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Sample records for protein vitronectin increases

  1. Vitronectin in vascular context: facets of a multitalented matricellular protein.

    PubMed

    Preissner, Klaus T; Reuning, Ute

    2011-06-01

    Vitronectin is an abundant adhesive glycoprotein in blood plasma and is found associated with different extracellular matrix sites, the vessel wall, and tumor cells, particularly upon tissue remodeling, injury/repair, or under disease conditions. Plasma vitronectin is a structurally labile molecule that may be converted into a multimeric/multivalent form by interaction with various (hemostatic) factors or through surface binding. Several distinct binding domains along the vitronectin sequence for integrin-type cell adhesion receptors, for urokinase receptor or proteoglycans as well as for growth factors, endow vascular matrix- or fibrin-associated vitronectin with differentiated cell attachment and aggregatory properties. These were found to be relevant for modulation of the cell-matrix interface in angiogenesis, hemostasis and thrombus formation, or wound repair, respectively. Other vitronectin ligands include plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 or high molecular weight kininogen that confer strong antiadhesive functions upon integrin- or urokinase receptor-mediated cell interactions with vitronectin. Together, vitronectin acts as a potent matricellular factor, coordinating cell migration with pericellular proteolysis and growth factor signaling at sites of tissue remodeling or in tumors. Structure-function studies of such vitronectin-related ligands and receptors lead to the characterization of their mode of action, also stimulating the search for new antagonists in tumor angiogenesis, platelet aggregation, or atherosclerosis. This review focuses on new developments in vitronectin biology, with particular emphasis on regulatory mechanisms of the protein in the context of cell adhesion/migration/proliferation and cell-dependent proteolysis, relevant for our understanding of hemostasis, thrombosis, tissue repair, and vascular diseases.

  2. Pathogenic Leptospira Species Acquire Factor H and Vitronectin via the Surface Protein LcpA

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; Miragaia, Lidia dos Santos; Breda, Leandro Carvalho Dantas; Abe, Cecilia Mari; Schmidt, Mariana Costa Braga; Moro, Ana Maria; Monaris, Denize; Conde, Jonas Nascimento; Józsi, Mihály; Isaac, Lourdes; Abreu, Patrícia Antônia Estima

    2014-01-01

    Upon infection, pathogenic Leptospira species bind several complement regulators in order to overcome host innate immunity. We previously characterized a 20-kDa leptospiral surface protein which interacts with C4b binding protein (C4BP): leptospiral complement regulator-acquiring protein A (LcpA). Here we show that LcpA also interacts with human factor H (FH), which remains functionally active once bound to the protein. Antibodies directed against short consensus repeat 20 (SCR20) inhibited binding of FH to LcpA by approximately 90%, thus confirming that this particular domain is involved in the interaction. We have also shown for the first time that leptospires bind human vitronectin and that the interaction is mediated by LcpA. Coincubation with heparin blocked LcpA-vitronectin interaction in a dose-dependent manner, strongly suggesting that binding may occur through the heparin binding domains of vitronectin. LcpA also bound to the terminal pathway component C9 and inhibited Zn2+-induced polymerization and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. Competitive binding assays indicated that LcpA interacts with C4BP, FH, and vitronectin through distinct sites. Taken together, our findings indicate that LcpA may play a role in leptospiral immune evasion. PMID:25534939

  3. Identification of outer membrane Porin D as a vitronectin-binding factor in cystic fibrosis clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Magnus; Singh, Birendra; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Su, Yu-Ching; Høiby, Niels; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen that frequently colonizes patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several pathogens are known to bind vitronectin to increase their virulence. Vitronectin has been shown to enhance P. aeruginosa adhesion to host epithelial cells. Methods We screened clinical isolates from the airways of CF patients and from the bloodstream of patients with bacteremia for binding of vitronectin. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and a proteomic approach was used to identify vitronectin-receptors in P. aeruginosa. Results P. aeruginosa from the airways of CF patients (n=27) bound more vitronectin than bacteremic isolates (n=15, p=0.025). Porin D (OprD) was identified as a vitronectin-binding protein. A P. aeruginosa oprD transposon insertion mutant had a decreased binding to soluble and immobilized vitronectin (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from CF patients significantly bound vitronectin. Porin D was defined as a novel P. aeruginosa vitronectin-receptor, and we postulate that the Porin D-dependent interaction with vitronectin may be important for colonization. PMID:26047937

  4. Isolation and characterization of a platelet membrane protein related to the vitronectin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lam, S C; Plow, E F; D'Souza, S E; Cheresh, D A; Frelinger, A L; Ginsberg, M H

    1989-03-01

    Glycoprotein IIb-IIIa is the most prominent Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-binding adhesion receptor on platelets. By affinity chromatography on an immobilized RGD peptide, we have investigated the possible existence of other platelet-associated adhesion receptors that bind RGD peptides. When an octyl glucoside extract of surface-radioiodinated platelets was applied to an affinity matrix of KYGRGDS-coupled Sepharose 4B, a 160-kDa-labeled protein (P160) and GPIIb-IIIa bound and were specifically eluted by soluble GRGDSP peptide, but not by the variant GRGESP peptide. Furthermore, a dodecapeptide corresponding to fibrinogen gamma 400-411 eluted only GPIIb-IIIa but not P160 from the RGD affinity matrix. Characterization of P160 by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by the O'Farrell gel electrophoresis system indicated that P160 is a component of platelet GPIc. GoH3, a monoclonal antibody recognizing the alpha subunit of the very late antigen-6, failed to immunoprecipitate P160 from the RGD eluate, indicating that it did not contain the very late antigen-6 alpha subunit. In immunoblots, P160 reacted specifically with a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody recognizing the alpha subunit of the vitronectin receptor (VnR), but not with the monoclonal anti-GPIIb antibody PMI-1, suggesting that P160 is the alpha subunit of platelet VnR. This possibility was further substantiated by the complete identity between the determined amino-terminal sequence of P160 and the known sequence of the VnR alpha subunit. Moreover, direct association of P160 with a beta subunit having an apparent molecular weight similar to that of GPIIIa was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation with LM609, an anti-VnR complex monoclonal antibody. These results indicate that the VnR complex is present on platelets and may play a functional role in platelet adhesive reactions.

  5. A Fine-Tuned Interaction between Trimeric Autotransporter Haemophilus Surface Fibrils and Vitronectin Leads to Serum Resistance and Adherence to Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Al-Jubair, Tamim; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Hallström, Teresia; Mörgelin, Matthias; Blom, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) escapes the host immune system by recruitment of the complement regulator vitronectin, which inhibits the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) by inhibiting C5b-C7 complex formation and C9 polymerization. We reported previously that Hib acquires vitronectin at the surface by using Haemophilus surface fibrils (Hsf). Here we studied in detail the interaction between Hsf and vitronectin and its role in the inhibition of MAC formation and the invasion of lung epithelial cells. The vitronectin-binding region of Hsf was defined at the N-terminal region comprising Hsf amino acids 429 to 652. Moreover, the Hsf recognition site on vitronectin consisted of the C-terminal amino acids 352 to 374. H. influenzae was killed more rapidly in vitronectin-depleted serum than in normal human serum (NHS), and increased MAC deposition was observed at the surface of an Hsf-deficient H. influenzae mutant. In parallel, Hsf-expressing Escherichia coli selectively acquired vitronectin from serum, resulting in significant inhibition of the MAC. Moreover, when vitronectin was bound to Hsf, increased bacterial adherence and internalization into epithelial cells were observed. Taking our findings together, we have defined a fine-tuned protein-protein interaction between Hsf and vitronectin that may contribute to increased Hib virulence. PMID:24664511

  6. Degradation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and laminin) by serine-proteinases isolated from Lonomia achelous caterpillar hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Sara; Guerrero, Belsy; Salazar, Ana M; Gil, Amparo; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L

    2006-09-01

    Lonomia achelous is a caterpillar distributed in southern Venezuela and in northern Brazil that causes an acute hemorrhagic syndrome in people who have contact with its bristles. The effect of the crude hemolymph and its chromatographic fractions (FDII, Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2) on extracellular matrix proteins was studied. The chromatographic fractions show activities similar to plasmin and urokinase. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both lonomins appear as a protein band of 25 kDa under reduced conditions. By exclusion chromatography, the molecular weights of Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2 were 26.5 and 24.5 kDa, respectively. Fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin were degraded by all venom components. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under reduced conditions, shows that lonomins degrade fibronectin in four main fragments of 116, 60, 50 and 30 kDa. Molecular exclusion chromatography in native conditions shows that the molecular masses of these fragments are > or = 300, 62 and 27 kDa. The proteolytic effect of lonomins was abolished by benzamidine/HCl, iodoacetic acid and aprotinin. The extracellular matrix protein degradation together with the fibrino(geno)lytic activity of hemolymph and its fractions could explain, in part, the hemorrhagic syndrome, and the wound dehiscence in persons who have had contact with the L. achelous caterpillar.

  7. A Mechanism for Assembly of Complexes of Vitronectin and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 from Sedimmentation Velocity Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Kenneth H.; Schar, Christine R.; Blouse, Grant E.; Shore, Joseph D.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Schuck, Peter; Peterson, Cynthia B.

    2005-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and vitronectin are cofactors involved in pathological conditions such as injury, inflammation, and cancer, during which local levels of PAI-1 are increased and the active serpin forms complexes with vitronectin. These complexes become deposited into surrounding tissue matrices, where they regulate cell adhesion and peri-cellular proteolysis. The mechanism for their co-localization has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that PAI-1-vitronectin complexes form in a stepwise and concentration-dependent fashion via 1:1 and 2:1 intermediates, with the 2:1 complex serving a key role in assembly of higher order complexes. To test this hypothesis, sedimentation velocity experiments in the analytical ultracentrifuge were performed to identify different PAI-1-vitronectin complexes. Analysis of sedimentation data invoked a novel multisignal method to discern the stoichiometry of the two proteins in the higher-order complexes formed (Balbo, A., Minor, K. H., Velikovsky, C. A., Mariuzza, R. A., Peterson, C. B., and Schuck, P. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 81—86). Our results demonstrate that PAI-1 and vitronectin assemble into higher order forms via a pathway that is triggered upon saturation of the two PAI-1-binding sites of vitronectin to form the 2:1 complex. This 2:1 PAI-1-vitronectin complex, with a sedimentation coefficient of 6.5 S, is the key intermediate for the assembly of higher order complexes. PMID:15905170

  8. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina involve vitronectin.

    PubMed

    Webster, T J; Schadler, L S; Siegel, R W; Bizios, R

    2001-06-01

    The role, including concentration, conformation, and bioactivity, of adsorbed vitronectin in enhancing osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina was investigated in the present study. Vitronectin adsorbed in a competitive environment in the highest concentration on nanophase alumina compared to conventional alumina. Enhanced adsorption of vitronectin on nanophase alumina was possibly due to decreased adsorption of apolipoprotein A-I and/or increased adsorption of calcium on nanophase alumina. In a novel manner, the present study utilized surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to determine the conformation of vitronectin adsorbed on nanophase alumina. These results provided the first evidence of increased unfolding of vitronectin adsorbed on nanophase alumina. Increased adsorption of calcium on nanophase alumina may affect the conformation of adsorbed vitronectin specifically to promote unfolding of the macromolecule to expose cell-adhesive epitopes recognized by specific cell-membrane receptors. Results of the present study also provided evidence of dose-dependent inhibition of osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina pretreated with vitronectin following preincubation (and thus blocking respective cell-membrane receptors) with either Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic Acid-Serine (RGDS) or Lysine-Arginine-Serine-Arginine (KRSR). These events, namely, enhanced vitronectin adsorption, comformation, and bioactivity, may explain the increased osteoblast adhesion on nanophase alumina.

  9. Neisseria meningitidis Opc Invasin Binds to the Sulphated Tyrosines of Activated Vitronectin to Attach to and Invade Human Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Virji, Mumtaz

    2010-01-01

    The host vasculature is believed to constitute the principal route of dissemination of Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) throughout the body, resulting in septicaemia and meningitis in susceptible humans. In vitro, the Nm outer membrane protein Opc can enhance cellular entry and exit, utilising serum factors to anchor to endothelial integrins; but the mechanisms of binding to serum factors are poorly characterised. This study demonstrates that Nm Opc expressed in acapsulate as well as capsulate bacteria can increase human brain endothelial cell line (HBMEC) adhesion and entry by first binding to serum vitronectin and, to a lesser extent, fibronectin. This study also demonstrates that Opc binds preferentially to the activated form of human vitronectin, but not to native vitronectin unless the latter is treated to relax its closed conformation. The direct binding of vitronectin occurs at its Connecting Region (CR) requiring sulphated tyrosines Y56 and Y59. Accordingly, Opc/vitronectin interaction could be inhibited with a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody 8E6 that targets the sulphotyrosines, and with synthetic sulphated (but not phosphorylated or unmodified) peptides spanning the vitronectin residues 43–68. Most importantly, the 26-mer sulphated peptide bearing the cell-binding domain 45RGD47 was sufficient for efficient meningococcal invasion of HBMECs. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing the binding of a bacterial adhesin to sulphated tyrosines of the host receptor. Our data also show that a single region of Opc is likely to interact with the sulphated regions of both vitronectin and of heparin. As such, in the absence of heparin, Opc-expressing Nm interact directly at the CR but when precoated with heparin, they bind via heparin to the heparin-binding domain of the activated vitronectin, although with a lower affinity than at the CR. Such redundancy suggests the importance of Opc/vitronectin interaction in meningococcal pathogenesis and may

  10. Vitronectin Expression in the Airways of Subjects with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M.; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M.; Correa, Mario A.; Ortega, Jorge E.; Paré, Peter D.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  11. Thin films of vitronectin transferred by MAPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, F.; Davidson, P.; Pauthe, E.; Gallet, O.; Anselme, K.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2011-11-01

    We report on matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) transfer of intact and functional protein molecules from a cryogenic aliquot obtained by freezing a protein-saline buffer solution. Vitronectin (Vn), an extracellular matrix protein with distinctive active domains for cell attachment and signalization, was expelled from frozen targets by KrF* excimer laser irradiation, and then immobilized on substrates. Particulates surrounded by a dense matrix were observed by optical, profilometry and AFM studies. The composition preservation of MAPLE-deposited protein films versus drop-cast films was demonstrated by FTIR and immunostaining studies. The stability and integrity of Vn after transfer was shown by their interaction with human osteoprogenitor cells in which actin filaments stretched across the entire cell area and clear focal points with surface were formed. The absence of detectable degradation of protein structure after MAPLE immobilization could provide benefits to surface functionalization for biomedical applications.

  12. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor promotes bronchial epithelial repair after injury through vitronectin binding.

    PubMed

    Adair, Jennifer E; Stober, Vandy; Sobhany, Mack; Zhuo, Lisheng; Roberts, John D; Negishi, Masahiko; Kimata, Koji; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2009-06-19

    Pulmonary epithelial injury is central to the pathogenesis of many lung diseases, such as asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Regulated epithelial repair is crucial for lung homeostasis and prevents scar formation and inflammation that accompany dysregulated healing. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in epithelial repair after injury. Vitronectin is a major ECM component that promotes epithelial repair. However, the factors that modify cell-vitronectin interactions after injury and help promote epithelial repair are not well studied. Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (IaI) is an abundant serum protein. IaI heavy chains contain von Willebrand A domains that can bind the arginine-glycine-aspartate domain of vitronectin. We therefore hypothesized that IaI can bind vitronectin and promote vitronectin-induced epithelial repair after injury. We show that IaI binds vitronectin at the arginine-glycine-aspartate site, thereby promoting epithelial adhesion and migration in vitro. Furthermore, we show that IaI-deficient mice have a dysregulated response to epithelial injury in vivo, consisting of decreased proliferation and epithelial metaplasia. We conclude that IaI interacts not only with hyaluronan, as previously reported, but also other ECM components like vitronectin and is an important regulator of cellular repair after injury. PMID:19395377

  13. Vitronectin-binding PAI-1 protects against the development of cardiac fibrosis through interaction with fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianyong; Yang, Hai-Chun; Kon, Valentina; Fogo, Agnes B; Lawrence, Daniel A; Ma, Ji

    2014-06-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promotes or abates fibrotic processes occurring in different organs. Binding of PAI-1 to vitronectin, an extracellular matrix component, may inhibit vitronectin-integrin complex-mediated cellular responses in pathophysiological conditions. To investigate the importance of plasmin suppression vs vitronectin-binding pathways of PAI-1 in cardiac fibrosis, we studied uninephrectomized mice fed a high salt diet and infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) together with different PAI-1 variants, including PAI-1AK (AK) that inhibits plasminogen activators but does not bind vitronectin, PAI-1RR (RR) that binds vitronectin but does not have protease inhibitory effects or control PAI-1 (CPAI), the control mutant that has similar molecular backbone and half-life as AK and RR while retaining all functions of native PAI-1. Compared with RR and CPAI, non-vitronectin-binding AK significantly increased expression of cardiac fibroblast marker, periostin (Ang+AK 8.40±3.55 vs Ang+RR 2.23±0.44 and Ang+CPAI 2.33±0.12% positive area, both P<0.05) and cardiac fibrosis (Ang+AK 1.79±0.26% vs Ang+RR 0.91±0.18% and Ang+CPAI 0.81±0.12% fibrotic area, both P<0.05), as well as Col1 mRNA (Ang+AK 12.81±1.84 vs Ang+RR 4.04±1.06 and Ang+CPAI 5.23±1.21 fold increase, both P<0.05). To elucidate mechanisms underlying the protective effects of vitronectin-binding PAI-1 against fibrosis, fibroblasts from normal adult human ventricles were stimulated with Ang and different PAI-1 variants. Protease inhibitory AK and CPAI increased supernatant fibronectin, while decreasing plasminogen activator/plasmin activities and matrix metalloproteinase. RR and CPAI variants significantly reduced fibroblast expression of integrin β3, vitronectin level in the supernatant and fibroblast adhesion to vitronectin compared with the non-vitronectin-binding AK. Further, RR and CPAI preserved apoptotic, decreased anti-apoptotic and proliferative activities in fibroblasts. Thus

  14. Vitronectin and dermcidin serum levels predict the metastatic progression of AJCC I-II early-stage melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Gardeazabal, Jesús; Erramuzpe, Asier; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Cortés, Jesús; García-Vázquez, María D; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Izu, Rosa; Luís Díaz-Ramón, Jose; de la Fuente, Ildefonso M; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2016-10-01

    Like many cancers, an early diagnosis of melanoma is fundamental to ensure a good prognosis, although an important proportion of stage I-II patients may still develop metastasis during follow-up. The aim of this work was to discover serum biomarkers in patients diagnosed with primary melanoma that identify those at a high risk of developing metastasis during the follow-up period. Proteomic and mass spectrophotometry analysis was performed on serum obtained from patients who developed metastasis during the first years after surgery for primary tumors and compared with that from patients who remained disease-free for more than 10 years after surgery. Five proteins were selected for validation as prognostic factors in 348 melanoma patients and 100 controls by ELISA: serum amyloid A and clusterin; immune system proteins; the cell adhesion molecules plakoglobin and vitronectin and the antimicrobial protein dermcidin. Compared to healthy controls, melanoma patients have high serum levels of these proteins at the moment of melanoma diagnosis, although the specific values were not related to the histopathological stage of the tumors. However, an analysis based on classification together with multivariate statistics showed that tumor stage, vitronectin and dermcidin levels were associated with the metastatic progression of patients with early-stage melanoma. Although melanoma patients have increased serum dermcidin levels, the REPTree classifier showed that levels of dermcidin <2.98 μg/ml predict metastasis in AJCC stage II patients. These data suggest that vitronectin and dermcidin are potent biomarkers of prognosis, which may help to improve the personalized medical care of melanoma patients and their survival. PMID:27216146

  15. Measurement of interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Minsu; Yang, Hyun-Kyu; Park, Keun-Hyung; Kang, Dong-Ku; Chang, Soo-Ik Kang, In-Cheol

    2007-11-03

    Protein nanoarrays containing integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA were fabricated on ProLinker{sup TM}-coated Au surface by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). An atomic force microscope (AFM) tip coated with ProLinker{sup TM} was modified by vitronectin. We measured the interaction force between nanoarrayed integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} or BSA and immobilized vitronectin on the cantilever tip by employing tethering-unbinding method. The unbinding force between integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} and vitronectin (1087 {+-} 62 pN) was much higher than that of between BSA and vitronectin (643 {+-} 74 pN). These results demonstrate that one can distinguish a specific protein interaction from non-specific interactions by means of force measurement on the molecular interactions between the nanoarrayed protein and its interacting protein on the AFM tip.

