon; Kim, Ho Soo; Jung, Young Jun; Kim, Sun Ha; Ji, Chang Yoon; Wang, Zhi; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids have essential roles in light-harvesting processes and protecting the photosynthetic machinery from photo-oxidative damage. Phytoene synthase (PSY) and Orange (Or) are key plant proteins for carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation. We previously isolated the sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) Or gene (IbOr), which is involved in carotenoid accumulation and salt stress tolerance. The molecular mechanism underlying IbOr regulation of carotenoid accumulation was unknown. Here, we show that IbOr has an essential role in regulating IbPSY stability via its holdase chaperone activity both in vitro and in vivo. This protection results in carotenoid accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance. IbOr transcript levels increase in sweetpotato stem, root, and calli after exposure to heat stress. IbOr is localized in the nucleus and chloroplasts, but interacts with IbPSY only in chloroplasts. After exposure to heat stress, IbOr predominantly localizes in chloroplasts. IbOr overexpression in transgenic sweetpotato and Arabidopsis conferred enhanced tolerance to heat and oxidative stress. These results indicate that IbOr holdase chaperone activity protects IbPSY stability, which leads to carotenoid accumulation, and confers enhanced heat and oxidative stress tolerance in plants. This study provides evidence that IbOr functions as a molecular chaperone, and suggests a novel mechanism regulating carotenoid accumulation and stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27633588

  12. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  13. Identification of proteins associated with RNA polymerase III using a modified tandem chromatin affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Thuy-Trinh; Saguez, Cyril; Conesa, Christine; Lefebvre, Olivier; Acker, Joël

    2015-02-01

    To identify the proteins associated with the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) machinery in exponentially growing yeast cells, we developed our own tandem chromatin affinity purification procedure (TChAP) after in vivo cross-link, allowing a reproducible and good recovery of the protein bait and its associated partners. In contrast to TFIIIA that could only be purified as a free protein, this protocol allows us to capture free Pol III together with Pol III bound on its target genes. Transcription factors, elongation factors, RNA-associated proteins and proteins involved in Pol III biogenesis were identified by mass spectrometry. Interestingly, the presence of all the TFIIIB subunits found associated with Pol III together with the absence of TFIIIC and chromatin factors including histones suggest that DNA-bound Pol III purified using TChAP is mainly engaged in transcription reinitiation.

  14. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  15. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is a target for TNBS-induced protein carbonylation in XS-106 dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Je, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Tae Hyung; Kim, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Hun; Lee, Ju Hee; Kim, Soo Chan; Lee, Sang-Kyou; Lee, Jaewon; Lee, Min-Geol

    2008-06-01

    ROS are produced in dendritic cells (DCs) during antigen presentation in contact hypersensitivity (CHS). As a result, ROS cause a number of nonenzymatic protein modifications, including carbonylation, which is the most widely used marker of oxidative stress. 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) is a well-characterized contact allergen that results in the formation of ROS. However, proteins that are carbonylated in DCs in response to TNBS have not been identified. To study ROS-dependent protein carbonylation in response to TNBS, we used the well-established mouse DC line, XS-106. We focused on the effects of TNBS on oxidation by examining selected oxidative markers. We identified TNBS-induced ROS and myeloperoxidase (MPO) proteins and demonstrated that the increase in ROS resulted in IL-12 production. The increase in oxidation was further confirmed by an oxidation-dependent increase in protein modifications, such as carbonylation. In fact, TNBS strongly induced carbonylation of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase in XS-106 DCs, as determined by MALDI-TOF analysis and 2-D Western blotting. ROS production and protein carbonylation were confirmed in human monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs). Furthermore, glutathione (GSH) decreased ROS and protein carbonylation in Mo-DCs. Carbonylation of ATP synthase in DCs may contribute to the pathophysiology of CHS.

  16. Cobalamin in inflammation III — glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to NG-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/NG-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the ‘base-off’ dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH4/BH3 radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  17. Cobalamin in inflammation III - glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the 'base-off' dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH(4)/BH(3) radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  18. Cloning, expression, and characterization of recombinant nitric oxide synthase-like protein from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Midha, Shuchi; Mishra, Rajeev; Aziz, M.A.; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Ashish; Khandelwal, Puneet; Bhatnagar, Rakesh . E-mail: rakbhat01@yahoo.com

    2005-10-14

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is amongst a family of evolutionarily conserved enzymes, involved in a multi-turnover process that results in NO as a product. The significant role of NO in various pathological and physiological processes has created an interest in this enzyme from several perspectives. This study describes for the first time, cloning and expression of a NOS-like protein, baNOS, from Bacillus anthracis, a pathogenic bacterium responsible for causing anthrax. baNOS was expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble and catalytically active enzyme. Homology models generated for baNOS indicated that the key structural features that are involved in the substrate and active site interaction have been highly conserved. Further, the behavior of baNOS in terms of heme-substrate interactions and heme-transitions was studied in detail. The optical perturbation spectra of the heme domain demonstrated that the ligands perturb the heme site in a ligand specific manner. baNOS forms a five-coordinate, high-spin complex with L-arginine analogs and a six-coordinate low-spin complex with inhibitor imidazole. Studies indicated that the binding of L-arginine, N {sup {omega}}-hydroxy-L-arginine, and imidazole produces various spectroscopic species that closely correspond to the equivalent complexes of mammalian NOS. The values of spectral binding constants further corroborated these results. The overall conservation of the key structural features and the correlation of heme-substrate interactions in baNOS and mammalian NOS, thus, point towards an interesting phenomenon of convergent evolution. Importantly, the NO generated by NOS of mammalian macrophages plays a potent role in antimicrobicidal activity. Because of the existence of high structural and behavioral similarity between mammalian NOS and baNOS, we propose that NO produced by B. anthracis may also have a pivotal pathophysiological role in anthrax infection. Therefore, this first report of characterization of a NOS

  19. Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase: localization of mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Nagegowda, Dinesh A; Ramalingam, Sathishkumar; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2005-08-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) synthase (HMGS; EC 2.3.3.10) synthesizes HMG-CoA, a substrate for mevalonate biosynthesis in the isoprenoid pathway. It catalyzes the condensation of acetyl-CoA with acetoacetyl-CoA (AcAc-CoA) to yield S-HMG-CoA and HS-CoA. In Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), HMGS is encoded by four isogenes (BjHMGS1-BjHMGS4). We have already enzymatically characterized recombinant BjHMGS1 expressed in Escherichia coli, and have identified its residues that are significant in catalysis. To further study HMGS mRNA expression that is developmentally regulated in flowers and seedlings, we have examined its mRNA distribution by in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed predominant localization of HMGS mRNA in the stigmas and ovules of flower buds and in the piths of seedling hypocotyls. RT-PCR analysis revealed that BjHMGS1 and BjHMGS2 but not BjHMGS3 and BjHMGS4were expressed in floral buds. To investigate the subcellular localization of BjHMGS1, we fused BjHMGS1 translationally in-frame either to the N- or C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP). BjHMGS1-GFP and GFP-BjHMGS1 fusions were used in particle gun bombardment of onion epidermal cells and tobacco BY-2 cells. The GFP-BjHMGS1 construct was also used in agroinfiltration of tobacco leaves. Both GFP-fusion proteins were observed transiently expressed in the cytosol on confocal microscopy of onion epidermal cells, tobacco BY-2 cells, and agroinfiltrated tobacco leaves. Further, subcellular fractionation of total proteins from transgenic plants expressing GFP-BjHMGS1 derived from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation confirmed that BjHMGS1 is a cytosolic enzyme. We suggest that the presence of BjHMGS isoforms is likely related to the specialization of each in different cellular and metabolic processes rather than to a different intracellular compartmentation of the enzyme.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  1. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection. PMID:26391171

  2. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  3. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-01

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  4. Starch synthase 4 is located in the thylakoid membrane and interacts with plastoglobule-associated proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M; Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Mérida, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Starch synthesis requires the formation of a primer that can be subsequently elongated and branched. How this primer is produced, however, remains unknown. The control of the number of starch granules produced per chloroplast is also a matter of debate. We previously showed starch synthase 4 (SS4) to be involved in both processes, although the mechanisms involved are yet to be fully characterised. The present work shows that SS4 displays a specific localization different from other starch synthases. Thus, this protein is located in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane and interacts with the proteins fibrillin 1a (FBN1a) and 1b (FBN1b), which are mainly located in plastoglobules. SS4 would seem to be associated with plastoglobules attached to the thylakoids (or to that portion of the thylakoids where plastoglobules have originated), forming a complex that includes the FBN1s and other as-yet unidentified proteins. The present results also indicate that the localization pattern of SS4, and its interactions with the FBN1 proteins, are mediated through its N-terminal region, which contains two long coiled-coil motifs. The localization of SS4 in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane suggests that starch granules are originated at specific regions of the chloroplast.

  5. Starch synthase 4 is located in the thylakoid membrane and interacts with plastoglobule-associated proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M; Raynaud, Sandy; Ragel, Paula; Mérida, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Starch synthesis requires the formation of a primer that can be subsequently elongated and branched. How this primer is produced, however, remains unknown. The control of the number of starch granules produced per chloroplast is also a matter of debate. We previously showed starch synthase 4 (SS4) to be involved in both processes, although the mechanisms involved are yet to be fully characterised. The present work shows that SS4 displays a specific localization different from other starch synthases. Thus, this protein is located in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane and interacts with the proteins fibrillin 1a (FBN1a) and 1b (FBN1b), which are mainly located in plastoglobules. SS4 would seem to be associated with plastoglobules attached to the thylakoids (or to that portion of the thylakoids where plastoglobules have originated), forming a complex that includes the FBN1s and other as-yet unidentified proteins. The present results also indicate that the localization pattern of SS4, and its interactions with the FBN1 proteins, are mediated through its N-terminal region, which contains two long coiled-coil motifs. The localization of SS4 in specific areas of the thylakoid membrane suggests that starch granules are originated at specific regions of the chloroplast. PMID:25088399

  6. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  7. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:27526699

  8. Acyl-carrier protein - Phosphopantetheinyltransferase partnerships in fungal fatty acid synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The synthesis of fatty acids is an essential primary metabolic process for energy storage and cellular structural integrity. Assembly of saturated fatty acids is achieved by fatty acid synthases (FASs) that combine acetyl- and malonyl-CoAs by repetitive decarboxylative Claisen condensations with su...

  9. Identification, immunolocalization, and immunological characterization of nitric oxide synthase-interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Meng; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Yanquan; Chen, Wenjun; Zhou, Chenhui; Chen, Xueqing; He, Lei; Xu, Jin; Liang, Chi; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-05-01

    Recently, accumulating evidences indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is a potent mediator with diverse roles in regulating cellular functions, signaling pathways, and variety of pathological processes. In the present study, using data from the published genomic for Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), we investigated a gene encoding nitric oxide synthase-interacting protein (NOSIP) of C. sinensis. Recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli BL21. The open reading frame of CsNOSIP comprises 867 bp which encodes 289 amino acids and shares 72.9, 45.2, 47, 46.4, and 45.8% identity with NOSIP from Schistosoma mansoni, Xenopus laevis, Rattus norvegicus, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the full-length sequence contains an eNOS-interacting domain and numerous B-cell epitopes. Quantitative RT-PCR indicated that CsNOSIP differentially transcribed throughout the adult worms, metacercariae, and egg stages of C. sinensis, and were highly expressed in the adult worms. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the rCsNOSIP could be detected by the serum from BALB/c mice infected with C. sinensis and the serum from BALB/c mice immunized with excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Furthermore, immunolocalization assay showed that CsNOSIP was specifically localized in the intestine, vitellarium, and eggs of adult worm. Both immunoblot and immunolocalization results demonstrated that CsNOSIP was one component of ESPs of C. sinensis, which could be supported by SignalP analysis. Moreover, analysis of the antibody subclass and cytokine profile demonstrated that subcutaneously immunized BALB/c mice with rCsNOSIP could significantly enhance serum IgG1 level and up-regulate expression of IL-4 and IL-6 in the splenocytes. Our results suggested that CsNOSIP was an important antigen exposed to host immune system and probably involved in immune regulation of host by inducing Th2-polarized immune response. PMID

  10. Homology modeling and docking studies of FabH (β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III) enzyme involved in type II fatty acid biosynthesis of Chlorella variabilis: a potential algal feedstock for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Misra, Namrata; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Panda, Prasanna Kumar; Sukla, Lala Bihari; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2013-03-01

    The concept of using microalgae as an alternative renewable source of biofuel has gained much importance in recent years. However, its commercial feasibility is still an area of concern for researchers. Unraveling the fatty acid metabolic pathway and understanding structural features of various key enzymes regulating the process will provide valuable insights to target microalgae for augmented oil content. FabH (β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase; KAS III) is a condensing enzyme catalyzing the initial elongation step of type II fatty acid biosynthetic process and acyl carrier protein (ACP) facilitates the shuttling of the fatty acyl intermediates to the active site of the respective enzymes in the pathway. In the present study, a reliable three-dimensional structure of FabH from Chlorella variabilis, an oleaginous green microalga was modeled and subsequently the key residues involved in substrate binding were determined by employing protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation protocols. The FabH-ACP complex having the lowest docking energy score showed the binding of ACP to the electropositive FabH surface with strong hydrogen bond interactions. The MD simulation results indicated that the substrate-complexed FabH adopted a more stable conformation than the free enzyme. Further, the FabH structure retained its stability throughout the simulation although noticeable displacements were observed in the loop regions. Molecular simulation studies suggested the importance of crucial hydrogen bonding of the conserved Arg(91) of FabH with Glu(53) and Asp(56) of ACP for exhibiting high affinity between the enzyme and substrate. The molecular modeling results are consistent with available experimental results on the flexibility of FabH and the present study provides first in silico insights into the structural and dynamical aspect of catalytic mechanism of FabH, which could be used for further site-specific mutagenic experiments to develop

  11. Recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III stimulates broad immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Shih-Jen; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Yu; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Chen, I-Hua; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-02-17

    The linkage of an immunogen with a toll-like receptor ligand has great potential to induce highly potent immune responses with the initial features of antigen-presenting cell activation. In the current study, we expressed recombinant dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (D3ED III) in lipidated form using an Escherichia coli-based system. The recombinant lipidated dengue-3 envelope protein domain III (LD3ED III) augments the expression levels of IL-12 family cytokines. LD3ED III-immunized mice enhance wide ranges of T cell responses as indicated by IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-21 production. Additionally, LD3ED III-immunized mice increase the frequencies of anti-D3ED III antibody producing cells. The boosted antibody titers cover various IgG isotypes, including IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3. Importantly, LD3ED III-immunized mice induce neutralizing antibody capacity associated with a reduction of viremia levels after challenges. In contrast, mice that are immunized with D3ED III formulated with aluminum phosphate (D3ED III/Alum) only enhance Th2 responses and boost IgG1 antibody titers. Neither neutralizing antibody responses nor the inhibition of viremia levels after challenge is observed in mice that are immunized with D3ED III/Alum. These results suggest that LD3ED III can induce broad profiles of cellular and humoral immune responses.

  12. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by a Novel Small Molecule Activator of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Symons, Kent T; Massari, Mark E; Dozier, Sara J; Nguyen, Phan M; Jenkins, David; Herbert, Mark; Gahman, Timothy C; Noble, Stewart A; Rozenkrants, Natasha; Zhang, Yan; Rao, Tadimeti S; Shiau, Andrew K; Hassig, Christian A

    2008-01-01

    The transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is activated by a network of proinflammatory signaling pathways. Here we describe the identification of a small molecule that downregulates the expression of iNOS mRNA and protein in cytokine-activated cells and suppresses nitric oxide production in vivo. Mechanistic analysis suggests that this small molecule, erstressin, also activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signaling pathway triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress. Erstressin induces rapid phosphorylation of eIF2α and the alternative splicing of XBP-1, hallmark initiating events of the UPR. Further, erstressin activates the transcription of multiple genes involved in the UPR. These data suggest an inverse relationship between UPR activation and iNOS mRNA and protein expression under proinflammatory conditions. PMID:20161838

  13. Interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang-Mei; Chu, Yun-Xia; Lv, Xiao-Fen; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Lanthanum (La) is an important rare earth element in the ecological environment of plant. The proteins on the plasma membrane control the transport of molecules into and out of cell. It is very important to investigate the effect of La(III) on the proteins on the plasma membrane in the plant cell. In the present work, the interaction between La(III) and proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish was investigated using optimization of the fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is found that the fluorescence of the complex system of protoplasts and 1-aniline Kenai-8-sulfonic acid in horseradish treated with the low concentration of La(III) is increased compared with that of the control horseradish. The opposite effect is observed in horseradish treated with the high concentration of La(III). These results indicated that the low concentration of La(III) can interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, causing the improvement in the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. The high concentration of La(III) can also interact with the proteins on the plasma membrane of horseradish, leading to the destruction of the structure of proteins on the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that the proteins on the plasma membrane are the targets of La(III) action on plant cell.

  14. Transmembrane BAX Inhibitor Motif Containing (TMBIM) Family Proteins Perturbs a trans-Golgi Network Enzyme, Gb3 Synthase, and Reduces Gb3 Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka; Hanada, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) is a well known receptor for Shiga toxin (Stx), produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae. The expression of Gb3 also affects several diseases, including cancer metastasis and Fabry disease, which prompted us to look for factors involved in its metabolism. In the present study, we isolated two cDNAs that conferred resistance to Stx-induced cell death in HeLa cells by expression cloning: ganglioside GM3 synthase and the COOH terminus region of glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl-d-asparate-associated protein 1 (GRINA), a member of the transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing (TMBIM) family. Overexpression of the truncated form, named GRINA-C, and some members of the full-length TMBIM family, including FAS inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2), reduced Gb3, and lactosylceramide was accumulated instead. The change of glycolipid composition was restored by overexpression of Gb3 synthase, suggesting that the synthase is affected by GRINA-C and FAIM2. Interestingly, the mRNA level of Gb3 synthase was unchanged. Rather, localization of the synthase as well as TGN46, a trans-Golgi network marker, was perturbed to form punctate structures, and degradation of the synthase in lysosomes was enhanced. Furthermore, GRINA-C was associated with Gb3 synthase. These observations may demonstrate a new type of posttranscriptional regulation of glycosyltransferases. PMID:20837469

  15. Transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing (TMBIM) family proteins perturbs a trans-Golgi network enzyme, Gb3 synthase, and reduces Gb3 biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Toshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka; Hanada, Kentaro

    2010-11-12

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) is a well known receptor for Shiga toxin (Stx), produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae. The expression of Gb3 also affects several diseases, including cancer metastasis and Fabry disease, which prompted us to look for factors involved in its metabolism. In the present study, we isolated two cDNAs that conferred resistance to Stx-induced cell death in HeLa cells by expression cloning: ganglioside GM3 synthase and the COOH terminus region of glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl-D-asparate-associated protein 1 (GRINA), a member of the transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing (TMBIM) family. Overexpression of the truncated form, named GRINA-C, and some members of the full-length TMBIM family, including FAS inhibitory molecule 2 (FAIM2), reduced Gb3, and lactosylceramide was accumulated instead. The change of glycolipid composition was restored by overexpression of Gb3 synthase, suggesting that the synthase is affected by GRINA-C and FAIM2. Interestingly, the mRNA level of Gb3 synthase was unchanged. Rather, localization of the synthase as well as TGN46, a trans-Golgi network marker, was perturbed to form punctate structures, and degradation of the synthase in lysosomes was enhanced. Furthermore, GRINA-C was associated with Gb3 synthase. These observations may demonstrate a new type of posttranscriptional regulation of glycosyltransferases.

  16. Effect of modification of the length and flexibility of the acyl carrier protein-thioesterase interdomain linker on functionality of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anil K; Witkowski, Andrzej; Berman, Harvey A; Zhang, Lei; Smith, Stuart

    2005-03-15

    A natural linker of approximately 20 residues connects the acyl carrier protein with the carboxy-terminal thioesterase domain of the animal fatty acid synthase. This study examines the effects of changes in the length and amino acid composition of this linker on catalytic activity, product composition, and segmental motion of the thioesterase domain. Deletion of 10 residues, almost half of the interdomain linker, had no effect on either mobility of the thioesterase domain, estimated from fluorescence polarization of a pyrenebutyl methylphosphono moiety bound covalently to the active site serine residue, or functionality of the fatty acid synthase; further shortening of the linker limited mobility of the thioesterase domain and resulted in reduced fatty acid synthase activity and an increase in product chain length from 16 to 18 and 20 carbon atoms. Surprisingly, however, even when the entire linker region was deleted, the fatty acid synthase retained 28% activity. Lengthening of the linker, by insertion of an unusually long acyl carrier protein-thioesterase linker from a modular polyketide synthase, increased mobility of the thioesterase domain without having any significant effect on catalytic properties of the complex. Interdomain linkers could also be used to tether, to the acyl carrier protein domain of the fatty acid synthase, a thioesterase active toward shorter chain length acyl thioesters generating novel short-chain fatty acid synthases. These studies reveal that although truncation of the interdomain linker partially impacts the ability of the thioesterase domain to terminate growth of the acyl chain, the overall integrity of the fatty acid synthase is quite tolerant to moderate changes in linker length and flexibility. The retention of fatty acid synthesizing activity on deletion of the entire linker region implies that the inherent flexibility of the phosphopantetheine "swinging arm" also contributes significantly to the successful docking of the long

  17. Safety assessment of a modified acetolactate synthase protein (GM-HRA) used as a selectable marker in genetically modified soybeans.

    PubMed

    Mathesius, C A; Barnett, J F; Cressman, R F; Ding, J; Carpenter, C; Ladics, G S; Schmidt, J; Layton, R J; Zhang, J X Q; Appenzeller, L M; Carlson, G; Ballou, S; Delaney, B

    2009-12-01

    Acetolactate synthase (ALS) enzymes have been isolated from numerous organisms including soybeans (Glycine max; GM-ALS) and catalyze the first common step in biosynthesis of branched chain amino acids. Expression of an ALS protein (GM-HRA) with two amino acid changes relative to native GM-ALS protein in genetically modified soybeans confers tolerance to herbicidal active ingredients and can be used as a selectable transformation marker. The safety assessment of the GM-HRA protein is discussed. Bioinformatics comparison of the amino acid sequence did not identify similarities to known allergenic or toxic proteins. In vitro studies demonstrated rapid degradation in simulated gastric fluid (<30s) and intestinal fluid (<1min). The enzymatic activity was completely inactivated at 50 degrees C for 15 min demonstrating heat lability. The protein expressed in planta is not glycosylated and genetically modified soybeans expressing the GM-HRA protein produced similar protein/allergen profiles as its non-transgenic parental isoline. No adverse effects were observed in mice following acute oral exposure at a dose of at least 436 mg/kg of body weight or in a 28-day repeated dose dietary toxicity study at doses up to 1247 mg/kg of body weight/day. The results demonstrate GM-HRA protein safety when used in agricultural biotechnology.

  18. Adenylosuccinate synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: homologous overexpression, purification and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lipps, G; Krauss, G

    1999-01-01

    Adenylosuccinate synthase (EC 6.3.4.4) catalyses the first committed step in the synthesis of adenosine. We have overexpressed the cloned gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ADE12) in S. cerevisiae. The recombinant enzyme exhibits similar kinetic behaviour to that of the native enzyme purified from S. cerevisiae. This ter-reactant dimeric enzyme shows Michaelis-Menten kinetics only with IMP. l-Aspartate and GTP display a weak negative co-operativity (Hill coefficient 0. 8-0.9). This negative co-operativity has not yet been reported for adenylosuccinate synthases from other organisms. Another unusual feature of the enzyme from S. cerevisiae is its negligible inhibition by adenine nucleotides and its pronounced inhibition by Cl(-) ions. PMID:10417315

  19. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Cyclic Peptidomimetics of the Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Binding Epitope That Disrupt the Protein-Protein Interaction Involving SPRY Domain-Containing Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Box Protein (SPSB) 2 and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Harjani, Jitendra R; Yap, Beow Keat; Leung, Eleanor W W; Lucke, Andrew; Nicholson, Sandra E; Scanlon, Martin J; Chalmers, David K; Thompson, Philip E; Norton, Raymond S; Baell, Jonathan B

    2016-06-23

    SPRY domain-containing suppressor of cytokine signaling box protein (SPSB) 2-deficient macrophages have been found to exhibit prolonged expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and enhanced killing of persistent pathogens, suggesting that inhibitors of the SPSB2-iNOS interaction have potential as novel anti-infectives. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of cyclic peptidomimetic inhibitors of the SPSB2-iNOS interaction constrained by organic linkers to improve stability and druggability. SPR, ITC, and (19)F NMR analyses revealed that the most potent cyclic peptidomimetic bound to the iNOS binding site of SPSB2 with low nanomolar affinity (KD 29 nM), a 10-fold improvement over that of the linear peptide DINNN (KD 318 nM), and showed strong inhibition of SPSB2-iNOS interaction in macrophage cell lysates. This study exemplifies a novel approach to cyclize a Type II β-turn linear peptide and provides a foundation for future development of this group of inhibitors as new anti-infectives.

  20. Arabidopsis MYC2 Interacts with DELLA Proteins in Regulating Sesquiterpene Synthase Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gao-Jie; Xue, Xue-Yi; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana flowers emit volatile terpenes, which may function in plant–insect interactions. Here, we report that Arabidopsis MYC2, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, directly binds to promoters of the sesquiterpene synthase genes TPS21 and TPS11 and activates their expression. Expression of TPS21 and TPS11 can be induced by the phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA), and both inductions require MYC2. The induction of TPS21 and TPS11 results in increased emission of sesquiterpene, especially (E)-β-caryophyllene. DELLAs, the GA signaling repressors, negatively affect sesquiterpene biosynthesis, as the sesquiterpene synthase genes were repressed in plants overaccumulating REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA), one of the Arabidopsis DELLAs, and upregulated in a penta DELLA-deficient mutant. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that DELLAs, represented by RGA, directly interact with MYC2. In yeast cells, the N terminus of MYC2 was responsible for binding to RGA. MYC2 has been proposed as a major mediator of JA signaling and crosstalk with abscisic acid, ethylene, and light signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that MYC2 is also connected to GA signaling in regulating a subset of genes. In Arabidopsis inflorescences, it integrates both GA and JA signals into transcriptional regulation of sesquiterpene synthase genes and promotes sesquiterpene production. PMID:22669881

  1. Homology analyses of the protein sequences of fatty acid synthases from chicken liver, rat mammary gland, and yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Soo-Ik ); Hammes, G.G. )

    1989-11-01

    Homology analyses of the protein sequences of chicken liver and rat mammary gland fatty acid synthases were carried out. The amino acid sequences of the chicken and rat enzymes are 67% identical. If conservative substitutions are allowed, 78% of the amino acids are matched. A region of low homologies exists between the functional domains, in particular around amino acid residues 1059-1264 of the chicken enzyme. Homologies between the active sites of chicken and rat and of chicken and yeast enzymes have been analyzed by an alignment method. A high degree of homology exists between the active sites of the chicken and rat enzymes. However, the chicken and yeast enzymes show a lower degree of homology. The DADPH-binding dinucleotide folds of the {beta}-ketoacyl reductase and the enoyl reductase sites were identified by comparison with a known consensus sequence for the DADP- and FAD-binding dinucleotide folds. The active sites of all of the enzymes are primarily in hydrophobic regions of the protein. This study suggests that the genes for the functional domains of fatty acid synthase were originally separated, and these genes were connected to each other by using different connecting nucleotide sequences in different species. An alternative explanation for the differences in rat and chicken is a common ancestry and mutations in the joining regions during evolution.

  2. Two redundant octanoyltransferases and one obligatory lipoyl synthase provide protein-lipoylation autonomy to plastids of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ewald, R; Hoffmann, C; Neuhaus, E; Bauwe, H

    2014-01-01

    Octanoyltransferases (LIP2) are important for the lipoylation of several α-ketoacid decarboxylases and glycine decarboxylase, all of which are essential multienzyme complexes of central metabolism, by attaching de novo-synthesised octanoyl moieties to the respective target subunits. Lipoyl synthase (LIP1) then inserts two sulphur atoms each into the protein-bound octanoyl chains to generate the functional lipoamide arms. In plants, most of the above multienzyme complexes occur only in mitochondria. Pyruvate dehydrogenase is an exception, since it also occurs in plastids. Plastidial LIP1 and LIP2 are known, but it is not clear how essential these enzymes are. Here, we report that not just one but two redundant LIP2 isoforms, LIP2p and LIP2p2, operate in plastids of Arabidopsis. The combined deletion of the two isoenzymes is embryo-lethal. Deletion of the plastidial lipoyl synthase LIP1p is also embryo-lethal, indicating that all plastidial LIP1 activity is due to LIP1p. These features suggest that protein lipoylation is based on an autonomous and partially redundant de novo lipoylation pathway in plastids.

  3. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  4. Identification of determinants in the protein partners aCBF5 and aNOP10 necessary for the tRNA:Psi55-synthase and RNA-guided RNA:Psi-synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sébastien; Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Loegler, Christine; Charpentier, Bruno; Branlant, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    Protein aNOP10 has an essential scaffolding function in H/ACA sRNPs and its interaction with the pseudouridine(Psi)-synthase aCBF5 is required for the RNA-guided RNA:Psi-synthase activity. Recently, aCBF5 was shown to catalyze the isomerization of U55 in tRNAs without the help of a guide sRNA. Here we show that the stable anchoring of aCBF5 to tRNAs relies on its PUA domain and the tRNA CCA sequence. Nonetheless, interaction of aNOP10 with aCBF5 can counterbalance the absence of the PUA domain or the CCA sequence and more generally helps the aCBF5 tRNA:Psi55-synthase activity. Whereas substitution of the aNOP10 residue Y14 by an alanine disturbs this activity, it only impairs mildly the RNA-guided activity. The opposite effect was observed for the aNOP10 variant H31A. Substitution K53A or R202A in aCBF5 impairs both the tRNA:Psi55-synthase and the RNA-guided RNA:Psi-synthase activities. Remarkably, the presence of aNOP10 compensates for the negative effect of these substitutions on the tRNA: Psi55-synthase activity. Substitution of the aCBF5 conserved residue H77 that is expected to extrude the targeted U residue in tRNA strongly affects the efficiency of U55 modification but has no major effect on the RNA-guided activity. This negative effect can also be compensated by the presence of aNOP10.

  5. Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, expression of a mouse full-length cDNA, and its localization on mouse chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Desnick, R.J.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-04-10

    Uroporphyrinogen-III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for the conversion of hydroxymethylbilane to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-S is the enzymatic defect in congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP), an autosomal recessive disorder. For the generation of a mouse model of CEP, the human URO-S cDNA was used to screen 2 X 10{sup 6} recombinants from a mouse adult liver cDNA library. Ten positive clones were isolated, and dideoxy sequencing of the entire 1.6-kb insert of clone pmUROS-1 revealed 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences of 144 and 623 bp, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 bp encoding a 265-amino-acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 28,501 Da. The mouse and human coding sequences had 80.5 and 77.8% nucleotide and amino acid identity, respectively. The authenticity of the mouse cDNA was established by expression of the active monomeric enzyme in Escherichia coli. In addition, the analysis of two multilocus genetic crosses localized the mouse gene on chromosome 7, consistent with the mapping of the human gene to a position of conserved synteny on chromosome 10. The isolation, expression, and chromosomal mapping of this full-length cDNA should facilitate studies of the structure and organization of the mouse genomic sequence and the development of a mouse model of CEP for characterization of the disease pathogenesis and evaluation of gene therapy. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  7. Stilbene Synthase and Chalcone Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Claus-Henning; Kindl, Helmut

    1984-01-01

    Cultured cells of Picea excelsa capable of forming stilbenes and flavanoids have been established. Unlike needles of intact plants containing piceatannol (3,3′,4′,5-tetrahydroxystilbene) and stilbene glycosides the cultured cells converted phenylalanine and p-coumaric acid primarily into resveratrol monomethyl ether (3,4′-dihydroxy-5-methoxystilbene) and naringenin. Partially purified enzyme preparations were assayed for chalcone synthase as well as for stilbene synthase activity converting malonyl-CoA plus p-coumaroyl-CoA into 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). Although stilbene synthase and chalcone synthase use the same substrates and exhibit similar molecular properties, i.e. molecular weight and subunit molecular weight, they are two different proteins. This difference was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and by means of monospecific antibodies. PMID:16663649

  8. Polarized deposition of basement membrane proteins depends on Phosphatidylinositol synthase and the levels of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Devergne, Olivier; Tsung, Karen; Barcelo, Gail; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2014-05-27

    The basement membrane (BM), a specialized sheet of the extracellular matrix contacting the basal side of epithelial tissues, plays an important role in the control of the polarized structure of epithelial cells. However, little is known about how BM proteins themselves achieve a polarized distribution. Here, we identify phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) as a critical regulator of the polarized secretion of BM proteins. A decrease of PIP2 levels, in particular through mutations in Phosphatidylinositol synthase (Pis) and other members of the phosphoinositide pathway, leads to the aberrant accumulation of BM components at the apical side of the cell without primarily affecting the distribution of apical and basolateral polarity proteins. In addition, PIP2 controls the apical and lateral localization of Crag (Calmodulin-binding protein related to a Rab3 GDP/GTP exchange protein), a factor specifically required to prevent aberrant apical secretion of BM. We propose that PIP2, through the control of Crag's subcellular localization, restricts the secretion of BM proteins to the basal side.

  9. Polypeptide composition of bacterial cyclic diguanylic acid-dependent cellulose synthase and the occurrence of immunologically crossreacting proteins in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.; Ross, P.; Weinhouse, H.; Amikam, D.; Volman, G.; Ohana, P.; Benziman, M. ); Calhoon, R.D.; Wong, Hing C.; Emerick, A.W. )

    1991-06-15

    To comprehend the catalytic and regulatory mechanism of the cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)-dependent cellulose synthase of Acetobacter xylinum and its relatedness to similar enzymes in other organisms, the structure of this enzyme was analyzed at the polypeptide level. The enzyme, purified 350-fold by enzyme-product entrapment, contains three major peptides (90, 67, and 54 kDa), which, based on direct photoaffinity and immunochemical labeling and amino acid sequence analysis, are constituents of the native cellulose synthase. Labeling of purified synthase with either ({sup 32}P)c-di-GMP or ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)UDP-glucose indicates that activator- and substrate-specific binding sites are most closely associated with the 67- and 54-kDa peptides, respectively, whereas marginal photolabeling is detected in the 90-k-Da peptide. However, antibodies raised against a protein derived from the cellulose synthase structural gene (bcsB) specifically label all three peptides. The authors suggest that the structurally related 67- and 54-kDa peptides are fragments proteolytically derived from the 90-kDa peptide encoded by bcsB. The anti-cellulose synthase antibodies crossreact with a similar set of peptides derived from other cellulose-producing microorganisms and plants such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Rhizobium leguminosarum, mung bean, peas, barley, and cotton. The occurrence of such cellulose synthase-like structures in plant species suggests that a common enzymatic mechanism for cellulose biogenesis is employed throughout nature.

  10. Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-10-24

    To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

  11. Proteomic profiling of cellulase-aid-extracted membrane proteins for functional identification of cellulose synthase complexes and their potential associated- components in cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ao; Wang, Ruyi; Li, Xianliang; Liu, Mingyong; Fan, Jian; Guo, Kai; Luo, Bing; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Shengqiu; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Bingrui; Peng, Liangcai; Xia, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers are an excellent model for understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants. In this study, we determined a high cellulose biosynthesis activity in vitro by optimizing biochemical reaction conditions in cotton fibers. By adding a commercial cellulase enzyme into fibers extraction process, we extracted markedly higher levels of GhCESA1 and GhCESA8 proteins and observed an increase in β-1,4-glucan and β-1,3-glucan products in vitro. LC-MS/MS analysis of anti-GhCESA8-immunoprecipitated proteins showed that 19 proteins could be found in three independent experiments including four CESAs (GhCESA1,2,7,8), five well-known non-CESA proteins, one callose synthase (CALS) and nine novel proteins. Notably, upon the cellulase treatment, four CESAs, one CALS and four novel proteins were measured at relatively higher levels by calculating total peptide counts and distinct peptide numbers, indicating that the cellulase-aid-extracted proteins most likely contribute to the increase in β-glucan products in vitro. These results suggest that the cellulase treatment may aid to release active cellulose synthases complexes from growing glucan chains and make them more amenable to extraction. To our knowledge, it is the first time report about the functional identification of the potential proteins that were associated with plant cellulose and callose synthases complexes by using the cellulase-aided protein extraction. PMID:27192945

  12. Proteomic profiling of cellulase-aid-extracted membrane proteins for functional identification of cellulose synthase complexes and their potential associated- components in cotton fibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ao; Wang, Ruyi; Li, Xianliang; Liu, Mingyong; Fan, Jian; Guo, Kai; Luo, Bing; Chen, Tingting; Feng, Shengqiu; Wang, Yanting; Wang, Bingrui; Peng, Liangcai; Xia, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers are an excellent model for understanding of cellulose biosynthesis in higher plants. In this study, we determined a high cellulose biosynthesis activity in vitro by optimizing biochemical reaction conditions in cotton fibers. By adding a commercial cellulase enzyme into fibers extraction process, we extracted markedly higher levels of GhCESA1 and GhCESA8 proteins and observed an increase in β-1,4-glucan and β-1,3-glucan products in vitro. LC-MS/MS analysis of anti-GhCESA8-immunoprecipitated proteins showed that 19 proteins could be found in three independent experiments including four CESAs (GhCESA1,2,7,8), five well-known non-CESA proteins, one callose synthase (CALS) and nine novel proteins. Notably, upon the cellulase treatment, four CESAs, one CALS and four novel proteins were measured at relatively higher levels by calculating total peptide counts and distinct peptide numbers, indicating that the cellulase-aid-extracted proteins most likely contribute to the increase in β-glucan products in vitro. These results suggest that the cellulase treatment may aid to release active cellulose synthases complexes from growing glucan chains and make them more amenable to extraction. To our knowledge, it is the first time report about the functional identification of the potential proteins that were associated with plant cellulose and callose synthases complexes by using the cellulase-aided protein extraction. PMID:27192945

  13. Infantile Refsum disease: deficiency of catalase-containing particles (peroxisomes), alkyldihydroxyacetone phosphate synthase and peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme proteins.

    PubMed

    Wanders, R J; Schutgens, R B; Schrakamp, G; van den Bosch, H; Tager, J M; Schram, A W; Hashimoto, T; Poll-Thé, B T; Saudubrau, J M

    1986-08-01

    In recent years a number of biochemical abnormalities have been described in patients with the infantile form of Refsum disease, including the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, trihydroxycoprostanoic acid and pipecolic acid. In this paper we show that catalase-containing particles (peroxisomes), alkyl dihydroxyacetone phosphate synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase protein are deficient in patients with infantile Refsum disease. These findings suggest that in the infantile form of Refsum disease, as in the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome the multiplicity of biochemical abnormalities is due to a deficiency of peroxisomes and hence to a generalized loss of peroxisomal functions. As a consequence the infantile form of Refsum disease can be diagnosed biochemically by methods already available for the prenatal and postnatal diagnosis of the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome.

  14. Norcoclaurine Synthase Is a Member of the Pathogenesis-Related 10/Bet v1 Protein Family[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jeong; Facchini, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) catalyzes the first committed step in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs). NCS from Thalictrum flavum (Tf NCS), Papaver somniferum (Ps NCS1 and Ps NCS2), and Coptis japonica (Cj PR10A) share substantial identity with pathogen-related 10 (PR10) and Bet v1 proteins, whose functions are not well understood. A distinct enzyme (Cj NCS1) with similarity to 2-oxoglutarate–dependent dioxygenases was suggested as the bona fide NCS in C. japonica. Here, we validate the exclusive role of PR10/Bet v1-type NCS enzymes in BIA metabolism. Immunolocalization of Ps NCS2 revealed its cell type–specific occurrence in phloem sieve elements, which contain all other known BIA biosynthetic enzymes. In opium poppy, NCS transcripts and proteins were abundant in root and stem, but at low levels in leaf and carpel. Silencing of NCS in opium poppy profoundly reduced alkaloid levels compared with controls. Immunoprecipitation of NCS from total protein extracts of T. flavum cells resulted in a nearly complete attenuation of NCS activity. A Ps NCS2–green fluorescent protein fusion introduced by microprojectile bombardment into opium poppy cells initially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum but subsequently sorted to the vacuole. In our hands, Cj NCS1 did not catalyze the formation of (S)-norcoclaurine from dopamine and 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde. PMID:21037103

  15. Rbs1, a new protein implicated in RNA polymerase III biogenesis in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Małgorzata; Makała, Ewa; Płonka, Marta; Bazan, Rafał; Gewartowski, Kamil; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Boguta, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) complex assembly and its transport to the nucleus. We demonstrate that a missense cold-sensitive mutation, rpc128-1007, in the sequence encoding the C-terminal part of the second largest Pol III subunit, C128, affects the assembly and stability of the enzyme. The cellular levels and nuclear concentration of selected Pol III subunits were decreased in rpc128-1007 cells, and the association between Pol III subunits as evaluated by coimmunoprecipitation was also reduced. To identify the proteins involved in Pol III assembly, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the rpc128-1007 mutation and selected the Rbs1 gene, whose overexpression enhanced de novo tRNA transcription in rpc128-1007 cells, which correlated with increased stability, nuclear concentration, and interaction of Pol III subunits. The rpc128-1007 rbs1Δ double mutant shows a synthetic growth defect, indicating that rpc128-1007 and rbs1Δ function in parallel ways to negatively regulate Pol III assembly. Rbs1 physically interacts with a subset of Pol III subunits, AC19, AC40, and ABC27/Rpb5. Additionally, Rbs1 interacts with the Crm1 exportin and shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus. We postulate that Rbs1 binds to the Pol III complex or subcomplex and facilitates its translocation to the nucleus.

