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Sample records for protein tyrosine nitration

  1. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  2. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  3. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  4. Desferrioxamine Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Krzywanski, David M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Postlethwait, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissues are exposed to exogenous and endogenous nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), which is the terminal agent in protein tyrosine nitration. Besides iron chelation, the hydroxamic acid (HA) desferrioxamine (DFO) shows multiple functionalities including nitration inhibition. To investigate mechanisms whereby DFO affects 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, we utilized gas phase •NO2 exposures, to limit introduction of other reactive species, and a lung surface model wherein red cell membranes (RCM) were immobilized under a defined aqueous film. When RCM were exposed to •NO2 covered by +/− DFO: (i) DFO inhibited 3-NT formation more effectively than other HA and non-HA chelators; (ii) 3-NT inhibition occurred at very low [DFO] for prolonged times; and (iii) 3-NT formation was iron independent but inhibition required DFO present. DFO poorly reacted with •NO2 compared to ascorbate, assessed via •NO2 reactive absorption and aqueous phase oxidation rates, yet limited 3-NT formation at far lower concentrations. DFO also inhibited nitration under aqueous bulk phase conditions, and inhibited 3-NT generated by active myeloperoxidase “bound” to RCM. Per the above and kinetic analyses suggesting preferential DFO versus •NO2 reaction within membranes, we conclude that DFO inhibits 3-NT formation predominantly by facile repair of the tyrosyl radical intermediate, which prevents •NO2 addition, and thus nitration, and potentially influences biochemical functionalities. PMID:22705369

  5. Protein tyrosine nitration in higher plants grown under natural and stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Palma, José M.; del Río, Luis A.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification (PTM) mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that is linked to nitro-oxidative damages in plant cells. During the last decade, the identification of proteins undergoing this PTM under adverse environmental conditions has increased. However, there is also a basal endogenous nitration which seems to have a regulatory function. The technological advances in proteome analysis have allowed identifying these modified proteins and have shown that the number and identity of the nitrated proteins change among plant species, analysed organs and growing/culture conditions. In this work, the current knowledge of protein tyrosine nitration in higher plants under different situations is reviewed. PMID:23444154

  6. Identification of nitrated tyrosine residues of protein kinase G-Iα by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingshan; Yao, Ikuko; Shimojo, Masahito; Katano, Tayo; Uchida, Hitoshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ito, Seiji

    2014-02-01

    The nitration of tyrosine to 3-nitrotyrosine is an oxidative modification of tyrosine by nitric oxide and is associated with many diseases, and targeting of protein kinase G (PKG)-I represents a potential therapeutic strategy for pulmonary hypertension and chronic pain. The direct assignment of tyrosine residues of PKG-I has remained to be made due to the low sensitivity of the current proteomic approach. In order to assign modified tyrosine residues of PKG-I, we nitrated purified PKG-Iα expressed in insect Sf9 cells by use of peroxynitrite in vitro and analyzed the trypsin-digested fragments by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Among the 21 tyrosine residues of PKG-Iα, 16 tyrosine residues were assigned in 13 fragments; and six tyrosine residues were nitrated, those at Y71, Y141, Y212, Y336, Y345, and Y567, in the peroxynitrite-treated sample. Single mutation of tyrosine residues at Y71, Y212, and Y336 to phenylalanine significantly reduced the nitration of PKG-Iα; and four mutations at Y71, Y141, Y212, and Y336 (Y4F mutant) reduced it additively. PKG-Iα activity was inhibited by peroxynitrite in a concentration-dependent manner from 30 μM to 1 mM, and this inhibition was attenuated in the Y4F mutant. These results demonstrated that PKG-Iα was nitrated at multiple tyrosine residues and that its activity was reduced by nitration of these residues.

  7. Atherosclerosis: A Link Between Lipid Intake and Protein Tyrosine Nitration

    PubMed Central

    Upmacis, Rita K.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a disease characterized by plaque formation in the arterial wall that can lead to heart attack and stroke, is a principal cause of death in the world. Since the 1990’s, protein nitrotyrosine formation has been known to occur in the atherosclerotic plaque. This potentially damaging reaction occurs as a result of tyrosine modification by reactive nitrogen species, such as nitrogen dioxide radical, which forms upon peroxynitrite decomposition or nitrite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide-activated peroxidase enzymes. The presence of protein-bound nitrotyrosine can be considered an indicator of a loss in the natural balance of oxidants and antioxidants, and as such, there is an emerging view that protein-bound nitrotyrosine may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This review brings together evidence that the accumulation of protein nitrotyrosine during atherogenesis is more widespread than initially thought (as its presence can be detected not only in the lesion but also in the blood stream and other organs) and is closely linked to lipid intake. PMID:20157638

  8. Protein targets of tyrosine nitration in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana M; Carreras, Alfonso; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Palma, José M; Pedrajas, José R; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Gómez-Rodríguez, María V; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is recognized as an important post-translational protein modification in animal cells that can be used as an indicator of a nitrosative process. However, in plant systems, there is scant information on proteins that undergo this process. In sunflower hypocotyls, the content of tyrosine nitration (NO(2)-Tyr) and the identification of nitrated proteins were studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and proteomic approaches, respectively. In addition, the cell localization of nitrotyrosine proteins and peroxynitrite were analysed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) using antibodies against 3-nitrotyrosine and 3'-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) as the fluorescent probe, in that order. The concentration of Tyr and NO(2)-Tyr in hypocotyls was 0.56 micromol mg(-1) protein and 0.19 pmol mg(-1) protein, respectively. By proteomic analysis, a total of 21 nitrotyrosine-immunopositive proteins were identified. These targets include proteins involved in photosynthesis, and in antioxidant, ATP, carbohydrate, and nitrogen metabolism. Among the proteins identified, S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) was selected as a model to evaluate the effect of nitration on SAHH activity using SIN-1 (a peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent. When the hypocotyl extracts were exposed to 0.5 mM, 1 mM, and 5 mM SIN-1, the SAHH activity was inhibited by some 49%, 89%, and 94%, respectively. In silico analysis of the barley SAHH sequence, characterized Tyr448 as the most likely potential target for nitration. In summary, the present data are the first in plants concerning the content of nitrotyrosine and the identification of candidates of protein nitration. Taken together, the results suggest that Tyr nitration occurs in plant tissues under physiological conditions that could constitute an important process of protein regulation in such a way that, when it is overproduced in adverse circumstances, it can be

  9. Protein Tyrosine Nitration and Thiol Oxidation by Peroxynitrite—Strategies to Prevent These Oxidative Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Daiber, Andreas; Daub, Steffen; Bachschmid, Markus; Schildknecht, Stefan; Oelze, Matthias; Steven, Sebastian; Schmidt, Patrick; Megner, Alexandra; Wada, Masayuki; Tanabe, Tadashi; Münzel, Thomas; Bottari, Serge; Ullrich, Volker

    2013-01-01

    The reaction product of nitric oxide and superoxide, peroxynitrite, is a potent biological oxidant. The most important oxidative protein modifications described for peroxynitrite are cysteine-thiol oxidation and tyrosine nitration. We have previously demonstrated that intrinsic heme-thiolate (P450)-dependent enzymatic catalysis increases the nitration of tyrosine 430 in prostacyclin synthase and results in loss of activity which contributes to endothelial dysfunction. We here report the sensitive peroxynitrite-dependent nitration of an over-expressed and partially purified human prostacyclin synthase (3.3 μM) with an EC50 value of 5 μM. Microsomal thiols in these preparations effectively compete for peroxynitrite and block the nitration of other proteins up to 50 μM peroxynitrite. Purified, recombinant PGIS showed a half-maximal nitration by 10 μM 3-morpholino sydnonimine (Sin-1) which increased in the presence of bicarbonate, and was only marginally induced by freely diffusing NO2-radicals generated by a peroxidase/nitrite/hydrogen peroxide system. Based on these observations, we would like to emphasize that prostacyclin synthase is among the most efficiently and sensitively nitrated proteins investigated by us so far. In the second part of the study, we identified two classes of peroxynitrite scavengers, blocking either peroxynitrite anion-mediated thiol oxidations or phenol/tyrosine nitrations by free radical mechanisms. Dithiopurines and dithiopyrimidines were highly effective in inhibiting both reaction types which could make this class of compounds interesting therapeutic tools. In the present work, we highlighted the impact of experimental conditions on the outcome of peroxynitrite-mediated nitrations. The limitations identified in this work need to be considered in the assessment of experimental data involving peroxynitrite. PMID:23567270

  10. Ripening of pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit is characterized by an enhancement of protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Álvarez de Morales, Paz; Ruiz, Carmelo; Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Barroso, Juan B.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Palma, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Pepper (Capsicum annuum, Solanaceae) fruits are consumed worldwide and are of great economic importance. In most species ripening is characterized by important visual and metabolic changes, the latter including emission of volatile organic compounds associated with respiration, destruction of chlorophylls, synthesis of new pigments (red/yellow carotenoids plus xanthophylls and anthocyanins), formation of pectins and protein synthesis. The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in fruit ripening has been established, but more work is needed to detail the metabolic networks involving NO and other reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in the process. It has been reported that RNS can mediate post-translational modifications of proteins, which can modulate physiological processes through mechanisms of cellular signalling. This study therefore examined the potential role of NO in nitration of tyrosine during the ripening of California sweet pepper. Methods The NO content of green and red pepper fruit was determined spectrofluorometrically. Fruits at the breaking point between green and red coloration were incubated in the presence of NO for 1 h and then left to ripen for 3 d. Profiles of nitrated proteins were determined using an antibody against nitro-tyrosine (NO2-Tyr), and profiles of nitrosothiols were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Nitrated proteins were identified by 2-D electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. Key Results Treatment with NO delayed the ripening of fruit. An enhancement of nitrosothiols and nitroproteins was observed in fruit during ripening, and this was reversed by the addition of exogenous NO gas. Six nitrated proteins were identified and were characterized as being involved in redox, protein, carbohydrate and oxidative metabolism, and in glutamate biosynthesis. Catalase was the most abundant nitrated protein found in both green and red fruit. Conclusions The RNS profile reported here indicates that ripening of

  11. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein tyrosine nitration in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Woon-Seok; Kim, Young Jun; Kabir, Mohammad Humayun; Kang, Jeong Won; Ahsan-Ul-Bari, Md; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights the significance of protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) in signal transduction pathways, the progress achieved in analytical methods, and the implication of nitration in the cellular pathophysiology of aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Although mass spectrometry of nitrated peptides has become a powerful tool for the characterization of nitrated peptides, the low stoichiometry of this modification clearly necessitates the use of affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides. Analysis of nitropeptides involves identification of endogenous, intact modification as well as chemical conversion of the nitro group to a chemically reactive amine group and further modifications that enable affinity capture and enhance detectability by altering molecular properties. In this review, we focus on the recent progress in chemical derivatization of nitropeptides for enrichment and mass analysis, and for detection and quantification using various analytical tools. PTN participates in physiological processes, such as aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine has been found to occur during the aging process; this was identified through mass spectrometry. Further, there are several studies implicating the presence of nitrated tyrosine in age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24889964

  12. Nano titanium dioxide photocatalytic protein tyrosine nitration: A potential hazard of TiO{sub 2} on skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Naihao; Zhu Zhening; Zhao Xuqi; Tao Ran; Yang Xiangliang Gao Zhonghong

    2008-06-13

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a prevalent post-translational modification which occurs as a result of oxidative and nitrative stress, it may be directly involved in the onset and/or progression of diseases. Considering the existence of nano titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in environment and sunscreen products along with the high content of nitrite in sweat, the UV-exposed skin may be a significant target for the photosensitized damage. In this paper, tyrosine nitration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was initiated in the UV-irradiated reaction mixture containing 0.2-3.0 mg/ml of three commercially nano TiO{sub 2} products and 0.25-1.0 mM NO{sub 2}{sup -}. It was found that anatase TiO{sub 2} and Degussa P25 TiO{sub 2} showed prominent photocatalytic activity on promoting the formation of protein tyrosine nitration, and the optimum condition for the reaction was around physiological pH. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic effect of rutile on protein tyrosine nitration was subtle. The potential physiological significance of nano TiO{sub 2}-photocatalytic protein nitration was also demonstrated in mouse skin homogenate. Although the relationship between photocatalytic protein tyrosine nitration and chronic cutaneous diseases needs further study, the toxicity of nano TiO{sub 2} to the skin disease should be paid more attention in the production and utilization process.

  13. When is Mass Spectrometry Combined with Affinity Approaches Essential? A Case Study of Tyrosine Nitration in Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, Brînduşa-Alina; Ulrich, Martina; Stumbaum, Mihaela; Bernevic, Bogdan; Moise, Adrian; Döring, Gerd; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Tyrosine nitration in proteins occurs under physiologic conditions and is increased at disease conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as inflammation and Alzheimer's disease. Identification and quantification of tyrosine-nitrations are crucial for understanding nitration mechanism(s) and their functional consequences. Mass spectrometry (MS) is best suited to identify nitration sites, but is hampered by low stabilities and modification levels and possible structural changes induced by nitration. In this insight, we discuss methods for identifying and quantifying nitration sites by proteolytic affinity extraction using nitrotyrosine (NT)-specific antibodies, in combination with electrospray-MS. The efficiency of this approach is illustrated by identification of specific nitration sites in two proteins in eosinophil granules from several biological samples, eosinophil-cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). Affinity extraction combined with Edman sequencing enabled the quantification of nitration levels, which were found to be 8 % and 15 % for ECP and EDN, respectively. Structure modeling utilizing available crystal structures and affinity studies using synthetic NT-peptides suggest a tyrosine nitration sequence motif comprising positively charged residues in the vicinity of the NT- residue, located at specific surface- accessible sites of the protein structure. Affinities of Tyr-nitrated peptides from ECP and EDN to NT-antibodies, determined by online bioaffinity- MS, provided nanomolar KD values. In contrast, false-positive identifications of nitrations were obtained in proteins from cystic fibrosis patients upon using NT-specific antibodies, and were shown to be hydroxy-tyrosine modifications. These results demonstrate affinity- mass spectrometry approaches to be essential for unequivocal identification of biological tyrosine nitrations.

  14. Glucose-mediated tyrosine nitration in adipocytes: Targets and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Koeck, Thomas; Willard, Belinda; Crabb, John W.; Kinter, Mike; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Aulak, Kulwant S.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, a key factor in insulin resistance and diabetic pathology, is associated with cellular oxidative stress that promotes oxidative protein modifications. We report that protein nitration is responsive to changes in glucose concentrations in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Alterations in the extent of tyrosine nitration as well as the cellular nitroproteome profile correlated tightly with changing glucose concentrations. The target proteins we identified are involved in fatty acid binding, cell signaling, protein folding, energy metabolism, antioxidant capacity, and membrane permeability. The nitration of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (FABP4) at Tyr19 decreases, similar to phosphorylation, the binding of palmitic acid to the fatty acid-free protein. This potentially alters intracellular fatty acid transport, nuclear translocation of FABP4, and agonism of PPAR gamma. Our results suggest that protein tyrosine nitration may be a factor in obesity, insulin resistance, and the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:19135148

  15. Nitration of Hsp90 on Tyrosine 33 Regulates Mitochondrial Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Maria C.; Ricart, Karina C.; Gonzalez, Analía S.; Dennys, Cassandra N.; Nelson, Pascal A.; Janes, Michael S.; Mehl, Ryan A.; Landar, Aimee; Estévez, Alvaro G.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxynitrite production and tyrosine nitration are present in several pathological conditions, including neurodegeneration, stroke, aging, and cancer. Nitration of the pro-survival chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in position 33 and 56 induces motor neuron death through a toxic gain-of-function. Here we show that nitrated Hsp90 regulates mitochondrial metabolism independently of the induction of cell death. In PC12 cells, a small fraction of nitrated Hsp90 was located on the mitochondrial outer membrane and down-regulated mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption, and ATP production. Neither endogenous Hsp90 present in the homogenate nor unmodified and fully active recombinant Hsp90 was able to compete with the nitrated protein for the binding to mitochondria. Moreover, endogenous or recombinant Hsp90 did not prevent the decrease in mitochondrial activity but supported nitrated Hsp90 mitochondrial gain-of-function. Nitrotyrosine in position 33, but not in any of the other four tyrosine residues prone to nitration in Hsp90, was sufficient to down-regulate mitochondrial activity. Thus, in addition to induction of cell death, nitrated Hsp90 can also regulate mitochondrial metabolism, suggesting that depending on the cell type, distinct Hsp90 nitration states regulate different aspects of cellular metabolism. This regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis by nitrated Hsp90 could be of particular relevance in cancer cells. PMID:26085096

  16. Tubulin tyrosine nitration regulates microtubule organization in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Yaroslav B.; Krasylenko, Yuliya A.; Demchuk, Oleh M.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2013-01-01

    During last years, selective tyrosine nitration of plant proteins gains importance as well-recognized pathway of direct nitric oxide (NO) signal transduction. Plant microtubules are one of the intracellular signaling targets for NO, however, the molecular mechanisms of NO signal transduction with the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins remain to be elucidated. Since biochemical evidence of plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration has been obtained recently, potential role of this posttranslational modification in regulation of microtubules organization in plant cell is estimated in current paper. It was shown that 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NO2-Tyr) induced partially reversible Arabidopsis primary root growth inhibition, alterations of root hairs morphology and organization of microtubules in root cells. It was also revealed that 3-NO2-Tyr intensively decorates such highly dynamic microtubular arrays as preprophase bands, mitotic spindles and phragmoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells under physiological conditions. Moreover, 3D models of the mitotic kinesin-8 complexes with the tail of detyrosinated, tyrosinated and tyrosine nitrated α-tubulin (on C-terminal Tyr 450 residue) from Arabidopsis were reconstructed in silico to investigate the potential influence of tubulin nitrotyrosination on the molecular dynamics of α-tubulin and kinesin-8 interaction. Generally, presented data suggest that plant α-tubulin tyrosine nitration can be considered as its common posttranslational modification, the direct mechanism of NO signal transduction with the participation of microtubules under physiological conditions and one of the hallmarks of the increased microtubule dynamics. PMID:24421781

  17. Post-translational Tyrosine Nitration of Eosinophil Granule Toxins Mediated by Eosinophil Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martina; Petre, Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Prömm, Franziska; Schirle, Markus; Schumm, Michael; Pero, Ralph S.; Doyle, Alfred; Checkel, James; Kita, Hirohito; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K. Ravi; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Schwarz, Heinz; Tsutsui, Masato; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Bellon, Gabriel; Lee, James J.; Przybylski, Michael; Döring, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues has been observed during various acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism of tyrosine nitration and the nature of the proteins that become tyrosine nitrated during inflammation remain unclear. Here we show that eosinophils but not other cell types including neutrophils contain nitrotyrosine-positive proteins in specific granules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the human eosinophil toxins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), major basic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and the respective murine toxins, are post-translationally modified by nitration at tyrosine residues during cell maturation. High resolution affinity-mass spectrometry identified specific single nitration sites at Tyr349 in EPO and Tyr33 in both ECP and EDN. ECP and EDN crystal structures revealed and EPO structure modeling suggested that the nitrated tyrosine residues in the toxins are surface exposed. Studies in EPO-/-, gp91phox-/-, and NOS-/- mice revealed that tyrosine nitration of these toxins is mediated by EPO in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and minute amounts of NOx. Tyrosine nitration of eosinophil granule toxins occurs during maturation of eosinophils, independent of inflammation. These results provide evidence that post-translational tyrosine nitration is unique to eosinophils. PMID:18694936

  18. Temporal patterns of tyrosine nitration in embryo heart development

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Liliana; Radmilovich, Milka; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Dennys, Cassandra N.; Wilson, Landon; Barnes, Stephen; Franco, Maria Clara; Beckman, Joseph S.; Estévez, Alvaro G.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine nitration is a biomarker for the production of peroxynitrite and other reactive nitrogen species. Nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity is present in many pathological conditions including several cardiac diseases. Because the events observed during heart failure may recapitulate some aspects of development, we tested whether nitrotyrosine is present during normal development of the rat embryo heart and its potential relationship in cardiac remodeling through apoptosis. Nitric oxide (NO) production is highly dynamic during development, but whether peroxynitrite and nitrotyrosine are formed during normal embryonic development has received little attention. Rat embryo hearts exhibited strong nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in endocardial and myocardial cells of the atria and ventricles from E12 to E18. After E18, nitrotyrosine staining faded and disappeared entirely by birth. Tyrosine nitration in the myocardial tissue coincided with elevated protein expression of nitric oxide synthases (eNOS and iNOS). The immunoreactivity for these NOS isoforms remained elevated even after nitrotyrosine had disappeared. Tyrosine nitration did not correlate with cell death or proliferation of cardiac cells. Analysis of tryptic peptides by MALDI-TOF shows that nitration occurs in actin, myosin, and the mitochondrial ATP synthase alpha chain. These results suggest that reactive nitrogen species are not restricted to pathological conditions but may play a role during normal embryonic development. PMID:23195686

  19. Glucose-modulated Tyrosine Nitration in Beta-Cells: Targets and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Koeck, Thomas; Corbett, John A.; Crabb, John W.; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Aulak, Kulwant S.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, key factor of the pre-diabetic and diabetic pathology, is associated with cellular oxidative stress that promotes oxidative protein modifications. We report that protein nitration is responsive to changes in glucose concentrations in islets of Langerhans and insulinoma beta-cells. Alterations in the extent of tyrosine nitration as well as the cellular nitroproteome profile correlated tightly with changing glucose concentrations. The target proteins we identified function in protein folding, energy metabolism, antioxidant capacity, and membrane permeability. Nitration of heat shock protein 60 in vitro was found to decrease its ATP hydrolysis and interaction with proinsulin, suggesting a mechanism by which protein nitration could diminish insulin secretion. This was supported by our finding of a decrease in stimulated insulin secretion following glycolytic stress in cultured cells. Our results reveal that protein tyrosine nitration may be a previously unrecognized factor in beta-cell dysfunction and the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:19402213

  20. Microbial Protein-tyrosine Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph D.; Wong, Dennis; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ester kinases identified in the past 3 decades came as a surprise, as protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr amino acids was thought to be unique to eukaryotes. Current analysis of available microbial genomes reveals that “eukaryote-like” protein kinases are prevalent in prokaryotes and can converge in the same signaling pathway with the classical microbial “two-component” systems. Most microbial tyrosine kinases lack the “eukaryotic” Hanks domain signature and are designated tyrosine kinases based upon their biochemical activity. These include the tyrosine kinases termed bacterial tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), which are responsible for the majority of known bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation events. Although termed generally as bacterial tyrosine kinases, BY-kinases can be considered as one family belonging to the superfamily of prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases in bacteria. Other members of this superfamily include atypical “odd” tyrosine kinases with diverse mechanisms of protein phosphorylation and the “eukaryote-like” Hanks-type tyrosine kinases. Here, we discuss the distribution, phylogeny, and function of the various prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases, focusing on the recently discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtkA and its relationship with other members of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:24554699

  1. Tyrosine nitration provokes inhibition of sunflower carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) activity under high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Carreras, Alfonso; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Valderrama, Raquel; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2013-02-28

    Protein tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification (PTM) mediated by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and it is a new area of research in higher plants. Previously, it was demonstrated that the exposition of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings to high temperature (HT) caused both oxidative and nitrosative stress. The nitroproteome analysis under this stress condition showed the induction of 13 tyrosine-nitrated proteins being the carbonic anhydrase (CA) one of these proteins. The analysis of CA activity under high temperature showed that this stress inhibited the CA activity by a 43%. To evaluate the effect of nitration on the CA activity in sunflower it was used 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent. Thus the CA activity was inhibited by 41%. In silico analysis of the pea CA protein sequence suggests that Tyr(205) is the most likely potential target for nitration.

  2. Hypothyroidism attenuates protein tyrosine nitration, oxidative stress and renal damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion: effect unrelated to antioxidant enzymes activities

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Velázquez, Verónica M; Barrera, Diana; Franco, Martha; Tapia, Edilia; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been established that hypothyroidism protects rats against renal ischemia and reperfusion (IR) oxidative damage. However, it is not clear if hypothyroidism is able to prevent protein tyrosine nitration, an index of nitrosative stress, induced by IR or if antioxidant enzymes have involved in this protective effect. In this work it was explored if hypothyroidism is able to prevent the increase in nitrosative and oxidative stress induced by IR. In addition the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was studied. Control and thyroidectomized (HTX) rats were studied 24 h of reperfusion after 60 min ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing 380 ± 22 g were subjected to surgical thyroidectomy. Rats were studied 15 days after surgery. Euthyroid sham-operated rats were used as controls (CT). Both groups of rats underwent a right kidney nephrectomy and suffered a 60 min left renal ischemia with 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were divided in four groups: CT, HTX, IR and HTX+IR. Rats were sacrificed and samples of plasma and kidney were obtained. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were measured in blood plasma. Kidney damage was evaluated by histological analysis. Oxidative stress was measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins. The protein carbonyl content was measured using antibodies against dinitrophenol (DNP)-modified proteins. Nitrosative stress was measured by immunohistochemical analysis of 3-nitrotyrosine modified proteins. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was measured by spectrophotometric methods. Multiple comparisons were performed with ANOVA followed by Bonferroni t test. Results The histological damage and the rise in plasma creatinine and BUN induced by IR were significantly lower in HTX+IR group. The increase in protein carbonyls and in 3-nitrotyrosine and 4

  3. Tyrosine phosphorylation of WW proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reuven, Nina; Shanzer, Matan

    2015-01-01

    A number of key regulatory proteins contain one or two copies of the WW domain known to mediate protein–protein interaction via proline-rich motifs, such as PPxY. The Hippo pathway components take advantage of this module to transduce tumor suppressor signaling. It is becoming evident that tyrosine phosphorylation is a critical regulator of the WW proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on the involved tyrosine kinases and their roles in regulating the WW proteins. PMID:25627656

  4. Fully automated multidimensional reversed-phase liquid chromatography with tandem anion/cation exchange columns for simultaneous global endogenous tyrosine nitration detection, integral membrane protein characterization, and quantitative proteomics mapping in cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Quan; Szeto, Samuel S W; Law, Henry C H; Zhang, Zaijun; Wang, Yuqiang; Chu, Ivan K

    2015-10-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a signature hallmark of radical-induced nitrative stress in a wide range of pathophysiological conditions, with naturally occurring abundances at substoichiometric levels. In this present study, a fully automated four-dimensional platform, consisting of high-/low-pH reversed-phase dimensions with two additional complementary, strong anion (SAX) and cation exchange (SCX), chromatographic separation stages inserted in tandem, was implemented for the simultaneous mapping of endogenous nitrated tyrosine-containing peptides within the global proteomic context of a Macaca fascicularis cerebral ischemic stroke model. This integrated RP-SA(C)X-RP platform was initially benchmarked through proteomic analyses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, revealing extended proteome and protein coverage. A total of 27 144 unique peptides from 3684 nonredundant proteins [1% global false discovery rate (FDR)] were identified from M. fascicularis cerebral cortex tissue. The inclusion of the S(A/C)X columns contributed to the increased detection of acidic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic peptide populations; these separation features enabled the concomitant identification of 127 endogenous nitrated peptides and 137 transmembrane domain-containing peptides corresponding to integral membrane proteins, without the need for specific targeted enrichment strategies. The enhanced diversity of the peptide inventory obtained from the RP-SA(C)X-RP platform also improved analytical confidence in isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analyses. PMID:26335518

  5. Fluorogenic Tagging of Peptide and Protein 3-Nitrotyrosine with 4-(Aminomethyl)-benzenesulfonic Acid for Quantitative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Nitration

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Victor S.; Dremina, Elena S.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Gerstenecker, Gary S.; Li, Xiaobao; Dobrowsky, Rick T.; Stobaugh, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Protein 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) has been recognized as an important biomarker of nitroxidative stress associated with inflammatory and degenerative diseases, and biological aging. Analysis of protein-bound 3-NT continues to represent a challenge since in vivo it frequently does not accumulate on proteins in amounts detectable by quantitative analytical methods. Here, we describe a novel approach of fluorescent tagging and quantitation of peptide-bound 3-NT residues based on the selective reduction to 3-AT followed by reaction with 4-(amino-methyl)benzenesulfonic acid (ABS) in the presence of K3Fe(CN)6 to form a highly fluorescent 2-phenylbenzoxazole product. Synthetic 3-NT peptide (0.005–1 μM) upon reduction with 10 mM sodium dithionite and tagging with 2 mM ABS and 5 μM K3Fe(CN)6 in 0.1 M Na2HPO4 buffer (pH 9.0) was converted with yields >95% to a single fluorescent product incorporating two ABS molecules per 3-NT residue, with fluorescence excitation and emission maxima at 360 ± 2 and 490 ± 2 nm, respectively, and a quantum yield of 0.77 ± 0.08, based on reverse-phase LC with UV and fluorescence detection, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC–MS–MS analysis. This protocol was successfully tested for quantitative analysis of in vitro Tyr nitration in a model protein, rabbit muscle phosphorylase b, and in a complex mixture of proteins from C2C12 cultured cells exposed to peroxynitrite, with a detection limit of ca. 1 pmol 3-NT by fluorescence spectrometry, and an apparent LOD of 12 and 40 pmol for nitropeptides alone or in the presence of 100 μg digested cell proteins, respectively. LC–MS–MS analysis of ABS tagged peptides revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, allowing for sequence-specific characterization of protein Tyr nitration in proteomic studies. Fluorogenic tagging with ABS also can be instrumental for detection and visualization of protein 3-NT in LC and gel-based protein separations. PMID:20703364

  6. Fluorogenic Tagging of Peptide and Protein 3-Nitrotyrosine with 4-(Aminomethyl)-benzenesulfonic Acid for Quantitative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Nitration.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Victor S; Dremina, Elena S; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Li, Xiaobao; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Stobaugh, John F; Schöneich, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Protein 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) has been recognized as an important biomarker of nitroxidative stress associated with inflammatory and degenerative diseases, and biological aging. Analysis of protein-bound 3-NT continues to represent a challenge since in vivo it frequently does not accumulate on proteins in amounts detectable by quantitative analytical methods. Here, we describe a novel approach of fluorescent tagging and quantitation of peptide-bound 3-NT residues based on the selective reduction to 3-AT followed by reaction with 4-(amino-methyl)benzenesulfonic acid (ABS) in the presence of K(3)Fe(CN)(6) to form a highly fluorescent 2-phenylbenzoxazole product. Synthetic 3-NT peptide (0.005-1 μM) upon reduction with 10 mM sodium dithionite and tagging with 2 mM ABS and 5 μM K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in 0.1 M Na(2)HPO(4) buffer (pH 9.0) was converted with yields >95% to a single fluorescent product incorporating two ABS molecules per 3-NT residue, with fluorescence excitation and emission maxima at 360 ± 2 and 490 ± 2 nm, respectively, and a quantum yield of 0.77 ± 0.08, based on reverse-phase LC with UV and fluorescence detection, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-MS-MS analysis. This protocol was successfully tested for quantitative analysis of in vitro Tyr nitration in a model protein, rabbit muscle phosphorylase b, and in a complex mixture of proteins from C2C12 cultured cells exposed to peroxynitrite, with a detection limit of ca. 1 pmol 3-NT by fluorescence spectrometry, and an apparent LOD of 12 and 40 pmol for nitropeptides alone or in the presence of 100 μg digested cell proteins, respectively. LC-MS-MS analysis of ABS tagged peptides revealed that the fluorescent derivatives undergo efficient backbone fragmentations, allowing for sequence-specific characterization of protein Tyr nitration in proteomic studies. Fluorogenic tagging with ABS also can be instrumental for detection and visualization of protein 3-NT in LC and gel-based protein separations. PMID

  7. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  8. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-01

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  9. Nitration of internal tyrosine of cytochrome c probed by resonance Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Quaroni, L; Smith, W E

    1999-01-01

    Tyrosines can be selectively nitrated in a protein and the resultant chromophore can be used as an in situ probe of the tyrosine environment. Resonance Raman scattering could have specific advantages as a detection method because of the inherent selectivity of the technique and because shifts in the intensity and frequency of the nitro stretch can be detected and related to the form and environment of the nitrotyrosine. To evaluate this possibility the internal residue Tyr67 of cytochrome c was nitrated and resonance Raman scattering was recorded. With 413.1-nm excitation the resonance scattering from the heme protein dominates, but with 457.9-nm excitation intense bands due to nitrostretching vibrations are readily observed. The frequency of the internal Tyr67 indicates an aqueous environment that suggests that on nitration this residue becomes exposed on the protein surface or that water enters the active pocket. pH dependent measurements can be used to follow the protonation of the residue. A pK(a) of approximately 7 also indicates an aqueous environment. This initial study indicates that resonance Raman scattering does have unique advantages as an in situ probe of the local structure of nitrated tyrosine residues.

  10. Tyrosine Nitration within the Proline-Rich Region of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan F.; Fu, Yifan; Vana, Laurel; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Binder, Lester I.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that nitrative injury contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we showed in vitro that within the tau protein the N-terminal tyrosine residues (Y18 and Y29) are more susceptible to nitrative modifications than other tyrosine sites (Y197 and Y394). Using site-specific antibodies to nitrated tau at Y18 and Y29, we identified tau nitrated in both glial (Y18) and neuronal (Y29) tau pathologies. In this study, we report the characterization of two novel monoclonal antibodies, Tau-nY197 and Tau-nY394, recognizing tau nitrated at Y197 and Y394, respectively. By Western blot analysis, Tau-nY197 labeled soluble tau and insoluble paired helical filament proteins (PHF-tau) nitrated at Y197 from control and AD brain samples. Tau-nY394 failed to label soluble tau isolated from control or severe AD samples, but labeled insoluble PHF-tau to a limited extent. Immunohistochemical analysis using Tau-nY197 revealed the hallmark tau pathology associated with AD; Tau-nY394 did not detect any pathological lesions characteristic of the disorder. These data suggest that a subset of the hallmark pathological inclusions of AD contain tau nitrated at Y197. However, nitration at Y197 was also identified in soluble tau from all control samples, including those at Braak stage 0, suggesting that nitration at this site in the proline-rich region of tau may have normal biological functions in the human brain. PMID:21514440

  11. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  12. Superoxide reacts with nitric oxide to nitrate tyrosine at physiological pH via peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Reiter, C D; Teng, R J; Beckman, J S

    2000-10-20

    Tyrosine nitration is a widely used marker of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide. Pfeiffer and Mayer (Pfeiffer, S., and Mayer, B. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 27280-27285) reported that superoxide produced from hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase in combination with nitric oxide produced from spermine NONOate did not nitrate tyrosine at neutral pH. They suggested that nitric oxide and superoxide at neutral pH form a less reactive intermediate distinct from preformed alkaline peroxynitrite that does not nitrate tyrosine. Using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to rapidly mix potassium superoxide with nitric oxide at pH 7.4, we report that an intermediate spectrally and kinetically identical to preformed alkaline cis-peroxynitrite was formed in 100% yield. Furthermore, this intermediate nitrated tyrosine in the same yield and at the same rate as preformed peroxynitrite. Equivalent concentrations of nitric oxide under aerobic conditions in the absence of superoxide did not produce detectable concentrations of nitrotyrosine. Carbon dioxide increased the efficiency of nitration by nitric oxide plus superoxide to the same extent as peroxynitrite. In experiments using xanthine oxidase as a source of superoxide, tyrosine nitration was substantially inhibited by urate formed from hypoxanthine oxidation, which was sufficient to account for the lack of tyrosine nitration previously reported. We conclude that peroxynitrite formed from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide at physiological pH remains an important species responsible for tyrosine nitration in vivo. PMID:10906340

  13. Effects of tyrosine-26 and tyrosine-64 nitration on the photoreactions of bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P.; Stoeckenius, W.

    1985-01-01

    The photoreactions of nitrated bacteriorhodopsin (bR) are examined. Flash-induced difference spectra of bR, bR with aminotyrosine in position 26 (bR-N26R) and bR with aminotyrosine in position 64 are analyzed. It is observed that changes in the actinic wavelength (from 520 to 500 or 580 nm) have no affect on the shape of the spectra and the formation and decay kinetics of the O and M intermediates. Nitration of tyrosine-64 decreases the chromophore absorbance, shifts the absorption maximum to 535 nm, and affects photocycle kinetics independent of the pK of its phenolic group. Light-dark adaptation spectra for bR are studied. The kinetics of the M and O intermediates in bR with nitrotyrosine in position 64 (bR-N64) and bR with aminotyrosine in position 64 and bR with nitrotyrosine in position 26 and bR-N26R are described and compared to bR; the pH dependence and M and O decay rates are considered. The deprotonation of bR-N64 during the photoreaction cycle and the effects of nitration on the activity of proton pumping are investigated.

  14. Heterogeneous Nitration of Tyrosine by NO­3 and N2O5: Rates, Mechanisms and Product Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, R. K.; Witkowski, B.; Burkholder, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Nitration of protein-bound tyrosine has been identified as a casual connection between air pollution and human health. Tyrosine is a common amino acid, 4-hydroxyphenylalanine, HO-C6H4-CH2-CH(NH2)-C(O)OH), and is present in many atmospheric bio-aerosols. Nitration of the aromatic units of protein molecules in polluted air enhances their allergenicity. The mechanism of heterogeneous nitration process of bio-aerosols by common nitrating agents in the atmosphere, O3/NO2, NO3, N2O5 is not well understood. This chemistry is thought to proceed via reactions with O3 and NO2 on particle surfaces, through mechanisms that are still uncertain. The possible role of higher nitrogen oxides also remains uncertain, partly due to a lack of measurements of fundamental chemical and physical parameters. In this work, we undertook measurements of reactive uptake of NO3, N2O5, as a function of relative humidity and temperature in a tyrosine coated flow tube reactor with chemical ionization mass spectrometric (CIMS) detection. Uptake coefficients on tyrosine coated flow tube were small under low relative humidity but were enhanced by an order of magnitude in the presence of high relative humidity, particularly for N2O5. The measured uptake coefficients were mostly due to reaction with water adsorbed on the surface of the flow tube. Only ~10% of the reactive uptake could be attributed to reaction with tyrosine. Following uptake, the contents of the flow tube were extracted, and analyzed using electrospray ionization - mass spectrometer (ESI-MS) to identify and quantify the products of the nitration reaction. The only organic reaction product detected was 3-nitro-tyrosine (3-NT). The measured uptake coefficients, mechanism of the title reactions and the possible atmospheric implications of these findings will be discussed.

  15. Exploring the sensitivity of ZnO nanotubes to tyrosine nitration: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahi, Pari Sadat; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Rezaee Roknabadi, Mahmood; Moosavi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Due to association of protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) with development of some serious human disorders and diseases, in this paper, the possible applications of ZnO-based nanobiosensors in nitrated tyrosine (nTyr) detection were explored within the density functional framework. With this motivation, the interaction of nTyr with ZnO single walled nanotubes via all possible active sites of nTyr was investigated. The results show the tendency of nTyr to interact through its nitro site (forming nitro-site configuration) with ZnO SWNTs as it has the highest binding energy; while, the charge-solvent configuration involving the interaction of nTyr's phenolic ring has the second place in terms of binding energy magnitude. Regardless of which active site contributes in interaction, the binding energies exhibit an ascending trend with decrease of SWNTs' curvature. Electronic properties analysis indicates that nTyr interaction via its nitro group results in formation of some flat bands inside the band gap region leading to significant reduction of overall band gap energy. Similar behavior is also observed in charge-solvent configuration but the band gap energy is larger. These red shifts are mainly attributed to contribution of 2p orbitals of species present in nTyr. Also, the hybridization of 3d orbital of Zn atom with 2p orbitals of nitro group atomic species is found responsible for bonding formation in bioconjugated system possessing the highest binding energy. Comparison of the electronic band structure of ZnO SWNT-Tyr with that of ZnO SWNT-nTyr indicates the sensitivity of ZnO SWNTs toward tyrosine nitration hence, a considerable change in its optical spectra is expectable. This introduces ZnO SWNTs as a promising candidate for PTN detection.

  16. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  17. Role of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Alka; Agrawal, Nisha; Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Amita; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a crucial regulatory mechanism that controls many biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, phosphorylation events primarily occur on serine (Ser) and threonine (Thr) residues, while in certain cases, it was also discovered on tyrosine (Tyr) residues. In contrary to plants, extensive reports on Tyr phosphorylation regulating a large numbers of biological processes exist in animals. Despite of such prodigious function in animals, Tyr phosphorylation is a least studied mechanism of protein regulation in plants. Recently, various chemical analytical procedures have strengthened the view that Tyr phosphorylation is equally prevalent in plants as in animals. However, regardless of Tyr phosphorylation events occuring in plants, no evidence could be found for the existence of gene encoding for Tyr phosphorylation i.e. the typical Tyr kinases. Various methodologies have suggested that plant responses to stress signals and developmental processes involved modifications in protein Tyr phosphorylation. Correspondingly, various reports have established the role of PTPs (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases) in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) hence, in the regulation of MAPK signaling cascade. Besides this, many dual specificity protein phosphatases (DSPs) are also known to bind starch and regulate starch metabolism through reversible phosphorylation. Here, we are emphasizing the significant progress on protein Tyr phosphatases to understand the role of these enzymes in the regulation of post-translational modification in plant physiology and development. PMID:26962298

  18. Nitration of Solvent-exposed Tyrosine 74 on Cytochrome c Triggers Heme Iron-Methionine 80 Bond Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Cassina, Adriana; Tórtora, Verónica; Marín, Mónica; Souza, José M.; Castro, Laura; Vila, Alejandro J.; Radi, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c, a mitochondrial electron transfer protein containing a hexacoordinated heme, is involved in other physiologically relevant events, such as the triggering of apoptosis, and the activation of a peroxidatic activity. The latter occurs secondary to interactions with cardiolipin and/or post-translational modifications, including tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrite and other nitric oxide-derived oxidants. The gain of peroxidatic activity in nitrated cytochrome c has been related to a heme site transition in the physiological pH region, which normally occurs at alkaline pH in the native protein. Herein, we report a spectroscopic characterization of two nitrated variants of horse heart cytochrome c by using optical spectroscopy studies and NMR. Highly pure nitrated cytochrome c species modified at solvent-exposed Tyr-74 or Tyr-97 were generated after treatment with a flux of peroxynitrite, separated, purified by preparative high pressure liquid chromatography, and characterized by mass spectrometry-based peptide mapping. It is shown that nitration of Tyr-74 elicits an early alkaline transition with a pKa = 7.2, resulting in the displacement of the sixth and axial iron ligand Met-80 and replacement by a weaker Lys ligand to yield an alternative low spin conformation. Based on the study of site-specific Tyr to Phe mutants in the four conserved Tyr residues, we also show that this transition is not due to deprotonation of nitro-Tyr-74, but instead we propose a destabilizing steric effect of the nitro group in the mobile Ω-loop of cytochrome c, which is transmitted to the iron center via the nearby Tyr-67. The key role of Tyr-67 in promoting the transition through interactions with Met-80 was further substantiated in the Y67F mutant. These results therefore provide new insights into how a remote post-translational modification in cytochrome c such as tyrosine nitration triggers profound structural changes in the heme ligation and microenvironment and impacts in

  19. Detection of Sequence-Specific Tyrosine Nitration of Manganese SOD and SERCA in Cardiovascular Disease and Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shanqin; Ying, Jia; Jiang, Bingbing; Guo, Wei; Adachi, Takeshi; Sharov, Victor; Lazar, Harold; Menzoian, James; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Schoneich, Christian; Cohen, Richard

    2006-06-01

    Nitration of protein tyrosine residues (nY) is a marker of oxidative stress and may alter the biological activity of the modified proteins. The aim of this study was to develop antibodies towards site-specific nY-modified proteins and to use histochemical and immunoblotting to demonstrate protein nitration in tissues. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies towards peptides with known nY sites in MnSOD nY-34 and of two adjacent nY in the sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA2 di-nY-294,295) were developed. Kidneys from rats infused with angiotensin II with known MnSOD nY and aorta from atherosclerotic rabbits and aging rat skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum with known SERCA di-nY were used for positive controls. Staining for MnSOD nY-34 was most intense in distal renal tubules and collecting ducts. Staining of atherosclerotic aorta for SERCA2 di-nY was most intense in atherosclerotic plaques. Aging rat skeletal muscle and atherosclerotic aorta and cardiac atrium from human diabetic patients also stained positively. Staining was decreased by sodium dithionite that chemically reduces nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, and the antigenic nY-peptide blocked staining for each respective nY site, but not for the other. As previously demonstrated, immunoblotting failed to detect these modified proteins in whole tissue lysates, but did when the proteins were concentrated. Immunohistochemical staining for specific nY-modified tyrosine residues offers the ability to assess the effects of oxidant stress associated with pathological conditions on individual proteins whose function may be affected in specific tissue sites.

  20. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  1. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  2. Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: Proteomic identification of nitrated proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Xiuzhen; Wang Jianling; Soman, Kizhake V.; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-08-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6 kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity. - Highlights: > Proteomic approaches are used to identify nitrated proteins in the spleen. > Twenty five nitrated proteins were found only in the spleen of aniline-treated rats. > Aniline exposure led to increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in

  3. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Eyer, Peter; Eddleston, Michael; Jiang, Wei; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasma levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.

  4. Studying Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatases in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alexander James; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of signal transduction regulators that have an essential role in normal development and physiology. Aberrant activation or inactivation of PTPs is at the basis of many human diseases. The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is being used extensively to model major aspects of development and disease as well as the mechanism of regeneration of limbs and vital organs, and most classical PTPs have been identified in zebrafish. Zebrafish is an excellent model system for biomedical research because the genome is sequenced, zebrafish produce a large number of offspring, the eggs develop outside the mother and are transparent, facilitating intravital imaging, and transgenesis and (site-directed) mutagenesis are feasible. Together, these traits make zebrafish amenable for the analysis of gene and protein function. In this chapter we cover three manipulations of zebrafish embryos that we have used to study the effects of PTPs in development, regeneration, and biochemistry. Microinjection at the one-cell stage is at the basis of many zebrafish experiments and is described first. This is followed by a description for measuring regeneration of the embryonic caudal fin, a powerful and robust physiological assay. Finally, the considerable but manageable troubleshooting of several complications associated with preparing zebrafish embryos for immunoblotting is explained. Overall, this chapter provides detailed protocols for manipulating zebrafish embryo samples with a compilation of tips collected through extensive experience from the zebrafish research community. PMID:27514815

  5. Genetic alterations of protein tyrosine phosphatases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuliang; Sedwick, David; Wang, Zhenghe

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are enzymes that remove phosphate from tyrosine residues in proteins. Recent whole-exome sequencing of human cancer genomes reveals that many PTPs are frequently mutated in a variety of cancers. Among these mutated PTPs, protein tyrosine phosphatase T (PTPRT) appears to be the most frequently mutated PTP in human cancers. Beside PTPN11 which functions as an oncogene in leukemia, genetic and functional studies indicate that most of mutant PTPs are tumor suppressor genes. Identification of the substrates and corresponding kinases of the mutant PTPs may provide novel therapeutic targets for cancers harboring these mutant PTPs. PMID:25263441

  6. Alterations in connexin 43 during diabetic cardiomyopathy: competition of tyrosine nitration versus phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    COOK, Angela C.; SCHANBACHER, Brandon L.; BAUER, John Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cardiac conduction abnormalities are observed early in the progression of Type I diabetes, but the mechanism(s) involved are undefined. Connexin 43, a critical component of ventricular gap junctions, depends on tyrosine phosphorylation status to modulate channel conductance - alterations in connexin 43 content, distributions, and/or phosphorylation status may be involved in cardiac rhythm disturbances. We tested the hypothesis that cardiac content/distribution of connexin 43 are altered in a rat model of Type I diabetic cardiomyopathy, investigating a mechanistic role for tyrosine. Methods We conducted electrocardiographic analyses during the progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats dosed with streptozotocin (65mg/kg), at 3, 7, and 35 days post-induction of diabetes. Following functional analyses, we conducted immunohistochemical and immunoprecipitation studies to assess alterations in connexin 43. Results We observed significant evidence of ventricular conduction abnormalities (QRS complex, Q-T interval) as early as 7 days post-streptozotocin, persisting throughout the study. Connexin 43 levels were increased 7d post- streptozotocin and remained elevated throughout the study. Connexin 40 content was unchanged relative to controls throughout the study. Changes in Connexin 43 distribution were also observed; connexin 43 staining was dispersed from myocyte short axis junctions. Connexin 43 tyrosine phosphorylation declined during the progression of diabetes, with concurrent increases in tyrosine nitration. Conclusions These data suggest that alterations in connexin 43 content and distribution occur during experimental diabetes and likely contribute to alterations in cardiac function, and that oxidative modification of tyrosine-mediated signaling may play a mechanistic role. PMID:24796789

  7. Differential inhibition of Arabidopsis superoxide dismutases by peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Holzmeister, Christian; Gaupels, Frank; Geerlof, Arie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Sattler, Michael; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of superoxide dismutases (SODs) in the plant antioxidant defence system little is known about their regulation by post-translational modifications. Here, we investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide derivatives on the seven SOD isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana. S-nitrosoglutathione, which causes S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, did not influence SOD activities. By contrast, peroxynitrite inhibited the mitochondrial manganese SOD1 (MSD1), peroxisomal copper/zinc SOD3 (CSD3), and chloroplastic iron SOD3 (FSD3), but no other SODs. MSD1 was inhibited by up to 90% but CSD3 and FSD3 only by a maximum of 30%. Down-regulation of these SOD isoforms correlated with tyrosine (Tyr) nitration and both could be prevented by the peroxynitrite scavenger urate. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that—amongst the 10 Tyr residues present in MSD1—Tyr63 was the main target responsible for nitration and inactivation of the enzyme. Tyr63 is located nearby the active centre at a distance of only 5.26 Å indicating that nitration could affect accessibility of the substrate binding pocket. The corresponding Tyr34 of human manganese SOD is also nitrated, suggesting that this might be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulation of manganese SODs. PMID:25428993

  8. Oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by ozone and nitrogen dioxide: reaction mechanisms and biological and atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Sandhiya, L; Kolandaivel, P; Senthilkumar, K

    2014-04-01

    The nitration of tyrosine by atmospheric oxidants, O3 and NO2, is an important cause for the spread of allergenic diseases. In the present study, the mechanism and pathways for the reaction of tyrosine with the atmospheric oxidants O3 and NO2 are studied using DFT-M06-2X, B3LYP, and B3LYP-D methods with the 6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The energy barrier for the initial oxidation reactions is also calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. The reaction is studied in gas, aqueous, and lipid media. The initial oxidation of tyrosine by O3 proceeds by H atom abstraction and addition reactions and leads to the formation of six different intermediates. The subsequent nitration reaction is studied for all the intermediates, and the results show that the nitration affects both the side chain and the aromatic ring of tyrosine. The rate constant of the favorable oxidation and nitration reaction is calculated using variational transition state theory over the temperature range of 278-350 K. The spectral properties of the oxidation and nitration products are calculated at the TD-M06-2X/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. The fate of the tyrosine radical intermediate is studied by its reaction with glutathione antioxidant. This study provides an enhanced understanding of the oxidation and nitration of tyrosine by O3 and NO2 in the context of improving the air quality and reducing the allergic diseases.

  9. Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: proteomic identification of nitrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiuzhen; Wang, Jianling; Soman, Kizhake V; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2011-08-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity.

  10. Flavonoids and tyrosine nitration: structure-activity relationship correlation with enthalpy of formation.

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Mitra; Terreux, Raphael; Phipps, Jenny

    2005-03-01

    The ability of 11 flavonoids, naturally occurring polyphenols, and their related structure-activity relationships (SAR's) for inhibiting peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosine was investigated. The flavonoids under study could be classified into four groups having very distinct in vitro inhibition effects. We also calculated the heat of formation (DeltaH(f)) of the corresponding flavonoids radicals which supported this finding. The most effective flavonoids included: catechin, taxifolin, luteolin, quercetin, and myricetin which have a common structural feature of ortho-dihydroxyl moiety (3',4'-OH substitution). Naringenin, kaempferol, and morin were 50% less effective inhibitors than the former group of flavonoid while their activities were in the range of trolox (an alpha-tocopherol analogue). The common structural aspect of this group of flavonoids is 4'-OH substitution. Therefore, these two groups of flavonoids may have similar mechanisms for their inhibition activity. No inhibition activity was observed by galangin. Apigenin behaved as a pro-oxidant in our in vitro study. Naringin was as effective as the second group at 4 mM tyrosine concentration while did not illustrate any inhibitory effect at 1 mM concentration of tyrosine. Our study provides further evidence for the importance of the catechol B ring and to a lesser effect the importance of 4'-OH substitution. Moreover, we observed very little or no influence on activity of flavonoids by 3-OH substitution and/or a C2-C3 double bond conjugated with 4-keto group within the subgroup containing the catechol moiety. Theoretical calculation of DeltaDeltaH(f) for tyrosyl radical repair by flavonoids (TyO*+FlOH-->TyOH+FlO*) correlated well with our in vitro results (inhibition% = -10 (DeltaDeltaH(f)), R2=0.906). Furthermore, this correlation was independent of tyrosine concentration. This model can be used to accurately predict the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on nitrotyrosine formation.

  11. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  12. High temperature triggers the metabolism of S-nitrosothiols in sunflower mediating a process of nitrosative stress which provokes the inhibition of ferredoxin-NADP reductase by tyrosine nitration.

    PubMed

    Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana M; Carreras, Alfonso; Gómez-Rodríguez, Maria V; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Luque, Francisco; Leterrier, Marina; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2011-11-01

    High temperature (HT) is considered a major abiotic stress that negatively affects both vegetative and reproductive growth. Whereas the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is well established under HT, less is known about the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). In sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings exposed to HT, NO content as well as S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) activity and expression were down-regulated with the simultaneous accumulation of total S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) including S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). However, the content of tyrosine nitration (NO(2) -Tyr) studied by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and by confocal laser scanning microscope was induced. Nitroproteome analysis under HT showed that this stress induced the protein expression of 13 tyrosine-nitrated proteins. Among the induced proteins, ferredoxin-NADP reductase (FNR) was selected to evaluate the effect of nitration on its activity after heat stress and in vitro conditions using 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (peroxynitrite donor) as the nitrating agent, the FNR activity being inhibited. Taken together, these results suggest that HT augments SNOs, which appear to mediate protein tyrosine nitration, inhibiting FNR, which is involved in the photosynthesis process.

  13. Reaction of tyrosine oxidation products with proteins of the lens

    PubMed Central

    Pirie, Antoinette

    1968-01-01

    Oxidation of tyrosine in the presence of bovine lens proteins leads to the formation of brown or black melanoproteins. Both tyrosinase and the oxidizing system of ferrous sulphate–ascorbic acid–EDTA are effective. The fluorescence of the lens proteins is both altered and enhanced by the tyrosine-oxidizing systems. Their fluorescence spectra resemble those of urea-insoluble proteins of human cataractous lens and of 1,2-naphthaquinone–proteins of naphthalene cataract. The lens proteins lose their thiol groups and, in acid hydrolysates of treated β-and γ-crystallins, a substance has been detected chromatographically that behaves similarly to a compound formed when 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) is oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of cysteine. Analysis and behaviour of this substance from hydrolysates of lens proteins suggest that it is a compound of cysteine and dopa. PMID:4971287

  14. Characterization of a PRL protein tyrosine phosphatase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Prakash Rao; Ayong, Lawrence; Eatrides, Jennifer; Schreiber, Melissa; Pham, Connie; Chakrabarti, Ratna; Fidock, David A; Allen, Charles M; Chakrabarti, Debopam

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenylated proteins have important functions in cell growth and differentiation of eukaryotic cells. Inhibitors of protein prenylation in malaria have recently shown strong promise as effective antimalarials. In studying protein prenylation in the malaria protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have shown earlier that the incubation of P. falciparum cells with (3)H-prenol precursors resulted in various size classes of labeled proteins. To understand the physiological function of prenylated proteins of malaria parasites, that are targets of prenyltransferase inhibitors, we searched the PlasmoDB database for proteins containing the C-terminus prenylation motif. We have identified, among other potentially prenylated proteins, an orthologue of a PRL (protein of regenerating liver) subgroup protein tyrosine phosphatases, termed PfPRL. Here, we show that PfPRL is expressed in the parasite's intraerythrocytic stages, where it partially associates with endoplasmic reticulum and within a subcompartment of the food vacuole. Additionally, PfPRL targeting parallels that of apical membrane antigen-1 in developing merozoites. Recombinant PfPRL shows phosphatase activity that is preferentially inhibited by a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor suggesting that PfPRL functions as a tyrosine phosphatase. Recombinant PfPRL can also be farnesylated in vitro. Inhibition of malarial farnesyltransferase activity can be achieved with the heptapetide RKCHFM, which corresponds to the C-terminus of PfPRL. This study provides the first evidence for expression of enzymatically active PRL-related protein tyrosine phosphatases in malarial parasites, and demonstrates the potential of peptides derived from Plasmodium prenylated proteins as malarial farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

  15. Regulation of receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase dimerization.

    PubMed

    van der Wijk, Thea; Blanchetot, Christophe; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    Receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are single membrane spanning proteins belonging to the family of PTPs that, together with the antagonistically acting protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), regulate the protein phosphotyrosine levels in cells. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification that has a major role in cell signaling by affecting protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Increasing evidence indicates that RPTPs, like RPTKs, are regulated by dimerization. For RPTPalpha, we have shown that rotational coupling of the constitutive dimers in the cell membrane determines enzyme activity. Furthermore, oxidative stress, identified as an important second messenger during the past decade, is a regulator of rotational coupling of RPTPalpha dimers. In this review, we discuss the biochemical and cell biological techniques that we use to study the regulation of RPTPs by dimerization. These techniques include (co-) immunoprecipitation, RPTP activity assays, chemical and genetic cross-linking, detection of cell surface proteins by biotinylation, and analysis of RPTPalpha dimers, using conformation-sensitive antibody binding.

  16. Pleiotrophin stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-adducin through inactivation of the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta.

    PubMed

    Pariser, Harold; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ezquerra, Laura; Herradon, Gonzalo; Deuel, Thomas F

    2005-09-16

    Pleiotrophin (PTN the protein, Ptn the gene) signals through a unique mechanism; it inactivates the tyrosine phosphatase activity of its receptor, the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)beta/zeta, and increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the substrates of RPTPbeta/zeta through the continued activity of a yet to be described protein tyrosine kinase(s) in PTN-stimulated cells. We have now found that the cytoskeletal protein beta-adducin interacts with the intracellular domain of RPTPbeta/zeta in a yeast two-hybrid system, that beta-adducin is a substrate of RPTPbeta/zeta, that beta-adducin is phosphorylated in tyrosine in cells not stimulated by PTN, and that tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-adducin is sharply increased in PTN-stimulated cells, suggesting that beta-adducin is a downstream target of and regulated by the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta signaling pathway. beta-Catenin was the first downstream target of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta signaling pathway to be identified; these data thus also suggest that PTN coordinately regulates steady state levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the important cytoskeletal proteins beta-adducin and beta-catenin and, through PTN-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation, beta-adducin may contribute to the disruption of cytoskeletal structure, increased plasticity, and loss of homophilic cell-cell adhesion that are the consequences of PTN stimulation of cells and a characteristic feature of different malignant cells with mutations that activate constitutive expression of the endogenous Ptn gene.

  17. Bidimensional tandem mass spectrometry for selective identification of nitration sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Amoresano, Angela; Chiappetta, Giovanni; Pucci, Piero; D'Ischia, Marco; Marino, Gennaro

    2007-03-01

    Nitration of protein tyrosine residues is very often regarded as a molecular signal of peroxynitrite formation during development, oxidative stress, and aging. However, protein nitration might also have biological functions comparable to protein phosphorylation, mainly in redox signaling and in signal transduction. The major challenge in the proteomic analysis of nitroproteins is the need to discriminate modified proteins, usually occurring at substoichiometric levels from the large amount of nonmodified proteins. Moreover, precise localization of the nitration site is often required to fully describe the biological process. Existing methodologies essentially rely on immunochemical techniques either using 2D-PAGE fractionation in combination with western blot analyses or exploiting immunoaffinity procedures to selectively capture nitrated proteins. Here we report a totally new approach involving dansyl chloride labeling of the nitration sites that rely on the enormous potential of MSn analysis. The tryptic digest from the entire protein mixture is directly analyzed by MS on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Discrimination between nitro- and unmodified peptide is based on two selectivity criteria obtained by combining a precursor ion scan and an MS3 analysis. This new procedure was successfully applied to the identification of 3-nitrotyrosine residues in complex protein mixtures. PMID:17243771

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during meiotic divisions of starfish oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peaucellier, G.; Andersen, A.C.; Kinsey, W.H. )

    1990-04-01

    We have used an antibody specific for phosphotyrosine to investigate protein phosphorylation on tyrosine during hormone-induced maturation of starfish oocytes. Analysis of immunoprecipitates from cortices of in vivo labeled Marthasterias glacialis oocytes revealed the presence of labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins only after hormone addition. Six major phosphoproteins of 195, 155, 100, 85, 45, and 35 kDa were detected. Total activity in immunoprecipitates increased until first polar body emission and was greatly reduced upon completion of meiosis but some proteins exhibited different kinetics. The labeling of the 155-kDa protein reached a maximum at germinal vesicle breakdown, while the 35-kDa appeared later and disappeared after polar body emission. Similar results were obtained with Asterias rubens oocytes. In vitro phosphorylation of cortices showed that tyrosine kinase activity is a major protein kinase activity in this fraction, the main endogenous substrate being a 68-kDa protein. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro were almost similar in extracts from oocytes treated or not with the hormone.