  16. Conserved Patterns of Microbial Immune Escape: Pathogenic Microbes of Diverse Origin Target the Human Terminal Complement Inhibitor Vitronectin via a Single Common Motif

    PubMed Central

    Kraiczy, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of many microbes relies on their capacity to resist innate immunity, and to survive and persist in an immunocompetent human host microbes have developed highly efficient and sophisticated complement evasion strategies. Here we show that different human pathogens including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, acquire the human terminal complement regulator vitronectin to their surface. By using truncated vitronectin fragments we found that all analyzed microbial pathogens (n = 13) bound human vitronectin via the same C-terminal heparin-binding domain (amino acids 352–374). This specific interaction leaves the terminal complement complex (TCC) regulatory region of vitronectin accessible, allowing inhibition of C5b-7 membrane insertion and C9 polymerization. Vitronectin complexed with the various microbes and corresponding proteins was thus functionally active and inhibited complement-mediated C5b-9 deposition. Taken together, diverse microbial pathogens expressing different structurally unrelated vitronectin-binding molecules interact with host vitronectin via the same conserved region to allow versatile control of the host innate immune response. PMID:26808444

  17. Vitronectin is not essential for normal mammalian development and fertility.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X; Saunders, T L; Camper, S A; Samuelson, L C; Ginsburg, D

    1995-01-01

    Vitronectin (VN) is an abundant glycoprotein present in plasma and the extracellular matrix of most tissues. Though the precise function of VN in vivo is unknown, it has been implicated as a participant in diverse biological processes, including cell attachment and spreading, complement activation, and regulation of hemostasis. The major site of synthesis appears to be the liver, though VN is also found in the brain at an early stage of mouse organogenesis, suggesting that it may play an important role in mouse development. Genetic deficiency of VN has not been reported in humans or in other higher organisms. To examine the biologic function of VN within the context of the intact animal, we have established a murine model for VN deficiency through targeted disruption of the murine VN gene. Southern blot analysis of DNA obtained from homozygous null mice demonstrates deletion of all VN coding sequences, and immunological analysis confirms the complete absence of VN protein expression in plasma. However, heterozygous mice carrying one normal and one null VN allele and homozygous null mice completely deficient in VN demonstrate normal development, fertility, and survival. Sera obtained from VN-deficient mice are completely deficient in "serum spreading factor" and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 binding activities. These observations demonstrate that VN is not essential for cell adhesion and migration during normal mouse development and suggest that its role in these processes may partially overlap with other adhesive matrix components. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8618914

  18. Abrogation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-vitronectin interaction ameliorates acute kidney injury in murine endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high mortality and morbidity in patients. Although the pathogenesis of AKI during sepsis is poorly understood, it is well accepted that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and vitronectin (Vn) are involved in AKI. However, the functional cooperation between PAI-1 and Vn in septic AKI has not been completely elucidated. To address this issue, mice were utilized lacking either PAI-1 (PAI-1-/-) or expressing a PAI-1-mutant (PAI-1R101A/Q123K) in which the interaction between PAI-1 and Vn is abrogated, while other functions of PAI-1 are retained. It was found that both PAI-1-/- and PAI-1R101A/Q123K mice are associated with decreased renal dysfunction, apoptosis, inflammation, and ERK activation as compared to wild-type (WT) mice after LPS challenge. Also, PAI-1-/- mice showed attenuated fibrin deposition in the kidneys. Furthermore, a lack of PAI-1 or PAI-1-Vn interaction was found to be associated with an increase in activated Protein C (aPC) in plasma. These results demonstrate that PAI-1, through its interaction with Vn, exerts multiple deleterious mechanisms to induce AKI. Therefore, targeting of the PAI-1-Vn interaction in kidney represents an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of septic AKI by not only altering the fibrinolytic capacity but also regulating PC activity.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Uses Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase (Lpd) to Bind to the Human Terminal Pathway Regulators Vitronectin and Clusterin to Inhibit Terminal Pathway Complement Attack

    PubMed Central

    Hallström, Teresia; Uhde, Melanie; Singh, Birendra; Skerka, Christine; Riesbeck, Kristian; Zipfel, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls host innate immune and complement attack. Here we identify Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), a 57 kDa moonlighting protein, as the first P. aeruginosa protein that binds the two human terminal pathway inhibitors vitronectin and clusterin. Both human regulators when bound to the bacterium inhibited effector function of the terminal complement, blocked C5b-9 deposition and protected the bacterium from complement damage. P. aeruginosa when challenged with complement active human serum depleted from vitronectin was severely damaged and bacterial survival was reduced by over 50%. Similarly, when in human serum clusterin was blocked by a mAb, bacterial survival was reduced by 44%. Thus, demonstrating that Pseudomonas benefits from attachment of each human regulator and controls complement attack. The Lpd binding site in vitronectin was localized to the C-terminal region, i.e. to residues 354–363. Thus, Lpd of P. aeruginosa is a surface exposed moonlighting protein that binds two human terminal pathway inhibitors, vitronectin and clusterin and each human inhibitor when attached protected the bacterial pathogen from the action of the terminal complement pathway. Our results showed insights into the important function of Lpd as a complement regulator binding protein that might play an important role in virulence of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26368530

  20. Control of adhesion of human induced pluripotent stem cells to plasma-patterned polydimethylsiloxane coated with vitronectin and γ-globulin.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryotaro; Hattori, Koji; Tachikawa, Saoko; Tagaya, Motohiro; Sasaki, Toru; Sugiura, Shinji; Kanamori, Toshiyuki; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi

    2014-09-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising source of cells for medical applications. Recently, the development of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microdevices to control the microenvironment of hiPSCs has been extensively studied. PDMS surfaces are often treated with low-pressure air plasma to facilitate protein adsorption and cell adhesion. However, undefined molecules present in the serum and extracellular matrix used to culture cells complicate the study of cell adhesion. Here, we studied the effects of vitronectin and γ-globulin on hiPSC adhesion to plasma-treated and untreated PDMS surfaces under defined culture conditions. We chose these proteins because they have opposite properties: vitronectin mediates hiPSC attachment to hydrophilic siliceous surfaces, whereas γ-globulin is adsorbed by hydrophobic surfaces and does not mediate cell adhesion. Immunostaining showed that, when applied separately, vitronectin and γ-globulin were adsorbed by both plasma-treated and untreated PDMS surfaces. In contrast, when PDMS surfaces were exposed to a mixture of the two proteins, vitronectin was preferentially adsorbed onto plasma-treated surfaces, whereas γ-globulin was adsorbed onto untreated surfaces. Human iPSCs adhered to the vitronectin-rich plasma-treated surfaces but not to the γ-globulin-rich untreated surfaces. On the basis of these results, we used perforated masks to prepare plasma-patterned PDMS substrates, which were then used to pattern hiPSCs. The patterned hiPSCs expressed undifferentiated-cell markers and did not escape from the patterned area for at least 7 days. The patterned PDMS could be stored for up to 6 days before hiPSCs were plated. We believe that our results will be useful for the development of hiPSC microdevices. PMID:24656306

  1. Increasing Alfalfa Rumen Bypass Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alfalfa has one of the highest crude protein contents among forage crops, but is is rapidly and extensively degraded by rumen microorganisms. To examine differential protein digestion, three distinct varieties of alfalfa, grown from single plants, were subjected to fermentation in the rumen of a ca...

  2. Propolis modulates vitronectin, laminin, and heparan sulfate/heparin expression during experimental burn healing*

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Paweł; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Koźma, Ewa M.; Wisowski, Grzegorz; Stojko, Jerzy; Klimek, Katarzyna; Olczyk, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed at assessing the dynamics of vitronectin (VN), laminin (LN), and heparan sulfate/heparin (HS/HP) content changes during experimental burn healing. Methods: VN, LN, and HS/HP were isolated and purified from normal and injured skin of domestic pigs, on the 3rd, 5th, 10th, 15th, and 21st days following thermal damage. The wounds were treated with apitherapeutic agent (propolis), silver sulfadiazine (SSD), physiological salt solution, and propolis vehicle. VN and LN were quantified using an immunoenzymatic assay and HS/HP was estimated by densitometric analysis. Results: Propolis treatment stimulated significant increases in VN, LN, and HS/HP contents during the initial phase of study, followed by a reduction in the estimated extracellular matrix molecules. Similar patterns, although less extreme, were observed after treatment with SSD. Conclusions: The beneficial effects of propolis on experimental wounds make it a potential apitherapeutic agent in topical burn management. PMID:23125086

  3. Attachment to fibronectin or vitronectin makes human neutrophil migration sensitive to alterations in cytosolic free calcium concentration

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Transient increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, appear to be required for the migration of human neutrophils on poly-D- lysine-coated glass in the presence of dilute serum (Marks, P. W., and F. R. Maxfield. 1990. J. Cell Biol. 110:43-52). In contrast, no requirement for [Ca2+]i transients exists when neutrophils migrate on albumin-coated glass in the absence of serum. To determine the mechanism that necessitates [Ca2+]i transients on poly-D-lysine in the presence of serum, migration was examined on substrates consisting of purified adhesive glycoproteins. In the absence of external Ca2+, a treatment which causes the cessation of [Ca2+]i transients, migration on fibronectin (fn) and vitronectin (vn) was significantly inhibited. Migration was also inhibited in Ca2(+)-buffered cells on these substrates, indicating that this effect was the result of an alteration of [Ca2+]i. In the absence of external Ca2+, the inhibition of migration on fn or vn was more pronounced when soluble fn or vn was added to cells migrating on these substrates. This effect of soluble adhesive glycoprotein was specific: in the absence of external Ca2+, soluble fn did not affect the migration of cells on vn, and soluble vn did not affect the migration on fn. No additional inhibition of migration was observed in Ca2(+)-buffered cells with the addition of soluble adhesive glycoprotein. These data indicate that [Ca2+]i transients are involved in continued migration of human neutrophils on fn or vn, proteins which are part of the extracellular matrix that neutrophils encounter in vivo. PMID:1702443

  4. Spike-in SILAC proteomic approach reveals the vitronectin as an early molecular signature of liver fibrosis in hepatitis C infections with hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Montaldo, Claudia; Mattei, Simone; Baiocchini, Andrea; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Del Nonno, Franca; Pucillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Cozzolino, Angela Maria; Battistelli, Cecilia; Amicone, Laura; Ippolito, Giuseppe; van Noort, Vera; Conigliaro, Alice; Alonzi, Tonino; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced iron overload has been shown to promote liver fibrosis, steatosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The zonal-restricted histological distribution of pathological iron deposits has hampered the attempt to perform large-scale in vivo molecular investigations on the comorbidity between iron and HCV. Diagnostic and prognostic markers are not yet available to assess iron overload-induced liver fibrogenesis and progression in HCV infections. Here, by means of Spike-in SILAC proteomic approach, we first unveiled a specific membrane protein expression signature of HCV cell cultures in the presence of iron overload. Computational analysis of proteomic dataset highlighted the hepatocytic vitronectin expression as the most promising specific biomarker for iron-associated fibrogenesis in HCV infections. Next, the robustness of our in vitro findings was challenged in human liver biopsies by immunohistochemistry and yielded two major results: (i) hepatocytic vitronectin expression is associated to liver fibrogenesis in HCV-infected patients with iron overload; (ii) hepatic vitronectin expression was found to discriminate also the transition between mild to moderate fibrosis in HCV-infected patients without iron overload.

  5. Increased Adipose Protein Carbonylation in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Serrot, Federico J.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Moran, Antoinette; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Choudry, Umar; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with obesity but mechanisms controlling this relationship in humans are not fully understood. Studies in animal models suggest a linkage between adipose reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin resistance. ROS oxidize cellular lipids to produce a variety of lipid hydroperoxides that in turn generate reactive lipid aldehydes that covalently modify cellular proteins in a process termed carbonylation. Mammalian cells defend against reactive lipid aldehydes and protein carbonylation by glutathionylation using glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) or carbonyl reduction/oxidation via reductases and/or dehydrogenases. Insulin resistance in mice is linked to ROS production and increased level of protein carbonylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport, and altered adipokine secretion. To assess protein carbonylation and insulin resistance in humans, eight healthy participants underwent subcutaneous fat biopsy from the periumbilical region for protein analysis and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing to measure insulin sensitivity. Soluble proteins from adipose tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the major carbonylated proteins identified as the adipocyte and epithelial fatty acid–binding proteins. The level of protein carbonylation was directly correlated with adiposity and serum free fatty acids (FFAs). These results suggest that in human obesity oxidative stress is linked to protein carbonylation and such events may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:21593812

  6. Hybrid vitronectin-mimicking polycaprolactone scaffolds for human retinal progenitor cell differentiation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Elodie; Baranov, Petr; Young, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made in an attempt to treat retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The irreversible loss of photoreceptors is common to both, and currently no restorative clinical treatment exists. It has been shown that retinal progenitor and photoreceptor precursor cell transplantation can rescue the retinal structure and function. Importantly, retinal progenitor cells can be collected from the developing neural retina with further expansion and additional modification in vitro, and the delivery into the degenerative host can be performed as a single-cell suspension injection or as a complex graft transplantation. Previously, we have described several polymer scaffolds for culture and transplantation of retinal progenitor cells of both mouse and human origin. This tissue engineering strategy increases donor cell survival and integration. We have also shown that biodegradable poly(ɛ-caprolactone) induces mature photoreceptor differentiation from human retinal progenitor cells. However, poor adhesive properties limit its use, and therefore it requires additional surface modification. The aim of this work was to study vitronectin-mimicking oligopeptides (Synthemax II-SC) poly(ɛ-caprolactone) films and their effects on human retinal progenitor cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we show that the incorporation of vitronectin-mimicking oligopeptide into poly(ɛ-caprolactone) leads to dose-dependent increases in cell adhesion; the optimum dose identified as 30 µg/ml. Inhibition of human retinal progenitor cells proliferation was seen on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and was maintained with the hybrid scaffold. This has been shown to be beneficial for driving cell differentiation. Additionally, we observed equal expression of Nrl, rhodopsin, recoverin, and rod outer membrane 1 after differentiation on the hybrid scaffold as compared to the standard fibronectin coating of poly

  7. Increased flexibility decreases antifreeze protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti N; Graether, Steffen P

    2010-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins protect several cold-blooded organisms from subzero environments by preventing death from freezing. The Type I antifreeze protein (AFP) isoform from Pseudopleuronectes americanus, named HPLC6, is a 37-residue protein that is a single α-helix. Mutational analysis of the protein showed that its alanine-rich face is important for binding to and inhibiting the growth of macromolecular ice. Almost all structural studies of HPLC6 involve the use of chemically synthesized protein as it requires a native N-terminal aspartate and an amidated C-terminus for full activity. Here, we examine the role of C-terminal amide and C-terminal arginine side chain in the activity, structure, and dynamics of nonamidated Arg37 HPLC6, nonamidated HPLC6 Ala37, amidated HPLC6 Ala37, and fully native HPLC6 using a recombinant bacterial system. The thermal hysteresis (TH) activities of the nonamidated mutants are 35% lower compared with amidated proteins, but analysis of the NMR data and circular dichroism spectra shows that they are all still α-helical. Relaxation data from the two nonamidated mutants indicate that the C-terminal residues are considerably more flexible than the rest of the protein because of the loss of the amide group, whereas the amidated Ala37 mutant has a C-terminus that is as rigid as the wild-type protein and has high TH activity. We propose that an increase in flexibility of the AFP causes it to lose activity because its dynamic nature prevents it from binding strongly to the ice surface. PMID:20936690

  8. Sequence determinants of protein aggregation: tools to increase protein solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. However, very often the target protein accumulates into insoluble aggregates in a misfolded and biologically inactive form. Bacterial inclusion bodies are major bottlenecks in protein production and are hampering the development of top priority research areas such structural genomics. Inclusion body formation was formerly considered to occur via non-specific association of hydrophobic surfaces in folding intermediates. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that protein aggregation in bacteria resembles to the well-studied process of amyloid fibril formation. Both processes appear to rely on the formation of specific, sequence-dependent, intermolecular interactions driving the formation of structured protein aggregates. This similarity in the mechanisms of aggregation will probably allow applying anti-aggregational strategies already tested in the amyloid context to the less explored area of protein aggregation inside bacteria. Specifically, new sequence-based approaches appear as promising tools to tune protein aggregation in biotechnological processes. PMID:15847694

  9. Translating human embryonic stem cells from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional cultures in a defined medium on laminin- and vitronectin-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Li, Jian; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Reuveny, Shaul; Cool, Simon M; Birch, William R; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng

    2012-07-01

    While defining the environment for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) culture on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces has made rapid progress, the industrial-scale implementation of this technology will benefit from translating this knowledge into a 3-dimensional (3D) system, thus enabling better control, automation, and volumetric scale-up in bioreactors. The current study describes a system with defined conditions that are capable of supporting the long-term 2D culture of hESCs and the transposing of these conditions to 3D microcarrier (MC) cultures. Vitronectin (VN) and laminin (LN) were chosen as matrices for the long-term propagation of hESCs in a defined culture medium (STEMPRO(®)) for conventional 2D culture. Adsorption of these proteins onto 2D tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) indicated that surface density saturation of 510 and 850 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, was attained above 20 μg/mL deposition solution concentration. Adsorption of these proteins onto spherical (97±10 μm), polystyrene MC followed a similar trend and coating surface densities of 450 and 650 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, were used to support hESC propagation. The long-term expansion of hESCs was equally successful on TCPS and MC, with consistently high expression (>90%) of pluripotent markers (OCT-4, MAB-84, and TRA-1-60) over 20 passages and maintenance of karyotypic normality. The average fold increase in cell numbers on VN-coated MC per serial passage was 8.5±1.0, which was similar to LN-coated MC (8.5±0.9). Embryoid body differentiation assays and teratoma formation confirmed that hESCs retained the ability to differentiate into lineages of all 3 germ layers, thus demonstrating the first translation to a fully defined MC-based environment for the expansion of hESCs.

  10. The heparin binding domain of vitronectin is the region that is required to enhance insulin-like growth factor-I signaling.

    PubMed

    Maile, Laura A; Busby, Walker H; Sitko, Kevin; Capps, Byron E; Sergent, Tiffany; Badley-Clarke, Jane; Ling, Yan; Clemmons, David R

    2006-04-01

    We have shown that vitronectin (Vn) binding to a cysteine loop sequence within the extracellular domain of the beta3-subunit (amino acids 177-184) of alphaVbeta3 is required for the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I signaling. When Vn binding to this sequence is blocked, IGF-I signaling in smooth muscle cells is impaired. Because this binding site is distinct from the site on beta3 to which the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence of extracellular matrix ligands bind (amino acids 107-171), we hypothesized that the region of Vn that binds to the cysteine loop on beta3 is distinct from the region that contains the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The results presented in this study demonstrate that this heparin binding domain (HBD) is the region of Vn that binds to the cysteine loop region of beta3 and that this region is sufficient to mediate the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I signaling. We provide evidence that binding of the HBD of Vn to alphaVbeta3 has direct effects on the activation state of beta3 as measured by beta3 phosphorylation. The increase in beta3 phosphorylation associated with exposure of cells to this HBD is associated with enhanced phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Src homology 2 domain-containing transforming protein C and enhanced activation MAPK, a downstream mediator of IGF-I signaling. We conclude that the interaction of the HBD of Vn binding to the cysteine loop sequence of beta3 is necessary and sufficient for the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I-mediated effects in smooth muscle cells.

  11. Adhesomes: specific granules containing receptors for laminin, C3bi/fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have localized several major extracellular matrix protein receptors in the specific granules of human polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocytic leukocytes using double label immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) with ultrathin frozen sections and colloidal-gold conjugates. Rabbit antibodies to 67-kD human laminin receptor (LNR) were located on the inner surface of the specific granule membrane and within its internal matrix. LNR antigens co-distributed with lactoferrin, a marker of specific granules, but did not co-localize with elastase in azurophilic granules of PMNs. Further, CD11b/CD18 (leukocyte receptor for C3bi, fibrinogen, endothelial cells, and endotoxin), mammalian fibronectin receptor (FNR), and vitronectin receptor (VNR) antigens were also co- localized with LNR in PMN specific granules. A similar type of granule was found in monocytes which stained for LNR, FNR, VNR, CD18, and lysozyme. Activation of PMNs with either PMA, f-met-leu-phe (fMLP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or monocytic leukocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced fusion of specific granules with the cell membrane and expression of both LNR and CD18 antigens on the outer cell surface. Further, stimulation led to augmented PMN adhesion on LN substrata, and six- to eightfold increases in specific binding of soluble LN that was inhibited by LNR antibody. These results indicate that four types of extracellular matrix receptors are located in leukocyte specific granules, and suggest that up-regulation of these receptors during inflammation may mediate leukocyte adhesion and extravasation. We have thus termed leukocyte specific granules adhesomes. PMID:2480353

  12. Moonlighting of Helicobacter pylori catalase protects against complement-mediated killing by utilising the host molecule vitronectin

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Corinna; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Ermert, David; Singh, Birendra; Su, Yu-Ching; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Blom, Anna M.; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important human pathogen and a common cause of peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Despite H. pylori provoking strong innate and adaptive immune responses, the bacterium is able to successfully establish long-term infections. Vitronectin (Vn), a component of both the extracellular matrix and plasma, is involved in many physiological processes, including regulation of the complement system. The aim of this study was to define a receptor in H. pylori that binds Vn and determine the significance of the interaction for virulence. Surprisingly, by using proteomics, we found that the hydrogen peroxide-neutralizing enzyme catalase KatA is a major Vn-binding protein. Deletion of the katA gene in three different strains resulted in impaired binding of Vn. Recombinant KatA was generated and shown to bind with high affinity to a region between heparin-binding domain 2 and 3 of Vn that differs from previously characterised bacterial binding sites on the molecule. In terms of function, KatA protected H. pylori from complement-mediated killing in a Vn-dependent manner. Taken together, the virulence factor KatA is a Vn-binding protein that moonlights on the surface of H. pylori to promote bacterial evasion of host innate immunity. PMID:27087644

  13. The 82-plex plasma protein signature that predicts increasing inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tepel, Martin; Beck, Hans C.; Tan, Qihua; Borst, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Lars M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to define the specific plasma protein signature that predicts the increase of the inflammation marker C-reactive protein from index day to next-day using proteome analysis and novel bioinformatics tools. We performed a prospective study of 91 incident kidney transplant recipients and quantified 359 plasma proteins simultaneously using nano-Liquid-Chromatography-Tandem Mass-Spectrometry in individual samples and plasma C-reactive protein on the index day and the next day. Next-day C-reactive protein increased in 59 patients whereas it decreased in 32 patients. The prediction model selected and validated 82 plasma proteins which determined increased next-day C-reactive protein (area under receiver-operator-characteristics curve, 0.772; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 0.876; P < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression showed that 82-plex protein signature (P < 0.001) was associated with observed increased next-day C-reactive protein. The 82-plex protein signature outperformed routine clinical procedures. The category-free net reclassification index improved with 82-plex plasma protein signature (total net reclassification index, 88.3%). Using the 82-plex plasma protein signature increased net reclassification index with a clinical meaningful 10% increase of risk mainly by the improvement of reclassification of subjects in the event group. An 82-plex plasma protein signature predicts an increase of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. PMID:26445912

  14. The vitronectin binding area of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, mapped by mutagenesis and protection against an inactivating organochemical ligand.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A

    2002-06-19

    A distinguishing feature of serpins is their ability to undergo a conformational change consisting in insertion of the reactive centre loop (RCL) into beta-sheet A. In the serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), RCL movements are regulated by vitronectin, having a previously poorly defined binding site lateral to PAI-1's beta-sheet A. Using a novel strategy, based on identification of amino acid residues necessary for vitronectin protection of PAI-1 against inactivation by 4,4'-dianilino-1,1'-bisnaphthyl-5,5'-disulfonic acid, we have defined a vitronectin binding surface spanning 10 residues between alpha-helix F, beta-strand 2A, and alpha-helix E. Our results contribute to elucidating the unique serpin conformational change.