  16. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Margaret A.; Joyce, Nigel I.; Genet, Russell A.; Cooper, Rebecca D.; Murray, Sarah R.; Noble, Alasdair D.; Butler, Ruth C.; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p < 0.001) were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD), starch branching enzyme I (SBEI) and the starch synthase III (SSIII) genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato. PMID:25806042

  17. Human brain prostaglandin D synthase has been evolutionarily differentiated from lipophilic-ligand carrier proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, A; Suzuki, Y; Igarashi, M; Eguchi, N; Toh, H; Urade, Y; Hayaishi, O

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs for glutathione-independent prostaglandin D synthase were isolated from cDNA libraries of human brain. The longest cDNA insert was 837 base pairs long and contained a coding region of 570 base pairs corresponding to 190 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 21,016. Between two cDNA inserts isolated from the two different libraries, nucleotide substitutions were observed at 16 positions, including conservative amino acid substitutions at 2 positions and nonconservative substitutions at 5 positions, indicating genetic heterogeneity of this enzyme in humans. The computer-assisted homology search revealed that the enzyme is a member of the lipocalin superfamily, comprising secretory hydrophobic molecule transporters, showing the greatest homology (28.8-29.4% identity; 51.3-53.1% similarity) to alpha 1-microglobulin among the members of this superfamily. In a phylogenetic tree of the superfamily, this enzyme, alpha 1-microglobulin, and the gamma chain of the complement component C8 form a cluster separate from the other 14 members. The two distinctive characteristics of glutathione-independent prostaglandin D synthase, as compared to the other members of this superfamily, are its enzymatic properties and its association with membranes that were probably acquired after evolutionary divergence of the two lipocalins. Based on the observed sequence homology, the tertiary structure of the enzyme was deduced to consist of an eight-stranded anti-parallel beta-barrel forming a hydrophobic pocket. Furthermore, the Cys-65 residue in the pocket, which is conserved only in the human and rat enzymes but not in other lipocalins, was considered to be a putative active site of the enzyme. Images PMID:1902577

  18. Protein nitration in cutaneous inflammation in the rat: essential role of inducible nitric oxide synthase and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Greenacre, S A B; Rocha, F A C; Rawlingson, A; Meinerikandathevan, S; Poston, R N; Ruiz, E; Halliwell, B; Brain, S D

    2002-01-01

    We have examined the relationship between neutrophil accumulation, NO• production and nitrated protein levels in zymosan-mediated inflammation in rat skin in vivo. Rats were anaesthetized and cutaneous inflammation was induced by zymosan (injected intradermally, i.d.). Experiments were carried out up to 48 h, in recovery procedures as appropriate. Assays for neutrophil accumulation (measurement of myeloperoxidase), nitric oxide (assessment of NO2−/NO3−) and nitrated proteins (detected by ELISA and Western blot) were performed in skin extracts. The results demonstrate a close temporal relationship between these parameters. Samples were assayed at 1, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h after i.d. injection of zymosan. The highest levels measured of each parameter (P<0.001 compared with vehicle) were found at 4–8 h, with a reduction towards basal levels by 24 h. Selective depletion of circulating neutrophils with anti-neutrophil antibody abolished neutrophil accumulation and protein nitration. In addition substantially decreased NO levels were found. A selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, N-3-aminomethyl-benzyl-acetamidine-dihydrochloride (1400W) also significantly reduced neutrophil levels and NO production and substantially inhibited protein nitration. We conclude that the neutrophil leukocyte plays an essential role in the formation of iNOS-derived NO and nitrated proteins in inflammation, in a time-dependent and reversible manner. The NO-derived iNOS also has a role in stimulating further neutrophil accumulation into skin. This suggests a close mechanistic coupling between neutrophils, NO production and protein nitration. PMID:12145098

  19. Repulsive axon guidance by Draxin is mediated by protein Kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and microtubule-associated protein 1B.

    PubMed

    Meli, Rajeshwari; Weisová, Petronela; Propst, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Draxin is an important axon guidance cue necessary for the formation of forebrain commissures including the corpus callosum, but the molecular details of draxin signaling are unknown. To unravel how draxin signals are propagated we used murine cortical neurons and genetic and pharmacological approaches. We found that draxin-induced growth cone collapse critically depends on draxin receptors (deleted in colorectal cancer, DCC), inhibition of protein kinase B/Akt, activation of GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β) and the presence of microtubule-associated protein MAP1B. This study, for the first time elucidates molecular events in draxin repulsion, links draxin and DCC to MAP1B and identifies a novel MAP1B-depenent GSK-3β pathway essential for chemo-repulsive axon guidance cue signaling.

  20. Flavone inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, nitric oxide production and protein S-nitrosylation in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenzhen; Yang, Bingwu; Fu, Huiling; Ma, Long; Liu, Tingting; Chai, Rongfei; Zheng, Zhaodi; Zhang, Qunye; Li, Guorong

    2015-03-13

    As the core structure of flavonoids, flavone has been proved to possess anticancer effects. Flavone's growth inhibitory functions are related to NO. NO is synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and generally increased in a variety of cancer cells. NO regulates multiple cellular responses by S-nitrosylation. In this study, we explored flavone-induced regulations on nitric oxide (NO)-related cellular processes in breast cancer cells. Our results showed that, flavone suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation and induces apoptosis. Flavone restrains NO synthesis by does-dependent inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity. The decrease of NO generation was detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Flavone-induced inhibitory effect on NOS activity is dependent on intact cell structure. For the NO-induced protein modification, flavone treatment significantly down-regulated protein S-nitrosylation, which was detected by “Biotin-switch” method. The present study provides a novel, NO-related mechanism for the anticancer function of flavone. - Highlights: • Flavone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. • Flavone decreases nitric oxide production by inhibiting NOS enzymatic activity in breast cancer cells. • Flavone down-regulates protein S-nitrosylation.

  1. The dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding protein c of ATP synthase from Escherichia coli is not sufficient to express an efficient H+ conduction.

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, P; Bienhaus, G; Hoppe, J; Schairer, H U

    1981-01-01

    Bacteriophage Mu was inserted into the unc genes of Escherichia coli. The resulting mutation AS12 had a polar effect on the unc operon: membranes of the mutant AS12 contained the dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-binding protein c and the protein a as sole subunits of the ATP synthase. It was shown by peptide mapping and amino acid analysis of the fragments that protein c from mutant AS12 was identical with the wild-type protein c. The absence of subunit b in mutant AS12 drastically lowered the H+ conduction dependent on the membrane-integrated moiety (F0) of the ATP synthase. This suggests that both subunits b and c are necessary for an efficient expression of H+ conduction. Images PMID:6273880

  2. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC. PMID:22104301

  3. Evidence for a Nonendosomal Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ESCRT-III-Like Protein Chm7.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Iva; Brune, Thomas; Preiss, Richard; Kölling, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) proteins are involved in a number of cellular processes, such as endosomal protein sorting, HIV budding, cytokinesis, plasma membrane repair, and resealing of the nuclear envelope during mitosis. Here we explored the function of a noncanonical member of the ESCRT-III protein family, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ortholog of human CHMP7. Very little is known about this protein. In silico analysis predicted that Chm7 (yeast ORF YJL049w) is a fusion of an ESCRT-II and ESCRT-III-like domain, which would suggest a role in endosomal protein sorting. However, our data argue against a role of Chm7 in endosomal protein sorting. The turnover of the endocytic cargo protein Ste6 and the vacuolar protein sorting of carboxypeptidase S (CPS) were not affected by CHM7 deletion, and Chm7 also responded very differently to a loss in Vps4 function compared to a canonical ESCRT-III protein. Our data indicate that the Chm7 function could be connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In line with a function at the ER, we observed a strong negative genetic interaction between the deletion of a gene function (APQ12) implicated in nuclear pore complex assembly and messenger RNA (mRNA) export and the CHM7 deletion. The patterns of genetic interactions between the APQ12 deletion and deletions of ESCRT-III genes, two-hybrid interactions, and the specific localization of mCherry fusion proteins are consistent with the notion that Chm7 performs a novel function at the ER as part of an alternative ESCRT-III complex.

  4. Zcchc8 is a glycogen synthase kinase-3 substrate that interacts with RNA-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, Michael P.; Welcker, Markus; Hwang, Harry C.; Clurman, Bruce E. . E-mail: bclurman@fhcrc.org

    2005-12-23

    Phosphorylation of c-Myc on threonine 58 (T58) stimulates its degradation by the Fbw7-SCF ubiquitin ligase. We used a phosphorylation-specific antibody raised against the c-Myc T58 region to attempt to identify other proteins regulated by the Fbw7 pathway. We identified two predominant proteins recognized by this antibody. The first is Ebna1 binding protein 2, a nucleolar protein that, in contrast with a previous report, is likely responsible for the nucleolar staining exhibited by this antibody. The second is Zcchc8, a nuclear protein that is highly phosphorylated in cells treated with nocodazole. We show that Zcchc8 is directly phosphorylated by GSK-3 in vitro and that GSK-3 inhibition prevents Zcchc8 phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, we found that Zcchc8 interacts with proteins involved in RNA processing/degradation. We suggest that Zcchc8 is a GSK-3 substrate with a role in RNA metabolism.

  5. /sup 13/C NMR studies of porphobilinogen synthase: observation of intermediates bound to a 280,000-dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, E.K.; Markham, G.D.

    1987-07-14

    /sup 13/C NMR has been used to observe the equilibrium complex of (4-/sup 13/C)-5-aminolevulinate ((4-/sup 13/C)ALA) bound to porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), a 280,000-dalton protein. (4-/sup 13/C)ALA (chemical shift = 205.9 ppm) forms (3,5-/sup 13/C)PBG (chemical shifts = 121.0 and 123.0 ppm). PBG prepared from a mixture of (4-/sup 13/C)ALA and (/sup 15/N)ALA was used to assign the 121.0 and 123.0 ppm resonances to C/sub 5/ and C/sub 3/, respectively. For the enzyme-bound equilibrium complex formed from holoenzyme and (4-/sup 13/C)ALA, two peaks of equal area with chemical shifts of 121.5 and 127.2 ppm are observed (line widths approx. 50 Hz), indicating that the predominant species is probably a distorted form of PBG. When excess free PBG is present, it is in slow exchange with bound PBG, indicating an exchange rate of < 10 s/sup -1/, which is consistent with the turnover rate of the enzyme. For the complex formed from (4-/sup 13/C)ALA and methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) modified PBG synthase, which does not catalyze PBG formation, the predominant species is a Schiff base adduct (chemical shift = 166.5 ppm, line width approx. 50 Hz). Free ALA is in slow exchange with the Schiff base. Activation of the MMTS-modified enzyme-Schiff base complex with /sup 113/Cd and 2-mercaptoethanol results in the loss of the Schiff base signal and the appearance of bound PBG with the same chemical shifts as for the bound equilibrium complex with Zn(II) enzyme. Neither splitting nor broadening from /sup 113/Cd-/sup 13/C coupling was observed.

  6. Bacterially expressed and refolded envelope protein (domain III) of dengue virus type-4 binds heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Pattnaik, Priyabrata; Babu, J Pradeep; Verma, Shailendra Kumar; Tak, Vijay; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2007-02-01

    An arboviral infection like dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) with high morbidity and mortality rate are extensively prevalent in several parts of the world. Global efforts have been directed towards development of vaccine for prevention of dengue. However, lack of thorough understanding about biology and pathogenesis of dengue virus restricts us from development of an effective vaccine. Here we report molecular interaction of domain III of envelope protein of dengue virus type-4 with heparan sulfate. A codon optimized synthetic gene encoding domain III of dengue virus type-4 envelope protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified under denaturing conditions, refolded and purified to homogeneity. Refolded Den4-DIII was characterized using biochemical and biophysical methods and shown to be pure and homogeneous. The purified protein was recognized in Western analyses by monoclonal antibody specific for the 6x His tag as well as the H241 monoclonal antibody. The in vitro refolded recombinant protein preparation was biologically functional and found to bind cell free heparan sulfate. This is the first report providing molecular evidence on binding of dengue-4 envelope protein to heparan sulfate. We developed a homology model of dengue-4 envelope protein (domain III) and mapped the possible amino acid residues critical for binding to heparan sulfate. Domain III envelope protein of dengue virus is a lead vaccine candidate. Our findings further the understanding on biology of dengue virus and will help in development of bioassay for the proposed vaccine candidate.

  7. Prostaglandin E synthase interacts with inducible heat shock protein 70 after heat stress in bovine primary dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Constanze; Viergutz, Torsten; Schwerin, Manfred; Weitzel, Joachim M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to heat stress in dairy cows leads to undesired side effects that are reflected by complex alterations in endocrine parameters, such as reduced progesterone, estradiol, and thyroid hormone concentrations. These endocrine maladaptation leads to failure to resume cyclicity, a poor uterine environment and inappropriate immune responses in postpartum dairy cows. Prostaglandins (PG's) are lipid mediators, which serve as signal molecules in response to various external stimuli as well as to cell-specific internal signal molecules. A central role in PG synthesis plays prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) that catalyzes the isomerization of PGH2 to PGE2 .The present study was conducted to investigate heat stress associated PGES expression. Expression of PGES and inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), as a putative chaperonic protein, was studied in bovine primary fibroblasts under different heat shock conditions. Bovine primary fibroblasts produce PGE2 at homoiothermical norm temperature (38.5°C in bovine), but reduce PGE2 production rates under extreme heat stress (at 45°C for 6 h). By contrast, PGE2 production rates are maintained after a milder heat stress (at 41.5°C for 6 h). PGE2 synthesis is abolished by application of cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, indicating de novo synthesis. Heat stress increases HSP70 but not PGES protein concentrations. HSP70 physically interacts with PGES and the PGES-HSP70 complex did not dissociate upon heat stress at 45°C even after returning the cells to 37°C. The PGE2 production negatively correlates with the portion of PGES-HSP70 complex. These results suggest a protein interaction between HSP70 and PGES in dermal fibroblast cells. Blockage of PGES protein by HSP70 seems to interfere with the regulatory processes essential for cellular adaptive protection. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Benzophenone synthase from Garcinia mangostana L. pericarps.

    PubMed

    Nualkaew, Natsajee; Morita, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Kinjo, Keishi; Kushiro, Tetsuo; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Abe, Ikuro

    2012-05-01

    The cDNA of a benzophenone synthase (BPS), a type III polyketide synthase (PKS), was cloned and the recombinant protein expressed from the fruit pericarps of Garcinia mangostana L., which contains mainly prenylated xanthones. The obtained GmBPS showed an amino acid sequence identity of 77-78% with other plant BPSs belonging to the same family (Clusiaceae). The recombinant enzyme produced 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzophenone as the predominant product with benzoyl CoA as substrate. It also accepted other substrates, such as other plant PKSs, and used 1-3 molecules of malonyl CoA to form various phloroglucinol-type and polyketide lactone-type compounds. Thus, providing GmBPS with various substrates in vivo might redirect the xanthone biosynthetic pathway.

  9. Structure and Interactions of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I.; Ebel, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL−1 and at temperatures of 20°C, 6°C, and 4°C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface. PMID:20643081

  10. Structure and interactions of fish type III antifreeze protein in solution.

    PubMed

    Salvay, Andrés G; Gabel, Frank; Pucci, Bernard; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I; Ebel, Christine

    2010-07-21

    It has been suggested that above a critical protein concentration, fish Type III antifreeze protein (AFP III) self-assembles to form micelle-like structures that may play a key role in antifreeze activity. To understand the complex activity of AFP III, a comprehensive description of its association state and structural organization in solution is necessary. We used analytical ultracentrifugation, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering to characterize the interactions and homogeneity of AFP III in solution. Small-angle neutron scattering was used to determine the low-resolution structure in solution. Our results clearly show that at concentrations up to 20 mg mL(-1) and at temperatures of 20 degrees C, 6 degrees C, and 4 degrees C, AFP III is monomeric in solution and adopts a structure compatible with that determined by crystallography. Surface tension measurements show a propensity of AFP III to localize at the air/water interface, but this surface activity is not correlated with any aggregation in the bulk. These results support the hypothesis that each AFP III molecule acts independently of the others, and that specific intermolecular interactions between monomers are not required for binding to ice. The lack of attractive interactions between monomers may be functionally important, allowing for more efficient binding and covering of the ice surface.

  11. A Mitochondrial ATP synthase Subunit Interacts with TOR Signaling to Modulate Protein Homeostasis and Lifespan in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; Wheeler, Charles T.; Yolitz, Jason; Laslo, Mara; Alberico, Thomas; Sun, Yaning; Song, Qisheng; Zou, Sige

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Diet composition is a critical determinant of lifespan and nutrient imbalance is detrimental health. However, how nutrients interact with genetic factors to modulate lifespan remains elusive. We investigated how diet composition influences mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit d (ATPsyn-d) in modulating lifespan in Drosophila. ATPsyn-d knockdown extended lifespan in females fed low carbohydrate-to-protein (C:P) diets, but not the high C:P ratio diet. This extension was associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress, transcriptional changes in metabolism, proteostasis and immune genes, reduced protein damage and aggregation, and reduced phosphorylation of S6K and ERK in TOR and MAPK signaling, respectively. ATPsyn-d knockdown did not extend lifespan in females with reduced TOR signaling induced genetically by Tsc2 overexpression or pharmacologically by rapamycin. Our data reveal a link among diet, mitochondria, MAPK and TOR signaling in aging and stresses the importance of considering genetic background and diet composition in implementing interventions for promoting healthy aging. PMID:25220459

  12. Distinct parts of leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase interact with 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strid, Tobias; Svartz, Jesper; Franck, Niclas; Hallin, Elisabeth; Ingelsson, Bjoern; Soederstroem, Mats; Hammarstroem, Sven

    2009-04-17

    Leukotriene C{sub 4} is a potent inflammatory mediator formed from arachidonic acid and glutathione. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO), 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) and leukotriene C{sub 4} synthase (LTC{sub 4}S) participate in its biosynthesis. We report evidence that LTC{sub 4}S interacts in vitro with both FLAP and 5-LO and that these interactions involve distinct parts of LTC{sub 4}S. FLAP bound to the N-terminal part/first hydrophobic region of LTC{sub 4}S. This part did not bind 5-LO which bound to the second hydrophilic loop of LTC{sub 4}S. Fluorescent FLAP- and LTC{sub 4}S-fusion proteins co-localized at the nuclear envelope. Furthermore, GFP-FLAP and GFP-LTC{sub 4}S co-localized with a fluorescent ER marker. In resting HEK293/T or COS-7 cells GFP-5-LO was found mainly in the nuclear matrix. Upon stimulation with calcium ionophore, GFP-5-LO translocated to the nuclear envelope allowing it to interact with FLAP and LTC{sub 4}S. Direct interaction of 5-LO and LTC{sub 4}S in ionophore-stimulated (but not un-stimulated) cells was demonstrated by BRET using GFP-5-LO and Rluc-LTC{sub 4}S.

  13. Sestrin 2 and AMPK Connect Hyperglycemia to Nox4-Dependent Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Matrix Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Assaad A.; Lee, Doug-Yoon; Roman, Linda J.; Khazim, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Mesangial matrix accumulation is an early feature of glomerular pathology in diabetes. Oxidative stress plays a critical role in hyperglycemia-induced glomerular injury. Here, we demonstrate that, in glomerular mesangial cells (MCs), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is uncoupled upon exposure to high glucose (HG), with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased production of nitric oxide. Peroxynitrite mediates the effects of HG on eNOS dysfunction. HG upregulates Nox4 protein, and inhibition of Nox4 abrogates the increase in ROS and peroxynitrite generation, as well as the eNOS uncoupling triggered by HG, demonstrating that Nox4 functions upstream from eNOS. Importantly, this pathway contributes to HG-induced MC fibronectin accumulation. Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction was confirmed in glomeruli of a rat model of type 1 diabetes. Sestrin 2-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation attenuates HG-induced MC fibronectin synthesis through blockade of Nox4-dependent ROS and peroxynitrite generation, with subsequent eNOS uncoupling. We also find that HG negatively regulates sestrin 2 and AMPK, thereby promoting Nox4-mediated eNOS dysfunction and increased fibronectin. These data identify a protective function for sestrin 2/AMPK and potential targets for intervention to prevent fibrotic injury in diabetes. PMID:23816887

  14. Crystal structure of the Yersinia type III secretion protein YscE

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Jason; Austin, Brian P.; Waugh, David S.

    2010-12-06

    The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a contact-dependent (type III) secretion system (T3SS) to transport virulence factors from the bacterial cytosol directly into the interior of mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. The type III secretion apparatus is composed of 20-25 different Yersinia secretion (Ysc) proteins. We report here the structure of YscE, the smallest Ysc protein, which is a dimer in solution. The probable mode of oligomerization is discussed.

  15. Trapping Open and Closed Forms of FitE-A Group III Periplasmic Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, R.; Proteau, A; Wagner, J; Cui, Q; Purisima, E; Matte, A; Cygler, M

    2009-01-01

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single {alpha}-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore.

  16. Role of Heat Shock Protein 90 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase during Early Anesthetic and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K.; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Billstrom, Amie R.; Zielonka, Jacek; Krolikowski, John G.; Bienengraeber, Martin W.; Warltier, David C.; Pratt, Philip F.; Kersten, Judy R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide is known to be essential for early anesthetic (APC) and ischemic (IPC) preconditioning of myocardium. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Hsp90-eNOS interactions modulate APC and IPC. Methods Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits after coronary occlusion and reperfusion in the absence or presence of preconditioning with 30 min of isoflurane (APC) or 5 min of coronary artery occlusion (IPC), and with or without pre-treatment with geldanamycin or radicicol, two chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester, a non-specific NOS inhibitor. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells or mouse cardiomyocytes, in the absence or presence of Hsp90 inhibitors or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester. Interactions between Hsp90 and eNOS, and eNOS activation were assessed with immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy. Results APC and IPC decreased infarct size (50% and 59%, respectively) and this action was abolished by Hsp90 inhibitors. NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester blocked APC but not IPC. Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells, concomitantly with an increase in Hsp90-eNOS interaction (immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry). Pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors abolished isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production and decreased Hsp90-eNOS interactions. Isoflurane did not increase nitric oxide production in mouse cardiomyocytes and eNOS was below the level of detection. Conclusion The results indicate that Hsp90 plays a critical role in mediating APC and IPC through protein-protein interactions, and suggest that endothelial cells are important contributors to nitric oxide-mediated signalling during APC. PMID:19194158

  17. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β. PMID:25935310

  18. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β.

  19. Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae Type III Effector XopN Targets OsVOZ2 and a Putative Thiamine Synthase as a Virulence Factor in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hoon; Kim, Chi-Yeol; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Lee, Byoung-Moo; Sun Moon, Jae; Hwang, Ingyu

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonasoryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is spread systemically through the xylem tissue and causes bacterial blight in rice. We evaluated the roles of Xanthomonas outer proteins (Xop) in the Xoo strain KXO85 in a Japonica-type rice cultivar, Dongjin. Five xop gene knockout mutants (xopQKXO85, xopXKXO85, xopP1KXO85, xopP2KXO85, and xopNKXO85) were generated by EZ-Tn5 mutagenesis, and their virulence was assessed in 3-month-old rice leaves. Among these mutants, the xopNKXO85 mutant appeared to be less virulent than the wild-type KXO85; however, the difference was not statistically significant. In contrast, the xopNKXO85 mutant exhibited significantly less virulence in flag leaves after flowering than the wild-type KXO85. These observations indicate that the roles of Xop in Xoo virulence are dependent on leaf stage. We chose the xopN gene for further characterization because the xopNKXO85 mutant showed the greatest influence on virulence. We confirmed that XopNKXO85 is translocated into rice cells, and its gene expression is positively regulated by HrpX. Two rice proteins, OsVOZ2 and a putative thiamine synthase (OsXNP), were identified as targets of XopNKXO85 by yeast two-hybrid screening. Interactions between XopNKXO85 and OsVOZ2 and OsXNP were further confirmed in planta by bimolecular fluorescence complementation and in vivo pull-down assays. To investigate the roles of OsVOZ2 in interactions between rice and Xoo, we evaluated the virulence of the wild-type KXO85 and xopNKXO85 mutant in the OsVOZ2 mutant line PFG_3A-07565 of Dongjin. The wild-type KXO85 and xopNKXO85 mutant were significantly less virulent in the mutant rice line. These results indicate that XopNKXO85 and OsVOZ2 play important roles both individually and together for Xoo virulence in rice. PMID:24019919

  20. A GTP-binding protein regulates the activity of (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase, an enzyme directly involved in yeast cell wall morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mol, P C; Park, H M; Mullins, J T; Cabib, E

    1994-12-01

    Synthesis of (1-->3)-beta-D-glucan, the major structural component of the yeast cell wall, is synchronized with the budding cycle. Membrane-bound, GTP-stimulated (1-->3)-beta-glucan synthase was dissociated by stepwise treatment with salt and detergents into two soluble fractions, A and B, both required for activity. Fraction A was purified about 800-fold by chromatography on Mono Q and Sephacryl S-300 columns. During purification, GTP binding to protein correlated with synthase complementing activity. A 20-kDa GTP-binding protein was identified by photolabeling in the purified preparation. This preparation no longer required GTP for activity, but incubation with another fraction from the Mono Q column (A1) led to hydrolysis of bound GTP to GDP with a concomitant return of the GTP requirement. Thus, fraction A1 appears to contain a GTPase-activating protein. These results show that the GTP-binding protein not only regulates glucan synthase activity but can be regulated in turn, constituting a potential link between cell cycle controls and wall morphogenesis. PMID:7983071

  1. Alpha C Protein as a Carrier for Type III Capsular Polysaccharide and as a Protective Protein in Group B Streptococcal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Kasper, Dennis L.; Paoletti, Lawrence C.; Madoff, Lawrence C.

    1999-01-01

    The alpha C protein, a protective surface protein of group B streptococci (GBS), is present in most non-type III GBS strains. Conjugate vaccines composed of the alpha C protein and type III capsular polysaccharide (CPS) might be protective against most GBS infections. In this study, the type III CPS was covalently coupled to full-length, nine-repeat alpha C protein (resulting in III-α9r conjugate vaccine) or to two-repeat alpha C protein (resulting in III-α2r conjugate vaccine) by reductive amination. Initial experiments with the III-α9r vaccine showed that it was poorly immunogenic in mice with respect to both vaccine antigens and was suboptimally efficacious in providing protection in mice against challenge with GBS. Therefore, modified vaccination protocols were used with the III-α2r vaccine. Female mice were immunized three times with 0.5, 5, or 20 μg of the III-α2r vaccine with an aluminum hydroxide adjuvant and bred. Ninety-five percent of neonatal mice born to dams immunized with the III-α2r vaccine survived challenge with GBS expressing type III CPS, and 60% survived challenge with GBS expressing wild-type (nine-repeat) alpha C protein; 18 and 17%, respectively, of mice in the negative control groups survived (P, <0.0001). These protection levels did not differ significantly from those obtained with the type III CPS-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine and the unconjugated two-repeat alpha C protein, which protected 98 and 58% of neonates from infection with GBS expressing type III CPS or the alpha C protein, respectively. Thus, the two-repeat alpha C protein in the vaccine was immunogenic and simultaneously enhanced the immunogenicity of type III CPS. III-α vaccines may be alternatives to GBS polysaccharide-tetanus toxoid vaccines, eliciting additional antibodies protective against GBS infection. PMID:10225912

  2. The Major Antigenic Membrane Protein of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris” Selectively Interacts with ATP Synthase and Actin of Leafhopper Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Galetto, Luciana; Bosco, Domenico; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Fletcher, Jacqueline; Marzachì, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas, uncultivable phloem-limited phytopathogenic wall-less bacteria, represent a major threat to agriculture worldwide. They are transmitted in a persistent, propagative manner by phloem-sucking Hemipteran insects. Phytoplasma membrane proteins are in direct contact with hosts and are presumably involved in determining vector specificity. Such a role has been proposed for phytoplasma transmembrane proteins encoded by circular extrachromosomal elements, at least one of which is a plasmid. Little is known about the interactions between major phytoplasma antigenic membrane protein (Amp) and insect vector proteins. The aims of our work were to identify vector proteins interacting with Amp and to investigate their role in transmission specificity. In controlled transmission experiments, four Hemipteran species were identified as vectors of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris”, the chrysanthemum yellows phytoplasmas (CYP) strain, and three others as non-vectors. Interactions between a labelled (recombinant) CYP Amp and insect proteins were analysed by far Western blots and affinity chromatography. Amp interacted specifically with a few proteins from vector species only. Among Amp-binding vector proteins, actin and both the α and β subunits of ATP synthase were identified by mass spectrometry and Western blots. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blots of plasma membrane and mitochondrial fractions confirmed the localisation of ATP synthase, generally known as a mitochondrial protein, in plasma membranes of midgut and salivary gland cells in the vector Euscelidius variegatus. The vector-specific interaction between phytoplasma Amp and insect ATP synthase is demonstrated for the first time, and this work also supports the hypothesis that host actin is involved in the internalization and intracellular motility of phytoplasmas within their vectors. Phytoplasma Amp is hypothesized to play a crucial role in insect transmission specificity. PMID

  3. HMP Binding Protein ThiY and HMP-P Synthase THI5 Are Structural Homologues

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Perry, Kay; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-10-14

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter system ThiXYZ transports N-formyl-4-amino-5-(aminomethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (FAMP), a thiamin salvage pathway intermediate, into cells. FAMP is then converted to 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) and recycled into the thiamin biosynthetic pathway. ThiY is the periplasmic substrate binding protein of the ThiXYZ system and delivers the substrate FAMP to the transmembrane domain. We report the crystal structure of Bacillus halodurans ThiY with FAMP bound at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. The crystal structure reveals that ThiY belongs to the group II periplasmic binding protein family. The closest structural homologues of ThiY are periplasmic binding proteins involved in alkanesulfonate/nitrate and bicarbonate transport. ThiY is also structurally homologous to thiamin binding protein (TbpA) and to thiaminase-I. THI5 is responsible for the synthesis of 4-amino-5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway of eukaryotes and is approximately 25% identical in sequence with ThiY. A homology model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae THI5 was generated on the basis of the structure of ThiY. Many features of the thiamin pyrimidine binding site are shared between ThiY and THI5, suggesting a common ancestor.

  4. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  5. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-20

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways.

  6. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae acyl carrier protein synthase: an essential enzyme in bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Briggs, Steven L.; McAllister, Kelly A.; Fischl, Anthony S.; Zhao, Genshi

    2000-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the formation of holo-ACP, which mediates the essential transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and lipids in the cell. Thus, AcpS plays an important role in bacterial fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis, making it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We have determined, for the first time, the crystal structure of the Streptococcus pneumoniae AcpS and AcpS complexed with 3′5′-ADP, a product of AcpS, at 2.0 and 1.9 Å resolution, respectively. The crystal structure reveals an α/β fold and shows that AcpS assembles as a tightly packed functional trimer, with a non-crystallographic pseudo-symmetric 3-fold axis, which contains three active sites at the interface between protomers. Only two active sites are occupied by the ligand molecules. Although there is virtually no sequence similarity between the S.pneumoniae AcpS and the Bacillus subtilis Sfp transferase, a striking structural similarity between both enzymes was observed. These data provide a starting point for structure-based drug design efforts towards the identification of AcpS inhibitors with potent antibacterial activity. PMID:11032795

  7. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Is Positively Regulated by Protein Kinase Cζ-Mediated Phosphorylation Induced by Wnt Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tejeda-Muñoz, Nydia; González-Aguilar, Héctor; Santoyo-Ramos, Paula; Castañeda-Patlán, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The molecular events that drive Wnt-induced regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) activity are poorly defined. In this study, we found that protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and GSK-3β interact mainly in colon cancer cells. Wnt stimulation induced a rapid GSK-3β redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nuclei in malignant cells and a transient PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β at a different site from serine 9. In addition, while Wnt treatment induced a decrease in PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β in nonmalignant cells, in malignant cells, this phosphorylation was increased. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of PKCζ abolished all of these effects, but unexpectedly, it also abolished the constitutive basal activity of GSK-3β. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that GSK-3β phosphorylation mediated by PKCζ enhanced GSK-3β activity. We mapped Ser147 of GSK-3β as the site phosphorylated by PKCζ, i.e., its mutation into alanine abolished GSK-3β activity, resulting in β-catenin stabilization and increased transcriptional activity, whereas phosphomimetic replacement of Ser147 by glutamic acid maintained GSK-3β basal activity. Thus, we found that PKCζ phosphorylates GSK-3β at Ser147 to maintain its constitutive activity in resting cells and that Wnt stimulation modifies the phosphorylation of Ser147 to regulate GSK-3β activity in opposite manners in normal and malignant colon cells. PMID:26711256

  8. Protein Kinase A Opposes the Phosphorylation-dependent Recruitment of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to A-kinase Anchoring Protein 220.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Tunquist, Brian J; Langeberg, Lorene K; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The proximity of an enzyme to its substrate can influence rate and magnitude of catalysis. A-kinase anchoring protein 220 (AKAP220) is a multivalent anchoring protein that can sequester a variety of signal transduction enzymes. These include protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Using a combination of molecular and cellular approaches we show that GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr-1132 on AKAP220 initiates recruitment of this kinase into the enzyme scaffold. We also find that AKAP220 anchors GSK3β and its substrate β-catenin in membrane ruffles. Interestingly, GSK3β can be released from the multienzyme complex in response to PKA phosphorylation on serine 9, which suppresses GSK3β activity. The signaling scaffold may enhance this regulatory mechanism, as AKAP220 has the capacity to anchor two PKA holoenzymes. Site 1 on AKAP220 (residues 610-623) preferentially interacts with RII, whereas site 2 (residues 1633-1646) exhibits a dual specificity for RI and RII. In vitro affinity measurements revealed that site 2 on AKAP220 binds RII with ∼10-fold higher affinity than site 1. Occupancy of both R subunit binding sites on AKAP220 could provide a mechanism to amplify local cAMP responses and enable cross-talk between PKA and GSK3β.

  9. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  10. G-rich, a Drosophila selenoprotein, is a Golgi-resident type III membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chang Lan; Shim, Myoung Sup; Chung, Jiyeol; Yoo, Hyun-Seung; Ha, Ji Min; Kim, Jin Young; Choi, Jinmi; Zang, Shu Liang; Hou, Xiao; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae . E-mail: imbglmg@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2006-10-06

    G-rich is a Drosophila melanogaster selenoprotein, which is a homologue of human and mouse SelK. Subcellular localization analysis using GFP-tagged G-rich showed that G-rich was localized in the Golgi apparatus. The fusion protein was co-localized with the Golgi marker proteins but not with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker protein in Drosophila SL2 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of G-rich suggests that this protein is either type II or type III transmembrane protein. To determine the type of transmembrane protein experimentally, GFP-G-rich in which GFP was tagged at the N-terminus of G-rich, or G-rich-GFP in which GFP was tagged at the C-terminus of G-rich, were expressed in SL2 cells. The tagged proteins were then digested with trypsin, and analyzed by Western blot analysis. The results showed that the C-terminus of the G-rich protein was exposed to the cytoplasm indicating it is a type III microsomal membrane protein. G-rich is First selenoprotein identified in the Golgi apparatus.

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus LANA protein downregulates nuclear glycogen synthase kinase 3 activity and consequently blocks differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyong; Martin, Heather; Shamay, Meir; Woodard, Crystal; Tang, Qi-Qun; Hayward, S Diane

    2007-05-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein interacts with glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and relocalizes GSK-3 in a manner that leads to stabilization of beta-catenin and upregulation of beta-catenin-responsive cell genes. The LANA-GSK-3 interaction was further examined to determine whether there were additional downstream consequences. In the present study, the nuclear GSK-3 bound to LANA in transfected cells and in BCBL1 primary effusion lymphoma cells was found to be enriched for the inactive serine 9-phosphorylated form of GSK-3. The mechanism of inactivation of nuclear GSK-3 involved LANA recruitment of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (RSK1). ERK1/2 and RSK1 coprecipitated with LANA, and LANA was a substrate for ERK1 in vitro. A model is proposed for the overall inactivation of nuclear GSK-3 that incorporates the previously described GSK-3 phosphorylation of LANA itself. Functional inactivation of nuclear GSK-3 was demonstrated by the ability of LANA to limit phosphorylation of the known GSK-3 substrates C/EBPbeta and C/EBPalpha. The effect of LANA-mediated ablation of C/EBP phosphorylation on differentiation was modeled in the well-characterized 3T3L1 adipogenesis system. LANA-expressing 3T3L1 cells were impaired in their ability to undergo differentiation and adipogenesis. C/EBPbeta induction followed the same time course as that seen in vector-transduced cells, but there was delayed and reduced induction of C/EBPbeta transcriptional targets in LANA-expressing cells. We conclude that LANA inactivates nuclear GSK-3 and modifies the function of proteins that are GSK-3 substrates. In the case of C/EBPs, this translates into LANA-mediated inhibition of differentiation. PMID:17314169

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  13. Structural Characterisation of the Beta-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases, FabF and FabH, of Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Nanson, Jeffrey D.; Himiari, Zainab; Swarbrick, Crystall M. D.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic, pneumonic, and septicaemic plague, remains a major public health threat, with outbreaks of disease occurring in China, Madagascar, and Peru in the last five years. The existence of multidrug resistant Y. pestis and the potential of this bacterium as a bioterrorism agent illustrates the need for new antimicrobials. The β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases, FabB, FabF, and FabH, catalyse the elongation of fatty acids as part of the type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) system, to synthesise components of lipoproteins, phospholipids, and lipopolysaccharides essential for bacterial growth and survival. As such, these enzymes are promising targets for the development of novel therapeutic agents. We have determined the crystal structures of the Y. pestis β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases FabF and FabH, and compared these with the unpublished, deposited structure of Y. pestis FabB. Comparison of FabB, FabF, and FabH provides insights into the substrate specificities of these enzymes, and investigation of possible interactions with known β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase inhibitors suggests FabB, FabF and FabH may be targeted simultaneously to prevent synthesis of the fatty acids necessary for growth and survival. PMID:26469877

  14. Trapping of Intermediates with Substrate Analog HBOCoA in the Polymerizations Catalyzed by Class III Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthase from Allochromatium Vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Tomich, John M.; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 hr−1. This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [3H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [3H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s−1, which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s−1). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  15. Trapping of intermediates with substrate analog HBOCoA in the polymerizations catalyzed by class III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cao, Ruikai; Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B; Fischer, Christopher J; Tomich, John M; Li, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 h(-1). This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve the formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [(3)H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [(3)H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s(-1), which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s(-1)). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Localized Iridium(III) Complexes as Efficient Photodynamic Therapy Agents via Protein Modifications.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jung Seung; Kang, Myeong-Gyun; Kang, Juhye; Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Shin Jung C; Kim, Hyun-Tak; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Lim, Mi Hee; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk

    2016-08-31

    Protein inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide radical (O2(•-)) is considered to trigger cell death pathways associated with protein dysfunction; however, the detailed mechanisms and direct involvement in photodynamic therapy (PDT) have not been revealed. Herein, we report Ir(III) complexes designed for ROS generation through a rational strategy to investigate protein modifications by ROS. The Ir(III) complexes are effective as PDT agents at low concentrations with low-energy irradiation (≤ 1 J cm(-2)) because of the relatively high (1)O2 quantum yield (> 0.78), even with two-photon activation. Furthermore, two types of protein modifications (protein oxidation and photo-cross-linking) involved in PDT were characterized by mass spectrometry. These modifications were generated primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, producing a significant effect for cancer cell death. Consequently, we present a plausible biologically applicable PDT modality that utilizes rationally designed photoactivatable Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27494510

  17. Structure and membrane actions of a marine worm protein cytolysin, Cerebratulus toxin A-III.

    PubMed

    Kem, W R

    1994-02-28

    Four homologous Cerebratulus lacteus A toxins are the first and as yet only protein cytolysins to be isolated from an ancient phylum of marine worms, the nemertines. The most abundant and toxic variant, toxin A-III, has been sequenced and its mechanisms of action studied in the most detail. It consists of a single basic polypeptide chain of 95 amino acid residues cross-linked by three disulfide bonds, and possesses a predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure. The C-terminal third of the toxin sequence is postulated to be a helical 'hairpin' structure involved in pore formation. Toxin A-III permeabilizes a variety of cells as well as liposomes made from a variety of phospholipids; apparently large pores are formed, as large proteins are released almost as rapidly as small organic molecules and inorganic ions. At sublytic concentrations, the toxin also inhibits protein kinase C and endogenous voltage-gated cation selective (sodium, calcium) channels occurring in the nervous and cardiovascular systems. A curious observation, also reported for colicins and some other protein cytolysins, was the conservation of toxin secondary structure upon insertion into phospholipid liposomes, despite the strong likelihood that significant changes in tertiary structure occur to provide a hydrophobic surface for interaction with membrane lipids. Because of its small size and presumed single helical hairpin secondary structure, Cl toxin A-III is an excellent molecular subject for investigating protein insertion into biological membranes and mechanisms of pore formation.

  18. The multiple phenylpropene synthases in both Clarkia breweri and Petunia hybrida represent two distinct protein lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koeduka, Takao; Louie, Gordon V.; Orlova, Irina; Kish, Christine M.; Ibdah, Mwafaq; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Baiga, Thomas J.; Noel, Joseph P.; Dudareva, Natalia; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-01-01

    Summary Many plants synthesize the volatile phenylpropene compounds eugenol and isoeugenol to serve in defense against herbivores and pathogens and to attract pollinators. Clarkia breweri flowers emit a mixture of eugenol and isoeugenol, while Petunia hybrida flowers emit mostly isoeugenol with small amounts of eugenol. We recently reported the identification of a petunia enzyme, PhIGS1, that catalyzes the formation of isoeugenol, and an Ocimum basilicum (basil) enzyme, ObEGS1, that produces eugenol. ObEGS1 and PhIGS1 both utilize coniferyl acetate, are 52% sequence identical, and belong to a family of NADPH-dependent reductases involved in secondary metabolism. Here we show that C. breweri flowers have two closely related proteins (96% identity), CbIGS1 and CbEGS1, that are similar to ObEGS1 (58% and 59%) and catalyze the formation of isoeugenol and eugenol, respectively. In vitro mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that substitution of only a single residue can substantially affect the product specificity of these enzymes. A third C. breweri enzyme identified, CbEGS2, also catalyzes the formation of eugenol from coniferyl acetate and is only 46% identical to CbIGS1 and CbEGS1 but more similar (>70%) to other types of reductases. We also found that petunia flowers contain an enzyme, PhEGS1, that is highly similar to CbEGS2 (82% identity) and that converts coniferyl acetate to eugenol. Our results indicate that plant enzymes with EGS and IGS activities have arisen multiple times and in different protein lineages. PMID:18208524

  19. Tuning cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes as activated protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heffern, Marie C; Reichova, Viktorie; Coomes, Joseph L; Harney, Allison S; Bajema, Elizabeth A; Meade, Thomas J

    2015-09-21

    Cobalt(III) Schiff base complexes ([Co(acacen)(L)2](+), where L = NH3) inhibit histidine-containing proteins through dissociative exchange of the labile axial ligands (L). This work investigates axial ligand exchange dynamics of [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) complexes toward the development of protein inhibitors that are activated by external triggers such as light irradiation. We sought to investigate ligand exchange dynamics to design a Co(III) complex that is substitutionally inert under normal physiological conditions for selective activation. Fluorescent imidazoles (C3Im) were prepared as axial ligands in [Co(acacen)(L)2](+) to produce complexes (CoC3Im) that could report on ligand exchange and, thus, complex stability. These fluorescent imidazole reporters guided the design of a new dinuclear Co(III) Schiff base complex containing bridging diimidazole ligands, which exhibits enhanced stability to ligand exchange with competing imidazoles and to hydrolysis within a biologically relevant pH range. These studies inform the design of biocompatible Co(III) Schiff base complexes that can be selectively activated for protein inhibition with spatial and temporal specificity.

  20. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  1. A phycocyanin·phellandrene synthase fusion enhances recombinant protein expression and β-phellandrene (monoterpene) hydrocarbons production in Synechocystis (cyanobacteria).

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Melis, Anastasios

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria can be exploited as photosynthetic platforms for heterologous generation of terpene hydrocarbons with industrial applications. Transformation of Synechocystis and heterologous expression of the β-phellandrene synthase (PHLS) gene alone is necessary and sufficient to confer to Synechocystis the ability to divert intermediate terpenoid metabolites and to generate the monoterpene β-phellandrene during photosynthesis. However, terpene synthases, including the PHLS, have a slow Kcat (low Vmax) necessitating high levels of enzyme concentration to enable meaningful rates and yield of product formation. Here, a novel approach was applied to increase the PHLS protein expression alleviating limitations in the rate and yield of β-phellandrene product generation. Different PHLS fusion constructs were generated with the Synechocystis endogenous cpcB sequence, encoding for the abundant in cyanobacteria phycocyanin β-subunit, expressed under the native cpc operon promoter. In one of these constructs, the CpcB·PHLS fusion protein accumulated to levels approaching 20% of the total cellular protein, i.e., substantially higher than expressing the PHLS protein alone under the same endogenous cpc promoter. The CpcB·PHLS fusion protein retained the activity of the PHLS enzyme and catalyzed β-phellandrene synthesis, yielding an average of 3.2 mg product g(-1) dry cell weight (dcw) versus the 0.03 mg g(-1)dcw measured with low-expressing constructs, i.e., a 100-fold yield improvement. In conclusion, the terpene synthase fusion-protein approach is promising, as, in this case, it substantially increased the amount of the PHLS in cyanobacteria, and commensurately improved rates and yield of β-phellandrene hydrocarbons production in these photosynthetic microorganisms. PMID:26410450

  2. A phycocyanin·phellandrene synthase fusion enhances recombinant protein expression and β-phellandrene (monoterpene) hydrocarbons production in Synechocystis (cyanobacteria).