  19. Specific dephosphorylation of Janus Kinase 2 by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhuo; Liu, Xidong; Chu, Huiying; Fu, Xueqi; Li, Tianbao; Hu, Lianghai; Xing, Shu; Li, Guohui; Gu, Jingkai; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2015-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated through phosphorylation of an activation loop thereby turning on downstream signaling pathways. Activation of JAK2, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase with an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling, requires phosphorylation of the 1007 and 1008 tyrosyl residues. Dephosphorylation of these two sites by phosphatases presumably inactivates the enzyme, but the underlying mechanism is not known. In this study, we employed MALDI-TOF/TOF and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the dephosphorylation process by using synthetic peptides derived from the tandem autophosphorylation sites (Y1007 and Y1008) of human JAK2. We found that tyrosine phosphatases catalyzed the dephosphorylation reaction sequentially, but different enzymes exhibited different selectivity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B caused rapid dephosphorylation of Y1008 followed by Y1007, while SHP1 and SHP2 selectively dephosphorylated Y1008 only, and yet HePTP randomly removed a single phosphate from either Y1007 or Y1008, leaving behind mono-phosphorylated peptides. The specificity of dephosphorylation was further confirmed by molecular modeling. The data reveal multiple modes of JAK2 regulation by tyrosine phosphatases, reflecting a complex, and intricate interplay between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  20. Beetroot betalain inhibits peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration and DNA strand cleavage.

    PubMed

    Sakihama, Yasuko; Maeda, Makiko; Hashimoto, Makoto; Tahara, Satoshi; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Two major betalains, red-purple betacyanins and yellow betaxanthins, were isolated from red beetroots (Beta vulgaris L.), and their peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenging capacity was investigated. Apparent colours of the betalains were bleached by the addition of ONOO(-), and the absorbance decreases were suppressed in the presence of glutathione, a ONOO(-) scavenger. After bleaching, a new absorption maximum was observed at 350 nm in the spectrum of the resulting reaction mixture. New peaks were detected from HPLC analysis of the reaction products of betanin, a representative constituent of red beetroot betacyanins, treated with ONOO(-) monitoring at 350 nm, and the intensity of the major peak was positively correlated with ONOO(-) concentration. Betanin inhibited the ONOO(-) (0.5 mM)-dependent nitration of tyrosine (0.1 mM). Additionally, the IC(50) value of betanin (19.2 μM) was lower than that of ascorbate (79.6 μM). The presence of betanin (0.05-1.0 mM) also inhibited ONOO(-) (0.5 mM)-dependent DNA strand cleavage in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that betalains can protect cells from nitrosative stress in addition to protecting them from oxidative stresses. PMID:22087762

  1. Short-term alpha- or gamma-delta-enriched tocopherol oil supplementation differentially effects the expression of proinflammatory mediators: selective impacts on characteristics of protein tyrosine nitration in vivo¿.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein 3’-nitrotyrosine (pNT) is an established biomarker of nitrosative cell stress in animals challenged with proinflammatory mediators like endotoxin (LPS). We determined that short-term feeding of diets supplemented with a-tocopherol- (a-T -96% a-isomer) or '- and d-enriched mixed tocopherol o...

  2. NLRP3 tyrosine phosphorylation is controlled by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22

    PubMed Central

    Spalinger, Marianne R.; Kasper, Stephanie; Gottier, Claudia; Lang, Silvia; Atrott, Kirstin; Vavricka, Stephan R.; Scharl, Sylvie; Gutte, Petrus M.; Grütter, Markus G.; Beer, Hans-Dietmar; Contassot, Emmanuel; Chan, Andrew C.; Dai, Xuezhi; Rawlings, David J.; Mair, Florian; Becher, Burkhard; Falk, Werner; Fried, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes form as the result of the intracellular presence of danger-associated molecular patterns and mediate the release of active IL-1β, which influences a variety of inflammatory responses. Excessive inflammasome activation results in severe inflammatory conditions, but physiological IL-1β secretion is necessary for intestinal homeostasis. Here, we have described a mechanism of NLRP3 inflammasome regulation by tyrosine phosphorylation of NLRP3 at Tyr861. We demonstrated that protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22), variants in which are associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, dephosphorylates NLRP3 upon inflammasome induction, allowing efficient NLRP3 activation and subsequent IL-1β release. In murine models, PTPN22 deficiency resulted in pronounced colitis, increased NLRP3 phosphorylation, but reduced levels of mature IL-1β. Conversely, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that carried an autoimmunity-associated PTPN22 variant had increased IL-1β levels. Together, our results identify tyrosine phosphorylation as an important regulatory mechanism for NLRP3 that prevents aberrant inflammasome activation. PMID:27043286

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase regulation of endothelial cell apoptosis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Chang, J; Gorospe, M; Passaniti, A

    1996-02-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, occurs during development and may also be an important factor in many diseases. However, little is known about the signal transduction pathways regulating apoptosis. In these studies, loss of endothelial cell-substrate attachment and apoptosis after removal of growth factors was associated with dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues at the cell periphery. Dephosphorylation of total cellular proteins accompanied apoptosis and was reduced by orthovanadate, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Orthovanadate blocked the fragmentation of nuclear DNA, inhibited DNA laddering, and suppressed the expression of TRPM-2, an apoptosis-associated gene. The tyrosine phosphorylation levels of FAK125, erk1 (mitogen-activated kinase kinase), and cdc-2 were reduced during apoptosis. FAK125 dephosphorylation was inhibited by orthovanadate, but premature activation (tyrosine dephosphorylation) of cdc-2 was not. Orthovanadate was as effective as basic fibroblast growth factor in activating erk1 without increasing cell proliferation and in preventing the apoptosis of endothelial cells after treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha. Endothelial cell differentiation on extracellular matrix (Matrigel) was also stimulated by orthovanadate in the absence of basic fibroblast growth factor without affecting growth arrest and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (Waf1/Cip1/Sdi1) was down-regulated during the early stages of differentiation, remained low for at least 6 hours as differentiation proceeded, and increased upon completion of differentiation. Cells that failed to down-regulate p21 mRNA on Matrigel in the absence of angiogenic factors underwent apoptosis. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatases are actively involved in signal transduction during apoptosis and may regulate p21 expression to inhibit endothelial cell differentiation.

  4. Protein (tyrosine)-chromophore (protonated Schiff base) coupling in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamoto, J.H.; Dupuis, P.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1984-11-01

    The kinetics of formation of both the tyrosinate ion (from its absorption at 296 nm) and the deprotonated Schiff base (M/sub 412/) (from its absorption at 404 nm) are studied simultaneously at different pH values (7-11) and temperatures (5-25/sup 0/C). Two formation rates are observed for M/sub 412/ in agreement with previous observations. The slow one is dominant under physiological conditions and is found to be slightly faster than that for the tyrosinate formation. This is in disagreement with the proposal that the tyrosinate formation is a prerequisite to the deprotonation of the Schiff base (M/sub 412/). The ratio of the amplitudes of the fast and slow components is found to be sensitive to pH and, at any pH, it can be used to calculate an amino acid pK/sub a/ value of 9.6. This is explained by proposing the existence of two sites for the protonated Schiff base within the protein. In one site, the Schiff base is near the neutral form of an amino acid residue with a pK/sub a/ value of 9.6 (giving rise to the slow component), while in the other, it is near its conjugate base. The formation of the tyrosinate ion as well as the formation of the slow and fast components of M/sub 412/ all have activation energies that are comparable to H-bond energies. A model is suggested to account for this and the comparable deprotonation rates of tyrosine and the slow component of the protonated Schiff base. It involves the reduction of their pK/sub a/ by their exposure to a positively charged species. 43 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Phospho-tyrosine dependent protein–protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Arndt; Benlasfer, Nouhad; Birth, Petra; Hegele, Anna; Wachsmuth, Franziska; Apelt, Luise; Stelzl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications, such as tyrosine phosphorylation, regulate protein–protein interactions (PPIs) critical for signal processing and cellular phenotypes. We extended an established yeast two-hybrid system employing human protein kinases for the analyses of phospho-tyrosine (pY)-dependent PPIs in a direct experimental, large-scale approach. We identified 292 mostly novel pY-dependent PPIs which showed high specificity with respect to kinases and interacting proteins and validated a large fraction in co-immunoprecipitation experiments from mammalian cells. About one-sixth of the interactions are mediated by known linear sequence binding motifs while the majority of pY-PPIs are mediated by other linear epitopes or governed by alternative recognition modes. Network analysis revealed that pY-mediated recognition events are tied to a highly connected protein module dedicated to signaling and cell growth pathways related to cancer. Using binding assays, protein complementation and phenotypic readouts to characterize the pY-dependent interactions of TSPAN2 (tetraspanin 2) and GRB2 or PIK3R3 (p55γ), we exemplarily provide evidence that the two pY-dependent PPIs dictate cellular cancer phenotypes. PMID:25814554

  6. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Hypothalamic Insulin and Leptin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Dodd, Garron T; Tiganis, Tony

    2015-10-01

    The hypothalamus is critical to the coordination of energy balance and glucose homeostasis. It responds to peripheral factors, such as insulin and leptin, that convey to the brain the degree of adiposity and the metabolic status of the organism. The development of leptin and insulin resistance in hypothalamic neurons appears to have a key role in the exacerbation of diet-induced obesity. In rodents, this has been attributed partly to the increased expression of the tyrosine phosphatases Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP), which attenuate leptin and insulin signaling. Deficiencies in PTP1B and TCPTP in the brain, or specific neurons, promote insulin and leptin signaling and prevent diet-induced obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and fatty liver disease. Although targeting phosphatases and hypothalamic circuits remains challenging, recent advances indicate that such hurdles might be overcome. Here, we focus on the roles of PTP1B and TCPTP in insulin and leptin signaling and explore their potential as therapeutic targets.

  7. Defining the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tran, Kim My; Aziz, Kathryn E; Sorokin, Alexey V; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Wenqi

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which plays a vital role in a variety of human cellular processes, is coordinated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Genomic studies provide compelling evidence that PTPs are frequently mutated in various human cancers, suggesting that they have important roles in tumor suppression. However, the cellular functions and regulatory machineries of most PTPs are still largely unknown. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the protein-protein interaction network of the human PTP family, we performed a global proteomic study. Using a Minkowski distance-based unified scoring environment (MUSE) for the data analysis, we identified 940 high confidence candidate-interacting proteins that comprise the interaction landscape of the human PTP family. Through a gene ontology analysis and functional validations, we connected the PTP family with several key signaling pathways or cellular functions whose associations were previously unclear, such as the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway, the Hippo-YAP pathway, and cytokinesis. Our study provides the first glimpse of a protein interaction network for the human PTP family, linking it to a number of crucial signaling events, and generating a useful resource for future studies of PTPs.

  8. Quantitative identification of protein nitration sites.

    PubMed

    Chiappetta, Giovanni; Corbo, Claudia; Palmese, Angelo; Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Marino, Gennaro; Amoresano, Angela

    2009-03-01

    Several labelling strategies have been developed targeting specific amino acid residues and/or PTMs. Methods specifically tailored for the qualitative and sometimes quantitative determination of PTMs have emerged. Many research groups have focused their attention towards o-nitrotyrosine residues, developing various methodologies for their identification, while direct quantification has remained elusive. So far the iTRAQ chemistry has been limited to primary amines. Here, we report a new strategy based on the use of iTRAQ reagents coupled to MS analysis for the selective labelling of o-nitrotyrosine residues. This method was proved to lead to the simultaneous localisation and quantification of nitration sites both in model proteins and in biological systems. PMID:19242934

  9. The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, T

    1998-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of tyrosines in proteins plays a key role in regulating many different processes in eukaryotic organisms, such as growth control, cell cycle control, differentiation cell shape and movement, gene transcription, synaptic transmission, and insulin action. Phosphorylation of proteins is brought about by enzymes called protein-tyrosine kinases that add phosphate to specific tyrosines in target proteins; phosphate is removed from phosphorylated tyrosines by enzymes called protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Phosphorylated tyrosines are recognized by specialized binding domains on other proteins, and such interactions are used to initiate intracellular signaling pathways. Currently, more than 95 protein-tyrosine kinases and more than 55 protein-tyrosine phosphatase genes are known in Homo sapiens. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation is a hallmark of many types of cancer and other human diseases. Drugs are being developed that antagonize the responsible protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in order to combat these diseases. PMID:9602534

  10. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  11. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  12. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  13. A rapid and selective mass spectrometric method for the identification of nitrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Amoresano, Angela; Chiappetta, Giovanni; Pucci, Piero; Marino, Gennaro

    2008-01-01

    The nitration of protein tyrosine residues represents an important posttranslational modification during development, oxidative stress, and biological aging. The major challenge in the proteomic analysis of nitroproteins is the need to discriminate modified proteins, usually occurring at substoichiometric levels, from the large amount of nonmodified proteins. Moreover, precise localization of the nitration site is often required to fully describe the biological process. Identification of the specific targets of protein oxidation was previously accomplished using immunoprecipitation techniques followed by immunochemical detection. Here, we report a totally new approach involving dansyl chloride labeling of the nitration sites which relies on the enormous potential of MS(n) analysis. The tryptic digest from the entire protein mixture is directly analyzed by MS on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. Discrimination between nitro- and unmodified peptide is based on two selectivity criteria obtained by combining a precursor ion scan and a MS3 analysis. The novel labeling procedure was successfully applied to the identification of 3-nitrotyrosine residues in complex protein mixtures. PMID:19082935

  14. Phosphorylation and nitration levels of photosynthetic proteins are conversely regulated by light stress.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, Dmitry; Lohscheider, Jens N; Kononikhin, Alexey S; Popov, Igor A; Nikolaev, Eugene N; Adamska, Iwona

    2011-11-01

    Using a label-free mass spectrometric approach, we investigated light-induced changes in the distribution of phosphorylated and nitrated proteins within subpopulations of native photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves adapted to growth light (GL) and subsequently exposed to high light (HL). Eight protein phosphorylation sites were identified in photosystem II (PSII) and the phosphorylation level of seven was regulated by HL as determined based on peak areas from ion chromatograms of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides. Although the phosphorylation of PSII proteins was reported in the past, we demonstrated for the first time that two minor antenna LHCB4 isoforms are alternately phosphorylated under GL and HL conditions in PSII monomers, dimers and supercomplexes. A role of LHCB4 phosphorylation in state transition and monomerization of PSII under HL conditions is proposed. We determined changes in the nitration level of 23 tyrosine residues in five photosystem I (PSI) and nine PSII proteins and demonstrated for the majority of them a lower nitration level in PSI and PSII complexes and supercomplexes under HL conditions, as compared to GL. In contrast, the nitration level significantly increased in assembled/disassembled PSI and PSII subcomplexes under HL conditions. A possible role of nitration in (1) monomerization of LHCB1-3 trimers under HL conditions (2) binding properties of ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase to photosystem I, and (3) PSII photodamage and repair cycle, is discussed. Based on these data, we propose that the conversely regulated phosphorylation and nitration levels regulate the stability and turnover of photosynthetic complexes under HL conditions.

  15. Signal processing by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification controlling many biological processes. Most phosphorylation occurs on serine and threonine, and to a less extend on tyrosine (Tyr). In animals, Tyr phosphorylation is crucial for the regulation of many responses such as growth or differentiation. Only recently with the development of mass spectrometry, it has been reported that Tyr phosphorylation is as important in plants as in animals. The genes encoding protein Tyr kinases and protein Tyr phosphatases have been identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Putative substrates of these enzymes, and thus Tyr-phosphorylated proteins have been reported by proteomic studies based on accurate mass spectrometry analysis of the phosphopeptides and phosphoproteins. Biochemical approaches, pharmacology and genetic manipulations have indicated that responses to stress and developmental processes involve changes in protein Tyr phosphorylation. The aim of this review is to present an update on Tyr phosphorylation in plants in order to better assess the role of this post-translational modification in plant physiology. PMID:21628997

  16. Methods to monitor classical protein-tyrosine phosphatase oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Karisch, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly H2O2, act as intracellular second messengers in many signaling pathways. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are now believed to be important targets of ROS. PTPs contain a conserved catalytic cysteine with an unusually low pKa. This property allows PTPs to execute nucleophilic attack on substrate phosphotyrosyl residues, but also renders them highly susceptible to oxidation. Reversible oxidation, which inactivates PTPs, is emerging as an important cellular regulatory mechanism and might contribute to human diseases, including cancer. Given their potential toxicity, it seems likely that ROS generation is highly controlled within cells to restrict oxidation to those PTPs that must be inactivated for signaling to proceed. Thus, identifying ROS-inactivated PTPs could be tantamount to finding the PTP(s) that critically regulate a specific signaling pathway. This article provides an overview of the methods currently available to identify and quantify PTP oxidation and outlines future challenges in redox signaling. PMID:22577968

  17. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Substrates and Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Jesse; Haj, Fawaz G.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires integration of complex signaling networks which, when deregulated, contribute to metabolic syndrome and related disorders. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has emerged as a key regulator of signaling networks that are implicated in metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review, we examine mechanisms that regulate PTP1B-substrate interaction, enzymatic activity and experimental approaches to identify PTP1B substrates. We then highlight findings that implicate PTP1B in metabolic regulation. In particular, insulin and leptin signaling are discussed as well as recently identified PTP1B substrates that are involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress response, cell-cell communication, energy balance and vesicle trafficking. In summary, PTP1B exhibits exquisite substrate specificity and is an outstanding pharmaceutical target for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25263014

  18. Nitration of JAK-2 at the 1007Y-1008Y activation epitope impedes phosphorylation at this site: defining a GH, AKT/protein kinase B and nitric oxide synthase axis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generalized liver protein tyrosine nitration (3’-nitrotyrosine, 3’-NT) increases in vivo after GH injection with immunohistocellular patterns strikingly similar to those we observed for a specific nitration of JAK2 at its 1007Y-1008Y regulatory phosphorylation epitope following proinflammatory chall...

  19. Examination of tyrosine/adenine stacking interactions in protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Kari L; Pellock, Samuel J; Cox, James R; Cafiero, Mauricio L; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2013-11-14

    The π-stacking interactions between tyrosine amino acid side chains and adenine-bearing ligands are examined. Crystalline protein structures from the protein data bank (PDB) exhibiting face-to-face tyrosine/adenine arrangements were used to construct 20 unique 4-methylphenol/N9-methyladenine (p-cresol/9MeA) model systems. Full geometry optimization of the 20 crystal structures with the M06-2X density functional theory method identified 11 unique low-energy conformations. CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS) limit interaction energies were estimated for all of the structures to determine the magnitude of the interaction between the two ring systems. CCSD(T) computations with double-ζ basis sets (e.g., 6-31G*(0.25) and aug-cc-pVDZ) indicate that the MP2 method overbinds by as much as 3.07 kcal mol(-1) for the crystal structures and 3.90 kcal mol(-1) for the optimized structures. In the 20 crystal structures, the estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy ranges from -4.00 to -6.83 kcal mol(-1), with an average interaction energy of -5.47 kcal mol(-1), values remarkably similar to the corresponding data for phenylalanine/adenine stacking interactions. Geometry optimization significantly increases the interaction energies of the p-cresol/9MeA model systems. The average estimated CCSD(T) CBS limit interaction energy of the 11 optimized structures is 3.23 kcal mol(-1) larger than that for the 20 crystal structures.

  20. PSTPIP: A Tyrosine Phosphorylated Cleavage Furrow–associated Protein that Is a Substrate for a PEST Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Susan; Dowbenko, Donald; Cheng, Jill; Li, Wenlu; Brush, Jennifer; Utzig, Suzan; Simanis, Viesturs; Lasky, Laurence A.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated proteins which interact with the PEST-type protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP hematopoietic stem cell fraction (HSCF), using the yeast two-hybrid system. This resulted in the identification of proline, serine, threonine phosphatase interacting protein (PSTPIP), a novel member of the actin- associated protein family that is homologous to Schizosaccharomyces pombe CDC15p, a phosphorylated protein involved with the assembly of the actin ring in the cytokinetic cleavage furrow. The binding of PTP HSCF to PSTPIP was induced by a novel interaction between the putative coiled-coil region of PSTPIP and the COOH-terminal, proline-rich region of the phosphatase. PSTPIP is tyrosine phosphorylated both endogenously and in v-Src transfected COS cells, and cotransfection of dominant-negative PTP HSCF results in hyperphosphorylation of PSTPIP. This dominant-negative effect is dependent upon the inclusion of the COOH-terminal, proline-rich PSTPIP-binding region of the phosphatase. Confocal microscopy analysis of endogenous PSTPIP revealed colocalization with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and actin-rich cytokinetic cleavage furrow. Overexpression of PSTPIP in 3T3 cells resulted in the formation of extended filopodia, consistent with a role for this protein in actin reorganization. Finally, overexpression of mammalian PSTPIP in exponentially growing S. pombe results in a dominant-negative inhibition of cytokinesis. PSTPIP is therefore a novel actin-associated protein, potentially involved with cytokinesis, whose tyrosine phosphorylation is regulated by PTP HSCF. PMID:9265651

  1. Induction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages incubated with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, A; Shrivastava, A; Kumar, R

    1995-03-01

    The cellular and molecular interaction between monocyte/macrophage and tumor cells leading to macrophage activation is not clearly understood. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event, we checked whether the tumor cells alter tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in macrophages. We found that both L929 and Yac-1 tumor cells induced increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several polypeptides in peritoneal as well as P388D-1 and IC-21 macrophages. Macrophages co-cultured with tumor cells also showed increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These observations suggest that increased tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in tumor cell-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539664

  2. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  3. Expression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase is Negatively Regulated Via Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Marcio Henrique Mello; Glezer, Isaias; Xavier, Andre Machado; da Silva, Marcelo Alberti Paiva; Pino, Jessica Monteiro Volejnik; Zamith, Thiago Panaro; Vieira, Taynara Fernanda; Antonio, Bruno Brito; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Martins, Vilma Regina; Lee, Kil Sun

    2016-07-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a glycoprotein of the plasma membrane that plays pleiotropic functions by interacting with multiple signaling complexes at the cell surface. Recently, a number of studies have reported the involvement of PrP(C) in dopamine metabolism and signaling, including its interactions with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptors. However, the outcomes reported by independent studies are still debatable. Therefore in this study, we investigated the effects of PrP(C) on the TH expression during the differentiation of N2a cells with dibutyryl-cAMP, a well-known cAMP analog that activates TH transcription. Upon differentiation, TH was induced with concomitant reduction of PrP(C) at protein level, but not at mRNA level. shRNA-mediated PrP(C) reduction increased the basal level of TH at both mRNA and protein levels without dibutyryl-cAMP treatment. This phenotype was reversed by re-expression of PrP(C). PrP(C) knockdown also potentiated the effect of dibutyryl-cAMP on TH expression. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) has suppressive effects on TH expression. As a consequence, altered PrP(C) functions may affect the regulation of dopamine metabolism and related neurological disorders.

  4. The Sts Proteins Target Tyrosine Phosphorylated, Ubiquitinated Proteins within TCR Signaling Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Carpino, N.; Chen, Y; Nassar, N; Oh, H

    2009-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) detects the presence of infectious pathogens and activates numerous intracellular signaling pathways. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination serve as key regulatory mechanisms downstream of the TCR. Negative regulation of TCR signaling pathways is important in controlling the immune response, and the Suppressor of TCR Signaling proteins (Sts-1 and Sts-2) have been shown to function as critical negative regulators of TCR signaling. Although their mechanism of action has yet to be fully uncovered, it is known that the Sts proteins possess intrinsic phosphatase activity. Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 and Sts-2 are instrumental in down-modulating proteins that are dually modified by both protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Specifically, both naive and activated T cells derived from genetically engineered mice that lack the Sts proteins display strikingly elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylated, ubiquitinated proteins following TCR stimulation. The accumulation of the dually modified proteins is transient, and in activated T cells but not naive T cells is significantly enhanced by co-receptor engagement. Our observations hint at a novel regulatory mechanism downstream of the T cell receptor.

  5. Mechanism of the Reaction of Human Manganese Superoxide Dismutase with Peroxynitrite: Nitration of Critical Tyrosine 34.

    PubMed

    Demicheli, Verónica; Moreno, Diego M; Jara, Gabriel E; Lima, Analía; Carballal, Sebastián; Ríos, Natalia; Batthyany, Carlos; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Quijano, Celia; Estrı́n, Darío A; Martí, Marcelo A; Radi, Rafael

    2016-06-21

    Human Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (hMnSOD) is a mitochondrial enzyme that metabolizes superoxide radical (O2(•-)). O2(•-) reacts at diffusional rates with nitric oxide to yield a potent nitrating species, peroxynitrite anion (ONOO(-)). MnSOD is nitrated and inactivated in vivo, with active site Tyr34 as the key oxidatively modified residue. We previously reported a k of ∼1.0 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of hMnSOD with ONOO(-) by direct stopped-flow spectroscopy and the critical role of Mn in the nitration process. In this study, we further established the mechanism of the reaction of hMnSOD with ONOO(-), including the necessary re-examination of the second-order rate constant by an independent method and the delineation of the microscopic steps that lead to the regio-specific nitration of Tyr34. The redetermination of k was performed by competition kinetics utilizing coumarin boronic acid, which reacts with ONOO(-) at a rate of ∼1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) to yield the fluorescence product, 7-hydroxycoumarin. Time-resolved fluorescence studies in the presence of increasing concentrations of hMnSOD provided a k of ∼1.0 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), fully consistent with the direct method. Proteomic analysis indicated that ONOO(-), but not other nitrating agents, mediates the selective modification of active site Tyr34. Hybrid quantum-classical (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) simulations supported a series of steps that involve the initial reaction of ONOO(-) with Mn(III) to yield Mn(IV) and intermediates that ultimately culminate in 3-nitroTyr34. The data reported herein provide a kinetic and mechanistic basis for rationalizing how MnSOD constitutes an intramitochondrial target for ONOO(-) and the microscopic events, with atomic level resolution, that lead to selective and efficient nitration of critical Tyr34. PMID:27227512

  6. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  7. ROLE OF TYROSINE-SULFATED PROTEINS IN RETINAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Y.; Al-Ubaidi, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a significant role in cellular and retinal health. The study of retinal tyrosine-sulfated proteins is an important first step toward understanding the role of ECM in retinal health and diseases. These secreted proteins are members of the retinal ECM. Tyrosine sulfation was shown to be necessary for the development of proper retinal structure and function. The importance of tyrosine sulfation is further demonstrated by the evolutionary presence of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases, enzymes that catalyze proteins’ tyrosine sulfation, and the compensatory abilities of these enzymes. Research has identified four tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins: fibulin 2, vitronectin, complement factor H (CFH), and opticin. Vitronectin and CFH regulate the activation of the complement system and are involved in the etiology of some cases of age-related macular degeneration. Analysis of the role of tyrosine sulfation in fibulin function showed that sulfation influences the protein's ability to regulate growth and migration. Although opticin was recently shown to exhibit anti-angiogenic properties, it is not yet determined what role sulfation plays in that function. Future studies focusing on identifying all of the tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins would be instrumental in determining the impact of sulfation on retinal protein function in retinal homeostasis and diseases. PMID:25819460

  8. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26058329

  9. Comparative Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases Regulating Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gyun Jee; Kim, Jaehong; Kim, Jong-Heon; Song, Seungeun; Park, Hana; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key regulatory factors in inflammatory signaling pathways. Although PTPs have been extensively studied, little is known about their role in neuroinflammation. In the present study, we examined the expression of 6 different PTPs (PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, MEG2, LYP, and RPTPβ) and their role in glial activation and neuroinflammation. All PTPs were expressed in brain and glia. The expression of PTP1B, SHP2, and LYP was enhanced in the inflamed brain. The expression of PTP1B, TC-PTP, and LYP was increased after treating microglia cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To examine the role of PTPs in microglial activation and neuroinflammation, we used specific pharmacological inhibitors of PTPs. Inhibition of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, LYP, and RPTPβ suppressed nitric oxide production in LPS-treated microglial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injection of PTP1B, TC-PTP, SHP2, and RPTPβ inhibitors downregulated microglial activation in an LPS-induced neuroinflammation model. Our results indicate that multiple PTPs are involved in regulating microglial activation and neuroinflammation, with different expression patterns and specific functions. Thus, PTP inhibitors can be exploited for therapeutic modulation of microglial activation in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:27790059

  10. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  11. Anomalous pH-dependence of the activity of human matrilysin (matrix metalloproteinase-7) as revealed by nitration and amination of its tyrosine residues

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Matrilysin activity exhibits a broad bell-shaped pH-dependence profile, with pKa values of 4.0 and 9.8. A maximum of five out of eight tyrosine residues in matrilysin were nitrated with tetranitromethane. On nitration of between one and five tyrosines, pKa at the alkaline side (pKe2) was shifted from 9.8 to 10.3–10.6, while that at the acidic side (pKe1) was not altered. The pKe2 that was shifted by nitration to 10.3–10.6 was restored to 9.4–9.7 by subsequent amination, suggesting that the shift in pKe2 is induced by a negative charge introduced on the most reactive tyrosine, Tyr-150. The Michaelis constant (Km) observed at pH 10 was decreased by nitration as a result of the increase in pKe2, suggesting that the residue with pKe2 may play a role in the recognition of substrate. When four or five tyrosines were nitrated, the activity at pH <7 decreased significantly, while that at pH 7–10 was unchanged, and thus the pH-dependence was not bell-shaped, but anomalous, with a third pKa (pKe3) of 6.2–6.4 in addition to pKe1 and pKe2. This suggests the possibility that a newly introduced nitrotyrosine residue has a strong influence on the activity as an ionizable group. PMID:15487974

  12. Partial purification and characterization of an enzyme from pea nuclei with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y L; Roux, S J

    1995-01-01

    A pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclear enzyme with protein tyrosine phosphatase activity has been partially purified and characterized. The enzyme has a molecular mass of 90 kD as judged by molecular sieve column chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Like animal protein tyrosine phosphatases it can be inhibited by low concentrations of molybdate and vanadate. It is also inhibited by heparin and spermine but not by either the acid phosphatase inhibitors citrate and tartrate or the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid. The enzyme does not require Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ for its activity but is stimulated by ethylenediaminetetraacetate and by ethyleneglycolbis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid. It dephosphorylates phosphotyrosine residues on the four different 32P-tyrosine-labeled peptides tested but not the phosphoserine/threonine residues on casein and histone. Like some animal protein tyrosine phosphatases, it has a variable pH optimum depending on the substrate used: the optimum is 5.5 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled lysozyme, but it is 7.0 when the substrate is [32P]tyrosine-labeled poly(glutamic acid, tyrosine). It has a Km of 4 microM when the lysozyme protein is used as a substrate.

  13. Pharmacophore modeling for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Lee, Keun Woo

    2007-05-01

    A three dimensional chemical feature based pharmacophore model was developed for the inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) using the CATALYST software, which would provide useful knowledge for performing virtual screening to identify new inhibitors targeted toward type II diabetes and obesity. A dataset of 27 inhibitors, with diverse structural properties, and activities ranging from 0.026 to 600 microM, was selected as a training set. Hypol, the most reliable quantitative four featured pharmacophore hypothesis, was generated from a training set composed of compounds with two H-bond acceptors, one hydrophobic aromatic and one ring aromatic features. It has a correlation coefficient, RMSD and cost difference (null cost-total cost) of 0.946, 0.840 and 65.731, respectively. The best hypothesis (Hypol) was validated using four different methods. Firstly, a cross validation was performed by randomizing the data using the Cat-Scramble technique. The results confirmed that the pharmacophore models generated from the training set were valid. Secondly, a test set of 281 molecules was scored, with a correlation of 0.882 obtained between the experimental and predicted activities. Hypol performed well in correctly discriminating the active and inactive molecules. Thirdly, the model was investigated by mapping on two PTP1B inhibitors identified by different pharmaceutical companies. The Hypol model correctly predicted these compounds as being highly active. Finally, docking simulations were performed on few compounds to substantiate the role of the pharmacophore features at the binding site of the protein by analyzing their binding conformations. These multiple validation approaches provided confidence in the utility of this pharmacophore model as a 3D query for virtual screening to retrieve new chemical entities showing potential as potent PTP1B inhibitors.

  14. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  15. Characterization of Detergent-Insoluble Proteins in ALS Indicates a Causal Link between Nitrative Stress and Aggregation in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Manuela; Samengo, Giuseppina; Nardo, Giovanni; Massignan, Tania; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Tartari, Silvia; Cantoni, Lavinia; Marino, Marianna; Cheroni, Cristina; De Biasi, Silvia; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Strong, Michael J.; Estevez, Alvaro G.; Salmona, Mario; Bendotti, Caterina; Bonetto, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive and fatal motor neuron disease, and protein aggregation has been proposed as a possible pathogenetic mechanism. However, the aggregate protein constituents are poorly characterized so knowledge on the role of aggregation in pathogenesis is limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a proteomic analysis of the protein composition of the insoluble fraction, as a model of protein aggregates, from familial ALS (fALS) mouse model at different disease stages. We identified several proteins enriched in the detergent-insoluble fraction already at a preclinical stage, including intermediate filaments, chaperones and mitochondrial proteins. Aconitase, HSC70 and cyclophilin A were also significantly enriched in the insoluble fraction of spinal cords of ALS patients. Moreover, we found that the majority of proteins in mice and HSP90 in patients were tyrosine-nitrated. We therefore investigated the role of nitrative stress in aggregate formation in fALS-like murine motor neuron-neuroblastoma (NSC-34) cell lines. By inhibiting nitric oxide synthesis the amount of insoluble proteins, particularly aconitase, HSC70, cyclophilin A and SOD1 can be substantially reduced. Conclusion/Significance Analysis of the insoluble fractions from cellular/mouse models and human tissues revealed novel aggregation-prone proteins and suggests that nitrative stress contribute to protein aggregate formation in ALS. PMID:19956584

  16. Comparison of fluorescence reagents for simultaneous determination of hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Mochizuki, Keisuke; Nakano, Yuki; Maruya, Natsumi; Goto, Masato; Maruyama, Yosuke; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are well-known and important contributors to oxidative and nitrosative stress in several diseases. Hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine products appear to be particularly susceptible targets of oxidative and nitrosative stress. We compared fluorescence reagents for their potential use in the analysis of hydroxylated phenylalanine and nitrated tyrosine products with a high-sensitivity and high-specificity HPLC-UV-FL technique. The analytes were extracted from serum via solid-phase extraction on Waters Oasis MCX cartridges. Chromatographic separation was achieved on an ODS column (Capcell Pak MG II; 150 × 2.0 mm) using a gradient mobile phase consisting of 20 mm sodium phosphate buffer (adjusted to pH 3.0) and acetonitrile. The method quantification limit for 4-nitrophenylalanine, m-tyrosine, and 3-nitrotyrosine was 0.1 μm. The relative standard deviation of the precision and accuracy was acceptable at the spiked concentration of 0.1 μm for 4-nitrophenylalanine, m-tyrosine and 3-nitrotyrosine. The method could be used for the in vitro analysis of serum samples.

  17. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity of CD45 is activated by sequential phosphorylation by two kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1994-01-01

    We describe a potential regulatory mechanism for the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45. Phosphorylation on both tyrosine and serine residues in vitro results in an activation of CD45 specifically toward one artificial substrate but not another. The activation of these kinases appears to be order dependent, as it is enhanced when phosphorylation of tyrosine precedes that of serine but phosphorylation in the reverse order yields no activation. Any of four protein-tyrosine kinases tested, in combination with the protein-serine/threonine kinase, casein kinase II, was capable of mediating this activation in vitro. The time course of phosphorylation of CD45 in response to T-cell activation is consistent with the possibility that this regulatory mechanism is utilized in vivo. Images PMID:7518565

  18. Analysis of free and protein-bound nitrotyrosine in human plasma by a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method that avoids nitration artifacts.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, M T; Halliwell, B; Moore, K P

    2000-01-01

    Measurement of nitrotyrosine in biological fluids and tissues is increasingly being used to monitor the production of reactive nitrogen species in vivo. The detection of nitrotyrosine in vivo has been reported with the use of a variety of methods including immunoassay, HPLC and GLC/MS. The validity of HPLC and immunoassays have been questioned with regard to their selectivity and sensitivity limits. In principle, the measurement of nitrotyrosine by GLC/MS permits a highly specific, highly sensitive and fully quantitative assay. The nitration of tyrosine under acidic conditions in the presence of nitrite is well documented. Derivatization for the full quantification of nitrotyrosine by using GLC/MS can lead to the artifactual nitration of tyrosine if performed under acidic conditions in the presence of nitrite. We describe a novel alkaline method for the hydrolysis and derivatization of nitrotyrosine and tyrosine, and demonstrate its applicability to the measurement of plasma concentrations of both free and protein-bound nitrotyrosine and tyrosine. A detection limit of 1 pg for nitrotyrosine and 100 pg for tyrosine has been achieved. Our method allows, for the first time, the analysis of free and protein-bound nitrotyrosine and tyrosine in biological samples. The plasma concentrations (means+/-S.E.M.) of free tyrosine and nitrotyrosine in eight normal subjects were 12+/-0.6 microg/ml and 14+/-0.7 ng/ml respectively. Plasma proteins contained tyrosine and nitrotyrosine at 60.7+/-1.7 microg/mg and 2.7+/-0.4 ng/mg respectively. PMID:10642501

  19. Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) zeta subunit: regulation of TCR-associated protein tyrosine kinase activity by TCR zeta.

    PubMed Central

    van Oers, N S; Tao, W; Watts, J D; Johnson, P; Aebersold, R; Teh, H S

    1993-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) zeta subunit is an important component of the TCR complex, involved in signal transduction events following TCR engagement. In this study, we showed that the TCR zeta chain is constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated to similar extents in thymocytes and lymph node T cells. Approximately 35% of the tyrosine-phosphorylated TCR zeta (phospho zeta) precipitated from total cell lysates appeared to be surface associated. Furthermore, constitutive phosphorylation of TCR zeta in T cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and did not require CD4 or CD8 coreceptor expression. In lymph node T cells that constitutively express tyrosine-phosphorylated TCR zeta, there was a direct correlation between surface TCR-associated protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity and expression of phospho zeta. TCR stimulation of these cells resulted in an increase in PTK activity that coprecipitated with the surface TCR complex and a corresponding increase in the levels of phospho zeta. TCR ligations also contributed to the detection of several additional phosphoproteins that coprecipitated with surface TCR complexes, including a 72-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. The presence of TCR-associated PTK activity also correlated with the binding of a 72-kDa protein, which became tyrosine phosphorylated in vitro kinase assays, to tyrosine phosphorylated TCR zeta. The cytoplasmic region of the TCR zeta chain was synthesized, tyrosine phosphorylated, and conjugated to Sepharose beads. Only tyrosine-phosphorylated, not nonphosphorylated, TCR zeta beads were capable of immunoprecipitating the 72-kDa protein from total cell lysates. This 72-kDa protein is likely the murine equivalent of human PTK ZAP-70, which has been shown to associate specifically with phospho zeta. These results suggest that TCR-associated PTK activity is regulated, at least in part, by the tyrosine phosphorylation status of TCR zeta. Images PMID:7689151

  20. Tyrosine administration decreases glutathione and stimulates lipid and protein oxidation in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Sgaravatti, Angela M; Magnusson, Alessandra S; de Oliveira, Amanda S; Rosa, Andréa P; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Zanin, Fernanda R; Pederzolli, Carolina D; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2009-09-01

    Tyrosine levels are abnormally elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of patients with inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism especially in tyrosinemia type II which is caused by deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and provokes eyes, skin and central nervous system disturbances. We have recently reported that tyrosine promoted oxidative stress in vitro but the exact mechanisms of brain damage in these disorder are poorly known. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo effect of L-tyrosine (500 mg/Kg) on oxidative stress indices in cerebral cortex homogenates of 14-day-old Wistar rats. A single injection of L-tyrosine decreased glutathione (GSH) and thiol-disulfide redox state (SH/SS ratio) while thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were enhanced. In contrast, the treatment did not affect ascorbic acid content, and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. These results indicate that acute administration of L-tyrosine may impair antioxidant defenses and stimulate oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in cerebral cortex of young rats in vivo. This suggests that oxidative stress may represent a pathophysiological mechanism in hypetyrosinemic patients.

  1. Identification of protein tyrosine phosphatases and dual-specificity phosphatases in mammalian spermatozoa and their role in sperm motility and protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, L; Ortega-Ferrusola, C; Macias-Garcia, B; Salido, G M; Peña, F J; Tapia, J A

    2009-06-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases have important roles in spermatozoa; however, little is known about the presence and regulation in these cells of their counterparts in signaling, namely, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs). The objectives of the present study were to identify PTPs and DSPs in boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa; to characterize their subcellular distribution; and to investigate the roles of tyrosine phosphatases in maintenance of protein tyrosine phosphorylation level and in sperm motility. Using Western blotting with specific antibodies in boar and stallion sperm lysates, we unequivocally identified two PTPs (PTPRB and PTPN11) and two DSPs (DUSP3 and DUSP4). In dog sperm lysates, only PTPN11, DUSP3, and DUSP4 were detected. In all these species, we did not detect the specific signal with anti-PTPRC (CD45), CDKN3, DUSP1, DUSP2, DUSP6, DUSP9, PTPN1, PTPN3, PTPN6, PTPN7, PTPN13, PTPRA, PTPRG, PTPRJ, PTPRK, or PTPRZ antibodies. Positive matches were further investigated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results showed that PTPRB was associated with the plasma membrane in the head and tail of boar and stallion spermatozoa. In agreement with Western blotting results, PTPRB antibodies did not show immunoreactivity in dog sperm analyzed by immunofluorescence. In the three species, DUSP4 was mainly found in the tail of spermatozoa, with little or no immunoreactivity in the head. PTPN11 was mainly located in the postacrosomal region in the head, whereas DUSP3 immunoreactivity was extended within the acrosome. PTPN11 and DUSP3 showed immunoreactivity in the tail that was restricted to the midpiece. Finally, we incubated boar, stallion, and dog spermatozoa with pervanadate and sodium orthovanadate, two PTP inhibitors, and analyzed overall protein tyrosine phosphorylation and assessed sperm motility. Sodium orthovanadate and pervanadate showed concentration-dependent inhibition of sperm motility that was

  2. Versatile and Efficient Site-Specific Protein Functionalization by Tubulin Tyrosine Ligase.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Dominik; Helma, Jonas; Mann, Florian A; Pichler, Garwin; Natale, Francesco; Krause, Eberhard; Cardoso, M Cristina; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemoenzymatic approach for simple and fast site-specific protein labeling is reported. Recombinant tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) was repurposed to attach various unnatural tyrosine derivatives as small bioorthogonal handles to proteins containing a short tubulin-derived recognition sequence (Tub-tag). This novel strategy enables a broad range of high-yielding and fast chemoselective C-terminal protein modifications on isolated proteins or in cell lysates for applications in biochemistry, cell biology, and beyond, as demonstrated by the site-specific labeling of nanobodies, GFP, and ubiquitin. PMID:26404067

  3. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ targets apical junction complex proteins in the intestine and regulates epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Murchie, Ryan; Guo, Cong-Hui; Persaud, Avinash; Muise, Aleixo; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-01-14

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)σ (PTPRS) was shown previously to be associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PTPσ(-/-) mice exhibit an IBD-like phenotype in the intestine and show increased susceptibility to acute models of murine colitis. However, the function of PTPσ in the intestine is uncharacterized. Here, we show an intestinal epithelial barrier defect in the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, demonstrated by a decrease in transepithelial resistance and a leaky intestinal epithelium that was determined by in vivo tracer analysis. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation was observed at the plasma membrane of epithelial cells lining the crypts of the small bowel and colon of the PTPσ(-/-) mouse, suggesting the presence of PTPσ substrates in these regions. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several putative PTPσ intestinal substrates that were hyper-tyrosine-phosphorylated in the PTPσ(-/-) mice relative to wild type. Among these were proteins that form or regulate the apical junction complex, including ezrin. We show that ezrin binds to and is dephosphorylated by PTPσ in vitro, suggesting it is a direct PTPσ substrate, and identified ezrin-Y353/Y145 as important sites targeted by PTPσ. Moreover, subcellular localization of the ezrin phosphomimetic Y353E or Y145 mutants were disrupted in colonic Caco-2 cells, similar to ezrin mislocalization in the colon of PTPσ(-/-) mice following induction of colitis. Our results suggest that PTPσ is a positive regulator of intestinal epithelial barrier, which mediates its effects by modulating epithelial cell adhesion through targeting of apical junction complex-associated proteins (including ezrin), a process impaired in IBD.

  4. A Multifeatures Fusion and Discrete Firefly Optimization Method for Prediction of Protein Tyrosine Sulfation Residues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunhua; Zhou, Peng; Li, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is one of the ubiquitous protein posttranslational modifications, where some sulfate groups are added to the tyrosine residues. It plays significant roles in various physiological processes in eukaryotic cells. To explore the molecular mechanism of tyrosine sulfation, one of the prerequisites is to correctly identify possible protein tyrosine sulfation residues. In this paper, a novel method was presented to predict protein tyrosine sulfation residues from primary sequences. By means of informative feature construction and elaborate feature selection and parameter optimization scheme, the proposed predictor achieved promising results and outperformed many other state-of-the-art predictors. Using the optimal features subset, the proposed method achieved mean MCC of 94.41% on the benchmark dataset, and a MCC of 90.09% on the independent dataset. The experimental performance indicated that our new proposed method could be effective in identifying the important protein posttranslational modifications and the feature selection scheme would be powerful in protein functional residues prediction research fields. PMID:27034949

  5. Glutamine synthetase is a molecular target of nitric oxide in root nodules of Medicago truncatula and is regulated by tyrosine nitration.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula M; Silva, Liliana S; Ribeiro, Isa; Seabra, Ana R; Carvalho, Helena G

    2011-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as an important regulatory player in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, but its biological role in nodule functioning is still far from being understood. To unravel the signal transduction cascade and ultimately NO function, it is necessary to identify its molecular targets. This study provides evidence that glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme for root nodule metabolism, is a molecular target of NO in root nodules of Medicago truncatula, being regulated by tyrosine (Tyr) nitration in relation to active nitrogen fixation. In vitro studies, using purified recombinant enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, demonstrated that the M. truncatula nodule GS isoenzyme (MtGS1a) is subjected to NO-mediated inactivation through Tyr nitration and identified Tyr-167 as the regulatory nitration site crucial for enzyme inactivation. Using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, it is shown that GS is nitrated in planta and that its nitration status changes in relation to active nitrogen fixation. In ineffective nodules and in nodules fed with nitrate, two conditions in which nitrogen fixation is impaired and GS activity is reduced, a significant increase in nodule GS nitration levels was observed. Furthermore, treatment of root nodules with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside resulted in increased in vivo GS nitration accompanied by a reduction in GS activity. Our results support a role of NO in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in root nodules and places GS as an important player in the process. We propose that the NO-mediated GS posttranslational inactivation is related to metabolite channeling to boost the nodule antioxidant defenses in response to NO.

  6. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  7. Quantitative profiling of spreading-coupled protein tyrosine phosphorylation in migratory cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yajun; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Yuanya; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Xiaorong; Liu, Kehui; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Yingchun

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that regulates cytoskeleton reorganization and cell spreading of migratory cells. A number of cytoskeletal proteins are known to be tyrosine phosphorylated (pY) in different cellular processes. However, the profile of pY proteins during different stages of cell spreading has not been available. Using immunoafffinity enrichment of pY proteins coupled with label free quantitative proteomics, we quantitatively identified 447 pY proteins in the migratory ECV-304 cells at the early spreading (adhesion) and the active spreading stages. We found that pY levels of the majority of the quantified proteins were significantly increased in the active spreading stage compared with the early spreading stage, suggesting that active cell spreading is concomitant with extra tyrosine phosphorylation. The major categories of proteins impacted by tyrosine phosphorylation are involved in cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, protein translation and degradation. Our findings, for the first time, dissect the cell spreading-specific pY signals from the adhesion induced pY signals, and provide a valuable resource for the future mechanistic research regarding the regulation of cell spreading. PMID:27554326

  8. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  9. A protein tyrosine phosphatase-like protein from baculovirus has RNA 5'-triphosphatase and diphosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Takagi, T; Taylor, G S; Kusakabe, T; Charbonneau, H; Buratowski, S

    1998-08-18

    The superfamily of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes at least one enzyme with an RNA substrate. We recently showed that the RNA triphosphatase domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans mRNA capping enzyme is related to the PTP enzyme family by sequence similarity and mechanism. The PTP most similar in sequence to the capping enzyme triphosphatase is BVP, a dual-specificity PTP encoded by the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Although BVP previously has been shown to have modest tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphatase activity, we find that it is much more potent as an RNA 5'-phosphatase. BVP sequentially removes gamma and beta phosphates from the 5' end of triphosphate-terminated RNA, leaving a 5'-monophosphate end. The activity was specific for polynucleotides; nucleotide triphosphates were not hydrolyzed. A mutant protein in which the active site cysteine was replaced with serine was inactive. Three other dual-specificity PTPs (VH1, VHR, and Cdc14) did not exhibit detectable RNA phosphatase activity. Therefore, capping enzyme and BVP are members of a distinct PTP-like subfamily that can remove phosphates from RNA. PMID:9707557

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 protein in Ca2+/A23187-treated human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, G; Piccinini, G; Balduini, C; Seppi, C; Brovelli, A

    1996-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were induced to release membrane vesicles by treatment with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187. In addition to the biochemical changes already known to accompany loading of human erythrocytes with Ca2+, the present study reveals that tyrosine phosphorylation of the anion exchanger band 3 protein also occurs. The relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 and membrane vesiculation was analysed using quinine (a non-specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, and the only known inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced vesiculation) and charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of the apamin-insensitive K(+)-channel. Both inhibitors suppressed tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3. In the presence of quinine, membrane vesiculation was also suppressed. In contrast, at the concentration of charybdotoxin required to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3, membrane vesiculation was only mildly inhibited (16-23% inhibition), suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is not necessary for membrane vesiculation. Phosphorylation of band 3 was in fact observed when erythrocytes were induced to shrink in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, e.g. by treatment with the K+ ionophore valinomycin or with hypertonic solutions. These observations suggest that band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs when cell volume regulation is required. PMID:8973551

  11. Leghemoglobin is nitrated in functional legume nodules in a tyrosine residue within the heme cavity by a nitrite/peroxide-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Martha; Calvo-Begueria, Laura; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Abián, Joaquín; Staudinger, Christiana; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein Tyr nitration is a post-translational modification yielding 3-nitrotyrosine (NO2-Tyr). Formation of NO2-Tyr is generally considered as a marker of nitroxidative stress and is involved in some human pathophysiological disorders, but it has been poorly studied in plants. Leghemoglobin (Lb) is an abundant hemeprotein of legume nodules that plays an essential role as O2 transporter. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used for a targeted search and quantification of NO2-Tyr in Lbs. For all Lbs examined, Tyr30, located in the distal heme pocket, is the major target of nitration. Lower amounts were found for NO2-Tyr25 and NO2-Tyr133. Nitrated Lb and other as yet unidentified nitrated proteins were also detected in nodules of plants not receiving NO3− and were found to decrease during senescence. This demonstrates formation of nitric oxide (•NO) and NO2− by alternative means to nitrate reductase, probably via a NO synthase-like enzyme, and strongly suggests that nitrated proteins perform biological functions and are not merely metabolic byproducts. In vitro assays with purified Lbs revealed that Tyr nitration requires NO2− + H2O2 and that peroxynitrite is not an efficient inducer of nitration, possibly by isomerizing it to NO3−. Nitrated Lb is formed via oxoferryl Lb, which generates nitrogen dioxide and tyrosyl radicals. This mechanism is distinctly different from that involved in heme nitration. Formation of NO2-Tyr in Lbs is a consequence of active metabolism in functional nodules, where Lbs may act as a sink of toxic peroxynitrite and may play a protective role in the symbiosis. PMID:25603991

  12. Tissue protein nitration and peripheral blood endotoxin activity are indicative of the severity of systemic organ compromise in naturally-occurring clinical cases of bacterial mastitis in Holstein dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this survey study was to determine a relationship between the intensity of tissue protein tyrosine nitration measured in samples of mammary gland, liver, pancreas and lung compared to estimated blood endotoxin (LPS) activity. Blood was collected from nine multiparous Holstein cows...

  13. Crystal structure of human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase-2 reveals the mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Takamasa; Fujikawa, Yukari; Kawaguchi, Yoshirou; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Soejima, Masayuki; Adachi, Rumi; Nakanishi, Yuichi; Mishiro-Sato, Emi; Liu, Ming-Cheh; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Kimura, Makoto; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification by tyrosine-sulfation plays an important role in extracellular protein-protein interactions. The protein tyrosine sulfation reaction is catalyzed by the Golgi-enzyme called the tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST). To date, no crystal structure is available for TPST. Detailed mechanism of protein tyrosine sulfation reaction has thus remained unclear. Here we present the first crystal structure of the human TPST isoform 2 (TPST2) complexed with a substrate peptide (C4P5Y3) derived from complement C4 and 3’-phosphoadenosine-5’-phosphate (PAP) at 1.9Å resolution. Structural and complementary mutational analyses revealed the molecular basis for catalysis being an SN2-like in-line displacement mechanism. TPST2 appeared to recognize the C4 peptide in a deep cleft by using a short parallel β-sheet type interaction, and the bound C4P5Y3 forms an L-shaped structure. Surprisingly, the mode of substrate peptide recognition observed in the TPST2 structure resembles that observed for the receptor type tyrosine kinases. PMID:23481380

  14. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  15. A second-generation expression system for tyrosine sulfated proteins and its application in crop protection

    PubMed Central

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Li, Xiang; Ellinghaus, Thomas L.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Wei, Tong; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Pruitt, Rory; Adams, Paul D.; Chern, Maw Sheng; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins and peptides is important for diverse biological processes in plants and animals. The paucity of heterologous expression systems for PTMs and the technical challenges associated with chemical synthesis of these modified proteins has limited detailed molecular characterization and therapeutic applications. Here we describe an optimized system for expression of tyrosine-sulfated proteins in Escherichia coli and its application in a bio-based crop protection strategy in rice. PMID:26611838

  16. Site-specific cross-linking of proteins through tyrosine hexahistidine tags.

    PubMed

    Stayner, R Scott; Min, Dong-Joon; Kiser, Patrick F; Stewart, Russell J

    2005-01-01

    The genetic addition of hexahistidine (H(6)) tags is widely used to isolate recombinant proteins by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Addition of a tyrosine residue to H(6) tags enabled proteins to be covalently cross-linked under mild conditions in a manner similar to the natural, site-specific cross-linking of tyrosines into dityrosine. A series of seven hexahistidine tags with tyrosines placed in various positions (H(6)Y tags) were added to the amino terminus of the I28 immunoglobulin domain of the human cardiac titin. The H(6)Y-tagged I28 dimerized in the presence of excess Ni(2+) with a K(D) of 200 microM. Treatment of Ni(2+)-dimerized H(6)Y-I28 with an oxidant, monoperoxyphthalic acid (MMPP) or sodium sulfite, resulted in covalent protein multimerization through chelated Ni(2+)-catalyzed cross-linking of the Y residues engineered into the H(6) tag. The protein oligomerization was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE). The presence of dityrosine in the cross-linked proteins was confirmed by fluorescence emission at 410 nm. Proteins lacking the Y residue in the H(6) tag treated with the same oxidative conditions did not cross-link or exhibit dityrosine fluorescence, despite the presence of an endogenous Y residue. The method may have potential uses in other protein conjugation applications such as protein labeling and interfacial immobilization of proteins on artificial surfaces. PMID:16287262

  17. The Importance of Being Tyrosine: Lessons in Molecular Recognition from Minimalist Synthetic Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Shohei; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Combinatorial libraries built with severely restricted chemical diversity have yielded highly functional synthetic binding proteins. Structural analyses of these minimalist binding sites have revealed the dominant role of large tyrosine residues for mediating molecular contacts and of small serine/glycine residues for providing space and flexibility. The concept of using limited residue types to construct optimized binding proteins mirrors findings in the field of small molecule drug development, where it has been proposed that most drugs are built from a limited set of side chains presented by diverse frameworks. The physicochemical properties of tyrosine make it the amino acid that is most effective for mediating molecular recognition, and protein engineers have taken advantage of these characteristics to build tyrosine-rich protein binding sites that outperform natural proteins in terms of affinity and specificity. Knowledge from preceding studies can be used to improve current designs, and thus, synthetic protein libraries will continue to evolve and improve. In the near future, it seems likely that synthetic binding proteins will supersede natural antibodies for most purposes, and moreover, synthetic proteins will enable many new applications beyond the scope of natural proteins. PMID:19298050

  18. Protein kinase C directly phosphorylates the insulin receptor in vitro and reduces its protein-tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, G E; Roth, R A; Beaudoin, J; Mochly-Rosen, D; Koshland, D E

    1986-01-01

    The beta subunit of purified insulin receptor is phosphorylated on a serine residue by purified preparations of protein kinase C (ATP: protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37). This phosphorylation is inhibited by antibodies to protein kinase C and stimulated by phospholipids, diacylglycerol, and Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the receptor by protein kinase C does not affect its insulin-binding activity but does inhibit by 65% the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112). These results indicate that activators of protein kinase C, such as phorbol esters, desensitize cells to insulin by direct protein kinase C action on the insulin receptor. Images PMID:3526339

  19. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  20. Seleninate in Place of Phosphate: Irreversible Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Mohannad; Liu, Sijiu; Zhou, Bo; Walls, Chad D.; Wu, Li; Knapp, Spencer; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-02-16

    A homotyrosine based seleninic acid irreversibly inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases by forming a covalent selenosulfide linkage with the active site cysteine sulfhydryl specifically. The details of the event are revealed by model synthetic studies and by kinetic, mass spectrometric, and crystallographic characterization.

  1. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  2. Structure and regulation of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2011-06-01

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase is the normal cellular ortholog of several avian and feline retroviral oncoproteins. Unlike its transforming viral counterparts, c-Fes tyrosine kinase activity is tightly regulated in vivo through a mechanism involving coiled-coil oligomerization domains and other unique structural features found in its long N-terminal region. This review is focused on the regulatory features and structural biology of c-Fes, which has been implicated in normal cellular growth regulation, the innate immune response, and tumorigenesis.