  15. PAI-1 over-expression decreases experimental post-thrombotic vein wall fibrosis by a non-vitronectin dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Andrea T.; Diaz, Jose A.; Ballard-Lipka, Nicole L.; Roelofs, Karen J.; Farris, Diana M.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Wakefield, Thomas W.; Henke, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Factors associated with post-thrombotic syndrome are known clinically, but the underlying cellular processes at the vein wall are not well-delineated. Prior work suggests that vein wall damage does not correlate with thrombus resolution, but rather with plasminogen activator-1 (PAI-1) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Objective We hypothesized that PAI-1 would confer post venous thrombosis (VT) vein wall protection via a Vitronectin (Vn) dependent mechanism. Methods A stasis model of VT was used with harvest over 2 weeks, in wild type (WT), Vn−/−, and PAI-1 overexpressing mice (PAI-1 Tg). Results PAI-1 Tg mice had larger VT at 6 and 14 days, compared to controls, but Vn−/−mice had no alteration of VT resolution. Gene deletion of Vn resulted in increased, rather than expected decrease in circulating PAI-1 activity. While both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg had attenuated intimal fibrosis, PAI-1 Tg had significantly less vein wall collagen and a compensatory increase in collagen III gene expression. Both Vn−/− and PAI-1 Tg vein wall had less monocyte chemotactic factor-1, and fewer macrophages (F4/80), with significantly less MMP-2 activity and decreased TIMP-1 antigen. Ex vivo assessment of TGFβ mediated fibrotic response showed that PAI-1 Tg vein walls had increased profibrotic gene expression (collagen I, III, MMP-2 and α-SMA) as compared with controls, opposite of the in vivo response. Conclusions The absence of Vn increases circulating PAI-1, which positively modulates vein wall fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner. Translationally, PAI-1 elevation may decrease vein wall damage after DVT, perhaps by decreasing macrophage-mediated activities. PMID:24943740

  16. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 and Vitronectin Expression Level and Stoichiometry Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration through Physiological Collagen Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Goyal, N.; Strawn, T. L.; Wu, J.; Mann, K. M.; Lawrence, D. A.; Fay, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is a critical process in arterial remodeling. Purified plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is reported to both promote and inhibit VSMC migration on 2-dimensional (D) surfaces. Objective To determine the effects of PAI-1 and vitronectin (VN) expressed by VSMC themselves on migration through physiological collagen matrices. Methods We studied migration of wild-type (WT), PAI-1-deficient, VN-deficient, PAI-1/VN doubly-deficient (DKO), and PAI-1-transgenic (Tg) VSMC through 3-D collagen gels. Results WT VSMC migrated significantly slower than PAI-1- and VN-deficient VSMC, but significantly faster than DKO VSMC. Experiments with recombinant PAI-1 suggested that basal VSMC PAI-1 expression inhibits migration by binding VN, which is secreted by VSMC and binds collagen. However, PAI-1-over-expressing Tg VSMC migrated faster than WT VSMC. Reconstitution experiments with recombinant PAI-1 mutants suggested that the pro-migratory effect of PAI-1 over-expression required its anti-plasminogen activator (PA) and LDL receptor-related protein (LRP) binding functions, but not VN binding. While promoting VSMC migration in the absence of PAI-1, VN inhibited the pro-migratory effect of active PAI-1. Conclusions In isolation, VN and PAI-1 are each pro-migratory. However, via formation of a high-affinity, non-motogenic complex, PAI-1 and VN each buffers the other's pro-migratory effect. The level of PAI-1 expression by VSMC and the concentration of VN in extracellular matrix are critical determinants of whether PAI-1 and VN promote or inhibit migration. These findings help to rectify previously conflicting reports and suggest that PAI-1/VN stoichiometry plays an important role in VSMC migration and vascular remodeling. PMID:20492459

  17. Construction of a plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 variant without measurable affinity to vitronectin but otherwise normal.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Durand, Michelle K V; Skeldal, Sune; Dupont, Daniel M; Bødker, Julie S; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Vitronectin (VN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have important functional interactions: VN stabilises the protease inhibitory activity of PAI-1 and PAI-1 inhibits binding of adhesion receptors to VN. Having previously mapped the PAI-1 binding area for VN, we have now constructed a PAI-1 variant, R103A-M112A-Q125A, without measurable affinity to VN, but with full protease inhibitory activity and endocytosis receptor binding. As a tool for evaluating the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the PAI-1-VN interaction, our new variant is far superior to the previously widely used PAI-1 variant Q125K, which we have found possesses an only about 10-fold reduced affinity to VN.

  18. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  19. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  20. Enhanced membrane protein expression by engineering increased intracellular membrane production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Membrane protein research is frequently hampered by the low natural abundance of these proteins in cells and typically relies on recombinant gene expression. Different expression systems, like mammalian cells, insect cells, bacteria and yeast are being used, but very few research efforts have been directed towards specific host cell customization for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. Here we show that by increasing the intracellular membrane production by interfering with a key enzymatic step of lipid synthesis, enhanced expression of membrane proteins in yeast is achieved. Results We engineered the oleotrophic yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, by deleting the phosphatidic acid phosphatase, PAH1, which led to massive proliferation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. For all eight tested representatives of different integral membrane protein families, we obtained enhanced protein accumulation levels and in some cases enhanced proteolytic integrity in the ∆pah1 strain. We analysed the adenosine A2AR G-protein coupled receptor case in more detail and found that concomitant induction of the unfolded protein response in the ∆pah1 strain enhanced the specific ligand binding activity of the receptor. These data indicate an improved quality control mechanism for membrane proteins accumulating in yeast cells with proliferated ER. Conclusions We conclude that redirecting the metabolic flux of fatty acids away from triacylglycerol- and sterylester-storage towards membrane phospholipid synthesis by PAH1 gene inactivation, provides a valuable approach to enhance eukaryotic membrane protein production. Complementary to this improvement in membrane protein quantity, UPR co-induction further enhances the quality of the membrane protein in terms of its proper folding and biological activity. Importantly, since these pathways are conserved in all eukaryotes, it will be of interest to investigate similar engineering approaches in other cell types of

  1. Macromolecular crowding increases structural content of folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Perham, Michael; Stagg, Loren; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2007-10-30

    Here we show that increased amount of secondary structure is acquired in the folded states of two structurally-different proteins (alpha-helical VlsE and alpha/beta flavodoxin) in the presence of macromolecular crowding agents. The structural content of flavodoxin and VlsE is enhanced by 33% and 70%, respectively, in 400 mg/ml Ficoll 70 (pH 7, 20 degrees C) and correlates with higher protein-thermal stability. In the same Ficoll range, there are only small effects on the unfolded-state structures of the proteins. This is the first in vitro assessment of crowding effects on the native-state structures at physiological conditions. Our findings imply that for proteins with low intrinsic stability, the functional structures in vivo may differ from those observed in dilute buffers. PMID:17919600

  2. Poliovirus protein 2BC increases cytosolic free calcium concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, R; Irurzun, A; Carrasco, L

    1997-01-01

    Poliovirus-infected cells undergo an increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations from the 4th h postinfection. The protein responsible for this effect was identified by the expression of different poliovirus nonstructural proteins in HeLa cells by using a recombinant vaccinia virus system. Synthesis of protein 2BC enhances cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in a manner similar to that observed in poliovirus-infected cells. To identify the regions in 2BC involved in modifying cytoplasmic calcium levels, several 2BC variants were generated. Regions present in both 2B and 2C are necessary to augment cellular free calcium levels. Therefore, in addition to inducing proliferation of membranous vesicles, poliovirus protein 2BC also alters cellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:9223520

  3. Wisconsin - Increased corn silage protein with intercropped lablab bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein supplements for livestock are costly. In recent research in southern WI, lablab bean grown with corn increased forage CP concentration over monoculture corn without compromising forage yield or potential milk production per acre. Corn was intercropped with each of three climbing beans: lab...

  4. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo.

  5. The interaction between uPAR and vitronectin triggers ligand-independent adhesion signalling by integrins

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Schulte, Carsten; Buttiglione, Valentina; De Lorenzi, Valentina; Piontini, Andrea; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Madsen, Chris D; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a non-integrin vitronectin (VN) cell adhesion receptor linked to the plasma membrane by a glycolipid anchor. Through structure–function analyses of uPAR, VN and integrins, we document that uPAR-mediated cell adhesion to VN triggers a novel type of integrin signalling that is independent of integrin–matrix engagement. The signalling is fully active on VN mutants deficient in integrin binding site and is also efficiently transduced by integrins deficient in ligand binding. Although integrin ligation is dispensable, signalling is crucially dependent upon an active conformation of the integrin and its association with intracellular adaptors such as talin. This non-canonical integrin signalling is not restricted to uPAR as it poses no structural constraints to the receptor mediating cell attachment. In contrast to canonical integrin signalling, where integrins form direct mechanical links between the ECM and the cytoskeleton, the molecular mechanism enabling the crosstalk between non-integrin adhesion receptors and integrins is dependent upon membrane tension. This suggests that for this type of signalling, the membrane represents a critical component of the molecular clutch. PMID:25168639

  6. Increasing protein production by directed vector backbone evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms was a key enabling technology for the rapid development of industrial and molecular biotechnology. However, despite all progress the improvement of protein production is an ongoing challenge and of high importance for cost-effective enzyme production. With the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for vector backbone optimization we report a novel directed evolution based approach to increase protein production levels by randomly introducing mutations in the vector backbone. In the current study we validate the epMEGAWHOP mutagenesis protocol for three different expression systems. The latter demonstrated the general applicability of the epMEGAWHOP method. Cellulase and lipase production was doubled in one round of directed evolution by random mutagenesis of pET28a(+) and pET22b(+) vector backbones. Protease production using the vector pHY300PLK was increased ~4-times with an average of ~1.25 mutations per kb vector backbone. The epMEGAWHOP does not require any rational understanding of the expression machinery and can generally be applied to enzymes, expression vectors and related hosts. epMEGAWHOP is therefore from our point of view a robust, rapid and straight forward alternative for increasing protein production in general and for biotechnological applications. PMID:23890095

  7. Increasing Protein Charge State When Using Laser Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Santosh; Flanigan, Paul M.; Perez, Johnny J.; Archer, Jieutonne J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser vaporization is used to transfer cytochrome c, myoglobin, lysozyme, and ubiquitin from the condensed phase into an electrospray (ES) plume consisting of a mixture of a supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), acetic acid (AA), or formic acid (FA). Interaction of acid-sensitive proteins like cytochrome c and myoglobin with the highly charged ES droplets resulted in a shift to higher charge states in comparison with acid-stable proteins like lysozyme and ubiquitin. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) measurements showed an increase in both the average charge states (Zavg) and the charge state with maximum intensity (Zmode) for acid-sensitive proteins compared with conventional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) under equivalent solvent conditions. A marked increase in ion abundance of higher charge states was observed for LEMS in comparison with conventional electrospray for cytochrome c (ranging from 19+ to 21+ versus 13+ to 16+) and myoglobin (ranging from 19+ to 26+ versus 18+ to 21+) using an ES solution containing m-NBA and TFA. LEMS measurements as a function of electrospray flow rate yielded increasing charge states with decreasing flow rates for cytochrome c and myoglobin.

  8. Protein Subcellular Relocalization Increases the Retention of Eukaryotic Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Byun, S. Ashley; Singh, Sarabdeep

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is widely accepted as a key evolutionary process, leading to new genes and novel protein functions. By providing the raw genetic material necessary for functional expansion, the mechanisms that involve the retention and functional diversification of duplicate genes are one of the central topics in evolutionary and comparative genomics. One proposed source of retention and functional diversification is protein subcellular relocalization (PSR). PSR postulates that changes in the subcellular location of eukaryotic duplicate proteins can positively modify function and therefore be beneficial to the organism. As such, PSR would promote retention of those relocalized duplicates and result in significantly lower death rates compared with death rates of nonrelocalized duplicate pairs. We surveyed both relocalized and nonrelocalized duplicate proteins from the available genomes and proteomes of 59 eukaryotic species and compared their relative death rates over a Ks range between 0 and 1. Using the Cox proportional hazard model, we observed that the death rates of relocalized duplicate pairs were significantly lower than the death rates of the duplicates without relocalization in most eukaryotic species examined in this study. These observations suggest that PSR significantly increases retention of duplicate genes and that it plays an important, but currently underappreciated, role in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:24265504

  9. Heterologous expression of the lipid transfer protein CERT increases therapeutic protein productivity of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Florin, Lore; Pegel, Antje; Becker, Eric; Hausser, Angelika; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kaufmann, Hitto

    2009-04-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the introduction of transgenes regulating protein transport or affecting post-translational modifications can further improve industrial processes for the production of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cells. Our study on improving therapeutic protein production in CHO cells by heterologous expression of the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) was initiated by the recent discovery that CERT is involved in protein kinase D (PKD)-dependent protein transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. We generated a set of CHO DG44 cell lines by stable integration of constructs expressing either CERT wild-type or CERT S132A, a mutant conferring increased lipid transfer activity, or a mock plasmid. CHO cells expressing heterologous CERT demonstrated significantly higher specific productivities of the therapeutic protein HSA when grown in inoculum suspension cultures. This effect translated into significantly increased overall HSA titers in a fed-batch format where cells are grown in chemically defined serum-free media. Furthermore, we could show that CERT also enhanced monoclonal antibody secretion in two IgG production cell lines with different basal productivities. The data demonstrate the potential of CERT engineering to improve mammalian cell culture production processes to yield high amounts of a therapeutic protein product of desired quality. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a bottle neck in recombinant protein secretion at the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. PMID:19428735

  10. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  11. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  12. Sildenafil increases muscle protein synthesis and reduces muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Wiktorowicz, John E; Soman, Kizhake V; Danesi, Christopher P; Kinsky, Michael P; Dillon, Edgar L; Randolph, Kathleen M; Casperson, Shannon L; Gore, Dennis C; Horstman, Astrid M; Lynch, James P; Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Hsu, Jean W; Jahoor, Farook; Jennings, Kristofer; White, Gregory R; McCammon, Susan D; Durham, William J

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in skeletal muscle function occur during the course of healthy aging as well as with bed rest or diverse diseases such as cancer, muscular dystrophy, and heart failure. However, there are no accepted pharmacologic therapies to improve impaired skeletal muscle function. Nitric oxide may influence skeletal muscle function through effects on excitation-contraction coupling, myofibrillar function, perfusion, and metabolism. Here we show that augmentation of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling by short-term daily administration of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increases protein synthesis, alters protein expression and nitrosylation, and reduces fatigue in human skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors represent viable pharmacologic interventions to improve muscle function. PMID:24330691

  13. Increased capillary permeability for plasma proteins in oral contraceptive users.

    PubMed

    Tollan, A; Kvenild, K; Strand, H; Oian, P; Maltau, J M

    1992-05-01

    The transcapillary fluid balance was examined in eleven women before administration of a monophasic oral contraceptive (desogestrel 0.15 mg, ethinylestradiol 0.03 mg), and after three and six months of use. The interstitial colloid osmotic pressure was measured by the "wick" method, and the interstitial hydrostatic pressure by the "wick-in-needle" method in subcutaneous tissue on thorax and leg. During the six-month observation period, the following changes were observed: Plasma colloid osmotic pressure decreased (mean 1.8 mmHg, p = 0.047), as well as serum albumin (mean 5.1 g/l, p = 0.0006), total protein concentration (mean 2.8 g/l, p = 0.0006), hemoglobin (mean 0.5 g/dl, p = 0.014) and hematocrit (mean 1.8%, p = 0.047). Blood pressure and body weight remained unchanged, but foot volume showed a significant increase. The colloid osmotic pressure gradient (plasma-interstitium) was significantly reduced. The results indicate an increase in plasma volume in addition to an increased capillary permeability to plasma proteins during oral contraceptive use. We suggest that the observed changes in transcapillary fluid balance is caused by the estrogen component of the oral contraceptive pill.

  14. Codon Optimizing for Increased Membrane Protein Production: A Minimalist Approach.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Kiavash; Toddo, Stephen; Nørholm, Morten H H; Daley, Daniel O

    2016-01-01

    Reengineering a gene with synonymous codons is a popular approach for increasing production levels of recombinant proteins. Here we present a minimalist alternative to this method, which samples synonymous codons only at the second and third positions rather than the entire coding sequence. As demonstrated with two membrane-embedded transporters in Escherichia coli, the method was more effective than optimizing the entire coding sequence. The method we present is PCR based and requires three simple steps: (1) the design of two PCR primers, one of which is degenerate; (2) the amplification of a mini-library by PCR; and (3) screening for high-expressing clones. PMID:27485329

  15. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process. PMID:26968261

  16. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  17. Modulation of integrin antagonist signaling by ligand binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin to the alphaVbeta3 integrin.

    PubMed

    Maile, Laura A; Aday, Ariel W; Busby, Walker H; Sanghani, Ravi; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Clemmons, David R

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between the arginine glycine and aspartic acid motif (RGD) of integrin ligands such as vitronectin and the integrin receptor alphaVbeta3 in mediating cell attachment has been well described. Similarly, the ability of disintegrins, small RGD containing peptides, to inhibit cell attachment and other cellular processes has also been studied extensively. Recently, we characterized a second site of interaction between vitronectin and its integrin partner. We determined that amino acids within the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin bind to a cysteine loop (C-loop) region of beta3 and that this interaction is required for the positive effects of alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy on IGF-I signaling in smooth muscle cells. In this study we examine the signaling events activated following ligand binding of disintegrins to the alphaVbeta3 and the ability of these signals to be regulated by binding of the heparin-binding domain of vitronectin. We demonstrate that disintegrin ligand binding activates a series of events including the sequential activation of the tyrosine kinases c-Src and Syk. This leads to the activation of calpain and the cleavage of the beta3 cytoplasmic tail. Addition of vitronectin or a peptide homologous to the heparin-binding domain inhibited activation of this pathway. Our results suggest that the signaling events that occur following ligand binding to the alphaVbeta3 integrin reflects a balance between the effects mediated through the RGD binding site interaction and the effects mediated by the heparin binding site interaction and that for intact vitronectin the effect of the heparin-binding domain predominates.

  18. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  19. Effect of cancer procoagulant (CP) on the growth and adhesion of MCF-7 cells to vitronectin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kamocka, Małgorzata; Rózalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Wierzbicki, Ryszard; Mielicki, Wojciech P

    2005-05-10

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine protease produced by fetal and malignant tissues, activating in vitro blood coagulation factor X. It has been demonstrated that CP is able to stimulate blood platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and collagen. The pro-adhesive properties of CP could play an important role in metastatic spread of cancer as well as in primary tumor growth. Effects of anti-CP antibody on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and on the cells adhesion to vitronectin have been analyzed in vitro. Addition of polyclonal anti-CP antibody to MCF-7 cell culture resulted in 16-18% (P < 0.001) decrease in the cells viability as compared with the control (other antibody or no antibody in the culture). Preincubation of MCF-7 cells with anti-CP antibody reduced the cells adhesion to vitronectin. Further addition of purified CP (0.5-8 microg/ml) to the MCF-7 cells preincubated with anti-CP antibody resulted in complete recovery of adhesive properties of the cells. However, when high concentration (16 microg/ml) of CP was added to the sample, only partial recovery of the adhesive properties by the cells was observed. Results of the experiments support the hypothesis that CP is involved in the growth of cancer cells, but its pro-coagulative properties are of secondary importance. One of the possible mechanisms of the interactions between CP and malignant cell could be the regulation of the cell adhesion processes.