    PubMed

    Formighieri, Cinzia; Melis, Anastasios

    2015-11-01

    Cyanobacteria can be exploited as photosynthetic platforms for heterologous generation of terpene hydrocarbons with industrial applications. Transformation of Synechocystis and heterologous expression of the β-phellandrene synthase (PHLS) gene alone is necessary and sufficient to confer to Synechocystis the ability to divert intermediate terpenoid metabolites and to generate the monoterpene β-phellandrene during photosynthesis. However, terpene synthases, including the PHLS, have a slow Kcat (low Vmax) necessitating high levels of enzyme concentration to enable meaningful rates and yield of product formation. Here, a novel approach was applied to increase the PHLS protein expression alleviating limitations in the rate and yield of β-phellandrene product generation. Different PHLS fusion constructs were generated with the Synechocystis endogenous cpcB sequence, encoding for the abundant in cyanobacteria phycocyanin β-subunit, expressed under the native cpc operon promoter. In one of these constructs, the CpcB·PHLS fusion protein accumulated to levels approaching 20% of the total cellular protein, i.e., substantially higher than expressing the PHLS protein alone under the same endogenous cpc promoter. The CpcB·PHLS fusion protein retained the activity of the PHLS enzyme and catalyzed β-phellandrene synthesis, yielding an average of 3.2 mg product g(-1) dry cell weight (dcw) versus the 0.03 mg g(-1)dcw measured with low-expressing constructs, i.e., a 100-fold yield improvement. In conclusion, the terpene synthase fusion-protein approach is promising, as, in this case, it substantially increased the amount of the PHLS in cyanobacteria, and commensurately improved rates and yield of β-phellandrene hydrocarbons production in these photosynthetic microorganisms.

  3. Solution structure of monomeric BsaL, the type III secretion needle protein of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Yu; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2006-06-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria that are important human pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. During the establishment of infection, these pathogens coordinately assemble greater than 20 different proteins into a macromolecular structure that spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and, in many respects, resembles and functions like a syringe. This type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) is used to inject proteins into a host cell's membrane and cytoplasm to subvert normal cellular processes. The external portion of the TTSA is a needle that is composed of a single type of protein that is polymerized in a helical fashion to form an elongated tube with a central channel of 2-3 nm in diameter. TTSA needle proteins from a variety of bacterial pathogens share sequence conservation; however, no atomic structure for any TTSA needle protein is yet available. Here, we report the structure of a TTSA needle protein called BsaL from Burkholderia pseudomallei determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The central part of the protein assumes a helix-turn-helix core domain with two well-defined alpha-helices that are joined by an ordered, four-residue linker. This forms a two-helix bundle that is stabilized by interhelix hydrophobic contacts. Residues that flank this presumably exposed core region are not completely disordered, but adopt a partial helical conformation. The atomic structure of BsaL and its sequence homology with other TTSA needle proteins suggest potentially unique structural dynamics that could be linked with a universal mechanism for control of type III secretion in diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  4. A Repulsive Electrostatic Mechanism for Protein Export through the Type III Secretion Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Zhang, Lingling; Picking, Wendy L.; Weis, David D.; De Guzman, Roberto N.; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus, which is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. The trajectories reveal a screwlike rotation motion during the export of nativelike helix-turn-helix conformations. Interestingly, the channel interior with excessive electronegative potential creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, whereas the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region also have electronegative interiors. Effector proteins also have considerable electronegative potential patches on their surfaces. From these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the type III secretion apparatus. Based on this mechanism, the ATPase activity and/or proton motive force could be used to energize the protein translocation through these nanomachines. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported. PMID:20141759

  5. Tomato Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1) and Putative Orthologs Comprise an Ancient Family of Cutin Synthase-like (CUS) Proteins that are Conserved among Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yeats, Trevor H.; Huang, Wenlin; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Viart, Hélène M-F.; Clausen, Mads H.; Stark, Ruth E.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aerial epidermis of all land plants is covered with a hydrophobic cuticle that provides essential protection from desiccation, and so its evolution is believed to have been prerequisite for terrestrial colonization. A major structural component of apparently all plant cuticles is cutin, a polyester of hydroxy fatty acids. However, despite its ubiquity, the details of cutin polymeric structure and the mechanisms of its formation and remodeling are not well understood. We recently reported that cutin polymerization in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit occurs via transesterification of hydroxyacylglycerol precursors, catalyzed by the GDSL-motif lipase/hydrolase family protein (GDSL) Cutin Deficient 1 (CD1). Here we present additional biochemical characterization of CD1 and putative orthologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and the moss Physcomitrella patens, which represent a distinct clade of cutin synthases within the large GDSL super-family. We demonstrate that members of this ancient and conserved family of cutin synthase-like (CUS) proteins act as polyester synthases with negligible hydrolytic activity. Moreover, solution-state NMR analysis indicates that CD1 catalyzes the formation of primarily linear cutin oligomeric products in vitro. These results reveal a conserved mechanism of cutin polyester synthesis in land plants, and suggest that elaborations of the linear polymer, such as branching or cross-linking, may require additional, as yet unknown, factors. PMID:24372802

  6. Trapping open and closed forms of FitE: a group III periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; Proteau, Ariane; Wagner, John; Cui, Qizhi; Purisima, Enrico O; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-05-15

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are essential components of bacterial transport systems, necessary for bacterial growth and survival. The two-domain structures of PBPs are topologically classified into three groups based on the number of crossovers or hinges between the globular domains: group I PBPs have three connections, group II have two, and group III have only one. Although a large number of structures for group I or II PBPs are known, fewer group III PBPs have been structurally characterized. Group I and II PBPs exhibit significant domain motions during transition from the unbound to ligand-bound form, however, no large conformational changes have been observed to date in group III PBPs. We have solved the crystal structure of a periplasmic binding protein FitE, part of an iron transport system, fit, recently identified in a clinical E. coli isolate. The structure, determined at 1.8 A resolution, shows that FitE is a group III PBP containing a single alpha-helix bridging the two domains. Among the individual FitE molecules present in two crystal forms we observed three different conformations (open, closed, intermediate). Our crystallographic and molecular dynamics results strongly support the notion that group III PBPs also adopt the same Venus flytrap mechanism as do groups I and II PBPs. Unlike other group III PBPs, FitE forms dimers both in solution and in the crystals. The putative siderophore binding pocket is lined with arginine residues, suggesting an anionic nature of the iron-containing siderophore. PMID:19004000

  7. Cutting edge: Mouse NAIP1 detects the type III secretion system needle protein.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, Manira; Zak, Daniel E; Chavarria-Smith, Joseph; Vance, Russell E; Miao, Edward A

    2013-10-15

    The NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasomes activate caspase-1 in response to bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Inadvertent injection of the T3SS rod protein and flagellin into the cytosol is detected through murine NAIP2 and NAIP5/6, respectively. In this study, we identify the agonist for the orphan murine NAIP1 receptor as the T3SS needle protein. NAIP1 is poorly expressed in resting mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages; however, priming with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid induces it and confers needle protein sensitivity. Further, overexpression of NAIP1 in immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages by retroviral transduction enabled needle detection. In contrast, peritoneal cavity macrophages basally express NAIP1 and respond to needle protein robustly, independent of priming. Human macrophages are known to express only one NAIP gene, which detects the needle protein, but not rod or flagellin. Thus, murine NAIP1 is functionally analogous to human NAIP. PMID:24043898

  8. Overexpression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannosylphosphodolichol synthase-encoding gene in Trichoderma reesei results in an increased level of protein secretion and abnormal cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, J S; Butterweck, A H; Kurzatkowski, W; Migdalski, A; Kubicek, C P; Palamarczyk, G

    1999-06-01

    Production of extracellular proteins plays an important role in the physiology of Trichoderma reesei and has potential industrial application. To improve the efficiency of protein secretion, we overexpressed in T. reesei the DPM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding mannosylphosphodolichol (MPD) synthase, under homologous, constitutively acting expression signals. Four stable transformants, each with different copy numbers of tandemly integrated DPM1, exhibited roughly double the activity of MPD synthase in the respective endoplasmic reticulum membrane fraction. On a dry-weight basis, they secreted up to sevenfold-higher concentrations of extracellular proteins during growth on lactose, a carbon source promoting formation of cellulases. Northern blot analysis showed that the relative level of the transcript of cbh1, which encodes the major cellulase (cellobiohydrolase I [CBH I]), did not increase in the transformants. On the other hand, the amount of secreted CBH I and, in all but one of the transformants, intracellular CBH I was elevated. Our results suggest that posttranscriptional processes are responsible for the increase in CBH I production. The carbohydrate contents of the extracellular proteins were comparable in the wild type and in the transformants, and no hyperglycosylation was detected. Electron microscopy of the DPM1-amplified strains revealed amorphous structure of the cell wall and over three times as many mitochondria as in the control. Our data indicate that molecular manipulation of glycan biosynthesis in Trichoderma can result in improved protein secretion.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of severe human malaria, has evolved to become resistant to previously successful antimalarial chemotherapies, most notably chloroquine and the antifolates. The prevalence of resistant strains has necessitated the discovery and development of new chemical entities with novel modes-of-action. Although much effort has been invested in the creation of analogues based on existing drugs and the screening of chemical and natural compound libraries, a crucial shortcoming in current Plasmodial drug discovery efforts remains the lack of an extensive set of novel, validated drug targets. A requirement of these targets (or the pathways in which they function) is that they prove essential for parasite survival. The polyamine biosynthetic pathway, responsible for the metabolism of highly abundant amines crucial for parasite growth, proliferation and differentiation, is currently under investigation as an antimalarial target. Chemotherapeutic strategies targeting this pathway have been successfully utilized for the treatment of Trypanosomes causing West African sleeping sickness. In order to further evaluate polyamine depletion as possible antimalarial intervention, the consequences of inhibiting P. falciparum spermidine synthase (PfSpdSyn) were examined on a morphological, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic level. Results Morphological analysis of P. falciparum 3D7 following application of the PfSpdSyn inhibitor cyclohexylamine confirmed that parasite development was completely arrested at the early trophozoite stage. This is in contrast to untreated parasites which progressed to late trophozoites at comparable time points. Global gene expression analyses confirmed a transcriptional arrest in the parasite. Several of the differentially expressed genes mapped to the polyamine biosynthetic and associated metabolic pathways. Differential expression of corresponding parasite proteins involved in polyamine biosynthesis was

  10. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  11. The type III secreted protein BspR regulates the virulence genes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi; Abe, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the causative agents of whooping cough. These pathogenic species share a number of virulence genes, including the gene locus for the type III secretion system (T3SS) that delivers effector proteins. To identify unknown type III effectors in Bordetella, secreted proteins in the bacterial culture supernatants of wild-type B. bronchiseptica and an isogenic T3SS-deficient mutant were compared with iTRAQ-based, quantitative proteomic analysis method. BB1639, annotated as a hypothetical protein, was identified as a novel type III secreted protein and was designated BspR (Bordetella secreted protein regulator). The virulence of a BspR mutant (ΔbspR) in B. bronchiseptica was significantly attenuated in a mouse infection model. BspR was also highly conserved in B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, suggesting that BspR is an essential virulence factor in these three Bordetella species. Interestingly, the BspR-deficient strain showed hyper-secretion of T3SS-related proteins. Furthermore, T3SS-dependent host cell cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity were also enhanced in the absence of BspR. By contrast, the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and adenylate cyclase toxin was completely abolished in the BspR-deficient strain. Finally, we demonstrated that BspR is involved in the iron-responsive regulation of T3SS. Thus, Bordetella virulence factors are coordinately but inversely controlled by BspR, which functions as a regulator in response to iron starvation.

  12. Structural basis for midbody targeting of spastin by the ESCRT-III protein CHMP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Rimanchi, Neggy; Renvoise, Benoit; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Blackstone, Craig; Hurley, James H.

    2009-01-15

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, including ESCRT-III, localizes to the midbody and participates in the membrane-abscission step of cytokinesis. The ESCRT-III protein charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) is required for recruitment of the MIT domain-containing protein spastin, a microtubule-severing enzyme, to the midbody. The 2.5-{angstrom} structure of the C-terminal tail of CHMP1B with the MIT domain of spastin reveals a specific, high-affinity complex involving a noncanonical binding site between the first and third helices of the MIT domain. The structural interface is twice as large as that of the MIT domain of the VPS4-CHMP complex, consistent with the high affinity of the interaction. A series of unique hydrogen-bonding interactions and close packing of small side chains discriminate against the other ten human ESCRT-III subunits. Point mutants in the CHMP1B binding site of spastin block recruitment of spastin to the midbody and impair cytokinesis.

  13. Electrostatic Interactions between Elongated Monomers Drive Filamentation of Drosophila Shrub, a Metazoan ESCRT-III Protein.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Brian J; Tibbe, Christine; Jeon, Hyesung; Drabek, Andrew A; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) is a conserved protein complex that facilitates budding and fission of membranes. It executes a key step in many cellular events, including cytokinesis and multi-vesicular body formation. The ESCRT-III protein Shrub in flies, or its homologs in yeast (Snf7) or humans (CHMP4B), is a critical polymerizing component of ESCRT-III needed to effect membrane fission. We report the structural basis for polymerization of Shrub and define a minimal region required for filament formation. The X-ray structure of the Shrub core shows that individual monomers in the lattice interact in a staggered arrangement using complementary electrostatic surfaces. Mutations that disrupt interface salt bridges interfere with Shrub polymerization and function. Despite substantial sequence divergence and differences in packing interactions, the arrangement of Shrub subunits in the polymer resembles that of Snf7 and other family homologs, suggesting that this intermolecular packing mechanism is shared among ESCRT-III proteins. PMID:27452459

  14. A bacterial type III secretion-based protein delivery tool for broad applications in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon J.; Schmutz, Christoph; Kasper, Christoph A.; Amstutz, Marlise; Schmidt, Alexander; Sauteur, Loïc; Vigano, M. Alessandra; Low, Shyan Huey; Affolter, Markus; Cornelis, Guy R.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    Methods enabling the delivery of proteins into eukaryotic cells are essential to address protein functions. Here we propose broad applications to cell biology for a protein delivery tool based on bacterial type III secretion (T3S). We show that bacterial, viral, and human proteins, fused to the N-terminal fragment of the Yersinia enterocolitica T3S substrate YopE, are effectively delivered into target cells in a fast and controllable manner via the injectisome of extracellular bacteria. This method enables functional interaction studies by the simultaneous injection of multiple proteins and allows the targeting of proteins to different subcellular locations by use of nanobody-fusion proteins. After delivery, proteins can be freed from the YopE fragment by a T3S-translocated viral protease or fusion to ubiquitin and cleavage by endogenous ubiquitin proteases. Finally, we show that this delivery tool is suitable to inject proteins in living animals and combine it with phosphoproteomics to characterize the systems-level impact of proapoptotic human truncated BID on the cellular network. PMID:26598622

  15. Endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' untranslated region of endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA: regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, J; Sánchez de Miguel, L; Montón, M; Casado, S; López-Farré, A

    1997-01-01

    Changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression may be involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation dysfunction associated with several vascular diseases. In the present work, we demonstrate that eNOS mRNA contains a previously undescribed cis element in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). A U+C-rich segment in the 3' UTR is critical in complex formation with bovine aortic endothelial cell cytosolic proteins. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), which destabilizes eNOS mRNA, increased the binding activity of the cytosolic proteins in a time-dependent manner. These data suggest that endothelial cytosolic proteins bind to the 3' UTR of eNOS mRNA. These proteins may play a role in TNF-alpha-induced eNOS mRNA destabilization. PMID:9315630

  16. Toc33 and Toc64-III cooperate in precursor protein import into the chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Manuel; Rudolf, Mareike; Tillmann, Bodo; Tripp, Joanna; Sommer, Maik S; Schleiff, Enrico

    2013-05-01

    The import of cytosolically synthesized precursor proteins into chloroplasts by the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) is crucial for organelle function. The recognition of precursor proteins at the chloroplast surface precedes translocation and involves the membrane-inserted receptor subunits Toc34 and Toc159. A third receptor, Toc64, was discussed to recognize cytosolic complexes guiding precursor proteins to the membrane surface, but this function remains debated. We analysed Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a T-DNA insertion in the gene encoding the Toc64 homolog Toc64-III. We observed a light intensity-dependent growth phenotype, which is distinct from the phenotype of ppi1, the previously described mutant of the TOC34 homolog TOC33. Furthermore, chloroplast import of the model precursor proteins pOE33 and pSSU into chloroplasts is reduced in protoplasts isolated from plants with impaired Toc64-III function. This suggests that Toc64-III modulates the translocation efficiency in vivo. A ppi1 and toc64-III double mutant shows a significant increase in the transcript levels of HSP90 and TOC75-III, the latter coding for the pore-forming TOC component. Remarkably, the protein level of Toc75-III is significantly reduced, suggesting that Toc64-III and Toc33 cooperate in the insertion or stabilization of Toc75-III. Accordingly, the results presented support Toc64 as an import-relevant component of the TOC complex.

  17. Inhibition of the p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction by cyclometallated iridium(III) compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; He, Bingyong; Miles, Jennifer A.; Wang, Wanhe; Mao, Zhifeng; Che, Weng Ian; Lu, Jin-Jian; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wilson, Andrew J.; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 transcription factor by mutation or other mechanisms is a frequent event in tumorigenesis. One of the major endogenous negative regulators of p53 in humans is hDM2, a ubiquitin E3 ligase that binds to p53 causing proteasomal p53 degradation. In this work, a library of organometallic iridium(III) compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to disrupt the p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction. The novel cyclometallated iridium(III) compound 1 [Ir(eppy)2(dcphen)](PF6) (where eppy = 2-(4-ethylphenyl)pyridine and dcphen = 4, 7-dichloro-1, 10-phenanthroline) blocked the interaction of p53/hDM2 in human amelanotic melanoma cells. Finally, 1 exhibited anti-proliferative activity and induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines consistent with inhibition of the p53/hDM2 interaction. Compound 1 represents the first reported organometallic p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction inhibitor. PMID:26883110

  18. Evaluation of Salmonella enterica type III secretion system effector proteins as carriers for heterologous vaccine antigens.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Wael Abdel Halim; Xu, Xin; Metelitsa, Leonid; Hensel, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Live attenuated strains of Salmonella enterica have a high potential as carriers of recombinant vaccines. The type III secretion system (T3SS)-dependent translocation of S. enterica can be deployed for delivery of heterologous antigens to antigen-presenting cells. Here we investigated the efficacy of various effector proteins of the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI2)-encoded T3SS for the translocation of model antigens and elicitation of immune responses. The SPI2 T3SS effector proteins SifA, SteC, SseL, SseJ, and SseF share an endosomal membrane-associated subcellular localization after translocation. We observed that all effector proteins could be used to translocate fusion proteins with the model antigens ovalbumin and listeriolysin into the cytosol of host cells. Under in vitro conditions, fusion proteins with SseJ and SteC stimulated T-cell responses that were superior to those triggered by fusion proteins with SseF. However, in mice vaccinated with Salmonella carrier strains, only fusion proteins based on SseJ or SifA elicited potent T-cell responses. These data demonstrate that the selection of an optimal SPI2 effector protein for T3SS-mediated translocation is a critical parameter for the rational design of effective Salmonella-based recombinant vaccines.

  19. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  20. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  1. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  2. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  3. Electro-optical properties characterization of fish type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Salvay, Andrés G; Santos, Javier; Howard, Eduardo I

    2007-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa-or 14-kDa tandem-globular proteins. In the present work, we study the behavior of several physical properties, such as the low-frequency dielectric permittivity spectrum, circular dichroism, and electrical conductivity of Fish Type III AFP solutions measured at different concentrations. The combination of the information obtained from these measurements could be explained through the formation of AFP molecular aggregates or, alternatively, by the existence of some other type of interparticle interactions. Thermal stability and electro-optical behavior, when proteins are dissolved in deuterated water, were also investigated.

  4. Electro-Optical Properties Characterization of Fish Type III Antifreeze Protein

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, Andrés G.; Santos, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice-binding proteins that depress the freezing point of water in a non-colligative manner without a significant modification of the melting point. Found in the blood and tissues of some organisms (such as fish, insects, plants, and soil bacteria), AFPs play an important role in subzero temperature survival. Fish Type III AFP is present in members of the subclass Zoarcoidei. AFPIII are small 7-kDa—or 14-kDa tandem—globular proteins. In the present work, we study the behavior of several physical properties, such as the low-frequency dielectric permittivity spectrum, circular dichroism, and electrical conductivity of Fish Type III AFP solutions measured at different concentrations. The combination of the information obtained from these measurements could be explained through the formation of AFP molecular aggregates or, alternatively, by the existence of some other type of interparticle interactions. Thermal stability and electro-optical behavior, when proteins are dissolved in deuterated water, were also investigated. PMID:19669526

  5. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  6. Review of Platensimycin and Platencin: Inhibitors of β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Synthase III (FabH).

    PubMed

    Shang, Ruofeng; Liang, Jianping; Yi, Yunpeng; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jiatu

    2015-01-01

    Platensimycin and platencin were successively discovered from the strain Streptomyces platensis through systematic screening. These natural products have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance in bacteria by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis with slightly different mechanisms. Bioactivity studies have shown that platensimycin and platencin offer great potential to inhibit many resistant bacteria with no cross-resistance or toxicity observed in vivo. This review summarizes the general information on platensimycin and platencin, including antibacterial and self-resistant mechanisms. Furthermore, the total synthesis pathways of platensimycin and platencin and their analogues from recent studies are presented. PMID:26404223

  7. a Computational Approach to Explore Protein Translocation Through Type III Secretion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Im, Wonpil

    2010-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria initiate infections by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) that is comprised of a basal body, a needle, and a tip. The needle channel is formed by the assembly of a single needle protein. To explore the export mechanisms of MxiH needle protein through the needle of Shigella flexneri, an essential step during needle assembly, we have performed steered molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent. Interestingly, the electronegative channel interior creates an energy barrier for MxiH to enter the channel, while the same may facilitate the ejection of the effectors into host cells. Structurally-known basal regions and ATPase underneath the basal region have also such electronegative interior, while effector proteins have considerable electronegative patches on their surfaces. Based on these observations, we propose a repulsive electrostatic mechanism for protein translocation through the TTSA. This mechanism is supported by the suggestion that an ATPase is required for protein translocation through these nanomachines, which may provide the energy to overcome the initial electrostatic energy barrier. A similar mechanism may be applicable to macromolecular channels in other secretion systems or viruses through which proteins or nucleic acids are transported.

  8. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  9. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  10. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  11. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jennifer S; von Lersner, Ariana K; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  12. Preclinical characterization of anticancer gallium(III) complexes: solubility, stability, lipophilicity and binding to serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Rudnev, Alexander V; Foteeva, Lidia S; Kowol, Christian; Berger, Roland; Jakupec, Michael A; Arion, Vladimir B; Timerbaev, Andrei R; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2006-11-01

    The discovery and development of gallium(III) complexes capable of inhibiting tumor growth is an emerging area of anticancer drug research. A range of novel gallium coordination compounds with established cytotoxic efficacy have been characterized in terms of desirable chemical and biochemical properties and compared with tris(8-quinolinolato)gallium(III) (KP46), a lead anticancer gallium-based candidate that successfully finished phase I clinical trials (under the name FFC11), showing activity against renal cell cancer. In view of probable oral administration, drug-like parameters, such as solubility in water, saline and 0.5% dimethyl sulfoxide, stability against hydrolysis, measured as the rate constant of hydrolytic degradation in water or physiological buffer using a capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) assay, and the octanol-water partition coefficient (logP) providing a rational estimate of a drug's lipophilicity, have been evaluated and compared. The differences in bioavailability characteristics between different complexes were discussed within the formalism of structure-activity relationships. The reactivity toward major serum transport proteins, albumin and transferrin, was also assayed in order to elucidate the drug's distribution pathway after intestinal absorption. According to the values of apparent binding rate constants determined by CZE, both KP46 and bis(2-acetylpyridine-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazonato-N,N,S)gallium(III) tetrachlorogallate(III) (KP1089) bind to transferrin faster than to albumin. This implies that transferrin would rather mediate the accumulation of gallium antineoplastic agents in solid tumors. A tendency of being faster converted into the protein-bound form found for KP1089 (due possibly to non-covalent binding) seems complementary to its greater in vitro antiproliferative activity.

  13. The Salmonella Type III Secretion System Inner Rod Protein PrgJ Is Partially Folded*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dalian; Lefebre, Matthew; Kaur, Kawaljit; McDowell, Melanie A.; Gdowski, Courtney; Jo, Sunhwan; Wang, Yu; Benedict, Stephen H.; Lea, Susan M.; Galan, Jorge E.; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2012-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is essential in the pathogenesis of many bacteria. The inner rod is important in the assembly of the T3SS needle complex. However, the atomic structure of the inner rod protein is currently unknown. Based on computational methods, others have suggested that the Salmonella inner rod protein PrgJ is highly helical, forming a folded 3 helix structure. Here we show by CD and NMR spectroscopy that the monomeric form of PrgJ lacks a tertiary structure, and the only well-structured part of PrgJ is a short α-helix at the C-terminal region from residues 65–82. Disruption of this helix by glycine or proline mutation resulted in defective assembly of the needle complex, rendering bacteria incapable of secreting effector proteins. Likewise, CD and NMR data for the Shigella inner rod protein MxiI indicate this protein lacks a tertiary structure as well. Our results reveal that the monomeric forms of the T3SS inner rod proteins are partially folded. PMID:22654099

  14. Methylmercury Alters the Activities of Hsp90 Client Proteins, Prostaglandin E Synthase/p23 (PGES/23) and nNOS

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel; Zeng, Heng; Aschner, Judy L.; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent pollutant with known neurotoxic effects. We have previously shown that astrocytes accumulate MeHg and play a prominent role in mediating MeHg toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) by altering glutamate signaling, generating oxidative stress, depleting glutathione (GSH) and initiating lipid peroxidation. Interestingly, all of these pathways can be regulated by the constitutively expressed, 90-kDa heat shock protein, Hsp90. As Hsp90 function is regulated by oxidative stress, we hypothesized that MeHg disrupts Hsp90-client protein functions. Astrocytes were treated with MeHg and expression of Hsp90, as well as the abundance of complexes of Hsp90-neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and Hsp90-prostaglandin E synthase/p23 (PGES/p23) were assessed. MeHg exposure decreased Hsp90 protein expression following 12 h of treatment while shorter exposures had no effect on Hsp90 protein expression. Interestingly, following 1 or 6 h of MeHg exposure, Hsp90 binding to PGES/p23 or nNOS was significantly increased, resulting in increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis from MeHg-treated astrocytes. These effects were attenuated by the Hsp90 antagonist, geldanmycin. NOS activity was increased following MeHg treatment while cGMP formation was decreased. This was accompanied by an increase in •O2− and H2O2 levels, suggesting that MeHg uncouples NO formation from NO-dependent signaling and increases oxidative stress. Altogether, our data demonstrates that Hsp90 interactions with client proteins are increased following MeHg exposure, but over time Hsp90 levels decline, contributing to oxidative stress and MeHg-dependent excitotoxicity. PMID:24852575

  15. Luminescent Alkyne-Bearing Terbium(III) Complexes and Their Application to Bioorthogonal Protein Labeling.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, William I; Abdelkader, Elwy H; Aulsebrook, Margaret L; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Loh, Choy-Theng; Grace, Michael R; Spiccia, Leone; Gasser, Gilles; Otting, Gottfried; Tuck, Kellie L; Graham, Bim

    2016-02-15

    Two new bifunctional macrocyclic chelate ligands that form luminescent terbium(III) complexes featuring an alkyne group for conjugation to (bio)molecules via the Cu(I)-catalyzed "click" reaction were synthesized. Upon ligation, the complexes exhibit a significant luminescent enhancement when excited at the λ(max) of the "clicked" products. To demonstrate the utility of the complexes for luminescent labeling, they were conjugated in vitro to E. coli aspartate/glutamate-binding protein incorporating a genetically encoded p-azido-L-phenylalanine or p-(azidomethyl)-L-phenylalanine residue. The complexes may prove useful for time-gated assay applications.

  16. Identification and Characterization of an Antigen I/II Family Protein Produced by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Green, Nicole M.; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; LeFebvre, Rance B.; Musser, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a gram-positive human bacterial pathogen that causes infections ranging in severity from pharyngitis to life-threatening invasive disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis. Serotype M28 strains are consistently isolated from invasive infections, particularly puerperal sepsis, a severe infection that occurs during or after childbirth. We recently sequenced the genome of a serotype M28 GAS strain and discovered a novel 37.4-kb foreign genetic element designated region of difference 2 (RD2). RD2 is similar in gene content and organization to genomic islands found in group B streptococci (GBS), the major cause of neonatal infections. RD2 encodes seven proteins with conventional gram-positive secretion signal sequences, six of which have not been characterized. Herein, we report that one of these six proteins (M28_Spy1325; Spy1325) is a member of the antigen I/II family of cell surface-anchored molecules produced by oral streptococci. PCR and DNA sequence analysis found that Spy1325 is very well conserved in GAS strains of distinct M protein serotypes. As assessed by real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR, the Spy1325 gene was expressed in vitro, and Spy1325 protein was present in culture supernatants and on the GAS cell surface. Western immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that Spy1325 was produced by GAS in infected mice and humans. Importantly, the immunization of mice with recombinant Spy1325 fragments conferred protection against GAS-mediated mortality. Similar to other antigen I/II proteins, recombinant Spy1325 bound purified human salivary agglutinin glycoprotein. Spy1325 may represent a shared virulence factor among GAS, GBS, and oral streptococci. PMID:16790795

  17. The impact of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors on transient protein expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Buyel, J F; Buyel, J J; Haase, C; Fischer, R

    2015-03-01

    The production of recombinant proteins in plants is often achieved by transient expression, e.g. following the injection or vacuum infiltration of Agrobacterium tumefaciens into tobacco leaves. We investigated the associated plant defence responses, revealing that callose deposition is triggered by T-DNA transfer and that subsets of secondary metabolites accumulate in response to mechanical wounding or the presence of bacteria. We also tested the ability of five co-expressed type III effector proteins from Pseudomonas syringae to modulate these defence responses and increase the yield of two model proteins, the fluorescent marker DsRed and monoclonal antibody 2G12. HopF2 and AvrRpt2 induced necrotic lesions 5 days post-injection (dpi) even at low doses (OD600 nm  = 0.0078), and increased the concentration of certain secondary metabolites. HopAO1 significantly reduced the number of callose deposits at 2 dpi compared to cells expressing DsRed and 2G12 alone, whereas HopI1 reduced the concentration of several secondary metabolites at 5 dpi compared to cells expressing DsRed and 2G12 alone. Co-expression with HopAO1, AvrPtoB or HopI1 increased the concentrations of DsRed and 2G12 increased by ~6% but this was not a significant change. In contrast, HopF2 and AvrRpt2 significantly reduced the concentrations of DsRed and 2G12 by 34% and 22%, respectively. Our results show that type III effector proteins can modulate plant defence responses and secondary metabolite profiles but that transient co-expression is not sufficient to increase the yields of target recombinant proteins in tobacco.

  18. The type III protein translocation system of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli involves EspA-EspB protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Neves, B C; Wallis, T; Shaw, R K; Hale, C; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2000-03-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), like many bacterial pathogens, use a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins across the bacterial cell wall. In EPEC, four proteins, EspA, EspB, EspD and Tir are known to be exported by a type III secretion system and to be essential for 'attaching and effacing' (A/E) lesion formation, the hallmark of EPEC pathogenicity. EspA was recently shown to be a structural protein and a major component of a large, transiently expressed, filamentous surface organelle which forms a direct link between the bacterium and the host cell. In contrast, EspB is translocated into the host cell where it is localized to both membrane and cytosolic cell fractions. EspA and EspB are required for translocation of Tir to the host cell membrane suggesting that they may both be components of the translocation apparatus. In this study, we show that EspB co-immunoprecipitates with the EspA filaments and that, during EPEC infection of HEp-2 cells, EspB localizes closely with EspA. Using a number of binding assays, we also show that EspB can bind and be copurified with EspA. Nevertheless, binding of EspA filaments to the host cell membranes occurred even in the absence of EspB. These results suggest that following initial attachment of the EspA filaments to the target cells, EspB is delivered into the host cell membrane and that the interaction between EspA and EspB may be important for protein translocation.

  19. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: III. Comparison between different proteins.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Liu, Na; Wei, Wei; Yu, Lin-Ling; Ma, Guanghui; Sun, Yan

    2014-05-16

    Previously, we studied bovine serum albumin (BSA) uptake to poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose resins, and an ionic capacity (IC) range (600-740mmol/L) for steep increases of both protein capacity (qm) and effective pore diffusion coefficient (De) was found. In this work, seven PEI-grafted Sepharose FF resins at IC range of 270-1030mmol/L were synthesized to investigate the effect of protein properties on the adsorption and uptake kinetics using BSA and γ-globulin as two model proteins. For BSA, the change trends of qm and De values with IC were well consistent with the previous results. For γ-globulin, the qm values increased slowly till reaching a maximum value at IC=560mmol/L and then decreased rapidly at IC>560mol/L. The De values nearly kept unchanged at low ICs (IC<460mmol/L), and increased steeply at IC>460mmol/L till reaching a maximum at 680mmol/L (De/D0=0.48±0.01). After that increase, the De values for γ-globulin dropped quickly at IC>680mol/L, which was not observed for BSA. It is interesting to note that in the narrow IC range of 460-680mmol/L, the De values of γ-globulin increased dramatically for more than four folds. Moreover, it is notable that the IC range where the hopping of De values occurred for γ-globulin was earlier than that for BSA (460 vs. 560mmol/L). The earlier hopping of γ-globulin uptake rate was attributed to its larger size and less net charge, which facilitated the happenings of the "chain delivery" effect. The quick drops of both qm and De values for γ-globulin at IC>680mmol/L were considered due to its large size, which led to the significant decrease of its effective pore volume. The results indicate that both PEI layer and protein size played important roles in protein adsorption to PEI-grafted resins, and further prove the "chain delivery" effect did contributed significantly to the uptake rate hopping in the PEI-grafted resins. This work could also help the design and selection of resins based on protein

  20. The ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex as a GTP-synthase. steady-state proton pumping and dose-response relationships for beta -adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Broadley, K J; Nederkoorn, P H; Timmerman, H; Timms, D; Davies, R H

    2000-07-21

    Steady-state solutions are developed for the rate of G alpha.GTP production in a synthase model of the ligand-receptor-G-protein ternary complex activated by a ligand-receptor proton pumping mechanism. The effective rate, k(31), defining the proton transfer, phosphorylation and G alpha.GTP release is a controlling rate of the synthase in the presence of a ligand with an efficient mode of signal activation, the ligand-receptor interaction taking place under effectively equilibrium conditions. The composite rate, however, becomes an amplifying factor in any dose-response relationship. The amplification is a triple product of the rate, k(31), the equilibrium constant associated with the activation of the proton signal, K(act)and the fraction of agonist conformer transmitting the signal, f(*). Where the rate of activation of the proton signal becomes critically inefficient, the rate of activation, k(act 1)replaces k(31)K(act). A correlation between beta(1)-adrenergic receptor-stimulated GDP release and adenylate cyclase activation shows that this correlation is not unique to an exchange reaction. Within the initiating Tyr-Arg-Tyr receptor proton shuttle mechanism, the position of Arg(r156) paralleldictates the high-(R(p)) and low-(R(u)) ligand-binding affinities. These states are close to R(*)and R(0)of the equilibrium model (De Lean et al., 1980, J. Biol. Chem.255, 7108-7117). An increased rate of hydrogen ion diffusion into a receptor mutant can give rise to constitutive activity while increased rates of G-protein release and changes in receptor state balance can contribute to the resultant level of action. Constitutive action will arise from a faster rate of G-protein release alone if proton diffusion in the wild-type receptor contributes to a basal level of G-protein activation. Competitive ligand-receptor occupancy for constitutive mutants shows that, where the rate of G-protein activation from the proportion of ligand-occupied receptors is less than the

  1. ESCRT-III drives the final stages of CUPS maturation for unconventional protein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Curwin, Amy J; Brouwers, Nathalie; Alonso Y Adell, Manuel; Teis, David; Turacchio, Gabriele; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Ronchi, Paolo; Malhotra, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional secretory pathway exports proteins that bypass the endoplasmic reticulum. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, conditions that trigger Acb1 secretion via this pathway generate a Grh1 containing compartment composed of vesicles and tubules surrounded by a cup-shaped membrane and collectively called CUPS. Here we report a quantitative assay for Acb1 secretion that reveals requirements for ESCRT-I, -II, and -III but, surprisingly, without the involvement of the Vps4 AAA-ATPase. The major ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 localizes transiently to CUPS and this was accelerated in vps4Δ cells, correlating with increased Acb1 secretion. Microscopic analysis suggests that, instead of forming intraluminal vesicles with the help of Vps4, ESCRT-III/Snf7 promotes direct engulfment of preexisting Grh1 containing vesicles and tubules into a saccule to generate a mature Acb1 containing compartment. This novel multivesicular / multilamellar compartment, we suggest represents the stable secretory form of CUPS that is competent for the release of Acb1 to cells exterior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16299.001 PMID:27115345

  2. Effect of annealing time of an ice crystal on the activity of type III antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Takamichi, Manabu; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Miura, Ai; Tsuda, Sakae

    2007-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess a unique ability to bind to a seed ice crystal to inhibit its growth. The strength of this binding has been evaluated by thermal hysteresis (TH). In this study, we examined the dependence of TH on experimental parameters, including cooling rate, annealing time, annealing temperature and the size of the seed ice crystal for an isoform of type III AFP from notched-fin eelpout (nfeAFP8). TH of nfeAFP8 dramatically decreased when using a fast cooling rate (0.20 degrees C x min(-1)). It also decreased with increasing seed crystal size under a slow cooling rate (0.01 degrees C x min(-1)), but such dependence was not detected under the fast cooling rate. TH was enhanced 1.4- and 2.5-fold when ice crystals were annealed for 3 h at 0.05 and 0.25 degrees C below T(m), respectively. After annealing for 2 h at 0.25 degrees C below T(m), TH activity showed marked dependence on the size of ice crystals. These results suggest that annealing of an ice crystal for 2-3 h significantly increased the TH value of type III AFP. Based on a proposed adsorption-inhibition model, we assume that type III AFP undergoes additional ice binding to the convex ice front over a 2-3 h time scale, which results in the TH dependence on the annealing time.

  3. A bacterial type III secretion assay for delivery of fungal effector proteins into wheat.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mago, Rohit; Staskawicz, Brian J; Ayliffe, Michael A; Ellis, Jeffrey G; Dodds, Peter N

    2014-03-01

    Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole-genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. Although Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here, we show that a nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens engineered to express the type III secretion system (T3SS) of P. syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens can deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) avirulence (Avr) proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with P. fluorescens makes it more suitable than X. translucens for detecting a hypersensitive response (HR) induced by an effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localization to the plasma membrane which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR, indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus, the modified AvrRpm1:effector-Pseudomonas fluorescens system is an effective tool for large-scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat. PMID:24156769

  4. Type III secretion needle proteins induce cell signaling and cytokine secretion via Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Jessen, Danielle L; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S; Nilles, Matthew L

    2014-06-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  5. Type III Secretion Needle Proteins Induce Cell Signaling and Cytokine Secretion via Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Danielle L.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are recognized by hosts by use of various receptors, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) and Nod-like receptor (NLR) families. Ligands for these varied receptors, including bacterial products, are identified by the immune system, resulting in development of innate immune responses. Only a couple of components from type III secretion (T3S) systems are known to be recognized by TLR or NLR family members. Known T3S components that are detected by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are (i) flagellin, detected by TLR5 and NLRC4 (Ipaf); and (ii) T3S rod proteins (PrgJ and homologs) and needle proteins (PrgI and homologs), detected by NAIP and the NLRC4 inflammasome. In this report, we characterize the induction of proinflammatory responses through TLRs by the Yersinia pestis T3S needle protein, YscF, the Salmonella enterica needle proteins PrgI and SsaG, and the Shigella needle protein, MxiH. More specifically, we determine that the proinflammatory responses occur through TLR2 and -4. These data support the hypothesis that T3S needles have an unrecognized role in bacterial pathogenesis by modulating immune responses. PMID:24643544

  6. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition: Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.J.; Callister, S.J.; Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; Nicora, C.D.; Lovley, D.R.; Long, P.E.; Lipton, M.S.

    2010-02-15

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  7. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovely, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  8. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; Proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lovley, Derek R.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample‐specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)‐reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes. PMID:21255372

  9. Development of a biomarker for Geobacter activity and strain composition; proteogenomic analysis of the citrate synthase protein during bioremediation of U(VI).

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Miletto, Marzia; Williams, Kenneth H; Nicora, Carrie D; Lovley, Derek R; Long, Philip E; Lipton, Mary S

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring the activity of target microorganisms during stimulated bioremediation is a key problem for the development of effective remediation strategies. At the US Department of Energy's Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Rifle, CO, the stimulation of Geobacter growth and activity via subsurface acetate addition leads to precipitation of U(VI) from groundwater as U(IV). Citrate synthase (gltA) is a key enzyme in Geobacter central metabolism that controls flux into the TCA cycle. Here, we utilize shotgun proteomic methods to demonstrate that the measurement of gltA peptides can be used to track Geobacter activity and strain evolution during in situ biostimulation. Abundances of conserved gltA peptides tracked Fe(III) reduction and changes in U(VI) concentrations during biostimulation, whereas changing patterns of unique peptide abundances between samples suggested sample-specific strain shifts within the Geobacter population. Abundances of unique peptides indicated potential differences at the strain level between Fe(III)-reducing populations stimulated during in situ biostimulation experiments conducted a year apart at the Rifle IFRC. These results offer a novel technique for the rapid screening of large numbers of proteomic samples for Geobacter species and will aid monitoring of subsurface bioremediation efforts that rely on metal reduction for desired outcomes.