  3. K depletion increases protein tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylation of ROMK

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Lerea, Kenneth M.; Welling, Paul; Jin, Lianhong; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    We purified Histagged ROMK1 and carried out in vitro phosphorylation assays with 32P-radiolabeled ATP to determine whether ROMK1 protein is a substrate for PTK. Addition of active c-Src and [32P]ATP to the purified ROMK1 protein resulted in the phosphorylation of the ROMK1 protein. However, c-Src did not phosphorylate R1Y337A in which tyrosine residue 337 was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, phosphopeptide mapping identified two phosphopeptides from the trypsin-digested ROMK1 protein. In contrast, no phosphorylated peptide has been found in the trypsin-digested R1Y337A protein. This suggested that two phosphorylated peptides might contain the same tyrosine residue. Also, addition of c-Src and [32P]ATP phosphorylated the synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid sequence 333–362 of the COOH terminus of ROMK1. We then examined the effect of dietary K intake on the tyrosine-phosphorylated ROMK level. Although the ROMK channels pulled down by immunoprecipitation with ROMK antibody were the same from rats on a K-deficient diet or on a high-K diet, more ROMK channels were phosphorylated by PTK in rats on a K-deficient diet than those on a high-K diet. We conclude that ROMK1 can be phosphorylated by PTK and that tyrosine residue 337 is the key site for the phosphorylation. Also, the tyrosine phosphorylation of ROMK is modulated by dietary K intake. This strongly suggests that PTK is an important member of the aldosterone-independent signal transduction pathway for regulating renal K secretion. PMID:12217858

  4. Lincomycin Biosynthesis Involves a Tyrosine Hydroxylating Heme Protein of an Unusual Enzyme Family

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Jitka; Olsovska, Jana; Novak, Petr; Mojzes, Peter; Chaloupkova, Radka; Kamenik, Zdenek; Spizek, Jaroslav; Kutejova, Eva; Mareckova, Marketa; Tichy, Pavel; Damborsky, Jiri; Janata, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The gene lmbB2 of the lincomycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces lincolnensis ATCC 25466 was shown to code for an unusual tyrosine hydroxylating enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of this clinically important antibiotic. LmbB2 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified near to homogeneity and shown to convert tyrosine to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). In contrast to the well-known tyrosine hydroxylases (EC 1.14.16.2) and tyrosinases (EC 1.14.18.1), LmbB2 was identified as a heme protein. Mass spectrometry and Soret band-excited Raman spectroscopy of LmbB2 showed that LmbB2 contains heme b as prosthetic group. The CO-reduced differential absorption spectra of LmbB2 showed that the coordination of Fe was different from that of cytochrome P450 enzymes. LmbB2 exhibits sequence similarity to Orf13 of the anthramycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which has recently been classified as a heme peroxidase. Tyrosine hydroxylating activity of LmbB2 yielding DOPA in the presence of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) was also observed. Reaction mechanism of this unique heme peroxidases family is discussed. Also, tyrosine hydroxylation was confirmed as the first step of the amino acid branch of the lincomycin biosynthesis. PMID:24324587

  5. Mushroom tyrosinase oxidizes tyrosine-rich sequences to allow selective protein functionalization.

    PubMed

    Long, Marcus J C; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2012-08-13

    We show that mushroom tyrosinase catalyzes the formation of reactive o-quinones on unstructured, tyrosine-rich sequences such as hemagglutinin (HA) tags (YPYDVPDYA). In the absence of exogenous nucleophiles and at low protein concentrations, the o-quinone decomposes with fragmentation of the HA tag. At higher protein concentrations (>5 mg mL⁻¹), crosslinking is observed. Besthorn's reagent intercepts the o-quinone to give a characteristic pink complex that can be observed directly on a denaturing SDS-PAGE gel. Similar labeled species can be formed by using other nucleophiles such as Cy5-hydrazide. These reactions are selective for proteins bearing HA and other unstructured poly-tyrosine-containing tags and can be performed in lysates to create specifically tagged proteins. PMID:22807021

  6. Inhibition by ajoene of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Villar, R; Alvariño, M T; Flores, R

    1997-02-01

    The effects of ajoene (a potent antithrombotic agent obtained from garlic) on the tyrosine phosphorylation status of human platelet proteins were investigated by immunoblotting-based experiments using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Incubation of platelets with ajoene enhanced the phosphorylation of at least four proteins (estimated MWs 76, 80, 84 and 120 kDa), both in resting platelets and in platelets subsequently stimulated with thrombin (0.1 U/ml). This effect was both dose- and incubation-time-dependent. High concentrations of ajoene (50 microM) or long periods of incubation (10 min) led to nonselective 'hyperphosphorylation' of numerous proteins. The effects of ajoene on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in platelet lysates were also investigated, PTP activity was inhibited when platelets were incubated with ajoene before lysis, but not when ajoene was added to lysates of platelets which had not been pre-exposed to ajoene.

  7. Diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility in mammal: the focusing of tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphotyrosine proteins.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Rahman, Md Saidur; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2014-11-01

    Male infertility refers to the inability of a man to achieve a pregnancy in a fertile female. In more than one-third of cases, infertility arises due to the male factor. Therefore, developing strategies for the diagnosis and prognosis of male infertility is critical. Simultaneously, a satisfactory model for the cellular mechanisms that regulate normal sperm function must be established. In this regard, tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the most common mechanisms through which several signal transduction pathways are adjusted in spermatozoa. It regulates the various aspects of sperm function, for example, motility, hyperactivation, capacitation, the acrosome reaction, fertilization, and beyond. Several recent large-scale studies have identified the proteins that are phosphorylated in spermatozoa to acquire fertilization competence. However, most of these studies are basal and have not presented an overall mechanism through which tyrosine phosphorylation regulates male infertility. In this review, we focus of this mechanism, discussing most of the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that have been identified to date. We categorized tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in spermatozoa that regulate male infertility using MedScan Reader (v5.0) and Pathway Studio (v9.0).

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein in persistently infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Y; Ofir, R; Salzberg, S; Heller, A; Weinstein, Y; Isakov, N; Udem, S; Wolfson, M; Rager-Zisman, B

    1995-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressing fatal human disease of the central nervous system which is a delayed sequel of measles virus (MV) infection. A typical pathological feature of this disease is the presence of viral ribonucleocapsid structures in the form of inclusion bodies and the absence of infectious virus or budding viral particles. The mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of a persistent MV infection in brain cells are still largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms underlying MV persistence in neuronal cells, a tissue culture model was studied. Clone NS20Y/MS of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 persistently infected with the wild-type Edmonston strain of MV secretes relatively high levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN). As shown previously, treatment of the persistently infected cultures with anti-IFN serum converted the persistent state into a productive infection indicated by the appearance of multinucleated giant cells. In this study, we have investigated whether alpha/beta IFN produced by NS20Y/MS cells activates cellular protein tyrosine kinases which will induce tyrosine phosphorylating activity specific to virus-infected cells. We present data to show augmented protein tyrosine kinase activity in the persistently infected cells. We demonstrate that the MV N protein is phosphorylated on tyrosine in addition to serine and threonine in the persistent state but not in NS20Y cells acutely infected with MV. PMID:7884896

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation of measles virus nucleocapsid protein in persistently infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Segev, Y; Ofir, R; Salzberg, S; Heller, A; Weinstein, Y; Isakov, N; Udem, S; Wolfson, M; Rager-Zisman, B

    1995-04-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a slowly progressing fatal human disease of the central nervous system which is a delayed sequel of measles virus (MV) infection. A typical pathological feature of this disease is the presence of viral ribonucleocapsid structures in the form of inclusion bodies and the absence of infectious virus or budding viral particles. The mechanisms governing the establishment and maintenance of a persistent MV infection in brain cells are still largely unknown. To understand the mechanisms underlying MV persistence in neuronal cells, a tissue culture model was studied. Clone NS20Y/MS of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 persistently infected with the wild-type Edmonston strain of MV secretes relatively high levels of alpha/beta interferon (IFN). As shown previously, treatment of the persistently infected cultures with anti-IFN serum converted the persistent state into a productive infection indicated by the appearance of multinucleated giant cells. In this study, we have investigated whether alpha/beta IFN produced by NS20Y/MS cells activates cellular protein tyrosine kinases which will induce tyrosine phosphorylating activity specific to virus-infected cells. We present data to show augmented protein tyrosine kinase activity in the persistently infected cells. We demonstrate that the MV N protein is phosphorylated on tyrosine in addition to serine and threonine in the persistent state but not in NS20Y cells acutely infected with MV.

  10. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase SHPTP2 is a required positive effector for insulin downstream signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, K; Milarski, K L; Saltiel, A R; Pessin, J E

    1995-01-01

    SHPTP2 is a ubiquitously expressed tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase that contains two amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domains responsible for its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. In this study, expression of dominant interfering mutants of SHPTP2 was found to inhibit insulin stimulation of c-fos reporter gene expression and activation of the 42-kDa (Erk2) and 44-kDa (Erk1) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Cotransfection of dominant interfering SHPTP2 mutants with v-Ras or Grb2 indicated that SHPTP2 regulated insulin signaling either upstream of or in parallel to Ras function. Furthermore, phosphotyrosine blotting and immunoprecipitation identified the 125-kDa focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) as a substrate for insulin-dependent tyrosine dephosphorylation. These data demonstrate that SHPTP2 functions as a positive regulator of insulin action and that insulin signaling results in the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7531337

  11. α-Ketoacids as precursors for phenylalanine and tyrosine labelling in cell-based protein overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-α-ketoacid metabolic precursors of phenylalanine and tyrosine effectively enter the metabolism of a protein overexpressing E. coli strain to label Phe- and Tyr-residues devoid of any cross-labelling. The methodology gives access to highly selective labelling patterns as valuable tools in protein NMR spectroscopy without the need of (15)N-chiral amino acid synthesis using organic chemistry.

  12. Tyrosine Nitration of PA700 Activates the 26S Proteasome to Induce Endothelial Dysfunction in Mice With Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Wang, Shuangxi; Wu, Yong; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system has been implicated in oxidative stress–induced endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism by which oxidative stress alters the ubiquitin-proteasome system is poorly defined. The present study was conducted to determine whether oxidative modifications of PA700, a 26S proteasome regulatory subunit, contributes to angiotensin II (Ang II)–induced endothelial dysfunction. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to low concentrations of Ang II, but not vehicle, for 6 hours significantly decreased the levels of tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor of endothelial NO synthase, which was accompanied by a decrease in GTP cyclohydrolase I, the rate-limiting enzyme for de novo BH4 synthesis. In addition, Ang II increased both tyrosine nitration of PA700 and the 26S proteasome activity, which were paralleled by increased coimmunoprecipitation of PA700 and the 20S proteasome. Genetic inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase or administration of uric acid (a peroxynitrite scavenger) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (nonselective NO synthase inhibitor) significantly attenuated Ang II–induced PA700 nitration, 26S proteasome activation, and reduction of GTP cyclohydrolase I and BH4. Finally, Ang II infusion in mice decreased the levels of both BH4 and GTP cyclohydrolase I and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation in isolated aortas, and all of these effects were prevented by the administration of MG132, a potent inhibitor for 26S proteasome. We conclude that Ang II increases tyrosine nitration of PA700 resulting in accelerated GTP cyclohydrolase I degradation, BH4 deficiency, and consequent endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. PMID:19597039

  13. Morin inhibits STAT3 tyrosine 705 phosphorylation in tumor cells through activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Phromnoi, Kanokkarn; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2013-04-01

    The major goal of cancer drug discovery is to find an agent that is safe and affordable, yet effective against cancer. Here we show that morin (3,5,7,2',4'-pentahydroxyflavone) has potential against cancer cells through suppression of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway, which is closely linked to the transformation, survival, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer. We found that morin completely suppressed inducible and constitutively activated STAT3 and blocked the nuclear translocation of STAT3 and its DNA binding in multiple myeloma and head and neck squamous carcinoma cells. Morin inhibited activated Src, JAK-1, and JAK-2, all of which are linked to STAT3 activation, while up-regulating a protein inhibitor of activated STAT3, PIAS3. Pervanadate reversed the effects of morin on STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating the role of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Furthermore, morin induced SHP1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels, and silencing of SHP1 abrogated the effect of morin on STAT3 phosphorylation, indicating that morin mediates its effects on STAT3 through SHP1. Suppression of STAT3 correlated with the down-regulation of various gene products linked to tumor survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis and led to sensitization of tumor cells to thalidomide and bortezomib. Comparing the activities of morin with those of four structurally related flavonols demonstrated the importance of hydroxyl groups in the B ring in inhibiting STAT3 activation. These findings suggest that morin suppresses the STAT3 pathway, leading to the down-regulation of STAT3-dependent gene expression and chemosensitization of tumor cells.

  14. Fluorescence lifetimes of tyrosine residues in cytochrome c'' as local probes to study protein unfolding.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Melinda; Santos, Raquel; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2009-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that multiple tyrosine residues of a protein can serve as localized probes of structural changes during thermal unfolding. Cytochrome c'' from Methylophilus methylotrophus, which has four tyrosine residues, was chosen as a model protein. The procedure involved, first, the assignment of the experimental decay times to the tyrosine residues, followed by the interpretation of the changes in the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients with temperature. We found that the fluorescence decays of cytochrome c'' are double-exponential from 23 to 80 degrees C, with decay times much shorter than those of the parent compound N-acetyl-tyrosinamide; this quenching was ascribed to dipole-dipole energy transfer from the tyrosine residues to the heme. The tyrosine-heme distances (R) and theoretical decay times, tau(comp), were estimated for each tyrosine residue. The analysis of the simulated decay generated with tau(comp), showed that a double-exponential fit is sufficient to describe the four decay times with two pre-exponential coefficients close to values observed from the experimental decay. Therefore, the decay times at 23 degrees C could be assigned to the individual tyrosine residues as tau(1) to Tyr-10 and Tyr-23 (at 20.3 A) and tau(2) to Tyr-12 and Tyr-115 (at 12-14 A). On the basis of this assignment and MD simulations, the temperature dependence of the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients suggest that upon unfolding, Tyr-12 is displaced from the heme, with loss of the structure of alpha-helix I. Moreover, Tyr-115 remains close to the heme and the structure in this region of the protein is not altered significantly. Altogether the data support the view that the protein core, comprising the heme and the four alpha-helices II to V, is clearly more stable than the remaining region that includes alpha-helix I and the loop between residues 19-27.

  15. Protein nitration and nitrosylation by NO-donating aspirin in colon cancer cells: Relevance to its mechanism of action

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jennie L.; Ji, Ping; Ouyang, Nengtai; Kopelovich, Levy; Rigas, Basil

    2011-06-10

    Nitric oxide-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) is a promising agent for cancer prevention. Although studied extensively, its molecular targets and mechanism of action are still unclear. S-nitrosylation of signaling proteins is emerging as an important regulatory mechanism by NO. Here, we examined whether S-nitrosylation of the NF-{kappa}B, p53, and Wnt signaling proteins by NO-ASA might explain, in part, its mechanism of action in colon cancer. NO-ASA releases significant amounts of NO detected intracellularly in HCT116 and HT-29 colon cells. Using a modified biotin switch assay we demonstrated that NO-ASA S-nitrosylates the signaling proteins p53, {beta}-catenin, and NF-{kappa}B, in colon cancer cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. NO-ASA suppresses NF-{kappa}B binding to its cognate DNA oligonucleotide, which occurs without changes in the nuclear levels of the NF-{kappa}B subunits p65 and p50 and is reversed by dithiothreitol that reduces -S-NO to -SH. In addition to S-nitrosylation, we documented both in vitro and in vivo widespread nitration of tyrosine residues of cellular proteins in response to NO-ASA. Our results suggest that the increased intracellular NO levels following treatment with NO-ASA modulate cell signaling by chemically modifying key protein members of signaling cascades. We speculate that S-nitrosylation and tyrosine nitration are responsible, at least in part, for the inhibitory growth effect of NO-ASA on cancer cell growth and that this may represent a general mechanism of action of NO-releasing agents.

  16. Activation of Tsk and Btk tyrosine kinases by G protein beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Langhans-Rajasekaran, S A; Wan, Y; Huang, X Y

    1995-01-01

    Tsk/Itk and Btk are members of the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing tyrosine kinase family. The PH domain has been demonstrated to be able to interact with beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) (G beta gamma) and phospholipids. Using cotransfection assays, we show here that the kinase activities of Tsk and Btk are stimulated by certain G beta gamma subunits. Furthermore, using an in vitro reconstitution assay with purified bovine brain G beta gamma subunits and the immunoprecipitated Tsk, we find that Tsk kinase activity is increased by G beta gamma subunits and another membrane factor(s). These results indicate that this family of tyrosine kinases could be an effector of heterotrimeric G proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7567982

  17. Protein renaturation by the liquid organic salt ethylammonium nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, C. A.; Flowers, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The room-temperature liquid salt, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), has been used to enhance the recovery of denatured-reduced hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Our results show that EAN has the ability to prevent aggregation of the denatured protein. The use of EAN as a refolding additive is advantageous because the renaturation is a one-step process. When HEWL was denatured reduced using routine procedures and renatured using EAN as an additive, HEWL was found to regain 75% of its activity. When HEWL was denatured and reduced in neat EAN, dilution resulted in over 90% recovery of active protein. An important aspect of this process is that renaturation of HEWL occurs at concentrations of 1.6 mg/mL, whereas other renaturation processes occur at significantly lower protein concentrations. Additionally, the refolded-active protein can be separated from the molten salt by simple desalting methods. Although the use of a low-temperature molten salt in protein renaturation is unconventional, the power of this approach lies in its simplicity and utility. PMID:11106174

  18. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B involves a sulphenyl-amide intermediate.

    PubMed

    Salmeen, Annette; Andersen, Jannik N; Myers, Michael P; Meng, Tzu-Ching; Hinks, John A; Tonks, Nicholas K; Barford, David

    2003-06-12

    The second messenger hydrogen peroxide is required for optimal activation of numerous signal transduction pathways, particularly those mediated by protein tyrosine kinases. One mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide regulates cellular processes is the transient inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatases through the reversible oxidization of their catalytic cysteine, which suppresses protein dephosphorylation. Here we describe a structural analysis of the redox-dependent regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which is reversibly inhibited by oxidation after cells are stimulated with insulin and epidermal growth factor. The sulphenic acid intermediate produced in response to PTP1B oxidation is rapidly converted into a previously unknown sulphenyl-amide species, in which the sulphur atom of the catalytic cysteine is covalently linked to the main chain nitrogen of an adjacent residue. Oxidation of PTP1B to the sulphenyl-amide form is accompanied by large conformational changes in the catalytic site that inhibit substrate binding. We propose that this unusual protein modification both protects the active-site cysteine residue of PTP1B from irreversible oxidation to sulphonic acid and permits redox regulation of the enzyme by promoting its reversible reduction by thiols.

  19. Fyn is a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta-signaling pathway: regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of Fyn by pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Pariser, Harold; Ezquerra, Laura; Herradon, Gonzalo; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Deuel, Thomas F

    2005-07-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN the protein, Ptn the gene) signals downstream targets through inactivation of its receptor, the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)beta/zeta, disrupting the balanced activity of RPTPbeta/zeta and the activity of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase. As a consequence of the inactivation of RPTPbeta/zeta, PTN stimulates a sharp increase in the levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the substrates of RPTPbeta/zeta in PTN-stimulated cells. We now report that the Src family member Fyn interacts with the intracellular domain of RPTPbeta/zeta in a yeast two-hybrid system. We further demonstrate that Fyn is a substrate of RPTPbeta/zeta, and that tyrosine phosphorylation of Fyn is sharply increased in PTN-stimulated cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that beta-catenin and beta-adducin are targets of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and defined the mechanisms through which tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and beta-adducin disrupts cytoskeletal protein complexes. We conclude that Fyn is a downstream target of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and suggest that PTN coordinately regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, beta-adducin, and Fyn through the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and that together Fyn, beta-adducin, and beta-catenin may be effectors of the previously described PTN-stimulated disruption of cytoskeletal stability, increased cell plasticity, and loss of cell-cell adhesion that are characteristic of PTN-stimulated cells and a feature of many human malignant cells in which mutations have established constitutive expression of the Ptn gene.

  20. Functional Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases in Thrombosis and Hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Souad; Hego, Alexandre; Delierneux, Céline; Wéra, Odile; Musumeci, Lucia; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are small blood cells derived from cytoplasmic fragments of megakaryocytes and play an essential role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Platelet activation depends on the rapid phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key signaling molecules, and a number of kinases and phosphatases have been identified as major regulators of platelet function. However, the investigation of novel signaling proteins has suffered from technical limitations due to the anucleate nature of platelets and their very limited levels of mRNA and de novo protein synthesis. In the past, experimental methods were restricted to the generation of genetically modified mice and the development of specific antibodies. More recently, novel (phospho)proteomic technologies and pharmacological approaches using specific small-molecule inhibitors have added additional capabilities to investigate specific platelet proteins.In this chapter, we report methods for using genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate the function of platelet signaling proteins. While the described experiments focus on the role of the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling, the presented methods are applicable to any signaling enzyme. Specifically, we describe a testing strategy that includes (1) aggregation and secretion experiments with mouse and human platelets, (2) immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays to study platelet signaling events, (3) detailed protocols to use selected animal models in order to investigate thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo, and (4) strategies for utilizing pharmacological inhibitors on human platelets. PMID:27514813

  1. Activation of protein tyrosine kinase p72syk by Fc epsilon RI aggregation in rat basophilic leukemia cells. p72syk is a minor component but the major protein tyrosine kinase of pp72.

    PubMed

    Minoguchi, K; Benhamou, M; Swaim, W D; Kawakami, Y; Kawakami, T; Siraganian, R P

    1994-06-17

    Aggregation of the high affinity IgE receptors (Fc epsilon RI) on rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells results in protein tyrosine phosphorylations. Previously we reported that there is prominent tyrosine phosphorylation of approximately 72-kDa proteins (pp72) and that the tyrosine kinase p72syk is one component of pp72. Here we studied further the relationship of p72syk to pp72. The aggregation of Fc epsilon RI induced the activation of p72syk which was parallel to its tyrosine phosphorylation. By in vitro kinase assay of immune complexes purified with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, p72syk was the major pp72 tyrosine kinase. However, by immunoblotting with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, p72syk was a minor component of pp72. The heterogeneous nature of pp72 was indicated by different studies. Under optimum conditions of one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, pp72 consisted of a heterogeneous group of 69-, 71-, and 72-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. There were differences in the tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins in cells activated in the absence of extracellular calcium or when stimulation was with the calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol myristate acetate. One of the proteins migrating at 69 kDa was p72syk. By two-dimensional gel electrophoresis pp72 was found to consist of multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protens including 71-80-kDa proteins that associate with p53/56lyn. A 75-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, different from pp72, was identified as p75HS1 (SPY75). These results demonstrate the heterogeneous nature of the pp72 and that p72syk is activated after Fc epsilon RI aggregation. PMID:7515887

  2. Cholecystokinin receptors regulate sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation via uptake of HCO3-.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchuan; Ru, Yanfei; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Yanjiao; Wu, Bin; Upur, Halmurat; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-10-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide hormone and a neurotransmitter, was detected in mature sperm two decades ago. However, the exact role of CCK and the types of CCK receptors (now termed CCK1 and CCK2) in sperm have not been identified. Here, we find that CCK1 and CCK2 receptors are immunolocalized to the acrosomal region of mature sperm. The antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor strongly activated the soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway that drives sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in dose- and time-dependent manners. But these actions of stimulation were abolished when sperm were incubated in the medium in the absence of HCO3-. Further investigation demonstrated that the inhibitor of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor could accelerate the uptake of HCO3- and significantly elevate the intracellular pH of sperm. Interestingly, the synthetic octapeptide of CCK (CCK8) showed the same action and mechanism as antagonists of CCK receptors. Moreover, CCK8 and the antagonist of CCK1 or CCK2 receptor were also able to accelerate human sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by stimulating the influx of HCO3-. Thus, the present results suggest that CCK and its receptors may regulate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation by modulating the uptake of HCO3-.

  3. No obvious abnormality in mice deficient in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta.

    PubMed

    Harroch, S; Palmeri, M; Rosenbluth, J; Custer, A; Okigaki, M; Shrager, P; Blum, M; Buxbaum, J D; Schlessinger, J

    2000-10-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPbeta (RPTPbeta; also known as PTPzeta) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPbeta play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPbeta. RPTPbeta-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPbeta is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPbeta-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPbeta-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPbeta-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPbeta function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPbeta can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  4. Expression, purification, and characterization of human osteoclastic protein-tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huan; Sui, Yuan; Cui, Yue; Lin, Peng; Li, Wannan; Xing, Shu; Wang, Deli; Hu, Min; Fu, Xueqi

    2015-03-01

    Osteoclastic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-oc) is a structurally unique transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that contains only a relatively small intracellular PTP catalytic domain, does not have an extracellular domain, and lacks a signal peptide proximal to the NH2 terminus. The present study reports the expression, purification, and characterization of the intracellular catalytic domain of PTP-oc (ΔPTP-oc). ΔPTP-oc was expressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion with a six-histidine tag and was purified via nickel affinity chromatography. When with para-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate, ΔPTP-oc exhibited classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Its responses to temperature and ionic strength were similar to those of other PTPs. The optimal pH value of ΔPTP-oc is approximately 7.0, unlike other PTPs, whose optimal pH values are approximately 5.0. PMID:25462809

  5. Lack of protein-tyrosine sulfation disrupts photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis, retinal function and retinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sherry, David M; Murray, Anne R; Kanan, Yogita; Arbogast, Kelsey L; Hamilton, Robert A; Fliesler, Steven J; Burns, Marie E; Moore, Kevin L; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the role(s) of protein-tyrosine sulfation in the retina, we examined retinal function and structure in mice lacking tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases (TPST) 1 and 2. Tpst double knockout (DKO; Tpst1(-/-) /Tpst2 (-/-) ) retinas had drastically reduced electroretinographic responses, although their photoreceptors exhibited normal responses in single cell recordings. These retinas appeared normal histologically; however, the rod photoreceptors had ultrastructurally abnormal outer segments, with membrane evulsions into the extracellular space, irregular disc membrane spacing and expanded intradiscal space. Photoreceptor synaptic terminals were disorganized in Tpst DKO retinas, but established ultrastructurally normal synapses, as did bipolar and amacrine cells; however, the morphology and organization of neuronal processes in the inner retina were abnormal. These results indicate that protein-tyrosine sulfation is essential for proper outer segment morphogenesis and synaptic function, but is not critical for overall retinal structure or synapse formation, and may serve broader functions in neuronal development and maintenance.

  6. Developmental expression and function analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D in oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Q; Tan, Z; Zhao, S; Huang, H; Zhao, X; Hu, X; Zhang, Y; Shields, C B; Uetani, N; Qiu, M

    2015-11-12

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) are extensively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), and have distinct spatial and temporal patterns in different cell types during development. Previous studies have demonstrated possible roles for RPTPs in axon outgrowth, guidance, and synaptogenesis. In the present study, our results revealed that protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type D (PTPRD) was initially expressed in mature neurons in embryonic CNS, and later in oligodendroglial cells at postnatal stages when oligodendrocytes undergo active axonal myelination process. In PTPRD mutants, oligodendrocyte differentiation was normal and a transient myelination delay occurred at early postnatal stages, indicating the contribution of PTPRD to the initiation of axonal myelination. Our results also showed that the remyelination process was not affected in the absence of PTPRD function after a cuprizone-induced demyelination in adult animals.

  7. Phosphonate monoesters on a thiacalix[4]arene framework as potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Trush, Viacheslav V; Kharchenko, Sergiy G; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Kalchenko, Vitaly I; Vovk, Andriy I

    2015-09-01

    Monoester derivatives of thiacalix[4]arene tetrakis(methylphosphonic) acid were found to be capable of inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. In addition, these compounds can strongly bind to human serum albumin. PMID:26205135

  8. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  9. Bisphenol A accelerates capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation of rat sperm by activating protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaofeng; Ru, Yanfei; Chu, Chen; Ni, Zimei; Zhou, Yuchuan; Wang, Shoulin; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a synthetic estrogen-mimic chemical. It has been shown to affect many reproductive endpoints. However, the effect of BPA on the mature sperm and the mechanism of its action are not clear yet. Here, our in vitro studies indicated that BPA could accelerate sperm capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in time- and dose-dependent manners. In vivo, the adult male rats exposed to a high dose of BPA could result in a significant increase in sperm activity. Further investigation demonstrated that BPA could accelerate capacitation-associated protein tyrosine phosphorylation even if sperm were incubated in medium devoid of BSA, HCO3 (-), and Ca(2+) However, this action of BPA stimulation could be blocked by H89, a highly selective blocker of protein kinase A (PKA), but not by KH7, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase. These data suggest that BPA may activate PKA to affect sperm functions and male fertility. PMID:27174873

  10. Analysis of Chlorination, Nitration, and Nitrosylation of Tyrosine and Oxidation of Methionine and Cysteine in Hemoglobin from Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hauh-Jyun Candy; Yang, Ya-Fen; Lai, Pang-Yen; Chen, Pin-Fan

    2016-09-20

    The post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins by endogenous reactive chlorine, nitrogen, and oxygen species is implicated in certain pathological conditions, including diabetes mellitus. Evidence showed that the extents of modifications on a number of proteins are elevated in diabetic patients. Measuring modification on hemoglobin has been used to monitor the extent of exposure. This study develops an assay for simultaneous quantification of the extent of chlorination, nitration, and oxidation in human hemoglobin and to examine whether the level of any of these modifications is higher in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic mellitus patients. This mass spectrometry-based assay used the bottom-up proteomic strategy. Due to the low amount of endogenous modification, we first characterized the sites of chlorination at tyrosine in hypochlorous acid-treated hemoglobin by an accurate mass spectrometer. The extents of chlorination, nitration, and oxidation of a total of 12 sites and types of modifications in hemoglobin were measured by nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry under the selected reaction monitoring mode. Relative quantification of these PTMs in hemoglobin extracted from blood samples shows that the extents of chlorination at α-Tyr-24, nitration at α-Tyr-42, and oxidation at the three methionine residues are significantly higher in diabetic patients (n = 19) than in nondiabetic individuals (n = 18). After excluding the factor of smoking, chlorination at α-Tyr-24, nitration at α-Tyr-42, and oxidation at the three methionine residues are significantly higher in the nonsmoking diabetic patients (n = 12) than in normal nonsmoking subjects (n = 11). Multiple regression analysis performed on the combined effect of age, body-mass index (BMI), and HbA1c showed that the diabetes factor HbA1c contributes significantly to the extent of chlorination at α-Tyr-24 in nonsmokers. In addition, age contributes to oxidation at

  11. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  12. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 interacts with oncogenic lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu; Leong, King-Fu; Pabich, Samantha; Yu, Chao-Lan

    2011-03-01

    Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) plays a key role in T cell signal transduction and is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Lck can function as an oncoprotein when overexpressed or constantly activated by mutations. Our previous studies showed that Lck-induced cellular transformation could be suppressed by enforced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), a SOCS family member involved in the negative feedback control of cytokine signaling. We observed attenuated Lck kinase activity in SOCS1-expressing cells, suggesting an important role of SOCS in regulating Lck functions. It remains largely unknown whether and how SOCS proteins interact with the oncogenic Lck kinase. Here, we report that among four SOCS family proteins, SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3 and CIS (cytokine-inducible SH2 domain containing protein), SOCS1 has the highest affinity in binding to the oncogenic Lck kinase. We identified the positive regulatory phosphotyrosine 394 residue in the kinase domain as the key interacting determinant in Lck. Additionally, the Lck kinase domain alone is sufficient to bind SOCS1. While the SH2 domain in SOCS1 is important in its association with the oncogenic Lck kinase, other functional domains may also contribute to overall binding affinity. These findings provide important mechanistic insights into the role of SOCS proteins as tumor suppressors in cells transformed by oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases.

  13. The tyrosine kinase McsB is a regulated adaptor protein for ClpCP.

    PubMed

    Kirstein, Janine; Dougan, David A; Gerth, Ulf; Hecker, Michael; Turgay, Kürşad

    2007-04-18

    Cells of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis have to adapt to fast environmental changes in their natural habitat. Here, we characterized a novel system in which cells respond to heat shock by regulatory proteolysis of a transcriptional repressor CtsR. In B. subtilis, CtsR controls the synthesis of itself, the tyrosine kinase McsB, its activator McsA and the Hsp100/Clp proteins ClpC, ClpE and their cognate peptidase ClpP. The AAA+ protein family members ClpC and ClpE can form an ATP-dependent protease complex with ClpP and are part of the B. subtilis protein quality control system. The regulatory response is mediated by a proteolytic switch, which is formed by these proteins under heat-shock conditions, where the tyrosine kinase McsB acts as a regulated adaptor protein, which in its phosphorylated form activates the Hsp100/Clp protein ClpC and targets the repressor CtsR for degradation by the general protease ClpCP.

  14. Weak oligomerization of low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase is conserved from mammals to bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Jascha; Bernadó, Pau; Xu, Huimin; Jin, Changwen; Pons, Miquel

    2009-08-01

    The well-characterized self-association of a mammalian low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (lmwPTP) produces inactive oligomers that are in equilibrium with active monomers. A role of the inactive oligomers as supramolecular proenzymes has been suggested. The oligomerization equilibrium of YwlE, a lmwPTP from Bacillus subtilis, was studied by NMR. Chemical shift data and NMR relaxation confirm that dimerization takes place through the enzyme's active site, and is fully equivalent to the dimerization previously characterized in a eukaryotic low-molecular-weight phosphatase, with similarly large dissociation constants. The similarity between the oligomerization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic phosphatases extends beyond the dimer and involves higher order oligomers detected by NMR relaxation analysis at high protein concentrations. The conservation across different kingdoms of life suggests a physiological role for lmwPTP oligomerization in spite of the weak association observed in vitro. Structural data suggest that substrate modulation of the oligomerization equilibrium could be a regulatory mechanism leading to the generation of signaling pulses. The presence of a phenylalanine residue in the dimerization site of YwlE, replacing a tyrosine residue conserved in all eukaryotic lmwPTPs, demonstrates that lmwPTP regulation by oligomerization can be independent from tyrosine phosphorylation.

  15. Pez: a novel human cDNA encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase- and ezrin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Mitchell, P J; Shipley, J; Gusterson, B A; Rogers, M V; Crompton, M R

    1995-04-26

    We have isolated cDNAs from normal human breast tissue and breast tumour cells that encode a protein (pez) with features of a novel non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase possessing N-terminal sequence homology to the ezrin-band 4.1-merlin-radixin protein family. Northern blot analysis indicates that pez is expressed in a variety of human tissues including kidney, skeletal muscle, lung and placenta. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has mapped pez to chromosome 1 region q32.2-41. Sequence identity to a characterized polymorphic marker confirms this localization. PMID:7733990

  16. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase SAP-1 protects against colitis through regulation of CEACAM20 in the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Murata, Yoji; Kotani, Takenori; Supriatna, Yana; Kitamura, Yasuaki; Imada, Shinya; Kawahara, Kohichi; Nishio, Miki; Daniwijaya, Edwin Widyanto; Sadakata, Hisanobu; Kusakari, Shinya; Mori, Munemasa; Kanazawa, Yoshitake; Saito, Yasuyuki; Okawa, Katsuya; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Okazawa, Hideki; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Azuma, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akira; Matozaki, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells contribute to regulation of intestinal immunity in mammals, but the detailed molecular mechanisms of such regulation have remained largely unknown. Stomach-cancer-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SAP-1, also known as PTPRH) is a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase that is localized specifically at microvilli of the brush border in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that SAP-1 ablation in interleukin (IL)-10-deficient mice, a model of inflammatory bowel disease, resulted in a marked increase in the severity of colitis in association with up-regulation of mRNAs for various cytokines and chemokines in the colon. Tyrosine phosphorylation of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 20, an intestinal microvillus-specific transmembrane protein of the Ig superfamily, was greatly increased in the intestinal epithelium of the SAP-1-deficient animals, suggesting that this protein is a substrate for SAP-1. Tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM20 by the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src and the consequent association of CEACAM20 with spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) promoted the production of IL-8 in cultured cells through the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In addition, SAP-1 and CEACAM20 were found to form a complex through interaction of their ectodomains. SAP-1 and CEACAM20 thus constitute a regulatory system through which the intestinal epithelium contributes to intestinal immunity. PMID:26195794

  19. Models for the activation pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, S.R.; Niyogi, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor's intrinsic protein-tyrosine kinase activity, which occurs upon formation of the receptor-ligand complex, is the critical regulatory event affecting the subsequent EGF-dependent cellular responses leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The molecular mechanism by which EGF-dependent activation of receptor kinase activity takes place is not clearly understood. In this study, the growth factor-dependent activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase was examined in vitro using detergent-solubilized, partially purified GEF receptors from A5431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Evaluation of the cooperativity observed in the EGF-dependent activation of soluble receptor tyrosine kinase would suggest a mechanism requiring the binding of the EGF peptide to both ligand binding sites on a receptor dimer to induce full receptor kinase activity. Equations describing potential cooperative kinase activation pathways have been examined. The theoretical system which best simulates the allosteric regulation observed in the experimental kinase activation data is that describing multiple essential activation. In addition, studies using mutant analogs of the EGF peptide ligand appear to confirm the requirement for an essential conformational change in the receptor-ligand complex to activate the receptor kinase activity. Several mutant growth factor analogues are able to occupy the ligand binding sites on the receptor without inducing the fully active receptor conformation.

  20. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation in sperm of a rare red deer, Tarim wapiti (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis).

    PubMed

    Tulake, Kuerban; Wang, Xuguang; Chen, Yong; Yu, Chucai; Jing, Binyu; Li, Heping

    2015-03-01

    High efficiency of in vitro capacitation of deer sperm has not yet been achieved as low sperm penetration rates were reported in in vitro fertilization studies. Our main goal in this study was to identify the changes of frozen-thawed sperm of the rare red deer Tarim wapiti (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis) and detect the effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA), serum, and heparin on the protein tyrosine phosphorylation of frozen-thawed sperm. The frozen-thawed sperm of Tarim wapiti was suspended in improved modified tyrode-albumin-lactate-pyruvate medium and cultured in 5% CO2 at 38.5°C, and the status of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm was detected by Western blotting. Although the results showed that the type number and expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of frozen-thawed wapiti sperm were decreased, the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins such as 10, 14, 40, 47, and 55kDa were increased significantly during the process of capacitation culture (1-2h). In addition, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were promoted by BSA rather than serum, and estrus sheep serum (ESS) rather than estrus deer serum. When ESS and heparin were used together at 4h after capacitation, four main tyrosine phosphorylation proteins (10±2, 14±2, 25±3, and 47±3kDa) had a significantly higher expression than that at 2h after capacitation. We demonstrated that these proteins were involved in wapiti sperm in vitro capacitation, heparin in the incubation media was necessary for the capacitation and tyrosine phosphorylation protein was promoted by ESS. PMID:25638741

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation in sperm of a rare red deer, Tarim wapiti (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis).

    PubMed

    Tulake, Kuerban; Wang, Xuguang; Chen, Yong; Yu, Chucai; Jing, Binyu; Li, Heping

    2015-03-01

    High efficiency of in vitro capacitation of deer sperm has not yet been achieved as low sperm penetration rates were reported in in vitro fertilization studies. Our main goal in this study was to identify the changes of frozen-thawed sperm of the rare red deer Tarim wapiti (Cervus elaphus yarkandensis) and detect the effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA), serum, and heparin on the protein tyrosine phosphorylation of frozen-thawed sperm. The frozen-thawed sperm of Tarim wapiti was suspended in improved modified tyrode-albumin-lactate-pyruvate medium and cultured in 5% CO2 at 38.5°C, and the status of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm was detected by Western blotting. Although the results showed that the type number and expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of frozen-thawed wapiti sperm were decreased, the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins such as 10, 14, 40, 47, and 55kDa were increased significantly during the process of capacitation culture (1-2h). In addition, tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were promoted by BSA rather than serum, and estrus sheep serum (ESS) rather than estrus deer serum. When ESS and heparin were used together at 4h after capacitation, four main tyrosine phosphorylation proteins (10±2, 14±2, 25±3, and 47±3kDa) had a significantly higher expression than that at 2h after capacitation. We demonstrated that these proteins were involved in wapiti sperm in vitro capacitation, heparin in the incubation media was necessary for the capacitation and tyrosine phosphorylation protein was promoted by ESS.

  3. Protein-serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases in bacterial signaling and regulation.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Charlotte; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Pagot, Yves; Poncet, Sandrine; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we address some recent developments in the field of bacterial protein phosphorylation, focusing specifically on serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. We present an overview of recent studies outlining the scope of physiological processes that are regulated by phosphorylation, ranging from cell cycle, growth, cell morphology, to metabolism, developmental phenomena, and virulence. Specific emphasis is placed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a showcase organism for serine/threonine kinases, and Bacillus subtilis to illustrate the importance of protein phosphorylation in developmental processes. We argue that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases have a distinctive feature of phosphorylating multiple substrates and might thus represent integration nodes in the signaling network. Some open questions regarding the evolutionary benefits of relaxed substrate selectivity of these kinases are treated, as well as the notion of nonfunctional 'background' phosphorylation of cellular proteins. We also argue that phosphorylation events for which an immediate regulatory effect is not clearly established should not be dismissed as unimportant, as they may have a role in cross-talk with other post-translational modifications. Finally, recently developed methods for studying protein phosphorylation networks in bacteria are briefly discussed.

  4. The Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein Dok7 Activates the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK via Dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Bergamin, E.; Hallock, P; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2010-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate neuromuscular junction requires, among others proteins, Agrin, a neuronally derived ligand, and the following muscle proteins: LRP4, the receptor for Agrin; MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK); and Dok7 (or Dok-7), a cytoplasmic adaptor protein. Dok7 comprises a pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Unique among adaptor proteins recruited to RTKs, Dok7 is not only a substrate of MuSK, but also an activator of MuSK's kinase activity. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Dok7 PH-PTB domains in complex with a phosphopeptide representing the Dok7-binding site on MuSK. The structure and biochemical data reveal a dimeric arrangement of Dok7 PH-PTB that facilitates trans-autophosphorylation of the kinase activation loop. The structure provides the molecular basis for MuSK activation by Dok7 and for rationalizing several Dok7 loss-of-function mutations found in patients with congenital myasthenic syndromes.

  5. Unbiased identification of substrates of protein tyrosine phosphatase ptp-3 in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Bose, Anjun K; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-06-01

    The leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases has three members in humans - PTPRF, PTPRD and PTPRS - that have been implicated in diverse processes including embryonic development, inhibition of cell growth and axonal guidance. Mutations in the LAR family are associated with developmental defects such as cleft palate as well as various cancers including breast, neck, lung, colon and brain. Although this family of tyrosine phosphatases is important for many developmental processes, little is known of their substrates. This is partially due to functional redundancy within the LAR family, as deletion of a single gene in the LAR family does not have an appreciable phenotype, but a dual knockout is embryonically lethal in mouse models. To circumvent the inability to knockout multiple members of the LAR family in mouse models, we used a knockout of ptp-3, which is the only known ortholog of the LAR family in Caenorhabditis elegans and allows for the study of the LAR family at the organismal level. Using SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, we identified 255 putative substrates of ptp-3, which included four of the nine known annotated substrates of the LAR family. A motif analysis of the identified phosphopeptides allowed for the determination of sequences that appear to be preferentially dephosphorylated. Finally, we discovered that kinases were overrepresented in the list of identified putative substrates and tyrosine residues whose phosphorylation is known to increase kinase activity were dephosphorylated by ptp-3. These data are suggestive of ptp-3 as a potential negative regulator of several kinase families, such as the mitogen activated kinases (MAPKs), and multiple tyrosine kinases including FER, MET, and NTRK2.

  6. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, So-Hee; Moon, Jeonghee; Lee, Myungkyu; Lee, Jae-Ran

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1.

  7. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  8. Implication of a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaits, F; Li, R Y; Ragab, A; Selves, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1994-07-01

    Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation and oncogenesis. The recent characterization of the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) suggests that dephosphorylation might be a crucial event in these phenomena. One of the functions of PTPases is to reverse the effect of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKases), many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that they may act as tumor suppressors as described for HPTP gamma. In order to investigate the implication in lung cancer of HPTP beta, a receptor PTPase, we have developed a semi-quantitative method derived from primer-directed reverse transcription (RT) and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 32P-labelled nucleotide. We have demonstrated that the expression of HPTP beta mRNA was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinomas and lung malpighian carcinomas as compared to normal lung tissue. In addition, HPTP beta was not expressed in the pulmonar adenocarcinoma cell line A427, which proliferates in a deregulated way. These results suggest that the loss of expression of HPTP beta might play a role in neoplasic transformation and thus this molecule could act as a tumor suppressor factor. PMID:7981622

  9. Implication of a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaits, F; Li, R Y; Ragab, A; Selves, J; Ragab-Thomas, J M; Chap, H

    1994-07-01

    Protein tyrosyl phosphorylation plays an essential role in regulating cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation and oncogenesis. The recent characterization of the family of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) suggests that dephosphorylation might be a crucial event in these phenomena. One of the functions of PTPases is to reverse the effect of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKases), many of which are oncogenes, suggesting that they may act as tumor suppressors as described for HPTP gamma. In order to investigate the implication in lung cancer of HPTP beta, a receptor PTPase, we have developed a semi-quantitative method derived from primer-directed reverse transcription (RT) and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with 32P-labelled nucleotide. We have demonstrated that the expression of HPTP beta mRNA was dramatically decreased in lung adenocarcinomas and lung malpighian carcinomas as compared to normal lung tissue. In addition, HPTP beta was not expressed in the pulmonar adenocarcinoma cell line A427, which proliferates in a deregulated way. These results suggest that the loss of expression of HPTP beta might play a role in neoplasic transformation and thus this molecule could act as a tumor suppressor factor.

  10. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is a major phosphatase of adherens junctions and dephosphorylates beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer R; Vadas, Mathew A; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2003-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion regulates processes important in embryonal development, normal physiology, and cancer progression. It is regulated by various mechanisms including tyrosine phosphorylation. We have previously shown that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is concentrated at intercellular junctions in confluent, quiescent monolayers but is nuclear in cells lacking cell-cell contacts. We show here with an epithelial cell model that Pez localizes to the adherens junctions in confluent monolayers. A truncation mutant lacking the catalytic domain acts as a dominant negative mutant to upregulate tyrosine phosphorylation at adherens junctions. We identified beta-catenin, a component of adherens junctions, as a substrate of Pez by a "substrate trapping" approach and by in vitro dephosphorylation with recombinant Pez. Consistent with this, ectopic expression of the dominant negative mutant caused an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, demonstrating that Pez regulates the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins, including beta-catenin. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins has been shown to decrease cell-cell adhesion, promoting cell migration as a result. Accordingly, the dominant negative Pez mutant enhanced cell motility in an in vitro "wound" assay. This suggests that Pez is also a regulator of cell motility, most likely through its action on cell-cell adhesion. PMID:12808048

  11. Nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) are endocrine disruptors to downregulate expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and motor behavior through conversion to nitric oxide in early development of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Jannat, Meshkatul; Fatimah, Ratu; Kishida, Mitsuyo

    2014-09-26

    With a view to consider the increasing concern over nitrogen pollution in the aquatic environment, we investigated effects of nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) on the activity of dopaminergic neuron in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Both nitrate and nitrite exposure decreased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in dopaminergic neurons at 48hpf. Only nitrite decreased the response to tactile stimulation at 72hpf, whereas both nitrate and nitrite decreased the swimming activity at 6dpf. When the embryos were exposed to nitrate or nitrite together with an estrogen receptor blocker (ICI 182,780), the decreases in TH expression and motor behavior caused by nitrate or nitrite alone were reversed suggesting the effects of nitrate and nitrite were mediated through estrogen receptor (ER). The result of co-incubation with an oxidoreductase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium, indicated the conversion to nitric oxide (NO) is likely to be responsible for the effects of nitrate and nitrite, which was further supported by the increased staining for NO after exposure. The present study demonstrates that nitrate and nitrite are neurotoxicants acting as an endocrine disruptor possibly through conversion to NO to downregulate the activity of dopaminergic neuron in early development of zebrafish. PMID:25173937

  12. Elevated intracellular calcium concentration increases secretory processing of the amyloid precursor protein by a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Petryniak, M A; Wurtman, R J; Slack, B E

    1996-01-01

    Secretory cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a process that releases soluble APP derivatives (APPs) into the extracellular space, is stimulated by the activation of muscarinic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The signalling pathways involved in the release process exhibit both protein kinase C- and protein tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent components [Slack, Breu, Petryniak, Srivastava and Wurtman (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 8337-8344]. The possibility that elevations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration initiate the tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent release of APPs was examined in human embryonic kidney cells expressing muscarinic m3 receptors. Inhibition of protein kinase C with the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X decreased the carbachol-evoked release of APPs by approx. 30%, as shown previously. The residual response was further decreased, in an additive manner, by the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A25. The Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin, like carbachol, stimulated both the release of APPs and the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, one of which was identified as paxillin, a component of focal adhesions. The effects of ionomycin on APPs release and on protein tyrosine phosphorylation were concentration-dependent, and occurred over similar concentration ranges; both effects were inhibited only partly by GF 109203X, but were abolished by EGTA or by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results demonstrate for the first time that ionophore-induced elevations in intracellular Ca2+ levels elicit APPs release via increased tyrosine phosphorylation. Part of the increase in APPs release evoked by muscarinic receptor activation might be attributable to a similar mechanism. PMID:9003386

  13. Effect of cooling (4°C) and cryopreservation on cytoskeleton actin and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in buffalo spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Naresh, Sai

    2016-02-01

    Semen cryopreservation is broadly utilized as a part of the bovine reproducing industry, a large portion of the spermatozoa does not survive and the majority of those that do survive experience various molecular and physiological changes that influence their fertilizing capacity. The main aim of this study is to determine the effect of cooling (4 °C) and cryopreservation on cytoskeleton actin, tyrosine phosphorylation and quality of buffalo spermatozoa, and to determine the similarity between in vitro capacitation and cryopreservation induced capacitation like changes. To achieve this, Western blot was used to examine the changes in actin expression and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas changes in actin polymerization, localization of actin and protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and cryopreservation were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence technique. Localization studies revealed that the actin localized to flagella and acrosome membrane regions and following, capacitation it migrated towards the acrosome region of sperm. Time dependent increase in actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation was observed during in vitro capacitation. The cooling phase (4 °C) and cryopreservation processes resulted in the loss/damage of cytoskeleton actin. In addition, we performed the actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cooled and cryopreserved buffalo spermatozoa. Interestingly, cooling and cryopreservation induces actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which were similar to in vitro capacitation (cryo-capacitation). These changes showed 1.3 folds reduction in the sperm quality parameters which includes motility, viability and plasma membrane integrity. Furthermore, our findings indicate that cooling and cryopreservation damages the cytoskeleton actin and also induces capacitation like changes such as protein tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. This could be one of the

  14. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  15. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of arsenic compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Rehman, Kanwal; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Wen Wen; Wang, Yan Wei; Sakamoto, Akira; Zhang, Yan Fang; Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2012-09-15

    Arsenic binding to biomolecules is considered one of the major toxic mechanisms, which may also be related to the carcinogenic risks of arsenic in humans. At the same time, arsenic is also known to activate the phosphorylation-dependent signaling pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor, the mitogen-activated protein kinase and insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 pathways. These signaling pathways originate at the level of receptor tyrosine kinases whose phosphorylation status is regulated by opposing protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation, which is governed by the balanced action of protein tyrosine kinases and phosphatases, regulates important signaling pathways that are involved in the control of cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. In the present study, we have focused on the interaction of cellular PTPs with toxic trivalent arsenite (iAs{sup III}) and its intermediate metabolites such as monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in vitro, and then determined the arsenic binding site in PTP by the use of recombinant PTPs (e.g., PTP1B and CD45). Interestingly, the activities of PTP1B (cytoplasm-form) or CD45 (receptor-linked form) were observed to be strongly inhibited by both methylated metabolites (i.e., MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III}) but not by iAs{sup III}. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has clearly confirmed that the organic intermediate, DMA{sup III} directly bound to the active site cysteine residue of PTP1B (e.g., Cys215), resulting in inhibition of enzyme activity. These results suggest that arsenic exposure may disturb the cellular signaling pathways through PTP inactivation. Highlights: ► This study focused on the interaction of PTPs with trivalent arsenicals in vitro. ► We for the first time confirmed that DMA{sup III} strongly inhibited activity of PTP1B. ► DMA{sup III} directly

  16. Expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase δ, PTPδ, in mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Maria; Nakamura, Fumio; Yamashita, Naoya; Uetani, Noriko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphate δ (PTPδ), one of the receptor type IIa protein tyrosine phosphates, is known for its roles in axon guidance, synapse formation, cell adhesion, and tumor suppression. Alternative splicing of this gene generates at least four (A-D) isoforms; however, the major isoform in vivo is yet to be determined. The protein localization has neither been revealed. We have generated anti-mouse PTPδ-specific monoclonal antibody and analyzed the protein expression in wild-type and Ptpδ knockout mice. Immunoblot analysis of various organs revealed that neuronal tissues express both C-and D-isoforms of PTPδ, whereas non-neuronal tissues express only C-isoform. Immunohistochemistry of wild-type or Ptpδ heterozygous sections showed that olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and several nuclei in brain stem exhibit moderate to strong positive signals. These signals were absent in Ptpδ knockout specimens. Higher magnification revealed differences between expression patterns of PTPδ mRNA and its protein product. In hippocampus, weak mRNA expression in CA1 stratum pyramidale but strong immunostaining in the stratum lacunosum moleculare was observed, suggesting the axonal expression of PTPδ in the entorhinal cortical afferents. Olfactory mitral cells exhibited mRNA expression in cell bodies and protein localization in their dendritic fields, glomerular and external plexiform layers. Nissl staining showed that the external plexiform layer was reduced in Ptpδ knockout mice. Golgi-impregnation confirmed the poor dendritic growth of homozygous mitral cells. These results suggest that PTPδ may localize in axons as well as in dendrites to regulate their elaboration in the central nervous system.

  17. Expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase δ, PTPδ, in mouse central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Maria; Nakamura, Fumio; Yamashita, Naoya; Uetani, Noriko; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Goshima, Yoshio

    2016-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphate δ (PTPδ), one of the receptor type IIa protein tyrosine phosphates, is known for its roles in axon guidance, synapse formation, cell adhesion, and tumor suppression. Alternative splicing of this gene generates at least four (A-D) isoforms; however, the major isoform in vivo is yet to be determined. The protein localization has neither been revealed. We have generated anti-mouse PTPδ-specific monoclonal antibody and analyzed the protein expression in wild-type and Ptpδ knockout mice. Immunoblot analysis of various organs revealed that neuronal tissues express both C-and D-isoforms of PTPδ, whereas non-neuronal tissues express only C-isoform. Immunohistochemistry of wild-type or Ptpδ heterozygous sections showed that olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and several nuclei in brain stem exhibit moderate to strong positive signals. These signals were absent in Ptpδ knockout specimens. Higher magnification revealed differences between expression patterns of PTPδ mRNA and its protein product. In hippocampus, weak mRNA expression in CA1 stratum pyramidale but strong immunostaining in the stratum lacunosum moleculare was observed, suggesting the axonal expression of PTPδ in the entorhinal cortical afferents. Olfactory mitral cells exhibited mRNA expression in cell bodies and protein localization in their dendritic fields, glomerular and external plexiform layers. Nissl staining showed that the external plexiform layer was reduced in Ptpδ knockout mice. Golgi-impregnation confirmed the poor dendritic growth of homozygous mitral cells. These results suggest that PTPδ may localize in axons as well as in dendrites to regulate their elaboration in the central nervous system. PMID:27026654

  18. Tyrosine Coupling Creates a Hyperbranched Multivalent Protein Polymer Using Horseradish Peroxidase via Bipolar Conjugation Points.

    PubMed

    Minamihata, Kosuke; Yamaguchi, Sou; Nakajima, Kei; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2016-05-18

    Protein polymers of covalently cross-linked protein monomers are highly attractive biomaterials because each monomer unit possesses distinct protein functions. Protein polymers often show enhancement effects on the function by integrating a large number of molecules into one macromolecule. The cross-linking site of component proteins should be precisely controlled to avoid diminishing the protein function. However, preparing protein polymers that are cross-linked site-specifically with a high cross-linking degree is a challenge. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of a site-specifically cross-linked protein polymer that has a hyperbranched polymer-like structure with a high cross-linking degree. A horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction was used to achieve the protein polymerization through a peptide tag containing a tyrosine residue (Y-tag). Y-tag sequences were introduced to both N- and C-termini of a model protein, protein G. The dual Y-tagged protein G (Y-pG-Y) was treated with HRP to form a Y-pG-Y polymer possessing average and maximum cross-linking degree of approximately 70-mer and 150-mer, respectively. The Y-pG-Y polymer shows the highest cross-linking degree among the protein polymers reported, which are completely soluble in water and cross-linked via covalent bonding. The Y-pG-Y was cross-linked site-specifically at the Tyr residue in the Y-tag, retaining its function, and the Y-pG-Y polymer showed extremely strong avidity against immunoglobulin G. The reactivities of N- and C-terminal Y-tags were evaluated, and we revealed that the difference in the radical formation rate by HRP was the key for yielding highly cross-linked protein polymers. PMID:27093089

  19. Tyrosine phosphate hydrolysis of host proteins by an essential Yersinia virulence determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Bliska, J.B.; Falkow, S. ); Guan, Kunliang; Dixon, J.E. )

    1991-02-15

    The plasmid-encoded YopH protein is a protein-tyrosine phosphatase that is essential for Yersinia virulence. The authors have investigated the molecular basis for the role of PTPase activity in Yersinia pathogenesis. Allelic recombination was employed to introduce a defined mutation in to the yopH plasmid gene. Conversion of the essential Cys-403 to Ala in the catalytic domain of the protein abolished YopH PTPase activity and significantly reduced the virulence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in a murine infection model. {sup 32}P-labeled phosphotyrosine-containing proteins were immunoprecipitated from extracts of Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected cell monolayers and analyzed by SDS/PAGE to assess the impact of YopH on host protein phosphorylation. Major proteins of 200, 120, and 60 kDa were dephosphorylated in macrophages associated with wild-type Y.pseydotuberculosis. Selective removal of phosphate from the 120- and 60-kDa proteins was shown to be specific to the YopH PTPase activity. These observations indicate that the essential function of YopH in Yersinia pathogenesis is host-protein dephosphorylation.

  20. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-01

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  1. Protein Tyrosine Nitration in Chronic Intramuscular Parasitism: Immunohistochemical evaluation of Relationships Between Nitration, Fiber Types, and Ubiquitin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that the catabolic processes associated with the proinflammatory impact of protozoan parasitic infection in Holstein calves were significantly more evident in red postural muscle such as psoas major (PM) than locomotor muscles typified by white rectu...

  2. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases are novel components of a polycystin complex

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Catherine A.; Ward, Heather H.; Case, Ruth L.; Thurston, Katie S.; Li, Xiaohong; Needham, Andrew; Romero, Elsa; Hyink, Deborah; Qamar, Seema; Roitbak, Tamara; Powell, Samantha; Ward, Christopher; Wilson, Patricia D.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sandford, Richard N.

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutation of PKD1 and PKD2 that encode polycystin-1 and polycystin-2. Polycystin-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and modulates multiple signaling pathways including AP-1, but the identity of the phosphatases regulating polycystin-1 are previously uncharacterized. Here we identify members of the LAR protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP) superfamily as members of the polycystin-1complex mediated through extra- and intracellular interactions. The first extracellular PKD1 domain of polycystin-1 interacts with the first Ig domain of RPTPσ, while the polycystin-1 C-terminus of polycystin-1 interacts with the regulatory D2 phosphatase domain of RPTPγ. Additional homo- and heterotypic interactions between RPTPs recruit RPTPδ The multimeric polycystin protein complex is found localised in cilia. RPTPσ and RPTPδ are also part of a polycystin-1/E-cadherin complex known to be important for early events in adherens junction stabilisation. The interaction between polycystin-1 and RPTPγ is disrupted in ADPKD cells, while RPTPσ and RPTPδ remain closely associated with E-cadherin, largely in an intracellular location. The polycystin-1 C-terminus is an in vitro substrate of RPTPγ, which dephosphorylates the c-Src phosphorylated Y4237 residue and activates AP1-mediated transcription. The data identify RPTPs as novel interacting partners of the polycystins both in cilia and at adhesion complexes and demonstrate RPTPγ phosphatase activity is central to the molecular mechanisms governing polycystin-dependent signaling. PMID:21126580

  3. Characterization and genomic mapping of genes and pseudogenes of a new human protein tyrosine phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Monckton, D.G.