  20. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the methionine requirement in kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Kass, P H; Rogers, Q R

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the methionine (met) requirement of kittens is correlated with the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). The study used 48 male kittens in two replications of six 4 x 4 Latin squares, each representing one concentration of met (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 6.0 or 9.0 g/kg diet) with four CP concentrations (150, 200, 300 and 500 g/kg diet) in 2-week periods. Cystine was present in the lowest CP diet at 5.3 g/kg diet and increased as dietary CP increased. Body weight gain, food intake, nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids, glucose, insulin, cortisol, somatomedin C, T(3) and T(4) concentrations on day 12 were measured. From breakpoint analysis of the nitrogen retention curves, the met requirement of kittens was found to be 3.1, 3.8, 3.1 and 2.4 g met/kg for the 150, 200, 300 and 500 g CP/kg diets, respectively. When met was limiting (1.5 or 2.5 g/kg diet), increasing dietary CP did not decrease, but rather increased food intake, body weight gain and nitrogen retention. Plasma met concentrations increased as dietary met increased and at 2.5-3.5 g met/kg diet were not different among kittens fed the various CP diets. Total plasma T(3) and T(4) increased significantly as dietary CP increased in kittens given the 2.5 and 4.5 g met/kg diets. Results indicate that food intake and possibly altered hormonal secretion play a role in this growth response. In conclusion, the met requirement of growing kittens, unlike omnivores and herbivores studied, was not positively correlated with the concentration of dietary CP.

  1. Lotus-leaf-like topography predominates over adsorbed ECM proteins in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) surface/cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Dan; Yuan, Lin; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Hong

    2013-06-26

    It is well-known that extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins mediate cell/surface interactions. However, introduction of a specific surface topography may disturb the correlation between ECM proteins adsorption and cells adhesion on a given surface. In present study, lotus-leaf-like topography was introduced on the surface of a biodegradable material, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx). Protein adsorption and cell interactions with this lotus-leaf-like surface (designated PHBHHx-L) were investigated. Water contact angle data indicated that the hydrophobicity of PHBHHx was enhanced by the introduction of lotus-leaf-like topography. The adsorption of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin and vitronectin) on PHBHHx-L was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared with flat PHBHHx, adsorption on the PHBHHx-L surface increased by ~260% for fibronectin and ~40% for vitronectin. In contrast, fibroblast and endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation were reduced on the PHBHHx-L compared to the flat polymer surface. These results suggest that the inhibition of cell adhesion and proliferation caused by the lotus-leaf-like topography dominates over the effect of the adsorbed adhesive proteins in promoting adhesion and proliferation. It can be concluded that the lotus-leaf-like topography plays a dominant role in cell/PHBHHx-L interactions. The present findings indicate the complexity of the interplay among surface topography, adsorbed proteins, and cell-surface interactions.

  2. Protein Structure, Function Set for Explosive Increase in Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Cites advances in x-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, computer modeling, and display to guide the design and analysis of protein structures. Reviews recent advances in knowledge, synthesis techniques, and theory of proteins. (JM)

  3. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-01

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  4. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the essential amino acid requirements of kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2006-08-01

    Essential amino acid (EAA) requirements of omnivores and herbivores (e.g. chicks, lambs, pigs and rats) are directly related to the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). When an EAA is limiting in the diet, addition of a mixture of EAA lacking the limiting one (which increases dietary CP) results in a decrease in food intake and weight gain. This interaction has been referred to as an AA imbalance and has not been studied in depth in strict carnivores. The objectives of these experiments were to examine the effects on growing kittens (2-week periods) of the addition to diets of a mixture of AA lacking the limiting one. The control diets were at the requirement of the respective limiting EAA (or about 85% of the 1986 National Research Council requirement). In experiment 1, with the dietary EAAs at the minimally determined requirements, the concentration of the essential or dispensable amino acids was increased to determine if CP or an EAA was limiting. Results of growth rates (n = 12) and plasma AA concentrations indicated that tryptophan was limiting, but increased body weight gain also occurred when the concentration of CP was increased as dispensable amino acids without additional tryptophan. Experiment 1 was repeated in experiment 2 using a crossover design. Again, when tryptophan was limiting additional concentrations of dispensable AAs increased body weight gain. This response is the opposite of that in herbivores and omnivores. Experiment 3 consisted of 10 separate crossover trials, one for each of the 10 EAA and examined the effect of two concentrations of dietary CP (200 and 300 g CP/kg diet) on body weight gain of kittens (n = 8) offered diets limiting in each respective EAA. Body weight gain was numerically greater when diets contained 300 g CP/kg than 200 g CP/kg for eight of 10 EAAs (p < 0.05 for only isoleucine and threonine) when each amino acid was limiting. This response is the reverse of that which occurs in chicks, lambs, pigs and rats when

  5. Increased coverage of protein families with the blocks database servers.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Greene, E A; Pietrokovski, S; Henikoff, S

    2000-01-01

    The Blocks Database WWW (http://blocks.fhcrc.org ) and Email (blocks@blocks.fhcrc.org ) servers provide tools to search DNA and protein queries against the Blocks+ Database of multiple alignments, which represent conserved protein regions. Blocks+ nearly doubles the number of protein families included in the database by adding families from the Pfam-A, ProDom and Domo databases to those from PROSITE and PRINTS. Other new features include improved Block Searcher statistics, searching with NCBI's IMPALA program and 3D display of blocks on PDB structures.

  6. A New Class of Orthosteric uPAR•uPA Small-Molecule Antagonists Are Allosteric Inhibitors of the uPAR•Vitronectin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O.

    2015-01-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR•uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently-labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 µM and inhibited the tight uPAR•uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 µM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR•uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN•uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR•uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells, and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTN•uPARSMB interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR•VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  7. A new class of orthosteric uPAR·uPA small-molecule antagonists are allosteric inhibitors of the uPAR·vitronectin interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Wang, Bo; Knabe, William Eric; Meroueh, Samy O

    2015-06-19

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored cell surface receptor that is at the center of an intricate network of protein-protein interactions. Its immediate binding partners are the serine proteinase urokinase (uPA), and vitronectin (VTN), a component of the extracellular matrix. uPA and VTN bind at distinct sites on uPAR to promote extracellular matrix degradation and integrin signaling, respectively. Here, we report the discovery of a new class of pyrrolone small-molecule inhibitors of the tight ∼1 nM uPAR·uPA protein-protein interaction. These compounds were designed to bind to the uPA pocket on uPAR. The highest affinity compound, namely 7, displaced a fluorescently labeled α-helical peptide (AE147-FAM) with an inhibition constant Ki of 0.7 μM and inhibited the tight uPAR·uPAATF interaction with an IC50 of 18 μM. Biophysical studies with surface plasmon resonance showed that VTN binding is highly dependent on uPA. This cooperative binding was confirmed as 7, which binds at the uPAR·uPA interface, also inhibited the distal VTN·uPAR interaction. In cell culture, 7 blocked the uPAR·uPA interaction in uPAR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells and impaired cell adhesion to VTN, a process that is mediated by integrins. As a result, 7 inhibited integrin signaling in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells as evidenced by a decrease in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and Rac1 GTPase activation. Consistent with these results, 7 blocked breast MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion with IC50 values similar to those observed in ELISA and surface plasmon resonance competition studies. Explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations show that the cooperativity between uPA and VTN is attributed to stabilization of uPAR motion by uPA. In addition, free energy calculations revealed that uPA stabilizes the VTNSMB·uPAR interaction through more favorable electrostatics and entropy. Disruption of the uPAR·VTNSMB interaction by 7 is consistent with the

  8. Activity of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fusion peptide in an experimental model of Pseudomonas sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Opal, S M; Palardy, J E; Jhung, J W; Donsky, C; Romulo, R L; Parejo, N; Marra, M N

    1995-01-01

    A chimeric protein consisting of the N-terminal domain of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and the C-terminal domain of bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein demonstrated a dose-dependent survival benefit (P = 0.001) and reduced endotoxin levels (P < 0.01) in neutropenic rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis. This lipopolysaccharide-binding protein-bactericidal/ permeability-increasing peptide has favorable pharmacokinetics and antiendotoxin properties which may be of value for human sepsis. PMID:8593028

  9. Identification of differentially expressed plasma proteins in atherosclerotic patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio Junior; Lobina, Omar; Rocchiccioli, Silvia; Nieddu, Gabriele; Ucciferri, Nadia; De Muro, Pierina; Idini, Michela; Nguyen, Hai Quy Tram; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Formato, Marilena

    2016-07-01

    Besides hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, several factors are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), many of them being closely related to each other owing to common origins or pathways. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunctions in diabetes include reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide, increased ROS and prothrombotic factors production, as well as activation of receptors for advanced glycation end-products. These alterations contribute to create a pro-inflammatory/thrombotic state that ultimately leads to plaque formation and complication. This study aimed at identifying differentially expressed plasma proteins between T2DM and non-diabetic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS. Before analysis, plasma samples were enriched in low-expression proteins through combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries. Both mono- and two-dimensional western blotting were performed for data validation. Differentially expressed proteins were mapped onto STRING v10 to build a protein-protein interaction network. Sixteen differentially expressed spots were identified with a high score. Among them, there were fibrinogen beta and gamma chains, complement C1r, C3 and C4-B subcomponents, alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), vitronectin and CD5 antigen-like. Protein-Protein interaction analysis evidenced a network among differentially expressed proteins in which vitronectin seems to represent a potentially pivotal node among fibrinolysis, complement dependent immune responses and inflammation in accordance with a number of in vitro and in vivo evidences for a contributory role of these proteins to the development of diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:27037039

  10. Lower Protein Stability Does Not Necessarily Increase Local Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-17

    Overall protein stability is thought to have an important impact on the millisecond time scale dynamics modulating enzyme function. In order to better understand the effects of overall stability on the substructure dynamics of mitochondrial cytochrome c, we test the effect of a destabilizing L85A mutation on the kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics of the alkaline conformational transition. The alkaline conformational transition replaces the Met80 ligand of the heme with a lysine residue from Ω-loop D, the heme crevice loop, consisting of residues 70-85. Residues 67-87 are the most conserved portion of the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c, suggesting that this region is of prime importance for function. Mutations to Ω-loop D affect the stability of the heme crevice directly, modulating the pKapp of the alkaline transition. Two variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c, WT*/L85A and WT*/K73H/L85A, were prepared for these studies. Guanidine-HCl unfolding monitored by circular dichroism and pH titrations at 695 nm, respectively, were used to study the thermodynamics of global and local unfolding of these variants. The kinetics of the alkaline transition were measured by pH-jump stopped-flow methods. Gated electron transfer techniques using bis(2,2',2″-terpyridine)cobalt(II) as a reducing reagent were implemented to measure the heme crevice dynamics for the WT*/K73H/L85A variant. Contrary to the expectation that dynamics around the heme crevice would be faster for the less stable WT*/K73H/L85A variant, based on the behavior of psychrophilic versus mesophilic enzymes, they were similar to those for a variant without the L85A mutation. In fact, below pH 7, the dynamics of the WT*/K73H/L85A variant were slower. PMID:27104373

  11. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  12. Increasing discordant antioxidant protein levels and enzymatic activities contribute to increasing redox imbalance observed during human prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Chaiswing, Luksana; Zhong, Weixiong; Oberley, Terry D.

    2014-01-01

    A metabolomics study demonstrated a decrease in glutathione and an increase in cysteine (Cys) levels in human prostate cancer (PCa) tissues as Gleason scores increased, indicating redox imbalance with PCa progression. These results were extended in the present study by analyzing redox state of the protein thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) and sulfinylation (SO3) of peroxiredoxins (Prxs) (PrxsSO3) in PCa tissues and cell lines. Lysates of paired human PCa tissues with varying degree of aggressiveness and adjacent benign (BN) tissues were used for analysis. Redox western blot analysis of Trx1 demonstrated low levels of reduced and high levels of oxidized Trx1 (functional and non-functional, respectively) in high grade PCa (Gleason scores 4+4 to 4+5) in comparison to intermediate grade PCa (Gleason scores 3+3 to 3+4) or BN tissues. PrxsSO3 were increased in high grade PCa. Oxidized Trx1 and PrxsSO3 are indicators of oxidative stress. To study whether redox imbalance may potentially affect enzyme activities of antioxidant proteins (AP), we determined levels of selected AP in PCa tissues by western blot analysis and found that mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Prx 3, and Trx1 were increased in high grade PCa tissues when compared with BN tissues. Enzyme activities of MnSOD in high grade PCa tissues were significantly increased but at a lower magnitude when compared with the levels of MnSOD protein (0.5 folds vs. 2 folds increase). Trx1 activity was not changed in high grade PCa tissues despite a large increase in Trx1 protein expression. Further studies demonstrated a significant increase in posttranslational modifications of tyrosine and lysine residues in MnSOD protein and oxidation of Cys at active site (Cys 32 and Cys 35) and regulatory site (Cys 62 and Cys 69) of Trx1 in high grade PCa compared to BN tissues. These discordant changes between protein levels and enzyme activities are consistent with protein inactivation by redox imbalance and

  13. Increasing Sequence Diversity with Flexible Backbone Protein Design: The Complete Redesign of a Protein Hydrophobic Core

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Grant S.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Miley, Michael J.; Machius, Mischa; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Protein design tests our understanding of protein stability and structure. Successful design methods should allow the exploration of sequence space not found in nature. However, when redesigning naturally occurring protein structures, most fixed backbone design algorithms return amino acid sequences that share strong sequence identity with wild-type sequences, especially in the protein core. This behavior places a restriction on functional space that can be explored and is not consistent with observations from nature, where sequences of low identity have similar structures. Here, we allow backbone flexibility during design to mutate every position in the core (38 residues) of a four-helix bundle protein. Only small perturbations to the backbone, 12 {angstrom}, were needed to entirely mutate the core. The redesigned protein, DRNN, is exceptionally stable (melting point >140C). An NMR and X-ray crystal structure show that the side chains and backbone were accurately modeled (all-atom RMSD = 1.3 {angstrom}).

  14. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction. PMID:26298568

  15. Whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake but not homocysteine plasma concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; Comparotto, Hugo; Jordao, Alceu Afonso

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of whey protein supplementation on homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism and liver oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four rats were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) to receive one of the following diets for 4 weeks: control diet (C), whey protein-composed diet (WP), and whey protein-supplemented diet (WPS). The C and WP diets consisted of AIN-93 with 20% casein and 20% whey protein as protein source, respectively. WPS was AIN-93 (20% casein) supplemented by the addition of 20% (w/w) whey protein. Four weeks of ingesting a WPS diet resulted in a significantly higher (P < 0.05) total protein and methionine intakes. Although a significant increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels occurred in WPS group compared with C and WP, no significant change was observed in plasma Hcy concentration between groups. Furthermore, the levels of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced oxidation protein products, known liver oxidative stress markers, were increased in the WPS group compared with the C group. In addition, no change in glutathione liver concentration was observed in any of the groups studied. In conclusion, whey protein supplementation increases methionine intake substantially; however, it does not change plasma Hcy concentrations. On the other hand, increased hepatic oxidative stress markers were observed in whey protein supplemented rats were probably due to high protein intake.

  16. Mitochondrial stress causes increased succination of proteins in adipocytes in response to glucotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Thomas, Sonia A; Carson, James A; Baynes, John W

    2012-07-15

    2SC [S-(2-succino)-cysteine] is a chemical modification formed by a Michael addition reaction of fumarate with cysteine residues in proteins. Formation of 2SC, termed 'succination' of proteins, increases in adipocytes grown in high-glucose medium and in adipose tissues of Type 2 diabetic mice. However, the metabolic mechanisms leading to increased fumarate and succination of protein in the adipocyte are unknown. Treatment of 3T3 cells with high glucose (30 mM compared with 5 mM) caused a significant increase in cellular ATP/ADP, NADH/NAD+ and Δψm (mitochondrial membrane potential). There was also a significant increase in the cellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins, which may be attributed to the increase in NADH/NAD+ and subsequent inhibition of tricarboxylic acid cycle NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases. Chemical uncouplers, which dissipated Δψm and reduced the NADH/NAD+ ratio, also decreased the fumarate concentration and protein succination. High glucose plus metformin, an inhibitor of complex I in the electron transport chain, caused an increase in fumarate and succination of protein. Thus excess fuel supply (glucotoxicity) appears to create a pseudohypoxic environment (high NADH/NAD+ without hypoxia), which drives the increase in succination of protein. We propose that increased succination of proteins is an early marker of glucotoxicity and mitochondrial stress in adipose tissue in diabetes.

  17. The rate of synthesis and decomposition of tissue proteins in hypokinesia and increased muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedorov, I. V.; Chernyy, A. V.; Fedorov, A. I.

    1978-01-01

    During hypokinesia and physical loading (swimming) of rats, the radioactivity of skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, and blood proteins was determined after administration of radioactive amino acids. Tissue protein synthesis decreased during hypokinesia, and decomposition increased. Both synthesis and decomposition increased during physical loading, but anabolic processes predominated in the total tissue balance. The weights of the animals decreased in hypokinesia and increased during increased muscle activity.

  18. Using Transcriptional Control To Increase Titers of Secreted Heterologous Proteins by the Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Kevin J.; Finnerty, Casey; Azam, Anum; Valdivia, Elias

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded at the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) locus secretes protein directly from the cytosol to the culture media in a concerted, one-step process, bypassing the periplasm. While this approach is attractive for heterologous protein production, product titers are too low for many applications. In addition, the expression of the SPI-1 gene cluster is subject to native regulation, which requires culturing conditions that are not ideal for high-density growth. We used transcriptional control to increase the amount of protein that is secreted into the extracellular space by the T3SS of Salmonella enterica. The controlled expression of the gene encoding SPI-1 transcription factor HilA circumvents the requirement of endogenous induction conditions and allows for synthetic induction of the secretion system. This strategy increases the number of cells that express SPI-1 genes, as measured by promoter activity. In addition, protein secretion titer is sensitive to the time of addition and the concentration of inducer for the protein to be secreted and SPI-1 gene cluster. Overexpression of hilA increases secreted protein titer by >10-fold and enables recovery of up to 28 ± 9 mg/liter of secreted protein from an 8-h culture. We also demonstrate that the protein beta-lactamase is able to adopt an active conformation after secretion, and the increase in secreted titer from hilA overexpression also correlates to increased enzyme activity in the culture supernatant. PMID:25038096

  19. Dexamethasone increases aquaporin-2 protein expression in ex vivo inner medullary collecting duct suspensions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minguang; Cai, Hui; Klein, Janet D; Laur, Oskar; Chen, Guangping

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is the vasopressin-regulated water channel that controls renal water reabsorption and plays an important role in the maintenance of body water homeostasis. Excessive glucocorticoid as often seen in Cushing's syndrome causes water retention. However, whether and how glucocorticoid regulates AQP2 remains unclear. In this study, we examined the direct effect of dexamethasone on AQP2 protein expression and activity. Dexamethasone increased AQP2 protein abundance in rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) suspensions. This was confirmed in HEK293 cells transfected with AQP2 cDNA. Cell surface protein biotinylation showed an increase of dexamethasone-induced cell membrane AQP2 expression and this effect was blocked by glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486. Functionally, dexamethasone treatment of oocytes injected with an AQP2 cRNA increased water transport activity as judged by cell rupture time in a hypo-osmotic solution (66 ± 13 s in dexamethasone vs. 101 ± 11 s in control, n = 15). We further found that dexamethasone treatment reduced AQP2 protein degradation, which could result in an increase of AQP2 protein. Interestingly, dexamethasone promoted cell membrane AQP2 moving to less buoyant lipid raft submicrodomains. Taken together, our data demonstrate that dexamethasone promotes AQP2 protein expression and increases water permeability mainly via inhibition of AQP2 protein degradation. The increase in AQP2 activity promotes water reabsorption, which may contribute to glucocorticoid-induced water retention and hypertension. PMID:26578982

  20. [Effect of increased protein content on nutritional and sensory quality of cookies].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Santiago Rafael; Osella, Carlos Alberto; Torre, Maria Adela de la; Sánchez, Hugo Diego

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of soy flour and whey protein concentrate (WPC) on cookies quality. An optimal recipe showing improved protein quality and content as well as acceptable sensory quality was defined taking into account the results obtained. Rotary moulded cookie formulation adaptable to lamination and cutting in pilot plant was used. Wheat flour from this formulation was partially replaced by whey protein concentrate and full fat soy flour. Second order models were employed to generate response surfaces for: total protein, lysine by 16 grams of total nitrogen, lysine by 100 grams of sample, loss of lysine during processing and sensory evaluation of cookies. We could obtain an effect on available lysine value when water content was increased in the formulation because a delay in the Maillard reaction. The optimal formulation contains 13% of full fat soy flour, 3% of whey protein concentrate and 23% of water. The results demonstrated that the protein content and the protein quality of the supplemented flours were increased when soy flour was added in the formulation of cookies. On other hand, protein content was increased but protein quality was decreased when WPC was used, because of available lysine loss.

  1. Relating the effects of protein type and content in increased-protein cheese pies to consumers' perception of satiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Marcano, J; Varela, P; Fiszman, S

    2015-02-01

    Since proteins have been shown to have the highest satiation-inducing effects of all the macronutrients, increasing the protein level is one of the main strategies for designing foods with enhanced satiating capacity. However, few studies analyze the effect that protein addition has on the texture and flavor characteristics of the target food item to relate it to the expected satiating capacity it elicits. The present work studied cheese pies with three levels of soy and whey proteins. Since the protein level altered the rheological behavior of the batters before baking and the texture of the baked pies, the feasibility of adding several protein levels for obtaining a range of final products was investigated. A check-all-that-apply questionnaire containing 32 sensory and non-sensory characteristics of the samples was given to consumers (n = 131) who also scored the perceived samples' satiating capacity. The results showed that the type and content of protein contributed distinctive sensory characteristics to the samples that could be related to their satiating capacity perception. Harder and drier samples (high protein levels) were perceived as more satiating with less perceptible sweet and milky cheese pie characteristic flavors. Soy contributed an off-flavour. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the interrelation of all these factors, aiding the development of highly palatable solid foods with enhanced satiating capacities.