  10. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Protein Kinase Activity Is Frequently Elevated in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Supports Tumour Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O′Flaherty, Linda; Pardo, Olivier E.; Dzien, Piotr; Phillips, Lois; Morgan, Carys; Pawade, Joya; May, Margaret T.; Sohail, Muhammad; Hetzel, Martin R.; Seckl, Michael J.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a central regulator of cellular metabolism, development and growth. GSK3 activity was thought to oppose tumourigenesis, yet recent studies indicate that it may support tumour growth in some cancer types including in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We examined the undefined role of GSK3 protein kinase activity in tissue from human NSCLC. Methods The expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was determined in 29 fresh frozen samples of human NSCLC and patient-matched normal lung tissue by quantitative immunoassay and western blotting for the phosphorylation of three distinct GSK3 substrates in situ (glycogen synthase, RelA and CRMP-2). The proliferation and sensitivity to the small-molecule GSK3 inhibitor; CHIR99021, of NSCLC cell lines (Hcc193, H1975, PC9 and A549) and non-neoplastic type II pneumocytes was further assessed in adherent culture. Results Expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was elevated in 41% of human NSCLC samples when compared to patient-matched control tissue. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β at the inhibitory S21/9 residue was a poor biomarker for activity in tumour samples. The GSK3 inhibitor, CHIR99021 dose-dependently reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines yet was ineffective against type II pneumocytes. Conclusion NSCLC tumours with elevated GSK3 protein kinase activity may have evolved dependence on the kinase for sustained growth. Our results provide further important rationale for exploring the use of GSK3 inhibitors in treating NSCLC. PMID:25486534

  11. Effect of type III antifreeze protein dilution and mutation on the growth inhibition of ice.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, C I; Chao, H; Sönnichsen, F D; Sykes, B D; Davies, P L

    1996-01-01

    Mutation of residues at the ice-binding site of type III antifreeze protein (AFP) not only reduced antifreeze activity as indicated by the failure to halt ice crystal growth, but also altered ice crystal morphology to produce elongated hexagonal bipyramids. In general, the c axis to a axis ratio of the ice crystal increased from approximately 2 to over 10 with the severity of the mutation. It also increased during ice crystal growth upon serial dilution of the wild-type AFP. This is in marked contrast to the behavior of the alpha-helical type I AFPs, where neither dilution nor mutation of ice-binding residues increases the c:a axial ratio of the ice crystal above the standard 3.3. We suggest that the ice crystal morphology produced by type III AFP and its mutants can be accounted for by the protein binding to the prism faces of ice and operating by step growth inhibition. In this model a decrease in the affinity of the AFP for ice leads to filling in of individual steps at the prism surfaces, causing the ice crystals to grow with a longer c:a axial ratio. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:8913575

  12. Identification of the major regenerative III protein (RegIII) in the porcine intestinal mucosa as RegIIIγ, not RegIIIα.

    PubMed

    Soler, L; Miller, I; Nöbauer, K; Carpentier, S; Niewold, T

    2015-09-15

    During the last years, an antimicrobial protein from the RegIII family has been consistently identified as one of the main up-regulated mRNA transcripts in the pig small intestinal mucosa during different infections such as enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). This transcript has been mainly referred to in the literature as pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP/RegIIIα). However, the identity of this transcript has not been confirmed, and no evidence of its expression at the protein level is available in the literature, because the absence of a specific antibody. In this study, we first unequivocally identified the PAP/RegIII family protein mainly expressed in ETEC infected pig intestine as RegIIIγ by 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF. This shows that the pig differs from species like human and mice in that RegIIIγ (and not RegIIIα) might be the major RegIII isotype during intestinal infection. Immunoblotting analysis with a specifically generated polyclonal rabbit antibody revealed that pig RegIIIγ is expressed throughout the intestinal tract, but most abundantly in the ileum. Although a higher abundance of mRNA was paralleled by higher protein abundance, a lack of linear relationship was found between RegIIIγ mRNA and protein abundances in the jejunal mucosa, the latter most pronounced in the case of natural infection. This may be related to the secretory nature of RegIIIγ. This would mean that the antimicrobial protein RegIIIγ is a good candidate as a non-invasive faecal intestinal health biomarker in swine. PMID:26187439

  13. Iridium(III) Luminescent Probe for Detection of the Malarial Protein Biomarker Histidine Rich Protein-II.

    PubMed

    Davis, Keersten M; Bitting, Anna L; Markwalter, Christine F; Bauer, Westley S; Wright, David W

    2015-07-07

    This work outlines the synthesis of a non-emissive, cyclometalated Ir(III) complex, Ir(ppy)2(H2O)2(+) (Ir1), which elicits a rapid, long-lived phosphorescent signal when coordinated to a histidine-containing protein immobilized on the surface of a magnetic particle. Synthesis of Ir1, in high yields,is complete O/N and involves splitting of the parent cyclometalated Ir(III) chloro-bridged dimer into two equivalents of the solvated complex. To confirm specificity, several amino acids were probed for coordination activity when added to the synthesized probe, and only histidine elicited a signal response. Using BNT-II, a branched peptide mimic of the malarial biomarker Histidine Rich Protein II (pfHRP-II), the iridium probe was validated as a tool for HRP-II detection. Quenching effects were noted in the BNT-II/Ir1 titration when compared to L-Histidine/Ir1, but these were attributed to steric hindrance and triplet state quenching. Biolayer interferometry was used to determine real-time kinetics of interaction of Ir1 with BNT-II. Once the system was optimized, the limit of detection of rcHRP-II using the probe was found to be 12.8 nM in solution. When this protein was immobilized on the surface of a 50 µm magnetic agarose particle, the limit of detection was 14.5 nM. The robust signal response of this inorganic probe, as well as its flexibility of use in solution or immobilized on a surface, can lend itself toward a variety of applications, from diagnostic use to imaging.

  14. Parallel channels and rate-limiting steps in complex protein folding reactions: prolyl isomerization and the alpha subunit of Trp synthase, a TIM barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Matthews, C Robert

    2002-10-18

    A kinetic folding mechanism for the alpha subunit of tryptophan synthase (alphaTS) from Escherichia coli, involving four parallel channels with multiple native, intermediate and unfolded forms, has recently been proposed. The hypothesis that cis/trans isomerization of several Xaa-Pro peptide bonds is the source of the multiple folding channels was tested by measuring the sensitivity of the three rate-limiting phases (tau(1), tau(2), tau(3)) to catalysis by cyclophilin, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase. Although the absence of catalysis for the tau(1) (fast) phase leaves its assignment ambiguous, our previous mutational analysis demonstrated its connection to the unique cis peptide bond preceding proline 28. The acceleration of the tau(2) (medium) and tau(3) (slow) refolding phases by cyclophilin demonstrated that cis/trans prolyl isomerization is also the source of these phases. A collection of proline mutants, which covered all of the remaining 18 trans proline residues of alphaTS, was constructed to obtain specific assignments for these phases. Almost all of the mutant proteins retained the complex equilibrium and kinetic folding properties of wild-type alphaTS; only the P217A, P217G and P261A mutations caused significant changes in the equilibrium free energy surface. Both the P78A and P96A mutations selectively eliminated the tau(1) folding phase, while the P217M and P261A mutations eliminated the tau(2) and tau(3) folding phases, respectively. The redundant assignment of the tau(1) phase to Pro28, Pro78 and Pro96 may reflect their mutual interactions in non-random structure in the unfolded state. The non-native cis isomers for Pro217 and Pro261 may destabilize an autonomous C-terminal folding unit, thereby giving rise to kinetically distinct unfolded forms. The nature of the preceding amino acid, the solvent exposure, or the participation in specific elements of secondary structure in the native state, in general, are not determinative of the proline residues whose

  15. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells.

    PubMed

    Galán, Jorge E; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C; Wagner, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilize complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen's benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies.

  16. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Jorge E.; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Wagner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilized complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen’s benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants, but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25002086

  17. Optimized green fluorescent protein fused to FoF1-ATP synthase for single-molecule FRET using a fast anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienerowitz, Maria; Ilchenko, Mykhailo; Su, Bertram; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Mayer, Günter; Henkel, Thomas; Heitkamp, Thomas; Börsch, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Observation times of freely diffusing single molecules in solution are limited by the photophysics of the attached fluorescence markers and by a small observation volume in the femtolitre range that is required for a sufficient signal-to-background ratio. To extend diffusion-limited observation times through a confocal detection volume, A. E. Cohen and W. E. Moerner have invented and built the ABELtrap -- a microfluidic device to actively counteract Brownian motion of single nanoparticles with an electrokinetic trap. Here we present a version of an ABELtrap with a laser focus pattern generated by electro-optical beam deflectors and controlled by a programmable FPGA chip. This ABELtrap holds single fluorescent nanoparticles for more than 100 seconds, increasing the observation time of fluorescent nanoparticles compared to free diffusion by a factor of 10000. To monitor conformational changes of individual membrane proteins in real time, we record sequential distance changes between two specifically attached dyes using Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET). Fusing the a-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase with mNeonGreen results in an improved signal-to-background ratio at lower laser excitation powers. This increases our measured trap duration of proteoliposomes beyond 2 s. Additionally, we observe different smFRET levels attributed to varying distances between the FRET donor (mNeonGreen) and acceptor (Alexa568) fluorophore attached at the a- and c-subunit of the FoF1-ATP synthase respectively.

  18. LAP5 and LAP6 Encode Anther-Specific Proteins with Similarity to Chalcone Synthase Essential for Pollen Exine Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Lei, Zhentian; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Huhman, David V.; Preuss, Daphne; Sumner, Lloyd W.

    2010-01-01

    Pollen grains of land plants have evolved remarkably strong outer walls referred to as exine that protect pollen and interact with female stigma cells. Exine is composed of sporopollenin, and while the composition and synthesis of this biopolymer are not well understood, both fatty acids and phenolics are likely components. Here, we describe mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) LESS ADHESIVE POLLEN (LAP5) and LAP6 that affect exine development. Mutation of either gene results in abnormal exine patterning, whereas pollen of double mutants lacked exine deposition and subsequently collapsed, causing male sterility. LAP5 and LAP6 encode anther-specific proteins with homology to chalcone synthase, a key flavonoid biosynthesis enzyme. lap5 and lap6 mutations reduced the accumulation of flavonoid precursors and flavonoids in developing anthers, suggesting a role in the synthesis of phenolic constituents of sporopollenin. Our in vitro functional analysis of LAP5 and LAP6 using 4-coumaroyl-coenzyme A yielded bis-noryangonin (a commonly reported derailment product of chalcone synthase), while similar in vitro analyses using fatty acyl-coenzyme A as the substrate yielded medium-chain alkyl pyrones. Thus, in vitro assays indicate that LAP5 and LAP6 are multifunctional enzymes and may play a role in both the synthesis of pollen fatty acids and phenolics found in exine. Finally, the genetic interaction between LAP5 and an anther gene involved in fatty acid hydroxylation (CYP703A2) demonstrated that they act synergistically in exine production. PMID:20442277

  19. Differential Expression of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes during Orchid Flower Senescence Induced by the Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning Ning; Yang, Shang Fa; Charng, Yee-yung

    2001-01-01

    Applying 10 pmol of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of type 1 or type 2A serine/threonine protein phosphatases, to the orchid (Phalaenopsis species) stigma induced a dramatic increase in ethylene production and an accelerated senescence of the whole flower. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine or silver thiosulfate, inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or action, respectively, effectively inhibited the OA-induced ethylene production and retarded flower senescence, suggesting that the protein phosphatase inhibitor induced orchid flower senescence through an ethylene-mediated signaling pathway. OA treatment induced a differential expression pattern for the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase multigene family. Accumulation of Phal-ACS1 transcript in the stigma, labelum, and ovary induced by OA were higher than those induced by pollination as determined by “semiquantitative” reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, the transcript levels of Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 induced by OA were much lower than those induced by pollination. Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, on the other hand, inhibited the OA-induced Phal-ACS1 expression in the stigma and delayed flower senescence. Our results suggest that a hyper-phosphorylation status of an unidentified protein(s) is involved in up-regulating the expression of Phal-ACS1 gene resulting in increased ethylene production and accelerated the senescence process of orchid flower. PMID:11351088

  20. A Medicago truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like Domain-Containing Protein Is Required for Rhizobial Infection and Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Breakspear, Andrew; Guan, Dian; Nakashima, Jin; Zhang, Shulan; Torres-Jerez, Ivone; Oldroyd, Giles; Murray, Jeremy D.; Udvardi, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The symbiosis between leguminous plants and soil rhizobia culminates in the formation of nitrogen-fixing organs called nodules that support plant growth. Two Medicago truncatula Tnt1-insertion mutants were identified that produced small nodules, which were unable to fix nitrogen effectively due to ineffective rhizobial colonization. The gene underlying this phenotype was found to encode a protein containing a putative membrane-localized domain of unknown function (DUF21) and a cystathionine-β-synthase domain. The cbs1 mutants had defective infection threads that were sometimes devoid of rhizobia and formed small nodules with greatly reduced numbers of symbiosomes. We studied the expression of the gene, designated M. truncatula Cystathionine-β-Synthase-like1 (MtCBS1), using a promoter-β-glucuronidase gene fusion, which revealed expression in infected root hair cells, developing nodules, and in the invasion zone of mature nodules. An MtCBS1-GFP fusion protein localized itself to the infection thread and symbiosomes. Nodulation factor-induced Ca2+ responses were observed in the cbs1 mutant, indicating that MtCBS1 acts downstream of nodulation factor signaling. MtCBS1 expression occurred exclusively during Medicago-rhizobium symbiosis. Induction of MtCBS1 expression during symbiosis was found to be dependent on Nodule Inception (NIN), a key transcription factor that controls both rhizobial infection and nodule organogenesis. Interestingly, the closest homolog of MtCBS1, MtCBS2, was specifically induced in mycorrhizal roots, suggesting common infection mechanisms in nodulation and mycorrhization. Related proteins in Arabidopsis have been implicated in cell wall maturation, suggesting a potential role for CBS1 in the formation of the infection thread wall. PMID:26884486

  1. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  2. [Mapping of the B Cell Neutralizing Epitopes on ED III of Envelope Protein from Dengue Virus].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yaying; Wen, Kun; Guo, Yonghui; Qiu, Liwen; Pan, Yuxian; Yu, Lan; Di, Biao; Chen, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) envelope [E] protein is the major surface protein of the virions that indued neutralizing antibodies. The domain III of envelope protein (EDIII) is an immunogenic region that holds potential for the development of vaccines; however, the epitopes of DENV EDIII, especially neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes, have not been comprehensively mapped. We mapped neutralizing B-cell linear epitopes on DENV-1 EDIII using 27 monoclonal antibodies against DENV-1 EDIII proteins from mice immunized with the DENV-1 EDIII. Epitope recognition analysis was performed using two set of sequential overlapping peptides (16m and 12m) that spanned the entire EDIII protein from DENV-1, respectively. This strategy identified a DENV-1 type- specific and a group-specific neutralizing epitope, which were highly conserved among isolates of DENV-1 and the four DENV serotypes and located at two regions from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 309-320 and 381-392(aa 309-320 and 381-392), respectively. aa310 -319(310KEVAETQHGT319)was similar among the four DENV serotypes and contact residues on aa 309 -320 from E protein were defined and found that substitution of residues E309 , V312, A313 and V320 in DENV-2, -3, -4 isolates were antigenically silent. We also identified a DENV-1 type-specific strain-restricted neutralizing epitope, which was located at the region from DENV-1 E, namely amino acid residues 329-348 . These novel type- and group-specific B-cell epitopes of DENV EDIII may aid help us elucidate the dengue pathogenesis and accelerate vaccine design. PMID:26951013

  3. Cytochrome C oxidase III interacts with hepatitis B virus X protein in vivo by yeast two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Wang, Xiao-Zhong; Yu, Jie-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Huang, Yue-Hong; Tao, Qi-Min

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To screen and identify the proteins which interact with hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein in hepatocytes by yeast two-hybrid system and to explore the effects of X protein in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: With HBV X gene amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), HBV X bait plasmid, named pAS2-1-X, was constructed by yeast-two hybridization system3 and verified by auto-sequencing assay. pAS2-1-X was transformed into the yeast AH109, and X-BD fusion protein expressed in the yeast cells was detected by Western blotting. The yeast cells cotransformed with pAS2-1-X and normal human liver cDNA library were grown in selective SC/-trp-leu-his-ade medium. The second screen was performed with β-gal activity detection, and false positive clones were eliminated by segregation analysis, true positive clones were amplified, sequenced and analyzed with bioinformatics. Mating experiment was peformed to confirm the binding of putative proteins to X protein in the yeast cells. RESULTS: Bait plasmid pAS2-1-X was successfully constructed and pAS2-1-X correctly expressed BD-X fusion protein in yeast AH109. One hundred and three clones grew in the selective SC/-trp-leu-his-ade medium, and only one clone passed through β-gal activity detection and segregation analysis. The inserted cDNA fragment showed high homology with Homo sapiens cytochrome C oxidase III (cox III). Furthermore, mating experiment identified that the binding of cox III to X protein was specific. CONCLUSION: cox III protein is a novel protein that can interact with X protein in vivo by yeast two-hybrid system, and may contribute to the development of HCC through the interaction with X protein. PMID:15334674

  4. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time.

  5. A Ser/Thr protein kinase phosphorylates MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase 1) during banana fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2012-08-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis during ripening. ACS isozymes are regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally. However, in banana, an important climacteric fruit, little is known about post-translational regulation of ACS. Here, we report the post-translational modification of MA-ACS1 (Musa acuminata ACS1), a ripening inducible isozyme in the ACS family, which plays a key role in ethylene biosynthesis during banana fruit ripening. Immunoprecipitation analyses of phospholabeled protein extracts from banana fruit using affinity-purified anti-MA-ACS1 antibody have revealed phosphorylation of MA-ACS1, particularly in ripe fruit tissue. We have identified the induction of a 41-kDa protein kinase activity in pulp at the onset of ripening. The 41-kDa protein kinase has been identified as a putative protein kinase by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis. Biochemical analyses using partially purified protein kinase fraction from banana fruit have identified the protein kinase as a Ser/Thr family of protein kinase and its possible involvement in MA-ACS1 phosphorylation during ripening. In vitro phosphorylation analyses using synthetic peptides and site-directed mutagenized recombinant MA-ACS1 have revealed that serine 476 and 479 residues at the C-terminal region of MA-ACS1 are phosphorylated. Overall, this study provides important novel evidence for in vivo phosphorylation of MA-ACS1 at the molecular level as a possible mechanism of post-translational regulation of this key regulatory protein in ethylene signaling pathway in banana fruit during ripening. PMID:22419220

  6. Presence of unique glyoxalase III proteins in plants indicates the existence of shorter route for methylglyoxal detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ajit; Kushwaha, Hemant R; Hasan, Mohammad R; Pareek, Ashwani; Sopory, Sudhir K; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L

    2016-01-01

    Glyoxalase pathway, comprising glyoxalase I (GLY I) and glyoxalase II (GLY II) enzymes, is the major pathway for detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG) into D-lactate involving reduced glutathione (GSH). However, in bacteria, glyoxalase III (GLY III) with DJ-1/PfpI domain(s) can do the same conversion in a single step without GSH. Our investigations for the presence of DJ-1/PfpI domain containing proteins in plants have indicated the existence of GLY III-like proteins in monocots, dicots, lycopods, gymnosperm and bryophytes. A deeper in silico analysis of rice genome identified twelve DJ-1 proteins encoded by six genes. Detailed analysis has been carried out including their chromosomal distribution, genomic architecture and localization. Transcript profiling under multiple stress conditions indicated strong induction of OsDJ-1 in response to exogenous MG. A member of OsDJ-1 family, OsDJ-1C, showed high constitutive expression at all developmental stages and tissues of rice. MG depletion study complemented by simultaneous formation of D-lactate proved OsDJ-1C to be a GLY III enzyme that converts MG directly into D-lactate in a GSH-independent manner. Site directed mutagenesis of Cys-119 to Alanine significantly reduces its GLY III activity indicating towards the existence of functional GLY III enzyme in rice—a shorter route for MG detoxification. PMID:26732528

  7. Presence of unique glyoxalase III proteins in plants indicates the existence of shorter route for methylglyoxal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ajit; Kushwaha, Hemant R; Hasan, Mohammad R; Pareek, Ashwani; Sopory, Sudhir K; Singla-Pareek, Sneh L

    2016-01-01

    Glyoxalase pathway, comprising glyoxalase I (GLY I) and glyoxalase II (GLY II) enzymes, is the major pathway for detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG) into D-lactate involving reduced glutathione (GSH). However, in bacteria, glyoxalase III (GLY III) with DJ-1/PfpI domain(s) can do the same conversion in a single step without GSH. Our investigations for the presence of DJ-1/PfpI domain containing proteins in plants have indicated the existence of GLY III-like proteins in monocots, dicots, lycopods, gymnosperm and bryophytes. A deeper in silico analysis of rice genome identified twelve DJ-1 proteins encoded by six genes. Detailed analysis has been carried out including their chromosomal distribution, genomic architecture and localization. Transcript profiling under multiple stress conditions indicated strong induction of OsDJ-1 in response to exogenous MG. A member of OsDJ-1 family, OsDJ-1C, showed high constitutive expression at all developmental stages and tissues of rice. MG depletion study complemented by simultaneous formation of D-lactate proved OsDJ-1C to be a GLY III enzyme that converts MG directly into D-lactate in a GSH-independent manner. Site directed mutagenesis of Cys-119 to Alanine significantly reduces its GLY III activity indicating towards the existence of functional GLY III enzyme in rice-a shorter route for MG detoxification. PMID:26732528

  8. Pore-forming Activity of the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System Protein EspD.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Caballero-Franco, Celia; Bakker, Dannika; Totten, Stephanie; Jardim, Armando

    2015-10-16

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a causative agent of gastrointestinal and diarrheal diseases. Pathogenesis associated with enterohemorrhagic E. coli involves direct delivery of virulence factors from the bacteria into epithelial cell cytosol via a syringe-like organelle known as the type III secretion system. The type III secretion system protein EspD is a critical factor required for formation of a translocation pore on the host cell membrane. Here, we show that recombinant EspD spontaneously integrates into large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) lipid bilayers; however, pore formation required incorporation of anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine and an acidic pH. Leakage assays performed with fluorescent dextrans confirmed that EspD formed a structure with an inner diameter of ∼2.5 nm. Protease mapping indicated that the two transmembrane helical hairpin of EspD penetrated the lipid layer positioning the N- and C-terminal domains on the extralumenal surface of LUVs. Finally, a combination of glutaraldehyde cross-linking and rate zonal centrifugation suggested that EspD in LUV membranes forms an ∼280-320-kDa oligomeric structure consisting of ∼6-7 subunits.

  9. ESCRT-III binding protein MITD1 is involved in cytokinesis and has an unanticipated PLD fold that binds membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hadders, Michael A.; Agromayor, Monica; Obita, Takayuki; Perisic, Olga; Caballe, Anna; Kloc, Magdalena; Lamers, Meindert H.; Williams, Roger L.; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins have a critical function in abscission, the final separation of the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Here, we describe the structure and function of a previously uncharacterized ESCRT-III interacting protein, MIT-domain containing protein 1 (MITD1). Crystal structures of MITD1 reveal a dimer, with a microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT) domain at the N terminus and a unique, unanticipated phospholipase D-like (PLD) domain at the C terminus that binds membranes. We show that the MIT domain binds to a subset of ESCRT-III subunits and that this interaction mediates MITD1 recruitment to the midbody during cytokinesis. Depletion of MITD1 causes a distinct cytokinetic phenotype consistent with destabilization of the midbody and abscission failure. These results suggest a model whereby MITD1 coordinates the activity of ESCRT-III during abscission with earlier events in the final stages of cell division. PMID:23045692

  10. Immunogenicity of a novel tetravalent vaccine formulation with four recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Mei-Yu; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel platform to express high levels of recombinant lipoproteins with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Based on this technology, our group developed recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs as vaccine candidates against dengue virus. This work aims to evaluate the immune responses in mice to the tetravalent formulation. We demonstrate that 4 serotypes of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III induced both humoral and cellular immunity against all 4 serotypes of dengue virus on the mixture that formed the tetravalent formulation. Importantly, the immune responses induced by the tetravalent formulation in the absence of the exogenous adjuvant were functional in clearing the 4 serotypes of dengue virus in vivo. We affirm that the tetravalent formulation of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III is a potential vaccine candidate against dengue virus and suggest further detailed studies of this formulation in nonhuman primates. PMID:27470096

  11. Immunogenicity of a novel tetravalent vaccine formulation with four recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs in mice.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chen-Yi; Pan, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Mei-Yu; Hsieh, Chun-Hsiang; Tsai, Jy-Ping; Liu, Hsueh-Hung; Liu, Shih-Jen; Chong, Pele; Leng, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hsin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel platform to express high levels of recombinant lipoproteins with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Based on this technology, our group developed recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain IIIs as vaccine candidates against dengue virus. This work aims to evaluate the immune responses in mice to the tetravalent formulation. We demonstrate that 4 serotypes of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III induced both humoral and cellular immunity against all 4 serotypes of dengue virus on the mixture that formed the tetravalent formulation. Importantly, the immune responses induced by the tetravalent formulation in the absence of the exogenous adjuvant were functional in clearing the 4 serotypes of dengue virus in vivo. We affirm that the tetravalent formulation of recombinant lipidated dengue envelope protein domain III is a potential vaccine candidate against dengue virus and suggest further detailed studies of this formulation in nonhuman primates. PMID:27470096

  12. Docking studies of flavonoid compounds as inhibitors of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase I (Kas I) of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Ghalia; Berakdar, Noura

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequent causes of many common bacterial infections, including cholecystitis, bacteremia, cholangitis, urinary tract infection (UTI), traveler's diarrhea and other clinical infections such as neonatal meningitis and pneumonia. The fatty acid biosynthesis is essential for the bacterial viability and growth. There are three types of β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) which are important for overcoming the bacterial resistance problem. β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase I (KAS I) is member of the condensing enzyme family, which is a key catalyst in bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis, and thus an attractive target for novel antibioticsis related to the elongation of unsaturated fatty acids in bacterial fatty acid synthesis and can be a good therapeutic target of designing novel antibiotics. In this report, we performed docking study of E. coli (KAS I) and 50 flavonoids. Out of these 50 flavonoids, there are two compounds, genistein and isorhamnetin, that showed the superior binding energy while fully satisfying the conditions of drug likeliness. The predicted binding energy of genistein and isorhamnetin toward KAS I are -135.76kcal/mol and -132.42kcal/mol, respectively. These energies favorably compare to the biding energy of known drugs thiolactomicin and cerulenin that are -90.26kcal/mol and -99.64kcal/mol, respectively. The method used was docking with the selected E. coli (KAS I-PDB ID-1FJ4) using iGemdock. This was also found to obey the Lipinski's guidelines of five and to show the drug likeliness and bioavailability. PMID:26292066

  13. Discovery of a linoleate 9S-dioxygenase and an allene oxide synthase in a fusion protein of Fusarium oxysporum[S

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H.

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum is a devastating plant pathogen that oxidizes C18 fatty acids sequentially to jasmonates. The genome codes for putative dioxygenase (DOX)-cytochrome P450 (CYP) fusion proteins homologous to linoleate diol synthases (LDSs) and the allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Aspergillus terreus, e.g., FOXB_01332. Recombinant FOXB_01332 oxidized 18:2n-6 to 9S-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid by hydrogen abstraction and antarafacial insertion of molecular oxygen and sequentially to an allene oxide, 9S(10)-epoxy-10,12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid, as judged from nonenzymatic hydrolysis products (α- and γ-ketols). The enzyme was therefore designated 9S-DOX-AOS. The 9S-DOX activity oxidized C18 and C20 fatty acids of the n-6 and n-3 series to hydroperoxides at the n-9 and n-7 positions, and the n-9 hydroperoxides could be sequentially transformed to allene oxides with only a few exceptions. The AOS activity was stereospecific for 9- and 11-hydroperoxides with S configurations. FOXB_01332 has acidic and alcoholic residues, Glu946-Val-Leu-Ser949, at positions of crucial Asn and Gln residues (Asn-Xaa-Xaa-Gln) of the AOS and LDS. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that FOXB_01332 and AOS of A. terreus differ in catalytically important residues suggesting that AOS of A. terreus and F. oxysporum belong to different subfamilies. FOXB_01332 is the first linoleate 9-DOX with homology to animal heme peroxidases and the first 9-DOX-AOS fusion protein. PMID:24082064

  14. Photosynthetic activity and protein overexpression found in Cr(III)-tolerant cells of the green algae Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M; Bartolomé, C M; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2014-08-01

    Chromium is an important constituent in effluents obtained from chromium plating industries. Due to the highly toxic nature of Cr(VI), attention has been shifted to less hazardous Cr(III) electroplating processes. This study evaluated aquatic toxicity of Cr(III)-containing laboratory samples representative of effluents from chromium electroplating industries, on the photosynthetic activity exhibited by both Cr(III)-sensitive (Dc1M(wt)) and tolerant (Dc1M(Cr(III)R30)) Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides strains. Additionally, selected de novo-determined peptide sequences, obtained from Dc1M(Cr(III)R30), have been analyzed to evidence the possible Cr(III) toxic mechanism involved in the resistance of these cells to high Cr(III) levels in aquatic environments. Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) strain exhibited a gross photosynthetic balance of about five times lower than that exhibited by Dc1M(wt) strain, demonstrating that Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) has a photosynthetic yield significantly lower than Dc1M(wt). SDS-PAGE of Dc1M(Cr(III)R30) samples showed the presence of at least two protein bands (23.05 and 153.46 KDa, respectively) absent in wild-type strain samples. Although it has achieved a low coincidence between the lower molecular weight band and a GTPase identified from genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, none of de novo peptide sequences obtained showed a significant MS-BLAST score, so that further studies will be required. PMID:24556547

  15. Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2C ABI1 interacts with type I ACC synthases and is involved in the regulation of ozone-induced ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwików, Agnieszka; Cieśla, Agata; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Mituła, Filip; Tajdel, Małgorzata; Gałgański, Łukasz; Ziółkowski, Piotr A; Kubiak, Piotr; Małecka, Arleta; Piechalak, Aneta; Szabat, Marta; Górska, Alicja; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Ibragimow, Izabela; Sadowski, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Ethylene plays a crucial role in various biological processes and therefore its biosynthesis is strictly regulated by multiple mechanisms. Posttranslational regulation, which is pivotal in controlling ethylene biosynthesis, impacts 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) protein stability via the complex interplay of specific factors. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of abscisic acid signaling, is involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis under oxidative stress conditions. We found that ABI1 interacts with ACS6 and dephosphorylates its C-terminal fragment, a target of the stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase, MPK6. In addition, ABI1 controls MPK6 activity directly and by this means also affects the ACS6 phosphorylation level. Consistently with this, ozone-induced ethylene production was significantly higher in an ABI1 knockout strain (abi1td) than in wild-type plants. Importantly, an increase in stress-induced ethylene production in the abi1td mutant was compensated by a higher ascorbate redox state and elevated antioxidant activities. Overall, the results of this study provide evidence that ABI1 restricts ethylene synthesis by affecting the activity of ACS6. The ABI1 contribution to stress phenotype underpins its role in the interplay between the abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene signaling pathways. PMID:24637173

  16. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-13

    Cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few other eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis.

  17. Role of testis-specific high-mobility-group protein in transcriptional regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in the liver of endotoxic shock mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifeng; Liu, Jinghua; Wang, Juan; Xu, Jia; Liu, Yawei; Sun, Xuegang; Su, Lei; Wang, Jiang Huai; Jiang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a central role in tissue damage during endotoxic shock. However, the underlying mechanisms that control transcription of iNOS are not completely defined. A screening strategy with DNA pull-down technology and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophorcsis (2D-DIGE) analysis was used to identify regulators that interact with the iNOS promoter. We found 14 proteins that bind to the iNOS promoter in the liver of endotoxic shock mice. After matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis, one of these proteins was identified as testis-specific high-mobility-group protein (tsHMG), an alternative splicing isoform encoded by the mitochondrial transcription factor A gene. We identified the binding sites of tsHMG on the iNOS promoter using a LiquiChip system, and further confirmed interactions between tsHMG and iNOS by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. Functional analysis by over-expression and RNA interference of tsHMG revealed that tsHMG regulates lipopolysaccharide-stimulated iNOS expression. These results indicate that tsHMG participates in modulation of iNOS expression in the early stage of endotoxic shock.

  18. The TWD40-2 protein and the AP2 complex cooperate in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of cellulose synthase to regulate cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Gu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is performed exclusively by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthases (CESAs). Therefore, the trafficking of CESAs to and from the plasma membrane is an important mechanism for regulating cellulose biosynthesis. CESAs were recently identified as cargo proteins of the classic adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway. The AP2 complex of the CME pathway is conserved in yeast, animals, and plants, and has been well-characterized in many systems. In contrast, the recently discovered TPLATE complex (TPC), which is proposed to function as a CME adaptor complex, is only conserved in plants and a few other eukaryotes. In this study, we discovered that the TWD40-2 protein, a putative member of the TPC, is also important for the endocytosis of CESAs. Genetic analysis between TWD40-2 and AP2M of the AP2 complex revealed that the roles of TWD40-2 in CME are both distinct from and cooperative with the AP2 complex. Loss of efficient CME in twd40-2-3 resulted in the unregulated overaccumulation of CESAs at the plasma membrane. In seedlings of twd40-2-3 and other CME-deficient mutants, a direct correlation was revealed between endocytic deficiency and cellulose content deficiency, highlighting the importance of controlled CESA endocytosis in regulating cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26417106

  19. Isoprene synthase expression and protein levels are reduced under elevated O3 but not under elevated CO2 (FACE) in field-grown aspen trees.

    PubMed

    Calfapietra, Carlo; Wiberley, Amy E; Falbel, Tanya G; Linskey, Autumn R; Mugnozza, Giuseppe Scarascia; Karnosky, David F; Loreto, Francesco; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2007-05-01

    Emission of hydrocarbons by trees has a crucial role in the oxidizing potential of the atmosphere. In particular, isoprene oxidation leads to the formation of tropospheric ozone and other secondary pollutants. It is expected that changes in the composition of the atmosphere will influence the emission rate of isoprene, which may in turn feedback on the accumulation of pollutants and greenhouse gases. We investigated the isoprene synthase (ISPS) gene expression and the ISPS protein levels in aspen trees exposed to elevated ozone (O(3)) and/or elevated carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in field-grown trees at the Aspen Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experimental site. Elevated O(3) reduced ISPS mRNA and the amount of ISPS protein in aspen leaves, whereas elevated CO(2) had no significant effect. Aspen clones with different O(3) sensitivity showed different levels of inhibition under elevated O(3) conditions. The drop in ISPS protein levels induced a drop in the isoprene emission rate under elevated O(3). However, the data indicated that other mechanisms also contributed to the observed strong inhibition of isoprene emission under elevated O(3). PMID:17407542

  20. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein (GSKIP) Regulates β-Catenin through Its Interactions with Both Protein Kinase A (PKA) and GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Dema, Alessandro; Schröter, Micha Friedemann; Perets, Ekaterina; Skroblin, Philipp; Moutty, Marie Christine; Deàk, Veronika Anita; Birchmeier, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-09-01

    The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) GSK3β interaction protein (GSKIP) is a cytosolic scaffolding protein binding protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Here we show that both the AKAP function of GSKIP, i.e. its direct interaction with PKA, and its direct interaction with GSK3β are required for the regulation of β-catenin and thus Wnt signaling. A cytoplasmic destruction complex targets β-catenin for degradation and thus prevents Wnt signaling. Wnt signals cause β-catenin accumulation and translocation into the nucleus, where it induces Wnt target gene expression. GSKIP facilitates control of the β-catenin stabilizing phosphorylation at Ser-675 by PKA. Its interaction with GSK3β facilitates control of the destabilizing phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser-33/Ser-37/Thr-41. The influence of GSKIP on β-catenin is explained by its scavenger function; it recruits the kinases away from the destruction complex without forming a complex with β-catenin. The regulation of β-catenin by GSKIP is specific for this AKAP as AKAP220, which also binds PKA and GSK3β, did not affect Wnt signaling. We find that the binding domain of AKAP220 for GSK3β is a conserved GSK3β interaction domain (GID), which is also present in GSKIP. Our findings highlight an essential compartmentalization of both PKA and GSK3β by GSKIP, and ascribe a function to a cytosolic AKAP-PKA interaction as a regulatory factor in the control of canonical Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling controls different biological processes, including embryonic development, cell cycle progression, glycogen metabolism, and immune regulation; deregulation is associated with diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  1. Purification and biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases KasA and KasB.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, M L; Agnihotri, G; Volker, C; Kallender, H; Brennan, P J; Lonsdale, J T

    2001-12-14

    Mycolic acids are vital components of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall, and enzymes involved in their formation represent attractive targets for the discovery of novel anti-tuberculosis agents. Biosynthesis of the fatty acyl chains of mycolic acids involves two fatty acid synthetic systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI), which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the dissociated FASII system, which consists of monofunctional enzymes, and acyl carrier protein (ACP) and elongates FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursors. In this study, we present the initial characterization of purified KasA and KasB, two beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes of the M. tuberculosis FASII system. KasA and KasB were expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Both enzymes showed activity typical of bacterial KASs, condensing an acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Consistent with the proposed role of FASII in mycolic acid synthesis, analysis of various acyl-ACP substrates indicated KasA and KasB had higher specificity for long chain acyl-ACPs containing at least 16 carbons. Activity of KasA and KasB increased with use of M. tuberculosis AcpM, suggesting that structural differences between AcpM and E. coli ACP may affect their recognition by the enzymes. Both enzymes were sensitive to KAS inhibitors cerulenin and thiolactomycin. These results represent important steps in characterizing KasA and KasB as targets for antimycobacterial drug discovery. PMID:11600501

  2. Crystal structure of pseudouridine synthase RluA: indirect sequence readout through protein-induced RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Charmaine; Chen, Junjun; Vizthum, Caroline A; Kandel, Jason M; Hamilton, Christopher S; Mueller, Eugene G; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2006-11-17

    RluA is a dual-specificity enzyme responsible for pseudouridylating 23S rRNA and several tRNAs. The 2.05 A resolution structure of RluA bound to a substrate RNA comprising the anticodon stem loop of tRNA(Phe) reveals that enzyme binding induces a dramatic reorganization of the RNA. Instead of adopting its canonical U turn conformation, the anticodon loop folds into a new structure with a reverse-Hoogsteen base pair and three flipped-out nucleotides. Sequence conservation, the cocrystal structure, and the results of structure-guided mutagenesis suggest that RluA recognizes its substrates indirectly by probing RNA loops for their ability to adopt the reorganized fold. The planar, cationic side chain of an arginine intercalates between the reverse-Hoogsteen base pair and the bottom pair of the anticodon stem, flipping the nucleotide to be modified into the active site of RluA. Sequence and structural comparisons suggest that pseudouridine synthases of the RluA, RsuA, and TruA families employ an equivalent arginine for base flipping.

  3. Differential effects on nitric oxide synthase, heat shock proteins and glutathione in human endothelial cells exposed to heat stress and simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Fismen, Lise; Hjelde, Astrid; Svardal, Asbjørn M; Djurhuus, Rune

    2012-07-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) may result from damage to the endothelium caused by the gas bubbles formed during decompression and may be related to nitric oxide (NO) production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Heat stress prior to diving has been shown to protect animals from DCS, and by simulating this treatment in human endothelial cells (HUVEC) we have shown that a simulated dive performed subsequent to a heat stress potentiated the heat-induced expression of HSP70 and increased the level of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Since operational saturation diving is performed at an increased oxygen level, HUVEC have been exposed to heat stress and simulated diving at 40 kPa O(2), comparing the response on HSP70, HSP90 and GSH level to the effects previously observed at 20 kPa O(2). In addition, we wanted to investigate the effect on both endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein and enzymatic activity. The present results showed that a heat stress (45°C, 1 h) decreased the NOS activity and the protein markedly. Hyperoxia (40 kPa) alone or a dive either at 20 or 40 kPa O(2),had no effects on NOS activity or protein. At 40 kPa O(2) a simulated dive after heat stress potentiated the HS-induced HSP70 response, whereas the heat-induced HSP90 response decreased. GSH levels were found to be inversely related to NOS activity and protein expression, and might be explained by a possible post-translational regulation by glutathionylation of eNOS protein. The results add to the limited knowledge of these critical factors in cellular defence mechanisms that can prevent injury during decompression.

  4. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  5. Btc22 chaperone is required for secretion and stability of the type III secreted protein Bsp22 in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi; Abe, Akio

    2012-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a sophisticated protein secretion machinery that delivers bacterial virulence proteins into host cells. A needle-tip protein, Bsp22 , is one of the secreted substrates of the T3SS and plays an essential role in the full function of the T3SS in Bordetella bronchiseptica. In this study, we found that BB1618 functions as a chaperone for Bsp22 . The deletion of BB1618 resulted in a dramatic impairment of Bsp22 secretion into the culture supernatants and Bsp22 stability in the bacterial cytosol. In contrast, the secretion of other type III secreted proteins was not affected by the BB1618 mutation. Furthermore, the BB1618 mutant strain could not induce cytotoxicity and displayed the same phenotypes as the Bsp22 mutant strain. An immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that BB1618 interacts with Bsp22 , but not with BopB and BopD . Thus, we identified BB1618 as a specific type III chaperone for Bsp22 . Therefore, we propose that BB1618 be renamed Btc22 for the Bordetella type III chaperone for Bsp22 .

  6. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  7. Production of synthetic methionine-free and synthetic methionine-limited alpha casein: protein foodstuff for patients with homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goda, Sayed K; Abu Aqel, Yasmin W; Al-Aswad, Mai R; Rashedy, Fatma A B; Mohamed, Amr S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility that synthetic forms of methionine-free alpha-casein and methionine-limited alpha casein could be produced by recombinant means to form the basis for developing an industrial-scale process for the provision of a foodstuff suitable for patients with homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) deficiency. As a first step, two forms of alpha casein gene, encoding methionine-free alpha casein (Fcas) or a methionine-limited alpha casein (Mcas), were synthesised and expressed in Escherichia coli. Using the overexpression vector pET28a, both genes were highly expressed in E. coli in soluble form as well as in inclusion bodies. The two recombinant proteins were purified by the one step methods using the fused His-tag and the Ni(2+)column and validated by Western blot analysis. This work paves the way for industrial-scale production of proteins suitable for patients with homocystinuria due to CBS deficiency.

  8. Mulberry leaf polyphenol extract induced apoptosis involving regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase/fatty acid synthase in a p53-negative hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzi-Peng; Lee, Huei-Jane; Ou, Ting-Tsz; Chang, Ya-Ju; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2012-07-11

    The polyphenols in mulberry leaf possess the ability to inhibit cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumors. It was reported that the p53 status plays an important role in switching apoptosis and the cell cycle following adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation. In this study, we aimed to detect the effect of the mulberry leaf polyphenol extract (MLPE) on inducing cell death in p53-negative (Hep3B) and p53-positive (Hep3B with transfected p53) hepatocellular carcinoma cells and also to clarify the role of p53 in MLPE-treated cells. After treatment of the Hep3B cells with MLPE, apoptosis was induced via the AMPK/PI3K/Akt and Bcl-2 family pathways. Transient transfection of p53 into Hep3B cells led to switching autophagy instead of apoptosis by MLPE treatment. We demonstrated that acridine orange staining and protein expressions of LC-3 and beclin-1 were increased in p53-transfected cells. These results implied induction of apoptosis or autophagy in MLPE-treated hepatocellular carcinoma cells can be due to the p53 status. We also found MLPE can not only activate AMPK but also diminish fatty acid synthase, a molecular target for cancer inhibition. At present, our results indicate MLPE can play an active role in mediating the cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the p53 might play an important role in regulating the death mechanisms.