    1996-07-01

    Previously described protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are classified into three types according to their sequence homology and structural features. Here we describe the characterization of genes and pseudogenes of a member of a fourth type of PTP, designated protein tyrosine phosphatase 4A (PTP4A). The 167-amino-acid human PTPs, but does not show any other sequence homology to any of the previously described PTPs. Two cDNA encoding PTP4A that differed in their noncoding regions were isolated. Another cDNA that has a high level of sequence identity with these two cDNAs and a deletion in the coding region was also isolated. Northern analysis using a probe from a common 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNAs recognized mRNAs of about 2 and 4 kb. Both species of mRNA were seen in all human adult and fetal tissues tested. Fluorescence in situ hybridization mapping of the corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones and sequence-tagged site analysis suggested that one of the PTP4A coding genes is located at 1p35 and the other is on chromosome 11. A processed pseudogene for PTP4A was found in the BRCA1 region of 17q21 and shares 96% sequence identity to one of the PTP4A coding cDNAs. Our studies also suggest the existence of another processed pseudogene on chromosome 11. 31 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Site-specific Nitration of Apolipoprotein A-I at Tyrosine 166 Is Both Abundant within Human Atherosclerotic Plaque and Dysfunctional*

    PubMed Central

    DiDonato, Joseph A.; Aulak, Kulwant; Huang, Ying; Wagner, Matthew; Gerstenecker, Gary; Topbas, Celalettin; Gogonea, Valentin; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Mehl, Ryan A.; Fox, Paul L.; Plow, Edward F.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Fisher, Edward A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is oxidatively modified in the artery wall at tyrosine 166 (Tyr166), serving as a preferred site for post-translational modification through nitration. Recent studies, however, question the extent and functional importance of apoA-I Tyr166 nitration based upon studies of HDL-like particles recovered from atherosclerotic lesions. We developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb 4G11.2) that recognizes, in both free and HDL-bound forms, apoA-I harboring a 3-nitrotyrosine at position 166 apoA-I (NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I) to investigate the presence, distribution, and function of this modified apoA-I form in atherosclerotic and normal artery wall. We also developed recombinant apoA-I with site-specific 3-nitrotyrosine incorporation only at position 166 using an evolved orthogonal nitro-Tyr-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair for functional studies. Studies with mAb 4G11.2 showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I was easily detected in atherosclerotic human coronary arteries and accounted for ∼8% of total apoA-I within the artery wall but was nearly undetectable (>100-fold less) in normal coronary arteries. Buoyant density ultracentrifugation analyses showed that NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I existed as a lipid-poor lipoprotein with <3% recovered within the HDL-like fraction (d = 1.063–1.21). NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I in plasma showed a similar distribution. Recovery of NO2-Tyr166-apoA-I using immobilized mAb 4G11.2 showed an apoA-I form with 88.1 ± 8.5% reduction in lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity, a finding corroborated using a recombinant apoA-I specifically designed to include the unnatural amino acid exclusively at position 166. Thus, site-specific nitration of apoA-I at Tyr166 is an abundant modification within the artery wall that results in selective functional impairments. Plasma levels of this modified apoA-I form may provide insights into a pathophysiological process within the diseased artery wall. PMID:24558038

  5. Phosphorylation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein tyrosine kinase A PtkA by Ser/Thr protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peifu; Wong, Dennis; Li, Wu; Xie, Jianping; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-11-13

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), has inflicted about one third of mankind and claims millions of deaths worldwide annually. Signalling plays an important role in Mtb pathogenesis and persistence, and thus represents attractive resource for drug target candidates. Here, we show that protein tyrosine kinase A (PtkA) can be phosphorylated by Mtb endogenous eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr protein kinases (eSTPKs). Kinase assays showed that PknA, PknD, PknF, and PknK can phosphorylate PtkA in dose- and time-dependent manner. Enzyme kinetics suggests that PknA has the highest affinity and enzymatic efficiency towards PtkA. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction assay in surrogate host showed that PtkA interacts with multi-eSTPKs in vivo, including PknA. Lastly, we show that PtkA phosphorylation by eSTPKs occurs on threonine residues and may effect tyrosine phosphorylation levels and thus PtkA activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that PtkA can serve as a substrate to many eSTPKs and suggests that's its activity can be regulated. PMID:26417687

  6. A RP-UFLC Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: Focus on Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 (PTPN2).

    PubMed

    Duval, Romain; Bui, Linh-Chi; Berthelet, Jérémy; Dairou, Julien; Mathieu, Cécile; Guidez, Fabien; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Cools, Jan; Chomienne, Christine; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are involved in numerous signaling pathways and dysfunctions of certain of these enzymes have been linked to several human diseases including cancer and autoimmune diseases. PTPN2 is a PTP mainly expressed in hematopoietic cells and involved in growth factor and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Loss of function analyses in patients with mutation/deletion of the PTPN2 gene and knock-out mouse models indicate that PTPN2 acts as a tumor suppressor in T-cell malignancies and as a regulator of inflammation and immunity. The use of sensitive and quantitative assays is of prime importance to better characterize the biochemical properties of PTPN2 and its biological roles. We report a highly sensitive non-radioactive assay that allows the measurement of the activity of purified PTPN2 and of endogenous PTPN2 immunoprecipitated on agarose beads. The assay relies on separation and quantitation by reverse-phase ultra fast liquid chromatography (RP-UFLC) of a fluorescein-labeled phosphotyrosine peptide substrate derived from the sequence of STAT1. The applicability and reliability of this approach is supported by kinetic and mechanistic studies using PTP inhibitors. More broadly, our PTPN2 assay provides the basis for the design of flexible methods for the measurement of other PTPs. PMID:26040922

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 58 kDa protein induced by morphine in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, K; Osugi, T; Kuo, C H; Higuchi, H; Miki, N

    1994-04-29

    A 58 kDa protein which was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues with morphine was found in human neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH cells) by immunoblot with monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. The tyrosine phosphorylation was induced by morphine in 5 min in a dose-dependent manner and the increment was completely inhibited by naloxone. A Delta (d) agonist, [D-Pen2,Pen5]-enkephalin (DPDPE), but not a m agonist, [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAGO), stimulated the phosphorylation and treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin inhibited the phosphorylation by morphine. These data suggest that d receptor-stimulation increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the 58 kDa protein through Gi protein in SK-N-SH cells.

  8. Biosynthetic substitution of tyrosine in green fluorescent protein with its surrogate fluorotyrosine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ayyadurai, Niraikulam; Prabhu, Nadarajan Saravanan; Deepankumar, Kanagavel; Kim, Aran; Lee, Sun-Gu; Yun, Hyungdon

    2011-11-01

    Introduction of a fluorine moiety into green fluorescent protein offers an interesting novel spectral variant. The calculated binding energy of fluorotyrosine (F-Tyr) (-8.42 kcal/mol) for tyrosyl tRNA synthetase was moderately higher than that of tyrosine (Tyr) (-8.36 kcal/mol). This result directly correlated with the expression level of F-Tyr containing GFP (38 mg/l), which was comparably higher than that of the parent GFP expression level (34 mg/l). Finally, we generated a model structure for GFP to assess possible interaction in the chromophore of the protein structure, which plays an important role in determining the spectral and folding behaviors of the F-Tyr incorporated GFP variant.

  9. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: From Housekeeping Enzymes to Master-Regulators of Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    There are many misconceptions surrounding the roles of protein phosphatases in the regulation of signal transduction, perhaps the most damaging of which is the erroneous view that these enzymes exert their effects merely as constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. On the contrary, the phosphatases are critical, specific regulators of signaling in their own right and serve an essential function, in a coordinated manner with the kinases, to determine the response to a physiological stimulus. This review is a personal perspective on the development of our understanding of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family of enzymes. I have discussed various aspects of the structure, regulation and function of the PTP family, which I hope will illustrate the fundamental importance of these enzymes to the control of signal transduction. PMID:23176256

  10. TEC protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Erk signaling pathway induced by HGF

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Jiang, Yinan; Zheng, Qiping; Yang, Xiaoming; Wang, Siying

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} TEC is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated by HGF-stimulation in vivo or after partial hepatectomy in mice. {yields} TEC enhances the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE) in HGF signaling pathway in hepatocyte. {yields} TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation through the Erk-MAPK pathway. -- Abstract: Background/aims: TEC, a member of the TEC family of non-receptor type protein tyrosine kinases, has recently been suggested to play a role in hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration. This study aims to investigate the putative mechanisms of TEC kinase regulation of hepatocyte differentiation, i.e. to explore which signaling pathway TEC is involved in, and how TEC is activated in hepatocyte after hepatectomy and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulation. Methods: We performed immunoprecipitation (IP) and immunoblotting (IB) to examine TEC tyrosine phosphorylation after partial hepatectomy in mice and HGF stimulation in WB F-344 hepatic cells. The TEC kinase activity was determined by in vitro kinase assay. Reporter gene assay, antisense oligonucleotide and TEC dominant negative mutant (TEC{sup KM}) were used to examine the possible signaling pathways in which TEC is involved. The cell proliferation rate was evaluated by {sup 3}H-TdR incorporation. Results: TEC phosphorylation and kinase activity were increased in 1 h after hepatectomy or HGF treatment. TEC enhanced the activity of Elk and serum response element (SRE). Inhibition of MEK1 suppressed TEC phosphorylation. Blocking TEC activity dramatically decreased the activation of Erk. Reduced TEC kinase activity also suppressed the proliferation of WB F-344 cells. These results suggest TEC is involved in the Ras-MAPK pathway and acts between MEK1 and Erk. Conclusions: TEC promotes hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration and is involved in HGF-induced Erk signaling pathway.

  11. A novel protein tyrosine kinase Tec identified in lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Li, Ranran; Su, Peng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Ting; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-08-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase Tec, a kind of non-receptor tyrosine kinase, is primarily found to be expressed in T cells, B cells, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells as a cytoplasmic protein. Tec has been proved to be a critical modulator of T cell receptor signaling pathway. In the present study, a homolog of Tec was identified in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. The full-length Tec cDNA of L. japonica (Lja-Tec) contains a 1923 bp open reading frame that encodes a 641-amino acid protein. The multi-alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Lja-Tec with typical vertebrate Tecs showed that it possesses all conserved domains of the Tec family proteins, indicating that an ortholog of Tec exists in the extant jawless vertebrate. In the phylogenetic tree that was reconstructed with 24 homologs of jawless and jawed vertebrates, the Tecs from lampreys and hagfish were clustered as a single clade. The genetic distance between the outgroup and agnathan Tecs' group is closer than that between outgroup and gnathostome Tecs' group, indicating that its origin was far earlier than any of the jawed vertebrates. The mRNA levels of Lja-Tec in lymphocyte-like cells and gills were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that it was significantly upregulated under stimulation with mixed pathogens. This result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. All these results indicated that Lja-Tec plays an important role in immune response. Our data will provide a reference for the further study of lamprey Tec and its immunological function in jawless vertebrates. PMID:26079172

  12. A novel protein tyrosine kinase Tec identified in lamprey, Lampetra japonica.

    PubMed

    Li, Ranran; Su, Peng; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qiong; Zhu, Ting; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2015-08-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase Tec, a kind of non-receptor tyrosine kinase, is primarily found to be expressed in T cells, B cells, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells as a cytoplasmic protein. Tec has been proved to be a critical modulator of T cell receptor signaling pathway. In the present study, a homolog of Tec was identified in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. The full-length Tec cDNA of L. japonica (Lja-Tec) contains a 1923 bp open reading frame that encodes a 641-amino acid protein. The multi-alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Lja-Tec with typical vertebrate Tecs showed that it possesses all conserved domains of the Tec family proteins, indicating that an ortholog of Tec exists in the extant jawless vertebrate. In the phylogenetic tree that was reconstructed with 24 homologs of jawless and jawed vertebrates, the Tecs from lampreys and hagfish were clustered as a single clade. The genetic distance between the outgroup and agnathan Tecs' group is closer than that between outgroup and gnathostome Tecs' group, indicating that its origin was far earlier than any of the jawed vertebrates. The mRNA levels of Lja-Tec in lymphocyte-like cells and gills were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results showed that it was significantly upregulated under stimulation with mixed pathogens. This result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. All these results indicated that Lja-Tec plays an important role in immune response. Our data will provide a reference for the further study of lamprey Tec and its immunological function in jawless vertebrates.

  13. Protein-Protein Interactions in Crystals of the Human Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase ICA512 Ectodomain

    SciTech Connect

    Primo M. E.; Jakoncic J.; Noguera M.E.; Risso V.A.; Sosa L.; Sica M.P.; Solimena M.; Poskus E. and Ermacora M.

    2011-09-15

    ICA512 (or IA-2) is a transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase located in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Initially, it was identified as one of the main antigens of autoimmune diabetes. Later, it was found that during insulin secretion, the cytoplasmic domain of ICA512 is cleaved and relocated to the nucleus, where it stimulates the transcription of the insulin gene. The role of the other parts of the receptor in insulin secretion is yet to be unveiled. The structures of the intracellular pseudocatalytic and mature extracellular domains are known, but the transmembrane domain and several intracellular and extracellular parts of the receptor are poorly characterized. Moreover the overall structure of the receptor remains to be established. We started to address this issue studying by X-ray crystallography the structure of the mature ectodomain of ICA512 (ME ICA512) and variants thereof. The variants and crystallization conditions were chosen with the purpose of exploring putative association interfaces, metal binding sites and all other structural details that might help, in subsequent works, to build a model of the entire receptor. Several structural features were clarified and three main different association modes of ME ICA512 were identified. The results provide essential pieces of information for the design of new experiments aimed to assess the structure in vivo.

  14. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  15. Stress-evoked tyrosine phosphorylation of signal regulatory protein α regulates behavioral immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Murata, Takaaki; Kusakari, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuriko; Takao, Keizo; Maruyama, Toshi; Ago, Yukio; Koda, Ken; Jin, Feng-Jie; Okawa, Katsuya; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Okazawa, Hideki; Murata, Yoji; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Matsuda, Toshio; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2010-08-01

    Severe stress induces changes in neuronal function that are implicated in stress-related disorders such as depression. The molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress remain primarily unknown, however. Signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha) is an Ig-superfamily protein that undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and binds the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Here we show that mice expressing a form of SIRPalpha that lacks most of the cytoplasmic region manifest prolonged immobility (depression-like behavior) in the forced swim (FS) test. FS stress induced marked tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha in the brain of wild-type mice through activation of Src family kinases. The SIRPalpha ligand CD47 was important for such SIRPalpha phosphorylation, and CD47-deficient mice also manifested prolonged immobility in the FS test. Moreover, FS stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of both the NR2B subunit of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor and the K+-channel subunit Kvbeta2 was regulated by SIRPalpha. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha is important for regulation of depression-like behavior in the response of the brain to stress.

  16. A tyrosine-phosphorylated 55-kilodalton motility-associated bovine sperm protein is regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphates and calcium.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S; Trautman, K D; Goueli, S A; Carr, D W

    1997-06-01

    Sperm motility is regulated by protein phosphorylation. We have recently shown that a serine/threonine phosphatase system is involved in motility regulation. Two of the components of the phosphatase system, GSK-3 and PP1gamma2, are regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. During our investigation of sperm tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins we discovered a 55-kDa protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation correlates closely to the motility state of sperm. This protein is tyrosine phosphorylated to a much higher degree in motile caudal than in immotile caput epididymal sperm. Motility inhibition of caudal epididymal sperm by protein kinase A (PKA) anchoring inhibition or by ionomycin-induced calcium overload led to the virtual disappearance of tyrosine phosphorylation of the 55-kDa protein. Conversely, treatment of sperm with motility activators, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP, resulted in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein. The protein was present in the soluble 100 000 x g supernatants of sperm extracts and was heat labile. Chromatography through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Western blot analysis showed that this 55-kDa protein is not a regulatory subunit of PKA or alpha-tubulin. Our results represent the identification of a soluble protein whose tyrosine phosphorylation varies directly with motility and suggest that motility regulation may involve cross talk between PKA, calcium, and tyrosine kinase pathways. PMID:9166697

  17. Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 Regulates UVB-Induced Signaling and Tumorigenesis in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Chastkofsky, Michael I; Bie, Wenjun; Ball-Kell, Susan M; He, Yu-Ying; Tyner, Angela L

    2015-10-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also called BRK) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase expressed in the epithelial linings of the gastrointestinal tract and the skin, where it is expressed in nondividing differentiated cells. We found that PTK6 expression increases in the epidermis following UVB treatment. To evaluate the roles of PTK6 in the skin following UVB-induced damage, we exposed back skin of Ptk6 +/+ and Ptk6 -/- SENCAR mice to incremental doses of UVB for 30 weeks. Wild-type mice were more sensitive to UVB and exhibited increased inflammation and greater activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) than Ptk6-/- mice. Disruption of Ptk6 did not have an impact on proliferation, although PTK6 was expressed and activated in basal epithelial cells in wild-type mice following UVB treatment. However, wild-type mice exhibited shortened tumor latency and increased tumor load compared with Ptk6-/- mice, and STAT3 activation was increased in these tumors. PTK6 activation was detected in UVB-induced tumors, and this correlated with increased activating phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1). Activation of PTK6 was also detected in human squamous cell carcinomas of the skin. Although PTK6 has roles in normal differentiation, it also contributes to UVB-induced injury and tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:25938342

  18. Role of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ in Sensing Extracellular CO2 and HCO3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuehan; Skelton, Lara A; Xu, Lumei; Chandler, Margaret P; Berthiaume, Jessica M; Boron, Walter F

    2016-09-01

    Regulation of blood pH-critical for virtually every facet of life-requires that the renal proximal tubule (PT) adjust its rate of H(+) secretion (nearly the same as the rate of HCO3 (-) reabsorption, JHCO3 ) in response to changes in blood [CO2] and [HCO3 (-)]. Yet CO2/HCO3 (-) sensing mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Because receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors render JHCO3 in the PT insensitive to changes in CO2 concentration, we hypothesized that the structural features of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-γ (RPTPγ) that are consistent with binding of extracellular CO2 or HCO3 (-) facilitate monitoring of blood CO2/HCO3 (-) concentrations. We now report that PTs express RPTPγ on blood-facing membranes. Moreover, RPTPγ deletion in mice eliminated the CO2 and HCO3 (-) sensitivities of JHCO3 as well as the normal defense of blood pH during whole-body acidosis. Thus, RPTPγ appears to be a novel extracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) sensor critical for pH homeostasis. PMID:26839367

  19. Nitropropenyl Benzodioxole, An Anti-Infective Agent with Action as a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    White, Kylie S; Nicoletti, Gina; Borland, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the activities of a broad spectrum antimicrobial compound,nitropropenyl benzodioxole (NPBD) which are of relevance to its potential as an anti-infective drug. These investigations support the proposal that a major mechanism of NPBD is action as a tyrosine mimetic, competitively inhibiting bacterial and fungal protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). NPBD did not affect major anti-bacterial drug targets, namely, ATP production, cell wall or cell membrane integrity, or transcription and translation of RNA. NPBD inhibited bacterial YopH and human PTP1B and not human CD45 in enzyme assays. NPBD inhibited PTP-associated bacterial virulence factors, namely, endospore formation in Bacillus cereus, prodigiosin secretion in Serratia marcescens, motility in Proteus spp., and adherence and invasion of mammalian cells by Yersinia enterocolitica. NPBD acts intracellularly to inhibit the early development stages of the Chlamydia trachomatis infection cycle in mammalian cells known to involve sequestration of host cell PTPs. NPBD thus both kills pathogens and inhibits virulence factors relevant to early infection, making it a suitable candidate for development as an anti-infective agent, particularly for pathogens that enter through, or cause infections at, mucosal surfaces. Though much is yet to be understood about bacterial PTPs, they are proposed as suitable anti-infective targets and have been linked to agents similar to NPBD. The structural and functional diversity and heterogeneous distribution of PTPs across microbial species make them suitably selective targets for the development of both broadly active and pathogen-specific drugs. PMID:24976873

  20. Estrogen stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation and Src kinase activity in avian osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, K D; Gay, C V

    1999-12-01

    The estrogen, 17beta-estradiol, stimulated a profound increase in phosphotyrosine immunostaining of proteins that localized along the site of attachment in avian osteoclasts within 1 min of treatment. By 10 min, this rapidly occurring event had returned to basal levels. Pretreatment with 1 microM herbimycin A, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, prevented the response. Immunoblotting revealed that Src kinase was one of the phosphorylated intermediates. Src kinase also appeared to translocate to the periphery of the cells during the 1 min 17beta-estradiol treatment and became dispersed by 10 min. Src kinase activity measurements indicated an increase in phosphotransferase activity after the 1 min estradiol treatment; this effect diminished with longer exposures to estrogen. Pretreatment of osteoclasts with 1 microg/ml cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, delayed the appearance of increased phosphotyrosine immunostaining at attachment sites, possibly through inhibition of Src kinase translocation. These findings demonstrate that estrogen stimulates rapid tyrosine phosphorylation in osteoclasts, a process that involves activation and translocation of Src kinase to the plasma membrane.

  1. Role of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase γ in Sensing Extracellular CO2 and HCO3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuehan; Skelton, Lara A; Xu, Lumei; Chandler, Margaret P; Berthiaume, Jessica M; Boron, Walter F

    2016-09-01

    Regulation of blood pH-critical for virtually every facet of life-requires that the renal proximal tubule (PT) adjust its rate of H(+) secretion (nearly the same as the rate of HCO3 (-) reabsorption, JHCO3 ) in response to changes in blood [CO2] and [HCO3 (-)]. Yet CO2/HCO3 (-) sensing mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Because receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors render JHCO3 in the PT insensitive to changes in CO2 concentration, we hypothesized that the structural features of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase-γ (RPTPγ) that are consistent with binding of extracellular CO2 or HCO3 (-) facilitate monitoring of blood CO2/HCO3 (-) concentrations. We now report that PTs express RPTPγ on blood-facing membranes. Moreover, RPTPγ deletion in mice eliminated the CO2 and HCO3 (-) sensitivities of JHCO3 as well as the normal defense of blood pH during whole-body acidosis. Thus, RPTPγ appears to be a novel extracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) sensor critical for pH homeostasis.

  2. Nitropropenyl benzodioxole, an anti-infective agent with action as a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    White, Kylie S; Nicoletti, Gina; Borland, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report on the activities of a broad spectrum antimicrobial compound,nitropropenyl benzodioxole (NPBD) which are of relevance to its potential as an anti-infective drug. These investigations support the proposal that a major mechanism of NPBD is action as a tyrosine mimetic, competitively inhibiting bacterial and fungal protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP). NPBD did not affect major anti-bacterial drug targets, namely, ATP production, cell wall or cell membrane integrity, or transcription and translation of RNA. NPBD inhibited bacterial YopH and human PTP1B and not human CD45 in enzyme assays. NPBD inhibited PTP-associated bacterial virulence factors, namely, endospore formation in Bacillus cereus, prodigiosin secretion in Serratia marcescens , motility in Proteus spp., and adherence and invasion of mammalian cells by Yersinia enterocolitica . NPBD acts intracellularly to inhibit the early development stages of the Chlamydia trachomatis infection cycle in mammalian cells known to involve sequestration of host cell PTPs. NPBD thus both kills pathogens and inhibits virulence factors relevant to early infection, making it a suitable candidate for development as an anti-infective agent, particularly for pathogens that enter through, or cause infections at, mucosal surfaces. Though much is yet to be understood about bacterial PTPs, they are proposed as suitable anti-infective targets and have been linked to agents similar to NPBD. The structural and functional diversity and heterogeneous distribution of PTPs across microbial species make them suitably selective targets for the development of both broadly active and pathogen-specific drugs.

  3. The growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene 3CH134 encodes a protein-tyrosine-phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C H; Sun, H; Lau, L F; Tonks, N K

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of fibroblasts with serum growth factors results in the rapid activation of a set of immediate-early genes, among them 3CH134. We have purified a bacterially expressed form of the 3CH134-encoded polypeptide and demonstrated that it has intrinsic protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (PTPase; protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48) activity in vitro. This activity is optimal at pH 7.5, is sensitive to vanadate and cysteinyl modifying agents, and is insensitive to a panel of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitors. Purified 3CH134 protein displays a high degree of selectivity among the tyrosine-phosphorylated polypeptide substrates tested. Under our assay conditions, the rates of dephosphorylation are in the order EDNDYINASL peptide < myelin basic protein < reduced, carboxyamidomethylated, and maleylated lysozyme (RCML) < p42mapk. There is a 200-fold range in rates for these substrates, with p42mapk dephosphorylated 15-fold more rapidly than RCML. Although 3CH134 is most closely related to the tyrosine/serine dual-specificity phosphatase VH1, we failed to detect any 3CH134-directed activity on casein or RCML phosphorylated on serine/threonine residues by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since 3CH134 expression is controlled transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally, it may represent a class of PTPases whose activity is regulated at the level of protein synthesis and degradation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8389479

  4. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed.

  5. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  6. Differential expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases accompanies the reorganisation of the retina upon laser lesion.

    PubMed

    Besser, Manuela; Horvat-Bröcker, Andrea; Eysel, Ulf T; Faissner, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    The regulation of protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in virtually all aspects of eukaryotic development. Beginning with the regulation of the cell cycle to cellular proliferation and differentiation, the delicate balance between the phosphorylating activity of kinases and the dephosphorylation by phosphatases controls the outcome of many signal transduction cascades. The generation of cellular diversity occurs in an environment that is structured by the extracellular matrix (ECM) which forms a surrounding niche for stem and progenitor cells. Cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions elicit specific signaling pathways that control cellular behavior. In pathological situations such as neural degenerating diseases, gene expression patterns and finally the composition of the ECM change dramatically. This leads to changes of cell behavior and finally results in the failure of regeneration and functional restoration in the adult central nervous system. In order to study the roles of tyrosine phosphatases and ECM in this context, we analyzed the effects of laser-induced retinal injury on the regulation of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTP) RPTPBr7, Phogrin and RPTPbeta/zeta. The latter occurs in several isoforms, including the soluble released chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan phosphacan that is expressed in the developing retina. The receptor variants RPTPbeta/zeta(long) and RPTPbeta/zeta(short) may serve as receptors of tenascin-proteins and serve as modulators of cell intrinsic signaling in response to the ECM. Using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis, we show here a time-dependent pattern of gene expression of these molecules following laser lesions of the retina.

  7. Detection and kinetics of protein nitration in aerosols by NO2 and O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Zhang, Y.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of air pollution on allergic diseases are not yet well-understood, but recent studies have shown that proteins are efficiently nitrated by polluted air (Franze et al., 2005) and that nitration enhances the allergenic potential of proteins such as the prominent birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 (Gruijthuijsen et al., 2006). Accordingly, the nitration of proteins in bioaerosol particles such as pollen and spores by NO2 and O3 might be a reason why allergies are on the increase in areas with traffic-related air pollution such as mega-cities and city clusters. In this study we have developed a method to determine the nitrotyrosine residue number per molecule in nitrated model proteins (bovine serum albumin, BSA; ovalbumin, OVA) by liquid chromatography coupled to UV-Vis photometry and mass spectrometry detectors (LC-DAD and LC-ESI-MS). Nitration experiments were carried out by exposing proteins to synthetic gas mixtures of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, nitrogen, synthetic air and water vapor. Reaction rates were measured at different concentration levels of NO2 and O3, and rate coefficients for the heterogeneous chemical reaction were determined. The implications for atmospheric aging and chemical transformation of bioaerosol particles and their potential effects on public health will be discussed. References: Franze, T., Weller, M.G., Niessner, R., Pöschl, U., Protein nitration by polluted air, Environ. Sci. Technol. 39, 1673-1678, 2005. Gruijthuijsen, Y.K., Grieshuber, I., Stöcklinger, A., Tischler, U., Fehrenbach, T., Weller, M.G., Vogel, L., Vieths, S., Pöschl, U., Duschl, A., Nitration enhances the allergenic potential of proteins, Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. 141, 265-275, 2006.

  8. Spinach 14-3-3 protein interacts with the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase in response to excess nitrate stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huini; Zhao, Xiuling; Guo, Chuanlong; Chen, Limei; Li, Kunzhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the function of 14-3-3 protein in response to excess nitrate stress, a 14-3-3 protein, designated as So14-3-3, was isolated from spinach. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that So14-3-3 belongs to non-ε group of 14-3-3 superfamily. Real time-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that So14-3-3 was induced by excess nitrate stress in spinach roots and leaves. After nitrate treatment, the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase (NR) increased and decreased respectively. Co-Immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) suggested that the interaction of So14-3-3 with the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase enhanced, but reduced with phosphorylated NR in spinach roots after nitrate treatment. Besides, 5 proteins interacted with So14-3-3 were found by Co-IP and LC-MS/MS analysis. So14-3-3 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants showed enhanced tolerance to nitrate treatment at the germination and young seedlings stage. The transgenic plants showed longer root length, lower malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, protein carbonyl contents, relatively higher soluble sugar and protein contents, than the WT plants after nitrate treatment. The phosphorylation levels of H(+)-ATPase in transgenic plants were higher than the WT plants after nitrate treatment, whereas NR were lower. Additionally, in transgenic plants, the interaction of So14-3-3 with phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and NR increased and decreased more than the WT plants under nitrate stress, leading to higher H(+)-ATPase and NR activities in transgenic plants. These data suggested that So14-3-3 might be involved in nitrate stress response by interacting with H(+)-ATPase and NR. PMID:27161584

  9. The effect of oviductal fluid on protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cryopreserved boar spermatozoa differs with the freezing method.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Johannisson, A; Saravia, F; Bergqvist, A S

    2012-02-01

    Sperm capacitation takes place in the oviduct and protein tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm proteins is a crucial step in capacitation and acquisition of fertilizing potential. Cryopreserved spermatozoa show altered expression of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the oviduct. The present study compared two freezing methods (conventional-conventional freezing (CF) and simplified-simplified freezing (SF) methods) for their effect on the ability of boar spermatozoa to undergo protein tyrosine phosphorylation in response to oviductal fluid (ODF). Cryopreserved boar-spermatozoa were incubated with pre- and post-ovulatory ODF for 6 h at 38 °C under 5% CO(2). Aliquots of sperm samples were taken at hourly intervals and analyzed for kinematics and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Global protein tyrosine phosphorylation in spermatozoa was measured using flow cytometry and different patterns of phosphorylation were assessed using confocal microscopy. Immediately after thawing, no significant difference was observed in post-thaw sperm motility, velocity and global tyrosine phosphorylation between the two methods of freezing although the freezing method significantly (P < 0.05) influenced the effect of oviductal fluid on these parameters during incubation. While spermatozoa frozen by the CF method showed a significantly higher (P < 0.001) proportion of phosphorylation in response to preovulatory ODF during incubation, spermatozoa frozen by the SF method did not elicit such significant response as there was no significant difference in the proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa between treatments at any given time during incubation. If the CF method was used, the proportion of spermatozoa displaying either tail or full sperm phosphorylation increased in response to both preovulatory (EODF) and postovulatory oviductal fluid. However, if the SF method was used, a significant increase in these patterns was noticed only in the EODF treated group. The present study

  10. A second-generation expression system for tyrosine-sulfated proteins and its application in crop protection.

    PubMed

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Li, Xiang; Ellinghaus, Thomas L; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Wei, Tong; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Pruitt, Rory; Adams, Paul D; Chern, Maw Sheng; Petzold, Christopher J; Liu, Chang C; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-04-18

    Posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins and peptides is important for diverse biological processes in plants and animals. The paucity of heterologous expression systems for PTMs and the technical challenges associated with chemical synthesis of these modified proteins has limited detailed molecular characterization and therapeutic applications. Here we describe an optimized system for expression of tyrosine-sulfated proteins in Escherichia coli and its application in a bio-based crop protection strategy in rice.

  11. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase N2 Is a Positive Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Signaling in Raw264.7 Cell through Derepression of Src Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Ha Thi, Huyen Trang; Choi, Seo-Won; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Hye-Youn; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-01-01

    T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is a phosphotyrosine-specific nonreceptor phosphatase and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues. Although PTPN2 functions as an important regulator in different signaling pathways, it is still unclear what is specific target protein of PTPN2 and how is regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we found that PTPN2 deficiency downregulated the expression of LPS-mediated pro-inflammtory cytokine genes. Conversely, overexpression of PTPN2 in Raw264.7 cells enhanced the expression and secretion of those cytokines. The activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways by LPS was reduced in PTPN2-knockdowned cells and ectopic expression of PTPN2 reversed these effects. Furthermore, we found that PTNP2 directly interacted with Src and removed the inhibitory Tyr527 phosphorylation of Src to enhance the activatory phosphorylation of Tyr416 residue. These results suggested that PTPN2 is a positive regulator of LPS-induced inflammatory response by enhancing the activity of Src through targeting the inhibitory phosphor-tyrosine527 of Src. PMID:27611995

  12. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase N2 Is a Positive Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Signaling in Raw264.7 Cell through Derepression of Src Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Hye-Youn; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-01-01

    T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is a phosphotyrosine-specific nonreceptor phosphatase and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues. Although PTPN2 functions as an important regulator in different signaling pathways, it is still unclear what is specific target protein of PTPN2 and how is regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we found that PTPN2 deficiency downregulated the expression of LPS-mediated pro-inflammtory cytokine genes. Conversely, overexpression of PTPN2 in Raw264.7 cells enhanced the expression and secretion of those cytokines. The activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways by LPS was reduced in PTPN2-knockdowned cells and ectopic expression of PTPN2 reversed these effects. Furthermore, we found that PTNP2 directly interacted with Src and removed the inhibitory Tyr527 phosphorylation of Src to enhance the activatory phosphorylation of Tyr416 residue. These results suggested that PTPN2 is a positive regulator of LPS-induced inflammatory response by enhancing the activity of Src through targeting the inhibitory phosphor-tyrosine527 of Src. PMID:27611995

  13. Identification of Nuclear Protein Targets for Six Leukemogenic Tyrosine Kinases Governed by Post-Translational Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Andrew; Williamson, Andrew; Jaworska, Ewa; Griffiths, John R.; Taylor, Sam; Walker, Michael; O’Dea, Mark Aspinall; Spooncer, Elaine; Unwin, Richard D.; Poolman, Toryn; Ray, David; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases. PMID:22745689

  14. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases. PMID:26547960

  15. INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF POLYHYDROXYLATED FULLERENES AGAINST PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE 1B.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, O L; Trush, V V; Tanchuk, V Yu; Vovk, A I

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of PTP1B by polyhydroxylated fullerenes was studied in silico and in vitro. The enzyme kinetics in the presence of polyhydroxy small gap fullerenes showed that reciprocal value of maximum velocity non-linearly increases with increasing the inhibitor concentration. Analysis of the dose-dependent curve of PTP1B inhibition suggests an apparent positive cooperativity with involvement of at least two binding sites for the hydroxylated fullerene cages. Molecular docking calculations indicated that highly hydroxylated fullerene C60 may occupy the active site and additional allosteric binding site with similar affinity. In silico analysis of a number of fullerenols with 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 hydroxyl groups showed that the inhibitory activity may depend on the degree of hydroxylation of the nanoparticles surface. These data provide some understanding of the mechanisms of inhibitory action of fullerenols on activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  16. Pterocarpans with inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B from Erythrina lysistemon Hutch.

    PubMed

    Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Kang, Keon Wook; Na, MinKyun; Ndinteh, Derek Tantoh; Mbafor, Joseph Tanyi; Oh, Won Keun

    2009-12-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the MeOH extract of the stem bark of Erythrina lysistemon Hutch. resulted in isolation of pterocarpans (1-3), named erylysins A-C, along with nine known pterocarpans (4-12). Their structures were determined to be 3''-hydroxy-2',2'-dimethylpyrano[6',5':3,4]-2'',2''-dimethyldihydropyrano[6'',5'':9,10]pterocarpan (1), furano[5',4':3,4]-9-hydroxy-10-prenylpterocarpan (2), and 8-formyl-3,9-dihydroxy-4,10-diprenylpterocarpan (3), based on spectroscopic analyses. All the isolates, with the exception of 3, 6, and 11, strongly inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity in an in vitro assay, with IC(50) values ranging from 1.01+/-0.3 to 18.1+/-0.9 microg/mL. This is the first report showing the potential of prenylated pterocarpans as a class of natural PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:19833362

  17. Small-molecule inhibitors of the c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Sabine; Miduturu, Chandra V; Kanda, Shigeru; Zhang, Jianming; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Salah, Eidarus; Deng, Xianming; Choi, Hwan Geun; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Knapp, Stefan; Gray, Nathanael S; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2012-04-20

    The c-Fes protein-tyrosine kinase modulates cellular signaling pathways governing differentiation, the innate immune response, and vasculogenesis. Here, we report the identification of types I and II kinase inhibitors with potent activity against c-Fes both in vitro and in cell-based assays. One of the most potent inhibitors is the previously described anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor TAE684. The crystal structure of TAE684 in complex with the c-Fes SH2-kinase domain showed excellent shape complementarity with the ATP-binding pocket and a key role for the gatekeeper methionine in the inhibitory mechanism. TAE684 and two pyrazolopyrimidines with nanomolar potency against c-Fes in vitro were used to establish a role for this kinase in osteoclastogenesis, illustrating the value of these inhibitors as tool compounds to probe the diverse biological functions associated with this unique kinase.

  18. Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase involvement in signal transduction and immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Burkhardt, A L; Bolen, J B

    1995-09-01

    The nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have been grouped into 10 different enzyme families based on predicted amino acid sequences. As the number of enzymes belonging to the nonreceptor class of PTK is increasing, one challenge is to determine how these various classes of PTKs interact within the cell to promote signal transduction. Herein, the activation of four classes of nonreceptor PTKs is discussed in relation to their interactions with each other as well as with other signaling molecules during the process of lymphocyte surface antigen receptor-mediated activation. Recent findings of nonreceptor PTK loss-of-function mutations in different immunodeficiency diseases has revealed the important contribution of this group of enzymes to lymphocyte development. PMID:7554458

  19. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez regulates TGFbeta, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and organ development.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Leila; Wadham, Carol; Crocker, Lesley A; Lardelli, Michael; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2007-09-24

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), crucial during embryogenesis for new tissue and organ formation, is also considered to be a prerequisite to cancer metastasis. We report here that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is expressed transiently in discrete locations in developing brain, heart, pharyngeal arches, and somites in zebrafish embryos. We also find that Pez knock-down results in defects in these organs, indicating a crucial role in organogenesis. Overexpression of Pez in epithelial MDCK cells causes EMT, with a drastic change in cell morphology and function that is accompanied by changes in gene expression typical of EMT. Transfection of Pez induced TGFbeta signaling, critical in developmental EMT with a likely role also in oncogenic EMT. In zebrafish, TGFbeta3 is co- expressed with Pez in a number of tissues and its expression was lost from these tissues when Pez expression was knocked down. Together, our data suggest Pez plays a crucial role in organogenesis by inducing TGFbeta and EMT. PMID:17893246

  20. Tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble protein and augmentation of lectin induced mitogenesis by DMSO in human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wedner, H.J.; Bass, G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have demonstrated that induction of mitogenesis in human T lymphocytes is associated with the tyrosine phosphorylation of a 66KD soluble substrate-TPP 66. Since DMSO has been shown to be a non-specific stimulator of tyrosine protein kinases they have examined the effect of DMSO on both activation and tyrosine phosphorylation in human T cells. Human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were isolated by dextran sedimentation, Ficol/Paque centrifugation and nylon wool filtration. Phosphorylation was performed in cells incubated with (/sup 32/P) orthophosphate followed by DMSO for 30 min. TPP 66 was identified by 2-D PAGE, autoradiography, and HV electrophoresis of the hydrolyzed protein. Concentrations of DMSO from 1% to 50% induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 with maximal stimulation seen at 20%. DMSO alone did not activate the T cells (measured by (/sup 3/H) thymidine incorporation) when tested at high concentrations for 30 sec to 10 min. (longer incubations were markedly toxic) or low concentrations for 12 to 48 hrs. Low concentrations of DMSO 0.1%-0.5% did however, markedly augment (/sup 3/H) thymidine incorporation induced by PHA or Con A. These data suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of TPP 66 alone may not constitute sufficient signal for the activation sequence to begin but the phosphorylation of this soluble substrate may be a critical factor in the propagation of the activation sequence.

  1. The Potent Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B from the Fruits of Melaleuca leucadendron

    PubMed Central

    Saifudin, Azis; Lallo, Subehan Ab; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) is a kind of fruit used as Indonesian medicinal component and recorded in Jamu (tonic made of medical herbs) prescription records for the diabetes treatment. Its methanol extract exhibited a strong inhibitory activity with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 2.05 μg/mL, while it is the same value with positive control RK-682. Objective: To isolate the chemical constituents of M. leucadendron and to evaluate their activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Further, determine their toxicity potential against T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). Materials and Methods: Methanol extract was fractionated using silica column chromatography, and the obtained fraction was purified using Sephadex 20-LH. The structure of isolated compounds was identified based on 1H and 13Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometry. Furthermore, the compounds were examined against PTP1B and TCPTP. Results: Methanol extract of M. leucadendron (Myrtaceae) afforded two triterpenes: Betulinic acid and ursolic acid in high quantities. Both compounds exhibited a strong inhibitory activity against PTP1B inhibition with IC50 value of 1.5 and 2.3 μg/mL, respectively (positive control RK-682, IC50 = 2.05 μg/mL). Their activity toward TCPTP, on the other hand, were at 2.4 and 3.1 μg/mL, respectively. Based on this purification work, betulinic acid and ursolic acid presented 7.6% and 2.4%, respectively, as markedly M. leucadendron most potential for betulinic acid source among Indonesian plants. The result should have demonstrated that the antidiabetes of M. dendron could be through the inhibition of PTP1B. SUMMARY Melaleuca leucadendron is a good source for ursolic acid.Confirming traditional use for type II diabetes via PTP1B inhibition. PMID:27114690

  2. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in regulating the immune system: implications for chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, Marianne R; McCole, Declan F; Rogler, Gerhard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Current hypothesis suggests that genetic, immunological, and bacterial factors contribute essentially to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Variations within the gene loci encoding protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have been associated with the onset of inflammatory bowel disease. PTPs modulate the activity of their substrates by dephosphorylation of tyrosine residues and are critical for the regulation of fundamental cellular signaling processes. Evidence emerges that expression levels of PTPN2, PTPN11, and PTPN22 are altered in actively inflamed intestinal tissue. PTPN2 seems to be critical for protecting intestinal epithelial barrier function, regulating innate and adaptive immune responses and finally for maintaining intestinal homeostasis. These observations have been confirmed in PTPN2 knockout mice in vivo. Those animals are clearly more susceptible to intestinal and systemic inflammation and feature alterations in innate and adaptive immune responses. PTPN22 controls inflammatory signaling in lymphocytes and mononuclear cells resulting in aberrant cytokine secretion pattern and autophagosome formation. PTPN22 deficiency in vivo results in more severe colitis demonstrating the relevance of PTPN22 for intestinal homeostasis in vivo. Of note, loss of PTPN22 promotes mitogen-activated protein kinase-induced cytokine secretion but limits secretion of nuclear factor κB-associated cytokines and autophagy in mononuclear cells. Loss of PTPN11 is also associated with increased colitis severity in vivo. In summary, dysfunction of those PTPs results in aberrant and uncontrolled immune responses that result in chronic inflammatory conditions. This way, it becomes more and more evident that dysfunction of PTPs displays an important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic intestinal inflammation, in particular inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Early diagnosis of bladder cancer through the detection of urinary tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khadjavi, A; Mannu, F; Destefanis, P; Sacerdote, C; Battaglia, A; Allasia, M; Fontana, D; Frea, B; Polidoro, S; Fiorito, G; Matullo, G; Pantaleo, A; Notarpietro, A; Prato, M; Castagno, F; Vineis, P; Gontero, P; Giribaldi, G; Turrini, F

    2015-01-01

    Background: A noninvasive, highly sensitive and specific urine test is needed for bladder cancer (BC) diagnosis and surveillance in addition to the invasive cystoscopy. We previously described the diagnostic effectiveness of urinary tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (UPY) and a new assay (UPY-A) for their measurement in a pilot study. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performances of the UPY-A using an independent cohort of 262 subjects. Methods: Urinary tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were measured by UPY-A test. The area under ROC curve, cutoff, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of UPY-A were determined. The association of UPY levels with tumour staging, grading, recurrence and progression risk was analysed by Kruskal–Wallis and Wilcoxon's test. To test the probability to be a case if positive at the UPY-A, a logistic test adjusted for possible confounding factor was used. Results: Results showed a significant difference of UPY levels between patients with BC vs healthy controls. For the best cutoff value, 261.26 Standard Units (SU), the sensitivity of the assay was 80.43% and the specificity was 78.82%. A statistically significant difference was found in the levels of UPY at different BC stages and grades between Ta and T1 and with different risk of recurrence and progression. A statistically significant increased risk for BC at UPY-A ⩾261.26 SU was observed. Conclusions: The present study supplies important information on the diagnostic characteristics of UPY-A revealing remarkable performances for early stages and allowing its potential use for different applications encompassing the screening of high-risk subjects, primary diagnosis and posttreatment surveillance. PMID:26125446

  4. Specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with a biarsenical probe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver B.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key regulator of the insulin-receptor and leptin-receptor signaling pathways, and it has therefore emerged as a critical anti-type-II-diabetes and anti-obesity drug target. Toward the goal of generating a covalent modulator of PTP1B activity that can be used for investigating its roles in cell signaling and disease progression, we report that the biarsenical probe FlAsH-EDT2 can be used to inhibit PTP1B variants that contain cysteine point mutations in a key catalytic loop of the enzyme. The site-specific cysteine mutations have little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the absence of FlAsH-EDT2. Upon addition of FlAsH-EDT2, however, the activity of the engineered PTP1B is strongly inhibited, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that the cysteine-rich PTP1B variants can be targeted with the biarsenical probe in either whole-cell lysates or intact cells. Together, our data provide an example of a biarsenical probe controlling the activity of a protein that does not contain the canonical tetra-cysteine biarsenical-labeling sequence CCXXCC. The targeting of “incomplete” cysteine-rich motifs could provide a general means for controlling protein activity by targeting biarsenical compounds to catalytically important loops in conserved protein domains. PMID:22263876

  5. Analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase interactions with microarrayed phosphopeptide substrates using imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Hines, Harry B.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays of peptide and recombinant protein libraries are routinely used for high-throughput studies of protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is currently applied as a method to localize analytes on thin tissue sections and other surfaces. Here, we have applied IMS as a label-free means to analyze protein-peptide interactions in a microarray-based phosphatase assay. This IMS strategy visualizes the entire microarray in one composite image by collecting a pre-defined raster of MALDI-TOF MS spectra over the surface of the chip. Examining the bacterial tyrosine phosphatase YopH, we used IMS as a label-free means to visualize enzyme binding and activity with a microarrayed phosphopeptide library printed on chips coated with either gold or indium-tin oxide. Further, we demonstrate that microarray-based IMS can be coupled with surface plasmon resonance imaging to add kinetic analyses to measured binding interactions. The method described here is within the capabilities of many modern MALDI-TOF instruments and has general utility for the label-free analysis of microarray assays. PMID:23906642

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85–93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways. PMID:26941753

  7. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Based Homo-dimerization of Arabidopsis RACK1A Proteins Regulates Oxidative Stress Signaling Pathways in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Sabila, Mercy; Kundu, Nabanita; Smalls, Deana; Ullah, Hemayet

    2016-01-01

    Scaffold proteins are known as important cellular regulators that can interact with multiple proteins to modulate diverse signal transduction pathways. RACK1 (Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1) is a WD-40 type scaffold protein, conserved in eukaryotes, from Chlamydymonas to plants and humans, plays regulatory roles in diverse signal transduction and stress response pathways. RACK1 in humans has been implicated in myriads of neuropathological diseases including Alzheimer and alcohol addictions. Model plant Arabidopsis thaliana genome maintains three different RACK1 genes termed RACK1A, RACK1B, and RACK1C with a very high (85-93%) sequence identity among them. Loss of function mutation in Arabidopsis indicates that RACK1 proteins regulate diverse environmental stress signaling pathways including drought and salt stress resistance pathway. Recently deduced crystal structure of Arabidopsis RACK1A- very first among all of the RACK1 proteins, indicates that it can potentially be regulated by post-translational modifications, like tyrosine phosphorylations and sumoylation at key residues. Here we show evidence that RACK1A proteins, depending on diverse environmental stresses, are tyrosine phosphorylated. Utilizing site-directed mutagenesis of key tyrosine residues, it is found that tyrosine phosphorylation can potentially dictate the homo-dimerization of RACK1A proteins. The homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins play a role in providing UV-B induced oxidative stress resistance. It is proposed that RACK1A proteins ability to function as scaffold protein may potentially be regulated by the homo-dimerized RACK1A proteins to mediate diverse stress signaling pathways. PMID:26941753

  8. UBC9-dependent Association between Calnexin and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) at the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dukgyu; Kraus, Allison; Prins, Daniel; Groenendyk, Jody; Aubry, Isabelle; Liu, Wen-Xin; Li, Hao-Dong; Julien, Olivier; Touret, Nicolas; Sykes, Brian D.; Tremblay, Michel L.; Michalak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Calnexin is a type I integral endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein, molecular chaperone, and a component of the translocon. We discovered a novel interaction between the calnexin cytoplasmic domain and UBC9, a SUMOylation E2 ligase, which modified the calnexin cytoplasmic domain by the addition of SUMO. We demonstrated that calnexin interaction with the SUMOylation machinery modulates an interaction with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), an ER-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in the negative regulation of insulin and leptin signaling. We showed that calnexin and PTP1B form UBC9-dependent complexes, revealing a previously unrecognized contribution of calnexin to the retention of PTP1B at the ER membrane. This work shows that the SUMOylation machinery links two ER proteins from divergent pathways to potentially affect cellular protein quality control and energy metabolism. PMID:25586181

  9. Binding of beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins to the PH domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, S; Simon, M I; Witte, O N; Katz, A

    1994-01-01

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) has been implicated as the defective gene in both human and murine B-cell deficiencies. The identification of molecules that interact with Btk may shed light on critical processes in lymphocyte development. The N-terminal unique region of Btk contains a pleckstrin homology domain. This domain is found in a broad array of signaling molecules and implicated to function in protein-protein interactions. By using an in vitro binding assay and an in vivo competition assay, the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk was shown to interact with the beta gamma dimer of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). A highly conserved tryptophan residue in subdomain 6 of the pleckstrin homology domain was shown to play a critical role in the binding. The interaction of Btk with beta gamma suggests the existence of a unique connection between cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases and G proteins in cellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7972043

  10. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  11. Structure and Configuration of Phosphoeleganin, a Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor from the Mediterranean Ascidian Sidnyum elegans.

    PubMed

    Imperatore, Concetta; Luciano, Paolo; Aiello, Anna; Vitalone, Rocco; Irace, Carlo; Santamaria, Rita; Li, Jia; Guo, Yue-W; Menna, Marialuisa

    2016-04-22

    A new phosphorylated polyketide, phosphoeleganin (1), has been isolated from the Mediterranean ascidian Sidnyum elegans. Its structure and configuration have been determined by extensive use of 2D NMR and microscale chemical degradation and/or derivatization. Phosphoeleganin (1) inhibited the protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity. PMID:27064611

  12. Inhibitory evaluation of oligonol on α-glucosidase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, cholinesterase, and β-secretase 1 related to diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Bhakta, Himanshu Kumar; Fujii, Hajime; Min, Byung-Sun; Park, Chan Hum; Yokozawa, Takako; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2016-03-01

    Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol that is derived from lychee fruit extract and contains catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins. This study investigates the anti-diabetic activities of oligonol via α-glucosidase and human recombinant protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) assays, as well as its anti-Alzheimer activities by evaluating the ability of this compound to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Oligonol exhibited potent concentration-dependent anti-diabetic activities by inhibiting α-glucosidase and PTP1B with IC50 values of 23.14 µg/mL and 1.02 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, a kinetics study revealed that oligonol inhibited α-glucosidase (K i = 22.36) and PTP1B (K i = 8.51) with characteristics typical of a mixed inhibitor. Oligonol also displayed potent concentration-dependent inhibitory activity against AChE and BChE with IC50 values of 4.34 µg/mL and 2.07 µg/mL, respectively. However, oligonol exhibited only marginal concentration-dependent BACE1 inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 130.45 µg/mL. A kinetics study revealed mixed-type inhibition against AChE (K i = 4.65) and BACE1 (K i = 58.80), and noncompetitive-type inhibition against BChE (K i = 9.80). Furthermore, oligonol exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity against peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-mediated protein tyrosine nitration. These results indicate that oligonol has strong preventative potential in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26724817

  13. Kinetic isotope effects in the characterization of catalysis by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Hengge, Alvan C

    2015-11-01

    Although thermodynamically favorable, the uncatalyzed hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters is extraordinarily slow, making phosphatases among the most catalytically efficient enzymes known. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are ubiquitous in biology, and kinetic isotope effects were one of the key mechanistic tools used to discern molecular details of their catalytic mechanism and the transition state for phosphoryl transfer. Later, the unique level of detail KIEs provided led to deeper questions about the potential role of protein motions in PTP catalysis. The recent discovery that such motions are responsible for different catalytic rates between PTPs arose from questions originating from KIE data showing that the transition states and chemical mechanisms are identical, combined with structural data demonstrating superimposable active sites. KIEs also reveal perturbations to the transition state as mutations are made to residues directly involved in chemistry, and to residues that affect protein motions essential for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. PMID:25840000

  14. Low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase: Multifaceted functions of an evolutionarily conserved enzyme.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Anna; Paoli, Paolo; Santi, Alice; Mugnaioni, Camilla; Toti, Alessandra; Camici, Guido; Cirri, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Originally identified as a low molecular weight acid phosphatase, LMW-PTP is actually a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts on many phosphotyrosine-containing cellular proteins that are primarily involved in signal transduction. Differences in sequence, structure, and substrate recognition as well as in subcellular localization in different organisms enable LMW-PTP to exert many different functions. In fact, during evolution, the LMW-PTP structure adapted to perform different catalytic actions depending on the organism type. In bacteria, this enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of group 1 and 4 capsules, but it is also a virulence factor in pathogenic strains. In yeast, LMW-PTPs dephosphorylate immunophilin Fpr3, a peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase member of the protein chaperone family. In humans, LMW-PTP is encoded by the ACP1 gene, which is composed of three different alleles, each encoding two active enzymes produced by alternative RNA splicing. In animals, LMW-PTP dephosphorylates a number of growth factor receptors and modulates their signalling processes. The involvement of LMW-PTP in cancer progression and in insulin receptor regulation as well as its actions as a virulence factor in a number of pathogenic bacterial strains may promote the search for potent, selective and bioavailable LMW-PTP inhibitors. PMID:27421795

  15. Leishmania donovani engages in regulatory interference by targeting macrophage protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1.

    PubMed

    Nandan, Devki; Reiner, Neil E

    2005-03-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus leishmania are obligate intracellular parasites of monocytes and macrophages. These pathogens have evolved to invade the mammalian immune system and typically survive for long periods of time. Leishmania have developed a variety of remarkable strategies to prevent their elimination by both innate and acquired immune effector mechanisms. One particular strategy of interest involves manipulation of host cell regulatory pathways so as to prevent macrophage activation required for efficient microbicidal activity. These interference mechanisms are the main focus of this review. Several lines of evidence have been developed to show that the Src homology-2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) becomes activated in leishmania-infected cells and that this contributes to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for the change in activation state of SHP-1 led to the identification of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 binding protein and SHP-1 activator. This was a surprising finding given that this ubiquitous and highly conserved protein plays an essential role in protein translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The role of leishmania EF-1alpha as an SHP-1 activator and its contribution to pathogenesis are reviewed with particular attention to the properties that distinguish it from host EF-1alpha. PMID:15721837

  16. Proteomic identification of age-dependent protein nitration in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Alterman, Michail A; Schöneich, Christian

    2003-11-15

    Age-related protein nitration was studied in skeletal muscle of Fisher 344 and Fisher 344/Brown Norway (BN) F1 rats by a proteomic approach. Proteins from young (4 months) and old (24 months) Fisher 344 rats and young (6 months) and old (34 months) Fisher 344/BN F1 animals were separated by 2-D gel electrophoresis. Western blot showed an age-related increase in the nitration of a few specific proteins, which were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and ESI-MS/MS. We identified age-dependent apparent nitration of beta-enolase, alpha-fructose aldolase, and creatine kinase, which perform important functions in muscle energy metabolism, suggesting that the nitration of such key proteins can be, in part, responsible for the decline of muscle motor function of the muscle. Furthermore, we have identified the apparent nitration of succinate dehydrogenase, rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta (GdI-2), triosephosphate isomerase, troponin I, alpha-crystallin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

  17. Are tyrosine residues involved in the photoconversion of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Chenopodium album?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Seki, Y; Uchida, A; Nakayama, K; Satoh, H

    2015-05-01

    Non-photosynthetic and hydrophilic chlorophyll (Chl) proteins, called water-soluble Chl-binding proteins (WSCPs), are distributed in various species of Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae, Polygonaceae and Brassicaceae. Based on their photoconvertibility, WSCPs are categorised into two classes: Class I (photoconvertible) and Class II (non-photoconvertible). Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP; Class I) is able to convert the chlorin skeleton of Chl a into a bacteriochlorin-like skeleton under light in the presence of molecular oxygen. Potassium iodide (KI) is a strong inhibitor of the photoconversion. Because KI attacks tyrosine residues in proteins, tyrosine residues in CaWSCP are considered to be important amino acid residues for the photoconversion. Recently, we identified the gene encoding CaWSCP and found that the mature region of CaWSCP contained four tyrosine residues: Tyr13, Tyr14, Tyr87 and Tyr134. To gain insight into the effect of the tyrosine residues on the photoconversion, we constructed 15 mutant proteins (Y13A, Y14A, Y87A, Y134A, Y13-14A, Y13-87A, Y13-134A, Y14-87A, Y14-134A, Y87-134A, Y13-14-87A, Y13-14-134A, Y13-87-134A, Y14-87-134A and Y13-14-87-134A) using site-directed mutagenesis. Amazingly, all the mutant proteins retained not only chlorophyll-binding activity, but also photoconvertibility. Furthermore, we found that KI strongly inhibited the photoconversion of Y13-14-87-134A. These findings indicated that the four tyrosine residues are not essential for the photoconversion.

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1 negatively regulates Dictyostelium STATa and is required for proper cell-type proportioning.

    PubMed

    Early, A; Gamper, M; Moniakis, J; Kim, E; Hunter, T; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    2001-04-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1, which mediates reversible phosphorylation on tyrosine, has been shown to play an important regulatory role during Dictyostelium development. Mutants lacking PTP1 develop more rapidly than normal, while strains that overexpress PTP1 display aberrant morphology. However, the signalling pathways involved have not been characterised. In reexamining these strains, we have found that there is an inverse correlation between levels of PTP1 activity, the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation on Dictyostelium STATa after treatment with cAMP, and the proportion of the slug population exhibiting STATa nuclear enrichment in vivo. This suggests that PTP1 acts to attenuate the tyrosine phosphorylation of STATa and downstream STATa-mediated pathways. Consistent with this, we show that when PTP1 is overexpressed, there is increased expression of a prestalk cell marker at the slug posterior, a phenocopy of STATa null slugs. In ptp1 null strains, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear enrichment in the slug anterior is increased. There is also a change in the prestalk to prespore cell ratio. Synergy experiments suggest that this is due to a cell-autonomous defect in forming the subset of prespore cells that are located in the anterior prespore region.