  2. Utilizing avidity to improve antifreeze protein activity: a type III antifreeze protein trimer exhibits increased thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Özge; Holland, Nolan B

    2013-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice growth inhibitors that allow the survival of several species living at temperatures colder than the freezing point of their bodily fluids. AFP activity is commonly defined in terms of thermal hysteresis, which is the difference observed for the solution freezing and melting temperatures. Increasing the thermal hysteresis activity of these proteins, particularly at low concentrations, is of great interest because of their wide range of potential applications. In this study, we have designed and expressed one-, two-, and three-domain antifreeze proteins to improve thermal hysteresis activity through increased binding avidity. The three-domain type III AFP yielded significantly greater activity than the one- and two-domain proteins, reaching a thermal hysteresis of >1.6 °C at a concentration of <1 mM. To elucidate the basis of this increase, the data were fit to a multidomain protein adsorption model based on the classical Langmuir isotherm. Fits of the data to the modified isotherms yield values for the equilibrium binding constants for the adsorption of AFP to ice and indicate that protein surface coverage is proportional to thermal hysteresis activity.

  3. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function. PMID:26997623

  4. Effect of increased protein intake on renal acid load and renal hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Teunissen-Beekman, Karianna F M; Dopheide, Janneke; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Brink, Elizabeth J; de Leeuw, Peter W; van Baak, Marleen A

    2016-03-01

    Increased protein intake versus maltodextrin intake for 4 weeks lowers blood pressure. Concerns exist that high-protein diets reduce renal function. Effects of acute and 4-week protein intake versus maltodextrin intake on renal acid load, glomerular filtration rate and related parameters were compared in this study. Seventy-nine overweight individuals with untreated elevated blood pressure and normal kidney function were randomized to consume a mix of protein isolates (60 g/day) or maltodextrin (60 g/day) for 4 weeks in energy balance. Twenty-four-hour urinary potential renal acid load (uPRAL) was compared between groups. A subgroup (maltodextrin N = 27, protein mix N = 25) participated in extra test days investigating fasting levels and postprandial effects of meals supplemented with a moderate protein- or maltodextrin-load on glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, plasma renin, aldosterone, pH, and bicarbonate. uPRAL was significantly higher in the protein group after 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.001). Postprandial filtration fraction decreased further after the protein-supplemented breakfast than after the maltodextrin-supplemented breakfast after 4 weeks of supplementation (P ≤ 0.001). Fasting and postprandial levels of glomerular filtration rate, effective renal plasma flow, renin, aldosterone, angiotensin-converting enzyme, pH and bicarbonate did not differ between groups. In conclusion, 4 weeks on an increased protein diet (25% of energy intake) increased renal acid load, but did not affect renal function. Postprandial changes, except for filtration fraction, also did not differ between groups. These data suggest that a moderate increase in protein intake by consumption of a protein mix for 4 weeks causes no (undesirable) effects on kidney function in overweight and obese individuals with normal kidney function.

  5. Increased precision for analysis of protein-ligand dissociation constants determined from chemical shift titrations.

    PubMed

    Markin, Craig J; Spyracopoulos, Leo

    2012-06-01

    NMR is ideally suited for the analysis of protein-protein and protein ligand interactions with dissociation constants ranging from ~2 μM to ~1 mM, and with kinetics in the fast exchange regime on the NMR timescale. For the determination of dissociation constants (K ( D )) of 1:1 protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions using NMR, the protein and ligand concentrations must necessarily be similar in magnitude to the K ( D ), and nonlinear least squares analysis of chemical shift changes as a function of ligand concentration is employed to determine estimates for the parameters K ( D ) and the maximum chemical shift change (Δδ(max)). During a typical NMR titration, the initial protein concentration, [P (0)], is held nearly constant. For this condition, to determine the most accurate parameters for K ( D ) and Δδ(max) from nonlinear least squares analyses requires initial protein concentrations that are ~0.5 × K ( D ), and a maximum concentration for the ligand, or titrant, of ~10 × [P (0)]. From a practical standpoint, these requirements are often difficult to achieve. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that co-variation of the ligand and protein concentrations during a titration leads to an increase in the precision of the fitted K ( D ) and Δδ(max) values when [P (0)] > K ( D ). Importantly, judicious choice of protein and ligand concentrations for a given NMR titration, combined with nonlinear least squares analyses using two independent variables (ligand and protein concentrations) and two parameters (K ( D ) and Δδ(max)) is a straightforward approach to increasing the accuracy of measured dissociation constants for 1:1 protein-ligand interactions.

  6. An Extensive Study of Protein Phase Diagram Modification: Increasing Macromolecular Crystallizability by Temperature Screening

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Bin; Zhu, Dao-Wei; Wang, Tao; Song, Jian; Zou, Yong-Shui; Zhang, Yong-Lian; Lin, Sheng-Xiang

    2009-02-23

    A new parameter 'relative crystallizability' for protein crystallization has been proposed, and its relationship with protein solubility and crystallization success has been studied (Zhu et al. J. Struct. Biol. 2006, 154, 297). Here we further construct the phase diagrams of a larger number of proteins, study the phase modification as a function of temperature, and establish the relationship between the nucleation zone area (S{sub N}) and crystallization success. The phase diagrams of 10 proteins were constructed and their S{sub N} were compared, demonstrating that temperature modifies the protein nucleation zone. Such modification can significantly enlarge the S{sub N} and increase protein crystallizability. For example, the S{sub N} of ribonuclease S and trypsin increases by 2.4- and 1.6-fold when the temperature moves to 277 K from 295 K, while at the same time the crystallization hits increase from 20.8% to 42.9% and 12.5% to 25%, respectively. S{sub N} of chymotrypsinogen A and concanavalin A increases by 1.6- and 1.7-fold (277 to 295 K), while the hits increase from 37.5% to 54.2% and 43.3% to 73.4%, respectively. Such an excellent agreement strongly supports the validity of protein 'relative crystallizability', and crystallization screening at several temperatures can significantly increase the success for most proteins. A new protein epididymal-specific lipocalin was crystallized by varying temperature, yielding quickly the first crystals, and complete data sets have been collected at 1.97 {angstrom}.

  7. Acetyl-L-carnitine increases mitochondrial protein acetylation in the aged rat heart.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Janos; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Lee, Kwangwon; Virmani, Ashraf; Koverech, Aleardo; Cavazza, Claudio; Chance, Mark R; Hoppel, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that in vivo treatment of elderly Fisher 344 rats with acetylcarnitine abolished the age-associated defect in respiratory chain complex III in interfibrillar mitochondria and improved the functional recovery of the ischemic/reperfused heart. Herein, we explored mitochondrial protein acetylation as a possible mechanism for acetylcarnitine's effect. In vivo treatment of elderly rats with acetylcarnitine restored cardiac acetylcarnitine content and increased mitochondrial protein lysine acetylation and increased the number of lysine-acetylated proteins in cardiac subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial β-oxidation, and ATP synthase of the respiratory chain showed the greatest acetylation. Acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, complex V, and aspartate aminotransferase was accompanied by decreased catalytic activity. Several proteins were found to be acetylated only after treatment with acetylcarnitine, suggesting that exogenous acetylcarnitine served as the acetyl-donor. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that acetylcarnitine treatment also induced changes in mitochondrial protein amount; a two-fold or greater increase/decrease in abundance was observed for thirty one proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the first time that in the aged rat heart in vivo administration of acetylcarnitine provides acetyl groups for protein acetylation and affects the amount of mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25660059

  8. An unknown genetic defect increases venous thrombosis risk, through interaction with protein C deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S J; Bovill, E G; Callas, P W; Long, G L

    1998-01-01

    We used two-locus segregation analysis to test whether an unknown genetic defect interacts with protein C deficiency to increase susceptibility to venous thromboembolic disease in a single large pedigree. Sixty-seven pedigree members carry a His107Pro mutation in the protein C gene, which reduces protein C levels to a mean of 46% of normal. Twenty-one carriers of the mutation and five other pedigree members had verified thromboembolic disease. We inferred the presence in this pedigree of a thrombosis-susceptibility gene interacting with protein C deficiency, by rejecting the hypothesis that the cases of thromboembolic disease resulted from protein C deficiency alone and by not rejecting Mendelian transmission of the interacting gene. When coinherited with protein C deficiency, the interacting gene conferred a probability of a thrombotic episode of approximately 79% for men and approximately 99% for women, before age 60 years. PMID:9683579

  9. Protein Targeting and Transport as a Necessary Consequence of Increased Cellular Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Maik S.; Schleiff, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    With increasing intracellular complexity, a new cell-biological problem that is the allocation of cytoplasmically synthesized proteins to their final destinations within the cell emerged. A special challenge is thereby the translocation of proteins into or across cellular membranes. The underlying mechanisms are only in parts well understood, but it can be assumed that the course of cellular evolution had a deep impact on the design of the required molecular machines. In this article, we aim to summarize the current knowledge and concepts of the evolutionary development of protein trafficking as a necessary premise and consequence of increased cellular complexity. PMID:25085907

  10. Conjugation of type I antifreeze protein to polyallylamine increases thermal hysteresis activity.

    PubMed

    Can, Ozge; Holland, Nolan B

    2011-10-19

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are ice binding proteins found in some plants, insects, and Antarctic fish allowing them to survive at subzero temperatures by inhibiting ice crystal growth. The interaction of AFPs with ice crystals results in a difference between the freezing and melting temperatures, termed thermal hysteresis, which is the most common measure of AFP activity. Creating antifreeze protein constructs that reduce the concentration of protein needed to observe thermal hysteresis activities would be beneficial for diverse applications including cold storage of cells or tissues, ice slurries used in refrigeration systems, and food storage. We demonstrate that conjugating multiple type I AFPs to a polyallylamine chain increases thermal hysteresis activity compared to the original protein. The reaction product is approximately twice as active when compared to the same concentration of free proteins, yielding 0.5 °C thermal hysteresis activity at 0.3 mM protein concentration. More impressively, the amount of protein required to achieve a thermal hysteresis of 0.3 °C is about 100 times lower when conjugated to the polymer (3 μM) compared to free protein (300 μM). Ice crystal morphologies observed in the presence of the reaction product are comparable to those of the protein used in the conjugation reaction. PMID:21905742

  11. Increased production of penicillin-binding protein 2, increased detection of other penicillin-binding proteins, and decreased coagulase activity associated with glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, B; Boyle-Vavra, S; deJonge, B L; Daum, R S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of glycopeptide resistance in the genus Staphylococcus is unknown. Since these antimicrobial compounds act by binding the peptidoglycan precursor terminus, the target of transglycosylase and transpeptidase enzymes, it was hypothesized that resistance might be mediated in Staphylococcus aureus by increased production or activity of these enzymes, commonly called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). To evaluate this possibility, glycopeptide-resistant mutants were prepared by passage of several clinical isolates of this species in nutrient broth containing successively increasing concentrations of the glycopeptide vancomycin or teicoplanin. Decreased coagulase activity and increased resistance to lysostaphin were uniformly present in the vancomycin-resistant mutants. Peptidoglycan cross-linking increased in one resistant isolate and decreased in two resistant isolates. The amounts of radioactive penicillin that bound to each PBP in susceptible and resistant strains were compared; PBP2 production was also evaluated by Western blotting. Increased penicillin labeling and production of PBP2 were found in all resistant derivatives selected by either vancomycin or teicoplanin. Moreover, the increase in PBP2 penicillin labeling occurred early in a series of vancomycin-selected derivatives and was strongly correlated (r > 0.9) with the increase in vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC. An increase in penicillin labeling also occurred, variably, in PBP1, PBP3, and/or PBP4. These data demonstrate a strong correlation between resistance to glycopeptides and increased PBP activity and/or production in S. aureus. Such an increase could allow PBPs to better compete with glycopeptides for the peptidoglycan precursor. PMID:9257762

  12. Calpain expression in lymphoid cells. Increased mRNA and protein levels after cell activation.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, R V; Goust, J M; Chakrabarti, A K; Barbosa, E; Hogan, E L; Banik, N L

    1995-02-10

    Although calpain is ubiquitously present in human tissues and is thought to play a role in demyelination, its activity is very low in resting normal lymphocytes. To determine the nature of calpain expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human lymphoid cells, we studied human T lymphocytic, B lymphocytic, and monocytic lines as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Stimulation of cells with the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore A23187 resulted in increased calpain mRNA and protein expression. Calpain mRNA expression is also increased in human T cells stimulated with anti-CD3. A dissociation between the increases of RNA and protein suggested that calpain could be released from the cells; the subsequent experiments showed its presence in the extracellular environment. 5,6-Dichloro-1b-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a reversible inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, reduced calpain mRNA levels by 50-67% and protein levels by 72-91%. Its removal resulted in resumption of both calpain mRNA and protein synthesis. Cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor, reduced calpain protein levels by 77-81% and calpain mRNA levels by 96% in activated THP-1 cells. Interferon-gamma induced calpain mRNA and protein in U-937 and THP-1 cells. Dexamethasone increased mRNA expression in THP-1 cells. Our results indicate that activation of lymphoid cells results in de novo synthesis and secretion of calpain. PMID:7852311

  13. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography in dual salt system increases protein binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Senczuk, Anna M; Klinke, Ralph; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Vedantham, Ganesh; Yigzaw, Yinges

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uses weakly hydrophobic resins and requires a salting-out salt to promote protein-resin interaction. The salting-out effects increase with protein and salt concentration. Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) is dependent on the binding constant, as well as on the flow characteristics during sample loading. DBC increases with the salt concentration but decreases with increasing flow rate. Dynamic and operational binding capacity have a major raw material cost/processing time impact on commercial scale production of monoclonal antibodies. In order to maximize DBC the highest salt concentration without causing precipitation is used. We report here a novel method to maintain protein solubility while increasing the DBC by using a combination of two salting-out salts (referred to as dual salt). In a series of experiments, we explored the dynamic capacity of a HIC resin (TosoBioscience Butyl 650M) with combinations of salts. Using a model antibody, we developed a system allowing us to increase the dynamic capacity up to twofold using the dual salt system over traditional, single salt system. We also investigated the application of this novel approach to several other proteins and salt combinations, and noted a similar protein solubility and DBC increase. The observed increase in DBC in the dual salt system was maintained at different linear flow rates and did not impact selectivity.

  14. Bactericidal Permeability Increasing Protein Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases in the Turkish Population

    PubMed Central

    Can, Güray; Akın, Hakan; Özdemir, Filiz T.; Can, Hatice; Yılmaz, Bülent; Eren, Fatih; Atuğ, Özlen; Ünsal, Belkıs; Hamzaoğlu, Hülya O.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease, a chronic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology, affects the small and large bowel at different levels. It is increasingly considered that innate immune system may have a central position in the pathogenesis of the disease. As a part of the innate immune system, bactericidal permeability increasing protein has an important role in the recognition and neutralization of gram-negative bacteria. The aim of our study was to investigate the involvement of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism (bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu) in inflammatory bowel disease in a large group of Turkish patients. Patients and Methods: The present study included 528 inflammatory bowel disease patients, 224 with Crohn's disease and 304 with ulcerative colitis, and 339 healthy controls. Results: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism was found to be associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis (P = 0.0001). The frequency of the Glu/Glu genotype was significantly lower in patients using steroids and in those with steroid dependence (P = 0.012, OR, 0.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-0.94; P = 0.0286, OR, 0.75; 95% CI: 0.66-0.86, respectively). There was no other association between bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism and phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. Conclusions: Bactericidal permeability increasing protein Lys216Glu polymorphism is associated with both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This is the first study reporting the association of bactericidal permeability increasing protein gene polymorphism with steroid use and dependence in Crohn's disease. PMID:26228368

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase pancreatic mass by induction of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Jacqueline A; Baggio, Laurie L; Cao, Xiemin; Abdulla, Tahmid; Campbell, Jonathan E; Secher, Thomas; Jelsing, Jacob; Larsen, Brett; Drucker, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) controls glucose homeostasis by regulating secretion of insulin and glucagon through a single GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). GLP-1R agonists also increase pancreatic weight in some preclinical studies through poorly understood mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the increase in pancreatic weight following activation of GLP-1R signaling in mice reflects an increase in acinar cell mass, without changes in ductal compartments or β-cell mass. GLP-1R agonists did not increase pancreatic DNA content or the number of Ki67(+) cells in the exocrine compartment; however, pancreatic protein content was increased in mice treated with exendin-4 or liraglutide. The increased pancreatic mass and protein content was independent of cholecystokinin receptors, associated with a rapid increase in S6 phosphorylation, and mediated through the GLP-1R. Rapamycin abrogated the GLP-1R-dependent increase in pancreatic mass but had no effect on the robust induction of Reg3α and Reg3β gene expression. Mass spectrometry analysis identified GLP-1R-dependent upregulation of Reg family members, as well as proteins important for translation and export, including Fam129a, eIF4a1, Wars, and Dmbt1. Hence, pharmacological GLP-1R activation induces protein synthesis, leading to increased pancreatic mass, independent of changes in DNA content or cell proliferation in mice.

  16. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth.

    PubMed

    Page, Jonathan M; Merkel, Alyssa R; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guo, Ruijing; Dadwal, Ushashi C; Cannonier, Shellese; Basu, Sandip; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2015-09-01

    The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled "Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II". In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2), poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  17. Alkaline phosphatase protein increases in response to prednisolone in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanford, W C; Kottel, R H; Fishman, W H

    1981-01-01

    Quantification of term-placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme protein in HeLa TCRC-1 cells grown in the presence and absence of prednisolone indicates that there is a net increase in amount of enzyme-specific protein in prednisolone-stimulated cells. In a similar analysis of HeLa D98AH2 cells, prednisolone treatment causes the appearance of term-placental alkaline phosphatase protein and the loss of the intestinal isoenzyme protein. These results support the interpretation that the response of these cells to corticosteroids is the net accumulation of alkaline phosphatase protein rather than the modification of pre-existing enzyme to a more active state. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7340849

  18. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  19. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  20. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  1. Estrogen down-regulates uncoupling proteins and increases oxidative stress in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Valle, Adamo; Company, Maria Margarita; Garau, Isabel; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2010-02-15

    Oxidative stress has been postulated as one of the mechanisms underlying the estrogen carcinogenic effect in breast cancer. Estrogens are known to increase mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) by an unknown mechanism. Given that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are key regulators of mitochondrial energy efficiency and ROS production, our aim was to check the presence and activity of UCPs in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer cells and tumors, as well as their relation to oxidative stress. Estrogen (1 nM) induced higher oxidative stress in the ER-positive MCF-7 cell line, showing increased mitochondrial membrane potential, H(2)O(2) levels, and DNA and protein damage compared to ER-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. All isoforms of uncoupling proteins were highly expressed in ER-positive breast cancer cells and tumors compared to negative ones. ROS production in mitochondria isolated from MCF-7 was increased by inhibition of UCPs with GDP, but not in mitochondria from MDA-MB-231. Estrogen treatment decreased uncoupling protein and catalase levels in MCF-7 and decreased GDP-dependent ROS production in isolated mitochondria. On the whole, these results suggest that estrogens, through an ER-dependent mechanism, may increase mitochondrial ROS production by repressing uncoupling proteins, which offers a new perspective on the understanding of why estrogens are a risk factor for breast cancer.

  2. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein's adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the "fossils" of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment. PMID

  3. A Minimalistic Resource Allocation Model to Explain Ubiquitous Increase in Protein Expression with Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Leeat; Segal, Eran; Milo, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Most proteins show changes in level across growth conditions. Many of these changes seem to be coordinated with the specific growth rate rather than the growth environment or the protein function. Although cellular growth rates, gene expression levels and gene regulation have been at the center of biological research for decades, there are only a few models giving a base line prediction of the dependence of the proteome fraction occupied by a gene with the specific growth rate. We present a simple model that predicts a widely coordinated increase in the fraction of many proteins out of the proteome, proportionally with the growth rate. The model reveals how passive redistribution of resources, due to active regulation of only a few proteins, can have proteome wide effects that are quantitatively predictable. Our model provides a potential explanation for why and how such a coordinated response of a large fraction of the proteome to the specific growth rate arises under different environmental conditions. The simplicity of our model can also be useful by serving as a baseline null hypothesis in the search for active regulation. We exemplify the usage of the model by analyzing the relationship between growth rate and proteome composition for the model microorganism E.coli as reflected in recent proteomics data sets spanning various growth conditions. We find that the fraction out of the proteome of a large number of proteins, and from different cellular processes, increases proportionally with the growth rate. Notably, ribosomal proteins, which have been previously reported to increase in fraction with growth rate, are only a small part of this group of proteins. We suggest that, although the fractions of many proteins change with the growth rate, such changes may be partially driven by a global effect, not necessarily requiring specific cellular control mechanisms. PMID:27073913

  4. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein's adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the "fossils" of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment.