  9. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25473931

  10. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  11. Overproduction of soluble trichodiene synthase from Fusarium sporotrichioides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Wu, Z; Oliver, J S; Hohn, T M

    1993-01-01

    Trichodiene synthase is a sesquiterpene cyclase isolated from various fungal species which catalyzes the cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) to trichodiene. The trichodiene synthase gene (Tox5) of Fusarium sporotrichioides has previously been cloned and expressed as 0.05-0.1% of total cell protein in Escherichia coli. We have used polymerase chain reaction to amplify the trichodiene coding sequence carried on the plasmid pTS56-1. The resulting DNA, carrying a BamHI restriction site and the T7 gene 10 ribosome binding site and translational spacer element immediately upstream of the ATG start codon as well as a HindIII site adjacent to the translational stop codon, was inserted into the corresponding sites of the expression vector pLM1. The latter vector carried the promoter and translational leader sequence from T7 gene 10 and the E. coli rmBT1T2 tandem transcription terminator. This construct was cloned into E. coli BL21 (DE3). The resulting transformants, when induced with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside, produced trichodiene synthase as 20-30% of total soluble protein. The recombinant synthase, which could be purified five-fold to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on Q Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superose 12, was identical to native protein in steady-state kinetic parameters and mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had the expected MENFP N-terminal sequence. PMID:8424673

  12. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants. PMID:23246552

  13. Tandem repeats of the extracellular domain of Matrix 2 influenza protein exposed in Brucella lumazine synthase decameric carrier molecule induce protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Paula; Zylberman, Vanesa; Ghersi, Giselle; Boado, Lorena; Palacios, Carlos; Goldbaum, Fernando; Mattion, Nora

    2013-01-21

    The antigenic variation of influenza virus represents a major prevention problem. However, the ectodomain of the protein Matrix 2 (M2e) is nearly invariant in all human influenza A strains and has been considered as a promising candidate for a broadly protective vaccine because antibodies to M2e are protective in animal models. In this work we evaluated the possible use of Brucella abortus lumazine synthase protein (BLS), a highly immunogenic decameric protein, as a carrier of the M2e peptide. Chimeric proteins generated by the fusion of one or four in tandem copies of M2e to BLS were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and assembled in decameric subunits similarly to the wild type BLS enzyme, as demonstrated by the comparative circular dichroism spectra and size exclusion chromatography and static light scattering analysis. The M2e peptides were stably exposed at the ten N-terminal ends of each BLS molecule. Immunization of mice with purified chimeras carrying only one M2e (BLS-M2e) copy elicited a significant humoral immune response with the addition of different adjuvants. The fusion of four in tandem copies of the M2e peptide (BLS-4M2e) resulted in similar levels of humoral immune response but in the absence of adjuvant. Survival of mice challenged with live influenza virus was 100% after vaccination with BLS-4M2e adjuvanted with Iscomatrix(®) (P<0.001) and 80% when adjuvanted with alum (P<0.01), while the chimera alone protected 60% of the animals (P<0.05). The approach described in this study is intended as a contribution to the generation of universal influenza immunogens, through a simple production and purification process and using safe carriers that might eventually avoid the use of strong adjuvants.

  14. Overexpression of Isoforms of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Adaptor Protein, Encoded by a Risk Gene for Schizophrenia, Alters Actin Dynamics and Synaptic Function.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Kristina; Swiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Patel, Mihir V; Liang, Chen; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Brzustowicz, Linda M; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2016-01-01

    Proper communication between neurons depends upon appropriate patterning of dendrites and correct distribution and structure of spines. Schizophrenia is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by alterations in dendrite branching and spine density. Nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein (NOS1AP), a risk gene for schizophrenia, encodes proteins that are upregulated in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of individuals with schizophrenia. To elucidate the effects of NOS1AP overexpression observed in individuals with schizophrenia, we investigated changes in actin dynamics and spine development when a long (NOS1AP-L) or short (NOS1AP-S) isoform of NOS1AP is overexpressed. Increased NOS1AP-L protein promotes the formation of immature spines when overexpressed in rat cortical neurons from day in vitro (DIV) 14 to DIV 17 and reduces the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). In contrast, increased NOS1AP-S protein increases the rate of actin polymerization and the number of immature and mature spines, which may be attributed to a decrease in total Rac1 expression and a reduction in the levels of active cofilin. The increase in the number of mature spines by overexpression of NOS1AP-S is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of mEPSCs. Our findings show that overexpression of NOS1AP-L or NOS1AP-S alters the actin cytoskeleton and synaptic function. However, the mechanisms by which these isoforms induce these changes are distinct. These results are important for understanding how increased expression of NOS1AP isoforms can influence spine development and synaptic function. PMID:26869880

  15. Overexpression of Isoforms of Nitric Oxide Synthase 1 Adaptor Protein, Encoded by a Risk Gene for Schizophrenia, Alters Actin Dynamics and Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Kristina; Swiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Patel, Mihir V.; Liang, Chen; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2016-01-01

    Proper communication between neurons depends upon appropriate patterning of dendrites and correct distribution and structure of spines. Schizophrenia is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by alterations in dendrite branching and spine density. Nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein (NOS1AP), a risk gene for schizophrenia, encodes proteins that are upregulated in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of individuals with schizophrenia. To elucidate the effects of NOS1AP overexpression observed in individuals with schizophrenia, we investigated changes in actin dynamics and spine development when a long (NOS1AP-L) or short (NOS1AP-S) isoform of NOS1AP is overexpressed. Increased NOS1AP-L protein promotes the formation of immature spines when overexpressed in rat cortical neurons from day in vitro (DIV) 14 to DIV 17 and reduces the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs). In contrast, increased NOS1AP-S protein increases the rate of actin polymerization and the number of immature and mature spines, which may be attributed to a decrease in total Rac1 expression and a reduction in the levels of active cofilin. The increase in the number of mature spines by overexpression of NOS1AP-S is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of mEPSCs. Our findings show that overexpression of NOS1AP-L or NOS1AP-S alters the actin cytoskeleton and synaptic function. However, the mechanisms by which these isoforms induce these changes are distinct. These results are important for understanding how increased expression of NOS1AP isoforms can influence spine development and synaptic function. PMID:26869880

  16. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L.; Mackey, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B’ regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B’ subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B’ subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B’ subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B’ subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  17. Recovery of West Nile Virus Envelope Protein Domain III Chimeras with Altered Antigenicity and Mouse Virulence

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, Alexander J.; Torres, Maricela; Plante, Jessica A.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Bente, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flaviviruses are positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses responsible for millions of human infections annually. The envelope (E) protein of flaviviruses comprises three structural domains, of which domain III (EIII) represents a discrete subunit. The EIII gene sequence typically encodes epitopes recognized by virus-specific, potently neutralizing antibodies, and EIII is believed to play a major role in receptor binding. In order to assess potential interactions between EIII and the remainder of the E protein and to assess the effects of EIII sequence substitutions on the antigenicity, growth, and virulence of a representative flavivirus, chimeric viruses were generated using the West Nile virus (WNV) infectious clone, into which EIIIs from nine flaviviruses with various levels of genetic diversity from WNV were substituted. Of the constructs tested, chimeras containing EIIIs from Koutango virus (KOUV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), and Bagaza virus (BAGV) were successfully recovered. Characterization of the chimeras in vitro and in vivo revealed differences in growth and virulence between the viruses, with in vivo pathogenesis often not being correlated with in vitro growth. Taken together, the data demonstrate that substitutions of EIII can allow the generation of viable chimeric viruses with significantly altered antigenicity and virulence. IMPORTANCE The envelope (E) glycoprotein is the major protein present on the surface of flavivirus virions and is responsible for mediating virus binding and entry into target cells. Several viable West Nile virus (WNV) variants with chimeric E proteins in which the putative receptor-binding domain (EIII) sequences of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses were substituted in place of the WNV EIII were recovered, although the substitution of several more divergent EIII sequences was not tolerated. The differences in virulence and tissue tropism observed with the chimeric

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-01

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion.

  19. Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau, α-Tubulin and βIII-Tubulin Expression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Im, Soyoung; Yoo, Changyoung; Jung, Ji-Han; Jeon, Ye-Won; Suh, Young Jin; Lee, Youn Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background The microtubule-associated protein Tau binds to both inner and outer surfaces of microtubules, leading to tubulin assembly and microtubule stabilization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of Tau, α-tubulin, and βIII-tubulin expression in breast carcinoma and to assess their relationships with disease progression in the context of taxane treatment. Methods Immunohistochemical expressions of Tau, α-tubulin, and βIII-tubulin were assessed in 183 breast cancer cases. Expression was correlated with clinicopathologic parameters, disease progression and overall survival. Results Tau expression was correlated with lymph node metastasis and estrogen receptor (ER) positivity (p=.003 and p<.001, respectively). Loss of α-tubulin was significantly correlated with distant metastasis (p=.034). Loss of βIII-tubulin was correlated with lymph node metastasis and ER positivity (p=.004 and p<.001, respectively). In taxane-treated cases, Tau expression and loss of α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin expression were related to disease progression (p=.001, p=.028, and p=.030, respectively). Tau expression was associated with a worse survival rate in taxane-treated patients (p=.049). Conclusions Tau expression and loss of α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin expression were correlated with aggressive behavior in taxane-treated breast cancer. Further evaluation of Tau, α-tubulin and βIII-tubulin may be useful in predicting clinical behavior and seeking therapeutic measures in taxane-based chemotherapy for breast cancer. PMID:24421846

  20. The Importance of Stereochemically Active Lone Pairs For Influencing Pb(II) and As(III) Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Neupane, Kosh P.; De Gioia, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity is a worldwide problem which is associated with the metal’s high affinity for thiolate rich proteins. Despite the tremendous toxicity concern, the mode of binding of As(III) and Pb(II) to proteins is poorly understood. To clarify the requirements for toxic metal binding to metalloregulatory sensor proteins such as As(III) in ArsR/ArsD and Pb(II) in PbrR or replacing Zn(II) in δ-aminolevulinc acid dehydratase (ALAD), we have employed computational and experimental methods examining these heavy metals binding to designed peptide models. The computational results show that the mode of coordination of As(III) and Pb(II) is greatly influenced by the steric bulk within the second coordination environment of the metal. The proposed basis of this selectivity is the large size of the ion and, most important, the influence of the stereochemically active lone pair in hemi-directed complexes of the metal ion as being crucial. The experimental data show that switching a bulky leucine layer above the metal binding site by a smaller alanine residue enhances the Pb(II) binding affinity by a factor of five supporting experimentally this lone pair steric hindrance hypothesis. These complementary approaches demonstrate the potential importance of a stereochemically active lone pair as a metal recognition mode in proteins and, specifically, how the second coordination sphere environment affects the affinity and selectivity of protein targets by certain toxic ions. PMID:22231489

  1. A substrate of the centisome 63 type III protein secretion system of Salmonella typhimurium is encoded by a cryptic bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Hardt, W D; Urlaub, H; Galán, J E

    1998-03-01

    Salmonella enterica has evolved a type III protein secretion system that allows these enteropathogens to translocate effector molecules directly into the host cell cytoplasm. These effectors mediate a variety of responses, including cytoskeletal rearrangements, cytokine production, and in certain cells, the induction of apoptosis. We report here the characterization of a substrate of this secretion system in S. enterica serovar typhimurium (Salmonella typhimurium) that is homologous to the SopE protein of Salmonella dublin implicated in bacterial entry into cultured epithelial cells. The sopE locus is located within a cluster of genes that encode tail and tail fiber proteins of a cryptic P2-like prophage, outside of the centisome 63 pathogenicity island that encodes the invasion-associated type III secretion system. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that sopE is present in only a subset of S. enterica serovars and that the flanking bacteriophage genes are also highly polymorphic. Encoding effector proteins that are delivered through type III secretion systems in highly mobile genetic elements may allow pathogens to adapt rapidly by facilitating the assembly of an appropriate set of effector proteins required for successful replication in a new environment.

  2. Abscission Is Regulated by the ESCRT-III Protein Shrub in Drosophila Germline Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Neuza Reis; Mathieu, Juliette; Huynh, Jean-René

    2015-01-01

    Abscission is the final event of cytokinesis that leads to the physical separation of the two daughter cells. Recent technical advances have allowed a better understanding of the cellular and molecular events leading to abscission in isolated yeast or mammalian cells. However, how abscission is regulated in different cell types or in a developing organism remains poorly understood. Here, we characterized the function of the ESCRT-III protein Shrub during cytokinesis in germ cells undergoing a series of complete and incomplete divisions. We found that Shrub is required for complete abscission, and that levels of Shrub are critical for proper timing of abscission. Loss or gain of Shrub delays abscission in germline stem cells (GSCs), and leads to the formation of stem-cysts, where daughter cells share the same cytoplasm as the mother stem cell and cannot differentiate. In addition, our results indicate a negative regulation of Shrub by the Aurora B kinase during GSC abscission. Finally, we found that Lethal giant discs (lgd), known to be required for Shrub function in the endosomal pathway, also regulates the duration of abscission in GSCs. PMID:25647097

  3. Immunogenic Subviral Particles Displaying Domain III of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein Vectored by Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Harahap-Carrillo, Indira S.; Ceballos-Olvera, Ivonne; Reyes-del Valle, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against dengue virus (DV) are commercially nonexistent. A subunit vaccination strategy may be of value, especially if a safe viral vector acts as biologically active adjuvant. In this paper, we focus on an immunoglobulin-like, independently folded domain III (DIII) from DV 2 envelope protein (E), which contains epitopes that elicits highly specific neutralizing antibodies. We modified the hepatitis B small surface antigen (HBsAg, S) in order to display DV 2 DIII on a virus-like particle (VLP), thus generating the hybrid antigen DIII-S. Two varieties of measles virus (MV) vectors were developed to express DIII-S. The first expresses the hybrid antigen from an additional transcription unit (ATU) and the second additionally expresses HBsAg from a separate ATU. We found that this second MV vectoring the hybrid VLPs displaying DIII-S on an unmodified HBsAg scaffold were immunogenic in MV-susceptible mice (HuCD46Ge-IFNarko), eliciting robust neutralizing responses (averages) against MV (1:1280 NT90), hepatitis B virus (787 mIU/mL), and DV2 (1:160 NT50) in all of the tested animals. Conversely, the MV vector expressing only DIII-S induced immunity against MV alone. In summary, DV2 neutralizing responses can be generated by displaying E DIII on a scaffold of HBsAg-based VLPs, vectored by MV. PMID:26350592

  4. Immunogenic Subviral Particles Displaying Domain III of Dengue 2 Envelope Protein Vectored by Measles Virus.

    PubMed

    Harahap-Carrillo, Indira S; Ceballos-Olvera, Ivonne; Valle, Jorge Reyes-Del

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against dengue virus (DV) are commercially nonexistent. A subunit vaccination strategy may be of value, especially if a safe viral vector acts as biologically active adjuvant. In this paper, we focus on an immunoglobulin-like, independently folded domain III (DIII) from DV 2 envelope protein (E), which contains epitopes that elicits highly specific neutralizing antibodies. We modified the hepatitis B small surface antigen (HBsAg, S) in order to display DV 2 DIII on a virus-like particle (VLP), thus generating the hybrid antigen DIII-S. Two varieties of measles virus (MV) vectors were developed to express DIII-S. The first expresses the hybrid antigen from an additional transcription unit (ATU) and the second additionally expresses HBsAg from a separate ATU. We found that this second MV vectoring the hybrid VLPs displaying DIII-S on an unmodified HBsAg scaffold were immunogenic in MV-susceptible mice (HuCD46Ge-IFNar(k)(o)), eliciting robust neutralizing responses (averages) against MV (1:1280 NT90), hepatitis B virus (787 mIU/mL), and DV2 (1:160 NT50) in all of the tested animals. Conversely, the MV vector expressing only DIII-S induced immunity against MV alone. In summary, DV2 neutralizing responses can be generated by displaying E DIII on a scaffold of HBsAg-based VLPs, vectored by MV. PMID:26350592

  5. [Preparation and crystallization of Polygonum cuspidatum benzalacetone synthase].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenrui; Liu, Chunmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Xue, Feiyan; Chen, Qing; Ma, Lanqing; Lü, Heshu

    2016-02-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generates backbones of a variety of plant secondary metabolites. Benzalacetone synthase (BAS) catalyzes a condensation reaction of decarboxylation between the substrates of 4-coumaric coenzyme A and malonyl coenzyme A to generate benzylidene acetone, whose derivatives are series of compounds with various biological activities. A BAS gene Pcpks2 and a bifunctional CHS/BAS PcPKSI were isolated from medicinal plant P. cuspidatum. Crystallographic and structure-based mutagenesis studies indicate that the functional diversity of the CHS-superfamily enzymes is principally derived from small modifications of the active site architecture. In order to obtain an understanding of the biosynthesis of polyketides in P. cuspidatum, which has been poorly described, as well as of its activation mechanism, PcPKS2 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein, purified to homogeneity and crystallized, which is helpful for the clarification of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme and lays the foundation for its genetic engineering manipulation. PMID:27382775

  6. Functional and evolutionary analysis of DXL1, a non-essential gene encoding a 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase like protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Cairó, Albert; Talavera, David; Saura, Andreu; Imperial, Santiago; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Campos, Narciso; Boronat, Albert

    2013-07-15

    The synthesis of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP), catalyzed by the enzyme DXP synthase (DXS), represents a key regulatory step of the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis. In plants DXS is encoded by small multigene families that can be classified into, at least, three specialized subfamilies. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three genes encoding proteins with similarity to DXS, including the well-known DXS1/CLA1 gene, which clusters within subfamily I. The remaining proteins, initially named DXS2 and DXS3, have not yet been characterized. Here we report the expression and functional analysis of A. thaliana DXS2. Unexpectedly, the expression of DXS2 failed to rescue Escherichia coli and A. thaliana mutants defective in DXS activity. Coherently, we found that DXS activity was negligible in vitro, being renamed as DXL1 following recent nomenclature recommendation. DXL1 is targeted to plastids as DXS1, but shows a distinct expression pattern. The phenotypic analysis of a DXL1 defective mutant revealed that the function of the encoded protein is not essential for growth and development. Evolutionary analyses indicated that DXL1 emerged from DXS1 through a recent duplication apparently specific of the Brassicaceae lineage. Divergent selective constraints would have affected a significant fraction of sites after diversification of the paralogues. Furthermore, amino acids subjected to divergent selection and likely critical for functional divergence through the acquisition of a novel, although not yet known, biochemical function, were identified. Our results provide with the first evidences of functional specialization at both the regulatory and biochemical level within the plant DXS family.

  7. Regulation of Ribosomal S6 Protein Kinase-p90rsk, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, and β-Catenin in Early Xenopus Development

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Monica A.; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Krebs, Edwin G.; Moon, Randall T.

    1999-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein that binds cadherins at the plasma membrane, HMG box transcription factors in the nucleus, and several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in regulating its stability. In developing embryos and in some human cancers, the accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and subsequently the nuclei of cells may be regulated by the Wnt-1 signaling cascade and by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). This has increased interest in regulators of both GSK-3 and β-catenin. Searching for kinase activities able to phosphorylate the conserved, inhibitory-regulatory GSK-3 residue serine 9, we found p90rsk to be a potential upstream regulator of GSK-3. Overexpression of p90rsk in Xenopus embryos leads to increased steady-state levels of total β-catenin but not of the free soluble protein. Instead, p90rsk overexpression increases the levels of β-catenin in a cell fraction containing membrane-associated cadherins. Consistent with the lack of elevation of free β-catenin levels, ectopic p90rsk was unable to rescue dorsal cell fate in embryos ventralized by UV irradiation. We show that p90rsk is a downstream target of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling during early Xenopus development, since ectopic FGF signaling activates both endogenous and overexpressed p90rsk. Moreover, overexpression of a dominant negative FGF receptor, which blocks endogenous FGF signaling, leads to decreased p90rsk kinase activity. Finally, we report that FGF inhibits endogenous GSK-3 activity in Xenopus embryos. We hypothesize that FGF and p90rsk play heretofore unsuspected roles in modulating GSK-3 and β-catenin. PMID:9891076

  8. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  9. Cell-penetration by Co(III)cyclen-based peptide-cleaving catalysts selective for pathogenic proteins of amyloidoses.

    PubMed

    Chei, Woo Suk; Lee, Joo-Won; Kim, Jae Bum; Suh, Junghun

    2010-07-15

    Derivatives of the Co(III) complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen) with various organic pendants have been reported as target-selective peptide-cleaving catalysts, which can be exploited as catalytic drugs. In order to provide a firm basis for the catalytic drugs based on Co(III)cyclen, the ability of the Co(III)cyclen-containing peptide-cleaving catalysts to penetrate animal cells such as mouse fibroblast NIH-3T 3 or human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells is demonstrated in the present study. Since the catalysts destroy pathogenic proteins for amyloidoses, results of the present study are expected to initiate extensive efforts to obtain therapeutically safe catalytic drugs for amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, mad cow disease, and so on. PMID:20542701

  10. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  11. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-09-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit.

  12. Progression of amyloid pathology to Alzheimer's disease pathology in an amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse model by removal of nitric oxide synthase 2.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, Donna M; Lewis, Matthew R; Van Nostrand, William E; Davis, Judianne; Previti, Mary Lou; Gharkholonarehe, Nastaran; Vitek, Michael P; Colton, Carol A

    2008-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by three primary pathologies in the brain: amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuron loss. Mouse models have been useful for studying components of AD but are limited in their ability to fully recapitulate all pathologies. We crossed the APPSwDI transgenic mouse, which develops amyloid beta (Abeta)-protein deposits only, with a nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) knock-out mouse, which develops no AD-like pathology. APPSwDI/NOS2(-/-) mice displayed impaired spatial memory compared with the APPSwDI mice, yet they have unaltered levels of Abeta. APPSwDI mice do not show tau pathology, whereas APPSwDI/NOS2(-/-) mice displayed extensive tau pathology associated with regions of dense microvascular amyloid deposition. Also, APPSwDI mice do not have any neuron loss, whereas the APPSwDI/NOS2(-/-) mice have significant neuron loss in the hippocampus and subiculum. Neuropeptide Y neurons have been shown to be particularly vulnerable in AD. These neurons appear to be particularly vulnerable in the APPSwDI/NOS2(-/-) mice as we observe a dramatic reduction in the number of NPY neurons in the hippocampus and subiculum. These data show that removal of NOS2 from an APP transgenic mouse results in development of a much greater spectrum of AD-like pathology and behavioral impairments.

  13. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  14. Cellular Localization and Biochemical Characterization of a Chimeric Fluorescent Protein Fusion of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase-Like A2 Inserted into Golgi Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lenucci, Marcello S.; Montefusco, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Cellulose synthase-like (Csl) genes are believed to encode enzymes for the synthesis of cell wall matrix polysaccharides. The subfamily of CslA is putatively involved in the biosynthesis of β-mannans. Here we report a study on the cellular localization and the enzyme activity of an Arabidopsis CslA family member, AtCslA2. We show that the fluorescent protein fusion AtCslA2-GFP, transiently expressed in tobacco leaf protoplasts, is synthesized in the ER and it accumulates in the Golgi stacks. The chimera is inserted in the Golgi membrane and is functional since membrane preparations obtained by transformed protoplasts carry out the in vitro synthesis of a 14C-mannan starting from GDP-d-[U-14C]mannose as substrate. The enzyme specific activity is increased by approximately 38% in the transformed protoplasts with respect to wild-type. Preliminary tests with proteinase K, biochemical data, and TM domain predictions suggest that the catalytic site of AtCslA2 faces the Golgi lumen. PMID:24558328

  15. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  16. Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Organs of Stramonita haemastoma: Protein Distribution and Gene Expression in Response to Thermal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Toni, Mattia; De Angelis, Federica; Bonaccorsi di Patti, Maria Carmela; Cioni, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated via the oxidation of l-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS) both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Three NOS isoforms, nNOS, iNOS and eNOS, are known in vertebrates, whereas a single NOS isoform is usually expressed in invertebrates, sharing structural and functional characteristics with nNOS or iNOS depending on the species. The present paper is focused on the constitutive Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent nNOS recently sequenced by our group in the neogastropod Stramonita haemastoma (ShNOS). In this paper we provide new data on cellular distribution of ShNOS in the CNS (pedal ganglion) and peripheral organs (osphradium, tentacle, eye and foot) obtained by WB, IF, CM and NADPHd. Results demonstrated that NOS-like proteins are widely expressed in sensory receptor elements, neurons and epithelial cells. The detailed study of NOS distribution in peripheral and central neurons suggested that NOS is both intracellular and presynaptically located. Present findings confirm that NO may have a key role in the central neuronal circuits of gastropods and in sensory perception. The physiological relevance of NOS enzymes in the same organs was suggested by thermal stress experiments demonstrating that the constitutive expression of ShNOS is modulated in a time- and organ-dependent manner in response to environmental stressors. PMID:26528988

  17. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β) Negatively Regulates PTTG1/Human Securin Protein Stability, and GSK3β Inactivation Correlates with Securin Accumulation in Breast Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCFβTrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers. PMID:21757741

  18. Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Central Nervous System and Peripheral Organs of Stramonita haemastoma: Protein Distribution and Gene Expression in Response to Thermal Stress.

    PubMed

    Toni, Mattia; De Angelis, Federica; di Patti, Maria Carmela Bonaccorsi; Cioni, Carla

    2015-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated via the oxidation of l-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS) both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Three NOS isoforms, nNOS, iNOS and eNOS, are known in vertebrates, whereas a single NOS isoform is usually expressed in invertebrates, sharing structural and functional characteristics with nNOS or iNOS depending on the species. The present paper is focused on the constitutive Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent nNOS recently sequenced by our group in the neogastropod Stramonita haemastoma (ShNOS). In this paper we provide new data on cellular distribution of ShNOS in the CNS (pedal ganglion) and peripheral organs (osphradium, tentacle, eye and foot) obtained by WB, IF, CM and NADPHd. Results demonstrated that NOS-like proteins are widely expressed in sensory receptor elements, neurons and epithelial cells. The detailed study of NOS distribution in peripheral and central neurons suggested that NOS is both intracellular and presynaptically located. Present findings confirm that NO may have a key role in the central neuronal circuits of gastropods and in sensory perception. The physiological relevance of NOS enzymes in the same organs was suggested by thermal stress experiments demonstrating that the constitutive expression of ShNOS is modulated in a time- and organ-dependent manner in response to environmental stressors.

  19. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  20. A Nucleus-Encoded Chloroplast Protein YL1 Is Involved in Chloroplast Development and Efficient Biogenesis of Chloroplast ATP Synthase in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Dong, Guojun; Wu, Limin; Wang, Fang; Yang, Xingzheng; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Haili; Wu, Jiahuan; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Huizhong; Qian, Qian; Yu, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase) is an importance thylakoid membrane-associated photosynthetic complex involved in the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant yellow leaf 1 (yl1), which exhibits chlorotic leaves throughout developmental stages. The YL1 mutation showed reduced chlorophyll contents, abnormal chloroplast morphology, and decreased photochemical efficiency. Moreover, YL1 deficiency disrupts the expression of genes associated with chloroplast development and photosynthesis. Molecular and genetic analyses revealed that YL1 is a nucleus-encoded protein with a predicted transmembrane domain in its carboxyl-terminus that is conserved in the higher plant kingdom. YL1 localizes to chloroplasts and is preferentially expressed in green tissues containing chloroplasts. Immunoblot analyses showed that inactivation of YL1 leads to drastically reduced accumulation of AtpA (α) and AtpB (β), two core subunits of CF1αβ subcomplex of cpATPase, meanwhile, a severe decrease (ca. 41.7%) in cpATPase activity was observed in the yl1-1 mutant compared with the wild type. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed a specific interaction between YL1 and AtpB subunit of cpATPase. Taken together, our results suggest that YL1 is a plant lineage-specific auxiliary factor involved in the biogenesis of the cpATPase complex, possibly via interacting with the β-subunit. PMID:27585744

  1. Protein minimization: characterization of the synthetic cyclic dodecapeptide corresponding to the reactive site region of the oil rape trypsin inhibitor type-III.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maurizio; Casavola, Elena Caroli; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Costantino, Paolo; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2003-03-01

    The design of minimal units required for enzyme inhibition is a major field of interest in structural biology and biotechnology. The successful design of the cyclic dodecapeptide corresponding to the Phe17-Val28 reactive site amino acid sequence of the low-molecular-mass trypsin inhibitor RTI-III from Brassica napus (micro-RTI-III) and of the recombinant murine dihydrofolate reductase-(DHFR-)micro-RTI-III fusion protein (DHFR-micro-RTI-III) is reported here. Micro-RTI-III was synthesized using a stepwise solid-phase approach based on the standard Fmoc chemistry, purified by RP-HPLC, and oxidatively refolded. DHFR-micro-RTI-III was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by metal-chelate affinity chromatography, and oxidatively refolded. The affinity of micro-RTI-III for bovine trypsin (K(d)=1.6x10(-9)M) is similar to that determined for DHFR-micro-RTI-III (K(d)=6.3x10(-10)M) and native RTI-III (K(d)=2.9x10(-10)M), at pH 8.2 and 22.0 degrees C. Remarkably, micro-RTI-III protects the DHFR domain of DHFR-micro-RTI-III from trypsin digestion. Micro-RTI-III is a new minimal trypsin inhibitor and may be regarded as a tool in protein structure-function studies and for developing multifunctional and multidomain proteinase inhibitors.

  2. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent elevation in adiponectin in the rostral ventrolateral medulla underlies g protein-coupled receptor 18-mediated hypotension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Penumarti, Anusha; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2014-10-01

    Direct activation of the endocannabinoid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of conscious rats by abnormal cannabidiol (Abn CBD; trans-4-[3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) elevates local nitric oxide (NO) and adiponectin (ADN) levels and reduces oxidative stress and blood pressure (BP). However, the molecular mechanisms for GPR18-mediated neurochemical responses, including the nitric oxide synthase isoform that generates NO, and their potential causal link to the BP reduction are not known. We hypothesized that GPR18-mediated enhancement of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, triggered by a reduction in cAMP, accounts for the NO/ADN-dependent reductions in RVLM oxidative stress and BP. Intra-RVLM GPR18 activation (Abn CBD; 0.4 μg) enhanced RVLM Akt, ERK1/2, and nNOS phosphorylation as well as ADN levels during the hypotensive response. Prior GPR18 blockade with O-1918 (1,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-2-[(1R,6R)-3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]benzene) produced the opposite effects and abrogated Abn CBD-evoked neurochemical and BP responses. Pharmacological inhibition of RVLM phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt (wortmannin), ERK1/2 (PD98059 [2-​(2-​amino-​3-​methoxyphenyl)-​4H-​1-​benzopyran-​4-​one]), or nNOS (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine), or activation of adenylyl cyclase (forskolin) virtually abolished intra-RVLM Abn CBD-evoked hypotension and the increases in Akt, ERK1/2, and nNOS phosphorylation and in ADN levels in the RVLM. Our pharmacological and neurochemical findings support a pivotal role for PI3K, Akt, ERK1/2, nNOS, and adenylyl cyclase, via modulation of NO, ADN, and cAMP levels, in GPR18 regulation of the RVLM redox state and BP in conscious rats.

  3. Dephosphorylation of the core clock protein KaiC in the cyanobacterial KaiABC circadian oscillator proceeds via an ATP synthase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H

    2012-02-28

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P(i) (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  4. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  5. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium[S

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael C.; Wellberg, Elizabeth A.; Lewis, Andrew S.; Terrell, Kristina L.; Merz, Andrea L.; Maluf, N. Karl; Serkova, Natalie J.; Anderson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [13C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. PMID:24771867

  6. Yeast Tolerance to Various Stresses Relies on the Trehalose-6P Synthase (Tps1) Protein, Not on Trehalose*

    PubMed Central

    Petitjean, Marjorie; Teste, Marie-Ange; François, Jean M.; Parrou, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a stable disaccharide commonly found in nature, from bacteria to fungi and plants. For the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, claims that trehalose is a stress protectant were based indirectly either on correlation between accumulation of trehalose and high resistance to various stresses or on stress hypersensitivity of mutants deleted for TPS1, which encodes the first enzyme in trehalose biosynthetic pathway. Our goal was to investigate more directly which one, between trehalose and/or the Tps1 protein, may serve yeast cells to withstand exposure to stress. By employing an original strategy that combined the use of mutant strains expressing catalytically inactive variants of Tps1, with MAL+ yeast strains able to accumulate trehalose from an exogenous supply, we bring for the first time unbiased proof that trehalose does not protect yeast cells from dying and that the stress-protecting role of trehalose in this eukaryotic model was largely overestimated. Conversely, we identified the Tps1 protein as a key player for yeast survival in response to temperature, oxidative, and desiccation stress. We also showed by robust RT-quantitative PCR and genetic interaction analysis that the role of Tps1 in thermotolerance is not dependent upon Hsf1-dependent transcription activity. Finally, our results revealed that the Tps1 protein is essential to maintain ATP levels during heat shock. Altogether, these findings supported the idea that Tps1 is endowed with a regulatory function in energy homeostasis, which is essential to withstand adverse conditions and maintain cellular integrity. PMID:25934390

  7. A new nephelometric assay for β-trace protein (prostaglandin D synthase) as an indicator of liquorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Petereit, H; Bachmann, G; Nekic, M; Althaus, H; Pukrop, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the sensitivity and specificity of a nephelometric β-trace protein assay for the diagnosis of liquorrhoea.
METHODS—One hundred and forty clinical samples with suspected liquorrhoea were analysed by a newly developed nephelometric assay. An established electroimmunoassay served as a reference method. The sensitivity and specificity of the β-trace nephelometric assay were calculated by a 2x2 contingency table for 10 different versions of a dichotomised nephelometric variable. In 52 patients (79 samples), the nephelometric findings were validated by referring to the clinical diagnosis based on the course of the disease, imaging techniques, and surgical inspection.
RESULTS—Given a specificity of 100%, a β-trace protein concentration of 6 mg/l or higher in a sample indicated liquorrhoea with a sensitivity of 92% compared with the reference method and of 93% compared with the clinical evaluation. The relation between the electroimmunoassay and the nephelometric assay was highly significant (p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS—The nephelometric β-trace protein assay is a simple and rapid method for the detection of liquorrhoea with high sensitivity and specificity and may facilitate the diagnosis of fistulas leaking CSF.

 PMID:11511708

  8. Serum leptin, C-reactive protein, and cancer mortality in the NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Holmberg, Lars; Ng, Tony; Rohrmann, Sabine; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Adipokines, such as leptin, may affect cancer through its link with inflammation and obesity. We investigated the association between leptin, C-reactive protein, and risk of cancer death while accounting general and abdominal obesity. From the Third National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES III), we selected 5957 adult men and women with baseline measurements of serum leptin and CRP. Multivariable Cox regression was used to assess leptin and CRP levels (low, moderate, high) in relation to risk of cancer death. Stratification analyses were performed for obesity as defined by body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. Fine and Gray regression was performed to account for death from cardiovascular disease and other causes as competing events. A total of 385 participants died of cancer during a mean follow-up of 18 years. After adjusting for BMI and waist circumference, an inverse association with log-transformed leptin was found for women, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.51-1.30) and 0.40 (95% CI: 0.24-0.68) for moderate and high compared to low levels of leptin, respectively; P(trend) = 0.0007). No association for leptin was observed in men, but higher CRP corresponded to increased risk of dying from cancer (HR: 2.98; 95% CI: 1.57-5.64 for the highest vs. lowest categories of CRP). Similar associations were observed with competing risk analysis also adjusted for BMI and waist circumference. Contrasting associations of serum leptin and CRP with cancer mortality may indicate sex-specific biological or environmental pathways linking obesity and cancer in men and women which warrant mechanistic investigations.

  9. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein.

  10. Distinct mechanisms of recognizing endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein IST1 by different microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains.

    PubMed

    Guo, Emily Z; Xu, Zhaohui

    2015-03-27

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery is responsible for membrane remodeling in a number of biological processes including multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and enveloped virus budding. In mammalian cells, efficient abscission during cytokinesis requires proper function of the ESCRT-III protein IST1, which binds to the microtubule interacting and trafficking (MIT) domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin via its C-terminal MIT-interacting motif (MIM). Here, we studied the molecular interactions between IST1 and the three MIT domain-containing proteins to understand the structural basis that governs pairwise MIT-MIM interaction. Crystal structures of the three molecular complexes revealed that IST1 binds to the MIT domains of VPS4, LIP5, and Spartin using two different mechanisms (MIM1 mode versus MIM3 mode). Structural comparison revealed that structural features in both MIT and MIM contribute to determine the specific binding mechanism. Within the IST1 MIM sequence, two phenylalanine residues were shown to be important in discriminating MIM1 versus MIM3 binding. These observations enabled us to deduce a preliminary binding code, which we applied to provide CHMP2A, a protein that normally only binds the MIT domain in the MIM1 mode, the additional ability to bind the MIT domain of Spartin in the MIM3 mode.

  11. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  12. A Soret marker band for four-coordinate ferric heme proteins from absorption spectra of isolated Fe(III)-Heme+ and Fe(III)-Heme+(His) ions in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Lykkegaard, Morten Køcks; Ehlerding, Anneli; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Panja, Subhasis; Wyer, Jean Ann; Zettergren, Henning

    2008-09-10

    In this work, we report the absorption spectra in the Soret band region of isolated Fe(III)-heme+ and Fe(III)-heme+(His) ions in vacuo from action spectroscopy. Fe(III)-heme+ refers to iron(III) coordinated by the dianion of protoporphyrin IX. We find that the absorption of the five-coordinate complex is similar to that of pentacoordinate metmyoglobin variants with hydrophobic binding pockets except for an overall blueshift of about 16 nm. In the case of four-coordinate iron(III), the Soret band is similar to that of five-coordinate iron(III) but much narrower. These spectra serve as a benchmark for theoretical modeling and also serve to identify the coordination state of ferric heme proteins. To our knowledge this is the first unequivocal spectroscopic characterization of isolated 4c ferric heme in the gas phase. PMID:18700762

  13. Melatonin attenuated adipogenesis through reduction of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta by regulating the glycogen synthase 3 beta in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Adipogenic differentiation is characterized by an increase in two major transcription factors: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). These two signals are influenced by C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ and cross-regulate each other's expression during the initial stages of adipogenesis. Melatonin has been known to act as not only a direct scavenger of free radicals but also an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). Here, we report that melatonin inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) which is due to the regulations of C/EBPβ in the early stage of adipogenic differentiation. Melatonin reduced the lipid accumulation, adiponectin, and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) during the adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Since C/EBPβ has been associated with the activation of PPARγ and the consensus site of ERK/GSK-3β, PPARγ and β-catenin were detected by immunofluorescence staining after pretreatment of melatonin. Melatonin blocked the activation of PPARγ which induced the degradation of β-catenin. Melatonin also decreased the levels of cyclic adenosine-3,5-monophosphate (cAMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cAMP triggered the activity of C/EBPβ which is a critical inducer of PPARγ and C/EBPα activation in the early stage of adipogenic differentiation, and this is further affected by ROS production. The adipogenic marker proteins such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and pERK were also decreased by melatonin. In summary, melatonin inhibited the cAMP synthesis through ROS reduction and the phosphorylation of the ERK/GSK-3β site which is known to be responsible for C/EBPβ activation for adipogenic differentiation in hMSCs. PMID:26797706

  14. Octacalcium phosphate crystals directly stimulate expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase through p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Uzan, Benjamin; Rey, Christian; Lioté, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals, including hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and carbonate-apatite, have been associated with severe osteoarthritis and several degenerative arthropathies. Most studies have considered the chondrocyte to be a bystander in the pathogenesis of calcium crystal deposition disease, assuming that synovial cell cytokines were the only triggers of chondrocyte activation. In the present study we identified direct activation of articular chondrocytes by OCP crystals, which are the BCP crystals with the greatest potential for inducing inflammation. OCP crystals induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA expression by isolated articular chondrocytes and cartilage fragments, in a dose-dependent manner and with variations over time. OCP crystals also induced IL-1β mRNA expression. Using pharmacological and cytokine inhibitors, we observed that OCP crystals induced NO production and inducible NOS mRNA activation were regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels; were independent from IL-1β gene activation; and involved p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as further confirmed by OCP crystal-induced p38 and JNK MAPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that the transcriptional inducible NOS response to OCP crystals involved both the p38 and the JNK MAPK pathways, probably under the control of activator protein-1. NO, a major mediator of cartilage degradation, can be directly produced by BCP crystals in chondrocytes. Together with synovial activation, this direct mechanism may be important in the pathogenesis of destructive arthropathies triggered by microcrystals. PMID:16207333

  15. Arsenite Acutely Decreases Nitric Oxide Production via the ROS—Protein Phosphatase 1—Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase-Thr497 Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jungwon; Lee, Jee Young; Sung, Min-Sun; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Cho, Du-Hyong; Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Park, Jung-Hyun; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Inho

    2014-01-01

    Chronic (>24 h) exposure of arsenite, an environmental toxicant, has shown the decreased nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells (EC) by decreasing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression and/or its phosphorylation at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser1179 in bovine sequence), which is associated with increased risk of vascular diseases. Here, we investigated the acute (<24 h) effect of arsenite on NO production using bovine aortic EC (BAEC). Arsenite acutely increased the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr497, but not of eNOS-Ser116 or eNOS-Ser1179, which was accompanied by decreased NO production. The level of eNOS expression was unaltered under this condition. Treatment with arsenite also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and pretreatment with a ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed the observed effect of arsenite on eNOS-Thr497 phosphorylation. Although protein kinase C (PKC) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were reported to be involved in eNOS-Thr497 phosphorylation, treatment with PKC inhibitor, Ro318425, and overexpression of various PKC isoforms did not affect the arsenite-stimulated eNOS-Thr497 phosphorylation. In contrast, treatment with PP1 inhibitor, calyculin A, mimicked the observed effect of arsenite on eNOS-Thr497 phosphorylation. Lastly, we found decreased cellular PP1 activity in arsenite-treated cells, which was reversed by NAC. Overall, our study demonstrates firstly that arsenite acutely decreases NO production at least in part by increasing eNOS-Thr497 phosphorylation via ROS-PP1 signaling pathway, which provide the molecular mechanism underlying arsenite-induced increase in vascular disease. PMID:25489418

  16. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-01-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7772036

  17. Natural Antisense Transcript for Hyaluronan Synthase 2 (HAS2-AS1) Induces Transcription of HAS2 via Protein O-GlcNAcylation*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Deleonibus, Sara; Moretto, Paola; Bowen, Timothy; Fischer, Jens W.; Grandoch, Maria; Oberhuber, Alexander; Love, Dona C.; Hanover, John A.; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Karousou, Eugenia; Viola, Manuela; D'Angelo, Maria Luisa; Hascall, Vincent C.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the microenvironment organization within vascular walls are critical events in the pathogenesis of vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulation into artery walls supports vessel thickening and is involved in many cardiocirculatory diseases. Excessive cytosolic glucose can enter the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, increase UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) availability, and lead to modification of cytosolic proteins via O-linked attachment of the monosaccharide β-N-GlcNAc (O-GlcNAcylation) from UDP-GlcNAc by the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase. As many cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins can be glycosylated by O-GlcNAc, we studied whether the expression of the HA synthases that synthesize HA could be controlled by O-GlcNAcylation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Among the three HAS isoenzymes, only HAS2 mRNA increased after O-GlcNAcylation induced by glucosamine treatments or by inhibiting O-GlcNAc transferase with PUGNAC (O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate). We found that the natural antisense transcript of HAS2 (HAS2-AS1) was absolutely necessary to induce the transcription of the HAS2 gene. Moreover, we found that O-GlcNAcylation modulated HAS2-AS1 promoter activation by recruiting the NF-κB subunit p65, but not the HAS2 promoter, whereas HAS2-AS1 natural antisense transcript, working in cis, regulated HAS2 transcription by altering the chromatin structure around the HAS2 proximal promoter via O-GlcNAcylation and acetylation. These results indicate that HAS2 transcription can be finely regulated not only by recruiting transcription factors to the promoter as previously described but also by modulating chromatin accessibility by epigenetic modifications. PMID:25183006

  18. DNase I hypersensitivity sites and nuclear protein binding on the fatty acid synthase gene: identification of an element with properties similar to known glucose-responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Foufelle, F; Lepetit, N; Bosc, D; Delzenne, N; Morin, J; Raymondjean, M; Ferré, P

    1995-06-01

    We have shown previously that fatty acid synthase (FAS) gene expression is positively regulated by glucose in rat adipose tissue and liver. In the present study, we have identified in the first intron of the gene a sequence closely related to known glucose-responsive elements such as in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes, including a putative upstream stimulatory factor/major late transcription factor (USF/MLTF) binding site (E-box) (+ 292 nt to + 297 nt). Location of this sequence corresponds to a site of hypersensitivity to DNase I which is present in the liver but not in the spleen. Moreover, using this information from a preliminary report of the present work, others have shown that a + 283 nt to + 303 nt sequence of the FAS gene can confer glucose responsiveness to a heterologous promoter. The protein binding to this region has been investigated in vitro by a combination of DNase I footprinting and gel-retardation experiments with synthetic oligonucleotides and known nuclear proteins. DNase I footprinting experiments using a + 161 nt to + 405 nt fragment of the FAS gene demonstrate that a region from + 290 nt to + 316 nt is protected by nuclear extracts from liver and spleen. This region binds two ubiquitous nuclear factors, USF/MLTF and the CAAT-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor 1 (CTF/NF1). Binding of these factors is similar in nuclear extracts from liver which does or does not express the FAS gene as observed for glucose-responsive elements in the L-pyruvate kinase and S14 genes. This suggests a posttranslational modification of a factor of the complex after glucose stimulation.