  19. Suppression of VEGF-induced angiogenesis by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, D E; Fan, T P

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a heparin-binding angiogenic factor which specifically acts on endothelial cells via distinct membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase receptors. Here we used the rat sponge implant model to test the hypothesis that the angiogenic activity of VEGF can be suppressed by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors. 2. Neovascular responses in subcutaneous sponge implants were determined by measurements of relative sponge blood flow by use of a 133Xe clearance technique, and confirmed by histological studies and morphometric analysis. 3. Daily local administration of 250 ng VEGF165 accelerated the rate of 133Xe clearance from the sponges and induced an intense neovascularisation. This VEGF165-induced angiogenesis was inhibited by daily co-administration of the selective PTK inhibitor, lavendustin A (10 micrograms), but not its negative control, lavendustin B (10 micrograms). Blood flow measurements and morphometric analysis of 8-day-old sponges showed that lavendustin A reduced the 133Xe clearance of VEGF165-treated sponges from 32.9 +/- 1.5% to 20.9 +/- 1.6% and the total fibrovascular growth area from 62.4 +/- 6.1% to 21.6 +/- 6.8% (n = 12, P < 0.05). 4. Co-injection of suramin (3 mg), an inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors, also suppressed the VEGF165-elicited neovascular response. In contrast, neither lavendustin A nor suramin produced any effect on the basal sponge-induced angiogenesis. 5. When given alone, low doses of VEGF165 (25 ng) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; 10 ng) did not modify the basal sponge-induced neovascularisation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 Figure 2 PMID:7533611

  20. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 regulates mammary gland tumorigenesis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Franks, R R; Xie, H; Tyner, A L

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6, also called BRK) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase expressed in the majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression has not been reported in normal mammary gland. To study functions of PTK6 in vivo, we generated and characterized several transgenic mouse lines with expression of human PTK6 under control of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat. Ectopic active PTK6 was detected in luminal epithelial cells of mature transgenic mammary glands. Lines expressing the MMTV-PTK6 transgene exhibited more than a two-fold increase in mammary gland tumor formation compared with nontransgenic control animals. PTK6 activates signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and active STAT3 was detected in PTK6-positive mammary gland epithelial cells. Endogenous mouse PTK6 was not detected in the normal mouse mammary gland, but it was induced in mouse mammary gland tumors of different origin, including spontaneous tumors that developed in control mice, and tumors that formed in PTK6, H-Ras, ERBB2 and PyMT transgenic models. MMTV-PTK6 and MMTV-ERBB2 transgenic mice were crossed to explore crosstalk between PTK6 and ERBB2 signaling in vivo. We found no significant increase in tumor incidence, size or metastasis in ERBB2/PTK6 double transgenic mice. Although we detected increased proliferation in ERBB2/PTK6 double transgenic tumors, an increase in apoptosis was also observed. MMTV-PTK6 clearly promotes mammary gland tumorigenesis in vivo, but its impact may be underrepresented in our transgenic models because of induction of endogenous PTK6 expression. PMID:24323291

  1. Protein-tyrosine phosphatases: biological function, structural characteristics, and mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y

    1998-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) superfamily consists of tyrosine-specific phosphatases, dual specificity phosphatases, and the low-molecular-weight phosphatases. They are modulators of signal transduction pathways that regulate numerous cell functions. Malfunction of PTPases have been linked to a number of oncogenic and metabolic disease states, and PTPases are also employed by microbes and viruses for pathogenicity. There is little sequence similarity among the three subfamilies of phosphatases. Yet, three-dimensional structural data show that they share similar conserved structural elements, namely, the phosphate-binding loop encompassing the PTPase signature motif (H/V)C(X)5R(S/T) and an essential general acid/base Asp residue on a surface loop. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that phosphatases in the PTPase superfamily utilize a common mechanism for catalysis going through a covalent thiophosphate intermediate that involves the nucleophilic Cys residue in the PTPase signature motif. The transition states for phosphoenzyme intermediate formation and hydrolysis are dissociative in nature and are similar to those of the solution phosphate monoester reactions. One strategy used by these phosphatases for transition state stabilization is to neutralize the developing negative charge in the leaving group. A conformational change that is restricted to the movement of a flexible loop occurs during the catalytic cycle of the PTPases. However, the relationship between loop dynamics and enzyme catalysis remains to be established. The nature and identity of the rate-limiting step in the PTPase catalyzed reaction requires further investigation and may be dependent on the specific experimental conditions such as temperature, pH, buffer, and substrate used. In-depth kinetic and structural analysis of a representative number of phosphatases from each group of the PTPase superfamily will most likely continue to yield insightful mechanistic information that may be

  2. Natural products possessing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity found in the last decades

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cheng-shi; Liang, Lin-fu; Guo, Yue-wei

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of approximately 300 secondary metabolites with inhibitory activity against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), which were isolated from various natural sources or derived from synthetic process in the last decades. The structure-activity relationship and the selectivity of some compounds against other protein phosphatases were also discussed. Potential pharmaceutical applications of several PTP1B inhibitors were presented. PMID:22941286

  3. Induction of the Nitrate Assimilation nirA Operon and Protein-Protein Interactions in the Maturation of Nitrate and Nitrite Reductases in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frías, José E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate is widely used as a nitrogen source by cyanobacteria, in which the nitrate assimilation structural genes frequently constitute the so-called nirA operon. This operon contains the genes encoding nitrite reductase (nirA), a nitrate/nitrite transporter (frequently an ABC-type transporter; nrtABCD), and nitrate reductase (narB). In the model filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, which can fix N2 in specialized cells termed heterocysts, the nirA operon is expressed at high levels only in media containing nitrate or nitrite and lacking ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source. Here we examined the genes downstream of the nirA operon in Anabaena and found that a small open reading frame of unknown function, alr0613, can be cotranscribed with the operon. The next gene in the genome, alr0614 (narM), showed an expression pattern similar to that of the nirA operon, implying correlated expression of narM and the operon. A mutant of narM with an insertion mutation failed to produce nitrate reductase activity, consistent with the idea that NarM is required for the maturation of NarB. Both narM and narB mutants were impaired in the nitrate-dependent induction of the nirA operon, suggesting that nitrite is an inducer of the operon in Anabaena. It has previously been shown that the nitrite reductase protein NirA requires NirB, a protein likely involved in protein-protein interactions, to attain maximum activity. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis confirmed possible NirA-NirB and NarB-NarM interactions, suggesting that the development of both nitrite reductase and nitrate reductase activities in cyanobacteria involves physical interaction of the corresponding enzymes with their cognate partners, NirB and NarM, respectively. IMPORTANCE Nitrate is an important source of nitrogen for many microorganisms that is utilized through the nitrate assimilation system, which includes nitrate/nitrite membrane transporters and the nitrate and nitrite reductases. Many

  4. Behavioral characterization of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sukoff Rizzo, S J; Lotarski, S M; Stolyar, P; McNally, T; Arturi, C; Roos, M; Finley, J E; Reinhart, V; Lanz, T A

    2014-09-01

    Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has been described as a regulator of multiple kinases and glutamate receptor subunits critical for synaptic plasticity. Published behavioral and biochemical characterization from the founder line of STEP knockout (KO) mice revealed superior cognitive performance, with enhanced phosphorylation of substrates such as ERK, Fyn and GluN2B; suggesting that inhibitors of STEP may have potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The objectives of this work aimed to replicate and extend the previously reported behavioral consequences of STEP knockout. Consistent with previous reported data, STEP KO mice demonstrated exploratory activity levels and similar motor coordination relative to WT littermate controls as well as intact memory in a Y-maze spatial novelty test. Interestingly, KO mice demonstrated deficits in pre-pulse inhibition as well as reduced seizure threshold relative to WT controls. Immunohistochemical staining of brains revealed the expected gene-dependent reduction in STEP protein confirming knockout in the mice. The present data confirm expression and localization of STEP and the absence in KO mice, and describe functional downstream implications of reducing STEP levels in vivo.

  5. Status Epilepticus-Induced Somatostatinergic Hilar Interneuron Degeneration Is Regulated by Striatal Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sik; Lin, Stanley L.; Lee, Boyoung; Kurup, Pradeep; Cho, Hee-Yeon; Naegele, Janice R.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Obrietan, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Excitotoxic cell death is one of the precipitating events in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. Of particular prominence is the loss of GABAergic hilar neurons. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the selective vulnerability of these cells are not well understood, activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway has been implicated in neuroprotective responses to excitotoxicity in other neuronal populations. Here, we report that high levels of the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), a key regulator of ERK/MAPK signaling, are found in vulnerable somatostatin-immunoreactive hilar interneurons. Under both control conditions and after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), ERK/MAPK activation was repressed in STEP-immunoreactive hilar neurons. This contrasts with robust SE-induced ERK/MAPK activation in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, a cell region that does not express STEP. During pilocarpine-induced SE, in vivo disruption of STEP activity allowed activation of the MAPK pathway, leading to immediate-early gene expression and significant rescue from cell death. Thus, STEP increases the sensitivity of neurons to SE-induced excitotoxicity by specifically blocking a latent neuroprotective response initiated by the MAPK pathway. These findings identify a key set of signaling events that render somatostatinergic hilar interneurons vulnerable to SE-induced cell death. PMID:17360923

  6. An Enzyme Cascade for Selective Modification of Tyrosine Residues in Structurally Diverse Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Struck, Anna-Winona; Bennett, Matthew R; Shepherd, Sarah A; Law, Brian J C; Zhuo, Ying; Wong, Lu Shin; Micklefield, Jason

    2016-03-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry enables a specific moiety in a complex biomolecule to be selectively modified in the presence of many reactive functional groups and other cellular entities. Such selectivity has become indispensable in biology, enabling biomolecules to be derivatized, conjugated, labeled, or immobilized for imaging, biochemical assays, or therapeutic applications. Methyltransferase enzymes (MTase) that accept analogues of the cofactor S-adenosyl methionine have been widely deployed for alkyl-diversification and bioorthogonal labeling. However, MTases typically possess tight substrate specificity. Here we introduce a more flexible methodology for selective derivatization of phenolic moieties in complex biomolecules. Our approach relies on the tandem enzymatic reaction of a fungal tyrosinase and the mammalian catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), which can effect the sequential hydroxylation of the phenolic group to give an intermediate catechol moiety that is subsequently O-alkylated. When used in this combination, the alkoxylation is highly selective for tyrosine residues in peptides and proteins, yet remarkably tolerant to changes in the peptide sequence. Tyrosinase-COMT are shown to provide highly versatile and regioselective modification of a diverse range of substrates including peptide antitumor agents, hormones, cyclic peptide antibiotics, and model proteins. PMID:26867114

  7. Hole hopping through tyrosine/tryptophan chains protects proteins from oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms have adapted to atmospheric dioxygen by exploiting its oxidizing power while protecting themselves against toxic side effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formed during oxidative stress, as well as high-potential reactive intermediates formed during enzymatic catalysis, could rapidly and irreversibly damage polypeptides were protective mechanisms not available. Chains of redox-active tyrosine and tryptophan residues can transport potentially damaging oxidizing equivalents (holes) away from fragile active sites and toward protein surfaces where they can be scavenged by cellular reductants. Precise positioning of these chains is required to provide effective protection without inhibiting normal function. A search of the structural database reveals that about one third of all proteins contain Tyr/Trp chains composed of three or more residues. Although these chains are distributed among all enzyme classes, they appear with greatest frequency in the oxidoreductases and hydrolases. Consistent with a redox-protective role, approximately half of the dioxygen-using oxidoreductases have Tyr/Trp chain lengths ≥3 residues. Among the hydrolases, long Tyr/Trp chains appear almost exclusively in the glycoside hydrolases. These chains likely are important for substrate binding and positioning, but a secondary redox role also is a possibility. PMID:26195784

  8. Activation of the Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase in Keratinocytes Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Renan P.; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L. G.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C. C.; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B.; Souza, Ana Carolina S.; Justo, Giselle Z.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  9. Activation of the low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase in keratinocytes exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Silva, Rodrigo A; Palladino, Marcelly V; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Machado, Daisy; Cruz, Bread L G; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria C C; Zambuzzi, Willian F; Vasques, Luciana; Nader, Helena B; Souza, Ana Carolina S; Justo, Giselle Z

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we provide new contribution to the mechanisms involved in keratinocytes response to hyperosmotic shock showing, for the first time, the participation of Low Molecular Weight Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (LMWPTP) activity in this event. We reported that sorbitol-induced osmotic stress mediates alterations in the phosphorylation of pivotal cytoskeletal proteins, particularly Src and cofilin. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of the phosphorylated form of LMWPTP, which was followed by an augment in its catalytic activity, was observed. Of particular importance, these responses occurred in an intracellular milieu characterized by elevated levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. Altogether, our results suggest that hyperosmostic stress provides a favorable cellular environment to the activation of LMWPTP, which is associated with increased expression of antioxidant enzymes, high levels of GSH and inhibition of Src kinase. Finally, the real contribution of LMWPTP in the hyperosmotic stress response of keratinocytes was demonstrated through analysis of the effects of ACP1 gene knockdown in stressed and non-stressed cells. LMWPTP knockdown attenuates the effects of sorbitol induced-stress in HaCaT cells, mainly in the status of Src kinase, Rac and STAT5 phosphorylation and activity. These results describe for the first time the participation of LMWPTP in the dynamics of cytoskeleton rearrangement during exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic shock, which may contribute to cell death. PMID:25781955

  10. Relationship between apoptosis and the cell cycle in lymphocytes: roles of protein kinase C, tyrosine phosphorylation, and AP1.

    PubMed

    Walker, P R; Kwast-Welfeld, J; Gourdeau, H; Leblanc, J; Neugebauer, W; Sikorska, M

    1993-07-01

    The mechanism of switching between the cell cycle and active cell death (apoptosis) was investigated in cytokine-dependent CTLL cells. These cells proliferate in the presence of interleukin 2 (IL2), but accumulate in early G1 and undergo apoptosis in its absence. In the absence of IL2 the cells also become sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. Using specific inhibitors of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases we established that two signals are required to fully repress cell death and stimulate G1 progression. One of these signals activates protein kinase C (PKC) which represses cell death and the other activates a tyrosine kinase which confers glucocorticoid resistance and permits cell cycle progression. Thus, phorbol esters can activate PKC and maintain cell viability in the absence of IL2, but the cells cannot proliferate. Moreover, the cells remain sensitive to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis unless the tyrosine kinase-mediated signal is also given. There is a correlation between the presence of AP1 DNA-binding activity and the repression of the cell death pathway. The c-jun gene is expressed constitutively and both IL2 and phorbol esters induce the expression of c-fos to generate a functional AP1 capable of repressing cell death. However, only interleukin 2 can initiate the tyrosine kinase-mediated modification that confers dexamethasone resistance and permits G1 progression. In the absence of IL2 glucocorticoids stimulate AP1 degradation and induce apoptosis.

  11. A C-terminal protein-binding domain in the retinoblastoma protein regulates nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Welch, P J; Wang, J Y

    1993-11-19

    The ubiquitously expressed c-Abl tyrosine kinase is localized to the nucleus and binds to DNA. The DNA binding activity is regulated by cdc2-mediated phosphorylation, suggesting a cell cycle function for c-Abl. Here we show that the tyrosine kinase activity of nuclear c-Abl is regulated in the cell cycle through a specific interaction with the retinoblastoma protein (RB). A domain in the C-terminus of RB, outside of the A/B pocket, binds to the ATP-binding lobe of the c-Abl tyrosine kinase, resulting in kinase inhibition. The RB-c-Abl interaction is not affected by the viral oncoproteins that bind to RB. Hyperphosphorylation of RB correlates with release of c-Abl and activation of the tyrosine kinase in S phase cells. The nuclear c-Abl tyrosine kinase can enhance transcription, and this activity is inhibited by RB. Nuclear c-Abl is an S phase-activated tyrosine kinase that may participate directly in the regulation of transcription. PMID:8242749

  12. Atomic structure of nitrate-binding protein crucial for photosynthetic productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2006-06-27

    Cyanobacteria, blue-green algae, are the most abundant autotrophs in aquatic environments and form the base of all aquatic food chains by fixing carbon and nitrogen into cellular biomass. The single most important nutrient for photosynthesis and growth is nitrate, which is severely limiting in many aquatic environments particularly the open ocean (1, 2). It is therefore not surprising that NrtA, the solute-binding component of the high-affinity nitrate ABC transporter, is the single-most abundant protein in the plasma membrane of these bacteria (3). Here we describe the first structure of a nitratespecific receptor, NrtA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, complexed with nitrate and determined to a resolution of 1.5Å. NrtA is significantly larger than other oxyanionbinding proteins, representing a new class of transport proteins. From sequence alignments, the only other solute-binding protein in this class is CmpA, a bicarbonatebinding protein. Therefore, these organisms created a novel solute-binding protein for two of the most important nutrients; inorganic nitrogen and carbon. The electrostatic charge distribution of NrtA appears to force the protein off of the membrane while the flexible tether facilitates the delivery of nitrate to the membrane pore. The structure not only details the determinants for nitrate selectivity in NrtA, but also the bicarbonate specificity in CmpA. Nitrate and bicarbonate transport are regulated by the cytoplasmic proteins NrtC and CmpC, respectively. Interestingly, the residues lining the ligand binding pockets suggest that they both bind nitrate. This implies that the nitrogen and carbon uptake pathways are synchronized by intracellular nitrate and nitrite.3 The nitrate ABC transporter of cyanobacteria is composed of four polypeptides (Figure 1): a high-affinity periplasmic solute-binding lipoprotein (NrtA), an integral membrane permease (NrtB), a cytoplasmic ATPase (NrtD), and a unique ATPase/solute-binding fusion protein (Nrt

  13. Characterization of protein tyrosine kinases from human breast cancer: involvement of the c-src oncogene product.

    PubMed

    Ottenhoff-Kalff, A E; Rijksen, G; van Beurden, E A; Hennipman, A; Michels, A A; Staal, G E

    1992-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism in response to the action of growth factors and oncogenes. Since many oncogenes code for tyrosine kinases, increased or altered oncogene expression may be reflected in increased tyrosine kinase activity. In a recent study (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), we found that the tyrosine kinase activity of the cytosolic and membrane fractions of malignant human breast tissue was significantly higher compared to the benign or the normal breast tissue. Moreover, the increase in the cytosolic fractions was found to be of prognostic value. In the present study we determined the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of another 72 breast cancer specimens, and it could be shown again that the PTK activity in all 72 of these tumors was elevated compared to normal controls. We characterized these cytosolic PTKs by anion exchange chromatography using fast protein liquid chromatography, and it could be shown that at least two different forms of PTK exist. Using antibodies against a number of known oncogene products, we could determine that at least 70% of the PTK activity in the cytosol originated from the presence of the c-src oncogene product. Both of the PTK activity peaks seen in the fast protein liquid chromatography patterns could be precipitated with the anti-Src antibody. Furthermore, using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, it could be shown that the antibody against c-src also precipitated a part of the cytosolic PTK activity. In normal human peripheral lymphocytes, no precipitation of the cytosolic and membrane PTK activity could be achieved using the anti-Src antibody. Inasmuch as the cytosolic PTK activity parallels the malignancy in breast tumors (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), and the majority of this activity is precipitated by anti-Src antibodies, the c-src protooncogene may play a key role in the manifestation of breast cancer.

  14. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  15. In vivo and in vitro specificity of protein tyrosine kinases for immunoglobulin G receptor (FcgammaRII) phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Bewarder, N; Weinrich, V; Budde, P; Hartmann, D; Flaswinkel, H; Reth, M; Frey, J

    1996-01-01

    Human B cells express four immunoglobulin G receptors, FcgammaRIIa, FcgammaRIIb1, FcgammaRIIb2, and FcgammaRIIc. Coligation of either FcgammaRII isoform with the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the abrogation of B-cell activation, but only the FcgammaRIIa/c and FcgammaIIb1 isoforms become phosphorylated. To identify the FcgammaRII-phosphorylating protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), we used the combination of an in vitro and an in vivo approach. In an in vitro assay using recombinant cytoplasmic tails of the different FcgammaRII isoforms as well as tyrosine exchange mutants, we show that each of the BCR-associated PTKs (Lyn, Blk, Fyn, and Syk) shows different phosphorylation patterns with regard to the different FcgammaR isoforms and point mutants. While each PTK phosphorylated FcgammaRIIa/c, FcgammaRIIb1 was phosphorylated by Lyn and Blk whereas FcgammaRIIb2 became phosphorylated only by Blk. Mutants lacking both tyrosine residues of the immune receptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) of FcgammaRIIa/c were not phosphorylated by Blk and Fyn, while Lyn-mediated phosphorylation was dependent on the presence of the C-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM. Results obtained in assays using an FcgammaR- B-cell line transfected with wild-type or mutated FcgammaRIIa demonstrated that exchange of the C-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM of FcgammaRIIa/c was sufficient to abolish FcgammaRIIa/c phosphorylation in B cells. Additionally, we could show that Lyn and Fyn bind to FcgammaRIIa/c, with the ITAM being necessary for association. Comparison of the phosphorylation pattern of each PTK observed in vitro with the phosphorylation pattern observed in vivo suggests that Lyn is the most likely candidate for FcgammaRIIa/c and FcgammaRIIb1 phosphorylation in vivo. PMID:8756631

  16. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  17. Pancreatic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Deficiency Exacerbates Acute Pancreatitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bettaieb, Ahmed; Koike, Shinichiro; Chahed, Samah; Bachaalany, Santana; Griffey, Stephen; Sastre, Juan; Haj, Fawaz G

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disorder that causes significant morbidity. The disease starts as local inflammation in the pancreas that may progress to systemic inflammation and complications. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is implicated in inflammatory signaling, but its significance in AP remains unclear. To investigate whether PTP1B may have a role in AP, we used pancreas PTP1B knockout (panc-PTP1B KO) mice and determined the effects of pancreatic PTP1B deficiency on cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. We report that PTP1B protein expression was increased in the early phase of AP in mice and rats. In addition, histological analyses of pancreas samples revealed enhanced features of AP in cerulein-treated panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Moreover, cerulein- and arginine-induced serum amylase and lipase were significantly higher in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Similarly, pancreatic mRNA and serum concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1B, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in panc-PTP1B KO mice compared with controls. Furthermore, panc-PTP1B KO mice exhibited enhanced cerulein- and arginine-induced NF-κB inflammatory response accompanied with increased mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress. Notably, these effects were recapitulated in acinar cells treated with a pharmacological inhibitor of PTP1B. These findings reveal a novel role for pancreatic PTP1B in cerulein- and arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. PMID:27461362

  18. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B expression is induced by inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum; Welsh, Laura A; Kershaw, Erin E; Neel, Benjamin G; Kahn, Barbara B

    2008-05-23

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin and leptin sensitivity. PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of humans and rodents may contribute to insulin resistance and obesity. The mechanisms mediating PTP1B overexpression in obese and diabetic states have been unclear. We find that adipose tissue inflammation and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) regulate PTP1B expression in vivo. High fat feeding of mice increased PTP1B expression 1.5- to 7-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. PTP1B overexpression in high fat-fed mice coincided with increased adipose tissue expression of the macrophage marker CD68 and TNFalpha, which is implicated in causing obesity-induced insulin resistance. TNFalpha increased PTP1B mRNA and protein levels by 2- to 5-fold in a dose- and time-dependent manner in adipocyte and hepatocyte cell lines. TNFalpha administration in mice increased PTP1B mRNA 1.4- to 4-fold in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and PTP1B protein 2-fold in liver. Actinomycin D treatment blocked, and high dose salicylate treatment inhibited by 80%, TNFalpha-induced PTP1B expression in adipocyte cell lines, suggesting TNFalpha may induce PTP1B transcription via nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from adipocyte cell lines and liver of mice demonstrated TNFalpha-induced recruitment of NFkappaB subunit p65 to the PTP1B promoter in vitro and in vivo. In mice with diet-induced obesity, TNFalpha deficiency also partly blocked PTP1B overexpression in adipose tissue. Our data suggest that PTP1B overexpression in multiple tissues in obesity is regulated by inflammation and that PTP1B may be a target of anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:18281274

  19. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  20. The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14 (Pez) inhibits metastasis by altering protein trafficking.

    PubMed

    Belle, Leila; Ali, Naveid; Lonic, Ana; Li, Xiaochun; Paltridge, James L; Roslan, Suraya; Herrmann, David; Conway, James R W; Gehling, Freya K; Bert, Andrew G; Crocker, Lesley A; Tsykin, Anna; Farshid, Gelareh; Goodall, Gregory J; Timpson, Paul; Daly, Roger J; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2015-02-17

    Factors secreted by tumor cells shape the local microenvironment to promote invasion and metastasis, as well as condition the premetastatic niche to enable secondary-site colonization and growth. In addition to this secretome, tumor cells have increased abundance of growth-promoting receptors at the cell surface. We found that the tyrosine phosphatase PTPN14 (also called Pez, which is mutated in various cancers) suppressed metastasis by reducing intracellular protein trafficking through the secretory pathway. Knocking down PTPN14 in tumor cells or injecting the peritoneum of mice with conditioned medium from PTPN14-deficient cell cultures promoted the growth and metastasis of breast cancer xenografts. Loss of catalytically functional PTPN14 increased the secretion of growth factors and cytokines, such as IL-8 (interleukin-8), and increased the abundance of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) at the cell surface of breast cancer cells and of FLT4 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3) at the cell surface of primary lymphatic endothelial cells. We identified RIN1 (Ras and Rab interactor 1) and PRKCD (protein kinase C-δ) as binding partners and substrates of PTPN14. Similar to cells overexpressing PTPN14, receptor trafficking to the cell surface was inhibited in cells that lacked PRKCD or RIN1 or expressed a nonphosphorylatable RIN1 mutant, and cytokine secretion was decreased in cells treated with PRKCD inhibitors. Invasive breast cancer tissue had decreased expression of PTPN14, and patient survival was worse when tumors had increased expression of the genes encoding RIN1 or PRKCD. Thus, PTPN14 prevents metastasis by restricting the trafficking of both soluble and membrane-bound proteins. PMID:25690013

  1. Hypoxia-induced protein binding to O2-responsive sequences on the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Norris, M L; Millhorn, D E

    1995-10-01

    We reported recently that the gene that encodes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of catecholamines, is regulated by hypoxia in the dopaminergic cells of the mammalian carotid body (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Bayliss, D. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1992) J. Neurochem. 58, 1538-1546) and in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells (Czyzyk-Krzeska, M. F., Furnari, B. A., Lawson, E. E. & Millhorn, D. E. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 760-764). Regulation of this gene during low O2 conditions occurs at both the level of transcription and RNA stability. Increased transcription during hypoxia is regulated by a region of the proximal promoter that extends from -284 to + 27 bases, relative to transcription start site. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the sequences that confer O2 responsiveness of the TH gene and to identify hypoxia-induced protein interactions with these sequences. Results from chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays identified a region between bases -284 and -150 that contains the essential sequences for O2 regulation. This region contains a number of regulatory elements including AP1, AP2, and HIF-1. Gel shift assays revealed enhanced protein interactions at the AP1 and HIF-1 elements of the native gene. Further investigations using supershift and shift-Western analysis showed that c-Fos and JunB bind to the AP1 element during hypoxia and that these protein levels are stimulated by hypoxia. Mutation of the AP1 sequence prevented stimulation of transcription of the TH-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene by hypoxia. PMID:7559551

  2. Reactive Nitrogen Species and Hydrogen Sulfide as Regulators of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Redox modifications of thiols serve as a molecular code enabling precise and complex regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and other proteins. Particular gasotransmitters and even the redox modifications themselves affect each other, of which a typical example is S-nitrosylation-mediated protection against the further oxidation of protein thiols. Recent Advances: For a long time, PTPs were considered constitutively active housekeeping enzymes. This view has changed substantially over the last two decades, and the PTP family is now recognized as a group of tightly and flexibly regulated fundamental enzymes. In addition to the conventional ways in which they are regulated, including noncovalent interactions, phosphorylation, and oxidation, the evidence that has accumulated during the past two decades suggests that many of these enzymes are also modulated by gasotransmitters, namely by nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Critical Issues: The specificity and selectivity of the methods used to detect nitrosylation and sulfhydration remains to be corroborated, because several researchers raised the issue of false-positive results, particularly when using the most widespread biotin switch method. Further development of robust and straightforward proteomic methods is needed to further improve our knowledge of the full extent of the gasotransmitters-mediated changes in PTP activity, selectivity, and specificity. Further Directions: Results of the hitherto performed studies on gasotransmitter-mediated PTP signaling await translation into clinical medicine and pharmacotherapeutics. In addition to directly affecting the activity of particular PTPs, the use of reversible S-nitrosylation as a protective mechanism against oxidative stress should be of high interest. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2191–2209. PMID:24328688

  3. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  4. [Difluro(phosphono)methyl]phenylalanine-containing peptide inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Desmarais, S; Friesen, R W; Zamboni, R; Ramachandran, C

    1999-01-01

    Peptides containing the non-hydrolysable phosphotyrosine analogue 4-[difluro(phosphono)methyl]phenylalanine [Phe(CF2P)] were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) PTP1B, CD45, PTPbeta, LAR and SHP-1. We have identified peptides containing two adjacent Phe(CF2P) residues as potent inhibitors of PTPs. The tripeptide having the sequence Glu-Phe(CF2P)-Phe(CF2P) is a potent and selective inhibitor of PTP1B. This peptide inhibits PTP1B with an IC50 of 40 nM, which is at least 100-fold lower than with other PTPs. A second tripeptide, Pro-Phe(CF2P)-Phe(CF2P), is most potent against PTPbeta, with an IC50 of 200 nM, and inhibits PTP1B with an IC50 of 300 nM. These data suggest that it is possible to develop selective, active-site-directed, reversible, potent inhibitors of PTPs. PMID:9882618

  5. Demonstration of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in the second of two homologous domains of CD45.

    PubMed

    Tan, X; Stover, D R; Walsh, K A

    1993-04-01

    It has been reported that alteration of deletion of critical residues within one of the two homologous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase)-like domains of CD45 completely abolishes all activity, suggesting that only the more N-terminal domain is catalytically active. However, we now demonstrate, by two independent techniques, that the second (C-terminal) domain is also a viable phosphatase. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase Lys-C or trypsin increased the phosphatase activity toward reduced, carboxymethylated, and maleylated lysozyme approximately 8-fold. A 50-kDa fragment, isolated by ion exchange chromatography, was found to be responsible for this activity. N-terminal sequencing revealed that this fragment includes less than half of the first phosphatase domain and most, if not all, of the second. In a second experiment, 109 residues, including the presumed catalytic region, were removed from domain I by site-directed mutagenesis. Expression of this construct in a mammalian cell line resulted in increased PTPase activity over nontransfected control cells. Isolation of the recombinant CD45 by immunoprecipitation and immunoaffinity chromatography revealed that it had phosphatase activity. Both of these experimental approaches demonstrate that the second conserved PTPase domain of CD45 is a functioning PTPase, but that external regulation may be required to express its activity in the context of the native molecule. PMID:8463207

  6. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase σ regulates the synapse number of zebrafish olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xigui; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Sagara, Hiroshi; Mikami, Yoshinori; Mishina, Masayoshi

    2011-11-01

    The formation and refinement of synaptic connections are key steps of neural development to establish elaborate brain networks. To investigate the functional role of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) σ, we employed an olfactory sensory neuron (OSN)-specific gene manipulation system in combination with in vivo imaging of transparent zebrafish embryos. Knockdown of PTPσ enhanced the accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the axon terminals of OSNs. The exaggerated accumulation of synaptic vesicles was restored to the normal level by the OSN-specific expression of PTPσ, indicating that presynaptic PTPσ is responsible for the regulation of synaptic vesicle accumulation. Consistently, transient expression of a dominant-negative form of PTPσ in OSNs enhanced the accumulation of synaptic vesicles. The exaggerated accumulation of synaptic vesicles was reproduced in transgenic zebrafish lines carrying an OSN-specific expression vector of the dominant-negative PTPσ. By electron microscopic analysis of the transgenic line, we found the significant increase of the number of OSN-mitral cell synapses in the central zone of the olfactory bulb. The density of docked vesicles at the active zone was also increased significantly. Our results suggest that presynaptic PTPσ controls the number of OSN-mitral cell synapses by suppressing their excessive increase.

  8. In vitro effects of cinnamic acid derivatives on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Pongsuwan, Jirawan; Wungcharoen, Chompunut; Yibchok-anun, Sirintorn

    2013-10-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a major negative regulator of insulin signaling pathways. Finding selective PTP1B inhibitors from natural sources has been widely recognized as a potential drug target for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and obesity. In the present study, we evaluated the inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid derivatives against PTP1B in vitro. Among 14 cinnamic acid derivatives and related compounds, the most potent inhibitor PTP1Bs were o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, which had IC50 values of 137.67 ± 13.37 and 181.60 ± 9.34 µM, respectively. The kinetics analysis revealed that PTP1B was inhibited by o-hydroxycinnamic acid and p-hydroxycinnamic acid in a non-competitive manner. o-Hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM) and p-hydroxycinnamic acid (25 μM), in combination with sodium orthovanadate (0.0125 μM), demonstrated a synergistic effect to inhibit PTP1B activity. In conclusion, the findings provide a new insight into naturally occurring PTP1B inhibitors that could be useful for treatment of diabetes and obesity.

  9. Protein tyrosine phosphatase α in the dorsomedial striatum promotes excessive ethanol-drinking behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamida, Sami; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wang, Jun; Wu, Su; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kharazia, Viktor; Ron, Dorit

    2013-09-01

    We previously found that excessive ethanol drinking activates Fyn in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) (Wang et al., 2010; Gibb et al., 2011). Ethanol-mediated Fyn activation in the DMS leads to the phosphorylation of the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, to the enhancement of the channel's activity, and to the development and/or maintenance of ethanol drinking behaviors (Wang et al., 2007, 2010). Protein tyrosine phosphatase α (PTPα) is essential for Fyn kinase activation (Bhandari et al., 1998), and we showed that ethanol-mediated Fyn activation is facilitated by the recruitment of PTPα to synaptic membranes, the compartment where Fyn resides (Gibb et al., 2011). Here we tested the hypothesis that PTPα in the DMS is part of the Fyn/GluN2B pathway and is thus a major contributor to the neuroadaptations underlying excessive ethanol intake behaviors. We found that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated PTPα knockdown in the DMS reduces excessive ethanol intake and preference in rodents. Importantly, no alterations in water, saccharine/sucrose, or quinine intake were observed. Furthermore, downregulation of PTPα in the DMS of mice significantly reduces ethanol-mediated Fyn activation, GluN2B phosphorylation, and ethanol withdrawal-induced long-term facilitation of NMDAR activity without altering the intrinsic features of DMS neurons. Together, these results position PTPα upstream of Fyn within the DMS and demonstrate the important contribution of the phosphatase to the maladaptive synaptic changes that lead to excessive ethanol intake.

  10. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPRS Is an Inhibitory Receptor on Human and Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bunin, Anna; Sisirak, Vanja; Ghosh, Hiyaa S.; Grajkowska, Lucja T.; Hou, Z. Esther; Miron, Michelle; Yang, Cliff; Ceribelli, Michele; Uetani, Noriko; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L.; Haecker, Hans; Staudt, Louis M.; Green, Peter H.; Bhagat, Govind; Reizis, Boris

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are primary producers of type I interferon (IFN) in response to viruses. The IFN-producing capacity of pDCs is regulated by specific inhibitory receptors, yet none of the known receptors are conserved in evolution. We report that within the human immune system, receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma (PTPRS) is expressed specifically on pDCs. Surface PTPRS was rapidly downregulated after pDC activation, and only PTPRS– pDCs produced IFN-α. Antibody-mediated PTPRS crosslinking inhibited pDC activation, whereas PTPRS knockdown enhanced IFN response in a pDC cell line. Similarly, murine Ptprs and the homologous receptor phosphatase Ptprf were specifically co-expressed in murine pDCs. Haplodeficiency or DC-specific deletion of Ptprs on Ptprf-deficient background were associated with enhanced IFN response of pDCs, leukocyte infiltration in the intestine and mild colitis. Thus, PTPRS represents an evolutionarily conserved pDC-specific inhibitory receptor, and is required to prevent spontaneous IFN production and immune-mediated intestinal inflammation. PMID:26231120

  11. An Affinity-Based Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Kumar, Sanjai; Wu, Li; Lawrence, David S.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2007-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are important signaling enzymes that control such fundamental processes as proliferation, differentiation, survival/apoptosis, as well as adhesion and motility. Potent and selective PTP inhibitors serve not only as powerful research tools, but also as potential therapeutics against a variety illness including cancer and diabetes. PTP activity-based assays are widely used in high throughput screening (HTS) campaigns for PTP inhibitor discovery. These assays suffer from a major weakness, in that the reactivity of the active site Cys can cause serious problems as highly reactive oxidizing and alkylating agents may surface as hits. We describe the development of a fluorescence polarization (FP)-based displacement assay that makes the use of an active site Cys to Ser mutant PTP (e.g., PTP1B/C215S) that retains the wild type binding affinity. The potency of library compounds is assessed by their ability to compete with the fluorescently labeled active site ligand for binding to the Cys to Ser PTP mutant. Finally, the substitution of the active site Cys by a Ser renders the mutant PTP insensitive to oxidation and alkylation and thus will likely eliminate “false” positives due to modification of the active site Cys that destroy the phosphatase activity. PMID:17532513

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase controls breast cancer invasion through the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bo-Mi; Chae, Hee Suk; Jeong, Young-Ju; Lee, Young-Rae; Noh, Eun-Mi; Youn, Hyun Zo; Jung, Sung Hoo; Yu, Hong-Nu; Chung, Eun Yong; Kim, Jong-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by cancer cells has been associated with the high potential of metastasis in several human carcinomas, including breast cancer. Several pieces of evidence demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) have functions that promote cell migration and metastasis in breast cancer. We analyzed whether PTP inhibitor might control breast cancer invasion through MMP expression. Herein, we investigate the effect of 4-hydroxy-3,3-dimethyl-2H benzo[g]indole-2,5(3H)-dione (BVT948), a novel PTP inhibitor, on 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion in MCF-7 cells. The expression of MMP-9 and cell invasion increased after TPA treatment, whereas TPA-induced MMP-9 expression and cell invasion were decreased by BVT948 pretreatment. Also, BVT948 suppressed NF-κB activation in TPA-treated MCF-7 cells. However, BVT948 didn’t block TPA-induced AP-1 activation in MCF-7 cells. Our results suggest that the PTP inhibitor blocks breast cancer invasion via suppression of the expression of MMP-9. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(11): 533-538] PMID:24152909

  13. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 promotes ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Tyner, A L

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) expression, activation, and amplification of the PTK6 gene have been reported in ERBB2/HER2-positive mammary gland cancers. To explore contributions of PTK6 to mammary gland tumorigenesis promoted by activated ERBB2, we crossed Ptk6-/- mice with the mouse mammary tumor virus-ERBB2 transgenic mouse line expressing activated ERBB2 and characterized tumor development and progression. ERBB2-induced tumorigenesis was significantly delayed and diminished in mice lacking PTK6. PTK6 expression was induced in the mammary glands of ERBB2 transgenic mice before tumor development and correlated with activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increased proliferation. Disruption of PTK6 impaired STAT3 activation and proliferation. Phosphorylation of the PTK6 substrates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1; p130CAS) was decreased in Ptk6-/- mammary gland tumors. Reduced numbers of metastases were detected in the lungs of Ptk6-/- mice expressing activated ERBB2, compared with wild-type ERBB2 transgenic mice. PTK6 activation was detected at the edges of ERBB2-positive tumors. These data support roles for PTK6 in both ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumor initiation and metastasis, and identify STAT3, FAK, and BCAR1 as physiologically relevant PTK6 substrates in breast cancer. Including PTK6 inhibitors as part of a treatment regimen could have distinct benefits in ERBB2/HER2-positive breast cancers.

  14. Comprehensive protein tyrosine phosphatase mRNA profiling identifies new regulators in the progression of glioma.

    PubMed

    Bourgonje, Annika M; Verrijp, Kiek; Schepens, Jan T G; Navis, Anna C; Piepers, Jolanda A F; Palmen, Chantal B C; van den Eijnden, Monique; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Wesseling, Pieter; Leenders, William P J; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J

    2016-01-01

    The infiltrative behavior of diffuse gliomas severely reduces therapeutic potential of surgical resection and radiotherapy, and urges for the identification of new drug-targets affecting glioma growth and migration. To address the potential role of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), we performed mRNA expression profiling for 91 of the 109 known human PTP genes on a series of clinical diffuse glioma samples of different grades and compared our findings with in silico knowledge from REMBRANDT and TCGA databases. Overall PTP family expression levels appeared independent of characteristic genetic aberrations associated with lower grade or high grade gliomas. Notably, seven PTP genes (DUSP26, MTMR4, PTEN, PTPRM, PTPRN2, PTPRT and PTPRZ1) were differentially expressed between grade II-III gliomas and (grade IV) glioblastomas. For DUSP26, PTEN, PTPRM and PTPRT, lower expression levels correlated with poor prognosis, and overexpression of DUSP26 or PTPRT in E98 glioblastoma cells reduced tumorigenicity. Our study represents the first in-depth analysis of PTP family expression in diffuse glioma subtypes and warrants further investigations into PTP-dependent signaling events as new entry points for improved therapy. PMID:27586084

  15. The Dtk receptor tyrosine kinase, which binds protein S, is expressed during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Crosier, P S; Freeman, S A; Orlic, D; Bodine, D M; Crosier, K E

    1996-02-01

    Dtk (Tyro 3/Sky/Rse/Brt/Tif) belongs to a recently recognized subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases that also includes Ufo (Axl/Ark) and Mer (Eyk). Ligands for Dtk and Ufo have been identified as protein S and the related molecule Gas6, respectively. This study examined expression of Dtk during ontogeny of the hematopoietic system and compared the pattern of expression with that of Ufo. Both receptors were abundantly expressed in differentiating embryonic stem cells, yolk sac blood islands, para-aortic splanchnopleural mesoderm, fractionated AA4+ fetal liver cells, and fetal thymus from day 14 until birth. Although Ufo was expressed at moderate levels in adult bone marrow, expression of Dtk in this tissue was barely detectable. In adult bone marrow subpopulations fractionated using counterflow centrifugal elutriation, immunomagnetic bead selection for lineage-depletion and FACS sorting for c-kit expression, very low levels of Dtk and/or Ufo were detected in some cell fractions. These results suggest that Dtk and Ufo are likely to be involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis, particularly during the embryonic stages of blood cell development.

  16. Transient expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases encoded in Cotesia plutellae bracovirus inhibits insect cellular immune responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed M. A.; Kim, Yonggyun

    2008-01-01

    Several immunosuppressive factors are associated with parasitism of an endoparasitoid wasp, Cotesia plutellae, on the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) encodes a large number of putative protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which may play a role in inhibiting host cellular immunity. To address this inhibitory hypothesis of CpBV-PTPs, we performed transient expression of individual CpBV-PTPs in hemocytes of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and analyzed their cellular immune responses. Two different forms of CpBV-PTPs were chosen and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector under the control of the p10 promoter of baculovirus: one with the normal cysteine active site (CpBV-PTP1) and the other with a mutated active site (CpBV-PTP5). The hemocytes transfected with CpBV-PTP1 significantly increased in PTP activity compared to control hemocytes, but those with CpBV-PTP5 exhibited a significant decrease in the PTP activity. All transfected hemocytes exhibited a significant reduction in both cell spreading and encapsulation activities compared to control hemocytes. Co-transfection of CpBV-PTP1 together with its double-stranded RNA reduced the messenger RNA (mRNA) level of CpBV-PTP1 and resulted in recovery of both hemocyte behaviors. This is the first report demonstrating that the polydnaviral PTPs can manipulate PTP activity of the hemocytes to interrupt cellular immune responses.

  17. Comprehensive determination of protein tyrosine pKa values for photoactive yellow protein using indirect 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oktaviani, Nur Alia; Pool, Trijntje J; Kamikubo, Hironari; Slager, Jelle; Scheek, Ruud M; Kataoka, Mikio; Mulder, Frans A A

    2012-02-01

    Upon blue-light irradiation, the bacterium Halorhodospira halophila is able to modulate the activity of its flagellar motor and thereby evade potentially harmful UV radiation. The 14 kDa soluble cytosolic photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is believed to be the primary mediator of this photophobic response, and yields a UV/Vis absorption spectrum that closely matches the bacterium's motility spectrum. In the electronic ground state, the para-coumaric acid (pCA) chromophore of PYP is negatively charged and forms two short hydrogen bonds to the side chains of Glu-46 and Tyr-42. The resulting acid triad is central to the marked pH dependence of the optical-absorption relaxation kinetics of PYP. Here, we describe an NMR approach to sequence-specifically follow all tyrosine side-chain protonation states in PYP from pH 3.41 to 11.24. The indirect observation of the nonprotonated (13)C(γ) resonances in sensitive and well-resolved two-dimensional (13)C-(1)H spectra proved to be pivotal in this effort, as observation of other ring-system resonances was hampered by spectral congestion and line-broadening due to ring flips. We observe three classes of tyrosine residues in PYP that exhibit very different pK(a) values depending on whether the phenolic side chain is solvent-exposed, buried, or hydrogen-bonded. In particular, our data show that Tyr-42 remains fully protonated in the pH range of 3.41-11.24, and that pH-induced changes observed in the photocycle kinetics of PYP cannot be caused by changes in the charge state of Tyr-42. It is therefore very unlikely that the pCA chromophore undergoes changes in its electrostatic interactions in the electronic ground state. PMID:22325281

  18. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  19. Insulin rapidly stimulates phosphorylation of a 46-kDa membrane protein on tyrosine residues as well as phosphorylation of several soluble proteins in intact fat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häring, H U; White, M F; Machicao, F; Ermel, B; Schleicher, E; Obermaier, B

    1987-01-01

    It is speculated that the transmission of an insulin signal across the plasma membrane of cells occurs through activation of the tyrosine-specific receptor kinase, autophosphorylation of the receptor, and subsequent phosphorylation of unidentified substrates in the cell. In an attempt to identify possible substrates, we labeled intact rat fat cells with [32P]orthophosphate and used an antiphosphotyrosine antibody to identify proteins that become phosphorylated on tyrosine residues in an insulin-stimulated way. In the membrane fraction of the fat cells, we found, in addition to the 95-kDa beta-subunit of the receptor, a 46-kDa phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated exclusively on tyrosine residues. This protein is not immunoprecipitated by antibodies against different regions of the insulin receptor and its HPLC tryptic peptide map is different from the tryptic peptide map of the insulin receptor, suggesting that it is not derived from the receptor beta-subunit. Insulin stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the 46-kDa protein within 150 sec in the intact cell 3- to 4-fold in a dose-dependent way at insulin concentrations between 0.5 nM and 100 nM. The insulin effect starts after 30 sec, is maximal at 150 sec, and declines to almost basal values by 5 min. Furthermore, the antiphosphotyrosine antibody precipitated at least five proteins in the soluble fraction of the fat cell. Insulin (0.5 nM, 100 nM) stimulated within 2 min the 32P incorporation into a 116-kDa band, a 62-kDa band, and three bands between 45 kDa and 50 kDa 2- to 10-fold. We suggest that the 46-kDa membrane protein and possibly also the soluble proteins are endogenous substrates of the receptor tyrosine kinase in fat cells and that their phosphorylation is an early step in insulin signal transmission. Images PMID:3540953

  20. The anti-inflammatory compound BAY-11-7082 is a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Navasona; Bencze, Gyula; Cohen, Philip; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2013-06-01

    The families of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) function in a coordinated manner to regulate signal transduction events that are critical for cellular homeostasis. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting from disruption of either PTP or PTK function, has been shown to be the cause of major human diseases, including cancer and diabetes. Consequently, the characterization of small-molecule inhibitors of these kinases and phosphatases may not only provide molecular probes with which to define the significance of particular signaling events, but also may have therapeutic implications. BAY-11-7082 is an anti-inflammatory compound that has been reported to inhibit IκB kinase activity. The compound has an α,β-unsaturated electrophilic center, which confers the property of being a Michael acceptor; this suggests that it may react with nucleophilic cysteine-containing proteins, such as PTPs. In this study, we demonstrated that BAY-11-7082 was a potent, irreversible inhibitor of PTPs. Using mass spectrometry, we have shown that BAY-11-7082 inactivated PTPs by forming a covalent adduct with the active-site cysteine. Administration of the compound caused an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation in RAW 264 macrophages, similar to the effects of the generic PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. These data illustrate that BAY-11-7082 is an effective pan-PTP inhibitor with cell permeability, revealing its potential as a new probe for chemical biology approaches to the study of PTP function. Furthermore, the data suggest that inhibition of PTP function may contribute to the many biological effects of BAY-11-7082 that have been reported to date.

  1. The anti-inflammatory compound BAY-11-7082 is a potent inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Navasona; Bencze, Gyula; Cohen, Philip; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2013-06-01

    The families of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) function in a coordinated manner to regulate signal transduction events that are critical for cellular homeostasis. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting from disruption of either PTP or PTK function, has been shown to be the cause of major human diseases, including cancer and diabetes. Consequently, the characterization of small-molecule inhibitors of these kinases and phosphatases may not only provide molecular probes with which to define the significance of particular signaling events, but also may have therapeutic implications. BAY-11-7082 is an anti-inflammatory compound that has been reported to inhibit IκB kinase activity. The compound has an α,β-unsaturated electrophilic center, which confers the property of being a Michael acceptor; this suggests that it may react with nucleophilic cysteine-containing proteins, such as PTPs. In this study, we demonstrated that BAY-11-7082 was a potent, irreversible inhibitor of PTPs. Using mass spectrometry, we have shown that BAY-11-7082 inactivated PTPs by forming a covalent adduct with the active-site cysteine. Administration of the compound caused an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation in RAW 264 macrophages, similar to the effects of the generic PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. These data illustrate that BAY-11-7082 is an effective pan-PTP inhibitor with cell permeability, revealing its potential as a new probe for chemical biology approaches to the study of PTP function. Furthermore, the data suggest that inhibition of PTP function may contribute to the many biological effects of BAY-11-7082 that have been reported to date. PMID:23578302

  2. Role of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) in the expansion of glioma-initiating cells by fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Rae-Kwon; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Hyun, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Hyejin; An, Sungkwan; Park, Myung-Jin; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Su-Jae

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Activation of Lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of glioma stem-like cells. {yields} Inhibition of LCK prevents acquisition of fractionated radiation-induced resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment. {yields} LCK activity is critical for the maintenance of self-renewal in glioma stem-like cells. -- Abstract: Brain cancers frequently recur or progress as focal masses after treatment with ionizing radiation. Radiation used to target gliomas may expand the cancer stem cell population and enhance the aggressiveness of tumors; however, the mechanisms underlying the expansion of cancer stem cell population after radiation have remained unclear. In this study, we show that LCK (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) is involved in the fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and acquisition of resistance to anticancer treatments. Fractionated radiation caused a selective increase in the activity of LCK, a Src family non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The activities of other Src family kinases Src, Fyn, and Lyn were not significantly increased. Moreover, knockdown of LCK expression with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) effectively blocked fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the CD133{sup +} cell population. siRNA targeting of LCK also suppressed fractionated radiation-induced expression of the glioma stem cell marker proteins CD133, Nestin, and Musashi. Expression of the known self-renewal-related proteins Notch2 and Sox2 in glioma cells treated with fractionated radiation was also downregulated by LCK inhibition. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of LCK effectively restored the sensitivity of glioma cells to cisplatin and etoposide. These results indicate that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase LCK is critically involved in fractionated radiation-induced expansion of the glioma-initiating cell population and

  3. The anti-inflammatory compound BAY 11-7082 is a potent inhibitor of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Bencze, Gyula; Cohen, Philip; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The families of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) function in a coordinated manner to regulate signal transduction events that are critical for cellular homeostasis. Aberrant tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting from disruption of either PTP or PTK function, has been shown to be the cause of major human diseases, including cancer and diabetes. Consequently, the characterization of small molecule inhibitors of these kinases and phosphatases may not only provide molecular probes with which to define the significance of particular signalling events, but also may have therapeutic implications. BAY 11-7082 is an anti-inflammatory compound that has been reported to inhibit IκB kinase activity. The compound has an α,β-unsaturated electrophilic center, which confers the property of being a Michael acceptor; this suggests that it may react with nucleophilic cysteine-containing proteins, such as PTPs. In this study, we demonstrated that BAY 11-7082 was a potent, irreversible inhibitor of PTPs. Using mass spectrometry, we have shown that BAY 11-7082 inactivated PTPs by forming a covalent adduct with the active site cysteine. Administration of the compound caused an increase in protein tyrosine phosphorylation in RAW 264 macrophages, similar to the effects of the generic PTP inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. These data illustrate that BAY 11-7082 is an effective pan-PTP inhibitor with cell permeability, revealing its potential as a new probe for chemical biology approaches to the study of PTP function. Furthermore, the data suggest that inhibition of PTP function may contribute to the many biological effects of BAY 11-7082 that have been reported to date. PMID:23578302

  4. Identification and characterization of novel membrane-bound PRL protein tyrosine phosphatases from Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Yadav, Smita; Rathaur, Sushma

    2015-11-01

    A significant amount of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity was detected in the detergent-soluble membrane-bound fraction of Setaria cervi, a bovine filarial parasite. The membrane-bound PTP activity was significantly inhibited when the adult parasites were exposed to compounds having antifilarial activity like aspirin and SK7 as well as phenylarsine oxide, a specific PTP inhibitor suggesting that this activity is stress regulated. Further, this enzyme was purified as a single protein of apparently 21 kDa using two different chromatographic techniques. The MALDI-MS/MS analysis of its peptides showed closest match with protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL (Aedes aegypti). This purified enzyme (named as PRL) showed maximum activity at pH 5.5/37 °C and hydrolysed para nitro phenyl phosphate (pNPP) at the highest rate followed by O-P-L-tyrosine and O-P-L-threonine. It showed significant inhibition by specific inhibitors of PTP such as sodium orthovanadate, phenylarsine oxide and ammonium molybdate and was activated by dithiothreitol (DTT). The active site modification studies suggested involvement of cysteine, arginine, histidine and aspartic acid in the catalytic activity of PRL. The activity of S. cervi PRL was also found to be resistant towards the external oxidative stress. Thus, S. cervi PRL could be taken as a potential target for the management of human lymphatic filariasis. PMID:26341797

  5. Identification of New Substrates of the Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B by Bayesian Integration of Proteome Evidence*

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Emanuela; Tinti, Michele; Costa, Stefano; Corallino, Salvatore; Nardozza, Aurelio Pio; Chatraryamontri, Andrew; Ceol, Arnaud; Cesareni, Gianni; Castagnoli, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    There is growing evidence that tyrosine phosphatases display an intrinsic enzymatic preference for the sequence context flanking the target phosphotyrosines. On the other hand, substrate selection in vivo is decisively guided by the enzyme-substrate connectivity in the protein interaction network. We describe here a system wide strategy to infer physiological substrates of protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we integrate, by a Bayesian model, proteome wide evidence about in vitro substrate preference, as determined by a novel high-density peptide chip technology, and “closeness” in the protein interaction network. This allows to rank candidate substrates of the human PTP1B phosphatase. Ultimately a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches were used to verify the prediction that the tyrosine phosphorylation levels of five high-ranking substrates, PLC-γ1, Gab1, SHP2, EGFR, and SHP1, are indeed specifically modulated by PTP1B. In addition, we demonstrate that the PTP1B-mediated dephosphorylation of Gab1 negatively affects its EGF-induced association with the phosphatase SHP2. The dissociation of this signaling complex is accompanied by a decrease of ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation and activation. PMID:21123182

  6. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudino, G; Cirillo, D; Naldini, L; Rossino, P; Comoglio, P M

    1988-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. We have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. We now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer "variant" line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn2+. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors. Images PMID:2451242

  7. The expression of COX-2 in VEGF-treated endothelial cells is mediated through protein tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Akarasereenont, Pravit C; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Thaworn, Athiwat; Chotewuttakorn, Sirikul

    2002-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX), existing as the COX-1 and COX-2 isoforms, converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2, which is then further metabolized to various prostaglandins. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to play important roles in inflammation and is upregulated by the prostaglandin E series through COX-2 in several cell types. Here, we have investigated the effects of VEGF on the COX isoform expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The signalling mechanism of the COX isoform expressed in endothelial cells activated with VEGF will be also investigated using the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine. The activity of COX-2 was assessed by measuring the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1alpha in the presence of exogenous arachidonic acids (10 microM, 10 min) by enzyme immunoassay. The expression of COX isoform protein was detected by immunoblot using specific antibodies. Untreated HUVEC contained no COX-2 protein. In HUVEC treated with VEGF (0.01-50 ng/ml), COX-2 protein, but not COX-1, and COX activity were increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the increased COX-2 protein and activity in response to VEGF (10 ng/ml) was inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein (0.05-5 microg/ml), but not by the protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine (0.1-10 ng/ml). Thus, the induction of COX-2 by VEGF in endothelial cells was mediated through protein tyrosine kinase, and the uses of specific COX-2 inhibitors in these conditions, in which VEGF was involved, might have a role. PMID:11926591

  8. Protein tyrosine kinase regulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Yu, L C; Li, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the modulation effect of protein tyrosine kinase on postsynaptic a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor trafficking induced by acute hypoxia in cultured brainstem neurons. The cultured neurons were exposed to 1% O2 and the expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 on the cell surface was significantly increased, while total GluR2 was not markedly changed. Furthermore, the hypoxia-induced increase in GluR2 expression on the cell surface was partially blocked by the protein tyrosine kinase membrane-permeable inhibitor genistein. In contrast, both the protein tyrosine kinase agonist nerve growth factor and protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate promoted the hypoxia-induced increase of GluR2 expression on cell surface. Moreover, GluR2 could be phosphorylated by tyrosine under normoxia and hypoxia conditions in vitro on brainstem neurons, and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluR2 was significantly stronger under hypoxia conditions. Our results indicate that acute hypoxia induces the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 to rapidly migrate to the cell membrane to modify the strength of the synapse. This study indicates that tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is an important pathway regulating the rapid migration of GluR2 in the postsynaptic domain induced by hypoxia. PMID:27525851

  9. Angiotensin II AT2 receptors are functionally coupled to protein tyrosine dephosphorylation in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nahmias, C; Cazaubon, S M; Briend-Sutren, M M; Lazard, D; Villageois, P; Strosberg, A D

    1995-01-01

    Murine N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells are shown to express a single class of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors that display all the pharmacological properties defining the Ang II receptor subtype 2 (AT2): high affinity for 125I-labelled AT2-selective agonist CGP 42112 (Kd 91 +/- 19 pM); expected rank order of potency (CGP 42112 = (Sar1,Ile8)Ang II > or = Ang II > PD 123319 >> DUP 753) for several Ang II analogues; increased binding in the presence of the reducing reagent dithiothreitol (DTT); and insensitivity to analogues of GTP. Molecular cloning of cDNA encoding AT2 receptors from N1E-115 cells reveals nucleotide sequence identity with the AT2 subtype expressed in fetal tissue. Murine AT2 receptors transiently expressed in COS cells display the same pharmacological profile as endogenous Ang II receptors of N1E-115 cells. Taken together, these data reveal the exclusive presence of the AT2 receptor subtype in N1E-115 cells. Incubation of N1E-115 cells with Ang II leads to a marked decrease in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins with apparent molecular masses of 80, 97, 120, 150 and 180 kDa respectively. Tyrosine dephosphorylation of the same set of proteins is observed after treatment with the AT2-specific agonist CGP 42112. The response to both effectors is rapid and transient, showing a maximum between 5 and 10 min, and returning to basal levels after 20-30 min. In both cases, tyrosine dephosphorylation can be prevented by co-incubation with an excess of the antagonist Sarile. These data thus establish that AT2 receptor activation leads to protein tyrosine dephosphorylation in N1E-115 cells, and support a possible role for AT2 receptors in the negative regulation of cell proliferation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7532401

  10. Photochemical Tyrosine Oxidation in the Structurally Well-Defined α3Y Protein: Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and a Long-Lived Tyrosine Radical

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tyrosine oxidation–reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+ oxidant provides high-quality Y32–O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 105 M–1 s–1 (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 103 M–1 s–1 (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 104 M–1 s–1 (pD 8.5). kH/kD of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32–O• is 28–58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2′-bipyridine)3]3+. Y32–O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2–10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical–radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32–O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32–O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y. PMID:25121576

  11. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus G Protein-Coupled Receptor Contains an Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-Based Inhibitory Motif That Activates Shp2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Nicola; Bakken, Thomas; Pennell, Christopher; Chen, Liwei; Wu, Jie; Cannon, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) is a constitutively active, highly angiogenic homologue of the interleukin-8 (IL-8) receptors that signals in part via the cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. We show that vGPCR contains a bona fide immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that binds and constitutively activates Shp2. PMID:21047965

  12. Regulation of interleukin-3-induced substrate phosphorylation and cell survival by SHP-2 (Src-homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2).

    PubMed

    Wheadon, Helen; Edmead, Christine; Welham, Melanie J

    2003-11-15

    The cytosolic SHP-2 (Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) has previously been implicated in IL-3 (interleukin-3) signalling [Bone, Dechert, Jirik, Schrader and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 14470 -14476; Craddock and Welham (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 29281-29289; Welham, Dechert, Leslie, Jirik and Schrader (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 23764-23768; Qu, Nguyen, Chen and Feng (2001) Blood 97, 911-914]. To investigate the role of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling in greater detail, we have inducibly expressed WT (wild-type) or two potentially substrate-trapping mutant forms of SHP-2, generated by mutation of Asp-425 to Ala (D425A) or Cyst-459 to Ser (C459S), in IL-3-dependent BaF/3 cells. Effects on IL-3-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, signal transduction and functional responses were examined. Expression of C459S SHP-2 protected the beta-chain of the murine IL-3R (IL-3 receptor), the adaptor protein Gab2 (Grb2-associated binder 2), and a cytosolic protein of 48 kDa from tyrosine dephosphorylation, consistent with them being bona fide substrates of SHP-2 in IL-3 signalling. The tyrosine phosphorylation of a 135 kDa transmembrane protein was also protected upon expression of C459S SHP-2. We have identified the inhibitory immunoreceptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1)/CD31 (cluster determinant 31) as a component of this 135 kDa substrate and also show that IL-3 can induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1. Expression of WT, C459S and D425A forms of SHP-2 had little effect on IL-3-driven proliferation or STAT5 (signal transduction and activators of transcription) phosphorylation or activation of protein kinase B. However, expression of WT SHP-2 increased ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) activation. Interestingly, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased ERK activation at later times after IL-3 stimulation, but potentiated IL-3-induced activation of Jun N-terminal kinases. In addition, expression of C459S SHP-2 decreased cell survival in

  13. Phosphoproteome analysis of capacitated human sperm. Evidence of tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-anchoring protein 3 and valosin-containing protein/p97 during capacitation.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott; Chertihin, Olga; Westbrook, V Anne; White, Forest; Jayes, Friederike; Kalab, Petr; Marto, Jarrod A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Herr, John C; Hunt, Donald F; Visconti, Pablo E

    2003-03-28

    Before fertilization can occur, mammalian sperm must undergo capacitation, a process that requires a cyclic AMP-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. To identify proteins phosphorylated during capacitation, two-dimensional gel analysis coupled to anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblots and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed. Among the protein targets, valosin-containing protein (VCP), a homolog of the SNARE-interacting protein NSF, and two members of the A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) family were found to be tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. In addition, immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to investigate phosphorylation sites in whole protein digests from capacitated human sperm. To increase this chromatographic selectivity for phosphopeptides, acidic residues in peptide digests were converted to their respective methyl esters before affinity chromatography. More than 60 phosphorylated sequences were then mapped by MS/MS, including precise sites of tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of the sperm tail proteins AKAP-3 and AKAP-4. Moreover, differential isotopic labeling was developed to quantify phosphorylation changes occurring during capacitation. The phosphopeptide enrichment and quantification methodology coupled to MS/MS, described here for the first time, can be employed to map and compare phosphorylation sites involved in multiple cellular processes. Although we were unable to determine the exact site of phosphorylation of VCP, we did confirm, using a cross-immunoprecipitation approach, that this protein is tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. Immunolocalization of VCP showed fluorescent staining in the neck of noncapacitated sperm. However, after capacitation, staining in the neck decreased, and most of the sperm showed fluorescent staining in the anterior head.