  5. The effect of elastomer chain flexibility on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Liu, Lina; Sheardown, Heather D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    Cells are known to respond differently when grown on materials of varying stiffness. However, the mechanism by which a cell senses substrate stiffness is unknown. Lower crosslink density elastomers formed from acrylated star-poly(d,l lactide-co-ϵ-caprolactone) have previously been shown to support higher smooth muscle cell proliferation in in vitro culture. This difference in growth was hypothesized to be due to differences in protein adsorption that resulted from differences in polymer chain mobility at the surface. Therefore, layer mass and viscoelastic properties were measured for HSA, IgG, fibronectin, vitronectin, and serum supplemented media adsorbed to elastomers of two crosslink densities. Significantly more fibronectin adsorbed to the lower crosslink density surface while significantly more IgG adsorbed to the higher crosslink density surface. Furthermore, differences in fibronectin and IgG layer shear moduli were observed, suggesting that there was a difference in the conformation of the adsorbed protein. ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the lower crosslink density elastomer absorbed more surface water. The increased amount of water may cause greater entropic gains upon protein adsorption to the lower crosslink density surface, which increases total protein adsorption from serum and may cause differences in protein conformation and thus cell behavior. PMID:24034504

  6. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  7. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  8. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected. PMID:14641959

  9. Increased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase (GRK) Expression in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Adam J.; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; McCullumsmith, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia target G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors. Ligand bound GPCRs are regulated by a family of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), members of which uncouple the receptor from heterotrimeric G proteins, desensitize the receptor, and induce receptor internalization via the arrestin family of scaffolding and signaling molecules. GRKs initiate the activation of downstream signaling pathways, can regulate receptors and signaling molecules independent of GPCR phosphorylation, and modulate epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (HDACs). We hypothesize that expression of GRK proteins are altered in schizophrenia, consistent with previous findings of alterations up and downstream from this family of molecules that facilitate intracellular signaling processes. Methods In this study we measured protein expression via Western blot analysis for GRKs 2, 3, 5, and 6 in the anterior cingulate cortex of patients with schizophrenia (N = 36) and a comparison group (N = 33). To control for antipsychotic treatment we measured these same targets in haloperidol treated vs. untreated rats (N = 10 for both). Results We found increased levels of GRK5 in schizophrenia. No changes were detected in GRK protein expression in rats treated with haloperidol decanoate for 9 months. Conclusion These data suggest that increased GRK5 expression may contribute the the pathophysiology of schizophrenia via abnormal regulation of the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, signaling, GPCRs, and histone modification. PMID:25153362

  10. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected.

  11. Comparative expression study to increase the solubility of cold adapted Vibrio proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niiranen, Laila; Espelid, Sigrun; Karlsen, Christian R; Mustonen, Milla; Paulsen, Steinar M; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Willassen, Nils P

    2007-03-01

    Functional and structural studies require gene overexpression and purification of soluble proteins. We wanted to express proteins from the psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio salmonicida in Escherichia coli, but encountered solubility problems. To improve the solubility of the proteins, we compared the effects of six N-terminal fusion proteins (Gb1, Z, thioredoxin, GST, MBP and NusA) and an N-terminal His6-tag. The selected test set included five proteins from the fish pathogen V. salmonicida and two related products from the mesophilic human pathogen Vibrio cholerae. We tested the expression in two different expression strains and at three different temperatures (16, 23 and 37 degrees C). His6-tag was the least effective tag, and these vector constructs were also difficult to transform. MBP and NusA performed best, expressing soluble proteins with all fusion partners in at least one of the cell types. In some cases MBP, GST and thioredoxin fusions resulted in products of incorrect size. The effect of temperature is complex: in most cases level of expression increased with temperature, whereas the effect on solubility was opposite. We found no clear connection between the preferred expression temperature of the protein and the temperature of the original host organism's natural habitat.

  12. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P < 0.05). The changes in the mRNA levels of O-GlcNAc enzymes were different in the two muscles, potentially resulting from different rates of oxidative stress and metabolic demands between the muscle types. These findings indicate that oxidative environment promotes O-GlcNAcylation in skeletal muscle and suggest an interrelationship between cellular redox state and O-GlcNAc protein modification. This could represent one mechanism underlying cellular adaptation to oxidative stress and health benefits of exercise. PMID:25416863

  13. Special Enrichment Strategies Greatly Increase the Efficiency of Missing Proteins Identification from Regular Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Na; Zhang, Chengpu; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Fengxu; Zhao, Mingzhi; Wu, Feilin; Gao, Yuan; Li, Yanchang; Chen, Lingsheng; Tian, Miaomiao; Zhang, Tao; Wen, Bo; Sensang, Na; Xiong, Zhi; Wu, Songfeng; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhen, Bei; Zhu, Yunping; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    As part of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) mission, laboratories all over the world have tried to map the entire missing proteins (MPs) since 2012. On the basis of the first and second Chinese Chromosome Proteome Database (CCPD 1.0 and 2.0) studies, we developed systematic enrichment strategies to identify MPs that fell into four classes: (1) low molecular weight (LMW) proteins, (2) membrane proteins, (3) proteins that contained various post-translational modifications (PTMs), and (4) nucleic acid-associated proteins. Of 8845 proteins identified in 7 data sets, 79 proteins were classified as MPs. Among data sets derived from different enrichment strategies, data sets for LMW and PTM yielded the most novel MPs. In addition, we found that some MPs were identified in multiple-data sets, which implied that tandem enrichments methods might improve the ability to identify MPs. Moreover, low expression at the transcription level was the major cause of the "missing" of these MPs; however, MPs with higher expression level also evaded identification, most likely due to other characteristics such as LMW, high hydrophobicity and PTM. By combining a stringent manual check of the MS2 spectra with peptides synthesis verification, we confirmed 30 MPs (neXtProt PE2 ∼ PE4) and 6 potential MPs (neXtProt PE5) with authentic MS evidence. By integrating our large-scale data sets of CCPD 2.0, the number of identified proteins has increased considerably beyond simulation saturation. Here, we show that special enrichment strategies can break through the data saturation bottleneck, which could increase the efficiency of MP identification in future C-HPP studies. All 7 data sets have been uploaded to ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD002255.

  14. Strong Selection Significantly Increases Epistatic Interactions in the Long-Term Evolution of a Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Adami, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Epistatic interactions between residues determine a protein’s adaptability and shape its evolutionary trajectory. When a protein experiences a changed environment, it is under strong selection to find a peak in the new fitness landscape. It has been shown that strong selection increases epistatic interactions as well as the ruggedness of the fitness landscape, but little is known about how the epistatic interactions change under selection in the long-term evolution of a protein. Here we analyze the evolution of epistasis in the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) using protease sequences collected for almost a decade from both treated and untreated patients, to understand how epistasis changes and how those changes impact the long-term evolvability of a protein. We use an information-theoretic proxy for epistasis that quantifies the co-variation between sites, and show that positive information is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition that detects epistasis in most cases. We analyze the “fossils” of the evolutionary trajectories of the protein contained in the sequence data, and show that epistasis continues to enrich under strong selection, but not for proteins whose environment is unchanged. The increase in epistasis compensates for the information loss due to sequence variability brought about by treatment, and facilitates adaptation in the increasingly rugged fitness landscape of treatment. While epistasis is thought to enhance evolvability via valley-crossing early-on in adaptation, it can hinder adaptation later when the landscape has turned rugged. However, we find no evidence that the HIV-1 protease has reached its potential for evolution after 9 years of adapting to a drug environment that itself is constantly changing. We suggest that the mechanism of encoding new information into pairwise interactions is central to protein evolution not just in HIV-1 protease, but for any protein adapting to a changing environment. PMID

  15. Synaptic Proteins In Schizophrenia Hippocampus Indicate Increased Neuronal Activity in CA3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ghose, Subroto; Gleason, Kelly; Begovic’, Anita; Perez, Jessica; Bartko, John; Russo, Scott; Wagner, Anthony D.; Selemon, Lynn; Tamminga, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    In schizophrenia, hippocampal perfusion is increased and declarative memory function is degraded. Based on a model of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenic psychosis, we postulated increased NMDA receptor signaling in CA3. Here we demonstrate that the GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2B/GluN1) and its associated postsynaptic membrane protein PSD95 are both increased in human hippocampal CA3 from schizophrenia cases, but not in CA1 tissue. Quantitative analyses of Golgi-stained hippocampal neurons show an increase in spine density on CA3 pyramidal cell apical dendrites (stratum radiatum) and an increase in the number of thorny excrescences. AMPA receptor subunit proteins are not altered in CA3 or CA1 subfields, nor are several additional related signaling proteins. These hippocampal data are consistent with increased excitatory signaling in CA3 and/or with an elevation in silent synapses in CA3, a state which may contribute to development of long term potentiation with subsequent stimulation and ‘un-silencing’. These changes are plausibly associated with increased associational activity in CA3, degraded declarative memory function and with psychotic manifestations in schizophrenia. The influence of these hyperactive hippocampal projections onto targets in limbic neocortex could contribute to components of schizophrenia manifestations in other cerebral regions. PMID:25585032

  16. Poly(zwitterionic)protein conjugates offer increased stability without sacrificing binding affinity or bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Andrew J.; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with therapeutic proteins is an attractive approach to targeting a number of challenging diseases. Unfortunately, the native proteins themselves are often unstable in physiological conditions, reducing bioavailability and therefore increasing the dose that is required. Conjugation with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is often used to increase stability, but this has a detrimental effect on bioactivity. Here, we introduce conjugation with zwitterionic polymers such as poly(carboxybetaine). We show that poly(carboxybetaine) conjugation improves stability in a manner similar to PEGylation, but that the new conjugates retain or even improve the binding affinity as a result of enhanced protein–substrate hydrophobic interactions. This chemistry opens a new avenue for the development of protein therapeutics by avoiding the need to compromise between stability and affinity. PMID:22169873

  17. Supplementation of cattle fed tropical grasses with microalgae increases microbial protein production and average daily gain.

    PubMed

    Costa, D F A; Quigley, S P; Isherwood, P; McLennan, S R; Poppi, D P

    2016-05-01

    A series of 3 experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of microalgae as supplements for ruminants consuming low-CP tropical grasses. In Exp. 1, the chemical composition and in vitro protein degradability of 9 algae species and 4 protein supplements were determined. In Exp. 2, rumen function and microbial protein (MCP) production were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with , , , or cottonseed meal (CSM). In Exp. 3, DMI and ADG were determined in steers fed speargrass hay alone or supplemented with increasing amounts of NPN (urea combined with ammonia sulfate), CSM, or . In Exp. 1, the CP content of and (675 and 580 g/kg DM) was highest among the algae species and higher than the other protein supplements evaluated, and sp. had the highest crude lipid (CL) content (198 g/kg DM). In Exp. 2, supplementation increased speargrass hay intake, the efficiency of MCP production, the fractional outflow rate of digesta from the rumen, the concentration of NHN, and the molar proportion of branched-chain fatty acids in the rumen fluid of steers above all other treatments. acceptance by steers was low and this resulted in no significant difference to unsupplemented steers for all parameters measured for this algae supplement. In Exp. 3, ADG linearly increased with increasing supplementary N intake from both and NPN, with no difference between the 2 supplements. In contrast, ADG quadratically increased with increasing supplementary N intake from CSM. It was concluded that and may potentially be used as protein sources for cattle grazing low-CP pastures. PMID:27285702

  18. Ligands for FKBP12 Increase Ca2+ Influx and Protein Synthesis to Improve Skeletal Muscle Function*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Seok; Georgiou, Dimitra K.; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Xu, Jianjun; Ismailov, Iskander I.; Knoblauch, Mark; Monroe, Tanner O.; Ji, RuiRui; Hanna, Amy D.; Joshi, Aditya D.; Long, Cheng; Oakes, Joshua; Tran, Ted; Corona, Benjamin T.; Lorca, Sabina; Ingalls, Christopher P.; Narkar, Vihang A.; Lanner, Johanna T.; Bayle, J. Henri; Durham, William J.; Hamilton, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin at high doses (2–10 mg/kg body weight) inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and protein synthesis in mice. In contrast, low doses of rapamycin (10 μg/kg) increase mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Similar changes are found with SLF (synthetic ligand for FKBP12, which does not inhibit mTORC1) and in mice with a skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12 deficiency. These interventions also increase Ca2+ influx to enhance refilling of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores, slow muscle fatigue, and increase running endurance without negatively impacting cardiac function. FKBP12 deficiency or longer treatments with low dose rapamycin or SLF increase the percentage of type I fibers, further adding to fatigue resistance. We demonstrate that FKBP12 and its ligands impact multiple aspects of muscle function. PMID:25053409

  19. Cold acclimation increases levels of some heat shock protein and sirtuin isoforms in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Teigen, Laura E; Orczewska, Julieanna I; McLaughlin, Jessica; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-10-01

    Molecular chaperones [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] increase in response to rapid changes in temperatures, but long-term acclimation to cold temperature may also warrant elevations in HSPs. In fishes, cold acclimation increases mitochondrial density and oxidative stress in some tissues, which may increase demand for HSPs. We hypothesized that levels of HSPs, as well as sirtuins (SIRTs), NAD-dependent deacetylases that mediate changes in metabolism and responses to oxidative stress (including increases in HSPs), would increase during cold acclimation of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Transcript levels of hsp70, hsc70, hsp60 and hsp90-α, sirts1-4, as well as protein levels of HSP60, HSP90 and HSC70 were quantified in liver and pectoral adductor muscle of stickleback during cold acclimation from 20 °C to 8 °C. In liver, cold acclimation stimulated a transient increase in mRNA levels of hsp60 and hsc70. Transcript levels of sirt1 and sirt2 also increased in response to cold acclimation and remained elevated. In pectoral muscle, mRNA levels of hsp60, hsp90-α, hsc70 and sirt1 all transiently increased in response to cold acclimation, while levels of sirts2-4 remained constant or declined. Similar to transcript levels, protein levels of HSC70 increased in both liver and pectoral muscle. Levels of HSP90 also increased in liver after 4 weeks at 8 °C. HSP60 remained unchanged in both tissues, as did HSP90 in pectoral muscle. Our results indicate that while both HSPs and SIRTs increase in response to cold acclimation in stickleback, the response is tissue and isoform specific, likely reflecting differences in metabolism and oxidative stress.

  20. Tresyl-based conjugation of protein antigen to lipid nanoparticles increases antigen immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-11-30

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  1. Protein co-ingestion strongly increases postprandial insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Manders, Ralph J F; Hansen, Dominique; Zorenc, Antoine H G; Dendale, Paul; Kloek, Joris; Saris, Wim H M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2014-07-01

    The capacity of nutritional protein to induce endogenous insulin secretion has been well established. However, it is not known whether such a response is applicable in a diverse population of type 2 diabetes patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of co-ingesting either intact or hydrolyzed protein with carbohydrate on postprandial plasma insulin and glucose responses in type 2 diabetes patients. Sixty longstanding, male, type 2 diabetes patients participated in a study in which we determined postprandial plasma insulin and glucose responses after ingesting a single bolus of carbohydrate (0.7 g/kg: CHO) with or without an intact protein (0.3 g/kg: PRO) or its hydrolysate (0.3 g/kg: PROh). Results showed that protein co-ingestion strongly increased postprandial insulin release, with the insulin response +99 ± 41 and +110 ± 10% greater in the CHO+PRO and CHO+PROh experiments when compared with the CHO experiment. The insulinotropic properties of protein co-ingestion were evident in nearly all patients, with 58 out of 60 patients responding >10% when compared with the insulin response following carbohydrate ingestion only (CHO). The concomitant plasma glucose responses were 22 ± 32 and 23 ± 36% lower in the CHO+PRO and CHO+PROh experiments, respectively. We conclude that protein co-ingestion represents an effective dietary strategy to strongly augment postprandial insulin release and attenuate the postprandial rise in glucose concentration in type 2 diabetes patients.

  2. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  3. Age-Induced Protein Modifications and Increased Proteolysis in Potato Seed-Tubers1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, G.N. Mohan; Houtz, Robert L.; Knowles, N. Richard

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin (40 kD) and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as an increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases (75, 90, and 100 kD) appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed “daughter” tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than “mother” tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Our results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; we also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers. PMID:9880350

  4. Age-induced protein modifications and increased proteolysis in potato seed-tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, G.N.M.; Knowles, N.R.; Houtz, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term aging of potato (Solanum tuberosum) seed-tubers resulted in a loss of patatin and a cysteine-proteinase inhibitor, potato multicystatin (PMC), as well as in increase in the activities of 84-, 95-, and 125-kD proteinases. Highly active, additional proteinases appeared in the oldest tubers. Over 90% of the total proteolytic activity in aged tubers was sensitive to trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino) butane or leupeptin, whereas pepstatin was the most effective inhibitor of proteinases in young tubers. Proteinases in aged tubers were also inhibited by crude extracts or purified PMC from young tubers, suggesting that the loss of PMC was responsible for the age-induced increase in proteinase activity. Nonenzymatic oxidation, glycation, and deamidation of proteins were enhanced by aging. Aged tubers developed daughter tubers that contained 3-fold more protein than mother tubers, with a polypeptide profile consistent with that of young tubers. Although PMC and patatin were absent from the older mother tubers, both proteins were expressed in the daughter tubers, indicating that aging did not compromise the efficacy of genes encoding PMC and patatin. Unlike the mother tubers, proteinase activity in daughter tubers was undetectable. Their results indicate that tuber aging nonenzymatically modifies proteins, which enhances their susceptibility to breakdown; the authors also identify a role for PMC in regulating protein turnover in potato tubers.

  5. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  6. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  7. Enteral β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Kao, Michelle; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Hernandez-Garcia, Adriana; Nguyen, Hanh V; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa A

    2016-06-01

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) on protein synthesis and the regulation of translation initiation and degradation pathways, overnight-fasted neonatal pigs were studied immediately (F) or fed one of five diets for 24 h: low-protein (LP), high-protein (HP), or LP diet supplemented with 4 (HMB4), 40 (HMB40), or 80 (HMB80) μmol HMB·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) Cell replication was assessed from nuclear incorporation of BrdU in the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle and jejunum crypt cells. Protein synthesis rates in LD, gastrocnemius, rhomboideus, and diaphragm muscles, lung, and brain were greater in HMB80 and HP and in brain were greater in HMB40 compared with LP and F groups. Formation of the eIF4E·eIF4G complex and S6K1 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in LD, gastrocnemius, and rhomboideus muscles were greater in HMB80 and HP than in LP and F groups. Phosphorylation of eIF2α and eEF2 and expression of SNAT2, LAT1, MuRF1, atrogin-1, and LC3-II were unchanged. Numbers of BrdU-positive myonuclei in the LD were greater in HMB80 and HP than in the LP and F groups; there were no differences in jejunum. The results suggest that enteral supplementation with HMB increases skeletal muscle protein anabolism in neonates by stimulation of protein synthesis and satellite cell proliferation.

  8. Heparin treatment increases thioredoxin interacting protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Aysim; Iscan, Evin; Topel, Hande; Avci, Sanem Tercan; Gumustekin, Mukaddes; Erdal, Esra; Atabey, Nese

    2015-08-01

    Heparins play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, migration and invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms of heparin mediated cellular behaviors are not well defined. To determine the effect of heparin on gene expression, we performed a cDNA microarray in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and found that heparin regulates transcription of genes involved in glucose metabolism. In this study, we showed a new role of heparin in the regulation of thioredoxin interacting protein, which is a major regulator of glucose metabolism, in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We determined the importance of a unique carbohydrate response element located on its promoter for the heparin-induced activation of thioredoxin-interacting protein and the modulatory role of heparin on nuclear accumulation of carbohydrate response element associated proteins. We showed the importance of heparin mediated histone modifications and down-regulation of Enhancer of zeste 2 polycomb repressive complex 2 expression for heparin mediated overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein. When we tested biological significance of these data; we observed that cells overexpressing thioredoxin-interacting protein are less adhesive and proliferative, however they have a higher migration and invasion ability. Interestingly, heparin treatment increased thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver of diabetic rats. In conclusion, our results show that heparin activates thioredoxin-interacting protein expression in liver and hepatocellular carcinoma cells and provide the first evidences of regulatory roles of heparin on carbohydrate response element associated factors. This study will contribute future understanding of the effect of heparin on glucose metabolism and glucose independent overexpression of thioredoxin-interacting protein during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  9. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    PubMed

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  10. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, M.; Guida, G.; Perlino, E.; Marra, E.; Quagliariello, E. )

    1989-09-29

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm{sup 2}). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-({sup 32}P)UTP and L-({sup 35}S)methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products.

  11. Enhanced heterologous protein production in Pichia pastoris under increased air pressure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene; Oliveira, Carla; Domingues, Lucília; Mota, Manuel; Belo, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is a widely used host for the production of heterologous proteins. In this case, high cell densities are needed and oxygen is a major limiting factor. The increased air pressure could be used to improve the oxygen solubility in the medium and to reach the high oxygen demand of methanol metabolism. In this study, two P. pastoris strains producing two different recombinant proteins, one intracellular (β-galactosidase) and other extracellular (frutalin), were used to investigate the effect of increased air pressure on yeast growth in glycerol and heterologous protein production, using the methanol AOX1-inducible system. Experiments were carried out in a stainless steel bioreactor under total air pressure of 1 bar and 5 bar. The use of an air pressure raise of up to 5 bar proved to be applicable for P. pastoris cultivation. Moreover, no effects on the kinetic growth parameters and methanol utilization (Mut) phenotype of strains were found, while an increase in recombinant β-galactosidase-specific activity (ninefold) and recombinant frutalin production was observed. Furthermore, the air pressure raise led to a reduction in the secreted protease specific activity. This work shows for the first time that the application of an air pressure of 5 bar may be used as a strategy to decrease protease secretion and improve recombinant protein production in P. pastoris.