  19. Structural basis for the endoribonuclease activity of the type III-A CRISPR-associated protein Csm6

    PubMed Central

    Niewoehner, Ole; Jinek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR–Cas systems provide an RNA-guided mechanism for genome defense against mobile genetic elements such as viruses and plasmids. In type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems, the RNA-guided multisubunit Csm effector complex targets both single-stranded RNAs and double-stranded DNAs. In addition to the Csm complex, efficient anti-plasmid immunity mediated by type III-A systems also requires the CRISPR-associated protein Csm6. Here we report the crystal structure of Csm6 from Thermus thermophilus and show that the protein is a ssRNA-specific endoribonuclease. The structure reveals a dimeric architecture generated by interactions involving the N-terminal CARF and C-terminal HEPN domains. HEPN domain dimerization leads to the formation of a composite ribonuclease active site. Consistently, mutations of invariant active site residues impair catalytic activity in vitro. We further show that the ribonuclease activity of Csm6 is conserved across orthologs, suggesting that it plays an important functional role in CRISPR–Cas systems. The dimer interface of the CARF domains features a conserved electropositive pocket that may function as a ligand-binding site for allosteric control of ribonuclease activity. Altogether, our work suggests that Csm6 proteins provide an auxiliary RNA-targeting interference mechanism in type III-A CRISPR–Cas systems that operates in conjunction with the RNA- and DNA-targeting endonuclease activities of the Csm effector complex. PMID:26763118

  20. Deletion of the RluD pseudouridine synthase promotes SsrA peptide tagging of ribosomal protein S7.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Hayes, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    RluD catalyses formation of three pseudouridine residues within helix 69 of the 50S ribosome subunit. Helix 69 makes important contacts with the decoding centre on the 30S subunit and deletion of rluD was recently shown to interfere with translation termination in Escherichia coli. Here, we show that deletion of rluD increases tmRNA activity on ribosomes undergoing release factor 2 (RF2)-mediated termination at UGA stop codons. Strikingly, tmRNA-mediated SsrA peptide tagging of two proteins, ribosomal protein S7 and LacI, was dramatically increased in ΔrluD cells. S7 tagging was due to a unique C-terminal peptide extension found in E. coli K-12 strains. Introduction of the rpsG gene (encoding S7) from an E. coli B strain abrogated S7 tagging in the ΔrluD background, and partially complemented the mutant's slow-growth phenotype. Additionally, exchange of the K-12 prfB gene (encoding RF2) with the B strain allele greatly reduced tagging in ΔrluD cells. In contrast to E. coli K-12 cells, deletion of rluD in an E. coli B strain resulted in no growth phenotype. These findings indicate that the originally observed rluD phenotypes result from synthetic interactions with rpsG and prfB alleles found within E. coli K-12 strains.

  1. The lumazine synthase/riboflavin synthase complex: shapes and functions of a highly variable enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Ladenstein, Rudolf; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert

    2013-06-01

    The xylene ring of riboflavin (vitamin B2 ) is assembled from two molecules of 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate by a mechanistically complex process that is jointly catalyzed by lumazine synthase and riboflavin synthase. In Bacillaceae, these enzymes form a structurally unique complex comprising an icosahedral shell of 60 lumazine synthase subunits and a core of three riboflavin synthase subunits, whereas many other bacteria have empty lumazine synthase capsids, fungi, Archaea and some eubacteria have pentameric lumazine synthases, and the riboflavin synthases of Archaea are paralogs of lumazine synthase. The structures of the molecular ensembles have been studied in considerable detail by X-ray crystallography, X-ray small-angle scattering and electron microscopy. However, certain mechanistic aspects remain unknown. Surprisingly, the quaternary structure of the icosahedral β subunit capsids undergoes drastic changes, resulting in formation of large, quasi-spherical capsids; this process is modulated by sequence mutations. The occurrence of large shells consisting of 180 or more lumazine synthase subunits has recently generated interest for protein engineering topics, particularly the construction of encapsulation systems.

  2. Refolding, crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of the West Nile virus envelope (E) protein domain III

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Fang; Lou, Zhiyong; Li, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yu Wai; Bell, John I.; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F.

    2005-04-01

    Domain III of the West Nile virus envelope protein, the putative receptor-binding domain, was reported to be intrinsically unstable and has defied previous crystallization attempts. It has now been purified from inclusion bodies by protein refolding and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Domain III of the West Nile virus envelope protein, the putative receptor-binding domain, is a major virion-surface determinant for virulence. This protein was reported to be intrinsically unstable and has defied previous crystallization attempts. It has now been purified from inclusion bodies by protein refolding and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. The crystals belong to space group P222{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.6, b = 59.7, c = 95.0 Å. A complete data set was collected to 2.8 Å at 100 K with Cu Kα X-rays from a rotating-anode generator.

  3. The inner rod protein controls substrate switching and needle length in a Salmonella type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Lefebre, Matthew D.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Type III secretion machines are essential for the biology of many bacteria that are pathogenic or symbiotic for animals, plants, or insects. They exert their function by delivering bacterial effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. The core component of these machines is the needle complex, a multiprotein structure that spans the bacterial envelope and serves as a conduit for proteins that transit this secretion pathway. The needle complex is composed of a multiring base embedded in the bacterial envelope and a filament-like structure, the needle, that projects from the bacterial surface and is linked to the base by the inner rod. Assembly of the needle complex proceeds in a step-wise fashion that is initiated by the assembly of the base and is followed by the export of the building subunits for the needle and inner rod substructures. Once assembled, the needle complex reprograms its specificity and becomes competent for the secretion of effector proteins. Here through genetic, biochemical, and electron microscopy analyses of the Salmonella inner rod protein subunit PrgJ we present evidence that the assembly of the inner rod dictates the timing of substrate switching and needle length. Furthermore, the identification of mutations in PrgJ that specifically alter the hierarchy of protein secretion provides additional support for a complex role of the inner rod substructure in type III secretion. PMID:24379359

  4. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT. PMID:26454079

  5. Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) Inhibition during Porcine In Vitro Maturation Modifies Oocyte Protein S-Nitrosylation and In Vitro Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Aguirregomezcorta, Jon; Santa, Ángela Patricia; García-Vázquez, Francisco Alberto; Coy, Pilar; Matás, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a molecule involved in many reproductive processes. Its importance during oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) has been demonstrated in various species although sometimes with contradictory results. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of NO during IVM of cumulus oocyte complexes and its subsequent impact on gamete interaction in porcine species. For this purpose, IVM media were supplemented with three NOS inhibitors: NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and aminoguanidine (AG). A NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), was also used. The effects on the cumulus cell expansion, meiotic resumption, zona pellucida digestion time (ZPdt) and, finally, on in vitro fertilization (IVF) parameters were evaluated. The oocyte S-nitrosoproteins were also studied by in situ nitrosylation. The results showed that after 42 h of IVM, AG, L-NAME and L-NMMA had an inhibitory effect on cumulus cell expansion. Meiotic resumption was suppressed only when AG was added, with 78.7% of the oocytes arrested at the germinal vesicle state (P<0.05). Supplementation of the IVM medium with NOS inhibitors or NO donor did not enhance the efficiency of IVF, but revealed the importance of NO in maturation and subsequent fertilization. Furthermore, protein S-nitrosylation is reported for the first time as a pathway through which NO exerts its effect on porcine IVM; therefore, it would be important to determine which proteins are nitrosylated in the oocyte and their functions, in order to throw light on the mechanism of action of NO in oocyte maturation and subsequent fertilization. PMID:25542028

  6. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT.

  7. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase negatively regulates hydrogen peroxide-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Benjamin Y; Sartoretto, Juliano L; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Michel, Thomas

    2009-10-13

    Hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species are intimately involved in endothelial cell signaling. In many cell types, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been implicated in the control of metabolic responses, but the role of endothelial cell redox signaling in the modulation of AMPK remains to be completely defined. We used RNA interference and pharmacological methods to establish that H(2)O(2) is a critical activator of AMPK in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). H(2)O(2) treatment of BAECs rapidly and significantly increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. The EC(50) for H(2)O(2)-promoted phosphorylation of AMPK is 65 + or - 15 microM, within the physiological range of cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations. The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta (CaMKKbeta) inhibitor STO-609 abolishes H(2)O(2)-dependent AMPK activation, whereas eNOS inhibitors enhance AMPK activation. Similarly, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKKbeta abrogates AMPK activation, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of eNOS leads to a striking increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Cellular imaging studies using the H(2)O(2) biosensor HyPer show that siRNA-mediated eNOS knockdown leads to a marked increase in intracellular H(2)O(2) generation, which is blocked by PEG-catalase. eNOS(-/-) mice show a marked increase in AMPK phosphorylation in liver and lung compared to wild-type mice. Lung endothelial cells from eNOS(-/-) mice also show a significant increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, these results establish that CaMKKbeta is critically involved in mediating the phosphorylation of AMPK promoted by H(2)O(2) in endothelial cells, and document that eNOS is an important negative regulator of AMPK phosphorylation and intracellular H(2)O(2) generation in endothelial cells. PMID:19805165

  8. STRUCTURAL ENZYMOLOGY OF POLYKETIDE SYNTHASES

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shiou-Chuan (Sheryl); Ames, Brian Douglas

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes structural and associated enzymological studies of polyketide synthases, including isolated single domains and multidomain fragments. The sequence–structure–function relationship of polyketide biosynthesis, compared with homologous fatty acid synthesis, is discussed in detail. Structural enzymology sheds light on sequence and structural motifs that are important for the precise timing, substrate recognition, enzyme catalysis, and protein–protein interactions leading to the extraordinary structural diversity of naturally occurring polyketides. PMID:19362634

  9. Carbonic anhydrase III and four-and-a-half LIM protein 1 are preferentially oxidized with muscle unloading

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiao-nan; Ferrington, Deborah A.; Thompson, LaDora V.

    2008-01-01

    The identities of proteins that show disuse-related changes in the content of oxidative modification are unknown. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the global accumulation of oxidized proteins is greater in aged animals with muscle disuse. The purposes of this study are 1) to identify the exact proteins that show disuse-related changes in oxidation levels and 2) to test the hypothesis that the global accumulation of oxidized proteins with muscle disuse would be greater in aged animals. Adult and old rats were randomized into four groups: weight bearing and 3, 7, or 14 days of hindlimb unloading. Soleus muscles were harvested to investigate the protein oxidation with unloading. Slot blot, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analyses were used to detect the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenol (HNE)- and nitrotyrosine (NT)-modified proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight and tandem mass spectroscopy were used to identify modified proteins. We found that global HNE- and NT-modified proteins accumulated significantly with aging but not with muscle unloading. Two HNE and NT target proteins, four-and-a-half LIM protein 1 (FHL1) and carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII), showed changes in the oxidation levels with muscle unloading. The changes in the oxidation levels happened to adult rats but not old rats. However, old rats had higher baseline levels of HNE-modified FHL1. In summary, the data suggest that the muscle unloading-related changes of protein oxidation are more significant in specific proteins and that the changes are age related. PMID:18756007

  10. Guanylate binding protein-1 mediates EGFRvIII and promotes glioblastoma growth in vivo but not in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanwei; Mukasa, Akitaki; Ma, Jiawei; Hong, Lei; Yu, Shuye; Sun, Lili; Huang, Qiang; Purow, Benjamin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadly primary brain tumor in adults. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently amplified and mutated in GBM. We previously reported that Guanylate binding protein-1 (GBP1) is a novel transcriptional target gene of EGFR and plays a role in GBM invasion. Here we demonstrate that GBP1 can also be induced by EGFRvIII at the transcriptional level through the p38 MAPK/Yin Yang 1 (YY1) signaling pathway. Silencing of GBP1 by RNA interference significantly inhibits EGFRvIII-mediated GBM cell proliferation in vitro and in a mouse model. Overexpression of GBP1 has no obvious effect on glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, in an orthotopic glioma mouse model GBP1 overexpression significantly promotes glioma growth and reduces survival rate of glioma-bearing mice by increasing cell proliferation and decreasing cell apoptosis in tumor. Clinically, GBP1 expression is elevated in human GBM tumors and positively correlates with EGFRvIII status in GBM specimens, and its expression is inversely correlated with the survival rate of GBM patients. Taken together, these results reveal that GBP1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for GBMs with EGFRvIII mutation. PMID:26848767

  11. New light on NO bonding in Fe(III) heme proteins from resonance Raman spectroscopy and DFT modeling.

    PubMed

    Soldatova, Alexandra V; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Olson, John S; Czernuszewicz, Roman S; Spiro, Thomas G

    2010-04-01

    Visible and ultraviolet resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for Fe(III)(NO) adducts of myoglobin variants with altered polarity in the distal heme pockets. The stretching frequencies of the Fe(III)-NO and N-O bonds, nu(FeN) and nu(NO), are negatively correlated, consistent with backbonding. However, the correlation shifts to lower nu(NO) for variants lacking a distal histidine. DFT modeling reproduces the shifted correlations and shows the shift to be associated with the loss of a lone-pair donor interaction from the distal histidine that selectively strengthens the N-O bond. However, when the model contains strongly electron-withdrawing substituents at the heme beta-positions, nu(FeN) and nu(NO) become positively correlated. This effect results from Fe(III)-N-O bending, which is induced by lone-pair donation to the N(NO) atom. Other mechanisms for bending are discussed, which likewise lead to a positive nu(FeN)/nu(NO) correlation, including thiolate ligation in heme proteins and electron-donating meso-substituents in heme models. The nu(FeN)/nu(NO) data for the Fe(III) complexes are reporters of heme pocket polarity and the accessibility of lone pair, Lewis base donors. Implications for biologically important processes, including NO binding, reductive nitrosylation, and NO reduction, are discussed. PMID:20218710

  12. The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase for interstitial remodeling of alveolar septa in surfactant protein D-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N.; Massa, Christopher B.; Birkelbach, Bastian; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Scott, Pamela; Haenni, Beat; Beers, Michael F.; Ochs, Matthias; Gow, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) modulates the lung's immune system. Its absence leads to NOS2-independent alveolar lipoproteinosis and NOS2-dependent chronic inflammation, which is critical for early emphysematous remodeling. With aging, SP-D knockout mice develop an additional interstitial fibrotic component. We hypothesize that this age-related interstitial septal wall remodeling is mediated by NOS2. Using invasive pulmonary function testing such as the forced oscillation technique and quasistatic pressure-volume perturbation and design-based stereology, we compared 29-wk-old SP-D knockout (Sftpd−/−) mice, SP-D/NOS2 double-knockout (DiNOS) mice, and wild-type mice (WT). Structural changes, including alveolar epithelial surface area, distribution of septal wall thickness, and volumes of septal wall components (alveolar epithelium, interstitial tissue, and endothelium) were quantified. Twenty-nine-week-old Sftpd−/− mice had preserved lung mechanics at the organ level, whereas elastance was increased in DiNOS. Airspace enlargement and loss of surface area of alveolar epithelium coexist with increased septal wall thickness in Sftpd−/− mice. These changes were reduced in DiNOS, and compared with Sftpd−/− mice a decrease in volumes of interstitial tissue and alveolar epithelium was found. To understand the effects of lung pathology on measured lung mechanics, structural data were used to inform a computational model, simulating lung mechanics as a function of airspace derecruitment, septal wall destruction (loss of surface area), and septal wall thickening. In conclusion, NOS2 mediates remodeling of septal walls, resulting in deposition of interstitial tissue in Sftpd−/−. Forward modeling linking structure and lung mechanics describes the complex mechanical properties by parenchymatous destruction (emphysema), interstitial remodeling (septal wall thickening), and altered recruitability of acinar airspaces. PMID:26320150

  13. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Norais, Cédric; Servant, Pascale; Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  14. Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases from Gram-Negative, Gram-Positive, and Atypical Bacterial Species: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kelly A.; Peery, Robert B.; Zhao, Genshi

    2006-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheine moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) onto a serine residue of apo-ACP, resulting in the conversion of apo-ACP to the functional holo-ACP. The holo form of bacterial ACP plays an essential role in mediating the transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and phospholipids. AcpS is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we have purified and characterized the AcpS enzymes from Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which exemplify gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical bacteria, respectively. Our gel filtration column chromatography and cross-linking studies demonstrate that the AcpS enzyme from M. pneumoniae, like E. coli enzyme, exhibits a homodimeric structure, but the enzyme from S. pneumoniae exhibits a trimeric structure. Our biochemical studies show that the AcpS enzymes from M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae can utilize both short- and long-chain acyl CoA derivatives but prefer long-chain CoA derivatives as substrates. On the other hand, the AcpS enzyme from E. coli can utilize short-chain CoA derivatives but not the long-chain CoA derivatives tested. Finally, our biochemical studies show that M. pneumoniae AcpS is kinetically a very sluggish enzyme compared with those from E. coli and S. pneumoniae. Together, the results of these studies show that the AcpS enzymes from different bacterial species exhibit different native structures and substrate specificities with regard to the utilization of CoA and its derivatives. These findings suggest that AcpS from different microorganisms plays a different role in cellular physiology. PMID:16788183

  15. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF{sub 1} on H{sup +} translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Zanotti, Franco; Gnoni, Antonio; Mangiullo, Roberto; Papa, Sergio

    2009-06-19

    The H{sup +} F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F{sub 1} moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the F{sub o} sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF{sub 1} component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the F{sub o}F{sub 1}-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF{sub 1} (residue 42-58) to the F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF{sub 1} the IF{sub 1}-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K{sup +}] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex. The results show that IF{sub 1}, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F{sub 1} to the F{sub o} side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF{sub 1} to F{sub 1}-{alpha}/{beta} subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H{sup +} translocation but enhances H{sup +} conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the F{sub o}F{sub 1} complex.

  16. Regulation of Hyaluronan (HA) Metabolism Mediated by HYBID (Hyaluronan-binding Protein Involved in HA Depolymerization, KIAA1199) and HA Synthases in Growth Factor-stimulated Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Aya; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Sachiko; Morikawa, Tomohiko; Kawabata, Keigo; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sakai, Shingo; Takahashi, Yoshito; Okada, Yasunori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2015-12-25

    Regulation of hyaluronan (HA) synthesis and degradation is essential to maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. We recently reported that HYBID (HYaluronan-Binding protein Involved in hyaluronan Depolymerization), also called KIAA1199, plays a key role in HA depolymerization in skin and arthritic synovial fibroblasts. However, regulation of HA metabolism mediated by HYBID and HA synthases (HASs) under stimulation with growth factors remains obscure. Here we report that TGF-β1, basic FGF, EGF, and PDGF-BB commonly enhance total amount of HA in skin fibroblasts through up-regulation of HAS expression, but molecular size of newly produced HA is dependent on HYBID expression levels. Stimulation of HAS1/2 expression and suppression of HYBID expression by TGF-β1 were abrogated by blockade of the MAPK and/or Smad signaling and the PI3K-Akt signaling, respectively. In normal human skin, expression of the TGF-β1 receptors correlated positively with HAS2 expression and inversely with HYBID expression. On the other hand, TGF-β1 up-regulated HAS1/2 expression but exerted only a slight suppressive effect on HYBID expression in synovial fibroblasts from the patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in the production of lower molecular weight HA compared with normal skin and synovial fibroblasts. These data demonstrate that although TGF-β1, basic FGF, EGF, and PDGF-BB enhance HA production in skin fibroblasts, TGF-β1 most efficiently contributes to production of high molecular weight HA by HAS up-regulation and HYBID down-regulation and suggests that inefficient down-regulation of HYBID by TGF-β1 in arthritic synovial fibroblasts may be linked to accumulation of depolymerized HA in synovial fluids in arthritis patients. PMID:26518873

  17. Correlation of nitric oxide produced by an inducible nitric oxide synthase-like protein with enhanced expression of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Inonotus obliquus cocultured with Phellinus morii.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanxia; Xi, Qi; Xu, Qian; He, Meihong; Ding, Jianing; Dai, Yucheng; Keller, Nancy P; Zheng, Weifa

    2015-05-01

    Fungal interspecific interactions enhance biosynthesis of phenylpropanoid metabolites (PM), and production of nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in this process. However, it remains unknown which signaling pathway(s) or regulator(s) mediate fungal PM biosynthesis. In this study, we cocultured two white-rot fungi, Inonotus obliquus and Phellinus morii, to examine NO production, expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and accumulation of phenylpropanoid-derived polyphenols by I. obliquus. Coculture of the two fungi caused an enhanced NO biosynthesis followed by increased transcription of the genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate CoA ligase (4CL), as well as an upregulated biosynthesis of styrylpyrone polyphenols in I. obliquus. Addition of the NO synthase (NOS) selective inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) inhibited NO production by more than 90% followed by cease in transcription of PAL and 4Cl. Treatment of guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one did not affect NO production but suppressed transcription of PAL and 4CL and reduced accumulation of total phenolic constituents. Genome-wide analysis of I. obliquus revealed two genes encoding a constitutive and an inducible NOS-like protein, respectively (cNOSL and iNOSL). Coculture of the two fungi did not increase the expression of the cNOSL gene but triggered expression of the iNOSL gene. Cloned iNOSL from Escherichia coli shows higher activity in transferring L-arginine to NO, and this activity is lost upon AG addition. Thus, iNOSL is more responsible for NO production in I. obliquus and may act as an important regulator governing PM production during fungal interspecific interactions. PMID:25582560

  18. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  19. Self-Chaperoning of the Type III Secretion System needle tip proteins IpaD and BipD

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven; Roversi, Pietro; Espina, Marianela; Olive, Andrew; Deane, Janet E.; Birket, Susan; Field, Terry; Picking, William D.; Blocker, Ariel; Galyov, Edouard E.; Picking, Wendy L.; Lea, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria expressing type III secretion systems (T3SS) have been responsible for the deaths of millions worldwide, acting as key virulence elements in diseases ranging from plague to typhoid fever. The T3SS is composed of a basal body, which traverses both bacterial membranes, and an external needle through which effector proteins are secreted. We report multiple crystal structures of two proteins that sit at the tip of the needle and are essential for virulence; IpaD from Shigella flexneri and BipD from Burkholderia pseudomallei. The structures reveal that the N-terminal domains of the molecules are intra-molecular chaperones that prevent premature oligomerization, as well as sharing structural homology with proteins involved in eukaryotic actin rearrangement. Crystal packing has allowed us to construct a model for the tip complex that is supported by mutations designed using the structure. PMID:17077085

  20. DNA polymerase III accessory proteins. I. holA and holB encoding delta and delta'.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z; Onrust, R; Skangalis, M; O'Donnell, M

    1993-06-01

    The genes encoding the delta and delta' subunits of the 10-subunit Escherichia coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, have been identified and sequenced. The holA gene encoding delta is located downstream of rlpB at 15.2 min and predicts a 38.7 kda protein. The holB gene encoding delta' is located at 24.3 min and predicts a 36.9-kDa protein. Hence the delta and delta' subunits are unrelated proteins encoded by separate genes. The genes have been used to express and purify delta and delta' in quantity. The predicted amino acid sequence of delta' is homologous to the sequences of the tau and gamma subunits revealing a large amount of structural redundancy within the holoenzyme.

  1. Regulation of MIR165/166 by class II and class III homeodomain leucine zipper proteins establishes leaf polarity

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Paz; Ram, Hathi; Pia Caggiano, Monica; Ohno, Carolyn; Ott, Felix; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz; Cho, Seok Keun; Yang, Seong Wook; Wenkel, Stephan; Heisler, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of plant leaves is their flattened shape. This shape depends on an antagonism between the genes that specify adaxial (top) and abaxial (bottom) tissue identity; however, the molecular nature of this antagonism remains poorly understood. Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) transcription factors are key mediators in the regulation of adaxial–abaxial patterning. Their expression is restricted adaxially during early development by the abaxially expressed microRNA (MIR)165/166, yet the mechanism that restricts MIR165/166 expression to abaxial leaf tissues remains unknown. Here, we show that class III and class II HD-ZIP proteins act together to repress MIR165/166 via a conserved cis-element in their promoters. Organ morphology and tissue patterning in plants, therefore, depend on a bidirectional repressive circuit involving a set of miRNAs and its targets. PMID:27698117

  2. In vitro Protein Synthesis by Plastids of Phaseolus vulgaris. III. Formation of Lamellar and Soluble Chloroplast Protein 12

    PubMed Central

    Margulies, Maurice M.; Parenti, Francesco

    1968-01-01

    Chloroplasts from leaves of plants which had been grown in the dark, and then illuminated for 12 hours were isolated, and allowed to incorporate 14C-leucine into protein, and the products of this incorporation were studied. Lamellar and soluble proteins are the principal products, and are formed in about equal amounts. Only some of the soluble proteins become heavily labeled. Those with highest specific activity have a molecular weight of the order of 140,000, while the higher molecular weight Fraction I protein has a much lower specific activity. The soluble protein as a whole does not serve as a precursor for the lamellar protein, and vice-versa, although a precursor-product relationship between a minor component of the soluble fraction and the lamellar fraction has not been ruled out. The relative protein synthesizing capabilities of chloroplasts and mitochondria are discussed with reference to the data presented. Images PMID:16656799

  3. Bacteriophage SPO1 structure and morphogenesis. III. SPO1 proteins and synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, M L; Eiserling, F A

    1983-01-01

    The virion proteins of SPO1 have been determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods on purified phage components and on phage lysates. The phage head contains 16 proteins, and the connector or neck structure has an additional 3 proteins not found in the head. The proximal part of the tail, composed of sheath, tube and connecting components, contains six proteins. The distal baseplate is the most complex structure, with 28 proteins identifiable on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. The maximum number of proteins found in phage subassemblies is 53, which would account for nearly half the coding capacity of the SPO1 genome. Images PMID:6827651

  4. Structural analysis of kinetic folding intermediates for a TIM barrel protein, indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase, by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry and Gō model simulation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenyu; Rao, Maithreyi K; Forsyth, William R; Finke, John M; Matthews, C Robert

    2007-11-23

    The structures of partially folded states appearing during the folding of a (betaalpha)(8) TIM barrel protein, the indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus (sIGPS), was assessed by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX-MS) and Gō model simulations. HX-MS analysis of the peptic peptides derived from the pulse-labeled product of the sub-millisecond folding reaction from the urea-denatured state revealed strong protection in the (betaalpha)(4) region, modest protection in the neighboring (betaalpha)(1-3) and (betaalpha)(5)beta(6) segments and no significant protection in the remaining N and C-terminal segments. These results demonstrate that this species is not a collapsed form of the unfolded state under native-favoring conditions nor is it the native state formed via fast-track folding. However, the striking contrast of these results with the strong protection observed in the (betaalpha)(2-5)beta(6) region after 5 s of folding demonstrates that these species represent kinetically distinct folding intermediates that are not identical as previously thought. A re-examination of the kinetic folding mechanism by chevron analysis of fluorescence data confirmed distinct roles for these two species: the burst-phase intermediate is predicted to be a misfolded, off-pathway intermediate, while the subsequent 5 s intermediate corresponds to an on-pathway equilibrium intermediate. Comparison with the predictions using a C(alpha) Gō model simulation of the kinetic folding reaction for sIGPS shows good agreement with the core of the structure offering protection against exchange in the on-pathway intermediate(s). Because the native-centric Gō model simulations do not explicitly include sequence-specific information, the simulation results support the hypothesis that the topology of TIM barrel proteins is a primary determinant of the folding free energy surface for the productive folding reaction. The early misfolding reaction must involve aspects of

  5. Shear stress stimulates phosphorylation of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase at Ser1179 by Akt-independent mechanisms: role of protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Sorescu, George; Boyd, Nolan; Shiojima, Ichiro; Walsh, Kenneth; Du, Jie; Jo, Hanjoong

    2002-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that shear stress stimulates NO(*) production by the protein kinase B/Akt (Akt)-dependent mechanisms in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) (Go, Y. M., Boo, Y. C., Park, H., Maland, M. C., Patel, R., Pritchard, K. A., Jr., Fujio, Y., Walsh, K., Darley-Usmar, V., and Jo, H. (2001) J. Appl. Physiol. 91, 1574-1581). Akt has been believed to regulate shear-dependent production of NO(*) by directly phosphorylating endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) at the Ser(1179) residue (eNOS-S(1179)), but a critical evaluation using specific inhibitors or dominant negative mutants (Akt(AA) or Akt(AAA)) has not been reported. In addition, other kinases, including protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP kinase have also shown to phosphorylate eNOS-S(1179). Here, we show that shear-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) is mediated by an Akt-independent, but a PKA-dependent, mechanism. Expression of Akt(AA) or Akt(AAA) in BAEC by using recombinant adenoviral constructs inhibited phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) if cells were stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but not by shear stress. As shown before, expression of Akt(AA) inhibited shear-dependent NO(*) production, suggesting that Akt is still an important regulator in NO production. Further studies showed that a selective inhibitor of PKA, H89, inhibited shear-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) and NO(*) production. In contrast, H89 did not inhibit phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) induced by expressing a constitutively active Akt mutant (Akt(Myr)) in BAEC, showing that the inhibitor did not affect the Akt pathway. 8-Bromo-cAMP alone phosphorylated eNOS-S(1179) within 5 min without activating Akt, in an H89-sensitive manner. Collectively, these results demonstrate that shear stimulates phosphorylation of eNOS-S(1179) in a PKA-dependent, but Aktindependent manner, whereas the NO(*) production is regulated by the mechanisms dependent on both PKA and Akt. A coordinated interaction

  6. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Protein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R.; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  7. Model investigations for vanadium-protein interactions: vanadium(III) compounds with dipeptides and their oxovanadium(IV) analogues.

    PubMed

    Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J; Tolis, Evangelos J; Tsangaris, John M; Evangelou, Angelos; Woollins, DerekJ; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Pessoa, Costa; Correia, Isabel; Kabanos, Themistoklis A

    2002-04-01

    The reaction of VCl(3) with 1,10-phenanthroline and a series of dipeptides (H(2)dip), having aliphatic as well as aromatic side chains, in methyl alcohol and in the presence of triethylamine affords vanadium(III) compounds of the general formula [V(III)(dip)(MeOH)(phen)]Cl. Aerial oxidation/hydrolysis of the vanadium(III) species gives their oxovanadium(IV) analogues of the general formula [V(IV)O(dip)(phen)]. X-ray crystallographic characterization of the [V(IV)O(dip)(phen)] compounds (where dip(2-)=Gly- L-Ala, Gly- L-Val and Gly- L-Phe) revealed that the vanadium atom possesses a severely distorted octahedral coordination and is ligated to a tridentate dip(2-) ligand at the N(amine) atom, the deprotonated N(peptide) atom and one of the O(carboxylate) atoms, as well as an oxo group and two phenanthroline nitrogen atoms. Circular dichroism characterization of the V(III)/V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide compounds revealed a strong signal for the V(IV)O(2+) species in the visible range of the spectrum, with a characteristic pattern which may be exploited to identify the N(am), N(pep) and O(car) ligation of a peptide or a protein to V(IV)O(2+) center, and a weak Cotton effect of opposite sign to their vanadium(III) analogues. The visible spectra of the V(III)-dipeptide compounds revealed two d-d bands with high intensity, thus indicating that the covalency of the metal-donor atoms is significant, i.e. the vanadium d orbitals are significantly mixed with the ligand orbitals, and this is confirmed by the low values of their Racah B parameters. The high-intensity band of the V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide compounds at approximately 460 nm implies also a strong covalency of the metal with the equatorial donor atoms and this was supported by the EPR spectra of these compounds. Moreover, the V(III)/V(IV)O(2+)-dipeptide complexes were characterized by EPR and IR spectroscopies as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:11941494

  8. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  9. A Yersinia secreted effector protein promotes virulence by preventing inflammasome recognition of the type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Igor E.; Palm, Noah W.; Sadanand, Saheli; Ryndak, Michelle B.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Flavell, Richard A.; Bliska, James B.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2010-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) detect conserved microbial structures generally absent from eukaryotes. Bacterial pathogens commonly utilize pore-forming toxins or specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence factors that promote bacterial replication by modulating host cell physiology. Detection of these secretion systems or toxins by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain leucine-rich-repeat proteins (NLRs) triggers the assembly of multiprotein complexes, termed inflammasomes, necessary for caspase-1 activation. Here we demonstrate that caspase-1 activation in response to the Yersinia type III secretion system (T3SS) requires the adapter ASC, and involves both NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes. We further identify a Yersinia type III secreted effector protein, YopK, which prevents inflammasome activation by preventing cellular recognition of the T3SS. Inflammasome-mediated sensing of the T3SS promotes bacterial clearance from infected tissues in vivo. These data demonstrate that a class of bacterial proteins interferes with cellular recognition of bacterial secretion systems, which contributes to bacterial survival within host tissues. PMID:20478539

  10. Cobalt(III)-Mediated Permanent and Stable Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins on NTA-Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Seraphine V; Schenk, Franziska C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2016-02-24

    We present the cobalt(III)-mediated interaction between polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-modified surfaces as a general approach for a permanent, oriented, and specific protein immobilization. In this approach, we first form the well-established Co(2+) -mediated interaction between NTA and His-tagged proteins and subsequently oxidize the Co(2+) center in the complex to Co(3+) . Unlike conventionally used Ni(2+) - or Co(2+) -mediated immobilization, the resulting Co(3+) -mediated immobilization is resistant toward strong ligands, such as imidazole and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and washing off over time because of the high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the Co(3+) complex. This immobilization method is compatible with a wide variety of surface coatings, including silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass, thiol SAMs on gold surfaces, and supported lipid bilayers. Furthermore, once the cobalt center has been oxidized, it becomes inert toward reducing agents, specific and unspecific interactions, so that it can be used to orthogonally functionalize surfaces with multiple proteins. Overall, the large number of available His-tagged proteins and materials with NTA groups make the Co(3+) -mediated interaction an attractive and widely applicable platform for protein immobilization.

  11. A recombinant fusion protein containing the domain III of the dengue-2 envelope protein is immunogenic and protective in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Lisset; Bernardo, Lídice; Martín, Jorge; Alvarez, Mayling; Prado, Irina; López, Carlos; Sierra, Beatriz de la C; Martínez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Rosmary; Zulueta, Aída; Pérez, Ana B; Lazo, Laura; Rosario, Delfina; Guillén, Gerardo; Guzmán, María G

    2006-04-12

    We have previously reported the construction and evaluation in mice of recombinant fusion proteins formed by a fragment (aa 286-426) of the dengue envelope protein and the P64k protein from Neisseria meningitidis. In this work we describe the immunization of Macaca fascicularis monkeys with two variants of these proteins [PD3 (insertion variant) and PD5 (fusion variant)] corresponding to serotype 2. Four doses of the proteins adjuvated in Freund's adjuvant were administered and the kinetics of antibody induction was monitored by ELISA and neutralization tests. Monkeys receiving PD3 or PD5 developed functional antibodies (Abs) in a dose-dependent manner. Following challenge with 5 log PFU of wild type dengue-2 virus (DEN2), animals immunized with PD5 were protected from developing viremia. These results constitute a proof-of-concept demonstrating that a fragment of the dengue envelope protein, containing the domain III and produced as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli, induces functional and protective immunity in a nonhuman primate model.

  12. Knock-out of the genes coding for the Rieske protein and the ATP-synthase delta-subunit of Arabidopsis. Effects on photosynthesis, thylakoid protein composition, and nuclear chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed

    Maiwald, Daniela; Dietzmann, Angela; Jahns, Peter; Pesaresi, Paolo; Joliot, Pierre; Joliot, Anne; Levin, Joshua Z; Salamini, Francesco; Leister, Dario

    2003-09-01

    In Arabidopsis, the nuclear genes PetC and AtpD code for the Rieske protein of the cytochrome b(6)/f (cyt b(6)/f) complex and the delta-subunit of the chloroplast ATP synthase (cpATPase), respectively. Knock-out alleles for each of these loci have been identified. Greenhouse-grown petc-2 and atpd-1 mutants are seedling lethal, whereas heterotrophically propagated plants display a high-chlorophyll (Chl)-fluorescence phenotype, indicating that the products of PetC and AtpD are essential for photosynthesis. Additional effects of the mutations in axenic culture include altered leaf coloration and increased photosensitivity. Lack of the Rieske protein affects the stability of cyt b(6)/f and influences the level of other thylakoid proteins, particularly those of photosystem II. In petc-2, linear electron flow is blocked, leading to an altered redox state of both the primary quinone acceptor Q(A) in photosystem II and the reaction center Chl P700 in photosystem I. Absence of cpATPase-delta destabilizes the entire cpATPase complex, whereas residual accumulation of cyt b(6)/f and of the photosystems still allows linear electron flow. In atpd-1, the increase in non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence and a higher de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments under low light is compatible with a slower dissipation of the transthylakoid proton gradient. Further and clear differences between the two mutations are evident when mRNA expression profiles of nucleus-encoded chloroplast proteins are considered, suggesting that the physiological states conditioned by the two mutations trigger different modes of plastid signaling and nuclear response.

  13. Ruthenium(III) readily abstracts NO from L-arginine, the physiological precursor to NO, in the presence of H2O2. A remarkably simple model system for NO synthases.

    PubMed

    Marmion, C J; Murphy, T; Nolan, K B

    2001-09-21

    Reaction of [Ru(Hedta)Cl]- with H2O2 in the presence of arginine, produces NO, in the form of an Ru(II)-(NO+) complex and citrulline which is a remarkably simple model system for the physiological NO synthase reaction. PMID:12240355

  14. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-08-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains three gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's 'cluster III' chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment.

  15. Functional Interaction between Type III-Secreted Protein IncA of Chlamydophila psittaci and Human G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Borth, Nicole; Litsche, Katrin; Franke, Claudia; Sachse, Konrad; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydophila (Cp.) psittaci, the causative agent of psittacosis in birds and humans, is the most important zoonotic pathogen of the family Chlamydiaceae. These obligate intracellular bacteria are distinguished by a unique biphasic developmental cycle, which includes proliferation in a membrane-bound compartment termed inclusion. All Chlamydiaceae spp. possess a coding capacity for core components of a Type III secretion apparatus, which mediates specific delivery of anti-host effector proteins either into the chlamydial inclusion membrane or into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Here we describe the interaction between Type III-secreted protein IncA of Cp. psittaci and host protein G3BP1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. In GST-pull down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments both in vitro and in vivo interaction between full-length IncA and G3BP1 were shown. Using fluorescence microscopy, the localization of G3BP1 near the inclusion membrane of Cp. psittaci-infected Hep-2 cells was demonstrated. Notably, infection of Hep-2 cells with Cp. psittaci and overexpression of IncA in HEK293 cells led to a decrease in c-Myc protein concentration. This effect could be ascribed to the interaction between IncA and G3BP1 since overexpression of an IncA mutant construct disabled to interact with G3BP1 failed to reduce c-Myc concentration. We hypothesize that lowering the host cell c-Myc protein concentration may be part of a strategy employed by Cp. psittaci to avoid apoptosis and scale down host cell proliferation. PMID:21304914

  16. Expression, purification and evaluation of diagnostic potential and immunogenicity of dengue virus type 3 domain III protein.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pradeep B J; Pattnaik, Priyabrata; Tripathi, Nagesh K; Srivastava, Ambuj; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2012-05-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome are the severe manifestations of dengue infection. The quest for reliable dengue diagnostics and a dengue vaccine remained elusive for decades. Domain III of dengue virus envelope contains multiple conformation dependant neutralizing epitopes, thus making it an attractive diagnostic and vaccine candidate. In this report we show the expression of dengue virus type 3 envelope domain III protein (D3EDIII) and demonstrate its potential as a diagnostic and vaccine candidate. Accordingly, D3EDIII was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified protein was used to develop an in-house plate ELISA and was further tested with a panel of 40 dengue infected serum samples previously characterized by commercially available serological tests. The in-house results were in excellent agreement with the commercial kits. D3EDIII was refolded by rapid dilution method and the refolded monomer protein was purified by Ion exchange chromatography. Further, the recombinant protein was biologically functional and found to inhibit dengue virus type 3 plaque formation on LLC-MK2 cells demonstrating its function of receptor interaction. Furthermore, D3EDIII in combination with Freund's complete adjuvant induced high antibody titers in BALB/c mice and these antibodies efficiently neutralized dengue 3 virus. Additionally, D3EDIII induced expression of Th1 cytokines that can inhibit the intracellular viral infections. Thus, our results demonstrate that D3EDIII protein has tremendous potential both in diagnosis of dengue infections and in vaccine development.