  14. The tyrosine corner: a feature of most Greek key beta-barrel proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsen, J. M.; Gernert, K. M.; Richardson, J. S.; Richardson, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Tyr corner is a conformation in which a tyrosine (residue "Y") near the beginning or end of an antiparallel beta-strand makes an H bond from its side-chain OH group to the backbone NH and/or CO of residue Y - 3, Y - 4, or Y - 5 in the nearby connection. The most common "classic" case is a delta 4 Tyr corner (more than 40 examples listed), in which the H bond is to residue Y - 4 and the Tyr chi 1 is near -60 degrees. Y - 2 is almost always a glycine, whose left-handed beta or very extended beta conformation helps the backbone curve around the Tyr ring. Residue Y - 3 is in polyproline II conformation (often Pro), and residue Y - 5 is usually a hydrophobic (often Leu) that packs next to the Tyr ring. The consensus sequence, then, is LxPGxY, where the first x (the H-bonding position) is hydrophilic. Residues Y and Y - 2 both form narrow pairs of beta-sheet H-bonds with the neighboring strand. delta 5 Tyr corners have a 1-residue insertion between the Gly and Tyr, forming a beta-bulge. One protein family has a delta 4 corner formed by a His rather than a Tyr, and several examples use Trp in place of Tyr. For almost all these cases, the protein or domain is a Greek key beta-barrel structure, the Tyr corner ends a Greek key connection, and it is well-conserved in related proteins. Most low-twist Greek key beta-barrels have 1 Tyr corner. "Reverse" delta 4 Tyr corners (H bonded to Y + 4) and other variants are described, all less common and less conserved. It seems likely that the more classic Tyr corners (delta 4, delta 5, and delta 3 Tyr, Trp, or His) contribute to the stability of a Greek key connection over a hairpin connection, and also that they may aid in the process of folding up Greek key structures. PMID:7703839

  15. Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Controls Responses to Aversive Stimuli: Implication for Ethanol Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Legastelois, Rémi; Darcq, Emmanuel; Wegner, Scott A.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ron, Dorit

    2015-01-01

    The STriatal-Enriched protein tyrosine Phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific phosphatase whose dysregulation in expression and/or activity is associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently showed that long-term excessive consumption of ethanol induces a sustained inhibition of STEP activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of mice. We further showed that down-regulation of STEP expression in the DMS, and not in the adjacent dorsolateral striatum, increases ethanol intake, suggesting that the inactivation of STEP in the DMS contributes to the development of ethanol drinking behaviors. Here, we compared the consequence of global deletion of the STEP gene on voluntary ethanol intake to the consumption of an appetitive rewarding substance (saccharin) or an aversive solution (quinine or denatonium). Whereas saccharin intake was similar in STEP knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) littermate mice, the consumption of ethanol as well as quinine and denatonium was increased in STEP KO mice. These results suggested that the aversive taste of these substances was masked upon deletion of the STEP gene. We therefore hypothesized that STEP contributes to the physiological avoidance towards aversive stimuli. To further test this hypothesis, we measured the responses of STEP KO and WT mice to lithium-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA) and found that whereas WT mice developed lithium place aversion, STEP KO mice did not. In contrast, conditioned place preference (CPP) to ethanol was similar in both genotypes. Together, our results indicate that STEP contributes, at least in part, to the protection against the ingestion of aversive agents. PMID:25992601

  16. Cellular Redistribution of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases LAR and PTPσ by Inducible Proteolytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Babette; Lerch, Markus M.; Müller, Thomas; Schilling, James; Ullrich, Axel

    1997-01-01

    Most receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) display a high degree of homology with cell adhesion molecules in their extracellular domains. We studied the functional significance of processing for the receptor-like PTPases LAR and PTPσ. PTPσ biosynthesis and intracellular processing resembled that of the related PTPase LAR and was expressed on the cell surface as a two-subunit complex. Both LAR and PTPσ underwent further proteolytical processing upon treatment of cells with either calcium ionophore A23187 or phorbol ester TPA. Induction of LAR processing by TPA in 293 cells did require overexpression of PKCα. Induced proteolysis resulted in shedding of the extracellular domains of both PTPases. This was in agreement with the identification of a specific PTPσ cleavage site between amino acids Pro821 and Ile822. Confocal microscopy studies identified adherens junctions and desmosomes as the preferential subcellular localization for both PTPases matching that of plakoglobin. Consistent with this observation, we found direct association of plakoglobin and β-catenin with the intracellular domain of LAR in vitro. Taken together, these data suggested an involvement of LAR and PTPσ in the regulation of cell contacts in concert with cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin/catenin family. After processing and shedding of the extracellular domain, the catalytically active intracellular portions of both PTPases were internalized and redistributed away from the sites of cell–cell contact, suggesting a mechanism that regulates the activity and target specificity of these PTPases. Calcium withdrawal, which led to cell contact disruption, also resulted in internalization but was not associated with prior proteolytic cleavage and shedding of the extracellular domain. We conclude that the subcellular localization of LAR and PTPσ is regulated by at least two independent mechanisms, one of which requires the presence of their extracellular domains and one of

  17. Evolution of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and their relaxed specificity toward substrates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Ji, Boyang; Kolar-Znika, Lorena; Boskovic, Ana; Jadeau, Fanny; Combet, Christophe; Grangeasse, Christophe; Franjevic, Damjan; Talla, Emmanuel; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    It has often been speculated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) evolve rapidly and maintain relaxed substrate specificity to quickly adopt new substrates when evolutionary pressure in that direction arises. Here, we report a phylogenomic and biochemical analysis of BY-kinases, and their relationship to substrates aimed to validate this hypothesis. Our results suggest that BY-kinases are ubiquitously distributed in bacterial phyla and underwent a complex evolutionary history, affected considerably by gene duplications and horizontal gene transfer events. This is consistent with the fact that the BY-kinase sequences represent a high level of substitution saturation and have a higher evolutionary rate compared with other bacterial genes. On the basis of similarity networks, we could classify BY kinases into three main groups with 14 subgroups. Extensive sequence conservation was observed only around the three canonical Walker motifs, whereas unique signatures proposed the functional speciation and diversification within some subgroups. The relationship between BY-kinases and their substrates was analyzed using a ubiquitous substrate (Ugd) and some Firmicute-specific substrates (YvyG and YjoA) from Bacillus subtilis. No evidence of coevolution between kinases and substrates at the sequence level was found. Seven BY-kinases, including well-characterized and previously uncharacterized ones, were used for experimental studies. Most of the tested kinases were able to phosphorylate substrates from B. subtilis (Ugd, YvyG, and YjoA), despite originating from very distant bacteria. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that BY-kinases have evolved relaxed substrate specificity and are probably maintained as rapidly evolving platforms for adopting new substrates.

  18. Protein-tyrosine Phosphatase and Kinase Specificity in Regulation of SRC and Breast Tumor Kinase* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Gaofeng; Aleem, Saadat; Yang, Ming; Miller, W. Todd; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant evidence to the contrary, the view that phosphatases are “nonspecific” still pervades the field. Systems biology approaches to defining how signal transduction pathways are integrated at the level of whole organisms also often downplay the contribution of phosphatases, defining them as “erasers” that serve merely to restore the system to its basal state. Here, we present a study that counteracts the idea of “nonspecific phosphatases.” We have characterized two structurally similar and functionally related kinases, BRK and SRC, which are regulated by combinations of activating autophosphorylation and inhibitory C-terminal sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. We demonstrated specificity at the level of the kinases in that SRMS phosphorylated the C terminus of BRK, but not SRC; in contrast, CSK is the kinase responsible for C-terminal phosphorylation of SRC, but not BRK. For the phosphatases, we observed that RNAi-mediated suppression of PTP1B resulted in opposing effects on the activity of BRK and SRC and have defined the mechanisms underlying this specificity. PTP1B inhibited BRK by directly dephosphorylating the Tyr-342 autophosphorylation site. In contrast, PTP1B potentiated SRC activity, but not by dephosphorylating SRC itself directly; instead, PTP1B regulated the interaction between CBP/PAG and CSK. SRC associated with, and phosphorylated, the transmembrane protein CBP/PAG at Tyr-317, resulting in CSK recruitment. We identified PAG as a substrate of PTP1B, and dephosphorylation abolished recruitment of the inhibitory kinase CSK. Overall, these findings illustrate how the combinatorial effects of PTKs and PTPs may be integrated to regulate signaling, with both classes of enzymes displaying exquisite specificity. PMID:25897081

  19. Protein modification in the post-mating spermatophore of the signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus: insight into the tyrosine phosphorylation in a non-motile spermatozoon.

    PubMed

    Niksirat, Hamid; Vancová, Marie; Andersson, Liselotte; James, Peter; Kouba, Antonín; Kozák, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    After mating, spermatophores of signal crayfish are stored on the body of the female for a period before fertilization. This study compared the post-mating protein profile and pattern of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of the signal crayfish spermatophore to that of the freshly ejaculated spermatophore and found substantial differences. Two major bands of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of molecular weights 10 and 50kDa were observed in the freshly ejaculated spermatophore of the signal crayfish. While the tyrosine-phosphorylated protein band with molecular weight 10kDa was formed by protein(s) of similar pH, the band with molecular weight of 50kDa consisted of proteins of varying pH. In the post-mating spermatophore, the band with molecular weight of 50kDa was not detected, and an increase in the level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation was observed in the 10kDa band. The microtubular radial arms of the spermatozoon showed a positive reaction to an anti-tyrosine antibody conjugated with gold particles in both the freshly ejaculated and post-mating spermatophores. In conclusion, the male gamete of the signal crayfish undergoes molecular modification during post-mating storage on the body of the female including changes in the level of protein expression and protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Structural similarity of the radial arms in the crayfish immotile spermatozoon with flagellum, which is the main site of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the mammalian motile spermatozoa, raises questions regarding evolution and function of such organelles across the animal kingdom that must be addressed in the future studies. PMID:27481552

  20. The protein tyrosine kinases EpsB and PtkA differentially affect biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Gerwig, Jan; Kiley, Taryn B.; Gunka, Katrin; Stanley-Wall, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to choose between motile and sessile lifestyles. The sessile way of life, also referred to as biofilm, depends on the formation of an extracellular polysaccharide matrix and some extracellular proteins. Moreover, a significant proportion of cells in a biofilm form spores. The first two genes of the 15-gene operon for extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, epsA and epsB, encode a putative transmembrane modulator protein and a putative protein tyrosine kinase, respectively, with similarity to the TkmA/PtkA modulator/kinase couple. Here we show that the putative kinase EpsB is required for the formation of structured biofilms. However, an epsB mutant is still able to form biofilms. As shown previously, a ptkA mutant is also partially defective in biofilm formation, but this defect is related to spore formation in the biofilm. The absence of both kinases resulted in a complete loss of biofilm formation. Thus, EpsB and PtkA fulfil complementary functions in biofilm formation. The activity of bacterial protein tyrosine kinases depends on their interaction with modulator proteins. Our results demonstrate the specific interaction between the putative kinase EpsB and its modulator protein EpsA and suggest that EpsB activity is stimulated by its modulator EpsA. PMID:24493247

  1. Substrate-Based Fragment Identification for the Development of Selective, Nonpeptidic Inhibitors of Striatal-Enriched Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Baguley, Tyler D.; Xu, Hai-Chao; Chatterjee, Manavi; Nairn, Angus C.; Lombroso, Paul J.; Ellman, Jonathan A.

    2013-01-01

    High levels of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) activity are observed in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Over-expression of STEP results in the dephosphorylation and inactivation of many key neuronal signaling molecules, including ionotropic glutamate receptors. Moreover, genetically reducing STEP levels in AD mouse models significantly reversed cognitive deficits and decreased glutamate receptor internalization. These results support STEP as a potential target for drug discovery for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, a substrate-based approach for the discovery and optimization of fragments called substrate activity screening (SAS) has been applied to the development of low molecular weight (<450 Da) and non-peptidic, single-digit micromolar mechanism-based STEP inhibitors with greater than 20-fold selectivity across multiple tyrosine and dual specificity phosphatases. Significant levels of STEP inhibition in rat cortical neurons are also observed. PMID:24083656

  2. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Laura R; Ather, Jennifer L; Randall, Matthew J; DePuccio, Daniel P; Landry, Christopher C; Wewers, Mark D; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-15

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol, and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation or N-methyl-d-asparate receptor inhibition but were associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other

  3. Ethanol and Other Short-Chain Alcohols Inhibit NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Laura R; Ather, Jennifer L; Randall, Matthew J; DePuccio, Daniel P; Landry, Christopher C; Wewers, Mark D; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-15

    Immunosuppression is a major complication of alcoholism that contributes to increased rates of opportunistic infections and sepsis in alcoholics. The NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein intracellular pattern recognition receptor complex that facilitates the cleavage and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, can be inhibited by ethanol, and we sought to better understand the mechanism through which this occurs and whether chemically similar molecules exert comparable effects. We show that ethanol can specifically inhibit activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, resulting in attenuated IL-1β and caspase-1 cleavage and secretion, as well as diminished apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation, without affecting potassium efflux, in a mouse macrophage cell line (J774), mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, mouse neutrophils, and human PBMCs. The inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome were independent of γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor activation or N-methyl-d-asparate receptor inhibition but were associated with decreased oxidant production. Ethanol treatment markedly decreased cellular tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas administration of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate prior to ethanol restored tyrosine phosphorylation and IL-1β secretion subsequent to ATP stimulation. Furthermore, sodium orthovanadate-induced phosphorylation of ASC Y144, necessary and sufficient for Nlrp3 inflammasome activation, and secretion of phosphorylated ASC were inhibited by ethanol. Finally, multiple alcohol-containing organic compounds exerted inhibitory effects on the Nlrp3 inflammasome, whereas 2-methylbutane (isopentane), the analogous alkane of the potent inhibitor isoamyl alcohol (isopentanol), did not. Our results demonstrate that ethanol antagonizes the NLRP3 inflammasome at an apical event in its activation through the stimulation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, an effect shared by other

  4. Keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 protein promotes melanin synthesis via regulation of tyrosine uptake.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heesung; Jung, Hyejung; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Hye Yun; Kim, Ok Bin; Han, Inn-Oc; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin, are known to be closely regulated by neighboring keratinocytes. However, how keratinocytes regulate melanin production is unclear. Here we report that melanin production in melanoma cells (B16F10 and MNT-1) was increased markedly on a keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix compared with a melanoma cell-derived extracellular matrix. siRNA-mediated reduction of keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 expression decreased melanin synthesis in melanoma cells, and laminin-332, but not fibronectin, enhanced melanin content and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-regulated melanin production in melanoma cells. Similar effects were observed in human melanocytes. Interestingly, however, laminin-332 did not affect the expression or activity of tyrosinase. Instead, laminin-332 promoted the uptake of extracellular tyrosine and, subsequently, increased intracellular levels of tyrosine in both melanocytes and melanoma cells. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that keratinocyte-derived laminin-332 contributes to melanin production by regulating tyrosine uptake.

  5. Astragaloside II triggers T cell activation through regulation of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chun-ping; Gao, Li-xin; Hou, Li-fei; Yang, Xiao-qian; He, Pei-lan; Yang, Yi-fu; Tang, Wei; Yue, Jian-min; Li, Jia; Zuo, Jian-ping

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulating activity of astragalosides, the active compounds from a traditional tonic herb Astragalus membranaceus Bge, and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions, focusing on CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45 PTPase), which plays a critical role in T lymphocyte activation. Methods: Primary splenocytes and T cells were prepared from mice. CD45 PTPase activity was assessed using a colorimetric assay. Cell proliferation was measured using a [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Cytokine proteins and mRNAs were examined with ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. Activation markers, including CD25 and CD69, were analyzed using flow cytometry. Activation of LCK (Tyr505) was detected using Western blot analysis. Mice were injected with the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide (CTX, 80 mg/kg), and administered astragaloside II (50 mg/kg). Results: Astragaloside I, II, III, and IV concentration-dependently increased the CD45-mediated of pNPP/OMFP hydrolysis with the EC50 values ranged from 3.33 to 10.42 μg/mL. Astragaloside II (10 and 30 nmol/L) significantly enhanced the proliferation of primary splenocytes induced by ConA, alloantigen or anti-CD3. Astragaloside II (30 nmol/L) significantly increased IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion, upregulated the mRNA levels of IFN-γ and T-bet in primary splenocytes, and promoted CD25 and CD69 expression on primary CD4+ T cells upon TCR stimulation. Furthermore, astragaloside II (100 nmol/L) promoted CD45-mediated dephosphorylation of LCK (Tyr505) in primary T cells, which could be blocked by a specific CD45 PTPase inhibitor. In CTX-induced immunosuppressed mice, oral administration of astragaloside II restored the proliferation of splenic T cells and the production of IFN-γ and IL-2. However, astragaloside II had no apparent effects on B cell proliferation. Conclusion: Astragaloside II enhances T cell activation by regulating the activity of CD45 PTPase, which may explain why Astragalus

  6. A critical tyrosine residue determines the uncoupling protein-like activity of the yeast mitochondrial oxaloacetate carrier.

    PubMed

    Luévano-Martínez, Luis A; Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Araiza-Olivera, Daniela; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Rial, Eduardo; Georgellis, Dimitris; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2012-04-01

    The mitochondrial Oac (oxaloacetate carrier) found in some fungi and plants catalyses the uptake of oxaloacetate, malonate and sulfate. Despite their sequence similarity, transport specificity varies considerably between Oacs. Indeed, whereas ScOac (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Oac) is a specific anion-proton symporter, the YlOac (Yarrowia lipolytica Oac) has the added ability to transport protons, behaving as a UCP (uncoupling protein). Significantly, we identified two amino acid changes at the matrix gate of YlOac and ScOac, tyrosine to phenylalanine and methionine to leucine. We studied the role of these amino acids by expressing both wild-type and specifically mutated Oacs in an Oac-null S. cerevisiae strain. No phenotype could be associated with the methionine to leucine substitution, whereas UCP-like activity was dependent on the presence of the tyrosine residue normally expressed in the YlOac, i.e. Tyr-ScOac mediated proton transport, whereas Phe-YlOac lost its protonophoric activity. These findings indicate that the UCP-like activity of YlOac is determined by the tyrosine residue at position 146.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor-related protein: a ligand and specific activator of the tyrosine kinase receptor Flt4.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J; Gray, A; Yuan, J; Luoh, S M; Avraham, H; Wood, W I

    1996-01-01

    The tyrosine kinases Flt4, Flt1, and Flk1 (or KDR) constitute a family of endothelial cell-specific receptors with seven immunoglobulin-like domains and a split kinase domain. Flt1 and Flk1 have been shown to play key roles in vascular development; these two receptors bind and are activated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). No ligand has been identified for Flt4, whose expression becomes restricted during development to the lymphatic endothelium. We have identified cDNA clones from a human glioma cell line that encode a secreted protein with 32% amino acid identity to VEGF. This protein, designated VEGF-related protein (VRP), specifically binds to the extracellular domain of Flt4, stimulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of Flt4 expressed in mammalian cells, and promotes the mitogenesis of human lung endothelial cells. VRP fails to bind appreciably to the extracellular domain of Flt1 or Flk1. The protein contains a C-terminal, cysteine-rich region of about 180 amino acids that is not found in VEGF. A 2.4-kb VRP mRNA is found in several human tissues including adult heart, placenta, ovary, and small intestine and in fetal lung and kidney. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 PMID:8700872

  8. High-throughput fluorescence polarization assay to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB)-protein tyrosine kinase interactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Eric A; Charvet, Casey D; Lokesh, G L; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2011-04-15

    The casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) proteins play an important role in regulating signal transduction pathways by functioning as E3 ubiquitin ligases. The Cbl proteins contain a conserved tyrosine kinase binding (TKB) domain that binds more than a dozen proteins, including protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The cell surface expression levels of the PTKs are regulated by Cbl-mediated ubiquitination, internalization, and degradation. Dysfunction in this signaling cascade has resulted in prolonged activation of the PTKs and, therefore, has been implicated in inflammatory diseases and various cancers. Due to this negative regulatory function, Cbl has been largely ignored as a therapeutic target. However, recent studies, such as the identification of (i) gain of function c-Cbl mutations in subsets of myeloid cancer and (ii) c-Cbl as a prostate basal cell marker that correlates with poor clinical outcome, suggest otherwise. Here we report the development of a competitive high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay in a 384-well format to identify inhibitors of Cbl(TKB). The high-throughput screen readiness of the assay was demonstrated by screening the Prestwick Chemical Library. PMID:21129358

  9. A general method for the rapid characterization of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins by mini two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ducret, A; Desponts, C; Desmarais, S; Gresser, M J; Ramachandran, C

    2000-06-01

    Our preliminary results are reported in the investigation of the tyrosine phosphorylation cascade triggered by the stimulation of the insulin receptor in the adipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 using a mini two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approach. The minigel format, 8 x 10 cm, was found sufficiently resolving and reproducible to study complex biological samples while considerably increasing throughput and lowering costs compared to larger gel formats. Consequently, we used the minigel format to rapidly screen a large number of samples, of which only the most relevant were then analyzed by optimized, preparative two-dimensional gels. The accurate localization and relative quantification of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins was performed using a nonradioactive triple labeling method. After transfer onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes, proteins were stained with Sypro Ruby to verify the separation quality and to localize the general region of interest for immunostaining. The membranes were subsequently blocked with polyvinylpyrrolidone-40 and probed with the relevant antibodies for visualization of the phosphorylated proteins by chemiluminescence. Finally, membranes were stained with colloidal gold to obtain a pattern reminiscent of the silver staining of a polyacrylamide gel. We believe that the presented strategy can be generalized for any gel application in which a protein has to be detected and identified based on its immunoreactivity. PMID:10892730

  10. Diverse levels of sequence selectivity and catalytic efficiency of protein-tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Selner, Nicholas G; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Chen, Xianwen; Neel, Benjamin G; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Knapp, Stefan; Bell, Charles E; Pei, Dehua

    2014-01-21

    The sequence selectivity of 14 classical protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) (PTPRA, PTPRB, PTPRC, PTPRD, PTPRO, PTP1B, SHP-1, SHP-2, HePTP, PTP-PEST, TCPTP, PTPH1, PTPD1, and PTPD2) was systematically profiled by screening their catalytic domains against combinatorial peptide libraries. All of the PTPs exhibit similar preference for pY peptides rich in acidic amino acids and disfavor positively charged sequences but differ vastly in their degrees of preference/disfavor. Some PTPs (PTP-PEST, SHP-1, and SHP-2) are highly selective for acidic over basic (or neutral) peptides (by >10(5)-fold), whereas others (PTPRA and PTPRD) show no to little sequence selectivity. PTPs also have diverse intrinsic catalytic efficiencies (kcat/KM values against optimal substrates), which differ by >10(5)-fold due to different kcat and/or KM values. Moreover, PTPs show little positional preference for the acidic residues relative to the pY residue. Mutation of Arg47 of PTP1B, which is located near the pY-1 and pY-2 residues of a bound substrate, decreased the enzymatic activity by 3-18-fold toward all pY substrates containing acidic residues anywhere within the pY-6 to pY+5 region. Similarly, mutation of Arg24, which is situated near the C-terminus of a bound substrate, adversely affected the kinetic activity of all acidic substrates. A cocrystal structure of PTP1B bound with a nephrin pY(1193) peptide suggests that Arg24 engages in electrostatic interactions with acidic residues at the pY+1, pY+2, and likely other positions. These results suggest that long-range electrostatic interactions between positively charged residues near the PTP active site and acidic residues on pY substrates allow a PTP to bind acidic substrates with similar affinities, and the varying levels of preference for acidic sequences by different PTPs are likely caused by the different electrostatic potentials near their active sites. The implications of the varying sequence selectivity and intrinsic catalytic

  11. The role of a conserved tyrosine residue in high-potential iron sulfur proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Iwagami, S. G.; Creagh, A. L.; Haynes, C. A.; Borsari, M.; Felli, I. C.; Piccioli, M.; Eltis, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Conserved tyrosine-12 of Ectothiorhodospira halophila high-potential iron sulphur protein (HiPIP) iso-I was substituted with phenylalanine (Y12F), histidine (Y12H), tryptophan (Y12W), isoleucine (Y12I), and alanine (Y12A). Variants Y12A and Y12I were expressed to reasonable levels in cells grown at lower temperatures, but decomposed during purification. Variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were substantially destabilized with respect to the recombinant wild-type HiPIP (rcWT) as determined by differential scanning calorimetry over a pH range of 7.0-11.0. Characterization of the Y12F variant by NMR indicates that the principal structural differences between this variant and the rcWT HiPIP result from the loss of the two hydrogen bonds of the Tyr-12 hydroxyl group with Asn-14 O delta 1 and Lys-59 NH, respectively. The effect of the loss of the latter interaction is propagated through the Lys-59/Val-58 peptide bond, thereby perturbing Gly-46. The delta delta GDapp of Y12F of 2.3 kcal/mol with respect to rcWT HiPIP (25 degrees C, pH 7.0) is entirely consistent with the contribution of these two hydrogen bonds to the stability of the latter. CD measurements show that Tyr-12 influences several electronic transitions within the cluster. The midpoint reduction potentials of variants Y12F, Y12H, and Y12W were 17, 19, and 22 mV (20 mM MOPS, 0.2 M sodium chloride, pH 6.98, 25 degrees C), respectively, higher than that of rcWT HiPIP. The current results indicate that, although conserved Tyr-12 modulates the properties of the cluster, its principle function is to stabilize the HiPIP through hydrogen bonds involving its hydroxyl group and electrostatic interactions involving its aromatic ring. PMID:8580847

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  13. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-11-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  14. Involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in Ras-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Krautwald, S; Büscher, D; Kummer, V; Buder, S; Baccarini, M

    1996-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed SH2-containing tyrosine phosphatases interact physically with tyrosine kinase receptors or their substrates and relay positive mitogenic signals via the activation of the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Conversely, the structurally related phosphatase SHP-1 is predominantly expressed in hemopoietic cells and becomes tyrosine phosphorylated upon colony-stimulating factor 1 treatment of macrophages without associating with the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor tyrosine kinase. Mice lacking functional SHP-1 (me/me and me(v)/me(v)) develop systemic autoimmune disease with accumulation of macrophages, suggesting that SHP-1 may be a negative regulator of hemopoietic cell growth. By using macrophages expressing dominant negative Ras and the me(v)/me(v) mouse mutant, we show that SHP-1 is activated in the course of mitogenic signal transduction in a Ras-dependent manner and that its activity is necessary for the Ras-dependent activation of the MAPK pathway but not of the Raf-1 kinase. Consistent with a role for SHP-1 as an intermediate between Ras and the MEK-MAPK pathway, Ras-independent activation of the latter kinases by bacterial lipopolysaccharide occurred normally in me(v)/me(v) cells. Our results sharply accentuate the diversity of signal transduction in mammalian cells, in which the same signaling intermediates can be rearranged to form different pathways. PMID:8887625

  15. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:27481946

  16. Gambogic Acid Inhibits STAT3 Phosphorylation Through Activation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1: Potential Role in Proliferation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Pandey, Manoj K.; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), is associated with proliferation, survival, and metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated whether gambogic acid (GA), a xanthone derived from the resin of traditional Chinese medicine, Gamboge hanburyi (mangosteen), can regulate the STAT3 pathway, leading to suppression of growth and sensitization of cancer cells. We found that GA induced apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells that correlated with the inhibition of both constitutive and inducible STAT3 activation. STAT3 phosphorylation at both tyrosine residue 705 and serine residue 727 was inhibited by GA. STAT3 suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of the protein tyrosine kinases Janus-activated kinase (JAK) 1, and JAK2. Treatment with the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor pervanadate reversed the GA-induced down-regulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a PTP. We also found that GA induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1. Deletion of the SHP-1 gene by small interfering RNA suppressed the ability of GA to inhibit STAT3 activation and to induce apoptosis, suggesting the critical role of SHP-1 in its action. Moreover, GA down-regulated the expression of STAT3-regulated antiapoptotic (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1), proliferative (cyclin D1), and angiogenic (VEGF) proteins, and this correlated with suppression of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Overall, these results suggest that GA blocks STAT3 activation, leading to suppression of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:21490133

  17. New hippolide derivatives with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity from the marine sponge Hippospongia lachne.

    PubMed

    Piao, Shu-Juan; Jiao, Wei-Hua; Yang, Fan; Yi, Yang-Hua; Di, Ying-Tong; Han, Bing-Nan; Lin, Hou-Wen

    2014-07-01

    Five new sesterterpenoids, compounds 1-5, have been isolated from the sponge Hippospongia lachne off Yongxing Island in the South China Sea. The structures of compounds 1-5 were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HRMS, 1D, and 2D NMR experiments. The stereochemistry, including absolute configurations of these compounds, was determined by spectroscopic, chemical, and computational methods. Compounds 1 and 5 showed moderate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activities with IC50 values of 5.2 μM and 8.7 μM, respectively, more potent than previously reported hippolides.

  18. Role of MbtH-like Proteins in the Adenylation of Tyrosine during Aminocoumarin and Vancomycin Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Björn; Taubitz, Tatjana; Heide, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    MbtH-like proteins consist of ∼70 amino acids and are encoded in the biosynthetic gene clusters of non-ribosomally formed peptides and other secondary metabolites derived from amino acids. Recently, several MbtH-like proteins have been shown to be required for the adenylation of amino acid in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis. We now investigated the role of MbtH-like proteins in the biosynthesis of the aminocoumarin antibiotics novobiocin, clorobiocin, and simocyclinone D8 and of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. The tyrosine-adenylating enzymes CloH, SimH, and Pcza361.18, involved in the biosynthesis of clorobiocin, simocyclinone D8, and vancomycin, respectively, required the presence of MbtH-like proteins in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming heterotetrameric complexes. In contrast, NovH, involved in novobiocin biosynthesis, showed activity in the absence of MbtH-like proteins. Comparison of the active centers of CloH and NovH showed only one amino acid to be different, i.e. Leu-383 versus Met-383. Mutation of this amino acid in CloH (L383M) indeed led to MbtH-independent adenylating activity. All investigated tyrosine-adenylating enzymes exhibited remarkable promiscuity for MbtH-like proteins from different pathways and organisms. YbdZ, the MbtH-like protein from the expression host Escherichia coli, was found to bind to adenylating enzymes during expression and to influence their biochemical properties markedly. Therefore, the use of ybdZ-deficient expression hosts is important in biochemical studies of adenylating enzymes. PMID:21890635

  19. Expression and function of the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta and its ligand pleiotrophin in human astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ulrike; Brockmann, Marc A; Aigner, Achim; Eckerich, Carmen; Müller, Sabine; Fillbrandt, Regina; Westphal, Manfred; Lamszus, Katrin

    2003-12-01

    Using subtractive cloning combined with cDNA array analysis, we previously identified the genes encoding for the protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta/receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (PTPzeta/RPTPbeta) and its ligand pleiotrophin (PTN) as overexpressed in human glioblastomas compared to normal brain. Both molecules have been implicated in neuronal migration during central nervous system development, and PTN is known to be involved in tumor growth and angiogenesis. We confirm overexpression of both molecules at the protein level in astrocytic gliomas of different malignancy grades. PTPzeta/RPTPbeta immunoreactivity was associated with increasing malignancy grade and localized predominantly to the tumor cells. PTN immunoreactivity as determined by ELISA and immunohistochemistry analysis was increased in low-grade astrocytomas compared to normal brain. Further increase in malignant gliomas was marginal, and thus no correlation with malignancy grade or microvessel density was present. However, PTN levels were significantly associated with those of fibroblast growth factor-2, suggesting co-regulation of both factors. Functionally, PTN induced weak chemotactic and strong haptotactic migration of glioblastoma and cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Haptotaxis of glioblastoma cells towards PTN was specifically inhibited by an anti-PTPzeta/RPTPbeta antibody. Our findings suggest that upregulated expression of PTN and PTPzeta/RPTPbeta in human astrocytic tumor cells can create an autocrine loop that is important for glioma cell migration. Although PTN is a secreted growth factor, it appears to exert its mitogenic effects mostly in a matrix-immobilized form, serving as a substrate for migrating tumor cells.

  20. Functional interaction between nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl and SR-Rich protein RBM39.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sanyue; Qu, Xiuhua; Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun; Liu, Xuan; Cao, Cheng

    2016-04-22

    RBM39, also known as splicing factor HCC1.4, acts as a transcriptional coactivator for the steroid nuclear receptors JUN/AP-1, ESR1/ER-α and ESR2/ER-β. RBM39 is involved in the regulation of the transcriptional responses of these steroid nuclear receptors and promotes transcriptional initiation. In this paper, we report that RBM39 interacts with the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl. Both the Src homology (SH) 2 and SH3 domains of c-Abl interact with RBM39. The major tyrosine phosphorylation sites on RBM39 that are phosphorylated by c-Abl are Y95 and Y99, as demonstrated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and mutational analysis. c-Abl was shown boost the transcriptional coactivation activity of RBM39 for ERα and PRβ in a tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. The results suggest that mammalian c-Abl plays an important role in steroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription by regulating RBM39.

  1. Incomplete Folding upon Binding Mediates Cdk4/Cyclin D Complex Activation by Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Inhibitor p27 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Li; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Otieno, Steve; Xiao, Limin; Bashford, Donald; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    p27Kip1 (p27), an intrinsically disordered protein, regulates the various Cdk/cyclin complexes that control cell cycle progression. The kinase inhibitory domain of p27 contains a cyclin-binding subdomain (D1), a Cdk-binding subdomain (D2), and a linker helix subdomain that connects D1 and D2. Here, we report that, despite extensive sequence conservation between Cdk4/cyclin D1 (hereafter Cdk4/cyclin D) and Cdk2/cyclin A, the thermodynamic details describing how the individual p27 subdomains contribute to equally high affinity binding to these two Cdk/cyclin complexes are strikingly different. Differences in enthalpy/entropy compensation revealed that the D2 subdomain of p27 folds incompletely when binding Cdk4/cyclin D versus Cdk2/cyclin A. Incomplete binding-induced folding exposes tyrosine 88 of p27 for phosphorylation by the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Abl. Importantly, tyrosine phosphorylation (of p27) relieves Cdk inhibition by p27, enabling cell cycle entry. Furthermore, the interaction between a conserved hydrophobic patch on cyclin D and subdomain D1 is much weaker than that with cyclin A; consequently, a construct containing subdomains D1 and LH (p27-D1LH) does not inhibit substrate binding to Cdk4/cyclin D as it does to Cdk2/cyclin A. Our results provide a mechanism by which Cdk4 (within the p27/Cdk4/cyclin D complex) is poised to be activated by extrinsic mitogenic signals that impinge upon p27 at the earliest stage of cell division. More broadly, our results further illustrate the regulatory versatility of intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:21715330

  2. The protein product of the c-cbl protooncogene is phosphorylated after B cell receptor stimulation and binds the SH3 domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a B cell immunodeficiency, is caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene. The absence of a functional Btk protein leads to a failure of B cell differentiation and antibody production. B cell receptor stimulation leads to the phosphorylation of the Btk protein and it is, therefore, likely that Btk is involved in B cell receptor signaling. As a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Btk is likely to interact with several proteins within the context of a signal transduction pathway. To understand such interactions, we have generated glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins corresponding to different domains of the human Btk protein. We have identified a 120-kD protein present in human B cells as being bound by the SH3 domain of Btk and which, after B cell receptor stimulation, is one of the major substrates of tyrosine phosphorylation. We have shown that this 120-kD protein is the protein product of c-cbl, a protooncogene, which is known to be phosphorylated in response to T cell receptor stimulation and to interact with several other tyrosine kinases. Association of the SH3 domain of Btk with p120cbl provides evidence for an analogous role for p120cbl in B cell signaling pathways. The p120cbl protein is the first identified ligand of the Btk SH3 domain. PMID:7629518

  3. Nitration of tyrosyl residues in human alpha-lactalbumin. Effect on lactose synthase specifier activity.

    PubMed

    Prieels, J P; Dolmans, M; Leonis, J; Brew, K

    1975-12-15

    Alpha-Lactalbumin isolated from human milk was reacted with tetranitromethane in molar excess of 8-32 mol/mol of tyrosine. After gel filtration on Sephadex G-75, followed by chromatographic fractionation using DEAE-Sephadex A-25, three main components were separated, which differed from one another in the extent of nitration. These protein fractions were found to contain, respectively, one and two nitrotyrosine residues, or two nitrotyrosine residues together with one nitrotryptophan. The lactose synthase specifier activity of each of these components was measured and compared with that of unsubstituted alpha-lactalbumin. Comparison of kinetic parameters showed the chemically modified proteins to be only slightly less active when tyrosines were the sole residues modified. In sharp contrast the additional nitration of a single tryptophan residue totally abolished the specifying activity of alpha-lactalbumin. Circular dichroism spectra of the tryptophan derivative revealed some structural alteration when compared with the other two and with the native protein. The conclusion could also be confirmed by using a double-immunodiffusion technique. After hydrolysis of the derivatives with thermolysin, it was possible to localize the substituted residues in the known sequence of human alpha-lactalbumin. Tyrosine-103 was found to be more easily nitrated than tyrosine-18. These two residues seem, therefore, to be on the outer surface of the molecule and more exposed than tyrosine-36 and tyrosine-50. Some precautions are indicated in the use of tetranitromethane as a nitrating agent on the basis of complex products observed in the nitration of the free amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan and their derivatives. PMID:812700

  4. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Rory N; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B; Sonti, Ramesh V; Petzold, Christopher J; Liu, Chang C; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2015-07-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21-amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals.

  5. Design, Synthesis, Biological Activity and Molecular Dynamics Studies of Specific Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors over SHP-2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Su-Xia; Li, Xiao-Bo; Liu, Wen-Bo; Ma, Ying; Wang, Run-Ling; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Wang, Shu-Qing; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Over expressing in PTPN1 (encoding Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, PTP1B), a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) that plays an overall positive role in insulin signaling, is linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The relationship between PTP1B and human diseases exhibits PTP1B as the target to treat these diseases. In this article, small weight molecules of the imidazolidine series were screened from databases and optimized on silicon as the inhibitors of PTP1B based on the steric conformation and electronic configuration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) compounds. The top three candidates were tested using an in vitro biological assay after synthesis. Finally, we report a novel inhibitor, Compound 13, that specifically inhibits PTP1B over the closely related phosphatase Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) at 80 μM. Its IC50 values are reported in this paper as well. This compound was further verified by computer analysis for its ability to combine the catalytic domains of PTP1B and SHP-2 by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:23774838

  6. Alterations in skeletal muscle protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity and expression in insulin-resistant human obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, F; Azevedo, J L; Cortright, R; Dohm, G L; Goldstein, B J

    1997-01-01

    Obese human subjects have increased protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase) activity in adipose tissue that can dephosphorylate and inactivate the insulin receptor kinase. To extend these findings to skeletal muscle, we measured PTPase activity in the skeletal muscle particulate fraction and cytosol from a series of lean controls, insulin-resistant obese (body mass index > 30) nondiabetic subjects, and obese individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes. PTPase activities in subcellular fractions from the nondiabetic obese subjects were increased to 140-170% of the level in lean controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, PTPase activity in both fractions from the obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes was significantly decreased to 39% of the level in controls (P < 0.05). By immunoblot analysis, leukocyte antigen related (LAR) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B had the greatest increase (threefold) in the particulate fraction from obese, nondiabetic subjects, and immunodepletion of this fraction using an affinity-purified antibody directed at the cytoplasmic domain of leukocyte antigen related normalized the PTPase activity when compared to the activity from control subjects. These findings provide further support for negative regulation of insulin action by specific PTPases in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in human obesity, while other regulatory mechanisms may be operative in the diabetic state. PMID:9218523

  7. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) as a phosphoryl mimetic in inhibitors of the Yersinia pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Eun; Bahta, Medhanit; Lountos, George T.; Ulrich, Robert G.; Burke, Terrence R. Jr Waugh, David S.

    2011-07-01

    The first X-ray crystal structure of the Y. pestis protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH in complex with an isothiazolidinone-based lead-fragment compound is reported. Isothiazolidinone (IZD) heterocycles can act as effective components of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors by simultaneously replicating the binding interactions of both a phosphoryl group and a highly conserved water molecule, as exemplified by the structures of several PTP1B–inhibitor complexes. In the first unambiguous demonstration of IZD interactions with a PTP other than PTP1B, it is shown by X-ray crystallography that the IZD motif binds within the catalytic site of the Yersinia pestis PTP YopH by similarly displacing a highly conserved water molecule. It is also shown that IZD-based bidentate ligands can inhibit YopH in a nonpromiscuous fashion at low micromolar concentrations. Hence, the IZD moiety may represent a useful starting point for the development of YopH inhibitors.

  8. The Syk protein tyrosine kinase can function independently of CD45 or Lck in T cell antigen receptor signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, D H; Spits, H; Peyron, J F; Rowley, R B; Bolen, J B; Weiss, A

    1996-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is a critical component of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling pathway, acting as a positive regulator of Src family protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as Lck. Most CD45-deficient human and murine T cell lines are unable to signal through their TCRs. However, there is a CD45-deficient cell line that can signal through its TCR. We have studied this cell line to identify a TCR signaling pathway that is independent of CD45 regulation. In the course of these experiments, we found that the Syk PTK, but not the ZAP-70 PTK, is able to mediate TCR signaling independently of CD45 and of Lck. For this function, Syk requires functional kinase and SH2 domains, as well as intact phosphorylation sites in the regulatory loop of its kinase domain. Thus, differential expression of Syk is likely to explain the paradoxical phenotypes of different CD45-deficient T cells. Finally, these results suggest differences in activation requirements between two closely related PTK family members, Syk and ZAP-70. The differential activities of these two kinases suggest that they may play distinct, rather than completely redundant, roles in lymphocyte signaling. Images PMID:8947048

  9. The rice immune receptor XA21 recognizes a tyrosine-sulfated protein from a Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Joe, Anna; Thomas, Nicholas; Liu, Furong; Albert, Markus; Robinson, Michelle R.; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Luu, Dee Dee; Chen, Huamin; Bahar, Ofir; Daudi, Arsalan; De Vleesschauwer, David; Caddell, Daniel; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhao, Xiuxiang; Li, Xiang; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Ruan, Deling; Majumder, Dipali; Chern, Mawsheng; Kalbacher, Hubert; Midha, Samriti; Patil, Prabhu B.; Sonti, Ramesh V.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Chang C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of the extracellular environment by immune receptors is of central importance to eukaryotic survival. The rice receptor kinase XA21, which confers robust resistance to most strains of the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is representative of a large class of cell surface immune receptors in plants and animals. We report the identification of a previously undescribed Xoo protein, called RaxX, which is required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity. Xoo strains that lack RaxX, or carry mutations in the single RaxX tyrosine residue (Y41), are able to evade XA21-mediated immunity. Y41 of RaxX is sulfated by the prokaryotic tyrosine sulfotransferase RaxST. Sulfated, but not nonsulfated, RaxX triggers hallmarks of the plant immune response in an XA21-dependent manner. A sulfated, 21–amino acid synthetic RaxX peptide (RaxX21-sY) is sufficient for this activity. Xoo field isolates that overcome XA21-mediated immunity encode an alternate raxX allele, suggesting that coevolutionary interactions between host and pathogen contribute to RaxX diversification. RaxX is highly conserved in many plant pathogenic Xanthomonas species. The new insights gained from the discovery and characterization of the sulfated protein, RaxX, can be applied to the development of resistant crop varieties and therapeutic reagents that have the potential to block microbial infection of both plants and animals. PMID:26601222

  10. Tyrosine 129 of the Murine Gammaherpesvirus M2 Protein Is Critical for M2 Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S.; O’Flaherty, Brigid M.; Speck, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy shared by all known gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish a latent infection in lymphocytes – predominantly in B cells. In immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients or AIDS patients, gammaherpesvirus infections can lead to the development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoid malignancies. The human gamma-herpesviruses, EBV and KSHV, encode proteins that are capable of modulating the host immune signaling machinery, thereby subverting host immune responses. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection of laboratory strains of mice has proven to be useful small-animal model that shares important pathogenic strategies with the human gamma-herpesviruses. The MHV68 M2 protein is known to manipulate B cell signaling and, dependent on route and dose of virus inoculation, plays a role in both the establishment of latency and virus reactivation. M2 contains two tyrosines that are targets for phosphorylation, and have been shown to interact with the B cell signaling machinery. Here we describe in vitro and in vivo studies of M2 mutants which reveals that while both tyrosines Y120 and Y129 are required for M2 induction of IL-10 expression from primary murine B cells in vitro, only Y129 is critical for reactivation from latency and plasma cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:25122496

  11. Tyrosine 129 of the murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein is critical for M2 function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; O'Flaherty, Brigid M; Speck, Samuel H

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy shared by all known gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish a latent infection in lymphocytes--predominantly in B cells. In immunocompromised patients, such as transplant recipients or AIDS patients, gammaherpesvirus infections can lead to the development of lymphoproliferative disease and lymphoid malignancies. The human gamma-herpesviruses, EBV and KSHV, encode proteins that are capable of modulating the host immune signaling machinery, thereby subverting host immune responses. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection of laboratory strains of mice has proven to be useful small-animal model that shares important pathogenic strategies with the human gamma-herpesviruses. The MHV68 M2 protein is known to manipulate B cell signaling and, dependent on route and dose of virus inoculation, plays a role in both the establishment of latency and virus reactivation. M2 contains two tyrosines that are targets for phosphorylation, and have been shown to interact with the B cell signaling machinery. Here we describe in vitro and in vivo studies of M2 mutants which reveals that while both tyrosines Y120 and Y129 are required for M2 induction of IL-10 expression from primary murine B cells in vitro, only Y129 is critical for reactivation from latency and plasma cell differentiation in vivo.

  12. Implication of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in MCF-7 cell proliferation and resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen

    SciTech Connect

    Blanquart, Christophe; Karouri, Salah-Eddine; Issad, Tarik

    2009-10-02

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and the T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) were initially thought to be mainly anti-oncogenic. However, overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP has been observed in human tumors, and recent studies have demonstrated that PTP1B contributes to the appearance of breast tumors by modulating ERK pathway. In the present work, we observed that decreasing the expression of TC-PTP or PTP1B in MCF-7 cells using siRNA reduced cell proliferation without affecting cell death. This reduction in proliferation was associated with decreased ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, selection of tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells, by long-term culture in presence of 4-OH tamoxifen, resulted in cells that display overexpression of PTP1B and TC-PTP, and concomitant increase in ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation. siRNA experiments showed that PTP1B, but not TC-PTP, is necessary for resistance to 4-OH tamoxifen. Therefore, our work indicates that PTP1B could be a relevant therapeutic target for treatment of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancers.

  13. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface. PMID:23580642

  14. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  15. NIN-like protein 8 is a master regulator of nitrate-promoted seed germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dawei; Easwaran, Vanathy; Chau, Vivian; Okamoto, Masanori; Ierullo, Matthew; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Endo, Akira; Yano, Ryoichi; Pasha, Asher; Gong, Yunchen; Bi, Yong-Mei; Provart, Nicolas; Guttman, David; Krapp, Anne; Rothstein, Steven J.; Nambara, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Seeds respond to multiple different environmental stimuli that regulate germination. Nitrate stimulates germination in many plants but how it does so remains unclear. Here we show that the Arabidopsis NIN-like protein 8 (NLP8) is essential for nitrate-promoted seed germination. Seed germination in nlp8 loss-of-function mutants does not respond to nitrate. NLP8 functions even in a nitrate reductase-deficient mutant background, and the requirement for NLP8 is conserved among Arabidopsis accessions. NLP8 reduces abscisic acid levels in a nitrate-dependent manner and directly binds to the promoter of CYP707A2, encoding an abscisic acid catabolic enzyme. Genetic analysis shows that NLP8-mediated promotion of seed germination by nitrate requires CYP707A2. Finally, we show that NLP8 localizes to nuclei and unlike NLP7, does not appear to be activated by nitrate-dependent nuclear retention of NLP7, suggesting that seeds have a unique mechanism for nitrate signalling. PMID:27731416

  16. Differential requirement of protein tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C in the regulation of T cell locomotion in three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Entschladen, F; Niggemann, B; Zänker, K S; Friedl, P

    1997-10-01

    Locomotion of T lymphocytes within three-dimensional collagen matrices is regulated via different signaling states of the cells. Purified human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells developed a spontaneously locomoting subpopulation of about 25% of the whole population immediately after incorporation into a three-dimensional collagen matrix analyzed by time-lapse videomicroscopy. This spontaneous locomotion was accompanied by enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity using genistein significantly reduced the spontaneous locomotory activity. This reduction was overcome by subsequent activation of protein kinase C (PKC) using PMA, which led to a persistent increase of locomotory activity to more than 60% of the cells. Thus, the PKC-driven type of locomotion was independent of PTK activity, whereas spontaneous locomotion was not altered by inhibition of PKC activity using calphostin C or inhibition of the serine/ threonine phosphatases pp1 and pp2A using okadaic acid. We presume that PTK activity, especially tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK, is decisively involved in the regulation of spontaneous T lymphocyte locomotion, which is independent of PKC activity. In contrast, PKC-driven locomotion is independent of tyrosine phosphorylation events, indicating that T lymphocyte locomotion is regulated by more than one signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis of phosphotyrosine residues, FAK, and PKC revealed an exclusive cellular distribution of these components, suggesting a regulation of T lymphocyte locomotion different from migration models developed for other cell types, which refer to a colocalization of FAK and PKC in focal adhesions.

  17. Tailor-Made Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases: In Vitro Site-Directed Mutagenesis of PTEN and PTPRZ-B.

    PubMed

    Luna, Sandra; Mingo, Janire; Aurtenetxe, Olaia; Blanco, Lorena; Amo, Laura; Schepens, Jan; Hendriks, Wiljan J; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In vitro site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) is a commonly used approach to experimentally analyze PTP functions at the molecular and cellular level and to establish functional correlations with PTP alterations found in human disease. Here, using the tumor-suppressor PTEN and the receptor-type PTPRZ-B (short isoform from PTPRZ1 gene) phosphatases as examples, we provide a brief insight into the utility of specific mutations in the experimental analysis of PTP functions. We describe a standardized, rapid, and simple method of mutagenesis to perform single and multiple amino acid substitutions, as well as deletions of short nucleotide sequences, based on one-step inverse PCR and DpnI restriction enzyme treatment. This method of SDM is generally applicable to any other protein of interest. PMID:27514801

  18. Identification of potential inhibitors based on compound proposal contest: Tyrosine-protein kinase Yes as a target

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Ishida, Takashi; Gromiha, M. Michael; Taguchi, Y-h.; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Hsin, Kun-Yi; Kitano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Sugaya, Nobuyoshi; Kato, Koya; Okuno, Tatsuya; Chikenji, George; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Yasuo, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Ryunosuke; Yanagisawa, Keisuke; Ban, Tomohiro; Teramoto, Reiji; Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Thangakani, A. Mary; Velmurugan, D.; Prathipati, Philip; Ito, Junichi; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Honma, Teruki; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    A search of broader range of chemical space is important for drug discovery. Different methods of computer-aided drug discovery (CADD) are known to propose compounds in different chemical spaces as hit molecules for the same target protein. This study aimed at using multiple CADD methods through open innovation to achieve a level of hit molecule diversity that is not achievable with any particular single method. We held a compound proposal contest, in which multiple research groups participated and predicted inhibitors of tyrosine-protein kinase Yes. This showed whether collective knowledge based on individual approaches helped to obtain hit compounds from a broad range of chemical space and whether the contest-based approach was effective. PMID:26607293

  19. Identification of potential inhibitors based on compound proposal contest: Tyrosine-protein kinase Yes as a target.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shuntaro; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Ishida, Takashi; Gromiha, M Michael; Taguchi, Y-H; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Hsin, Kun-Yi; Kitano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Sugaya, Nobuyoshi; Kato, Koya; Okuno, Tatsuya; Chikenji, George; Mochizuki, Masahiro; Yasuo, Nobuaki; Yoshino, Ryunosuke; Yanagisawa, Keisuke; Ban, Tomohiro; Teramoto, Reiji; Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Thangakani, A Mary; Velmurugan, D; Prathipati, Philip; Ito, Junichi; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Honma, Teruki; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2015-11-26

    A search of broader range of chemical space is important for drug discovery. Different methods of computer-aided drug discovery (CADD) are known to propose compounds in different chemical spaces as hit molecules for the same target protein. This study aimed at using multiple CADD methods through open innovation to achieve a level of hit molecule diversity that is not achievable with any particular single method. We held a compound proposal contest, in which multiple research groups participated and predicted inhibitors of tyrosine-protein kinase Yes. This showed whether collective knowledge based on individual approaches helped to obtain hit compounds from a broad range of chemical space and whether the contest-based approach was effective.

  20. Involvement of Protein Kinase D1 in Signal Transduction from the Protein Kinase C Pathway to the Tyrosine Kinase Pathway in Response to Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone*

    PubMed Central

    Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Maeda, Noriko; Toku, Seikichi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its stimulation activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK). We found that the transactivation of ErbB4 was involved in GnRH-induced ERK activation in immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1–7 cells). We found also that GnRH induced the cleavage of ErbB4. In the present study, we examined signal transduction for the activation of ERK and the cleavage of ErbB4 after GnRH treatment. Both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage were completely inhibited by YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gq/11 proteins. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) markedly decreased both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Experiments with two types of PKC inhibitors, Gö 6976 and bisindolylmaleimide I, indicated that novel PKC isoforms but not conventional PKC isoforms were involved in ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Our experiments indicated that the novel PKC isoforms activated protein kinase D (PKD) after GnRH treatment. Knockdown and inhibitor experiments suggested that PKD1 stimulated the phosphorylation of Pyk2 by constitutively activated Src and Fyn for ERK activation. Taken together, it is highly possible that PKD1 plays a critical role in signal transduction from the PKC pathway to the tyrosine kinase pathway. Activation of the tyrosine kinase pathway may be involved in the progression of cancer. PMID:26338704

  1. In situ quantification of HER2–protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) protein–protein complexes in paraffin sections from breast cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Aubele, M; Spears, M; Ludyga, N; Braselmann, H; Feuchtinger, A; Taylor, K J; Lindner, K; Auer, G; Stering, K; Höfler, H; Schmitt, M; Bartlett, J M S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6; breast tumour kinase) is overexpressed in up to 86% of the invasive breast cancers, and its association with the oncoprotein human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was shown in vitro by co-precipitation. Furthermore, expression of PTK6 in tumours is linked with the expression of HER2. Method and results: In this study, we used the proximity ligation assay (PLA) technique on formalin-fixed paraffin sections from eighty invasive breast carcinoma tissue specimens to locate PTK6–HER2 protein–protein complexes. Proximity ligation assay signals from protein complexes were assessed quantitatively, and expression levels showed a statistically significant association with tumour size (P=0.015) and course of the cancer disease (P=0.012). Conclusion: Protein tyrosine kinase 6 forms protein complexes with HER2 in primary breast cancer tissues, which can be visualised by use of the PLA technique. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2–PTK6 complexes are of prognostic relevance. PMID:20700126

  2. CD22 associates with protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C, Syk, and phospholipase C-gamma(1) upon B cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cross-linking B cell antigen receptor (BCR) elicits early signal transduction events, including activation of protein tyrosine kinases, phosphorylation of receptor components, activation of phospholipase C- gamma (PLC-gamma), and increases in intracellular free Ca2+. In this article, we report that cross-linking the BCR led to a rapid translocation of cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1C to the particulate fraction, where it became associated with a 140-150-kD tyrosyl-phosphorylated protein. Western blotting analysis identified this 140-150-kD protein to be CD22. The association of PTP-1C with CD22 was mediated by the NH2-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of PTP-1C. Complexes of either CD22/PTP-1C/Syk/PLC-gamma(1) could be isolated from B cells stimulated by BCR engagement or a mixture of hydrogen peroxidase and sodium orthovanadate, respectively. The binding of PLC- gamma(1) and Syk to tyrosyl-phosphorylated CD22 was mediated by the NH2- terminal SH2 domain of PLC-gamma(1) and the COOH-terminal SH2 domain of Syk, respectively. These observations suggest that tyrosyl- phosphorylated CD22 may downmodulate the activity of this complex by dephosphorylation of CD22, Syk, and/or PLC-gamma(1). Transient expression of CD22 and a null mutant of PTP-1C (PTP-1CM) in COS cells resulted in an increase in tyrosyl phosphorylation of CD22 and its interaction with PTP-1CM. By contrast, CD22 was not tyrosyl phosphorylated or associated with PTP-1CM in the presence of wild-type PTP-1C. These results suggest that tyrosyl-phosphorylated CD22 may be a substrate for PTP-1C regulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of CD22. PMID:8627166

  3. Identification of p130(cas) as a substrate for the cytosolic protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST.

    PubMed Central

    Garton, A J; Flint, A J; Tonks, N K

    1996-01-01

    PTP-PEST is a ubiquitously expressed, cytosolic, mammalian protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) which exhibits high specific activity in vitro. We have investigated the substrate specificity of PTP-PEST by a novel substrate-trapping approach in combination with in vitro dephosphorylation experiments. We initially identified a prominent 130-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in pervanadate-treated HeLa cell lysates which was preferentially dephosphorylated by PTP-PEST in vitro. In order to identify this potential substrate, mutant (substrate-trapping) forms of PTP-PEST were generated which lack catalytic activity but retain the ability to bind substrates. These mutant proteins associated in stable complexes exclusively with the same 130-kDa protein, which was identified as p130(cas) by immunoblotting. This exclusive association was observed in lysates from several cell lines and in transfected COS cells, but was not observed with other members of the PTP family, strongly suggesting that p130(cas) represents a major physiologically relevant substrate for PTP-PEST. Our studies suggest potential roles for PTP-PEST in regulation of p130(cas) function. These functions include mitogen- and cell adhesion-induced signalling events and probable roles in transformation by various oncogenes. These results provide the first demonstration of a PTP having an inherently restricted substrate specificity in vitro and in vivo. The methods used to identify p130(cas) as a specific substrate for PTP-PEST are potentially applicable to any PTP and should therefore prove useful in determining the physiological substrates of other members of the PTP family. PMID:8887669

  4. The novel Smad protein Expansion regulates the receptor tyrosine kinase pathway to control Drosophila tracheal tube size.

    PubMed

    Iordanou, Ekaterini; Chandran, Rachana R; Yang, Yonghua; Essak, Mina; Blackstone, Nicholas; Jiang, Lan

    2014-09-01

    Tubes with distinct shapes and sizes are critical for the proper function of many tubular organs. Here we describe a unique phenotype caused by the loss of a novel, evolutionarily-conserved, Drosophila Smad-like protein, Expansion. In expansion mutants, unicellular and intracellular tracheal branches develop bubble-like cysts with enlarged apical membranes. Cysts in unicellular tubes are enlargements of the apical lumen, whereas cysts in intracellular tubes are cytoplasmic vacuole-like compartments. The cyst phenotype in expansion mutants is similar to, but weaker than, that observed in double mutants of Drosophila type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), Ptp4E and Ptp10D. Ptp4E and Ptp10D negatively regulate the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways, especially epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor/breathless (FGFR, Btl) signaling to maintain the proper size of unicellular and intracellular tubes. We show Exp genetically interacts with RTK signaling, the downstream targets of RPTPs. Cyst size and number in expansion mutants is enhanced by increased RTK signaling and suppressed by reduced RTK signaling. Genetic interaction studies strongly suggest that Exp negatively regulates RTK (EGFR, Btl) signaling to ensure proper tube sizes. Smad proteins generally function as intermediate components of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β, DPP) signaling pathway. However, no obvious genetic interaction between expansion and TGF-β (DPP) signaling was observed. Therefore, Expansion does not function as a typical Smad protein. The expansion phenotype demonstrates a novel role for Smad-like proteins in epithelial tube formation.