  12. Increased Asynchronous Release and Aberrant Calcium Channel Activation in Amyloid Precursor Protein Deficient Neuromuscular Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Baiping; Long, Cheng; Wu, Gangyi; Zheng, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Despite the critical roles of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, its physiological function remains poorly established. Our previous studies implicated a structural and functional activity of the APP family of proteins in the developing neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here we performed comprehensive analyses of neurotransmission in mature neuromuscular synapse of APP deficient mice. We found that APP deletion led to reduced paired-pulse facilitation and increased depression of synaptic transmission with repetitive stimulation. Readily releasable pool size and total releasable vesicles were not affected, but probability of release was significantly increased. Strikingly, the amount of asynchronous release, a measure sensitive to presynaptic calcium concentration, was dramatically increased, and pharmacological studies revealed that it was attributed to aberrant activation of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. We propose that APP modulates synaptic transmission at the NMJ by ensuring proper Ca2+ channel function. PMID:17919826

  13. Intense exercise increases protein oxidation in spleen and liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukiko; Nakatsuji, Aki; Aoi, Wataru; Wada, Sayori; Kuwahata, Masashi; Kido, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that sports anemia is mainly associated with intravascular hemolysis induced by exercise. We hypothesized that such exercise-induced hemolysis leads to oxidative damage due to an increase in free iron caused by hematocyte destruction. Thirty-one male ICR mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: a rested control group, an intense-exercise group, and a group rested for 24 hours after intense exercise. The serum haptoglobin level of the intense-exercise group decreased compared with that of the rested control group, suggesting hemolysis. Tissue iron and protein carbonyl levels in the liver were increased after exercise, and the protein carbonyl level in the spleen on the day after exercise was significantly increased compared with that of the resting state. These results suggest that the spleen and liver, where extravascular hemolysis occurs, were subjected to oxidative modification by the free iron, which was released from large numbers of hemocytes that were destroyed due to the intense exercise.

  14. Self-cycling operation increases productivity of recombinant protein in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Storms, Zachary J; Brown, Tobin; Sauvageau, Dominic; Cooper, David G

    2012-09-01

    Self-cycling fermentation (SCF), a cyclical, semi-continuous process that induces cell synchrony, was incorporated into a recombinant protein production scheme. Escherichia coli CY15050, a lac(-) mutant lysogenized with temperature-sensitive phage λ modified to over-express β-galactosidase, was used as a model system. The production scheme was divided into two de-coupled stages. The host cells were cultured under SCF operation in the first stage before being brought to a second stage where protein production was induced. In the first stage, the host strain demonstrated a stable cycling pattern immediately following the first cycle. This reproducible pattern was maintained over the course of the experiments and a significant degree of cell synchrony was obtained. By growing cells using SCF, productivity increased 50% and production time decreased by 40% compared to a batch culture under similar conditions. In addition, synchronized cultures induced from the end of a SCF cycle displayed shorter lysis times and a more complete culture-wide lysis than unsynchronized cultures. Finally, protein synthesis was influenced by the time at which the lytic phase was induced in the cell life cycle. For example, induction of a synchronized culture immediately prior to cell division resulted in the maximum protein productivity, suggesting protein production can be optimized with respect to the cell life cycle using SCF. PMID:22407770

  15. Identification and expression analysis on bactericidal permeability-increasing protein/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein of blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Tang, Leilei; Liang, Yinhua; Jiang, Yuhong; Liu, Shaojun; Zhang, Fuyun; He, Xia; Wang, Tianyi; Zhou, Yi; Zhong, Huan; Yan, Jinpeng

    2015-08-01

    Bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI) and lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) belong to the lipid transfer protein/lipopolysaccharide-binding protein family and play a critical role in the innate immune response to Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, a novel BPI/LBP from blunt snout bream, Megalobrama amblycephala (maBPI/LBP) was isolated by RACE techniques. The open reading frame (ORF) of maBPI/LBP gene encoded a polypeptide of 474 amino acids with a putative 18-aa hydrophobic signal peptide. Structurally, the maBPI/LBP showed highly similar to those of BPI/LBPs from invertebrate and teleost, LBPs and BPIs from mammal, which contained an N-terminal BPI/LBP/CETP domain BPI1 with a LPS-binding domain, a C-terminal BPI/LBP/CETP domain BPI2, and proline-rich domain. The homologous identities of deduced amino acid sequences displayed that the maBPI/LBP possessed significant similarity (96.61% and 90.07%) with those of grass carp and common carp, respectively. The recombinant protein of maBPI/LBP showed effectively kill Gram-negative bacteria. The maBPI/LBP gene was expressed in a wide range of normal tested tissues, with the highest expression levels in the kidney. The experiments revealed that the mRNA expression of maBPI/LBP in spleen considerably up-regulated from 2 h to 8 h post LPS stimulation, and peaked rapidly at 2 h (7.40-fold, P < 0.05), which confirmed that maBPI/LBP was the absolute sensitive to LPS stimulation. Furthermore, the level of maBPI/LBP mRNA expression reached the maximum for a second time at 24 h after LPS stimulation. These results suggested that maBPI/LBP was a constitutive and inducible acute-phase protein contributing to the host immune defense against pathogenic bacterial infection in M. amblycephala. This study will further our understanding of the function of BPI/LBP and the molecular mechanism of innate immunity in teleost.

  16. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  17. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Højlund, Kurt

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that multiple proteins involved in key regulatory processes in mitochondria are phosphorylated in mammalian tissues. Insulin regulates glucose metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent signaling and has been shown to stimulate ATP synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effect of insulin on the phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo. Using a combination of TiO(2) phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS, we compared the phosphoproteomes of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle samples obtained from healthy individuals before and after 4 h of insulin infusion. In total, we identified 207 phosphorylation sites in 95 mitochondrial proteins. Of these phosphorylation sites, 45% were identified in both basal and insulin-stimulated samples. Insulin caused a 2-fold increase in the number of different mitochondrial phosphopeptides (87 ± 7 vs 40 ± 7, p = 0.015) and phosphoproteins (46 ± 2 vs 26 ± 3, p = 0.005) identified in each mitochondrial preparation. Almost half of the mitochondrial phosphorylation sites (n = 94) were exclusively identified in the insulin-stimulated state and included the majority of novel sites. Phosphorylation sites detected more often or exclusively in insulin-stimulated samples include multiple sites in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism, as well as several components of the newly defined mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial processes by phosphorylation-dependent mechanisms.

  18. Deletion of the membrane protein Lmo0412 increases the virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan José; Pucciarelli, María Graciela

    2014-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes gastroenteritis, meningitis, encephalitis and maternofetal infections. 20-30% of eubacterial ORFs are predicted to encode membrane proteins. The bacterial cytoplasmic membrane is a macromolecular structure, which plays a key role for the pathogenesis. Despite this, little knowledge exists regarding the function of cytoplasmic membrane proteins of Listeria during infection. Here, we investigated a predicted membrane protein of the pathogen L. monocytogenes, Lmo0412, of unknown function. Lmo0412 is only present in the Listeria genus and low conserved in the non-pathogenic species L. innocua. Bacterial fractionation and western blot analyses showed that Lmo0412 was only detectable in the membrane of L. monocytogenes EGDe during logarithmic growth phase. lmo0412 expression in L. monocytogenes was down-regulated during in vitro infection of JEG-3 epithelial cells. An L. monocytogenes mutant deficient in this membrane protein showed increased invasion of Caco-2 and NRK-49F host cells using in vitro infection models. Moreover, the lack of Lmo0412 in this deletion mutant increased the viable bacteria counts in the spleen and liver of mice compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, these data suggest a selective advantage conferred by the absence of Lmo0412 for the virulence of L. monocytogenes.

  19. Hypoxia stimulates prostacyclin synthesis in newborn pulmonary artery endothelium by increasing cyclooxygenase-1 protein.

    PubMed

    North, A J; Brannon, T S; Wells, L B; Campbell, W B; Shaul, P W

    1994-07-01

    In newborn lambs, pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI2) production increases acutely in response to low oxygen. We tested the hypothesis that decreased oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 synthesis in arterial segments and cultured endothelial cells from newborn lamb intrapulmonary arteries. In segments studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by 73%. Endothelium removal lowered PGI2 by 77% and PGE2 by 66%. At low oxygen tension (PO2, 40 mm Hg), PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis rose by 96% and 102%, respectively. Similarly, in endothelial cells studied at PO2 of 680 mm Hg, the synthesis of PGI2 exceeded PGE2 by 50%, and at low oxygen tension both PGI2 and PGE2 increased (89% and 64%, respectively). Endothelial cell PGI2 synthesis maximally stimulated by bradykinin, A23187, or arachidonic acid was also increased at low PO2 by 50%, 66%, and 48%, respectively. PGE2 synthesis was similarly altered, increasing by 33%, 37%, and 41%, respectively. In contrast, lowering oxygen had minimal effect on PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis with exogenous PGH2, which is the product of cyclooxygenase. Immunoblot analyses revealed that there was a 2.6-fold greater abundance of cyclooxygenase-1 protein at PO2 of 40 versus 680 mm Hg, and the increase at lower oxygen tension was inhibited by cycloheximide. The cyclooxygenase-2 isoform was not detected. Thus, attenuated oxygenation directly stimulates PGI2 and PGE2 synthesis in intrapulmonary arterial segments and endothelial cells from newborn lambs. This process is due to enhanced cyclooxygenase activity related to increased abundance of the cyclooxygenase-1 protein, and this effect may be due to increased synthesis of the enzyme protein.

  20. Increased expression of the antiapoptotic protein MCL1 in canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Oida, Kumiko; Jung, Kyungsook; Nishikawa, Sho; Jang, Hyosun; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2013-07-31

    Myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (MCL1) is a potent antiapoptotic protein that plays a critical role in cell survival and drug resistance in various cancers. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of MCL1 in mast cell tumors (MCTs) has not been investigated in dogs. Here, we detected increased MCL1 expression in MCT cell lines, regardless of the presence of a c-kit mutation. MCL1 expression increased when the cells were exposed to specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase or Janus kinase-signaling pathways, thus protecting the cells from apoptosis, but not when KIT or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling cascades were inhibited. These results indicate that MCL1 expression may contribute to MCT survival and confer drug resistance. PMID:23428776

  1. Increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Vitaioli, Lucia; Amenta, Francesco

    2004-05-01

    Astrogliosis, consisting in astroglial proliferation and increased expression of the specific cytoskeletal protein glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) is common in several situations of brain damage. Arterial hypertension, which induces cerebrovascular changes, can cause also brain damage, neurodegeneration and dementia (vascular dementia). This study was designed to assess astroglial reaction in different brain areas (frontal cortex, occipital cortex, hippocampus and striatum) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) in the pre-hypertensive phase (2 months of age), in the developing phase of hypertension (4 months of age) and in established hypertension (6 months of age). SHR were compared to age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Analysis included reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of GFAP mRNA, GFAP immunochemistry (Western blot analysis) and immunohistochemistry. A significant increase of GFAP mRNA and an increase of GFAP immunoreactivity were noticeable in different brain areas of SHR compared to normotensive WKY rats at 6, but not at 2 or 4 months of age. Immunohistochemistry revealed a numerical augmentation (hyperplasia) and an increase in size (hypertrophy) of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in frontal cortex, occipital cortex and striatum of SHR. In the hippocampus of SHR only a numerical increase of GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes was found. These finding demonstrating the occurrence of astrogliosis in the brain of SHR with established hypertension suggest that hypertension induces a condition of brain suffering enough to increase biosynthesis and expression of GFAP similarly as reported in several neurodegenerative disorders and in brain ischemia.

  2. Expression of a Truncated ATHB17 Protein in Maize Increases Ear Weight at Silking

    PubMed Central

    Creelman, Robert A.; Griffith, Cara; Ahrens, Jeffrey E.; Taylor, J. Philip; Murphy, Lesley R.; Manjunath, Siva; Thompson, Rebecca L.; Lingard, Matthew J.; Back, Stephanie L.; Larue, Huachun; Brayton, Bonnie R.; Burek, Amanda J.; Tiwari, Shiv; Adam, Luc; Morrell, James A.; Caldo, Rico A.; Huai, Qing; Kouadio, Jean-Louis K.; Kuehn, Rosemarie; Sant, Anagha M.; Wingbermuehle, William J.; Sala, Rodrigo; Foster, Matt; Kinser, Josh D.; Mohanty, Radha; Jiang, Dongming; Ziegler, Todd E.; Huang, Mingya G.; Kuriakose, Saritha V.; Skottke, Kyle; Repetti, Peter P.; Reuber, T. Lynne; Ruff, Thomas G.; Petracek, Marie E.; Loida, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    ATHB17 (AT2G01430) is an Arabidopsis gene encoding a member of the α-subclass of the homeodomain leucine zipper class II (HD-Zip II) family of transcription factors. The ATHB17 monomer contains four domains common to all class II HD-Zip proteins: a putative repression domain adjacent to a homeodomain, leucine zipper, and carboxy terminal domain. However, it also possesses a unique N-terminus not present in other members of the family. In this study we demonstrate that the unique 73 amino acid N-terminus is involved in regulation of cellular localization of ATHB17. The ATHB17 protein is shown to function as a transcriptional repressor and an EAR-like motif is identified within the putative repression domain of ATHB17. Transformation of maize with an ATHB17 expression construct leads to the expression of ATHB17Δ113, a truncated protein lacking the first 113 amino acids which encodes a significant portion of the repression domain. Because ATHB17Δ113 lacks the repression domain, the protein cannot directly affect the transcription of its target genes. ATHB17Δ113 can homodimerize, form heterodimers with maize endogenous HD-Zip II proteins, and bind to target DNA sequences; thus, ATHB17Δ113 may interfere with HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional activity via a dominant negative mechanism. We provide evidence that maize HD-Zip II proteins function as transcriptional repressors and that ATHB17Δ113 relieves this HD-Zip II mediated transcriptional repression activity. Expression of ATHB17Δ113 in maize leads to increased ear size at silking and, therefore, may enhance sink potential. We hypothesize that this phenotype could be a result of modulation of endogenous HD-Zip II pathways in maize. PMID:24736658

  3. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Banerji, Christopher R S; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-04-28

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology.

  4. Blood parameters in growing pigs fed increasing levels of bacterial protein meal

    PubMed Central

    Hellwing, Anne Louise F; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The experiment investigated the effects of increasing dietary levels of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on various blood parameters reflecting protein and fat metabolism, liver function, and purine base metabolism in growing pigs. Sixteen barrows were allocated to four different experimental diets. The control diet was based on soybean meal. In the other three diets soybean meal was replaced with increasing levels of BPM, approximately 17%, 35%, and 50% of the nitrogen being derived from BPM. Blood samples from the jugular vein were taken when the body weights of the pigs were approximately 10 kg, 21 kg, 45 kg, and 77 kg. The blood parameters reflecting fat metabolism and liver function were not affected by diet. Both the plasma albumin and uric acid concentrations tended to decrease (P = 0.07 and 0.01, respectively) with increasing dietary BPM content, whereas the plasma glucose concentration tended to increase (P = 0.07) with increasing dietary BPM content. It was concluded that up to 50% of the nitrogen could be derived from BPM without affecting metabolic function, as reflected in the measured blood parameters. PMID:17996082

  5. Increased signaling entropy in cancer requires the scale-free property of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Severini, Simone; Kuehn, Reimer; Sollich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One of the key characteristics of cancer cells is an increased phenotypic plasticity, driven by underlying genetic and epigenetic perturbations. However, at a systems-level it is unclear how these perturbations give rise to the observed increased plasticity. Elucidating such systems-level principles is key for an improved understanding of cancer. Recently, it has been shown that signaling entropy, an overall measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, and computable from integrating a sample's gene expression profile with a protein interaction network, correlates with phenotypic plasticity and is increased in cancer compared to normal tissue. Here we develop a computational framework for studying the effects of network perturbations on signaling entropy. We demonstrate that the increased signaling entropy of cancer is driven by two factors: (i) the scale-free (or near scale-free) topology of the interaction network, and (ii) a subtle positive correlation between differential gene expression and node connectivity. Indeed, we show that if protein interaction networks were random graphs, described by Poisson degree distributions, that cancer would generally not exhibit an increased signaling entropy. In summary, this work exposes a deep connection between cancer, signaling entropy and interaction network topology. PMID:25919796

  6. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  7. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  8. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types. PMID:26568031

  9. Increasing pentose phosphate pathway flux enhances recombinant protein production in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Nocon, Justyna; Steiger, Matthias; Mairinger, Teresa; Hohlweg, Jonas; Rußmayer, Hannes; Hann, Stephan; Gasser, Brigitte; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2016-07-01

    Production of heterologous proteins in Pichia pastoris (syn. Komagataella sp.) has been shown to exert a metabolic burden on the host metabolism. This burden is associated with metabolite drain, which redirects nucleotides and amino acids from primary metabolism. On the other hand, recombinant protein production affects energy and redox homeostasis of the host cell. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that overexpression of single genes of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) had a positive influence on recombinant production of cytosolic human superoxide dismutase (hSOD). In this study, different combinations of these genes belonging to the oxidative PPP were generated and analyzed. Thereby, a 3.8-fold increase of hSOD production was detected when glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (ZWF1) and 6-gluconolactonase (SOL3) were simultaneously overexpressed, while the combinations of other genes from PPP had no positive effect on protein production. By measuring isotopologue patterns of (13)C-labelled metabolites, we could detect an upshift in the flux ratio of PPP to glycolysis upon ZWF1 and SOL3 co-overexpression, as well as increased levels of 6-phosphogluconate. The substantial improvement of hSOD production by ZWF1 and SOL3 co-overexpression appeared to be connected to an increase in PPP flux. In conclusion, we show that overexpression of SOL3 together with ZWF1 enhanced both the PPP flux ratio and hSOD accumulation, providing evidence that in P. pastoris Sol3 limits the flux through PPP and recombinant protein production.

  10. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  11. Inflammatory Eicosanoids Increase Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression via Activation of Multiple Neuronal Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Herbst-Robinson, Katie J.; Liu, Li; James, Michael; Yao, Yuemang; Xie, Sharon X.; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Senile plaques comprised of Aβ peptides are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain, as are activated glia that release inflammatory molecules, including eicosanoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ levels can be increased through activation of thromboxane A2-prostanoid (TP) receptors on neurons. We demonstrate that TP receptor regulation of APP expression depends on Gαq-signaling and conventional protein kinase C isoforms. Importantly, we discovered that Gαq-linked prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene D4 receptors also regulate APP expression. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2, as well as total APP levels, were found to be elevated in the brains of aged 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring Aβ plaques and activated glia, suggesting that increased APP expression resulted from eicosanoid binding to Gαq-linked neuronal receptors. Notably, inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis significantly lowered brain APP protein levels in aged 5XFAD mice. These results provide new insights into potential AD therapeutic strategies. PMID:26672557

  12. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-06-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. PMID:10856027

  13. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed Central

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-01-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10856027

  14. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein (BPI) Inhibits the Infectivity of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pinkenburg, Olaf; Meyer, Torben; Bannert, Norbert; Norley, Steven; Bolte, Kathrin; Czudai-Matwich, Volker; Herold, Susanne; Gessner, André; Schnare, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their well-known antibacterial activity some antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) display also antiviral effects. A 27 aa peptide from the N-terminal part of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) previously shown to harbour antibacterial activity inhibits the infectivity of multiple Influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1) the causing agent of the Influenza pneumonia. In contrast, the homologous murine BPI-peptide did not show activity against Influenza A virus. In addition human BPI-peptide inhibits the activation of immune cells mediated by Influenza A virus. By changing the human BPI-peptide to the sequence of the mouse homologous peptide the antiviral activity was completely abolished. Furthermore, the human BPI-peptide also inhibited the pathogenicity of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but failed to interfere with HIV and measles virus. Electron microscopy indicate that the human BPI-peptide interferes with the virus envelope and at high concentrations was able to destroy the particles completely. PMID:27273104

  15. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  16. Contribution of increased VEGF receptors to hypoxic changes in fetal ovine carotid artery contractile proteins.