  17. ULK3 regulates cytokinetic abscission by phosphorylating ESCRT-III proteins

    PubMed Central

    Caballe, Anna; Wenzel, Dawn M; Agromayor, Monica; Alam, Steven L; Skalicky, Jack J; Kloc, Magdalena; Carlton, Jeremy G; Labrador, Leticia; Sundquist, Wesley I; Martin-Serrano, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery mediates the physical separation between daughter cells during cytokinetic abscission. This process is regulated by the abscission checkpoint, a genome protection mechanism that relies on Aurora B and the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4C to delay abscission in response to chromosome missegregation. In this study, we show that Unc-51-like kinase 3 (ULK3) phosphorylates and binds ESCRT-III subunits via tandem MIT domains, and thereby, delays abscission in response to lagging chromosomes, nuclear pore defects, and tension forces at the midbody. Our structural and biochemical studies reveal an unusually tight interaction between ULK3 and IST1, an ESCRT-III subunit required for abscission. We also demonstrate that IST1 phosphorylation by ULK3 is an essential signal required to sustain the abscission checkpoint and that ULK3 and CHMP4C are functionally linked components of the timer that controls abscission in multiple physiological situations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06547.001 PMID:26011858

  18. Role of Autocleavage in the Function of a Type III Secretion Specificity Switch Protein in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Monjarás Feria, Julia V.; Lefebre, Matthew D.; Stierhof, York-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are multiprotein machines employed by many Gram-negative bacteria to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to promote bacterial survival and colonization. The core unit of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins through the bacterial envelope. A distinct feature of the T3SS is that protein export occurs in a strictly hierarchical manner in which proteins destined to form the needle complex filament and associated structures are secreted first, followed by the secretion of effectors and the proteins that will facilitate their translocation through the target host cell membrane. The secretion hierarchy is established by complex mechanisms that involve several T3SS-associated components, including the “switch protein,” a highly conserved, inner membrane protease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage. It has been proposed that the autocleavage of the switch protein is the trigger for substrate switching. We show here that autocleavage of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium switch protein SpaS is an unregulated process that occurs after its folding and before its incorporation into the needle complex. Needle complexes assembled with a precleaved form of SpaS function in a manner indistinguishable from that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, an engineered mutant of SpaS that is processed by an external protease also displays wild-type function. These results demonstrate that the cleavage event per se does not provide a signal for substrate switching but support the hypothesis that cleavage allows the proper conformation of SpaS to render it competent for its switching function. PMID:26463164

  19. SINC, a type III secreted protein of Chlamydia psittaci, targets the inner nuclear membrane of infected cells and uninfected neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Sergio A.; Hovis, Kelley M.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Tran, Bao; Hsia, Ru-ching; Ravel, Jacques; Jenkins-Houk, Clifton; Wilson, Katherine L.; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2015-01-01

    SINC, a new type III secreted protein of the avian and human pathogen Chlamydia psittaci, uniquely targets the nuclear envelope of C. psittaci–infected cells and uninfected neighboring cells. Digitonin-permeabilization studies of SINC-GFP–transfected HeLa cells indicate that SINC targets the inner nuclear membrane. SINC localization at the nuclear envelope was blocked by importazole, confirming SINC import into the nucleus. Candidate partners were identified by proximity to biotin ligase-fused SINC in HEK293 cells and mass spectrometry (BioID). This strategy identified 22 candidates with high confidence, including the nucleoporin ELYS, lamin B1, and four proteins (emerin, MAN1, LAP1, and LBR) of the inner nuclear membrane, suggesting that SINC interacts with host proteins that control nuclear structure, signaling, chromatin organization, and gene silencing. GFP-SINC association with the native LEM-domain protein emerin, a conserved component of nuclear “lamina” structure, or with a complex containing emerin was confirmed by GFP pull down. Our findings identify SINC as a novel bacterial protein that targets the nuclear envelope with the capability of globally altering nuclear envelope functions in the infected host cell and neighboring uninfected cells. These properties may contribute to the aggressive virulence of C. psittaci. PMID:25788290

  20. Rapid purification of recombinant dengue and West Nile virus envelope Domain III proteins by metal affinity membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lik Chern Melvin; Chua, Anthony Jin Shun; Goh, Li Shan Liza; Pua, Shu Min; Cheong, Yuen Kuen; Ng, Mah Lee

    2010-11-01

    Arthropod-borne flaviviruses such as dengue virus (DENV) and West Nile virus (WNV) pose significant health threats to the global community. Due to escalating numbers of DENV and WNV infections worldwide, development of an effective vaccine remains a global health priority. As flavivirus envelope Domain III (DIII) protein is highly immunogenic and capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies against wild-type virus, it is both a potential protein subunit vaccine candidate and a suitable diagnostic reagent. Here, we describe the use of metal affinity membrane chromatography as a rapid and improved alternative for the purification of recombinant DIII (rDIII) antigens from DENV serotypes 1-4 and WNV - New York, Sarafend, Wengler and Kunjin strains. Optimum conditions for the expression, solubilization, renaturation and purification of these proteins were established. The purified proteins were confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and ELISA using antibodies raised against the respective viruses. Biological function of the purified rDIII proteins was confirmed by their ability to generate DIII-specific antibodies in mice that could neutralize the virus.

  1. Terpene synthases are widely distributed in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Komatsu, Mamoru; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Omura, Satoshi; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Odoriferous terpene metabolites of bacterial origin have been known for many years. In genome-sequenced Streptomycetaceae microorganisms, the vast majority produces the degraded sesquiterpene alcohol geosmin. Two minor groups of bacteria do not produce geosmin, with one of these groups instead producing other sesquiterpene alcohols, whereas members of the remaining group do not produce any detectable terpenoid metabolites. Because bacterial terpene synthases typically show no significant overall sequence similarity to any other known fungal or plant terpene synthases and usually exhibit relatively low levels of mutual sequence similarity with other bacterial synthases, simple correlation of protein sequence data with the structure of the cyclized terpene product has been precluded. We have previously described a powerful search method based on the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and protein families database (Pfam) search that has allowed the discovery of monoterpene synthases of bacterial origin. Using an enhanced set of HMM parameters generated using a training set of 140 previously identified bacterial terpene synthase sequences, a Pfam search of 8,759,463 predicted bacterial proteins from public databases and in-house draft genome data has now revealed 262 presumptive terpene synthases. The biochemical function of a considerable number of these presumptive terpene synthase genes could be determined by expression in a specially engineered heterologous Streptomyces host and spectroscopic identification of the resulting terpene products. In addition to a wide variety of terpenes that had been previously reported from fungal or plant sources, we have isolated and determined the complete structures of 13 previously unidentified cyclic sesquiterpenes and diterpenes. PMID:25535391

  2. ClRTL1 Encodes a Chinese Fir RNase III-Like Protein Involved in Regulating Shoot Branching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Su, Qian; Zheng, Renhua; Liu, Guangxin; Lu, Ye; Bian, Liming; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Identification of genes controlling shoot branching is crucial for improving plant architecture and increasing crop yield or biomass. A branching mutant of Chinese fir named "Dugansha" (Cunninghamia lanceolata var. dugan.) has been isolated in our laboratory. We chose the cDNA-AFLP technique and an effective strategy to screen genes that potentially regulate shoot branching in Chinese fir using this mutant. An RNase III-like1 cDNA fragment named ClRTL1 was identified as a potential positive regulator. To investigate the function of ClRTL1 in regulating shoot branching, we cloned the full-length cDNA sequence from C. lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook, deduced its secondary structure and function, and overexpressed the coding sequence in Arabidopsis. The ClRTL1 cDNA is 1045 bp and comprises an open reading frame of 705 bp. It encodes a protein of 235 amino acids. The deduced secondary structure of the ClRTL1 indicates that it is a mini-RNase III-like protein. The expression analysis and phenotypes of 35S: ClRTL1 in A. thaliana implies that ClRTL1 plays a role in promoting shoot branching in Chinese fir. PMID:26516842

  3. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell. PMID:19435936

  4. Dynamic behavior of Arabidopsis eIF4A-III, putative core protein of exon junction complex: fast relocation to nucleolus and splicing speckles under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, O A; Calder, G; Pendle, A F; Kim, S H; Lewandowska, D; Simpson, C G; Jones, I M; Brown, J W S; Shaw, P J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we identify the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of the mammalian DEAD box helicase, eIF4A-III, the putative anchor protein of exon junction complex (EJC) on mRNA. Arabidopsis eIF4A-III interacts with an ortholog of the core EJC component, ALY/Ref, and colocalizes with other EJC components, such as Mago, Y14, and RNPS1, suggesting a similar function in EJC assembly to animal eIF4A-III. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-eIF4A-III fusion protein showed localization to several subnuclear domains: to the nucleoplasm during normal growth and to the nucleolus and splicing speckles in response to hypoxia. Treatment with the respiratory inhibitor sodium azide produced an identical response to the hypoxia stress. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 led to accumulation of GFP-eIF4A-III mainly in the nucleolus, suggesting that transition of eIF4A-III between subnuclear domains and/or accumulation in nuclear speckles is controlled by proteolysis-labile factors. As revealed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, the nucleoplasmic fraction was highly mobile, while the speckles were the least mobile fractions, and the nucleolar fraction had an intermediate mobility. Sequestration of eIF4A-III into nuclear pools with different mobility is likely to reflect the transcriptional and mRNA processing state of the cell.

  5. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  6. A tick gut protein with fibronectin III domains aids Borrelia burgdorferi congregation to the gut during transmission.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Sukanya; Coumou, Jeroen; Schuijt, Tim J; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a "molecular exit" direction for spirochete egress from the gut.

  7. A Tick Gut Protein with Fibronectin III Domains Aids Borrelia burgdorferi Congregation to the Gut during Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Schuijt, Tim J.; Boder, Eric; Hovius, Joppe W.; Fikrig, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi transmission to the vertebrate host commences with growth of the spirochete in the tick gut and migration from the gut to the salivary glands. This complex process, involving intimate interactions of the spirochete with the gut epithelium, is pivotal to transmission. We utilized a yeast surface display library of tick gut proteins to perform a global screen for tick gut proteins that might interact with Borrelia membrane proteins. A putative fibronectin type III domain-containing tick gut protein (Ixofin3D) was most frequently identified from this screen and prioritized for further analysis. Immunization against Ixofin3D and RNA interference-mediated reduction in expression of Ixofin3D resulted in decreased spirochete burden in tick salivary glands and in the murine host. Microscopic examination showed decreased aggregation of spirochetes on the gut epithelium concomitant with reduced expression of Ixofin3D. Our observations suggest that the interaction between Borrelia and Ixofin3D facilitates spirochete congregation to the gut during transmission, and provides a “molecular exit” direction for spirochete egress from the gut. PMID:25102051

  8. The Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-encoded type III secretion systems can translocate Chlamydia trachomatis proteins into the cytosol of host cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, Theresa D; Starnbach, Michael N

    2005-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate, intracellular pathogen that is a major cause of preventable blindness and infertility worldwide. Although the published genome sequence suggests that C. trachomatis encodes a type III secretion system, the lack of genetic tools for studying Chlamydia has hindered the examination of this potentially important class of virulence genes. We have developed a technique to identify Chlamydia proteins that can be translocated into the host cell cytoplasm by a type III secretion system. We have selected several Chlamydia proteins and tagged them with a multiple peptide motif element called F8M4. Epitopes contained in the F8M4 tag allow us to use tools corresponding to different arms of the adaptive immune system to detect the expression and translocation of these proteins by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In particular, CD8(+)-T-cell reactivity can be used to detect the translocation of F8M4-tagged proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. We have found that CD8(+)-T-cell activity assays are sensitive enough to detect translocation of even a small amount of F8M4-tagged protein. We have used CD8(+)-T-cell activity to show that CopN, a Chlamydia protein previously shown to be translocated by Yersinia type III secretion, can be translocated by the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) type III secretion system. Additionally, we demonstrate that CopD and Pkn5, two Chlamydia proteins hypothesized to be substrates of a type III secretion system, are translocated via the SPI-2 type III secretion system of serovar Typhimurium. The epitope tag system described here can be used more generally to examine the expression and subcellular compartmentalization of bacterial proteins deployed during the interaction of pathogens with mammalian cells.

  9. The Mechanosensory Structure of the Hair Cell Requires Clarin-1, a Protein Encoded by Usher Syndrome III Causative Gene

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ruishuang; Melki, Sami; Chen, Daniel H.-C.; Tian, Guilian; Furness, David; Oshima-Takago, Tomoko; Neef, Jakob; Moser, Tobias; Askew, Charles; Horwitz, Geoff; Holt, Jeffrey; Imanishi, Yoshikazu; Alagramam, Kumar N.

    2012-01-01

    Mutation in the clarin-1 gene results in loss of hearing and vision in humans (Usher syndrome III), but the role of clarin-1 in the sensory hair cells is unknown. Clarin-1 is predicted to be a four transmembrane domain protein similar to members of the tetraspanin family. Mice carrying null mutation in the clarin-1 (Clrn1−/−) gene show loss of hair cell function and a possible defect in ribbon synapse. We investigated the role of clarin-1 using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. We show by immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings of Ca2+ currents and membrane capacitance from IHCs that clarin-1 is not essential for formation or function of ribbon synapse. However, reduced cochlear microphonic potentials, FM1-43 loading and transduction currents pointed to diminished cochlear hair bundle function in Clrn1−/− mice. Electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells revealed loss of some tall stereocilia and gaps in the v-shaped bundle, although tip-links and staircase arrangement of stereocilia were not primarily affected by Clrn1−/− mutation. Human clarin-1 protein expressed in transfected mouse cochlear hair cells localized to the bundle; however, the pathogenic variant, p.N48K, failed to localize to the bundle. The mouse model generated to study the in vivo consequence of p. N48K in clarin-1 (Clrn1N48K) supports our in vitro and Clrn1−/− mouse data and the conclusion that CLRN1 is an essential hair bundle protein. Further, the ear phenotype in the Clrn1N48K mouse suggests that it is a valuable model for ear disease in CLRN1N48K, the most prevalent Usher III mutation in North America. PMID:22787034

  10. c-Src regulates cell cycle proteins expression through protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 pathways in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Du, Liying; Feng, Renqing

    2013-07-01

    We have demonstrated that c-Src suppression inhibited the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of c-Src on the cell cycle progression using siRNAs and small molecule inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2). Western blot analysis demonstrated the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E and up-regulation of p27 Kip1 after c-Src suppression by PP2. Incubation of cells in the presence of PP2 significantly blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (AKT), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β). Specific pharmacological inhibitors of MEK1/2/ERK1/2 and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathways were used to demonstrate the relationship between the signal cascade and cell cycle proteins expression. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were decreased after inhibition of ERK1/2 or AKT activity, whereas the p27 Kip1 expression was increased. In addition, knockdown of c-Src by siRNAs reduced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT, and GSK3β. After c-Src depletion by siRNAs, we observed significant down-regulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and up-regulation of p27 Kip1. These results suggest that c-Src suppression by PP2 or siRNAs may regulate the progression of cell cycle through AKT/GSK3β and ERK1/2 pathways.

  11. Quantification of the physiochemical constraints on the export of spider silk proteins by Salmonella type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a molecular machine in gram negative bacteria that exports proteins through both membranes to the extracellular environment. It has been previously demonstrated that the T3SS encoded in Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) can be harnessed to export recombinant proteins. Here, we demonstrate the secretion of a variety of unfolded spider silk proteins and use these data to quantify the constraints of this system with respect to the export of recombinant protein. Results To test how the timing and level of protein expression affects secretion, we designed a hybrid promoter that combines an IPTG-inducible system with a natural genetic circuit that controls effector expression in Salmonella (psicA). LacO operators are placed in various locations in the psicA promoter and the optimal induction occurs when a single operator is placed at the +5nt (234-fold) and a lower basal level of expression is achieved when a second operator is placed at -63nt to take advantage of DNA looping. Using this tool, we find that the secretion efficiency (protein secreted divided by total expressed) is constant as a function of total expressed. We also demonstrate that the secretion flux peaks at 8 hours. We then use whole gene DNA synthesis to construct codon optimized spider silk genes for full-length (3129 amino acids) Latrodectus hesperus dragline silk, Bombyx mori cocoon silk, and Nephila clavipes flagelliform silk and PCR is used to create eight truncations of these genes. These proteins are all unfolded polypeptides and they encompass a variety of length, charge, and amino acid compositions. We find those proteins fewer than 550 amino acids reliably secrete and the probability declines significantly after ~700 amino acids. There also is a charge optimum at -2.4, and secretion efficiency declines for very positively or negatively charged proteins. There is no significant correlation with hydrophobicity. Conclusions We show that

  12. A Substrate-Fusion Protein Is Trapped inside the Type III Secretion System Channel in Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Dohlich, Kim; Zumsteg, Anna Brotcke; Goosmann, Christian; Kolbe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a macromolecular complex used by Gram-negative bacteria to secrete effector proteins from the cytoplasm across the bacterial envelope in a single step. For many pathogens, the T3SS is an essential virulence factor that enables the bacteria to interact with and manipulate their respective host. A characteristic structural feature of the T3SS is the needle complex (NC). The NC resembles a syringe with a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and a long needle-like structure that protrudes from the bacterium. Based on the paradigm of a syringe-like mechanism, it is generally assumed that effectors and translocators are unfolded and secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm through the basal body and needle channel. Despite extensive research on T3SS, this hypothesis lacks experimental evidence and the mechanism of secretion is not fully understood. In order to elucidate details of the T3SS secretion mechanism, we generated fusion proteins consisting of a T3SS substrate and a bulky protein containing a knotted motif. Because the knot cannot be unfolded, these fusions are accepted as T3SS substrates but remain inside the NC channel and obstruct the T3SS. To our knowledge, this is the first time substrate fusions have been visualized together with isolated NCs and we demonstrate that substrate proteins are secreted directly through the channel with their N-terminus first. The channel physically encloses the fusion protein and shields it from a protease and chemical modifications. Our results corroborate an elementary understanding of how the T3SS works and provide a powerful tool for in situ-structural investigations in the future. This approach might also be applicable to other protein secretion systems that require unfolding of their substrates prior to secretion. PMID:24453973

  13. Overexpression of the S100A2 protein as a prognostic marker for patients with stage II and III colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    MASUDA, TAIKI; ISHIKAWA, TOSHIAKI; MOGUSHI, KAORU; OKAZAKI, SATOSHI; ISHIGURO, MEGUMI; IIDA, SATORU; MIZUSHIMA, HIROSHI; TANAKA, HIROSHI; UETAKE, HIROYUKI; SUGIHARA, KENICHI

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify a novel prognostic biomarker related to recurrence in stage II and III colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Stage II and III CRC tissue mRNA expression was profiled using an Affymetrix Gene Chip, and copy number profiles of 125 patients were generated using an Affymetrix 250K Sty array. Genes showing both upregulated expression and copy number gains in cases involving recurrence were extracted as candidate biomarkers. The protein expression of the candidate gene was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of tissue from 161 patients. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was also examined. We identified 9 candidate genes related to recurrence of stage II and III CRC, whose mRNA expression was significantly higher in CRC than in normal tissue. Of these proteins, the S100 calcium-binding protein A2 (S100A2) has been observed in several human cancers. S100A2 protein overexpression in CRC cells was associated with significantly worse overall survival and relapse-free survival, indicating that S100A2 is an independent risk factor for stage II and III CRC recurrence. S100A2 overexpression in cancer cells could be a biomarker of poor prognosis in stage II and III CRC recurrence and a target for treatment of this disease. PMID:26783118

  14. [Contributions to mechanical dishwashing. III. Dynamics of removal of protein residue from glass surfaces (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weinberger, P; Wildbrett, G

    1977-12-30

    Using tracer technique the removal of protein soil--dried casein resp. skin milk--from glass plates by mechanical dishwashing was investigated. Prerinsing for 2 min with cold tap water removes 91.25 percent of the quantity of casein originally present. When this prerinse is followed by 20 min main wash, the residual casein can be removed if at least 30g of detergent has been added to 131 water. Optimum inter-relation-ships of quantity of detergent added with time and temperature of the washing and rinse cycles are given. Dry protein residues from skim milk are more easily removed than casein residues, probably because the salts and lactose dried together with the proteins facilitate the cleaning.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF SHORT-RANGE INTERACTIONS ON PROTEIN CONFORMATION, III. DIPEPTIDE DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS OF KNOWN SEQUENCE AND STRUCTURE*

    PubMed Central

    Kotelchuck, D.; Dygert, M.; Scheraga, H. A.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis is made of the distribution into α-helical and non-α-helical regions of the various dipeptide types appearing in a sample of seven proteins of known sequence and structure. By considering as a group all dipeptide types occurring at a given location relative to the reported helix-coil boundaries and examining the percentage of cases in which these appear in non-α-helical regions throughout the protein sample, we find a sharp change in the nature of the observed dipeptide types when the helix-coil boundary is crossed. Furthermore, we find that dipeptide types which occur in the coil region near the C-terminal end of helical segments are non-α-helical in almost 90 per cent of the cases in which they appear throughout the sample. No similar effect is found in the coil region near the N-terminal end of helical segments. These results give evidence for the importance of short-range interactions in determining protein conformation. They are also consistent with predictions based on a model for helix formation given in the second paper of this series.1 PMID:5259754

  16. Characterization of the Interaction between the Salmonella Type III Secretion System Tip Protein SipD and the Needle Protein PrgI by Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement*

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi; Tang, Chun; De Guzman, Roberto N.

    2011-01-01

    Many Gram-negative bacteria that cause major diseases and mortality worldwide require the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence proteins into their hosts and cause infections. A structural component of the T3SS is the needle apparatus, which consists of a base, an external needle, and a tip complex. In Salmonella typhimurium, the external needle is assembled by the polymerization of the needle protein PrgI. On top of this needle sits a tip complex, which is partly formed by the tip protein SipD. How SipD interacts with PrgI during the assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus remains unknown. The central region of PrgI forms an α-helical hairpin, whereas SipD has a long central coiled-coil, which is a defining structural feature of other T3SS tip proteins as well. Using NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement, we have identified a specific region on the SipD coiled-coil that interacts directly with PrgI. We present a model of how SipD might dock at the tip of the needle based on our paramagnetic relaxation enhancement results, thus offering new insight about the mechanism of assembly of the T3SS needle apparatus. PMID:21138848

  17. Protein and energy intake during weaning. III. Effects on plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, I; Borulf, S; Abildskov, K; Heird, W; Räihä, N

    1988-01-01

    Preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations were measured at 5 and 6 months of age in 30 healthy term infants who were either breast-fed ad libitum or fed one of two different formulas (1.9 g of protein per 100 ml with a whey:casein ratio of 50:50; 2.9 g of protein per 100 ml with a whey:casein ratio of 20:80) ad libitum, plus the same supplementary food regimen. The mean plasma concentrations of total amino acids and especially total essential amino acids were higher in the formula-fed infants. Those fed formula also had plasma concentrations of methionine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, leucine, valine, threonine, aspartate, proline, lysine, tyrosine, histidine that exceeded plasma concentrations of breast-fed infants by 2 or more standard deviations. Concentrations of arginine, glutamic acid, glutamine, ornithine, serine, cystine did not differ and taurine was higher in the breast-fed infants. The data indicate that formulas in common use today during weaning (4-6 months) provide excessive protein intakes when compared to the breast-fed control infants. A lowering of protein concentration and a further manipulation of the whey:casein ratio is necessary if plasma amino acid patterns similar to those found in breast-fed infants is to be achieved with artificial feeding.

  18. Production of dengue virus envelope protein domain III-based antigens in tobacco chloroplasts using inducible and constitutive expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gottschamel, Johanna; Lössl, Andreas; Ruf, Stephanie; Wang, Yanliang; Skaugen, Morten; Bock, Ralph; Clarke, Jihong Liu

    2016-07-01

    Dengue fever is a disease in many parts of the tropics and subtropics and about half the world's population is at risk of infection according to the World Health Organization. Dengue is caused by any of the four related dengue virus serotypes DEN-1, -2, -3 and -4, which are transmitted to people by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Currently there is only one vaccine (Dengvaxia(®)) available (limited to a few countries) on the market since 2015 after half a century's intensive efforts. Affordable and accessible vaccines against dengue are hence still urgently needed. The dengue envelop protein domain III (EDIII), which is capable of eliciting serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies, has become the focus for subunit vaccine development. To contribute to the development of an accessible and affordable dengue vaccine, in the current study we have used plant-based vaccine production systems to generate a dengue subunit vaccine candidate in tobacco. Chloroplast genome engineering was applied to express serotype-specific recombinant EDIII proteins in tobacco chloroplasts using both constitutive and ethanol-inducible expression systems. Expression of a tetravalent antigen fusion construct combining EDIII polypeptides from all four serotypes was also attempted. Transplastomic EDIII-expressing tobacco lines were obtained and homoplasmy was verified by Southern blot analysis. Northern blot analyses showed expression of EDIII antigen-encoding genes. EDIII protein accumulation levels varied for the different recombinant EDIII proteins and the different expression systems, and reached between 0.8 and 1.6 % of total cellular protein. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the chloroplast compartment as a production site for an EDIII-based vaccine candidate against dengue fever and presents a Gateway(®) plastid transformation vector for inducible transgene expression. PMID:27116001

  19. Thermodynamic stability of domain III from the envelope protein of flaviviruses and its improvement by molecular design.

    PubMed

    Zidane, Nora; Dussart, Philippe; Bremand, Laetitia; Villani, Maria Elena; Bedouelle, Hugues

    2013-06-01

    The Flavivirus genus includes widespread and severe human pathogens like the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1 to DENV4), yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus. Domain III (ED3) of the viral envelope protein interacts with cell receptors and contains epitopes recognized by virus neutralizing antibodies. Its structural, antigenic and immunogenic properties have been thoroughly studied contrary to its physico-chemical properties. Here, the ED3 domains of the above pathogenic flaviviruses were produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Their thermodynamic stabilities were measured and compared in experiments of unfolding equilibriums, induced with chemicals or heat and monitored through protein fluorescence. A designed ED3 domain, with the consensus sequence of DENV strains from all serotypes, was highly stable. The low stability of the ED3 domain from DENV3 was increased by three changes of residues in the protein core without affecting its reactivity towards DENV-infected human serums. Additional changes showed that the stability of ED3 varied with the DENV3 genotype. The T(m) of ED3 was higher than 69°C for all the tested viruses and reached 86°C for the consensus ED3. The latter, deprived of its disulfide bond by mutations, was predominantly unfolded at 20°C. These results will help better understand and design the properties of ED3 for its use as diagnostic, vaccine or therapeutic tools.

  20. Structural and Functional Similarity between the Bacterial Type III Secretion System Needle Protein PrgI and the Eukaryotic Apoptosis Bcl-2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Powers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional similarity is challenging to identify when global sequence and structure similarity is low. Active-sites or functionally relevant regions are evolutionarily more stable relative to the remainder of a protein structure and provide an alternative means to identify potential functional similarity between proteins. We recently developed the FAST-NMR methodology to discover biochemical functions or functional hypotheses of proteins of unknown function by experimentally identifying ligand binding sites. FAST-NMR utilizes our CPASS software and database to assign a function based on a similarity in the structure and sequence of ligand binding sites between proteins of known and unknown function. Methodology/Principal Findings The PrgI protein from Salmonella typhimurium forms the needle complex in the type III secretion system (T3SS). A FAST-NMR screen identified a similarity between the ligand binding sites of PrgI and the Bcl-2 apoptosis protein Bcl-xL. These ligand binding sites correlate with known protein-protein binding interfaces required for oligomerization. Both proteins form membrane pores through this oligomerization to release effector proteins to stimulate cell death. Structural analysis indicates an overlap between the PrgI structure and the pore forming motif of Bcl-xL. A sequence alignment indicates conservation between the PrgI and Bcl-xL ligand binding sites and pore formation regions. This active-site similarity was then used to verify that chelerythrine, a known Bcl-xL inhibitor, also binds PrgI. Conclusions/Significance A structural and functional relationship between the bacterial T3SS and eukaryotic apoptosis was identified using our FAST-NMR ligand affinity screen in combination with a bioinformatic analysis based on our CPASS program. A similarity between PrgI and Bcl-xL is not readily apparent using traditional global sequence and structure analysis, but was only identified because of conservation in ligand binding sites

  1. Synthesis, molecular structure, theoretical calculation, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxic activity of manganese(III) complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline.

    PubMed

    Thamilarasan, V; Sengottuvelan, N; Sudha, A; Srinivasan, P; Siva, A

    2015-01-01

    Manganese(III) complex (1) [Mn(8-hq)3] (where 8-hq=8-hydroxyquinoline) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental, spectral (UV-vis, FT-IR) and thermal analysis. The structure of complex (1) has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and the configuration around manganese(III) ion was elongated octahedral coordination geometry. Density functional theory calculations were performed for ligand and its complex. Binding studies of ligand and complex 1 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. Absorption spectral studies revealed that ligand and complex 1 binds to DNA groove and its intrinsic binding strength has been found to be 2.57×10(4) and 2.91×10(4)M(-1). A molecular docking study confirm that the complex 1 is a minor groove binder and was stabilized through hydrogen bonding interactions. Complex 1 exhibits a good binding propensity to bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The in vitro cytotoxicity study of complex 1 on breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) indicate that it has the potential to act as effective anticancer drug, with IC50 values of 3.25μM. The ligand and its complex have been screened for antimicrobial activities and the complex showed better antimicrobial activity than the free ligand.

  2. New Light on NO Bonding in Fe(III) Heme Proteins from Resonance Raman Spectroscopy and DFT Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Olson, John S.; Czernuszewicz, Roman S.; Spiro, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Visible and ultraviolet resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for FeIII(NO) adducts of myoglobin variants with altered polarity in the distal heme pockets. The stretching frequencies of the FeIII–NO and N–O bonds, νFeN and νNO, are negatively correlated, consistent with backbonding. However, the correlation shifts to lower νNO for variants lacking a distal histidine. DFT modeling reproduces the shifted correlations, and shows the shift to be associated with the loss of a lone-pair donor interaction from the distal histidine that selectively strengthens the N–O bond. However, when the model contains strongly electron-withdrawing substituents at the heme β-positions, νFeN and νNO become positively correlated. This effect results from FeIII–N–O bending, which is induced by lone pair donation to the NNO atom. Other mechanisms for bending are discussed, which likewise lead to a positive νFeN/νNO correlation, including thiolate ligation in heme proteins and electron-donating meso-substituents in heme models. The νFeN/νNO data for the Fe(III) complexes are reporters of heme pocket polarity and the accessibility of lone pair, Lewis base donors. Implications for biologically important processes, including NO binding, reductive nitrosylation and NO reduction, are discussed. PMID:20218710

  3. Mechanism for Adhesion G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR56-Mediated RhoA Activation Induced By Collagen III Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Rong; Jeong, Sung-Jin; Yang, Annie; Wen, Miaoyun; Saslowsky, David E.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Araç, Demet; Piao, Xianhua

    2014-01-01

    GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Despite the importance of GPR56 in brain development, where mutations cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP), the signaling mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. Like many other adhesion GPCRs, GPR56 is cleaved via a GPCR autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN) domain into N- and C-terminal fragments (GPR56N and GPR56C); however, the biological significance of this cleavage is elusive. Taking advantage of the recent identification of a GPR56 ligand and the presence of BFPP-associated mutations, we investigated the molecular mechanism of GPR56 signaling. We demonstrate that ligand binding releases GPR56N from the membrane-bound GPR56C and triggers the association of GPR56C with lipid rafts and RhoA activation. Furthermore, one of the BFPP-associated mutations, L640R, does not affect collagen III-induced lipid raft association of GPR56. Instead, it specifically abolishes collagen III-mediated RhoA activation. Together, these findings reveal a novel signaling mechanism that may apply to other members of the adhesion GPCR family. PMID:24949629

  4. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  5. β-III spectrin underpins ankyrin R function in Purkinje cell dendritic trees: protein complex critical for sodium channel activity is impaired by SCA5-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Yvonne L; Perkins, Emma M; Cairncross, Callum J; Lyndon, Alastair R; Skehel, Paul A; Jackson, Mandy

    2014-07-15

    Beta III spectrin is present throughout the elaborate dendritic tree of cerebellar Purkinje cells and is required for normal neuronal morphology and cell survival. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5) and spectrin associated autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 are human neurodegenerative diseases involving progressive gait ataxia and cerebellar atrophy. Both disorders appear to result from loss of β-III spectrin function. Further elucidation of β-III spectrin function is therefore needed to understand disease mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic options. Here, we report that β-III spectrin is essential for the recruitment and maintenance of ankyrin R at the plasma membrane of Purkinje cell dendrites. Two SCA5-associated mutations of β-III spectrin both reduce ankyrin R levels at the cell membrane. Moreover, a wild-type β-III spectrin/ankyrin-R complex increases sodium channel levels and activity in cell culture, whereas mutant β-III spectrin complexes fail to enhance sodium currents. This suggests impaired ability to form stable complexes between the adaptor protein ankyrin R and its interacting partners in the Purkinje cell dendritic tree is a key mechanism by which mutant forms of β-III spectrin cause ataxia, initially by Purkinje cell dysfunction and exacerbated by subsequent cell death. PMID:24603075

  6. Synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) as novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jia; Zhu, Di-Di; Li, Zi-Lin; Sun, Juan; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2011-08-01

    A series of novel cinnamic acid secnidazole ester derivatives have been designed and synthesized, and their biological activities were also evaluated as potential inhibitors of FabH. These compounds were assayed for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Compounds with potent antibacterial activities were tested for their E. coli FabH inhibitory activity. Compound 3n showed the most potent antibacterial activity with MIC of 1.56-6.25 μg/mL against the tested bacterial strains and exhibited the most potent E. coli FabH inhibitory activity with IC₅₀ of 2.5 μM. Docking simulation was performed to position compound 3n into the E. coli FabH active site to determine the probable binding conformation. PMID:21741250

  7. Maternal immunization of mice with group B streptococcal type III polysaccharide-beta C protein conjugate elicits protective antibody to multiple serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Madoff, L C; Paoletti, L C; Tai, J Y; Kasper, D L

    1994-01-01

    Group B streptococcal infection is a major cause of neonatal mortality. Antibody to the capsular polysaccharide protects against invasive neonatal disease, but immunization with capsular polysaccharides fails to elicit protective antibody in many recipients. Conjugation of the polysaccharide to tetanus toxoid has been shown to increase immune response to the polysaccharide. In animal models, C proteins of group B streptococci are also protective determinants. We examined the ability of the beta C protein to serve in the dual role of carrier for the polysaccharide and protective immunogen. Type III polysaccharide was covalently coupled to beta C protein by reductive amination. Immunization of rabbits with the polysaccharide-protein conjugate elicited high titers of antibody to both components, and the serum induced opsonophagocytic killing of type III, Ia/C, and Ib/C strains of group B streptococci. Female mice were immunized with the conjugate vaccine and then bred; 93% of neonatal pups born to these dams vaccinated with conjugate survived type III group B streptococcal challenge and 76% survived type Ia/C challenge, compared with 3% and 8% survival, respectively, in controls (P < 0.001). The beta C protein acted as an effective carrier for the type III polysaccharide while simultaneously induced protective immunity against beta C protein--containing strains of group B streptococci. Images PMID:7518832

  8. Recombinant West Nile virus envelope protein E and domain III expressed in insect larvae protects mice against West Nile disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Escribano, José M; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2011-02-17

    In this study, West Nile virus (WNV) envelope (rE) protein and its domain III (rDIII) were efficiently expressed in a cost-effective system based on insect larvae as non-fermentative living biofactories. Mice immunized with the partially purified rE or rDIII elicited high antibodies titers that neutralized viral infectivity in cell culture and in suckling mice. All vaccinated animals were fully protected when challenged with neurovirulent WNV NY99. Passive transfer of protective antibodies from immunized mothers to their offspring occurred both by transplacental and lactation routes. These results indicate that the insect-derived antigens tested may constitute potential vaccine candidates to be further evaluated.

  9. A primer on molecular biology for imagers: III. Proteins: structure and function.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Sunil D; Li, King C P

    2004-04-01

    This article along with the first 2 in this series (4,12) completes the discussion on the key molecules and process inside the cell namely, DNA, RNA, and proteins. These 3 articles provide a very basic foundation for understanding molecular biology concepts and summarize some of the work of numerous scientists over the past century. We understand these processes far better now than we did in the past, but clearly this knowledge is by no means complete and a number of basic scientists are working hard to elucidate and understand the fundamental mechanisms that operate within a cell. Genes and gene products work with each other in complex, interconnected pathways, and in perfect harmony to make a functional cell, tissue, and an organism as a whole. There is a lot of cross-talk that happens between different proteins that interact with various other proteins, DNA, and RNA to establish pathways, networks, and molecular systems as a team working to perfection. The past 15 years have seen the rapid development of systems biology approaches. We live in an era that emphasizes multi-disciplinary, cross-functional teams to perform science rather than individual researchers working on the bench on a very specific problem. Global approaches have become more common and the amount of data generated must be managed by trained bioinformatics personnel and large computers. In our subsequent articles, we will discuss these global approaches and the areas of genomics, functional genomics, and proteomics that have revolutionized the way we perform science. PMID:15109017

  10. COX7A2L Is a Mitochondrial Complex III Binding Protein that Stabilizes the III2+IV Supercomplex without Affecting Respirasome Formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; Lobo-Jarne, Teresa; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Bratic, Ana; García-Bartolomé, Alberto; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Cadenas, Susana; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Ugalde, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I, III, and IV associate into a variety of supramolecular structures known as supercomplexes and respirasomes. While COX7A2L was originally described as a supercomplex-specific factor responsible for the dynamic association of complex IV into these structures to adapt MRC function to metabolic variations, this role has been disputed. Here, we further examine the functional significance of COX7A2L in the structural organization of the mammalian respiratory chain. As in the mouse, human COX7A2L binds primarily to free mitochondrial complex III and, to a minor extent, to complex IV to specifically promote the stabilization of the III2+IV supercomplex without affecting respirasome formation. Furthermore, COX7A2L does not affect the biogenesis, stabilization, and function of the individual oxidative phosphorylation complexes. These data show that independent regulatory mechanisms for the biogenesis and turnover of different MRC supercomplex structures co-exist.

  11. COX7A2L Is a Mitochondrial Complex III Binding Protein that Stabilizes the III2+IV Supercomplex without Affecting Respirasome Formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; Lobo-Jarne, Teresa; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Bratic, Ana; García-Bartolomé, Alberto; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Cadenas, Susana; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Ugalde, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I, III, and IV associate into a variety of supramolecular structures known as supercomplexes and respirasomes. While COX7A2L was originally described as a supercomplex-specific factor responsible for the dynamic association of complex IV into these structures to adapt MRC function to metabolic variations, this role has been disputed. Here, we further examine the functional significance of COX7A2L in the structural organization of the mammalian respiratory chain. As in the mouse, human COX7A2L binds primarily to free mitochondrial complex III and, to a minor extent, to complex IV to specifically promote the stabilization of the III2+IV supercomplex without affecting respirasome formation. Furthermore, COX7A2L does not affect the biogenesis, stabilization, and function of the individual oxidative phosphorylation complexes. These data show that independent regulatory mechanisms for the biogenesis and turnover of different MRC supercomplex structures co-exist. PMID:27545886

  12. Cellulose Synthase Complexes: Composition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Live cell imaging has greatly advanced our knowledge on the molecular mechanism by which cellulose is deposited. Both the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton are involved in assuring the proper distribution, organization, and dynamics of cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). This review is an update on the most recent progress on the characterization of the composition, regulation, and trafficking of CSCs. With the newly identified cellulose synthase interactive protein 1 (CSI1) on hand, we begin to unveil the mystery of an intimate relationship between cellulose microfibrils and microtubules. PMID:22639663

  13. Coiled-coil domain of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli type III secreted protein EspD is involved in EspA filament-mediated cell attachment and hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Daniell, S J; Delahay, R M; Shaw, R K; Hartland, E L; Pallen, M J; Booy, F; Ebel, F; Knutton, S; Frankel, G

    2001-06-01

    Many animal and plant pathogens use type III secretion systems to secrete key virulence factors, some directly into the host cell cytosol. However, the basis for such protein translocation has yet to be fully elucidated for any type III secretion system. We have previously shown that in enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli the type III secreted protein EspA is assembled into a filamentous organelle that attaches the bacterium to the plasma membrane of the host cell. Formation of EspA filaments is dependent on expression of another type III secreted protein, EspD. The carboxy terminus of EspD, a protein involved in formation of the translocation pore in the host cell membrane, is predicted to adopt a coiled-coil conformation with 99% probability. Here, we demonstrate EspD-EspD protein interaction using the yeast two-hybrid system and column overlays. Nonconservative triple amino acid substitutions of specific EspD carboxy-terminal residues generated an enteropathogenic E. coli mutant that was attenuated in its ability to induce attaching and effacing lesions on HEp-2 cells. Although the mutation had no effect on EspA filament biosynthesis, it also resulted in reduced binding to and reduced hemolysis of red blood cells. These results segregate, for the first time, functional domains of EspD that control EspA filament length from EspD-mediated cell attachment and pore formation.

  14. Novel fold of VirA, a type III secretion system effector protein from Shigella flexneri

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jamaine; Wang, Jiawei; Tropea, Joseph E.; Zhang, Di; Dauter, Zbigniew; Waugh, David S.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2009-01-28

    VirA, a secreted effector protein from Shigella sp., has been shown to be necessary for its virulence. It was also reported that VirA might be related to papain-like cysteine proteases and cleave {alpha}-tubulin, thus facilitating intracellular spreading. We have now determined the crystal structure of VirA at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution. The shape of the molecule resembles the letter 'V,' with the residues in the N-terminal third of the 45-kDa molecule (some of which are disordered) forming one clearly identifiable domain, and the remainder of the molecule completing the V-like structure. The fold of VirA is unique and does not resemble that of any known protein, including papain, although its N-terminal domain is topologically similar to cysteine protease inhibitors such as stefin B. Analysis of the sequence conservation between VirA and its Escherichia coli homologs EspG and EspG2 did not result in identification of any putative protease-like active site, leaving open a possibility that the biological function of VirA in Shigella virulence may not involve direct proteolytic activity.

  15. 2.0 Angstrom Structure of Prostaglandin H2 Synthase-1 Reconstituted with a Manganese Porphyrin Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,K.; Selinsky, B.; Loll, P.

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase (EC 1.14.99.1) is a clinically important drug target that catalyzes two key steps in the biosynthesis of the eicosanoid hormones. The enzyme contains spatially distinct cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites, both of which require a heme cofactor. Substitution of ferric heme by Mn{sup III} protoporphyrin IX greatly diminishes the peroxidase activity, but has little effect on the cyclooxygenase activity. Here, the 2.0 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of the Mn{sup III} form of ovine prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase-1 is described (R = 21.8%, R{sub free} = 23.7%). Substitution of Mn{sup III} for Fe{sup III} causes no structural perturbations in the protein. However, the out-of-plane displacement of the manganese ion with respect to the porphyrin is greater than that of the iron by approximately 0.2 Angstroms. This perturbation may help to explain the altered catalytic properties of the manganese enzyme.

  16. NMR characterization of the interaction of the Salmonella type III secretion system protein SipD and bile salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Nordhues, Bryce A; Zhong, Dalian; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2010-05-18

    Salmonella and Shigella bacteria require the type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence proteins into their hosts and initiate infections. The tip proteins SipD and IpaD are critical components of the Salmonella and Shigella T3SS, respectively. Recently, SipD and IpaD have been shown to interact with bile salts, which are enriched in the intestines, and are hypothesized to act as environmental sensors for these enteric pathogens. Bile salts activate the Shigella T3SS but repress the Salmonella T3SS, and the mechanism of this differing response to bile salts is poorly understood. Further, how SipD binds to bile salts is currently unknown. Computer modeling predicted that IpaD binds the bile salt deoxycholate in a cleft formed by the N-terminal domain and the long central coiled coil of IpaD. Here, we used NMR methods to determine which SipD residues are affected by the interaction with the bile salts deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxcholate. The bile salts perturbed nearly the same set of SipD residues; however, the largest chemical shift perturbations occurred away from what was predicted for the bile salt binding site in IpaD. Our NMR results indicate that that bile salt interaction of SipD will be different from what was predicted for IpaD, suggesting a possible mechanism for the differing response of Salmonella and Shigella to bile salts.