  5. A Tyrosine-Rich Cell Surface Protein in the Diatom Amphora coffeaeformis Identified through Transcriptome Analysis and Genetic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Matthias T.; Poulsen, Nicole; Klemm, Jennifer; Kennedy, Matthew R.; Sherrill, C. David; Kröger, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are single-celled eukaryotic microalgae that are ubiquitously found in almost all aquatic ecosystems, and are characterized by their intricately structured SiO2 (silica)-based cell walls. Diatoms with a benthic life style are capable of attaching to any natural or man-made submerged surface, thus contributing substantially to both microbial biofilm communities and economic losses through biofouling. Surface attachment of diatoms is mediated by a carbohydrate- and protein- based glue, yet no protein involved in diatom underwater adhesion has been identified so far. In the present work, we have generated a normalized transcriptome database from the model adhesion diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Using an unconventional bioinformatics analysis we have identified five proteins that exhibit unique amino acid sequences resembling the amino acid composition of the tyrosine-rich adhesion proteins from mussel footpads. Establishing the first method for the molecular genetic transformation of A. coffeaeformis has enabled investigations into the function of one of these proteins, AC3362, through expression as YFP fusion protein. Biochemical analysis and imaging by fluorescence microscopy revealed that AC3362 is not involved in adhesion, but rather plays a role in biosynthesis and/or structural stability of the cell wall. The methods established in the present study have paved the way for further molecular studies on the mechanisms of underwater adhesion and biological silica formation in the diatom A. coffeaeformis. PMID:25372470

  6. Nitration transforms a sensitive peroxiredoxin 2 into a more active and robust peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Lía M; Manta, Bruno; Hugo, Martín; Gil, Magdalena; Batthyàny, Carlos; Trujillo, Madia; Poole, Leslie B; Denicola, Ana

    2014-05-30

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are efficient thiol-dependent peroxidases and key players in the mechanism of H2O2-induced redox signaling. Any structural change that could affect their redox state, oligomeric structure, and/or interaction with other proteins could have a significant impact on the cascade of signaling events. Several post-translational modifications have been reported to modulate Prx activity. One of these, overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine to the sulfinic derivative, inactivates the enzyme and has been proposed as a mechanism of H2O2 accumulation in redox signaling (the floodgate hypothesis). Nitration of Prx has been reported in vitro as well as in vivo; in particular, nitrated Prx2 was identified in brains of Alzheimer disease patients. In this work we characterize Prx2 tyrosine nitration, a post-translational modification on a noncatalytic residue that increases its peroxidase activity and its resistance to overoxidation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that treatment of disulfide-oxidized Prx2 with excess peroxynitrite renders mainly mononitrated and dinitrated species. Tyrosine 193 of the YF motif at the C terminus, associated with the susceptibility toward overoxidation of eukaryotic Prx, was identified as nitrated and is most likely responsible for the protection of the peroxidatic cysteine against oxidative inactivation. Kinetic analyses suggest that tyrosine nitration facilitates the intermolecular disulfide formation, transforming a sensitive Prx into a robust one. Thus, tyrosine nitration appears as another mechanism to modulate these enzymes in the complex network of redox signaling.

  7. Nitration Transforms a Sensitive Peroxiredoxin 2 into a More Active and Robust Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Lía M.; Manta, Bruno; Hugo, Martín; Gil, Magdalena; Batthyàny, Carlos; Trujillo, Madia; Poole, Leslie B.; Denicola, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx) are efficient thiol-dependent peroxidases and key players in the mechanism of H2O2-induced redox signaling. Any structural change that could affect their redox state, oligomeric structure, and/or interaction with other proteins could have a significant impact on the cascade of signaling events. Several post-translational modifications have been reported to modulate Prx activity. One of these, overoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine to the sulfinic derivative, inactivates the enzyme and has been proposed as a mechanism of H2O2 accumulation in redox signaling (the floodgate hypothesis). Nitration of Prx has been reported in vitro as well as in vivo; in particular, nitrated Prx2 was identified in brains of Alzheimer disease patients. In this work we characterize Prx2 tyrosine nitration, a post-translational modification on a noncatalytic residue that increases its peroxidase activity and its resistance to overoxidation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that treatment of disulfide-oxidized Prx2 with excess peroxynitrite renders mainly mononitrated and dinitrated species. Tyrosine 193 of the YF motif at the C terminus, associated with the susceptibility toward overoxidation of eukaryotic Prx, was identified as nitrated and is most likely responsible for the protection of the peroxidatic cysteine against oxidative inactivation. Kinetic analyses suggest that tyrosine nitration facilitates the intermolecular disulfide formation, transforming a sensitive Prx into a robust one. Thus, tyrosine nitration appears as another mechanism to modulate these enzymes in the complex network of redox signaling. PMID:24719319

  8. Functional analysis of the T-cell-restricted protein tyrosine kinase Txk.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J H; Sutmuller, R P; Sims, M J; Cooksley, S

    1998-01-01

    T lymphocytes express a range of tyrosine kinases that are involved in signalling processes driving cell activation, proliferation and differentation. Two tyrosine kinases expressed only in T cells, the Itk/Emt and Txk gene products, are members of the Tec family of kinases. The role of Tec kinases in cellular function is poorly understood, although a Tec kinase specific to B cells, Btk, is essential for B-cell development. To explore the contribution of the T-cell-specific Tec kinases to lymphocyte function, we have expressed human Txk in the baculovirus system and conducted the first characterization of its activity. We find that Txk exhibits a substrate preference in vitro quite distinct from that of the major T-cell kinases Lck and ZAP70, suggesting that Tec-family kinases might act on a distinct range of substrates. We also investigated the interactions of Txk with the cytoplasmic domains of the key signalling molecules CD3zeta, CD28 and CTLA4 and find that none of these are phosphorylated by Txk, nor are they ligands for the SH2 or SH3 domains of Txk. We conclude that it is unlikely that Txk has a role in the early signal transduction events associated with these key pathways controlling T-cell activation. PMID:9761724

  9. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-09-27

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. PMID:7524079

  10. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7524079

  11. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  12. Structural investigation of the binding of a herpesviral protein to the SH3 domain of tyrosine kinase Lck.

    PubMed

    Schweimer, Kristian; Hoffmann, Silke; Bauer, Finn; Friedrich, Ute; Kardinal, Christian; Feller, Stephan M; Biesinger, Brigitte; Sticht, Heinrich

    2002-04-23

    Herpesvirus saimiri codes for a tyrosine kinase interacting protein (Tip) that interacts with both the SH3 domain and the kinase domain of the T-cell-specific tyrosine kinase Lck via two separate motifs. The activation of Lck by Tip is considered as a key event in the transformation of human T-lymphocytes during herpesviral infection. We investigated the interaction of proline-rich Tip peptides with the LckSH3 domain starting with the structural characterization of the unbound interaction partners. The solution structure of the LckSH3 was determined by heteronuclear multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using 44 residual dipolar couplings in addition to the conventional experimental restraints. Circular dichroism spectroscopy proved that the polyproline helix of Tip is already formed prior to SH3 binding and is conformationally stable. NMR titration experiments point out three major regions of the Tip-Lck interaction comprising the RT loop, the n-src loop, and a helical turn preceding the last strand of the beta-sheet. Further changes of the chemical shifts were observed for the N- and C-terminal beta-strands of the SH3 domain, indicating additional contacts outside the proline-rich segment or subtle structural rearrangements transmitted from the binding site of the proline helix. Fluorescence spectroscopy shows that Tip binds to the SH3 domains of several Src kinases (Lck, Hck, Lyn, Src, Fyn, Yes), exhibiting the highest affinities for Lyn, Hck, and Lck.

  13. Electron transport to periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) of Wolinella succinogenes is independent of a NapC protein.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Sänger, Monica; Schuster, Stephan C; Gross, Roland

    2003-07-01

    The rumen bacterium Wolinella succinogenes grows by respiratory nitrate ammonification with formate as electron donor. Whereas the enzymology and coupling mechanism of nitrite respiration is well known, nitrate reduction to nitrite has not yet been examined. We report here that intact cells and cell fractions catalyse nitrate and chlorate reduction by reduced viologen dyes with high specific activities. A gene cluster encoding components of a putative periplasmic nitrate reductase system (napA, G, H, B, F, L, D) was sequenced. The napA gene was inactivated by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette. The resulting mutant did not grow by nitrate respiration and did not reduce nitrate during growth by fumarate respiration, in contrast to the wild type. An antigen was detected in wild-type cells using an antiserum raised against the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) from Paracoccus pantotrophus. This antigen was absent in the W. succinogenes napA mutant. It is concluded that the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA is the only respiratory nitrate reductase in W. succinogenes, although a second nitrate-reducing enzyme is apparently induced in the napA mutant. The nap cluster of W. succinogenes lacks a napC gene whose product is thought to function in quinol oxidation and electron transfer to NapA in other bacteria. The W. succinogenes genome encodes two members of the NapC/NirT family, NrfH and FccC. Characterization of corresponding deletion mutants indicates that neither of these two proteins is required for nitrate respiration. A mutant lacking the genes encoding respiratory nitrite reductase (nrfHA) had wild-type properties with respect to nitrate respiration. A model of the electron transport chain of nitrate respiration is proposed in which one or more of the napF, G, H and L gene products mediate electron transport from menaquinol to the periplasmic NapAB complex. Inspection of the W. succinogenes genome sequence suggests that ammonia formation from

  14. Involvement of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and reduction of cellular sulfhydryl groups in cell death induced by 1' -acetoxychavicol acetate in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Jerry; Kennedy, David Opare; Kojima, Akiko; Hasuma, Tadayoshi; Yano, Yoshihisa; Otani, Shuzo; Murakami, Akira; Koshimizu, Koichi; Ohigashi, Hajime; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2002-02-20

    Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying potential anticancer drugs continues and unraveling these mechanisms would not only provide a conceptual framework for drug design but also promote use of natural products for chemotherapy. To further evaluate the efficacy of the anticancer activity of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), this study investigates the underlying mechanisms by which ACA induces death of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. ACA treatment induced loss of cell viability, and Western blotting analysis revealed that the compound stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins with 27 and 70 kDa proteins being regulated in both dose- and time-dependent manner prior to loss of viability. Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A moderately protected cells from ACA-induced toxicity. In addition, cellular glutathione and protein sulfydryl groups were also significantly reduced both dose- and time-dependently during evidence of cell death. Replenishing thiol levels by antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an excellent supplier of glutathione and precursor of glutathione, substantially recovered the viability loss, but the recovery being time-dependent, as late addition of NAC (at least 30 min after ACA addition to cultures) was, however, ineffective. Addition of NAC to ACA treated cultures also abolished tyrosine phosphorylation of the 27 kDa protein. These results, at least partly, identify cellular sulfhydryl groups and protein tyrosine phosphorylation as targets of ACA cytotoxicity in tumor cells.

  15. The heterotrimeric G q protein-coupled angiotensin II receptor activates p21 ras via the tyrosine kinase-Shc-Grb2-Sos pathway in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sadoshima, J; Izumo, S

    1996-01-01

    p21 ras plays as important role in cell proliferation, transformation and differentiation. Recently, the requirement of p21 ras has been suggested for cellular responses induced by stimulation of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors. However, it remains to be determined how agonists for G protein-coupled receptors activate p21 ras in metazoans. We show here that stimulation of the G q protein-coupled angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor causes activation of p21 ras in cardiac myocytes. The p21 ras activation by Ang II is mediated by an increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity, but not by an inhibition of the GTPase-activating protein. Ang II causes rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and its association with Grb2 and mSos-1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of p21 ras. This leads to translocation of mSos-1 to the membrane fraction. Shc associates with the SH3 domain of Fyn whose tyrosine kinase activity is activated by Ang II with a similar time course as that of tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc. Ang II-induced increase in the guanine nucleotide exchange activity was inhibited by a peptide ligand specific to the SH3 domain of the Src family tyrosine kinases. These results suggest that an agonist for a pertussis toxin-insensitive G protein-coupled receptor may initiate the cross-talk with non-receptor-type tyrosine kinases, thereby activating p21 ras using a similar mechanism as receptor tyrosine kinase-induced p21 ras activation. Images PMID:8631299

  16. The ER structural protein Rtn4A stabilizes and enhances signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB3.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Jason; Wald, Jessica H; Rafidi, Hanine; Cuevas, Antonio; Sweeney, Colleen; Carraway, Kermit L

    2016-01-01

    ErbB3 and ErbB4 are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by the neuregulin (NRG) family of growth factors. These receptors govern various developmental processes, and their dysregulation contributes to several human disease states. The abundance of ErbB3 and ErbB4, and thus signaling through these receptors, is limited by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nrdp1, which targets ErbB3 and ErbB4 for degradation. Reticulons are proteins that influence the morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by promoting the formation of tubules, a response of cells to some stressors. We found that the ER structural protein reticulon 4A (Rtn4A, also known as Nogo-A) increased ErbB3 abundance and proliferative signaling by suppressing Nrdp1 function. Rtn4A interacted with Nrdp1 and stabilized ErbB3 in an Nrdp1-dependent manner. Rtn4A overexpression induced the redistribution of Nrdp1 from a cytosolic or perinuclear localization to ER tubules. Rtn4A knockdown in human breast tumor cells decreased ErbB3 abundance, NRG-stimulated signaling, and cellular proliferation and migration. Because proteins destined for the plasma membrane are primarily synthesized in the sheet portions of the ER, our observations suggest that Rtn4A counteracts the Nrdp1-mediated degradation of ErbB3 by sequestering the ubiquitin ligase into ER tubules. The involvement of a reticulon suggests a molecular link between ER structure and the sensitivity of cells to receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated survival signals at the cell surface. PMID:27353365

  17. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  18. Proteomic identification of plasma protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha and fibronectin associated with liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, infection.

    PubMed

    Khoontawad, Jarinya; Laothong, Umawadee; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Pinlaor, Porntip; Mulvenna, Jason; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Mairiang, Eimorn; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2012-01-01

    Opisthorchiasis caused by Opisthorchis viverrini induces periductal fibrosis via host immune/inflammatory responses. Plasma protein alteration during host-parasite interaction-mediated inflammation may provide potential diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers. To search for target protein changes in O. viverrini-infected hamsters, a 1-D PAGE gel band was trypsin-digested and analyzed by a LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach in the plasma profile of infected hamsters, and applied to humans. Sixty seven proteins were selected for further analysis based on at least two unique tryptic peptides with protein ID score >10 and increased expression at least two times across time points. These proteins have not been previously identified in O. viverrini-associated infection. Among those, proteins involved in structural (19%), immune response (13%), cell cycle (10%) and transcription (10%) were highly expressed. Western blots revealed an expression level of protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha (PTPα) which reached a peak at 1 month and subsequently tended to decrease. Fibronectin significantly increased at 1 month and tended to increase with time, supporting proteomic analysis. PTPα was expressed in the cytoplasm of inflammatory cells, while fibronectin was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix at periductal fibrosis areas. In addition, these protein levels significantly increased in the plasma of O. viverrini-infected patients compared to healthy individuals, and significantly decreased at 2-months post-treatment, indicating their potential as disease markers. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma PTPα and fibronectin may be associated with opisthorchiasis and the hamster model provides the basis for development of novel diagnostic markers in the future.

  19. Verruculides A and B, two new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from an Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Wataru; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Izumikawa, Yuta; Iwasaki, Kohei; Toraiwa, Kengo; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-08-15

    Two new merosesquiterpenes, verruculides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a culture broth of the Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum TPU1311, together with three known congeners, chrodrimanins A (3), B (4), and H (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, UV, CD, and IR). Compound 2 had a linear sesquiterpene moiety and was considered to be the derivative of the biosynthetic precursor for 1 and 3-5. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 8.4, 8.5, and 14.9 μM, respectively. Compound 2 showed 40% inhibition at 23.1 μM, while 4 was not active at 20.7 μM. PMID:26115570

  20. Sesquiterpene Hydroquinones with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activities from a Dysidea sp. Marine Sponge Collected in Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-07-22

    Three new sesquiterpene hydroquinones, avapyran (1), 17-O-acetylavarol (2), and 17-O-acetylneoavarol (3), were isolated from a Dysidea sp. marine sponge collected in Okinawa together with five known congeners: avarol (4), neoavarol (5), 20-O-acetylavarol (6), 20-O-acetylneoavarol (7), and 3'-aminoavarone (8). The structures of 1-3 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with IC50 values of 11, 9.5, and 6.5 μM, respectively, while known compounds 4-8 gave IC50 values of 12, >32, 10, 8.6, and 18 μM, respectively. In a preliminary investigation on structure-activity relationships, six ester and methoxy derivatives (9-14) were prepared from 4 and 5.

  1. Sesquiterpene Hydroquinones with Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitory Activities from a Dysidea sp. Marine Sponge Collected in Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-07-22

    Three new sesquiterpene hydroquinones, avapyran (1), 17-O-acetylavarol (2), and 17-O-acetylneoavarol (3), were isolated from a Dysidea sp. marine sponge collected in Okinawa together with five known congeners: avarol (4), neoavarol (5), 20-O-acetylavarol (6), 20-O-acetylneoavarol (7), and 3'-aminoavarone (8). The structures of 1-3 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-3 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with IC50 values of 11, 9.5, and 6.5 μM, respectively, while known compounds 4-8 gave IC50 values of 12, >32, 10, 8.6, and 18 μM, respectively. In a preliminary investigation on structure-activity relationships, six ester and methoxy derivatives (9-14) were prepared from 4 and 5. PMID:27336796

  2. Verruculides A and B, two new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors from an Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Wataru; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Izumikawa, Yuta; Iwasaki, Kohei; Toraiwa, Kengo; Ukai, Kazuyo; Rotinsulu, Henki; Wewengkang, Defny S; Sumilat, Deiske A; Mangindaan, Remy E P; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-08-15

    Two new merosesquiterpenes, verruculides A (1) and B (2), were isolated from a culture broth of the Indonesian ascidian-derived Penicillium verruculosum TPU1311, together with three known congeners, chrodrimanins A (3), B (4), and H (5). The structures of 1 and 2 were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data (1D and 2D NMR, HRMS, UV, CD, and IR). Compound 2 had a linear sesquiterpene moiety and was considered to be the derivative of the biosynthetic precursor for 1 and 3-5. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with IC50 values of 8.4, 8.5, and 14.9 μM, respectively. Compound 2 showed 40% inhibition at 23.1 μM, while 4 was not active at 20.7 μM.

  3. Influence of protein tyrosine phosphatase gene (PTPN22) polymorphisms on rheumatic heart disease susceptibility in North Indian population.

    PubMed

    Gupta, U; Mir, S S; Chauhan, T; Garg, N; Agarwal, S K; Pande, S; Mittal, B

    2014-11-01

    This study was aimed to assess the association of Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor22 (PTPN22) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) susceptibility in 400 RHD patients and 300 controls. The PTPN22 polymorphisms (rs2476601, rs1217406 and rs3789609) were genotyped using Taqman probes (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). Statistical analysis was performed by spss and haplotype analysis by snpstat. The frequencies of variant alleles were not different between controls and cases (rs2476601: 2.00% & 1.05%; rs1217406: 36.33% & 34.75%; and rs3789609: 38.17% & 40.00%, respectively]. However, G rs2476601 A rs1217406 T rs3789609 haplotype turned out to be a low risk factor for RHD (P = 0.0042) predisposition in females and adult patients. This study suggests PTPN22 haplotype may modulate the risk to RHD in North Indians.

  4. Discovery of new potent human protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors via pharmacophore and QSAR analysis followed by in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mutasem O; Bustanji, Yasser; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Yousef, Al-Motassem; Zalloum, Waleed A; Al-Masri, Ihab M; Atallah, Naji

    2007-03-01

    A pharmacophoric model was developed for human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (h-PTP 1B) inhibitors utilizing the HipHop-REFINE module of CATALYST software. Subsequently, genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression analysis were employed to select an optimal combination of physicochemical descriptors and pharmacophore hypothesis that yield consistent QSAR equation of good predictive potential (r = 0.87,F-statistic = 69.13,r(BS)2 = 0.76,r(LOO)2 = 0.68). The validity of the QSAR equation and the associated pharmacophoric hypothesis was experimentally established by the identification of five new h-PTP 1B inhibitors retrieved from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database. PMID:17035054

  5. Discovery of new potent human protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors via pharmacophore and QSAR analysis followed by in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mutasem O; Bustanji, Yasser; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Yousef, Al-Motassem; Zalloum, Waleed A; Al-Masri, Ihab M; Atallah, Naji

    2007-03-01

    A pharmacophoric model was developed for human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (h-PTP 1B) inhibitors utilizing the HipHop-REFINE module of CATALYST software. Subsequently, genetic algorithm and multiple linear regression analysis were employed to select an optimal combination of physicochemical descriptors and pharmacophore hypothesis that yield consistent QSAR equation of good predictive potential (r = 0.87,F-statistic = 69.13,r(BS)2 = 0.76,r(LOO)2 = 0.68). The validity of the QSAR equation and the associated pharmacophoric hypothesis was experimentally established by the identification of five new h-PTP 1B inhibitors retrieved from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database.

  6. Triterpenoids from the leaves of Diospyros kaki (persimmon) and their inhibitory effects on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Thuong, Phuong Thien; Lee, Chul Ho; Dao, Trong Tuan; Nguyen, Phi Hung; Kim, Wan Gi; Lee, Sang Jun; Oh, Won Keun

    2008-10-01

    Phytochemical study on a methanol-soluble extract of the leaves of persimmon (Diospyros kaki) resulted in the isolation of two new ursane-type triterpenoids, 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12,20(30)-dien-24,28-dioic acid (1) and 3alpha,19alpha-dihydroxyurs-12-en-24,28-dioic acid (2), together with 12 known ursane- and oleanane-type triterpenoids (3-14). Triterpenoids with a 3beta-hydroxy group were found to inhibit protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity, with IC50 values ranging from 3.1+/-0.2 to 18.8+/-1.3 microM, whereas those with a 3alpha-hydroxy moiety were not active.

  7. Different zinc sensitivity of Brassica organs is accompanied by distinct responses in protein nitration level and pattern.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Lehotai, Nóra; Molnár, Árpád; Ördög, Attila; Bordé, Ádám; Laskay, Gábor; Erdei, László

    2016-03-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement, but its excess exerts toxic effects in plants. Heavy metal stress can alter the metabolism of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) leading to oxidative and nitrosative damages; although the participation of these processes in Zn toxicity and tolerance is not yet known. Therefore this study aimed to evaluate the zinc tolerance of Brassica organs and the putative correspondence of it with protein nitration as a relevant marker for nitrosative stress. Both examined Brassica species (B. juncea and B. napus) proved to be moderate Zn accumulators; however B. napus accumulated more from this metal in its organs. The zinc-induced damages (growth diminution, altered morphology, necrosis, chlorosis, and the decrease of photosynthetic activity) were slighter in the shoot system of B. napus than in B. juncea. The relative zinc tolerance of B. napus shoot was accompanied by moderate changes of the nitration pattern. In contrast, the root system of B. napus suffered more severe damages (growth reduction, altered morphology, viability loss) and slighter increase in nitration level compared to B. juncea. Based on these, the organs of Brassica species reacted differentially to excess zinc, since in the shoot system modification of the nitration pattern occurred (with newly appeared nitrated protein bands), while in the roots, a general increment in the nitroproteome could be observed (the intensification of the same protein bands being present in the control samples). It can be assumed that the significant alteration of nitration pattern is coupled with enhanced zinc sensitivity of the Brassica shoot system and the general intensification of protein nitration in the roots is attached to relative zinc endurance. PMID:26685787

  8. Different zinc sensitivity of Brassica organs is accompanied by distinct responses in protein nitration level and pattern.

    PubMed

    Feigl, Gábor; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Lehotai, Nóra; Molnár, Árpád; Ördög, Attila; Bordé, Ádám; Laskay, Gábor; Erdei, László

    2016-03-01

    Zinc is an essential microelement, but its excess exerts toxic effects in plants. Heavy metal stress can alter the metabolism of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) leading to oxidative and nitrosative damages; although the participation of these processes in Zn toxicity and tolerance is not yet known. Therefore this study aimed to evaluate the zinc tolerance of Brassica organs and the putative correspondence of it with protein nitration as a relevant marker for nitrosative stress. Both examined Brassica species (B. juncea and B. napus) proved to be moderate Zn accumulators; however B. napus accumulated more from this metal in its organs. The zinc-induced damages (growth diminution, altered morphology, necrosis, chlorosis, and the decrease of photosynthetic activity) were slighter in the shoot system of B. napus than in B. juncea. The relative zinc tolerance of B. napus shoot was accompanied by moderate changes of the nitration pattern. In contrast, the root system of B. napus suffered more severe damages (growth reduction, altered morphology, viability loss) and slighter increase in nitration level compared to B. juncea. Based on these, the organs of Brassica species reacted differentially to excess zinc, since in the shoot system modification of the nitration pattern occurred (with newly appeared nitrated protein bands), while in the roots, a general increment in the nitroproteome could be observed (the intensification of the same protein bands being present in the control samples). It can be assumed that the significant alteration of nitration pattern is coupled with enhanced zinc sensitivity of the Brassica shoot system and the general intensification of protein nitration in the roots is attached to relative zinc endurance.

  9. In vivo modification of tyrosine residues in recombinant mussel adhesive protein by tyrosinase co-expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In nature, mussel adhesive proteins (MAPs) show remarkable adhesive properties, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Thus, they have been considered promising adhesive biomaterials for various biomedical and industrial applications. However, limited production of natural MAPs has hampered their practical applications. Recombinant production in bacterial cells could be one alternative to obtain useable amounts of MAPs, although additional post-translational modification of tyrosine residues into 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (Dopa) and Dopaquinone is required. The superior properties of MAPs are mainly attributed to the introduction of quinone-derived intermolecular cross-links. To solve this problem, we utilized a co-expression strategy of recombinant MAP and tyrosinase in Escherichia coli to successfully modify tyrosine residues in vivo. Results A recombinant hybrid MAP, fp-151, was used as a target for in vivo modification, and a dual vector system of pET and pACYC-Duet provided co-expression of fp-151 and tyrosinase. As a result, fp-151 was over-expressed and mainly obtained from the soluble fraction in the co-expression system. Without tyrosinase co-expression, fp-151 was over-expressed in an insoluble form in inclusion bodies. The modification of tyrosine residues in the soluble-expressed fp-151 was clearly observed from nitroblue tetrazolium staining and liquid-chromatography-mass/mass spectrometry analyses. The purified, in vivo modified, fp-151 from the co-expression system showed approximately 4-fold higher bulk-scale adhesive strength compared to in vitro tyrosinase-treated fp-151. Conclusion Here, we reported a co-expression system to obtain in vivo modified MAP; additional in vitro tyrosinase modification was not needed to obtain adhesive properties and the in vivo modified MAP showed superior adhesive strength compared to in vitro modified protein. It is expected that this co-expression strategy will accelerate the use of functional MAPs in

  10. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling is coupled to src family kinase activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein tyrosine kinase (PT...

  11. Cryopreservation-induced alterations in protein tyrosine phosphorylation of spermatozoa from different portions of the boar ejaculate.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Siqueira, A P; Hossain, M S; Bergqvist, A S

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that boar sperm quality after cryopreservation differs depending on the ejaculate fraction used and that spermatozoa contained in the first 10mL (P1) of the sperm-rich fraction (SRF) show better cryosurvival than those in the SRF-P1. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) in spermatozoa is related with the tolerance of spermatozoa to frozen storage and cryocapacitation, we assessed the dynamics of cryopreservation-induced PTP and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in spermatozoa, using flow cytometry, from P1 and SRF-P1 of the boar ejaculate at different stages of cryopreservation. Sperm kinetics, assessed using a computer-assisted semen analyzer, did not differ between P1 and SRF-P1 during cryopreservation but the decrease in sperm velocity during cryopreservation was significant (P<0.05) in SRF-P1 compared to P1. There were no significant differences in percentages of spermatozoa with high [Ca(2+)]i between P1 and SRF-P1 in fresh as well as in frozen-thawed semen. A higher (P<0.001) proportion of spermatozoa displayed PTP during the course of cryopreservation indicating a definite effect of the cryopreservation process on sperm PTP. The proportion of spermatozoa with PTP did not differ significantly between portions of the boar ejaculate. However at any given step during cryopreservation the percentage of spermatozoa with PTP was comparatively higher in SRF-P1 than P1. A 32kDa tyrosine phosphorylated protein, associated with capacitation, appeared after cooling suggesting that cooling induces capacitation-like changes in boar spermatozoa. In conclusion, the study has shown that the cryopreservation process induced PTP in spermatozoa and their proportions were similar between portions of SRF. PMID:21893053

  12. Src-family protein tyrosine kinase phosphorylates WNK4 and modulates its inhibitory effect on KCNJ1 (ROMK)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Yue, Peng; Yarborough, Orlando; Scholl, Ute I.; Giebisch, Gerhard; Lifton, Richard P.; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    With-no-lysine kinase 4 (WNK4) inhibits the activity of the potassium channel KCNJ1 (ROMK) in the distal nephron, thereby contributing to the maintenance of potassium homeostasis. This effect is inhibited via phosphorylation at Ser1196 by serum/glucocorticoid-induced kinase 1 (SGK1), and this inhibition is attenuated by the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK). Using Western blot and mass spectrometry, we now identify three sites in WNK4 that are phosphorylated by c-Src: Tyr1092, Tyr1094, and Tyr1143, and show that both c-Src and protein tyrosine phosphatase type 1D (PTP-1D) coimmunoprecipitate with WNK4. Mutation of Tyr1092 or Tyr1143 to phenylalanine decreased the association of c-Src or PTP-1D with WNK4, respectively. Moreover, the Tyr1092Phe mutation markedly reduced ROMK inhibition by WNK4; this inhibition was completely absent in the double mutant WNK4Y1092/1094F. Similarly, c-Src prevented SGK1-induced phosphorylation of WNK4 at Ser1196, an effect that was abrogated in the double mutant. WNK4Y1143F inhibited ROMK activity as potently as wild-type (WT) WNK4, but unlike WT, the inhibitory effect of WNK4Y1143F could not be reversed by SGK1. The failure to reverse WNK4Y1143F-induced inhibition of ROMK by SGK1 was possibly due to enhancing endogenous SFK effect on WNK4 by decreasing the WNK4–PTP-1D association because inhibition of SFK enabled SGK1 to reverse WNK4Y1143F-induced inhibition of ROMK. We conclude that WNK4 is a substrate of SFKs and that the association of c-Src and PTP-1D with WNK4 at Tyr1092 and Tyr1143 plays an important role in modulating the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK. PMID:25805816

  13. Src-family protein tyrosine kinase phosphorylates WNK4 and modulates its inhibitory effect on KCNJ1 (ROMK).

    PubMed

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Yue, Peng; Yarborough, Orlando; Scholl, Ute I; Giebisch, Gerhard; Lifton, Richard P; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2015-04-01

    With-no-lysine kinase 4 (WNK4) inhibits the activity of the potassium channel KCNJ1 (ROMK) in the distal nephron, thereby contributing to the maintenance of potassium homeostasis. This effect is inhibited via phosphorylation at Ser1196 by serum/glucocorticoid-induced kinase 1 (SGK1), and this inhibition is attenuated by the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK). Using Western blot and mass spectrometry, we now identify three sites in WNK4 that are phosphorylated by c-Src: Tyr(1092), Tyr(1094), and Tyr(1143), and show that both c-Src and protein tyrosine phosphatase type 1D (PTP-1D) coimmunoprecipitate with WNK4. Mutation of Tyr(1092) or Tyr(1143) to phenylalanine decreased the association of c-Src or PTP-1D with WNK4, respectively. Moreover, the Tyr1092Phe mutation markedly reduced ROMK inhibition by WNK4; this inhibition was completely absent in the double mutant WNK4(Y1092/1094F). Similarly, c-Src prevented SGK1-induced phosphorylation of WNK4 at Ser(1196), an effect that was abrogated in the double mutant. WNK4(Y1143F) inhibited ROMK activity as potently as wild-type (WT) WNK4, but unlike WT, the inhibitory effect of WNK4(Y1143F) could not be reversed by SGK1. The failure to reverse WNK4(Y1143F)-induced inhibition of ROMK by SGK1 was possibly due to enhancing endogenous SFK effect on WNK4 by decreasing the WNK4-PTP-1D association because inhibition of SFK enabled SGK1 to reverse WNK4(Y1143F)-induced inhibition of ROMK. We conclude that WNK4 is a substrate of SFKs and that the association of c-Src and PTP-1D with WNK4 at Tyr(1092) and Tyr(1143) plays an important role in modulating the inhibitory effect of WNK4 on ROMK. PMID:25805816

  14. ER-Bound Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B Interacts with Src at the Plasma Membrane/Substrate Interface

    PubMed Central

    Burdisso, Juan E.; Conde, Cecilia; Cáceres, Alfredo; Arregui, Carlos O.

    2012-01-01

    PTP1B is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchored enzyme whose access to substrates is partly dependent on the ER distribution and dynamics. One of these substrates, the protein tyrosine kinase Src, has been found in the cytosol, endosomes, and plasma membrane. Here we analyzed where PTP1B and Src physically interact in intact cells, by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) in combination with temporal and high resolution microscopy. We also determined the structural basis of this interaction. We found that BiFC signal is displayed as puncta scattered throughout the ER network, a feature that was enhanced when the substrate trapping mutant PTP1B-D181A was used. Time-lapse and co-localization analyses revealed that BiFC puncta did not correspond to vesicular carriers; instead they localized at the tip of dynamic ER tubules. BiFC puncta were retained in ventral membrane preparations after cell unroofing and were also detected within the evanescent field of total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRFM) associated to the ventral membranes of whole cells. Furthermore, BiFC puncta often colocalized with dark spots seen by surface reflection interference contrast (SRIC). Removal of Src myristoylation and polybasic motifs abolished BiFC. In addition, PTP1B active site and negative regulatory tyrosine 529 on Src were primary determinants of BiFC occurrence, although the SH3 binding motif on PTP1B also played a role. Our results suggest that ER-bound PTP1B dynamically interacts with the negative regulatory site at the C-terminus of Src at random puncta in the plasma membrane/substrate interface, likely leading to Src activation and recruitment to adhesion complexes. We postulate that this functional ER/plasma membrane crosstalk could apply to a wide array of protein partners, opening an exciting field of research. PMID:22701734

  15. Protein nitration in cutaneous inflammation in the rat: essential role of inducible nitric oxide synthase and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Greenacre, S A B; Rocha, F A C; Rawlingson, A; Meinerikandathevan, S; Poston, R N; Ruiz, E; Halliwell, B; Brain, S D

    2002-01-01

    We have examined the relationship between neutrophil accumulation, NO• production and nitrated protein levels in zymosan-mediated inflammation in rat skin in vivo. Rats were anaesthetized and cutaneous inflammation was induced by zymosan (injected intradermally, i.d.). Experiments were carried out up to 48 h, in recovery procedures as appropriate. Assays for neutrophil accumulation (measurement of myeloperoxidase), nitric oxide (assessment of NO2−/NO3−) and nitrated proteins (detected by ELISA and Western blot) were performed in skin extracts. The results demonstrate a close temporal relationship between these parameters. Samples were assayed at 1, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h after i.d. injection of zymosan. The highest levels measured of each parameter (P<0.001 compared with vehicle) were found at 4–8 h, with a reduction towards basal levels by 24 h. Selective depletion of circulating neutrophils with anti-neutrophil antibody abolished neutrophil accumulation and protein nitration. In addition substantially decreased NO levels were found. A selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, N-3-aminomethyl-benzyl-acetamidine-dihydrochloride (1400W) also significantly reduced neutrophil levels and NO production and substantially inhibited protein nitration. We conclude that the neutrophil leukocyte plays an essential role in the formation of iNOS-derived NO and nitrated proteins in inflammation, in a time-dependent and reversible manner. The NO-derived iNOS also has a role in stimulating further neutrophil accumulation into skin. This suggests a close mechanistic coupling between neutrophils, NO production and protein nitration. PMID:12145098

  16. Epidermal growth factor, but not insulin, stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of an endogenous protein of Mr 95,000 in triton extracts of human placental syncytiotrophoblast membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tavaré, J M; Diggle, T A; Denton, R M

    1987-01-01

    1. Triton extracts of syncytiotrophoblast membranes were incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, MgCl2 and MnCl2. Addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) resulted in increased phosphorylation not only of the EGF receptor and a Mr-35,000 protein as previously described, but also a protein of Mr 95,000 on both tyrosine and serine residues. In addition, a small increase in the phosphorylation of a protein of Mr 105,000 was observed. Spermine had a similar effect on the phosphorylation of the Mr-95,000 protein, without affecting the phosphorylation of the other proteins. In the absence of MnCl2, the effect of spermine on the phosphorylation of Mr-95,000 protein was still evident, whereas that of EGF was greatly diminished. 2. The Mr-95,000 protein bound poorly to wheat-germ-lectin-Sepharose and was not precipitated by antisera specific for insulin and EGF receptors. The protein continued to exhibit serine and tyrosine phosphorylation on addition of [gamma-32P]ATP, MgCl2 and MnCl2 to a glycoprotein-depleted fraction prepared by chromatography on wheat-germ-lectin-Sepharose. The extent of phosphorylation was no longer increased by spermine or EGF, but was inhibited by heparin. 3. It is suggested that the Mr-95,000 protein not only is a possible direct substrate for the EGF-receptor (but not the insulin receptor) tyrosine kinase but is a substrate for other endogenous kinases, including a protein tyrosine kinase which is probably not a glycoprotein, and a protein serine kinase with properties similar to those of casein kinase II. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3328613

  17. ANSID: a Solid-Phase Proteomic Approach for Identification and Relative Quantification of Aromatic Nitration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Tal; Whitehouse, Julia; Ma, Yuliang; Mercer, Emily; Brown, Neil; Gross, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Nitration of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acid residues in proteins occurs in the setting of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases – importantly, this modification has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases and the physiological process of tissue aging. To understand the biological consequences of aromatic nitration in both health and disease, it is critical to molecularly identify the proteins that undergo nitration, specify their cognate modification sites and quantify their extent of nitration. To date, unbiased identification of nitrated proteins has painstakingly employed 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by Western Blotting with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody for detection. Apart from being relatively slow and laborious, this method suffers from limited coverage, the potential for false-positive identifications and failure to reveal specific amino acid modification sites. To overcome these shortcomings, we have developed a solid-phase, chemical-capture approach for unbiased and high-throughput discovery of nitrotyrosine and nitrotryptophan sites in proteins. Utilizing this method, we have successfully identified several endogenously nitrated proteins in rat brain and a total of 244 nitrated peptides from 145 proteins following in vitro exposure of rat brain homogenates to the nitrating agent peroxynitrite (1 mM). As expected, Tyr residues constituted the great majority of peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration sites; however, we were surprised to discover several brain proteins that contain nitrated Trp residues. By incorporating a stable-isotope labeling step, this new Aromatic Nitrtion Site IDentification (ANSID) method was also adapted for relative quantification of nitration site abundances in proteins. Application of the quantitative ANSID method offers great potential to advance our understanding of the role of protein nitration in disease pathogenesis and normal physiology.

  18. ANSID: a Solid-Phase Proteomic Approach for Identification and Relative Quantification of Aromatic Nitration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Tal; Whitehouse, Julia; Ma, Yuliang; Mercer, Emily; Brown, Neil; Gross, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Nitration of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acid residues in proteins occurs in the setting of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases - importantly, this modification has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases and the physiological process of tissue aging. To understand the biological consequences of aromatic nitration in both health and disease, it is critical to molecularly identify the proteins that undergo nitration, specify their cognate modification sites and quantify their extent of nitration. To date, unbiased identification of nitrated proteins has painstakingly employed 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by Western Blotting with an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody for detection. Apart from being relatively slow and laborious, this method suffers from limited coverage, the potential for false-positive identifications and failure to reveal specific amino acid modification sites. To overcome these shortcomings, we have developed a solid-phase, chemical-capture approach for unbiased and high-throughput discovery of nitrotyrosine and nitrotryptophan sites in proteins. Utilizing this method, we have successfully identified several endogenously nitrated proteins in rat brain and a total of 244 nitrated peptides from 145 proteins following in vitro exposure of rat brain homogenates to the nitrating agent peroxynitrite (1 mM). As expected, Tyr residues constituted the great majority of peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration sites; however, we were surprised to discover several brain proteins that contain nitrated Trp residues. By incorporating a stable-isotope labeling step, this new Aromatic Nitrtion Site IDentification (ANSID) method was also adapted for relative quantification of nitration site abundances in proteins. Application of the quantitative ANSID method offers great potential to advance our understanding of the role of protein nitration in disease pathogenesis and normal physiology.

  19. SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on days...

  20. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide increases tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins and opens the paracellular pathway in lung microvascular endothelia through TLR4, TRAF6, and src family kinase activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: LPS is a key mediator in vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections and opens the pulmonary vascular endothelial paracellular pathway through protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activation. We asked which PTKs and signaling molecules mediate LPS-induced endothel...

  1. Src family protein tyrosine kinase regulates the basolateral K channel in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) by phosphorylation of KCNJ10 protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengbiao; Wang, Lijun; Thomas, Sherin; Wang, Kemeng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Rinehart, Jesse; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2013-09-01

    The loss of function of the basolateral K channels in the distal nephron causes electrolyte imbalance. The aim of this study is to examine the role of Src family protein tyrosine kinase (SFK) in regulating K channels in the basolateral membrane of the mouse initial distal convoluted tubule (DCT1). Single-channel recordings confirmed that the 40-picosiemen (pS) K channel was the only type of K channel in the basolateral membrane of DCT1. The suppression of SFK reversibly inhibited the basolateral 40-pS K channel activity in cell-attached patches and decreased the Ba(2+)-sensitive whole-cell K currents in DCT1. Inhibition of SFK also shifted the K reversal potential from -65 to -43 mV, suggesting a role of SFK in determining the membrane potential in DCT1. Western blot analysis showed that KCNJ10 (Kir4.1), a key component of the basolateral 40-pS K channel in DCT1, was a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein. LC/MS analysis further confirmed that SFK phosphorylated KCNJ10 at Tyr(8) and Tyr(9). The single-channel recording detected the activity of a 19-pS K channel in KCNJ10-transfected HEK293T cells and a 40-pS K channel in the cells transfected with KCNJ10+KCNJ16 (Kir.5.1) that form a heterotetramer in the basolateral membrane of the DCT. Mutation of Tyr(9) did not alter the channel conductance of the homotetramer and heterotetramer. However, it decreased the whole-cell K currents, the probability of finding K channels, and surface expression of KCNJ10 in comparison to WT KCNJ10. We conclude that SFK stimulates the basolateral K channel activity in DCT1, at least partially, by phosphorylating Tyr(9) on KCNJ10. We speculate that the modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of KCNJ10 should play a role in regulating membrane transport function in DCT1.

  2. Systematic analysis of the in situ crosstalk of tyrosine modifications reveals no additional natural selection on multiply modified residues

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhicheng; Liu, Zexian; Cheng, Han; Wang, Yongbo; Gao, Tianshun; Ullah, Shahid; Ren, Jian; Xue, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that different post-translational modifications (PTMs) synergistically orchestrate specific biological processes by crosstalks. However, the preference of the crosstalk among different PTMs and the evolutionary constraint on the PTM crosstalk need further dissections. In this study, the in situ crosstalk at the same positions among three tyrosine PTMs including sulfation, nitration and phosphorylation were systematically analyzed. The experimentally identified sulfation, nitration and phosphorylation sites were collected and integrated with reliable predictions to perform large-scale analyses of in situ crosstalks. From the results, we observed that the in situ crosstalk between sulfation and nitration is significantly under-represented, whereas both sulfation and nitration prefer to co-occupy with phosphorylation at same tyrosines. Further analyses suggested that sulfation and nitration preferentially co-occur with phosphorylation at specific positions in proteins, and participate in distinct biological processes and functions. More interestingly, the long-term evolutionary analysis indicated that multi-PTM targeting tyrosines didn't show any higher conservation than singly modified ones. Also, the analysis of human genetic variations demonstrated that there is no additional functional constraint on inherited disease, cancer or rare mutations of multiply modified tyrosines. Taken together, our systematic analyses provided a better understanding of the in situ crosstalk among PTMs. PMID:25476580

  3. Fibulin 2, a Tyrosine O-Sulfated Protein, Is Up-regulated Following Retinal Detachment*

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Yogita; Brobst, Daniel; Han, Zongchao; Naash, Muna I.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal detachment is the physical separation of the retina from the retinal pigment epithelium. It occurs during aging, trauma, or during a variety of retinal disorders such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, or as a complication following cataract surgery. This report investigates the role of fibulin 2, an extracellular component, in retinal detachment. A major mechanism for detachment resolution is enhancement of cellular adhesion between the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium and prevention of its cellular migration. This report shows that fibulin 2 is mainly present in the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch membrane, choriocapillary, and to a lesser degree in the retina. In vitro studies revealed the presence of two isoforms for fibulin 2. The small isoform is located inside the cell, and the large isoform is present inside and outside the cells. Furthermore, fibulin 2 is post-translationally modified by tyrosine sulfation, and the sulfated isoform is present outside the cell, whereas the unsulfated pool is internally located. Interestingly, sulfated fibulin 2 significantly reduced the rate of cellular growth and migration. Finally, levels of fibulin 2 dramatically increased in the retinal pigment epithelium following retinal detachment, suggesting a direct role for fibulin 2 in the re-attachment of the retina to the retinal pigment epithelium. Understanding the role of fibulin 2 in enhancing retinal attachment is likely to help improve the current therapies or allow the development of new strategies for the treatment of this sight-threatening condition. PMID:24692557

  4. Light-switched inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B based on phosphonocarbonyl phenylalanine as photoactive phosphotyrosine mimetic.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan; Schütz, Anja; Rademann, Jörg

    2015-06-15

    Phosphopeptide mimetics containing the 4-phosphonocarbonyl phenylalanine (pcF) as a photo-active phosphotyrosine isoster are developed as potent, light-switchable inhibitors of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B. The photo-active inhibitors 6-10 are derived from phosphopeptide substrates and are prepared from the suitably protected pcF building block 12 by Fmoc-based solid phase peptide synthesis. All pcF-containing peptides are moderate inhibitors of PTP1B with KI values between 10 and 50μM. Irradiation of the inhibitors at 365nm in the presence of the protein PTP1B amplify the inhibitory activity of pcF-peptides up to 120-fold, switching the KI values of the best inhibitors to the sub-micromolar range. Photo-activation of the inhibitors results in the formation of triplet intermediates of the benzoylphosphonate moiety, which deactivate PTP1B following an oxidative radical mechanism. Deactivation of PTP1B proceeds without covalent crosslinking of the protein target with the photo-switched inhibitors and can be reverted by subsequent addition of reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT).

  5. Inactivation and unfolding of protein tyrosine phosphatase from Thermus thermophilus HB27 during urea and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yejing; He, Huawei; Liu, Lina; Gao, Chunyan; Xu, Shui; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) on the activity, conformation and unfolding process of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), a thermostable low molecular weight protein from Thermus thermophilus HB27, have been studied. Enzymatic activity assays showed both urea and GdnHCl resulted in the inactivation of PTPase in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Inactivation kinetics analysis suggested that the inactivation of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl were both monophasic and reversible processes, and the effects of urea and GdnHCl on PTPase were similar to that of mixed-type reversible inhibitors. Far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD), Tryptophan and 1-anilinonaphthalene -8-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence spectral analyses indicated the existence of a partially active and an inactive molten globule-like intermediate during the unfolding processes induced by urea and GdnHCl, respectively. Based on the sequence alignment and the homolog Tt1001 protein structure, we discussed the possible conformational transitions of PTPase induced by urea and GdnHCl and compared the conformations of these unfolding intermediates with the transient states in bovine PTPase and its complex structures in detail. Our results may be able to provide some valuable clues to reveal the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity, and the unfolding pathway and mechanism of PTPase. PMID:25255086

  6. Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 is required for normal timing of cell cycle progression during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ye, Diana Z; Li, Zhaoyu; Teta-Bissett, Monica; Peng, Yong; Taub, Rebecca; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2015-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 (Prl-1) is an immediate-early gene that is significantly induced during liver regeneration. Several in vitro studies have suggested that Prl-1 is important for the regulation of cell cycle progression. To evaluate its function in liver regeneration, we ablated the Prl-1 gene specifically in mouse hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. Prl-1 mutant mice (Prl-1(loxP/loxP);AlfpCre) appeared normal and fertile. Liver size and metabolic function in Prl-1 mutants were comparable to controls, indicating that Prl-1 is dispensable for liver development, postnatal growth, and hepatocyte differentiation. Mutant mice demonstrated a delay in DNA synthesis after 70% partial hepatectomy, although ultimate liver mass restoration was not affected. At 40 h posthepatectomy, reduced protein levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 were observed in Prl-1 mutant liver. Investigation of the major signaling pathways involved in liver regeneration demonstrated that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 were significantly reduced at 40 h posthepatectomy in Prl-1 mutants. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Prl-1 is required for proper timing of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Prl-1 promotes G1/S progression via modulating expression of several cell cycle regulators through activation of the AKT and STAT3 signaling pathway.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 is required for normal timing of cell cycle progression during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ye, Diana Z.; Li, Zhaoyu; Teta-Bissett, Monica; Peng, Yong; Taub, Rebecca; Greenbaum, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 (Prl-1) is an immediate-early gene that is significantly induced during liver regeneration. Several in vitro studies have suggested that Prl-1 is important for the regulation of cell cycle progression. To evaluate its function in liver regeneration, we ablated the Prl-1 gene specifically in mouse hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. Prl-1 mutant mice (Prl-1loxP/loxP;AlfpCre) appeared normal and fertile. Liver size and metabolic function in Prl-1 mutants were comparable to controls, indicating that Prl-1 is dispensable for liver development, postnatal growth, and hepatocyte differentiation. Mutant mice demonstrated a delay in DNA synthesis after 70% partial hepatectomy, although ultimate liver mass restoration was not affected. At 40 h posthepatectomy, reduced protein levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 were observed in Prl-1 mutant liver. Investigation of the major signaling pathways involved in liver regeneration demonstrated that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 were significantly reduced at 40 h posthepatectomy in Prl-1 mutants. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Prl-1 is required for proper timing of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Prl-1 promotes G1/S progression via modulating expression of several cell cycle regulators through activation of the AKT and STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25377314

  8. Protein tyrosine and serine–threonine phosphatases in the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus: Identification and potential functions

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, C.A.; Walton, K.D.; Robertson, A.J.; Carbonneau, S.; Thomason, R.T.; Coffman, J.A.; McClay, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatases, in coordination with protein kinases, play crucial roles in regulation of signaling pathways. To identify protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and serine–threonine (ser–thr) phosphatases in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome, 179 annotated sequences were studied (122 PTPs, 57 ser–thr phosphatases). Sequence analysis identified 91 phosphatases (33 conventional PTPs, 31 dual specificity phosphatases, 1 Class III Cysteine-based PTP, 1 Asp-based PTP, and 25 ser–thr phosphatases). Using catalytic sites, levels of conservation and constraint in amino acid sequence were examined. Nine of 25 receptor PTPs (RPTPs) corresponded to human, nematode, or fly homologues. Domain structure revealed that sea urchin-specific RPTPs including two, PTPRLec and PTPRscav, may act in immune defense. Embryonic transcription of each phosphatase was recorded from a high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray experiment. Most RPTPs are expressed at very low levels, whereas nonreceptor PTPs (NRPTPs) are generally expressed at moderate levels. High expression was detected in MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) and numerous ser–thr phosphatases. For several expressed NRPTPs, MKPs, and ser–thr phosphatases, morpholino antisense-mediated knockdowns were performed and phenotypes obtained. Finally, to assess roles of annotated phosphatases in endomesoderm formation, a literature review of phosphatase functions in model organisms was superimposed on sea urchin developmental pathways to predict areas of functional activity. PMID:17087928

  9. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ) in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smart, Chanel E; Askarian Amiri, Marjan E; Wronski, Ania; Dinger, Marcel E; Crawford, Joanna; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Vargas, Ana Cristina; Reid, Lynne; Simpson, Peter T; Song, Sarah; Wiesner, Christiane; French, Juliet D; Dave, Richa K; da Silva, Leonard; Purdon, Amy; Andrew, Megan; Mattick, John S; Lakhani, Sunil R; Brown, Melissa A; Kellie, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  10. Stimulation of the alveolar macrophage respiratory burst by ADP causes selective glutathionylation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Rinna, Alessandra; Torres, Martine; Forman, Henry Jay

    2006-07-01

    H(2)O(2) produced by stimulation of the macrophage NADPH oxidase is involved both in bacterial killing and as a second messenger in these cells. Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are targets for H(2)O(2) signaling through oxidation of their catalytic cysteine, resulting in inhibition of their activity. Here, we show that, in the rat alveolar macrophage NR8383 cell line, H(2)O(2) produced through the ADP-stimulated respiratory burst induces the formation of a disulfide bond between PTP1B and GSH that was detectable with an antibody to glutathione-protein complexes and was reversed by DTT addition. PTP1B glutathionylation was dependent on H(2)O(2) as the presence of catalase at the time of ADP stimulation inhibited the formation of the conjugate. Interestingly, other PTPs, i.e., SHP-1 and SHP-2, did not undergo glutathionylation in response to ADP stimulation of the respiratory burst, although glutathionylation of these proteins could be shown by reaction with 25 mM glutathione disulfide in vitro. While previous studies have suggested the reversible oxidation of PTP1B during signaling or showed PTP1B glutathionylation in vitro, the present study directly demonstrates that physiological stimulation of H(2)O(2) production results in PTP1B glutathionylation in intact cells, which may affect downstream signaling.

  11. Dynamic gene and protein expression patterns of the autism-associated Met receptor tyrosine kinase in the developing mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Matthew C.; Bergman, Mica Y.; Campbell, Daniel B.; Eagleson, Kathie L.; Levitt, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of appropriate neural circuitry depends upon the coordination of multiple developmental events across space and time. These events include proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival - all of which can be mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling through the Met receptor tyrosine kinase. We previously found a functional promoter variant of the MET gene to be associated with autism spectrum disorder, suggesting that forebrain circuits governing social and emotional function may be especially vulnerable to developmental disruptions in HGF/Met signaling. However, little is known about the spatiotemporal distribution of Met expression in the forebrain during the development of such circuits. To advance our understanding of the neurodevelopmental influences of Met activation, we employed complementary Western blotting, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to comprehensively map Met transcript and protein expression throughout perinatal and postnatal development of the mouse forebrain. Our studies reveal complex and dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of expression during this period. Spatially, Met transcript is localized primarily to specific populations of projection neurons within the neocortex and in structures of the limbic system, including the amygdala, hippocampus and septum. Met protein appears to be principally located in axon tracts. Temporally, peak expression of transcript and protein occurs during the second postnatal week. This period is characterized by extensive neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, supporting a role for the receptor in these processes. Collectively, these data suggest that Met signaling may be necessary for the appropriate wiring of forebrain circuits with particular relevance to social and emotional dimensions of behavior. PMID:19226509

  12. Tyrosine Binding Protein Sites Regulate the Intracellular Trafficking and Processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein through a Novel Lysosome-Directed Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cobb, M. Rebecca; Seah, Claudia; Pasternak, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis posits that the production of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline associated with AD. Aβ is produced by sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretase. While nascent APP is well known to transit to the endosomal/ lysosomal system via the cell surface, we have recently shown that APP can also traffic to lysosomes intracellularly via its interaction with AP-3. Because AP-3 interacts with cargo protein via interaction with tyrosine motifs, we mutated the three tyrosines motif in the cytoplasmic tail of APP. Here, we show that the YTSI motif interacts with AP-3, and phosphorylation of the serine in this motif disrupts the interaction and decreases APP trafficking to lysosomes. Furthermore, we show that phosphorylation at this motif can decrease the production of neurotoxic Aβ 42. This demonstrates that reducing APP trafficking to lysosomes may be a strategy to reduce Aβ 42 in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27776132

  13. The CD4 and CD8 antigens are coupled to a protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck) that phosphorylates the CD3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, E K; Dasgupta, J D; Schlossman, S F; Trevillyan, J M; Rudd, C E

    1989-01-01

    Many mammalian receptors have been found to regulate cell growth by virtue of a protein-tyrosine kinase domain in their cytoplasmic tail. We recently described an association of the CD4 antigen with a T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck; formerly termed pp58lck; EC 2.7.1.112). This interaction represents a potential mechanism by which T-cell growth may be regulated and offers a model by which other members of the src family (products of c-src, c-yes, c-fgr, etc.) may interact with mammalian growth factor receptors. As in the case of the CD4 antigen, the CD8 antigen appears to serve as a receptor for nonpolymorphic regions of products of the major histocompatibility complex and has been implicated in the regulation of T-cell growth. In this study, we reveal that the human CD8 antigen is also associated with the T-cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (p56lck). The associated p56lck kinase was detected by use of both in vitro and in vivo labeling regimes using an antiserum to the C terminus of p56lck. Two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH-gradient gel electrophoresis and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated the similarity of p56lck to the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the CD4 antigen. The catalytic activity of p56lck was revealed by the autophosphorylation of the 55- to 60-kDa kinase and the occasional labeling of a 35-kDa protein. Last, we demonstrate directly that members of the CD3 complex, including the gamma, delta, and epsilon chains, as well as a putative zeta subunit, can be phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by the CD4/CD8.p56lck complex. Images PMID:2470098

  14. RTK SLAP down: the emerging role of Src-like adaptor protein as a key player in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Wybenga-Groot, Leanne E; McGlade, C Jane

    2015-02-01

    SLAP (Src like adaptor protein) contains adjacent Src homology 3 (SH3) and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains closely related in sequence to that of cytoplasmic Src family tyrosine kinases. Expressed most abundantly in the immune system, SLAP function has been predominantly studied in the context of lymphocyte signaling, where it functions in the Cbl dependent downregulation of antigen receptor signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests that SLAP plays a role in the regulation of a broad range of membrane receptors including members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family. In this review we highlight the role of SLAP in the ubiquitin dependent regulation of type III RTKs PDGFR, CSF-1R, KIT and Flt3, as well as Eph family RTKs. SLAP appears to bind activated type III and Eph RTKs via a conserved autophosphorylated juxtamembrane tyrosine motif in an SH2-dependent manner, suggesting that SLAP is important in regulating RTK signaling.

  15. Identification of genomic regions that interact with a viable allele of the Drosophila protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew.

    PubMed Central

    Firth, L; Manchester, J; Lorenzen, J A; Baron, M; Perkins, L A

    2000-01-01

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is critical for a multitude of developmental decisions and processes. Among the molecules known to transduce the RTK-generated signal is the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Previously, Csw has been demonstrated to function throughout the Drosophila life cycle and, among the RTKs tested, Csw is essential in the Torso, Sevenless, EGF, and Breathless/FGF RTK pathways. While the biochemical function of Csw remains to be unambiguously elucidated, current evidence suggests that Csw plays more than one role during transduction of the RTK signal and, further, the molecular mechanism of Csw function differs depending upon the RTK in question. The isolation and characterization of a new, spontaneously arising, viable allele of csw, csw(lf), has allowed us to undertake a genetic approach to identify loci required for Csw function. The rough eye and wing vein gap phenotypes exhibited by adult flies homo- or hemizygous for csw(lf) has provided a sensitized background from which we have screened a collection of second and third chromosome deficiencies to identify 33 intervals that enhance and 21 intervals that suppress these phenotypes. We have identified intervals encoding known positive mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., drk, dos, Egfr, E(Egfr)B56, pnt, Ras1, rolled/MAPK, sina, spen, Src64B, Star, Su(Raf)3C, and vein, as well as known negative mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., aos, ed, net, Src42A, sty, and su(ve). Of particular interest are the 5 lethal enhancing intervals and 14 suppressing intervals for which no candidate genes have been identified. PMID:11014820

  16. Loss of protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 potentiates epidermal growth factor suppression of intestinal epithelial chloride secretion.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Michael; Rudenko, Ivan; McCole, Declan F

    2010-10-01

    The Crohn's disease candidate gene, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 2 (PTPN2), has been shown to regulate epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation in fibroblasts. In intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), EGF-induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation and recruitment of PI3K play a key role in regulating many cellular functions including Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. Moreover, EGFR also serves as a conduit for signaling by other non-growth factor receptor ligands such as the proinflammatory cytokine, IFN-γ. Here we investigated a possible role for PTPN2 in the regulation of EGFR signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion in IECs. PTPN2 knockdown enhanced EGF-induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation in T(84) cells. In particular, PTPN2 knockdown promoted EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR residues Tyr-992 and Tyr-1068 and led subsequently to increased association of the catalytic PI3K subunit, p110, with EGFR and elevated phosphorylation of the downstream marker, Akt. As a functional consequence, loss of PTPN2 potentiated EGF-induced inhibition of carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion. In contrast, PTPN2 knockdown affected neither IFN-γ-induced EGFR transactivation nor EGF- or IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2. In summary, our data establish a role for PTPN2 in the regulation of EGFR signaling in IECs in response to EGF but not IFN-γ. Knockdown of PTPN2 directs EGFR signaling toward increased PI3K activation and increased suppression of epithelial chloride secretory responses. Moreover, our findings suggest that PTPN2 dysfunction in IECs leads to altered control of intestinal epithelial functions regulated by EGFR. PMID:20689057

  17. Identification of genomic regions that interact with a viable allele of the Drosophila protein tyrosine phosphatase corkscrew.

    PubMed

    Firth, L; Manchester, J; Lorenzen, J A; Baron, M; Perkins, L A

    2000-10-01

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is critical for a multitude of developmental decisions and processes. Among the molecules known to transduce the RTK-generated signal is the nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Previously, Csw has been demonstrated to function throughout the Drosophila life cycle and, among the RTKs tested, Csw is essential in the Torso, Sevenless, EGF, and Breathless/FGF RTK pathways. While the biochemical function of Csw remains to be unambiguously elucidated, current evidence suggests that Csw plays more than one role during transduction of the RTK signal and, further, the molecular mechanism of Csw function differs depending upon the RTK in question. The isolation and characterization of a new, spontaneously arising, viable allele of csw, csw(lf), has allowed us to undertake a genetic approach to identify loci required for Csw function. The rough eye and wing vein gap phenotypes exhibited by adult flies homo- or hemizygous for csw(lf) has provided a sensitized background from which we have screened a collection of second and third chromosome deficiencies to identify 33 intervals that enhance and 21 intervals that suppress these phenotypes. We have identified intervals encoding known positive mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., drk, dos, Egfr, E(Egfr)B56, pnt, Ras1, rolled/MAPK, sina, spen, Src64B, Star, Su(Raf)3C, and vein, as well as known negative mediators of RTK signaling, e.g., aos, ed, net, Src42A, sty, and su(ve). Of particular interest are the 5 lethal enhancing intervals and 14 suppressing intervals for which no candidate genes have been identified. PMID:11014820

  18. Quantification of kinetic changes in protein tyrosine phosphorylation and cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration in boar spermatozoa during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Siqueira, A P; Hossain, M S; Johannisson, A; Eriksson, I; Wallgren, M; Bergqvist, A S

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm is associated with capacitation in several mammalian species. Although tyrosine phosphorylated proteins have been demonstrated in cryopreserved sperm, indicating capacitation-like changes during cryopreservation, these changes have not yet been quantified objectively. We monitored tyrosine phosphorylation, intracellular calcium and sperm kinematics throughout the cryopreservation process, and studied the relationships among them in boar spermatozoa. Sperm kinetics changed significantly during cryopreservation: curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and straight line velocity all decreased significantly (P < 0.05). While the percentage of sperm with high intracellular calcium declined (P < 0.05), global phosphorylation increased significantly (P < 0.01). Specifically, cooling to 5 °C induced phosphorylation in the spermatozoa. After cooling, a 32-kDa protein not observed in fresh semen appeared and was consistently present throughout the cryopreservation process. While the level of expression of this phosphoprotein decreased after addition of the second extender, frozen-thawed spermatozoa showed an increased expression. The proportion of sperm cells with phosphorylation in the acrosomal area also increased significantly (P < 0.05) during cryopreservation, indicating that phosphorylation might be associated with capacitation-like changes. These results provide the first quantitative evidence of dynamic changes in the subpopulation of boar spermatozoa undergoing tyrosine phosphorylation during cryopreservation. PMID:22541541

  19. Prognostic value of protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) for long-term survival of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Aubele, M; Walch, A K; Ludyga, N; Braselmann, H; Atkinson, M J; Luber, B; Auer, G; Tapio, S; Cooke, T; Bartlett, J M S

    2008-10-01

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase PTK6 (BRK) shows elevated expression in approximately two-thirds of primary breast tumours, and is implicated in EGF receptor-dependent signalling and epithelial tumorigenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, we performed a retrospective study on 426 archival breast cancer samples from patients with long-term follow-up and compared the protein expression levels of PTK6, the HER receptors, Sam68 (a substrate of PTK6), and signalling proteins including MAP kinase (MAPK), phosphorylated MAPK (P-MAPK), and PTEN. We show that PTK6 expression is of significant prognostic value in the outcome of breast carcinomas. In multivariate analysis, the disease-free survival of patients of >or=240 months was directly associated with the protein expression level of PTK6 (Pproteins, we used protein extracts from the T47D cell line for immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. By this, interactions could be demonstrated between PTK6 and MAPK, P-MAPK, HER2/neu, HER3, HER4, PTEN, and Sam68. On the basis of these results, we suggest that PTK6 may serve as a future target for the development of novel treatments in breast cancer.

  20. Prognostic value of protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) for long-term survival of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aubele, M; Walch, A K; Ludyga, N; Braselmann, H; Atkinson, M J; Luber, B; Auer, G; Tapio, S; Cooke, T; Bartlett, J M S

    2008-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase PTK6 (BRK) shows elevated expression in approximately two-thirds of primary breast tumours, and is implicated in EGF receptor-dependent signalling and epithelial tumorigenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, we performed a retrospective study on 426 archival breast cancer samples from patients with long-term follow-up and compared the protein expression levels of PTK6, the HER receptors, Sam68 (a substrate of PTK6), and signalling proteins including MAP kinase (MAPK), phosphorylated MAPK (P-MAPK), and PTEN. We show that PTK6 expression is of significant prognostic value in the outcome of breast carcinomas. In multivariate analysis, the disease-free survival of patients of ⩾240 months was directly associated with the protein expression level of PTK6 (P⩽0.001), but was also inversely associated with nodal status (P⩽0.001) and tumour size (P⩽0.01). PTK6 expression in tumour tissue significantly correlated (P⩽0.05) with the expression of PTEN, MAPK, P-MAPK, and Sam68. To investigate whether these correlations may be due to molecular interactions between PTK6 and these proteins, we used protein extracts from the T47D cell line for immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. By this, interactions could be demonstrated between PTK6 and MAPK, P-MAPK, HER2/neu, HER3, HER4, PTEN, and Sam68. On the basis of these results, we suggest that PTK6 may serve as a future target for the development of novel treatments in breast cancer. PMID:18781181

  1. Effects of dietary protein concentration on ammonia volatilization, nitrate leaching, and plant nitrogen uptake from dairy manure applied to lysimeters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lysimeter experiment was designed to investigate the effects of dietary crude protein (CP) concentration on nitrate-N (NO3-N) and ammonia (NH3) losses from dairy manure applied to soil and manure N use for plant growth. Lactating dairy cows were fed diets with 16.7 (HighCP) or 14.8% (LowCP) cru...

  2. The neural receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase DPTP69D is required during periods of axon outgrowth in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Chand; Purdy, Joy

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a series of 18 chemically induced alleles of Ptp69D ranging in strength from viable to worse than null, which represent unique tools for probing the structure, function, and signaling pathway of DPTP69D. Three alleles are strongly temperature sensitive and were used to define the developmental periods requiring DPTP69D function; adult health requires DPTP69D during the mid- to late-pupal stage, eclosion requires DPTP69D during the early to mid-larval stage, and larval survival requires DPTP69D during embryogenesis. Mutations predicted to abolish the phosphatase activity of the membrane proximal D1 domain severely reduce but do not abolish DPTP69D function. Six alleles appear null; only 20% of null homozygotes pupate and <5% eclose, only to fall into the food and drown. One allele, Ptp69D(7), confers axon and viability defects more severe than those of the null phenotype. Sequence analysis predicts that Ptp69D(7) encodes a mutant protein that may bind but not release substrate. Like mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase gene Dlar, strong Ptp69D alleles cause the ISNb nerve to bypass its muscle targets. Genetic analysis reveals that the bypass defect in Dlar and Ptp69D mutants is dependent upon DPTP99A function, consistent with the hypothesis that DPTP69D and DLAR both counteract DPTP99A, allowing ISNb axons to enter their target muscle field. PMID:12807778

  3. Evidence for new homotypic and heterotypic interactions between transmembrane helices of proteins involved in receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling.

    PubMed

    Sawma, Paul; Roth, Lise; Blanchard, Cécile; Bagnard, Dominique; Crémel, Gérard; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Sturgis, James N; Hubert, Pierre

    2014-12-12

    Signaling in eukaryotic cells frequently relies on dynamic interactions of single-pass membrane receptors involving their transmembrane (TM) domains. To search for new such interactions, we have developed a bacterial two-hybrid system to screen for both homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TM helices. We have explored the dimerization of TM domains from 16 proteins involved in both receptor tyrosine kinase and neuropilin signaling. This study has revealed several new interactions. We found that the TM domain of Mucin-4, a putative intramembrane ligand for erbB2, dimerizes not only with erbB2 but also with all four members of the erbB family. In the Neuropilin/Plexin family of receptors, we showed that the TM domains of Neuropilins 1 and 2 dimerize with themselves and also with Plexin-A1, Plexin-B1, and L1CAM, but we were unable to observe interactions with several other TM domains notably those of members of the VEGF receptor family. The potentially important Neuropilin 1/Plexin-A1 interaction was confirmed using a surface plasmon resonance assay. This work shows that TM domain interactions can be highly specific. Exploring further the propensities of TM helix-helix association in cell membrane should have important practical implications related to our understanding of the structure-function of bitopic proteins' assembly and subsequent function, especially in the regulation of signal transduction. PMID:25315821

  4. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β: its role in breast cancer and associations with receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Zahnow, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of leucine-zipper transcription factors that regulate gene expression to control cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation and metabolism. Encoded by an intronless gene, C/EBPβ is expressed as several distinct protein isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, LIP) whose expression is regulated by the differential use of several in-frame translation start sites. LAP1 and LAP2 are transcriptional activators and are associated with differentiation, whereas LIP is frequently elevated in proliferative tissue and acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of transcription. However, emerging evidence suggests that LIP can serve as a transcriptional activator in some cellular contexts, and that LAP1 and LAP2 might also have unique actions. The LIP:LAP ratio is crucial for the maintenance of normal growth and development, and increases in this ratio lead to aggressive forms of breast cancer. This review discusses the regulation of C/EBPβ activity by post-translational modification, the individual actions of LAP1, LAP2 and LIP, and the functions and downstream targets that are unique to each isoform. The role of the C/EBPβ isoforms in breast cancer is discussed and emphasis is placed on their interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:19351437

  5. Oncogenic activation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase fusion protein, Tpr-Met, involves exclusion from the endocytic degradative pathway.

    PubMed

    Mak, H H L; Peschard, P; Lin, T; Naujokas, M A; Zuo, D; Park, M

    2007-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms of dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are observed in human cancers. In addition to gain-of-function, loss of negative regulation also contributes to oncogenic activation of RTKs. Negative regulation of many RTKs involves their internalization and degradation in the lysosome, a process regulated through ubiquitination. RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation, are no longer transmembrane proteins, and are predicted to escape lysosomal degradation. To test this, we used the Tpr-Met oncogene, generated following chromosomal translocation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met). Unlike Met, Tpr-Met is localized in the cytoplasm and also lacks the binding site for Cbl ubiquitin ligases. We determined whether subcellular localization of Tpr-Met, and/or loss of its Cbl-binding site, is important for oncogenic activity. Presence of a Cbl-binding site and ubiquitination of cytosolic Tpr-Met oncoproteins does not alter their transforming activity. In contrast, plasma membrane targeting allows Tpr-Met to enter the endocytic pathway, and Tpr-Met transforming activity as well as protein stability are decreased in a Cbl-dependent manner. We show that transformation by Tpr-Met is in part dependent on its ability to escape normal downregulatory mechanisms. This provides a paradigm for many RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation.

  6. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K.; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell–ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression. PMID:26446841

  7. Focal adhesions are foci for tyrosine-based signal transduction via GIV/Girdin and G proteins.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Lo, I-Chung; Kabir, Firooz; Midde, Krishna K; Wang, Honghui; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-12-01

    GIV/Girdin is a multimodular signal transducer and a bona fide metastasis-related protein. As a guanidine exchange factor (GEF), GIV modulates signals initiated by growth factors (chemical signals) by activating the G protein Gαi. Here we report that mechanical signals triggered by the extracellular matrix (ECM) also converge on GIV-GEF via β1 integrins and that focal adhesions (FAs) serve as the major hubs for mechanochemical signaling via GIV. GIV interacts with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and ligand-activated β1 integrins. Phosphorylation of GIV by FAK enhances PI3K-Akt signaling, the integrity of FAs, increases cell-ECM adhesion, and triggers ECM-induced cell motility. Activation of Gαi by GIV-GEF further potentiates FAK-GIV-PI3K-Akt signaling at the FAs. Spatially restricted signaling via tyrosine phosphorylated GIV at the FAs is enhanced during cancer metastasis. Thus GIV-GEF serves as a unifying platform for integration and amplification of adhesion (mechanical) and growth factor (chemical) signals during cancer progression.

  8. Loss of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTPN22 Reduces Mannan-Induced Autoimmune Arthritis in SKG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Shatakshi; Brownlie, Rebecca J.; Garcia, Celine; Cowan, Graeme; Salmond, Robert J.; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic phosphatase, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22), is a negative regulator of T cell signaling. Genome-wide association studies have shown that single-nucleotide polymorphisms in PTPN22 confer an increased risk of developing multiple autoimmune diseases in humans. The precise function of PTPN22 and how the variant protein contributes to autoimmunity is not well understood. To address this issue, we investigated the effect of PTPN22 deficiency on disease susceptibility in a mouse model of autoimmune arthritis. The SKG mouse expresses a hypomorphic mutant allele of ZAP70, which, upon exposure to fungal Ags, predisposes the mice to a CD4+ T cell–mediated autoimmune arthritis that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. Surprisingly, SKG Ptpn22−/− mice developed less severe mannan-induced arthritis compared with SKG mice. Diminution of disease was not due to significant alterations in thymocyte development or repertoire selection in SKG Ptpn22−/− mice, even though T cell–mediated signal transduction was improved. Instead, Ptpn22 deficiency appeared to bias CD4 Th cell differentiation away from the Th17 lineage, which is pathogenic in this setting, to a more Th1/T regulatory–focused response. These data show that even small perturbations in TCR signal transduction pathways can have profound consequences on the differentiation of T cell lineages and thus for the development of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27288531

  9. Regulation of phosphorylation level and distribution of PTP36, a putative protein tyrosine phosphatase, by cell-substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Takada, T; Mori, Y; Uchida, Y; Miki, T; Okuyama, A; Kosugi, A; Sawada, M; Oh-hora, M; Hamaoka, T

    1999-07-16

    Recently we have cloned a putative protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP36/PTPD2/pez, which possesses a domain homologous to the N-terminal half of band 4.1 protein. In mouse fibroblasts adhered to substrates, PTP36 was phosphorylated on serine residues. PTP36 was found to make complexes with serine/threonine kinase(s), which phosphorylated PTP36 in vitro. PTP36 was dephosphorylated rapidly when the cell-substrate adhesion was disrupted and it was phosphorylated again along with the reattachment of the cells to fibronectin. Rephosphorylation of PTP36 seemed to depend on actin polymerization since it was inhibited by cytochalasin D. The cell detachment also induced the translocation of PTP36 into the membrane-associated cytoskeletal fraction. Staurosporine and ML-9, which inhibited the phosphorylation of PTP36 in vivo, induced the translocation of PTP36 too. On the contrary, when the dephosphorylation of PTP36 was inhibited by okadaic acid, no translocation of PTP36 was induced by the cell detachment. These results demonstrate that the cell-substrate adhesion and cell spreading regulates the intracellular localization of PTP36 most likely through its phosphorylation and therefore, PTP36 may play important roles in the signal transduction pathway of cell-adhesion. PMID:10400706

  10. Antidepressant Activity of Enicostemma littorale Blume in Shp2 (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase)-inhibited Animal Model of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Doss, VA; Kuberapandian, Dharaniyambigai

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to develop a new animal model based on signaling pathways to understand the pathophysiology, therapy of depression, and to investigate the antidepressant activity of Enicostemma littorale which is not yet established. Methods: Animal models of depression were raised by physical methods and administration of methyl isobutyl ketone (100 mg/kg b.w., i.p.,) and a protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate (30 mg/kg b.w., i.p.,) to young Wistar rats. E. littorale aqueous extract (100 mg/kg b.w., oral) was administered. Forced swimming test (FST), biochemical, and histopathological parameters were performed with reference to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg b.w., oral) treatment. Results: High-performance thin-layer chromatography confirmed the presence of swertiamarin, a unique glycoside present in the Gentianaceae family. FST indicated high rates of immobility in depressed groups and low rates in plant extract-administered group with reference to fluoxetine. Biochemical assays indicated significantly (P < 0.05) increased levels of total protein, superoxide dismutase, triglycerides, and total serum cholesterol, whereas significant reduction (P < 0.05) of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and lipid peroxidation in plant extract-administered groups in comparison to the depressed groups. Histopathological analysis indicated disorganized neuronal architecture during depression whereas rejuvenation of neuronal patterns was observed during treatment with plant extract and fluoxetine. Conclusions: This study shows that sodium orthovanadate induces depression in animals and also establishes the antidepressant activity of E. littorale. PMID:27761214

  11. Loss of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor J Expression Predicts an Aggressive Clinical Course in Patients with Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongfeng; Li, Ming; Pu, Juan; Wang, Wanwei; Zhu, Weiguo; Liu, Haiyan

    2016-07-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Receptor J (PTPRJ) has been reported to be a tumor suppressor in various human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of PTPRJ in ESCC patients and its effects on biological behaviors of ESCC cells. PTPRJ expression, at mRNA and protein levels, were respectively detected by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry, based on 106 newly diagnosed ESCC patients. The associations between PTPRJ expression and clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC patients were statistically analyzed. Then, the effects of PTPRJ in migration and invasion were determined by wound healing and transwell assays based on ESCC cell line transfected with siRNA or expression vector of PTPRJ. Expression of PTPRJ at mRNA and protein levels were both significantly lower in ESCC tissues than those in normal esophageal mucosa. Immunohistochemistry showed that PTPRJ protein was localized in the cytoplasm of cancer cells in ESCC tissues. In addition, PTPRJ downregulation was found to be closely correlated with advanced tumor stage (P = 0.01) and poor differentiation (P = 0.03). Moreover, knockdown of PTPRJ in KYSE510 cells could significantly promote cell migration and invasion (both P < 0.05), which were reversed by the restoration of PTPRJ expression in vitro (both P < 0.05). Our data offer the convincing evidence that loss of PTPRJ expression may predict an aggressive clinical course in ESCC patients. PTPRJ may function as a tumor suppressor and play an important role in the regulation of ESCC cell motility, suggesting its potentials as a therapeutic agent for human ESCC.

  12. A novel homolog of protein tyrosine kinase Fyn identified in Lampetra japonica with roles in the immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Song, Xueying; Su, Peng; Li, Ranran; Liu, Chang; Gou, Meng; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xin; Li, Qingwei

    2016-04-01

    The non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase (nrPTK) Fyn, a member of the avian sarcoma virus transforming gene (Src) kinase family, plays a very significant role in cell growth, survival, apoptosis, tumor formation and immune response. In this study, a homolog of nrPTK Fyn was identified for the first time in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica and was named "Lja-Fyn". The cDNA fragment of lamprey lja-fyn contains a 1611-bp open reading frame, which encodes a protein of 537 amino acids. Multiple sequence alignment analysis showed that it shares four conserved domains (Src homology (SH) 4, SH3, SH2 and protein kinases catalytic domains) and a variable unique domain with vertebrates Fyn molecules. Though Lja-Fyn has high sequence similarity with typical Fyn and Yes molecules of jawed vertebrates, the identities among Lja-Fyn and typical Fyn molecules in unique domain are relatively higher than that among Lja-Fyn and typical Yes molecules. The result indicates that Lja-Fyn is a homolog of Fyn rather than Yes. The phylogenetic analysis showed that Fyn, Yes and Src molecules are grouped into three distinct phylogenetic clusters, and Lja-Fyn is grouped as a single branch in Fyn cluster. The real-time quantitative PCR assay revealed the wide distribution of the lja-fyn mRNA in lamprey immune related tissues. After stimulation with mixed antigens, the levels of lja-fyn mRNA were obviously up-regulated in the gill and lymphocyte-like cells, and the similar results were got by western blot analysis of Lja-Fyn protein expression. These results indicated that nrPTK Lja-Fyn was likely to be involved in immune response. Furthermore, our present findings also provide the necessary information for understanding the distinction between lamprey Lja-Fyn and other members of jawed vertebrates in Src family. PMID:26743129

  13. A 32-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein shows a protease-dependent increase in dead boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Tomohito; Shidara, Osamu; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Boar sperm TyrP32 is a 32-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein that increases during the capacitation and acrosome reaction and during cryocapacitation. However, it is still unclear whether the increase in TyrP32 is an event that is limited to the process of sperm fertilization, including cryocapacitation. The aims of the present study were to demonstrate that TyrP32 is increased in dead spermatozoa after freeze-thawing without a cryoprotectant and to find the causal factors for this increase. Washed spermatozoa were resuspended in a salt solution and then frozen. The frozen samples were rapidly thawed in a warm water bath and then used for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)/Western blotting to detect TyrP32, SDS-PAGE/silver staining of sperm proteins and staining of acrosomal contents with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA). In the samples before freezing, TyrP32 was barely detectable, and the distribution of the acrosomal contents was normal in most spermatozoa. One cycle of freeze-thawing induced an increase in TyrP32, a decrease in major sperm proteins and disorder in the acrosomal contents. However, the addition of a protease inhibitor (APMSF, 1 mM) suppressed the increase in TyrP32 and the decrease in the major sperm proteins, although it did not have any influence on the disorder in the acrosomal contents. Additionally, the spermatozoa did not exhibit any flagellar movement after freeze-thawing, which showed that almost all of them were dead. These results indicate that TyrP32 can show a protease-dependent increase in dead spermatozoa after freeze-thawing without a cryoprotectant even though the dead spermatozoa do not undergo cryocapacitation. PMID:18787309

  14. Multisite tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminus of Mint1/X11α by Src kinase regulates the trafficking of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Christopher J R; Black, Hannah L; Andrews, Katie L; Davenport, Elizabeth C; Conboy, Michael; Chawla, Sangeeta; Dowle, Adam A; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry R; Evans, Gareth J O

    2016-05-01

    Mint/X11 is one of the four neuronal trafficking adaptors that interact with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and are linked with its cleavage to generate β-amyloid peptide, a key player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. How APP switches between adaptors at different stages of the secretory pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 regulates the destination of APP. A canonical SH2-binding motif ((202) YEEI) was identified in the N-terminus of Mint1 that is phosphorylated on tyrosine by C-Src and recruits the active kinase for sequential phosphorylation of further tyrosines (Y191 and Y187). A single Y202F mutation in the Mint1 N-terminus inhibits C-Src binding and tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous studies observed that co-expression of wild-type Mint1 and APP causes accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi. Unphosphorylatable Mint1 (Y202F) or pharmacological inhibition of Src reduced the accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi of heterologous cells. A similar result was observed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons where Mint1(Y202F) permitted the trafficking of APP to more distal neurites than the wild-type protein. These data underline the importance of the tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 as a critical switch for determining the destination of APP. The regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking is poorly understood. We have discovered that the APP adapter, Mint1, is phosphorylated by C-Src kinase. Mint1 causes APP accumulation in the trans-Golgi network, whereas inhibition of Src or mutation of Mint1-Y202 permits APP recycling. The phosphorylation status of Mint1 could impact on the pathological trafficking of APP in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26865271

  15. Changes in Carboxy Methylation and Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase PP2A Are Associated with Epididymal Sperm Maturation and Motility.

    PubMed

    Dudiki, Tejasvi; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Ferrara, John K; Kline, Douglas W; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian sperm contain the serine/threonine phosphatases PP1γ2 and PP2A. The role of sperm PP1γ2 is relatively well studied. Here we confirm the presence of PP2A in sperm and show that it undergoes marked changes in methylation (leucine 309), tyrosine phosphorylation (tyrosine 307) and catalytic activity during epididymal sperm maturation. Spermatozoa isolated from proximal caput, distal caput and caudal regions of the epididymis contain equal immuno-reactive amounts of PP2A. Using demethyl sensitive antibodies we show that PP2A is methylated at its carboxy terminus in sperm from the distal caput and caudal regions but not in sperm from the proximal caput region of the epididymis. The methylation status of PP2A was confirmed by isolation of PP2A with microcystin agarose followed by alkali treatment, which causes hydrolysis of protein carboxy methyl esters. Tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm PP2A varied inversely with methylation. That is, PP2A was tyrosine phosphorylated when it was demethylated but not when methylated. PP2A demethylation and its reciprocal tyrosine phosphorylation were also affected by treatment of sperm with L-homocysteine and adenosine, which are known to elevate intracellular S-adenosylhomocysteine, a feedback inhibitor of methyltransferases. Catalytic activity of PP2A declined during epididymal sperm maturation. Inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid or by incubation of caudal epididymal spermatozoa with L-homocysteine and adenosine resulted in increase of sperm motility parameters including percent motility, velocity, and lateral head amplitude. Demethylation or pharmacological inhibition of PP2A also leads to an increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Our results show for the first time that changes in PP2A activity due to methylation and tyrosine phosphorylation occur in sperm and that these changes may play an important role in the regulation of sperm function. PMID:26569399

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  18. Chronic restraint stress induces sperm acrosome reaction and changes in testicular tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Supatcharee; Burawat, Jaturon; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sampannang, Apichakan; Maneenin, Chanwit; Iamsaard, Sitthichai

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stress is a cause of male infertility. Although sex hormones and sperm quality have been shown to be low in stress, sperm physiology and testicular functional proteins, such as phosphotyrosine proteins, have not been documented. Objective: To investigate the acrosome status and alterations of testicular proteins involved in spermatogenesis and testosterone synthesis in chronic stress in rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats were divided into 2 groups (control and chronic stress (CS), n=7). CS rats were immobilized (4 hr/day) for 42 consecutive days. The blood glucose level (BGL), corticosterone, testosterone, acrosome status, and histopathology were examined. The expressions of testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (CYP11A1), and phosphorylated proteins were analyzed. Results: Results showed that BGL (71.25±2.22 vs. 95.60±3.36 mg/dl), corticosterone level (24.33±4.23 vs. 36.9±2.01 ng/ml), acrosome reacted sperm (3.25±1.55 vs. 17.71±5.03%), and sperm head abnormality (3.29±0.71 vs. 6.21±1.18%) were significantly higher in CS group in comparison with control. In contrast, seminal vesicle (0.41±0.05 vs. 0.24±0.07 g/100g), testosterone level (3.37±0.79 vs. 0.61±0.29 ng/ml), and sperm concentration (115.33±7.70 vs. 79.13±3.65×106 cells/ml) of CS were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Some atrophic seminiferous tubules and low sperm mass were apparent in CS rats. The expression of CYP11A1 except StAR protein was markedly decreased in CS rats. In contrast, a 55 kDa phosphorylated protein was higher in CS testes. Conclusion: CS decreased the expression of CYP11A, resulting in decreased testosterone, and increased acrosome-reacted sperm, assumed to be the result of an increase of 55 kDa phosphorylated protein. PMID:27525328

  19. Distance Mapping in Proteins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy: Tyrosine, like Tryptophan, Quenches Bimane Fluorescence in a Distance-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan-induced quenching of fluorophores (TrIQ) uses intramolecular fluorescence quenching to assess distances in proteins too small (<15 Å) to be easily probed by traditional Forster resonance energy transfer methods. A powerful aspect of TrIQ is its ability to obtain an ultrafast snapshot of a protein conformation, by identifying “static quenching” (contact between the Trp and probe at the moment of light excitation). Here we report new advances in this site-directed fluorescence labeling (SDFL) approach, gleaned from recent studies of T4 lysozyme (T4L). First, we show that like TrIQ, tyrosine-induced quenching (TyrIQ) occurs for the fluorophore bimane in a distance-dependent fashion, although with some key differences. The Tyr “sphere of quenching” for bimane (≤10 Å) is smaller than for Trp (≤15 Å, Cα–Cα distance), and the size difference between the quenching residue (Tyr) and control (Phe) differs by only a hydroxyl group. Second, we show how TrIQ and TyrIQ can be used together to assess the magnitude and energetics of a protein movement. In these studies, we placed a bimane (probe) and Trp or Tyr (quencher) on opposite ends of a “hinge” in T4L and conducted TrIQ and TyrIQ measurements. Our results are consistent with an ∼5 Å change in Cα–Cα distances between these sites upon substrate binding, in agreement with the crystal structures. Subsequent Arrhenius analysis suggests the activation energy barrier (Ea) to this movement is relatively low (∼1.5–2.5 kcal/mol). Together, these results demonstrate that TyrIQ, used together with TrIQ, significantly expands the power of quenching-based distance mapping SDFL studies. PMID:25144569

  20. Postsynaptic density protein 95-regulated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in levodopa-induced dyskinesia rat models

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Maowen; Kong, Min; Ma, Guozhao

    2015-01-01

    Context Abnormality in interactions between N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and its signaling molecules occurs in the lesioned striatum in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). It was reported that Fyn-mediated NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation, can enhance NMDA receptor function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), one of the synapse-associated proteins, regulates interactions between receptor and downstream-signaling molecules. In light of the relationship between PSD-95, NR2B, and Fyn kinases, does PSD-95 contribute to the overactivity of NMDA receptor function induced by dopaminergic treatment? To further prove the possibility, the effects of regulating the PSD-95 expression on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and on the interactions of Fyn and NR2B in LID rat models were evaluated. Methods In the present study, parkinsonian rat models were established by injecting 6-hydroxydopamine. Subsequently, valid PD rats were treated with levodopa (50 mg/kg/day with benserazide 12.5 mg/kg/day, twice daily) intraperitoneally for 22 days to create LID rat models. Then, the effect of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of the PSD-95mRNA antisense oligonucleotides (PSD-95 ASO) on the rotational response to levodopa challenge was assessed. The effects of pretreatment with an intrastriatal injection of PSD-95 ASO on the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B in the LID rat models were detected by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Results Levodopa administration twice daily for 22 days to parkinsonian rats shortened the rotational duration and increased the peak turning responses. The altered rotational responses were attenuated by PSD-95 ASO pretreatment. Meanwhile, PSD-95 ASO pretreatment decreased the level of PSD-95 protein expression and reduced both the augmented NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of Fyn with NR2B triggered during the levodopa administration in the

  1. Cdk5/p35 phosphorylates lemur tyrosine kinase-2 to regulate protein phosphatase-1C phosphorylation and activity.

    PubMed

    Manser, Catherine; Vagnoni, Alessio; Guillot, Florence; Davies, Jennifer; Miller, Christopher C J

    2012-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5)/p35 and protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) are two major enzymes that control a variety of physiological processes within the nervous system including neuronal differentiation, synaptic plasticity and axonal transport. Defective cdk5/p35 and PP1 function are also implicated in several major human neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5/p35 and the catalytic subunit of PP1 (PP1C) both bind to the brain-enriched, serine-threonine kinase lemur tyrosine kinase-2 (LMTK2). Moreover, LMTK2 phosphorylates PP1C on threonine-320 (PP1Cthr³²⁰) to inhibit its activity. Here, we demonstrate that LMTK2 is phosphorylated on serine-1418 (LMTK2ser¹⁴¹⁸) by cdk5/p35 and present evidence that this regulates its ability to phosphorylate PP1Cthr³²⁰. We thus describe a new signalling pathway within the nervous system that links cdk5/p35 with PP1C and which has implications for a number of neuronal functions and neuronal dysfunction.

  2. Effect of feeding garlic leaf on microbial nitrogen supply, kinetics of plasma phenylalanine, tyrosine and protein synthesis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Md; Liang, Xi; Sekiguchi, Natsumi; Sano, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the feeding effects of garlic leaf on microbial N supply (MNS), turnover rates of plasma phenylalanine (PheTR) and tyrosine (TyrTR) and whole body protein synthesis (WBPS) in sheep. The sheep were fed either mixed hay (Hay-diet, as control) or hay plus garlic leaf diet (GL-diet, at a ratio of 9:1) in a crossover design each for a 21 day period. The isotope dilution method using [(2) H5 ]Phe and [(2) H2 ]Tyr was performed on the 21st day of each dietary treatment. Nitrogen intake remained similar between the diets and N absorption and N digestibility were higher (P<0.05) in the GL-diet than Hay-diet. Total purine derivatives excretion and MNS were greater (P<0.05) in the GL-diet than the Hay-diet. Plasma PheTR tended to be higher (P=0.06) during GL feeding and TyrTR did not differ between the diets. Further, WBPS tended to be greater (P=0.05) for the GL-diet compared with the Hay-diet. Hence, the present results suggest that garlic leaf may have positive effects on N metabolism by influencing MNS in sheep and could be used as a potential ruminant feed in the future.

  3. Strongylophorines, new protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors, from the marine sponge Strongylophora strongilata collected at Iriomote Island.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Abdjul, Delfly B; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2015-09-15

    A new meroditerpene, 26-O-ethylstrongylophorine-14 (1), was isolated from the Okinawan marine sponge Strongylophora strongilata together with six known strongylophorines: 26-O-methylstrongylophorine-16 (2) and strongylophorines-2 (3), -3 (4), -8 (5), -15 (6), and -17 (7). The structure of 1 was assigned on the basis of its spectroscopic data. Compound 1 inhibited the activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with an IC50 value of 8.7 μM, while known compounds 2-8 gave IC50 values of 8.5, >24.4, 9.0, 21.2, 11.9, and 14.8 μM, respectively. Oleanolic acid, a positive control, inhibited PTP1B activity at 0.7 μM (IC50). The inhibitory activities of strongylophorines possessing the acetal moiety at C-26 (1, 2, and 6) were stronger than those of the lactone derivatives (3 and 5). This is the first study to demonstrate that meroditerpenes inhibit PTP1B activity.

  4. Isopetrosynol, a New Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitor, from the Marine Sponge Halichondria cf. panicea Collected at Iriomote Island.

    PubMed

    Abdjul, Delfly Booby; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Kirikoshi, Ryota; Ukai, Kazuyo; Namikoshi, Michio

    2016-01-01

    A new polyacetylene compound, isopetrosynol (1), was isolated from the Okinawan marine sponge Halichondria cf. panicea together with petrosynol (2), adociacetylene D (3), (5R)-3,15,27-triacontatriene-1,29-diyn-5-ol (4), and petrosterol (5). The structure of 1 was assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data for 1 and 2. Compound 1 inhibited protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity with an IC50 value of 8.2±0.3 µM, while compound 2, a diastereomer of 1, showed only 28.9±4.5% inhibition at 21.6 µM. The IC50 values of compounds 3 and 4 were 7.8±0.5 and 12.2±0.5 µM, respectively. Oleanolic acid, a positive control, inhibited PTP1B activity at 0.7±0.1 µM (IC50) in the same experiment. The inhibitory activity of 1 was stronger than that of its diastereomer (2). This is the first study to show the inhibitory effects of polyacetylene compounds on PTP1B. PMID:27373628

  5. Small molecules as potent protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors documented in patents from 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jun; Jiang, Bo; Wu, Ning; Wang, Shuai-Yu; Shi, Da-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (2-DM) are the main threats to human health in the worldwide. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a promising molecular level legitimate therapeutic target in the effective management of 2-DM. For the search of potent PTP1B inhibitors, much investigation has revealed a large number of small-molecule compounds obtained from natural sources or prepared by synthesis/semi-synthesis with various skeletons and promising anti-PTP1B activities in the treatment of 2-DM. Although some reviews on the development of PTP1B inhibitors have been published, they were mainly concentrated on the results reported in journal articles. In this review, we will provide an overview of the developments of the potent PTP1B inhibitors claimed in recent patents during the past five years (2009-2013) with their structural features and biological features, as well as the structure-activity relationships (SARs) and strategies for finding potent and specific PTP1B inhibitors. This paper will provide valuable information for understanding the current anti-PTP1B investigation and developing potent PTP1B inhibitors as treating 2-DM drugs. PMID:25643610

  6. The protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPRZ and PTPRG bind to distinct members of the contactin family of neural recognition molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain, Samuel; Watkins, Dara J.

    2010-04-05

    The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ) are expressed primarily in the nervous system and mediate cell adhesion and signaling events during development. We report here the crystal structures of the carbonic anhydrase-like domains of PTPRZ and PTPRG and show that these domains interact directly with the second and third immunoglobulin repeats of the members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural recognition molecules. Interestingly, these receptors exhibit distinct specificities: PTPRZ binds only to CNTN1, whereas PTPRG interacts with CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. Furthermore, we present crystal structures of the four N-terminal immunoglobulin repeats of mouse CNTN4 both alone and in complex with the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of mouse PTPRG. In these structures, the N-terminal region of CNTN4 adopts a horseshoe-like conformation found also in CNTN2 and most likely in all CNTNs. This restrained conformation of the second and third immunoglobulin domains creates a binding site that is conserved among CNTN3, 4, 5, and 6. This site contacts a discrete region of PTPRG composed primarily of an extended {beta}-hairpin loop found in both PTPRG and PTPRZ. Overall, these findings implicate PTPRG, PTPRZ and CNTNs as a group of receptors and ligands involved in the manifold recognition events that underlie the construction of neural networks.

  7. A complex between contactin-1 and the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRZ controls the development of oligodendrocyte precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lamprianou, Smaragda; Chatzopoulou, Elli; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Bouyain, Samuel; Harroch, Sheila

    2013-09-23

    The six members of the contactin (CNTN) family of neural cell adhesion molecules are involved in the formation and maintenance of the central nervous system (CNS) and have been linked to mental retardation and neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism. Five of the six CNTNs bind to the homologous receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases gamma (PTPRG) and zeta (PTPRZ), but the biological roles of these interactions remain unclear. We report here the cocrystal structure of the carbonic anhydrase-like domain of PTPRZ bound to tandem Ig repeats of CNTN1 and combine these structural data with binding assays to show that PTPRZ binds specifically to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Furthermore, analyses of glial cell populations in wild-type and PTPRZ-deficient mice show that the binding of PTPRZ to CNTN1 expressed at the surface of oligodendrocyte precursor cells inhibits their proliferation and promotes their development into mature oligodendrocytes. Overall, these results implicate the PTPRZ/CNTN1 complex as a previously unknown modulator of oligodendrogenesis.

  8. Elevated protein tyrosine phosphatase activity provokes Eph/ephrin-facilitated adhesion of pre-B leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wimmer-Kleikamp, Sabine H; Nievergall, Eva; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Adikari, Samantha; Mansour, Mariam; Yeadon, Trina; Boyd, Andrew W; Patani, Neill R; Lackmann, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Signaling by Eph receptors and cell-surface ephrin ligands modulates adhesive cell properties and thereby coordinates cell movement and positioning in normal and oncogenic development. While cell contact-dependent Eph activation frequently leads to cell-cell repulsion, also the diametrically opposite response, cell-cell adhesion, is a probable outcome. However, the molecular principles regulating such disparate functions have remained controversial. We have examined cell-biologic mechanisms underlying this switch by analyzing ephrin-A5-induced cell-morphologic changes of EphA3-positive LK63 pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Their exposure to ephrin-A5 surfaces leads to a rapid conversion from a suspended/nonpolarized to an adherent/polarized cell type, a transition that relies on EphA3 functions operating in the absence of Eph-kinase signaling. Cell morphology change and adhesion of LK63 cells are effectively attenuated by endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity, whereby PTP inhibition and productive EphA3-phosphotyrosine signaling reverse the phenotype to nonadherent cells with a condensed cytoskeleton. Our findings suggest that Eph-associated PTP activities not only control receptor phosphorylation levels, but as a result switch the response to ephrin contact from repulsion to adhesion, which may play a role in the pathology of hematopoietic tumors. PMID:18385452

  9. The Hem protein mediates neuronal migration by inhibiting WAVE degradation and functions opposite of Abelson tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zengrong; Bhat, Krishna Moorthi

    2011-01-01

    In the nervous system, neurons form in different regions, then they migrate and occupy specific positions. We have previously shown that RP2/sib, a well-studied neuronal pair in the Drosophila ventral nerve cord (VNC), has a complex migration route. Here, we show that the Hem protein, via the WAVE complex, regulates migration of GMC-1 and its progeny RP2 neuron. In Hem or WAVE mutants, RP2 neuron either abnormally migrates, crossing the midline from one hemisegment to the contralateral hemisegment, or does not migrate at al and fail to send out its axon projection. We report that Hem regulates neuronal migration through stabilizing WAVE. Since Hem and WAVE normally form a complex, our data argues that in the absence of Hem, WAVE, which is presumably no longer in a complex, becomes susceptible to degradation. We also find that Abelson Tyrosine kinase affects RP2 migration in a similar manner as Hem and WAVE, and appears to operate via WAVE. However, while Abl negatively regulates the levels of WAVE, it regulates migration via regulating the activity of WAVE. Our results also show that during the degradation of WAVE, Hem function is opposite to that of and downstream of Abl. PMID:21726548

  10. Metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma shows frequent deletion in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D gene.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sally R; Harwood, Catherine A; Purdie, Karin J; Gulati, Abha; Matin, Rubeta N; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Cerio, Rino; Kelsell, David P; Leigh, Irene M; Proby, Charlotte M

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and its incidence is increasing rapidly. Metastatic cSCC accounts for the majority of deaths associated with NMSC, but the genetic basis for cSCC progression remains poorly understood. A previous study identified small deletions (typically <1 Mb) in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D (PTPRD) gene that segregated with more aggressive cSCC. To investigate the apparent association between deletion within PTPRD and cSCC metastasis, a series of 74 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors from 31 patients was analyzed using a custom Illumina 384 SNP microarray. Deletions were found in 37% of patients with metastatic cSCC and were strongly associated with metastatic tumors when compared to those that had not metastasized (p = 0.007). Subsequent mutation analysis revealed a higher mutation rate for PTPRD than has been reported in any other cancer type, with 37% of tumors harboring a somatic mutation. Conversely, bisulfite sequencing showed that methylation was not a mechanism of PTPRD disruption in cSCC. This is the first report to observe an association between deletion within PTPRD and metastatic disease and highlights the potential use of these deletions as a diagnostic biomarker for tumor progression. Combined with the high mutation rate observed in our study, PTPRD is one of the most commonly altered genes in cSCC and warrants further investigation to determine its significance for metastasis in other tumor types.

  11. Polymorphism in protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor delta is associated with the risk of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Su, Tong; Tan, Xiaojie; Li, Xiaopan; Xie, Jiaxin; Wang, Guoping; Shen, Jian; Hou, Jianguo; Cao, Guangwen

    2013-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is a common urological malignancy. Our previous study has indicated that the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type delta (PTPRD) gene may play a role. To determine the effect of PTPRD genetic polymorphisms on ccRCC occurrence and progression, a total of 377 ccRCC cases and 754 matched controls were enrolled in the study. DNA sequencing and genotyping, and immunohistochemistry were conducted to test the associations of genotypes with ccRCC risk and PTPRD expression level in somatic tissues. The C allele of PTPRD rs2279776 was associated with a higher risk of ccRCC (per allele OR=1.23, P=0.03). Patients without distant metastasis at the time of surgery were followed for a median of 33.1months. Overall survival was not different between different rs2279776 genotype groups (P=0.30). The C allele was associated with a higher percentage of negative immunostaining in adjacent normal renal tissues (P=0.02). PTPRD rs2279776 SNP may be a novel genetic risk factor of ccRCC.

  12. A rapid lateral flow immunoassay for the detection of tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 autoantibodies in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity.

  13. Contribution of casein kinase 2 and spleen tyrosine kinase to CFTR trafficking and protein kinase A-induced activity.

    PubMed

    Luz, Simão; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Mendes, Ana Isabel; Romeiras, Francisco; Sousa, Marisa; Schreiber, Rainer; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter; Mehta, Anil; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Farinha, Carlos M

    2011-11-01

    Previously, the pleiotropic "master kinase" casein kinase 2 (CK2) was shown to interact with CFTR, the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Moreover, CK2 inhibition abolished CFTR conductance in cell-attached membrane patches, native epithelial ducts, and Xenopus oocytes. CFTR possesses two CK2 phosphorylation sites (S422 and T1471), with unclear impact on its processing and trafficking. Here, we investigated the effects of mutating these CK2 sites on CFTR abundance, maturation, and degradation coupled to effects on ion channel activity and surface expression. We report that CK2 inhibition significantly decreased processing of wild-type (wt) CFTR, with no effect on F508del CFTR. Eliminating phosphorylation at S422 and T1471 revealed antagonistic roles in CFTR trafficking: S422 activation versus T1471 inhibition, as evidenced by a severe trafficking defect for the T1471D mutant. Notably, mutation of Y512, a consensus sequence for the spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) possibly acting in a CK2 context adjacent to the common CF-causing defect F508del, had a strong effect on both maturation and CFTR currents, allowing the identification of this kinase as a novel regulator of CFTR. These results reinforce the importance of CK2 and the S422 and T1471 residues for regulation of CFTR and uncover a novel regulation of CFTR by SYK, a recognized controller of inflammation.

  14. PAH- and PCB-induced Alterations of Protein Tyrosine Kinase and Cytokine Gene Transcription in Harbor Seal (Phoca Vitulina) PBMC

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Jennifer C. C.; Kenny, Thomas P.; Tjeerdema, Ronald S.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2005-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying in vitro immunomodulatory effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were investigated in harbor seal peripheral leukocytes, via real-time PCR. We examined the relative genetic expression of the protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) Fyn and Itk, which play a critical role in T cell activation, and IL-2, a cytokine of central importance in initiating adaptive immune responses. IL-1, the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokine of innate immunity, was also included as a measure of macrophage function. Harbor seal PBMC were exposed to the prototypic immunotoxic PAH benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-169), a model immunotoxic PCB, or DMSO (vehicle control). Exposure of Con A-stimulated harbor seal PBMC to both BaP and CB-169 produced significantly altered expression in all four targets relative to vehicle controls. The PTKs Fyn and Itk were both up-regulated following exposure to BaP and CB-169. In contrast, transcripts for IL-2 and IL-1 were decreased relative to controls by both treatments. Our findings are consistent with those of previous researchers working with human and rodent systems and support a hypothesis of contaminant-altered lymphocyte function mediated (at least in part) by disruption of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and cytokine production. PMID:16050139

  15. Structure of the Trypanosoma cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1, a potential therapeutic target for Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Waugh, David S.

    2013-06-05

    Chagas’ disease, a neglected tropical affliction transmitted by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is prevalent in Latin America and affects nearly 18 million people worldwide, yet few approved drugs are available to treat the disease. Moreover, the currently available drugs exhibit severe toxicity or are poorly effective in the chronic phase of the disease. This limitation, along with the large population at risk, underscores the urgent need to discover new molecular targets and novel therapeutic agents. Recently, the T. cruzi protein tyrosine phosphatase TcPTP1 has been implicated in the cellular differentiation and infectivity of the parasite and is therefore a promising target for the design of novel anti-parasitic drugs. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of TcPTP1 refined to a resolution of 2.18 Å, which provides structural insights into the active site environment that can be used to initiate structure-based drug design efforts to develop specific TcPTP1 inhibitors. Potential strategies to develop such inhibitors are also discussed.

  16. Synthesis and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibition activities of two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongchao; Shi, Dayong; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2011-11-01

    3-bromo-4,5-bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl)-1,2-benzenediol ( 1) is a natural bromophenol isolated from the red algae Rhodomela confervoides that exhibits significant inhibition against protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Based on its activity, we synthesized two new synthetic bromophenols and their methoxy derivatives from vanillin using the structure of natural bromophenol 1 as a scaffold. The structures of these bromophenols were elucidated from 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and high resolution electron ionization mass spectrometry as 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 2), 2,3-dibromo-1-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dimethoxybenzyl)-3',4'-dimethoxybenzyl)-4,5-dimethoxybenzene ( 3), 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(2″-bromo-4″,5″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 4) and 3,4-dibromo-5-(2'-bromo-6'-(3″,4″-dihydroxybenzyl)-3',4'-dihydroxybenzyl)pyrocatechol ( 5). PTP1B inhibition activities of these compounds were evaluated using a colorimetric assay, and compounds 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting activity against PTP1B.

  17. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods to study G protein-coupled receptor-receptor tyrosine kinase heteroreceptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signaling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signaling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal and can place also RTK signaling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization, and downregulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this chapter, we provide an overview of different BRET(2) assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described.

  18. Directed differentiation of postnatal hippocampal neural stem cells generates nuclear receptor related-1 protein- and tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yinxiu; Zhang, Zixin; Ma, Jiangbo; Xia, Hechun; Wang, Yin; Liu, Yinming; Ma, Quanrui; Sun, Tao; Liu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder. Although the detailed underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated, the major pathological feature of PD is the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra. The use of donor stem cells to replace DA neurons may be a key breakthrough in the treatment of PD. In the present study, the growth kinetics of hippocampal neural stem cells (Hip-NSCs) isolated from postnatal mice and cultured in vitro were observed, specifically the generation of cells expressing DA neuronal markers nuclear receptor related-1 protein (Nurr1) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). It was revealed that Hip-NSCs differentiated primarily into astrocytes when cultured in serum-containing medium. However, in low serum conditions, the number of βIII tubulin-positive neurons increased markedly. The proportion of Nurr1-positive cells and TH-positive neurons, significantly increased with increasing duration of directed differentiation of Hip-NSCs (P=0.0187 and 0.0254, respectively). The results of the present study reveal that Hip-NSCs may be induced to differentiate in vitro into neurons expressing Nurr1 and TH, known to be critical regulators of DA neuronal fate. Additionally, their expression may be necessary to facilitate neuronal maturation in vitro. These data suggest that Hip-NSCs may serve as a source of DA neurons for cell therapy in patients diagnosed with PD. PMID:27432537

  19. Expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ is a risk factor for triple negative breast cancer relapse

    PubMed Central

    FU, FENFEN; XIAO, XI; ZHANG, TAO; ZOU, QIONGYAN; CHEN, ZONGLIN; PEI, LEI; SU, JUAN; YI, WENJUN

    2016-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a higher rate of distant recurrence and a poorer prognosis than those with other breast cancer subtypes. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanism of TNBC relapse. A retrospective immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTPRZ1) and pleiotrophin (PTN) was performed for 325 cases of breast cancer. These samples included 66 cases of luminal A breast cancer, 67 cases of luminal B breast cancer, 78 cases of Her-2-enriched breast cancer, 78 cases of TNBC and 36 cases of relapsed TNBC (RTNBC). In addition, 30 control specimens and 30 cases of metastasized lymph nodes were examined. PTPRZ1 and PTN were highly expressed in the RTNBC group. Compared with the RTNBC group, significant differences in the expression of PTPRZ1 were observed between the TNBC, BC and control groups. A significant difference was observed in the expression of PTN in the BC group (P<0.05) compared to RTNBC, and there were no significant differences in the expression of PTPRZ1 and PTN among the molecular subtypes. No significant correlation was observed between the expression of PTPRZ1, PTN, ER, PR, Her-2 and ALN and the tumor size or menopause status. No significant correlation was identified between the expression of PTPRZ1 and PTN and the expression of CD24 and CD44. In summary, high expression of PTPRZ1 may be an independent risk indicator for TNBC recurrence and metastasis. PMID:26893832

  20. Purification and Characterization of ZmRIP1, a Novel Reductant-Inhibited Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase from Maize1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingbing; Zhao, Yanxia; Liang, Liyan; Ren, Huibo; Xing, Yu; Chen, Lin; Sun, Mingzhu; Wang, Yuanhua; Han, Yu; Jia, Haifeng; Huang, Conglin; Wu, Zhongyi; Jia, Wensuo

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) have long been thought to be activated by reductants and deactivated by oxidants, owing to the presence of a crucial sulfhydryl group in their catalytic centers. In this article, we report the purification and characterization of Reductant-Inhibited PTPase1 (ZmRIP1) from maize (Zea mays) coleoptiles, and show that this PTPase has a unique mode of redox regulation and signaling. Surprisingly, ZmRIP1 was found to be deactivated by a reductant. A cysteine (Cys) residue (Cys-181) near the active center was found to regulate this unique mode of redox regulation, as mutation of Cys-181 to arginine-181 allowed ZmRIP1 to be activated by a reductant. In response to oxidant treatment, ZmRIP1 was translocated from the chloroplast to the nucleus. Expression of ZmRIP1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants and maize protoplasts altered the expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in antioxidant catabolism, such as At1g02950, which encodes a glutathione transferase. Thus, the novel PTPase identified in this study is predicted to function in redox signaling in maize. PMID:22529284

  1. BIOLUMINISCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (BRET) METHODS TO STUDY G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR - RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASE HETERORECEPTOR COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Flajolet, Marc; Agnati, Luigi F.; Greengard, Paul; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can form heteroreceptor complexes. In these complexes, the signalling from each interacting protomer is modulated to produce an integrated and therefore novel response upon agonist(s) activation. In the GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes, GPCRs can activate RTK in the absence of added growth factor through the use of RTK signalling molecules. This integrative phenomenon is reciprocal, and can place also RTK signalling downstream of GPCR. Formation of either stable or transient complexes by these two important classes of membrane receptors is involved in regulating all aspects of receptor function, from ligand binding to signal transduction, trafficking, desensitization and down regulation among others. Functional phenomena can be modulated with conformation-specific inhibitors that stabilize defined GPCR states to abrogate both GPCR agonist- and growth factor-stimulated cell responses or by means of small interfering heteroreceptor complex interface peptides. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technology has emerged as a powerful method to study the structure of heteroreceptor complexes closely associated with the study of receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes. In this work we provide an overview of different BRET2 assays that can be used to study the structure of GPCR-RTK heteroreceptor complexes and their functions. Various experimental designs for optimization of these experiments are also described. PMID:24143976

  2. Salicylic Acid Based Small Molecule Inhibitor for the Oncogenic Src Homology-2 Domain Containing Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase-2 (SHP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xian; He, Yantao; Liu, Sijiu; Yu, Zhihong; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yang, Zhenyun; Dong, Yuanshu; Nabinger, Sarah C.; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Wang, Lina; Chan, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2010-08-13

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) plays a pivotal role in growth factor and cytokine signaling. Gain-of-function SHP2 mutations are associated with Noonan syndrome, various kinds of leukemias, and solid tumors. Thus, there is considerable interest in SHP2 as a potential target for anticancer and antileukemia therapy. We report a salicylic acid based combinatorial library approach aimed at binding both active site and unique nearby subpockets for enhanced affinity and selectivity. Screening of the library led to the identification of a SHP2 inhibitor II-B08 (compound 9) with highly efficacious cellular activity. Compound 9 blocks growth factor stimulated ERK1/2 activation and hematopoietic progenitor proliferation, providing supporting evidence that chemical inhibition of SHP2 may be therapeutically useful for anticancer and antileukemia treatment. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the structure of SHP2 in complex with 9 reveals molecular determinants that can be exploited for the acquisition of more potent and selective SHP2 inhibitors.

  3. Identification of the Tyrosine-Protein Phosphatase Non-Receptor Type 2 as a Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility Locus in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Joanna E.; Plant, Darren; Flynn, Edward; Tadjeddine, Meriem; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Dahlqvist, Solbritt Rantapää; Goulielmos, George; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.; Sidiropoulos, Prodromos; Krintel, Sophine B.; Ørnbjerg, Lykke M.; Hetland, Merete L.; Klareskog, Lars; Haeupl, Thomas; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D.; Raza, Karim; Witte, Torsten; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; FitzGerald, Oliver; Veale, Douglas; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Genome-wide association studies have facilitated the identification of over 30 susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, evidence for a number of potential susceptibility genes have not so far reached genome-wide significance in studies of Caucasian RA. Methods A cohort of 4286 RA patients from across Europe and 5642 population matched controls were genotyped for 25 SNPs, then combined in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant evidence of association was detected for nine SNPs within the European samples. When meta-analysed with previously published data, 21 SNPs were associated with RA susceptibility. Although SNPs in the PTPN2 gene were previously reported to be associated with RA in both Japanese and European populations, we show genome-wide evidence for a different SNP within this gene associated with RA susceptibility in an independent European population (rs7234029, P = 4.4×10−9). Conclusions This study provides further genome-wide evidence for the association of the PTPN2 locus (encoding the T cell protein tyrosine phosphastase) with Caucasian RA susceptibility. This finding adds to the growing evidence for PTPN2 being a pan-autoimmune susceptibility gene. PMID:23840476

  4. A Rapid Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Detection of Tyrosine Phosphatase-Like Protein IA-2 Autoantibodies in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Larger, Etienne; Volland, Hervé; Morel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells and is strongly associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies. Autoantibodies to tyrosine phosphatase-like protein IA-2 (IA-2As) are considered to be highly predictive markers of T1D. We developed a novel lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) based on a bridging format for the rapid detection of IA-2As in human serum samples. In this assay, one site of the IA-2As is bound to HA-tagged-IA-2, which is subsequently captured on the anti-HA-Tag antibody-coated test line on the strip. The other site of the IA-2As is bound to biotinylated IA-2, allowing the complex to be visualized using colloidal gold nanoparticle-conjugated streptavidin. For this study, 35 serum samples from T1D patients and 44 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our novel assay and the results were correlated with two IA-2A ELISAs. Among the 35 serum samples from T1D patients, the IA-2A LFIA, the in-house IA-2A ELISA and the commercial IA-2A ELISA identified as positive 21, 29 and 30 IA-2A-positive sera, respectively. The major advantages of the IA-2A LFIA are its rapidity and simplicity. PMID:25047039

  5. 1,2-Naphthoquinone activates vanilloid receptor 1 through increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to contraction of guinea pig trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuno, Shota; Taguchi, Keiko; Iwamoto, Noriko; Yamano, Shigeru; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.; Kumagai, Yoshito . E-mail: yk-em-tu@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2006-01-15

    1,2-Naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) has recently been identified as an environmental quinone in diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and atmospheric PM{sub 2.5}. We have found that this quinone is capable of causing a concentration-dependent contraction of tracheal smooth muscle in guinea pigs with EC{sub 5} value of 18.7 {mu}M. The contraction required extracellular calcium and was suppressed by L-type calcium channel blockers nifedipine and diltiazem. It was found that 1,2-NQ activated phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/lipoxygenase (LO)/vanilloid receptor (VR1) signaling. Additionally, 1,2-NQ was capable of transactivating protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in guinea pig trachea, suggesting that phosphorylation of PTKs contributes to 1,2-NQ-induced tracheal contraction. Consistent with this notion, this action was blocked by the PTKs inhibitor genistein and the EGFR antagonist PD153035, indicating that contraction was, at least in part, attributable to PTKs phosphorylation that activates VR1, resulting in increased intracellular calcium content in the smooth muscle cells.

  6. Activation of the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) by Nitrated Lipids in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Dong, Yunzhou; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulator of endothelial metabolic and functional homeostasis. Here, we examined the regulation of AMPK by nitrated oleic acid (OA-NO2) and investigated the implications in endothelial function. Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) with OA-NO2 induced a significant increase in both AMPK-Thr172 phosphorylation and AMPK activity as well as upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic ablation of HO-1 or HIF-1α abolished OA-NO2-induced AMPK phosphorylation. OA-NO2 induced a dramatic increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation that was abrogated by the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4-bis-ethylene glycol (ZnBG). Inhibition of ERK1/2 using UO126 or PD98059 reduced but did not abolish OA-NO2-induced HIF-1α upregulation, suggesting that OA-NO2/HO-1-initiated HIF-1α induction is partially dependent on ERK1/2 activity. In addition, OA-NO2 enhanced endothelial intracellular Ca2+, an effect that was inhibited by the HIF-1α inhibitor, YC-1, and by HIF-1α siRNA. These results implicate the involvement of HIF-1α. Experiments using the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibitor STO-609, the selective CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, and an isoform-specific siRNA demonstrated that OA-NO2-induced AMPK phosphorylation was dependent on CaMKKβ. Together, these results demonstrate that OA-NO2 activates AMPK in endothelial cells via an HO-1–dependent mechanism that increases HIF-1α protein expression and Ca2+/CaMKKβ activation. PMID:22363546

  7. CD8+ T-cell clones deficient in the expression of the CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase have impaired responses to T-cell receptor stimuli.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, C T; Pingel, J T; Nelson, J O; Thomas, M L

    1991-01-01

    CD45 is a high-molecular-weight transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase expressed only by nucleated cells of hematopoietic origin. To examine function, mouse CD8+ cytolytic T-cell clones were derived that had a specific defect in the expression of CD45. Northern (RNA) blot analysis indicates that the CD45 deficiency is due to either a transcriptional defect or mRNA instability. The CD45-deficient cells were greatly diminished in their ability to respond to antigen. All functional parameters of T-cell receptor signalling analyzed (cytolysis of targets, proliferation, and cytokine production) were markedly diminished. A CD45+ revertant was isolated, and the ability to respond to antigen was restored. These results support a central and immediate role for this transmembrane protein tyrosine phosphatase in T-cell receptor signalling. Images PMID:1652055

  8. Resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced platelet stimulation through suppressing NADPH oxidase and oxidative inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji Yong; Min, Ji Hyun; Wang, Su Bin; Chae, Yun Hee; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon collagen stimulation are implicated in propagating various platelet-activating pathways. Among ROS-producing enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) is largely responsible for collagen receptor-dependent ROS production. Therefore, NOX has been proposed as a novel target for the development of antiplatelet agent. We here investigate whether resveratrol inhibits collagen-induced NOX activation and further examine the effects of resveratrol on ROS-dependent signaling pathways in collagen-stimulated platelets. Collagen-induced superoxide anion production in platelets was inhibited by resveratrol. Resveratrol suppressed collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX. Correlated with the inhibitory effects on NOX, resveratrol protected SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) from ROS-mediated inactivation and subsequently attenuated the