  17. THI1, a Thiamine Thiazole Synthase, Interacts with Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK33 and Modulates the S-Type Anion Channels and Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Long; Wang, Mei; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Chen, Dong-Hua; Lv, Hong-Jun; Shen, Jian-Lin; Qiao, Zhu; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thiamine is required for both plant growth and development. Here, the involvement of a thiamine thiazole synthase, THI1, has been demonstrated in both guard cell abscisic acid (ABA) signaling and the drought response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). THI1 overexpressors proved to be more sensitive to ABA than the wild type with respect to both the activation of guard cell slow type anion channels and stomatal closure; this effectively reduced the rate of water loss from the plant and thereby enhanced its level of drought tolerance. A yeast two-hybrid strategy was used to screen a cDNA library from epidermal strips of leaves for THI1 regulatory factors, and identified CPK33, a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase, as interactor with THI1 in a plasma membrane-delimited manner. Loss-of-function cpk33 mutants were hypersensitive to ABA activation of slow type anion channels and ABA-induced stomatal closure, while the CPK33 overexpression lines showed opposite phenotypes. CPK33 kinase activity was essential for ABA-induced stomatal closure. Consistent with their contrasting regulatory role over stomatal closure, THI1 suppressed CPK33 kinase activity in vitro. Together, our data reveal a novel regulatory role of thiamine thiazole synthase to kinase activity in guard cell signaling. PMID:26662273

  18. Observing single FoF1-ATP synthase at work using an improved fluorescent protein mNeonGreen as FRET donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkamp, Thomas; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the universal chemical energy currency for cellular activities provided mainly by the membrane enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase in bacteria, chloroplasts and mitochondria. Synthesis of ATP is accompanied by subunit rotation within the enzyme. Over the past 15 years we have developed a variety of single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments to monitor catalytic action of individual bacterial enzymes in vitro. By specifically labeling rotating and static subunits within a single enzyme we were able to observe three-stepped rotation in the F1 motor, ten-stepped rotation in the Fo motor and transient elastic deformation of the connected rotor subunits. However, the spatial and temporal resolution of motor activities measured by smFRET were limited by the photophysics of the FRET fluorophores. Here we evaluate the novel FRET donor mNeonGreen as a fusion to FoF1-ATP synthase and compare it to the previously used fluorophore EGFP. Topics of this manuscript are the biochemical purification procedures and the activity measurements of the fully functional mutant enzyme.

  19. Essential role of the donor acyl carrier protein in stereoselective chain translocation to a fully reducing module of the nanchangmycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E

    2012-01-31

    Incubation of recombinant module 2 of the polyether nanchangmycin synthase (NANS), carrying an appended thioesterase domain, with the ACP-bound substrate (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-NANS_ACP1 (2-ACP1) and methylmalonyl-CoA in the presence of NADPH gave diastereomerically pure (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (4a). These results contrast with the previously reported weak discrimination by NANS module 2+TE between the enantiomers of the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine-conjugated substrate analogue (±)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-SNAC (2-SNAC), which resulted in formation of a 5:3 mixture of 4a and its (2S,4S)-diastereomer 4b. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with 2-ACP1 in the absence of NADPH gave unreduced 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (3) with a k(cat) of 4.4 ± 0.9 min⁻¹ and a k(cat)/K(m) of 67 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹, corresponding to a ∼2300-fold increase compared to the k(cat)/K(m) for the diffusive substrate 2-SNAC. Covalent tethering of the 2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl thioester substrate to the NANS ACP1 domain derived from the natural upstream PKS module of the nanchangmycin synthase significantly enhanced both the stereospecificity and the kinetic efficiency of the sequential polyketide chain translocation and condensation reactions catalyzed by the ketosynthase domain of NANS module 2. PMID:22229794

  20. Mitochondrial citrate synthase crystals: novel finding in Sengers syndrome caused by acylglycerol kinase (AGK) mutations.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Komudi; Mackay, Nevena; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Kantor, Paul F; Ackerley, Cameron; Robinson, Brian H; Schulze, Andreas; Cameron, Jessie M

    2013-01-01

    We report on two families with Sengers syndrome and mutations in the acylglycerol kinase gene (AGK). In the first family, two brothers presented with vascular strokes, lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy and cataracts, abnormal muscle cell histopathology and mitochondrial function. One proband had very abnormal mitochondria with citrate synthase crystals visible in electron micrographs, associated with markedly high citrate synthase activity. Exome sequencing was used to identify mutations in the AGK gene in the index patient. Targeted sequencing confirmed the same homozygous mutation (c.3G>A, p.M1I) in the brother. The second family had four affected members, of which we examined two. They also presented with similar clinical symptoms, but no strokes. Postmortem heart and skeletal muscle tissues showed low complex I, III and IV activities in the heart, but normal in the muscle. Skin fibroblasts showed elevated lactate/pyruvate ratios and low complex I+III activity. Targeted sequencing led to identification of a homozygous c.979A>T, p.K327* mutation. AGK is located in the mitochondria and phosphorylates monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol to lysophosphatidic acid and phosphatidic acid. Disruption of these signaling molecules affects the mitochondria's response to superoxide radicals, resulting in oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA, lipids and proteins, and stimulation of cellular detoxification pathways. High levels of manganese superoxide dismutase protein were detected in all four affected individuals, consistent with increased free radical damage. Phosphatidic acid is also involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and its loss will result in changes to the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane. These effects manifest as cataract formation in the eye, respiratory chain dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in heart tissue. These two pedigrees confirm that mutation of AGK is responsible for the severe neonatal presentation of Sengers syndrome. The

  1. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Poggianella, Monica; Slon Campos, José L; Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  2. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Bestagno, Marco; Ooi, Eng Eong; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII) of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE) in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well. PMID:26218926

  3. The type III effector HopF2Pto targets Arabidopsis RIN4 protein to promote Pseudomonas syringae virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, Mike; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Elmore, James; Felsensteiner, Corinna; Coaker, Gitta; Desveaux, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    Plant immunity can be induced by two major classes of pathogen-associated molecules. Pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs or MAMPs) are conserved molecular components of microbes that serve as “non-self” features to induce PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Pathogen effector proteins used to promote virulence can also be recognized as “non-self” features or induce a “modified-self” state that can induce effector-triggered immunity (ETI). The Arabidopsis protein RIN4 plays an important role in both branches of plant immunity. Three unrelated type III secretion effector (TTSE) proteins from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2, and AvrB, target RIN4, resulting in ETI that effectively restricts pathogen growth. However, no pathogenic advantage has been demonstrated for RIN4 manipulation by these TTSEs. Here, we show that the TTSE HopF2Pto also targets Arabidopsis RIN4. Transgenic plants conditionally expressing HopF2Pto were compromised for AvrRpt2-induced RIN4 modification and associated ETI. HopF2Pto interfered with AvrRpt2-induced RIN4 modification in vitro but not with AvrRpt2 activation, suggestive of RIN4 targeting by HopF2Pto. In support of this hypothesis, HopF2Pto interacted with RIN4 in vitro and in vivo. Unlike AvrRpm1, AvrRpt2, and AvrB, HopF2Pto did not induce ETI and instead promoted P. syringae growth in Arabidopsis. This virulence activity was not observed in plants genetically lacking RIN4. These data provide evidence that RIN4 is a major virulence target of HopF2Pto and that a pathogenic advantage can be conveyed by TTSEs that target RIN4. PMID:20133879

  4. Inhibition of a type III secretion system by the deletion of a short loop in one of its membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Meshcheryakov, Vladimir A.; Kitao, Akio; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2013-05-01

    Crystal structures of the cytoplasmic domain of FlhB from S. typhimurium and A. aeolicus were solved at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. The deletion of a short loop in the cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella FlhB completely abolishes secretion by the type III secretion system. A molecular-dynamics simulation shows that the deletion of the loop affects the flexibility of a linker between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. The membrane protein FlhB is a highly conserved component of the flagellar secretion system. It is composed of an N-terminal transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (FlhB{sub C}). Here, the crystal structures of FlhB{sub C} from Salmonella typhimurium and Aquifex aeolicus are described at 2.45 and 2.55 Å resolution, respectively. These flagellar FlhB{sub C} structures are similar to those of paralogues from the needle type III secretion system, with the major difference being in a linker that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of FlhB. It was found that deletion of a short flexible loop in a globular part of Salmonella FlhB{sub C} leads to complete inhibition of secretion by the flagellar secretion system. Molecular-dynamics calculations demonstrate that the linker region is the most flexible part of FlhB{sub C} and that the deletion of the loop reduces this flexibility. These results are in good agreement with previous studies showing the importance of the linker in the function of FlhB and provide new insight into the relationship between the different parts of the FlhB{sub C} molecule.

  5. Distribution of chromium species in a Cr-polluted soil: presence of Cr(III) in glomalin related protein fraction.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, María L; Ferri, Alejandro; Cornejo, Pablo; Gomez, Elena

    2014-09-15

    The accumulation of Cr in soil could be highly toxic to human health; therefore Cr soil distribution was studied in rhizosphere soils from Ricinus communis and Conium maculatum and bare soil (BS) from an industrial and urban area in Argentina. Total Cr, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) concentrations were determined in 3 soil fractions: total, extractable and associated to total-glomalin-related protein (T-GRSP). BS had the highest total Cr and total Cr(VI) concentrations. Total Cr(VI) concentration from both rhizosphere soils did not differ from the allowed value for residential area in Argentina (8 μg Cr(VI) g(-1) soil), while total Cr(VI) in BS was 1.8 times higher. Total Cr concentration in all the soils was higher than the allowed value (250 μg Cr g(-1) soil). Extractable and associated to T-GRSP Cr(VI) concentrations were below the detection limit. Cr(III) bound to T-GRSP was the highest in the BS. These findings are in agreement with a long term effect of glomalin in sequestrating Cr. In both plant species, total Cr was higher in root than in shoot and both species presented arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). As far as we know, this is the first study that reports the presence of Cr in T-GRSP fraction of soil organic matter. These findings suggest that Cr mycorrhizostabilization could be a predominant mechanism used by R. communis and C. maculatum to diminish Cr soil concentration. Nevertheless, further research is needed to clarify the contribution of native AMF isolated from R. communis and C. maculatum rhizosphere to the Cr phytoremediation process.

  6. Effect of Protein Incorporation on the Nanostructure of the Bicontinuous Microemulsion Phase of Winsor-III Systems: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Douglas G.; Gomez del Rio, Javier A.; Ye, Ran; Urban, Volker S.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O’Neill, Hugh M.

    2015-01-20

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis using the Teubner₋Strey model has been employed to evaluate the effect of protein incorporation into the middle, bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) phase of Winsor-III (WIII) systems formed by an aerosol-OT (AOT)/alkyl ethoxylate mixed surfactant system to understand better the extraction of proteins into and out of BμEs and to study the effect of proteins on a system that serves as a biomimetic analog of cell membranes. Under conditions of high salinity, the incorporation of positively charged proteins cytochrome c, lysozyme, and α-chymotrypsin, near their solubilization limit in the BμEs promoted the release of water and oil from the BμEs, a decrease in the quasi-periodic repeat distance (d), an increase in ordering (a decrease in the amphiphilicity factor, fa) for the surfactant monolayers, and a decrease in the surface area per surfactant headgroup, suggesting that the proteins affected the self-assembly of components in the BμE phase and produced Debye shielding of AOTs sulfonate headgroup. For WIII systems possessing lower salinity, cytochrome c reduced the efficiency of surfactant in the BμE phase, noted by increases in d and fa, suggesting that the enzyme and AOT underwent ion pairing. We find that the results of this study demonstrate the importance of ionic strength to modulate proteinsurfactant interactions, which in turn will control the release of proteins encapsulated in the BμEs, relevant to WIII-based protein extraction and controlled release from BμE delivery systems, and demonstrate the utility of BμEs as a model system to understand the effect of proteins on biomembranes.

  7. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) turnover by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) activity: novel mechanism for Pin1 to protect against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Suk Ling; Pastorino, Lucia; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of senile plaques of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides derived from amyloid precursor protein (APP) and neurofibrillary tangles made of hyperphosphorylated Tau. Increasing APP gene dosage or expression has been shown to cause familial early-onset AD. However, whether and how protein stability of APP is regulated is unclear. The prolyl isomerase Pin1 and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) have been shown to have the opposite effects on APP processing and Tau hyperphosphorylation, relevant to the pathogenesis of AD. However, nothing is known about their relationship. In this study, we found that Pin1 binds to the pT330-P motif in GSK3β to inhibit its kinase activity. Furthermore, Pin1 promotes protein turnover of APP by inhibiting GSK3β activity. A point mutation either at Thr-330, the Pin1-binding site in GSK3β, or at Thr-668, the GSK3β phosphorylation site in APP, abolished the regulation of GSK3β activity, Thr-668 phosphorylation, and APP stability by Pin1, resulting in reduced non-amyloidogenic APP processing and increased APP levels. These results uncover a novel role of Pin1 in inhibiting GSK3β kinase activity to reduce APP protein levels, providing a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Pin1 protects against Alzheimer disease.

  8. Attenuation of the hypoxia-induced protein kinase Cdelta interaction with the 'd' subunit of F1Fo-ATP synthase in neonatal cardiac myocytes: implications for energy preservation and survival.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tiffany T; Ogbi, Mourad; Yu, Qilin; Johnson, John A

    2010-07-15

    The F1Fo-ATP synthase provides most of the heart's energy, yet events that alter its function during injury are poorly understood. Recently, we described a potent inhibitory effect on F1Fo-ATP synthase function mediated by the interaction of PKCdelta (protein kinase Cdelta) with dF1Fo ('d' subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase/ATP synthase). We have now developed novel peptide modulators which facilitate or inhibit the PKCdelta-dF1Fo interaction. These peptides include HIV-Tat (transactivator of transcription) protein transduction and mammalian mitochondrial-targeting sequences. Pre-incubation of NCMs (neonatal cardiac myocyte) with 10 nM extracellular concentrations of the mitochondrial-targeted PKCdelta-dF1Fo interaction inhibitor decreased Hx (hypoxia)-induced co-IP (co-immunoprecipitation) of PKCdelta with dF1Fo by 40+/-9%, abolished Hx-induced inhibition of F1Fo-ATPase activity, attenuated Hx-induced losses in F1Fo-derived ATP and protected against Hx- and reperfusion-induced cell death. A scrambled-sequence (inactive) peptide, which contained HIV-Tat and mitochondrial-targeting sequences, was without effect. In contrast, the cell-permeant mitochondrial-targeted PKCdelta-dF1Fo facilitator peptide, which we have shown previously to induce the PKCdelta-dF1Fo co-IP, was found to inhibit F1Fo-ATPase activity to an extent similar to that caused by Hx alone. The PKCdelta-dF1Fo facilitator peptide also decreased ATP levels by 72+/-18% under hypoxic conditions in the presence of glycolytic inhibition. None of the PKCdelta-dF1Fo modulatory peptides altered the inner mitochondrial membrane potential. Our studies provide the first evidence that disruption of the PKCdelta-dF1Fo interaction using cell-permeant mitochondrial-targeted peptides attenuates cardiac injury resulting from prolonged oxygen deprivation.

  9. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  10. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  11. Type- and Subcomplex-Specific Neutralizing Antibodies against Domain III of Dengue Virus Type 2 Envelope Protein Recognize Adjacent Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Austin, S. Kyle; Purtha, Whitney E.; Oliphant, Theodore; Nybakken, Grant E.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Roehrig, John T.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Barrett, Alan D.; Fremont, Daved H.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Neutralization of flaviviruses in vivo correlates with the development of an antibody response against the viral envelope (E) protein. Previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against an epitope on the lateral ridge of domain III (DIII) of the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein strongly protect against infection in animals. Based on X-ray crystallography and sequence analysis, an analogous type-specific neutralizing epitope for individual serotypes of the related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) was hypothesized. Using yeast surface display of DIII variants, we defined contact residues of a panel of type-specific, subcomplex-specific, and cross-reactive MAbs that recognize DIII of DENV type 2 (DENV-2) and have different neutralizing potentials. Type-specific MAbs with neutralizing activity against DENV-2 localized to a sequence-unique epitope on the lateral ridge of DIII, centered at the FG loop near residues E383 and P384, analogous in position to that observed with WNV-specific strongly neutralizing MAbs. Subcomplex-specific MAbs that bound some but not all DENV serotypes and neutralized DENV-2 infection recognized an adjacent epitope centered on the connecting A strand of DIII at residues K305, K307, and K310. In contrast, several MAbs that had poor neutralizing activity against DENV-2 and cross-reacted with all DENV serotypes and other flaviviruses recognized an epitope with residues in the AB loop of DIII, a conserved region that is predicted to have limited accessibility on the mature virion. Overall, our experiments define adjacent and structurally distinct epitopes on DIII of DENV-2 which elicit type-specific, subcomplex-specific, and cross-reactive antibodies with different neutralizing potentials. PMID:17881453

  12. Type- and subcomplex-specific neutralizing antibodies against domain III of dengue virus type 2 envelope protein recognize adjacent epitopes.

    PubMed

    Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Austin, S Kyle; Purtha, Whitney E; Oliphant, Theodore; Nybakken, Grant E; Schlesinger, Jacob J; Roehrig, John T; Gromowski, Gregory D; Barrett, Alan D; Fremont, Daved H; Diamond, Michael S

    2007-12-01

    Neutralization of flaviviruses in vivo correlates with the development of an antibody response against the viral envelope (E) protein. Previous studies demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against an epitope on the lateral ridge of domain III (DIII) of the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein strongly protect against infection in animals. Based on X-ray crystallography and sequence analysis, an analogous type-specific neutralizing epitope for individual serotypes of the related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) was hypothesized. Using yeast surface display of DIII variants, we defined contact residues of a panel of type-specific, subcomplex-specific, and cross-reactive MAbs that recognize DIII of DENV type 2 (DENV-2) and have different neutralizing potentials. Type-specific MAbs with neutralizing activity against DENV-2 localized to a sequence-unique epitope on the lateral ridge of DIII, centered at the FG loop near residues E383 and P384, analogous in position to that observed with WNV-specific strongly neutralizing MAbs. Subcomplex-specific MAbs that bound some but not all DENV serotypes and neutralized DENV-2 infection recognized an adjacent epitope centered on the connecting A strand of DIII at residues K305, K307, and K310. In contrast, several MAbs that had poor neutralizing activity against DENV-2 and cross-reacted with all DENV serotypes and other flaviviruses recognized an epitope with residues in the AB loop of DIII, a conserved region that is predicted to have limited accessibility on the mature virion. Overall, our experiments define adjacent and structurally distinct epitopes on DIII of DENV-2 which elicit type-specific, subcomplex-specific, and cross-reactive antibodies with different neutralizing potentials.

  13. Use of envelope domain III protein for detection and differentiation of flaviviruses in the Free State Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mathengtheng, Lehlohonolo; Burt, Felicity J

    2014-04-01

    The presence of the mosquito-borne flavivirus species West Nile virus (WNV) and Wesselsbron virus (WESSV) in southern Africa is well established; however, their true prevalence remains unknown. To date, the presence of tick-borne flaviviruses has not been confirmed in this region. Serological assays using reagents that can be handled in a biosafety level 2 or lower facility were developed and evaluated for the detection and differentiation of tick- and mosquito-borne flaviviruses in the Free State province of South Africa. A total of 2393 serum samples from a variety of species including humans, cattle, and sheep were tested using Kunjin virus (KUNV) cell lysate antigen for the detection of anti-flavivirus antibodies in an indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immonosorbent assay (ELISA). To further differentiate positive reactors on the KUNV assay for antibodies against tick- or mosquito-borne flaviviruses, recombinant envelope domain III (r-EDIII) proteins of Langat virus (LGTV), WNV, and WESSV were expressed in a bacterial expression system and used in ELISA. A total of 722 samples were positive using the KUNV assay, of which 71, 457, and 431 were positive using the r-LGTVEDIII, r-WNVEDIII, and r-WESSVEDIII assays, respectively. A total of 70 samples were reactive using the KUNV assay but not using any of the other assays, suggesting that there are possibly other flaviviruses circulating in the Free State province for which specific r-EDIII assays were not available. Collectively, the results suggest a strong presence of flaviviruses co-circulating in the Free State province with an abundance of mosquito-borne flaviviruses. There is evidence suggesting the presence of tick-borne flaviviruses, but it has yet to be confirmed. The EDIII protein is a useful tool that can be used in the detection and differentiation of flaviviruses in resource-limited laboratories, but virus neutralization assays are suggested for accurate confirmation of results. PMID

  14. A novel fusion protein domain III-capsid from dengue-2, in a highly aggregated form, induces a functional immune response and protection in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, Iris; Bernardo, Lidice; Pavon, Alekis; Guzman, Maria G.

    2009-11-25

    Based on the immunogenicity of domain III from the Envelope protein of dengue virus as well as the proven protective capacity of the capsid antigen, we have designed a novel domain III-capsid chimeric protein with the goal of obtaining a molecule potentially able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immunity (CMI). After expression of the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli, the domain III moiety retained its antigenicity as evaluated with anti-dengue sera. In order to explore alternatives for modulating the immunogenicity of the protein, it was mixed with oligodeoxynucleotides in order to obtain particulated aggregates and then immunologically evaluated in mice in comparison with non-aggregated controls. Although the humoral immune response induced by both forms of the protein was equivalent, the aggregated variant resulted in a much stronger CMI as measured by in vitro IFN-gamma secretion and protection experiments, mediated by CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} cells. The present work provides additional evidence in support for a crucial role of CMI in protection against dengue virus and describes a novel vaccine candidate against the disease based on a recombinant protein that can stimulate both arms of the acquired immune system.

  15. A novel method for study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiufen; Zhang, Caihua; Cheng, Jiongjia; Bi, Shuping

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) technique. In neutral Tris-HCl medium, the effect of this aggregation of protein results in the enhancement of RRS intensity and the relationship between the enhancement of the RRS signal and the Al concentration is nonlinear. On this basis, we established a new method for the determination of the critical induced-aggregation concentrations ( CCIAC) of metal ion Al(III) inducing the protein aggregation. Our results show that many factors, such as, pH value, anions, salts, temperature and solvents have obvious effects. We also studied the extent of aggregation and structural changes using ultra-violet spectrometry, protein intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism to further understand the exact mechanisms of the aggregation characteristics of proteins induced by metal ion Al(III) at the molecular level, to help us to develop effective methods to investigate the toxicity of metal ion Al, and to provide theoretical and quantitative evidences for the development of appropriate treatments for neurodementia such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and dementia related to dialysis.

  16. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System

    PubMed Central

    Gawthorne, Jayde A.; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M.; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles. PMID:26921426

  17. InvB is a type III secretion-associated chaperone for the Salmonella enterica effector protein SopE.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ho; Galán, Jorge E

    2003-12-01

    SopE is a bacteriophage-encoded effector protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium that is translocated into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells by a type III secretion system (TTSS) (W.-D. Hardt, H. Urlaub, and J. E. Galán, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:2574-2579, 1998; M. W. Wood, R. Rosqvist, P. B. Mullan, M. H. Edwards, and E. E. Galyov, Mol. Microbiol. 22:327-338, 1996). In this study, we provide evidence that an unlinked gene carried within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), invB (K. Eichelberg, C. Ginocchio, and J. E. Galán, J. Bacteriol. 176:4501-4510, 1994), is required for the secretion of SopE through the SPI-1 TTSS. Furthermore, far-Western blotting analysis shows that SopE directly interacts with InvB through a domain located at its amino terminus. We conclude that InvB is the TTSS-associated chaperone for SopE. PMID:14645290

  18. Intramuscular delivery of a naked DNA plasmid encoding proinsulin and pancreatic regenerating III protein ameliorates type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen-Rui; Xie, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Hong-Jie; Su, Yu-Yong; Lu, Jing-Li; Li, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Xiang, Ming

    2011-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of pancreatic islets and destruction of β cells. Up to now, there is still no cure for this devastating disease and alternative approach should be developed. To explore a novel gene therapy strategy combining immunotherapy and β cell regeneration, we constructed a non-viral plasmid encoding proinsulin (PI) and pancreatic regenerating (Reg) III protein (pReg/PI). Therapeutic potentials of this plasmid for T1DM were investigated. Intramuscular delivery of pReg/PI resulted in a significant reduction in hyperglycemia and diabetes incidence, with an increased insulin contents in the serum of T1DM mice model induced by STZ. Treatment with pReg/PI also restored the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines and expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells, which may attribute to the establishment of self-immune tolerance. Additionally, in comparison to the mice treated with empty vector pBudCE4.1 (pBud), attenuated insulitis and apoptosis achieved by inhibiting activation of NF-κB in the pancreas of pReg/PI treated mice were observed. In summary, these results indicate that intramuscular delivery of pReg/PI distinctly ameliorated STZ-induced T1DM by reconstructing the immunological self-tolerance and promoting the regeneration of β cells, which might be served as a promising candidate for the gene therapy of T1DM.

  19. Optimization of immobilized gallium (III) ion affinity chromatography for selective binding and recovery of phosphopeptides from protein digests.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Olson, Douglas J H; Ross, Andrew R S

    2008-12-01

    Although widely used in proteomics research for the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides from protein digests, immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) often suffers from low specificity and differential recovery of peptides carrying different numbers of phosphate groups. By systematically evaluating and optimizing different loading, washing, and elution conditions, we have developed an efficient and highly selective procedure for the enrichment of phosphopeptides using a commercially available gallium(III)-IMAC column (PhosphoProfile, Sigma). Phosphopeptide enrichment using the reagents supplied with the column is incomplete and biased toward the recovery and/or detection of smaller, singly phosphorylated peptides. In contrast, elution with base (0.4 M ammonium hydroxide) gives efficient and balanced recovery of both singly and multiply phosphorylated peptides, while loading peptides in a strong acidic solution (1% trifluoracetic acid) further increases selectivity toward phosphopeptides, with minimal carryover of nonphosphorylated peptides. 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid, a matrix commonly used when analyzing phosphopeptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry was also evaluated as an additive in loading and eluting solvents. Elution with 50% acetonitrile containing 20 mg/mL dihydroxybenzoic acid and 1% phosphoric acid gave results similar to those obtained using ammonium hydroxide as the eluent, although the latter showed the highest specificity for phosphorylated peptides. PMID:19183793

  20. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: an unusual riboflavin synthase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, S; Korn, S; Lottspeich, F; Bacher, A

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase was purified by a factor of about 1,500 from cell extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. The enzyme had a specific activity of about 2,700 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, which is relatively low compared to those of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Amino acid sequences obtained after proteolytic cleavage had no similarity with known riboflavin synthases. The gene coding for riboflavin synthase (designated ribC) was subsequently cloned by marker rescue with a ribC mutant of Escherichia coli. The ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum specifies a protein of 153 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees with the information gleaned from Edman degradation of the isolated protein and shows 67% identity with the sequence predicted for the unannotated reading frame MJ1184 of Methanococcus jannaschii. The ribC gene is adjacent to a cluster of four genes with similarity to the genes cbiMNQO of Salmonella typhimurium, which form part of the cob operon (this operon contains most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12). The amino acid sequence predicted by the ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum shows no similarity whatsoever to the sequences of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Most notably, the M. thermoautotrophicum protein does not show the internal sequence homology characteristic of eubacterial and yeast riboflavin synthases. The protein of M. thermoautotrophicum can be expressed efficiently in a recombinant E. coli strain. The specific activity of the purified, recombinant protein is 1,900 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C. In contrast to riboflavin synthases from eubacteria and fungi, the methanobacterial enzyme has an absolute requirement for magnesium ions. The 5' phosphate of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine does not act as a substrate. The findings suggest that riboflavin synthase has evolved independently in eubacteria and methanobacteria. PMID:9139911

  1. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase T-786C Mutation, Prothrombin Gene Mutation (G-20210-A) and Protein S Deficiency Could Lead to Myocardial Infarction in a Very Young Male Adult

    PubMed Central

    Klincheva, Milka; Vilarova, Elena Ambarkova; Angjusheva, Tanja; Milev, Ivan; Idoski, Enver; Mitrev, Zan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Myocardial infarction is a rare medical event in young people. The main reasons include congenital coronary abnormalities, coronary artery spasm, and coronary thrombosis due to hypercoagulable states (hereditary and acquired). AIM: We present a case of a young male adult with myocardial infarction caused by a combination of gene mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency. CASE PRESENTATION: A 19 years old young man was admitted to our hospital complaining of chest pain during the last two weeks. The patient did not have any known cardiovascular risk factors, except a positive family anamnesis. Subacute inferior nonST segment myocardial infarction was diagnosed according to the patient’s history, electrocardiographic and laboratory findings. Coronary angiography revealed suboclusive thrombus in the proximal, medial and distal part of the right coronary artery (TIMI 2). Percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. Anticoagulant and antiagregant therapy (heparin, acetilsalicilic acid and clopidogrel) according to protocol was started. The hospital stay was uneventful. Homozygous endothelial nitric oxid synthase (eNOS) T-786-C mutation, heterozygote prothrombin gene mutation (G-20210-A), and protein S deficiency were verified from the thrombophilia testing. Other trombophilic tests were normal. Three months after discharge from hospital another coronary angiography was performed. It revealed normal coronary arteries. Four years after the attack, the patient is free of symptoms and another cardiovascular event. CONCLUSION: Combination of genetic mutations and anticoagulation protein deficiency could be a reasonable cause for myocardial infarction in a very young male adult without any other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27275349

  2. Citrate synthase from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Zinsser, Veronika L; Moore, Catherine M; Hoey, Elizabeth M; Trudgett, Alan; Timson, David J

    2013-06-01

    Citrate synthase catalyses the first step of the Krebs' tricarboxylic acid cycle. A sequence encoding citrate synthase from the common liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, has been cloned. The encoded protein sequence is predicted to fold into a largely α-helical protein with high structural similarity to mammalian citrate synthases. Although a hexahistidine-tagged version of the protein could be expressed in Escherichia coli, it was not possible to purify it by nickel-affinity chromatography. Similar results were obtained with a version of the protein which lacks the putative mitochondrial targeting sequence (residues 1 to 29). However, extracts from bacterial cells expressing this version had additional citrate synthase activity after correcting for the endogenous, bacterial activity. The apparent K m for oxaloacetate was found to be 0.22 mM, which is higher than that observed in mammalian citrate synthases. Overall, the sequence and structure of F. hepatica citrate synthase are similar to ones from other eukaryotes, but there are enzymological differences which merit further investigation.

  3. Membrane localization and topology of leukotriene C4 synthase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Peter; Weber, Brittany M; McKee, Mary; Brown, Dennis; Soberman, Roy J

    2002-08-01

    Leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) synthase conjugates LTA(4) with GSH to form LTC(4). Determining the site of LTC(4) synthesis and the topology of LTC(4) synthase may uncover unappreciated intracellular roles for LTC(4), as well as how LTC(4) is transferred to its export carrier, the multidrug resistance protein-1. We have determined the membrane localization of LTC(4) synthase by immunoelectron microscopy. In contrast to the closely related five-lipoxygenase-activating protein, LTC(4) synthase is distributed in the outer nuclear membrane and peripheral endoplasmic reticulum but is excluded from the inner nuclear membrane. We have combined immunofluorescence with differential membrane permeabilization to determine the topology of LTC(4) synthase. The active site of LTC(4) synthase is localized in the lumen of the nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that the synthesis of LTB(4) and LTC(4) occurs in different subcellular locations and suggests that LTC(4) must be returned to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane for export by multidrug resistance protein-1. The differential localization of two very similar integral membrane proteins suggests that mechanisms other than size-dependent exclusion regulate their passage to the inner nuclear membrane.

  4. SseBCD Proteins Are Secreted by the Type III Secretion System of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 and Function as a Translocon

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Thomas; Deiwick, Jörg; Rappl, Catherine; Freeman, Jeremy A.; Schröder, Werner; Miller, Samuel I.; Hensel, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The type III secretion system encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) is required for systemic infections and intracellular accumulation of Salmonella enterica. This system is induced by intracellular Salmonella and subsequently transfers effector proteins into the host cell. Growth conditions either inducing expression of the type III secretion system or the secretion of substrate proteins were defined. Here we report the identification of a set of substrate proteins consisting of SseB, SseC, and SseD that are secreted by the SPI2 system in vitro. Secretion was observed if bacterial cells were exposed to acidic pH after growth in minimal medium with limitation of Mg2+ or phosphate. SseB, -C, and -D were isolated in a fraction detached from the bacterial cell surface by mechanical shearing, indicating that these proteins are predominantly assembled into complexes on the bacterial cell surface. The three proteins were required for the translocation of SPI2 effector proteins SspH1 and SspH2 into infected host cells. Thus, SseB, SseC, and SseD function as the translocon for effector proteins by intracellular Salmonella. PMID:11567004

  5. Computational design and selections for an engineered, thermostable terpene synthase

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Juan E; Lin, Chun-Shi; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Feld, Birte K; Avrantinis, Sara K; Bronson, Jonathan; Greaves, John; Saven, Jeffery G; Weiss, Gregory A

    2011-01-01

    Terpenoids include structurally diverse antibiotics, flavorings, and fragrances. Engineering terpene synthases for control over the synthesis of such compounds represents a long sought goal. We report computational design, selections, and assays of a thermostable mutant of tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS) for the catalysis of carbocation cyclization reactions at elevated temperatures. Selection for thermostability included proteolytic digestion followed by capture of intact proteins. Unlike the wild-type enzyme, the mutant TEAS retains enzymatic activity at 65°C. The thermostable terpene synthase variant denatures above 80°C, approximately twice the temperature of the wild-type enzyme. PMID:21739507

  6. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    PubMed

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  7. Identification of avian wax synthases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bird species show a high degree of variation in the composition of their preen gland waxes. For instance, galliform birds like chicken contain fatty acid esters of 2,3-alkanediols, while Anseriformes like goose or Strigiformes like barn owl contain wax monoesters in their preen gland secretions. The final biosynthetic step is catalyzed by wax synthases (WS) which have been identified in pro- and eukaryotic organisms. Results Sequence similarities enabled us to identify six cDNAs encoding putative wax synthesizing proteins in chicken and two from barn owl and goose. Expression studies in yeast under in vivo and in vitro conditions showed that three proteins from chicken performed WS activity while a sequence from chicken, goose and barn owl encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing both wax ester and triacylglycerol synthesis. Mono- and bifunctional WS were found to differ in their substrate specificities especially with regard to branched-chain alcohols and acyl-CoA thioesters. According to the expression patterns of their transcripts and the properties of the enzymes, avian WS proteins might not be confined to preen glands. Conclusions We provide direct evidence that avian preen glands possess both monofunctional and bifunctional WS proteins which have different expression patterns and WS activities with different substrate specificities. PMID:22305293

  8. EffectiveDB—updates and novel features for a better annotation of bacterial secreted proteins and Type III, IV, VI secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Valerie; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Platzer, Alexander; Jehl, Marc-André; Arnold, Roland; Rattei, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Protein secretion systems play a key role in the interaction of bacteria and hosts. EffectiveDB (http://effectivedb.org) contains pre-calculated predictions of bacterial secreted proteins and of intact secretion systems. Here we describe a major update of the database, which was previously featured in the NAR Database Issue. EffectiveDB bundles various tools to recognize Type III secretion signals, conserved binding sites of Type III chaperones, Type IV secretion peptides, eukaryotic-like domains and subcellular targeting signals in the host. Beyond the analysis of arbitrary protein sequence collections, the new release of EffectiveDB also provides a ‘genome-mode’, in which protein sequences from nearly complete genomes or metagenomic bins can be screened for the presence of three important secretion systems (Type III, IV, VI). EffectiveDB contains pre-calculated predictions for currently 1677 bacterial genomes from the EggNOG 4.0 database and for additional bacterial genomes from NCBI RefSeq. The new, user-friendly and informative web portal offers a submission tool for running the EffectiveDB prediction tools on user-provided data. PMID:26590402

  9. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  10. Precursor complex structure of pseudouridine synthase TruB suggests coupling of active site perturbations to an RNA-sequestering peripheral protein domain.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Charmaine; Hamilton, Christopher S; Mueller, Eugene G; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2005-08-01

    The pseudouridine synthase TruB is responsible for the universally conserved post-transcriptional modification of residue 55 of elongator tRNAs. In addition to the active site, the "thumb", a peripheral domain unique to the TruB family of enzymes, makes extensive interactions with the substrate. To coordinate RNA binding and release with catalysis, the thumb may be able to sense progress of the reaction in the active site. To establish whether there is a structural correlate of communication between the active site and the RNA-sequestering thumb, we have solved the structure of a catalytically inactive point mutant of TruB in complex with a substrate RNA, and compared it to the previously determined structure of an active TruB bound to a reaction product. Superposition of the two structures shows that they are extremely similar, except in the active site and, intriguingly, in the relative position of the thumb. Because the two structures were solved using isomorphous crystals, and because the thumb is very well ordered in both structures, the displacement of the thumb we observe likely reflects preferential propagation of active site perturbations to this RNA-binding domain. One of the interactions between the active site and the thumb involves an active site residue whose hydrogen-bonding status changes during the reaction. This may allow the peripheral RNA-binding domain to monitor progress of the pseudouridylation reaction.

  11. Localization of Nitric Oxide Synthase-containing Neurons in the Bat Visual Cortex and Co-localization with Calcium-binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ya-Nan; Kim, Hang-Gu; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Microchiroptera (microbats) is a suborder of bats thought to have degenerated vision. However, many recent studies have shown that they have visual ability. In this study, we labeled neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)—the synthesizing enzyme of the gaseous non-synaptic neurotransmitter nitric oxide—and co-localized it with calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the visual cortex of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, a species of microbats). nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were found in all layers of the visual cortex. Intensely labeled neurons were most common in layer IV, and weakly labeled neurons were most common in layer VI. Majority of the nNOS-IR neurons were round- or oval-type neurons; no pyramidal-type neurons were found. None of these neurons co-localized with CB, CR, or PV. However, the synthesis of nitric oxide in the bat visual cortex by nNOS does not depend on CB, CR, or PV. PMID:26379314

  12. Role of NF-kappa B in cell survival and transcription of latent membrane protein 1-expressing or Epstein-Barr virus latency III-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Cahir-McFarland, Ellen D; Carter, Kara; Rosenwald, Andreas; Giltnane, Jena M; Henrickson, Sarah E; Staudt, Louis M; Kieff, Elliott

    2004-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency III infection converts B lymphocytes into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by expressing EBV nuclear and membrane proteins, EBNAs, and latent membrane proteins (LMPs), which regulate transcription through Notch and tumor necrosis factor receptor pathways. The role of NF-kappa B in LMP1 and overall EBV latency III transcriptional effects was investigated by treating LCLs with BAY11-7082 (BAY11). BAY11 rapidly and irreversibly inhibited NF-kappa B, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, induced apoptosis, and altered LCL gene expression. BAY11 effects were similar to those of an NF-kappa B inhibitor, Delta N-I kappa B alpha, in effecting decreased JNK1 expression and in microarray analyses. More than 80% of array elements that decreased with Delta N-I kappa B alpha expression decreased with BAY11 treatment. Newly identified NF-kappa B-induced, LMP1-induced, and EBV-induced genes included pleckstrin, Jun-B, c-FLIP, CIP4, and I kappa B epsilon. Of 776 significantly changed array elements, 134 were fourfold upregulated in EBV latency III, and 74 were fourfold upregulated with LMP1 expression alone, whereas only 28 were more than fourfold downregulated by EBV latency III. EBV latency III-regulated gene products mediate cell migration (EBI2, CCR7, RGS1, RANTES, MIP1 alpha, MIP1 beta, CXCR5, and RGS13), antigen presentation (major histocompatibility complex proteins and JAW1), mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (DUSP5 and p62Dok), and interferon (IFN) signaling (IFN-gamma R alpha, IRF-4, and STAT1). Comparison of EBV latency III LCL gene expression to immunoglobulin M (IgM)-stimulated B cells, germinal-center B cells, and germinal-center-derived lymphomas clustered LCLs with IgM-stimulated B cells separately from germinal-center cells or germinal-center lymphoma cells. Expression of IRF-2, AIM1, ASK1, SNF2L2, and components of IFN signaling pathways further distinguished EBV latency III-infected B cells from IgM-stimulated or

  13. Tribolium castaneum Apolipophorin-III acts as an immune response protein against Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba toxic activity.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Estefanía; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a 2.1-fold Apolipophorin-III mRNA up-regulation was found in Tribolium castaneum larvae challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Ba spore-crystal mixture. Knockdown of Apolipophorin-III by RNAi resulted in increased T. castaneum larvae susceptibility following Cry3Ba spore-crystal treatment, demonstrating Apolipophorin-III involvement in insect defense against B. thuringiensis. We showed that Apolipophorin-III participates in T. castaneum immune response to B. thuringiensis activating the prophenoloxidase cascade since: (i) phenoloxidase activity significantly increased after Cry3Ba spore-crystal treatment compared to untreated or Cry1Ac spore-crystal treated larvae and (ii) phenoloxidase activity in Cry3Ba spore-crystal treated Apolipophorin-III silenced larvae was 71±14% lower than that of non-silenced intoxicated larvae.

  14. Type III secretion and in planta recognition of the Xanthomonas avirulence proteins AvrBs1 and AvrBsT.

    PubMed

    Escolar, L; Van Den Ackerveken, G; Pieplow, S; Rossier, O; Bonas, U

    2001-09-01

    summary The hrp gene cluster of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) encodes a type III secretion system required for the delivery of virulence and avirulence proteins into the plant. Some of these effector proteins, e.g. AvrBs1 and AvrBsT, are recognized by pepper plants carrying corresponding resistance genes, triggering the hypersensitive reaction (HR). In this study, epitope tagged AvrBs1 and AvrBsT proteins were detected in culture supernatants only in the presence of a functional type III apparatus and not in a hrcV mutant, showing that both proteins are secreted by Xcv in an hrp-dependent manner. Expression of both avirulence genes is constitutive and independent of the hrp gene regulators, hrpG and hrpX. Transient expression of avrBs1 and avrBsT in resistant host plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer resulted in the induction of a specific HR. This indicates that recognition occurs intracellularly, and suggests that during the Xcv infection, AvrBs1 and AvrBsT are translocated from Xcv into the plant cell. We describe a conserved protein motif which is present in the N-terminal region of all known Xcv avirulence proteins and discuss its potential role in translocation into plant cells. PMID:20573017

  15. A novel tetravalent formulation combining the four aggregated domain III-capsid proteins from dengue viruses induces a functional immune response in mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Suzarte, Edith; Gil, Lázaro; Valdés, Iris; Marcos, Ernesto; Lazo, Laura; Izquierdo, Alienys; García, Angélica; López, Lázaro; Álvarez, Maylin; Pérez, Yusleydis; Castro, Jorge; Romero, Yaremis; Guzmán, María G; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-08-01

    Our group developed a subunit vaccine candidate against dengue virus based on two different viral regions: the domain III of the envelope protein and the capsid protein. The novel chimeric protein from dengue-2 virus [domain III-capsid (DIIIC-2)], when presented as aggregated incorporating oligodeoxynucleotides, induced anti-viral and neutralizing antibodies, a cellular immune response and conferred significant protection to mice and monkeys. The remaining constructs were already obtained and properly characterized. Based on this evidence, this work was aimed at assessing the immune response in mice of the chimeric proteins DIIIC of each serotype, as monovalent and tetravalent formulations. Here, we demonstrated the immunogenicity of each protein in terms of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, without antigen competition on the mixture forming the formulation tetra DIIIC. Accordingly, significant protection was afforded as measured by the limited viral load in the mouse encephalitis model. The assessment of the tetravalent formulation in non-human primates was also conducted. In this animal model, it was demonstrated that the formulation induced neutralizing antibodies and memory cell-mediated immune response with IFN-γ-secreting and cytotoxic capacity, regardless the route of immunization used. Taken together, we can assert that the tetravalent formulation of DIIIC proteins constitutes a promising vaccine candidate against dengue virus, and propose it for further efficacy experiments in monkeys or in the dengue human infection model, as it has been recently proposed.

  16. Molecular signals required for type III secretion and translocation of the Xanthomonas campestris AvrBs2 protein to pepper plants.

    PubMed

    Mudgett, M B; Chesnokova, O; Dahlbeck, D; Clark, E T; Rossier, O; Bonas, U; Staskawicz, B J

    2000-11-21

    Strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) carrying avrBs2 are specifically recognized by Bs2 pepper plants, resulting in localized cell death and plant resistance. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of the Xcv