    PubMed

    Adeoye, Olayemi O; Butler, Stacy M; Hubbell, Margaret C; Semotiuk, Andrew; Williams, James M; Pearce, William J

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can modulate smooth muscle phenotype and, consequently, the composition and function of arteries upstream from the microcirculation, where angiogenesis occurs. Given that hypoxia potently induces VEGF, the present study explores the hypothesis that, in fetal arteries, VEGF contributes to hypoxic vascular remodeling through changes in abundance, organization, and function of contractile proteins. Pregnant ewes were acclimatized at sea level or at altitude (3,820 m) for the final 110 days of gestation. Endothelium-denuded carotid arteries from full-term fetuses were used fresh or after 24 h of organ culture in a physiological concentration (3 ng/ml) of VEGF. After 110 days, hypoxia had no effect on VEGF abundance but markedly increased abundance of the Flk-1 (171%) and Flt-1 (786%) VEGF receptors. Hypoxia had no effect on smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA), decreased myosin light chain (MLC) kinase (MLCK), and increased 20-kDa regulatory MLC (MLC(20)) abundances. Hypoxia also increased MLCK-SMαA, MLC(20)-SMαA, and MLCK-MLC(20) colocalization. Compared with hypoxia, organ culture with VEGF produced the same pattern of changes in contractile protein abundance and colocalization. Effects of VEGF on colocalization were blocked by the VEGF receptor antagonists vatalanib (240 nM) and dasatinib (6.3 nM). Thus, through increases in VEGF receptor density, hypoxia can recruit VEGF to help mediate remodeling of fetal arteries upstream from the microcirculation. The results support the hypothesis that VEGF contributes to hypoxic vascular remodeling through changes in abundance, organization, and function of contractile proteins. PMID:23325408

  17. T cell inactivation by poxviral B22 family proteins increases viral virulence.

    PubMed

    Alzhanova, Dina; Hammarlund, Erika; Reed, Jason; Meermeier, Erin; Rawlings, Stephanie; Ray, Caroline A; Edwards, David M; Bimber, Ben; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Sprague, Jerald; Axthelm, Michael K; Pickup, David J; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C; Wong, Scott W; Sacha, Jonah B; Slifka, Mark K; Früh, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Infections with monkeypox, cowpox and weaponized variola virus remain a threat to the increasingly unvaccinated human population, but little is known about their mechanisms of virulence and immune evasion. We now demonstrate that B22 proteins, encoded by the largest genes of these viruses, render human T cells unresponsive to stimulation of the T cell receptor by MHC-dependent antigen presentation or by MHC-independent stimulation. In contrast, stimuli that bypass TCR-signaling are not inhibited. In a non-human primate model of monkeypox, virus lacking the B22R homologue (MPXVΔ197) caused only mild disease with lower viremia and cutaneous pox lesions compared to wild type MPXV which caused high viremia, morbidity and mortality. Since MPXVΔ197-infected animals displayed accelerated T cell responses and less T cell dysregulation than MPXV US2003, we conclude that B22 family proteins cause viral virulence by suppressing T cell control of viral dissemination. PMID:24832205

  18. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross).

  19. Extending CATH: increasing coverage of the protein structure universe and linking structure with function.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Alison L; Sillitoe, Ian; Lewis, Tony; Clegg, Andrew B; Rentzsch, Robert; Furnham, Nicholas; Pellegrini-Calace, Marialuisa; Jones, David; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine A

    2011-01-01

    CATH version 3.3 (class, architecture, topology, homology) contains 128,688 domains, 2386 homologous superfamilies and 1233 fold groups, and reflects a major focus on classifying structural genomics (SG) structures and transmembrane proteins, both of which are likely to add structural novelty to the database and therefore increase the coverage of protein fold space within CATH. For CATH version 3.4 we have significantly improved the presentation of sequence information and associated functional information for CATH superfamilies. The CATH superfamily pages now reflect both the functional and structural diversity within the superfamily and include structural alignments of close and distant relatives within the superfamily, annotated with functional information and details of conserved residues. A significantly more efficient search function for CATH has been established by implementing the search server Solr (http://lucene.apache.org/solr/). The CATH v3.4 webpages have been built using the Catalyst web framework.

  20. Increased expression of Dock180 protein in the noninfarcted myocardium in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Lan; Li, Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Zhao, Wen-Ju; Wang, Li-Ping

    2013-03-01

    The integrin β1 subunit and its downstream molecule focal adhesion kinase have been identified as critical molecules for the inhibition of postinfarction cardiac remodeling, ischemic cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. However, as a component of the integrin pathway, it is still unclear whether Dock180 (dedicator of cytokinesis 1) protein is expressed in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones. In this study, experimental myocardial infarction (MI) and sham-operation (sham) models were established in Sprague Dawley rats and the expression of Dock180 protein in the myocardium of the sham group and in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones of the MI group was detected by Western blot technique. The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium was as follows: postsham 24-hour group, 0.10 ± 0.04 (n = 8); post-MI 24-hour group, 0.13 ± 0.03 (n = 8); postsham 12-week group, 0.11 ± 0.05 (n = 8); and post-MI 12-week group 0.17 ± 0.04 (n = 8). The Dock180 protein expression in the myocardium in the post-MI 12-week group was significantly higher than that in the postsham 12-week group (p = 0.019), in the postsham 24-hour group (p = 0.004), and in the post-MI 24-hour group (p = 0.040). We conclude that Dock180 protein is expressed in the myocardium in rats. Furthermore, its expression is significantly increased in the noninfarcted myocardium of the peri-infarct zones.

  1. Comparative biology and expression of TENP, an egg protein related to the bacterial permeability-increasing family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, Lynn; Dunn, Ian C

    2014-03-15

    The 'transiently expressed in neural precursors' (TENP) gene product is a member of the bacterial/permeability-increasing (BPI) family of antimicrobial proteins but was first identified as having a role in an early neurological event occurring in post-mitotic cells. However, recent characterisation of the egg white proteome has shown that TENP is an important egg component constituting ~0.1-0.5% of the total protein and suggesting it is expressed in the adult oviduct. In this study we confirmed quantitatively that the expression of TENP is largely confined to the tubular glands of the magnum of the oviduct, where egg white synthesis occurs, with around 10,000 times more expression than in the embryo where TENP was first identified. TENP expression is significantly increased with the administration of oestrogen or progesterone (P<0.001) and is reduced in regressed oviducts (P<0.001) demonstrating gonadal steroid control, typical of an oviduct and egg specific gene. A putative translational start site for TENP has been characterised and the evidence indicates that it is expressed as one predominant transcript. In comparison with the published sequence, insertion and deletion events have been identified causing a partial frame-shift that results in an altered amino acid sequence to that previously documented. TENP is conserved across divergent avian species being found in chicken, turkey, duck and zebra finch and its expression profile confirmed in both chicken and duck. Similarity searches have shown homology with the BPI-like family of innate immune genes, particularly with palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone (PLUNC) members of this family. We therefore believe that at least in adults the role of TENP is as a major component of egg, particularly the white and it is probable that it contributes to its antimicrobial function.

  2. Intensive insulin treatment increases donor site wound protein synthesis in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chinkes, David L.; Aarsland, Asle; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the treatment of burns, patients’ own skin is the preferred material to cover burn wounds, resulting in the need to create a donor site wound. Enhancement of healing of the donor site wound would be beneficial in burn patients. Insulin, an anabolic agent, is routinely used to treat hyperglycemia after injury. We investigated whether intensive insulin treatment (INS) increases fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of the donor site wound protein and decreases the length of hospitalization normalized for total body surface area burned (LOS/TBSA). Methods FSR of the donor site wound protein was measured in pediatric patients randomized to control (CNT) (n = 13) and INS (n = 10) treatments. Depending on the postoperative day when the tracer study was done studies were divided into “Early” (days < 5) and “Late” (days >=5) periods. Results FSR of the donor site wound protein was greater in the INS group at the “Early” period of wound healing (CNT vs. INS, 8.2±3.8 vs. 13.1±6.9 %/day, p: < 0.05); but not at the “Late” (CNT vs. INS, 19.7±4.6 vs. 16.6±4.0 %/day, p > 0.05). Despite these differences LOS/TBSA was not decreased in the INS group. Correlation analyses demonstrated that independently of the treatment regimen FSR positively correlated (p < 0.05) with time post creation of the donor site and negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with LOS/TBSA. Conclusions Insulin treatment increased FSR of the donor site wound protein in the early period of wound healing; FSR correlated with LOS/TBSA independently of the treatment regimen. PMID:21236451

  3. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  4. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  5. Pregnancy Zone Protein is Increased in the Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Associates with Senile Plaques.

    PubMed

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Ijsselstijn, Linda; van der Weiden, Marcel M; Zheng, Ping-Pin; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Koudstaal, Peter J; Luider, Theo M; Kros, Johan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of pregnancy zone protein (PZP) were found in the serum of persons who later developed Alzheimer's disease (AD) in comparison to controls who remained dementia free. We suggested that this increase is due to brain derived PZP entering the blood stream during the early phase of the disease. Here we investigate the possible involvement of PZP in human AD pathogenesis. We observed increased PZP immunoreactivity in AD postmortem brain cortex compared to non-demented controls. In the AD cortex, PZP immunoreactivity localized to microglial cells that interacted with senile plaques and was occasionally observed in neurons. Our data link the finding of elevated serum PZP levels with the characteristic AD pathology and identify PZP as a novel component in AD.

  6. Oral supplementation with whey proteins increases plasma glutathione levels of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Micke, P; Beeh, K M; Schlaak, J F; Buhl, R

    2001-02-01

    HIV infection is characterized by an enhanced oxidant burden and a systemic deficiency of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant. The semi-essential amino acid cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and limits its synthesis. Therefore, different strategies to supplement cysteine supply have been suggested to increase glutathione levels in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with two different cysteine-rich whey protein formulas on plasma GSH levels and parameters of oxidative stress and immune status in HIV-infected patients. In a prospective double blind clinical trial, 30 patients (25 male, 5 female; mean age (+/- SD) 42 +/- 9.8 years) with stable HIV infection (221 +/- 102 CD4 + lymphocytes L-1) were randomized to a supplemental diet with a daily dose of 45 g whey proteins of either Protectamin (Fresenius Kabi, Bad Hamburg, Germany) or Immunocal (Immunotec, Vandreuil, Canada) for two weeks. Plasma concentrations of total, reduced and oxidized GSH, superoxide anion (O2-) release by blood mononuclear cells, plasma levels of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and 12 were quantified with standard methods at baseline and after therapy. Pre-therapy, plasma GSH levels (Protectamin: 1.92 +/- 0.6 microM; Immunocal: 1.98 +/- 0.9 microM) were less than normal (2.64 +/- 0.7 microM, P = 0.03). Following two weeks of oral supplementation with whey proteins, plasma GSH levels increased in the Protectamin group by 44 +/- 56% (2.79 +/- 1.2 microM, P = 0.004) while the difference in the Immunocal group did not reach significance (+ 24.5 +/- 59%, 2.51 +/- 1.48 microM, P = 0.43). Spontaneous O2- release by blood mononuclear cells was stable (20.1 +/- 14.2 vs. 22.6 +/- 16.1 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.52) whereas PMA-induced O2- release decreased in the Protectamin group (53.7 +/- 19 vs. 39.8 +/- 18 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and

  7. Dry Eye Symptoms Are Increased in Mice Deficient in Phospholipid Transfer Protein (PLTP)

    PubMed Central

    Setälä, Niko L.; Metso, Jari; Jauhiainen, Matti; Sajantila, Antti; Holopainen, Juha M.

    2011-01-01

    In the tear fluid the outermost part facing the tear–air interface is composed of lipids preventing evaporation of the tears. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) mediates phospholipid transfer processes between serum lipoproteins and is also a normal component of human tears. To study whether PLTP plays any functional role in tear fluid we investigated PLTP-deficient mice, applying functional and morphologic analyses under normal housing and experimentally induced dry eye conditions. Aqueous tear fluid production, corneal epithelial morphology, barrier function, and occludin expression were assessed. In mice with a full deficiency of functional PLTP enhanced corneal epithelial damage, increased corneal permeability to carboxyfluorescein, and decreased corneal epithelial occludin expression were shown. These pathologic signs were worsened by experimentally induced dry eye both in wild-type and PLTP knock-out mice. Deficiency in the production of tear PLTP in mice is accompanied by corneal epithelial damage, a feature that is typical in human dry eye syndrome (DES). To complement animal experiments we collected tear fluid from human dry eye patients as well as healthy control subjects. Increased tear fluid PLTP activity was observed among DES patients. In conclusion, the presence of PLTP in tear fluid appears to be essential for maintaining a healthy and functional ocular surface. Increased PLTP activity in human tear fluid in DES patients suggests an ocular surface protective role for this lipid transfer protein. PMID:21514421

  8. Halobacterial nano vesicles displaying murine bactericidal permeability-increasing protein rescue mice from lethal endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; DasSarma, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Oindrilla; Kim, Jong Myoung; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) had been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and endotoxin neutralizing activity by interacting with LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The current study examines the feasibility of using murine BPI (mBPI) expressed on halophilic Archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) for the treatment of endotoxemia in high-risk patients, using a murine model of D-galactosamine-induced endotoxic shock. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1was used to express the N-terminal 199 amino acid residues of mBPI fused to the GVNP GvpC protein, and bound to the surface of the haloarchaeal GVNPs. Our results indicate that delivery of mBPIN-GVNPs increase the survival rate of mice challenged with lethal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Additionally, the mBPIN-GVNP-treated mice displayed reduced symptoms of inflammation, including inflammatory anemia, recruitment of neutrophils, liver apoptosis as well as increased pro-inflammatory serum cytokine levels. PMID:27646594

  9. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  10. Halobacterial nano vesicles displaying murine bactericidal permeability-increasing protein rescue mice from lethal endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; DasSarma, Priya; Bhattacharjee, Oindrilla; Kim, Jong Myoung; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2016-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) had been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and endotoxin neutralizing activity by interacting with LPS of Gram-negative bacteria. The current study examines the feasibility of using murine BPI (mBPI) expressed on halophilic Archaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) for the treatment of endotoxemia in high-risk patients, using a murine model of D-galactosamine-induced endotoxic shock. Halobacterium sp. NRC-1was used to express the N-terminal 199 amino acid residues of mBPI fused to the GVNP GvpC protein, and bound to the surface of the haloarchaeal GVNPs. Our results indicate that delivery of mBPIN-GVNPs increase the survival rate of mice challenged with lethal concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine. Additionally, the mBPIN-GVNP-treated mice displayed reduced symptoms of inflammation, including inflammatory anemia, recruitment of neutrophils, liver apoptosis as well as increased pro-inflammatory serum cytokine levels. PMID:27646594

  11. 1,25(OH)2D3 increases membrane associated protein kinase C in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Simboli-Campbell, M; Franks, D J; Welsh, J

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] affects protein kinase C (PKC) activity in kidney, as has been demonstrated in HL-60 cells we measured 1,25(OH)2D3 binding, PKC activity and PKC immunoreactivity in Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells, a normal renal epithelial cell line derived from bovine kidney. Our data demonstrate that MDBK cells exhibit specific high affinity binding for 1,25(OH)2D3, indicating the presence of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Treatment of MDBK cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 for 24 h increased membrane PKC activity and immunoreactivity. The effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 was dose-dependent, with a peak effect observed at 10(-7)M 1,25(OH)2D3. The 1,25(OH)2D3 induced increase in membrane PKC was paralleled by a comparable decrease in cytosolic PKC activity and amount. Although time course studies were consistent with a VDR mediated effect of 1,25(OH)2D3 on PKC protein synthesis, total PKC activity was not increased by 1,25(OH)2D3, suggesting an effect on PKC translocation or localization. These results suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 modulates PKC mediated events in kidney, a classic target for this steroid hormone.

  12. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile. PMID:25752767

  13. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-peptidoglycan complexes increase monocyte/macrophage activation and enhance the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Mauricio C; Todone, Marcos; Ganem, María B; Wang, Qian; Mariuzza, Roy A; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRP) are pattern recognition receptors that can bind or hydrolyse peptidoglycan (PGN). Four human PGRP have been described: PGRP-S, PGRP-L, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. Mammalian PGRP-S has been implicated in intracellular destruction of bacteria by polymorphonuclear cells, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ have been found in keratinocytes and epithelial cells, and PGRP-L is a serum protein that hydrolyses PGN. We have expressed recombinant human PGRP and observed that PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα exist as monomer and disulphide dimer proteins. The PGRP dimers maintain their biological functions. We detected the PGRP-S dimer in human serum and polymorphonuclear cells, from where it is secreted after degranulation; these cells being a possible source of serum PGRP-S. Recombinant PGRP do not act as bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents in the assayed conditions; however, PGRP-S and PGRP-Iα cause slight damage in the bacterial membrane. Monocytes/macrophages increase Staphylococcus aureus phagocytosis in the presence of PGRP-S, PGRP-Iα and PGRP-Iβ. All PGRP bind to monocyte/macrophage membranes and are endocytosed by them. In addition, all PGRP protect cells from PGN-induced apoptosis. PGRP increase THP-1 cell proliferation and enhance activation by PGN. PGRP-S-PGN complexes increase the membrane expression of CD14, CD80 and CD86, and enhance secretion of interleukin-8, interleukin-12 and tumour necrosis factor-α, but reduce interleukin-10, clearly inducing an inflammatory profile.

  14. HIV-1 Tat Protein Increases Microglial Outward K+ Current and Resultant Neurotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianuo; Xu, Peng; Collins, Cory; Liu, Han; Zhang, Jingdong; Keblesh, James P.; Xiong, Huangui

    2013-01-01

    Microglia plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Increasing evidence indicates the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are involved in the regulation of microglia function, prompting us to hypothesize Kv channels may also be involved in microglia-mediated neurotoxic activity in HIV-1-infected brain. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the involvement of Kv channels in the response of microglia to HIV-1 Tat protein. Treatment of rat microglia with HIV-1 Tat protein (200 ng/ml) resulted in pro-inflammatory microglial activation, as indicated by increases in TNF-α, IL-1β, reactive oxygen species, and nitric oxide, which were accompanied by enhanced outward K+ current and Kv1.3 channel expression. Suppression of microglial Kv1.3 channel activity, either with Kv1.3 channel blockers Margatoxin, 5-(4-Phenoxybutoxy)psoralen, or broad-spectrum K+ channel blocker 4-Aminopyridine, or by knockdown of Kv1.3 expression via transfection of microglia with Kv1.3 siRNA, was found to abrogate the neurotoxic activity of microglia resulting from HIV-1 Tat exposure. Furthermore, HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated with the application of supernatant collected from K+ channel blocker-treated microglia. Lastly, the intracellular signaling pathways associated with Kv1.3 were investigated and enhancement of microglial Kv1.3 was found to correspond with an increase in Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. These data suggest targeting microglial Kv1.3 channels may be a potential new avenue of therapy for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders. PMID:23738010

  15. Chronic SIV and morphine treatment increases heat shock protein 5 expression at the synapse.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, Gurudutt; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Callen, Shannon; Fox, Howard S; Lisco, Steven J; Buch, Shilpa J

    2015-10-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection accelerates neurocognitive impairments and neuropathology in the CNS of HIV-infected subjects, collectively referred to as HAND. To identify potential pathogenic markers associated with HIV and morphine in perturbing the synaptic architecture, we performed quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics on purified synaptosomes isolated from the caudate of two groups of rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV differing by one regimen-morphine treatment. The upregulation of heat shock 70-kDa protein 5 in the SIV + morphine group points to increased cellular stress during SIV/morphine interaction thus leading to CNS dysfunction.

  16. Novel proteins associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy: selective reduction in α(1A)-adrenergic receptors and increased desensitization proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Moravec, Christine S; Perez, Dianne M

    2013-04-01

    Abstract Therapeutics to treat human heart failure (HF) and the identification of proteins associated with HF are still limited. We analyzed α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes in human HF and performed proteomic analysis on more uniform samples to identify novel proteins associated with human HF. Six failing hearts with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and four non-failing heart controls were subjected to proteomic analysis. Out of 48 identified proteins, 26 proteins were redundant between samples. Ten of these 26 proteins were previously reported to be associated with HF. Of the newly identified proteins, we found several muscle proteins and mitochondrial/electron transport proteins, while novel were functionally similar to previous reports. However, we also found novel proteins involved in functional classes such as β-oxidation and G-protein coupled receptor signaling and desensitization not previously associated with HF. We also performed radioligand-binding studies on the heart samples and not only confirmed a large loss of β(1)-ARs in end-stage DCM, but also found a selective decrease in the α(1A)-AR subtype not previously reported. We have identified new proteins and functional categories associated with end-stage DCM. We also report that similar to the previously characterized loss of β(1)-AR in HF, there is also a concomitant loss of α(1A)-ARs, which are considered cardioprotective proteins.

  17. Microtubule-Associated Protein SBgLR Facilitates Storage Protein Deposition and Its Expression Leads to Lysine Content Increase in Transgenic Maize Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Li, Shixue; Yue, Jing; Xiao, Wenhan; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) seed is deficient in protein and lysine content. Many studies have been made to improve the nutritional quality of maize seeds. Previously, we reported the role of a natural lysine-rich protein gene SBgLR in increasing protein and lysine content. However, how the SBgLR improves lysine and protein content remains unclear. Here, the reasons and possible mechanism for SBgLR in protein and lysine improvement have been analyzed and discussed. Through seed-specific expression of SBgLR, we obtained transgenic maize with the simultaneously increased lysine and protein contents. High-protein and high-lysine characters were stably inherited across generations. The expression of SBgLR in maize kernels increased the accumulation of both zeins and non-zein proteins. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the number of protein bodies (PBs) was increased obviously in SBgLR transgenic immature endosperms with the morphology and structure of PBs unchanged. The proteinaceous matrix was more abundant in transgenic mature endosperms under scanning electron microscopy. The stabilities of zein and lysine-rich non-zein genes were also increased in transgenic endosperms. Finally, the potential application of SBgLR in maize nutrient improvement was evaluated. This study shows that a cytoskeleton-associated protein has potential applicable value in crop nutrient improving, and provided a feasible strategy for improvement of maize grain quality. PMID:26703573

  18. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  19. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  20. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  1. Single amino acid substitutions on the needle tip protein IpaD increased Shigella virulence.

    PubMed

    Meghraoui, Alaeddine; Schiavolin, Lionel; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm

    2014-07-01

    Infection of colonic epithelial cells by Shigella is associated with the type III secretion system, which serves as a molecular syringe to inject effectors into host cells. This system includes an extracellular needle used as a conduit for secreted proteins. Two of these proteins, IpaB and IpaD, dock at the needle tip to control secretion and are also involved in the insertion of a translocation pore into host cell membrane allowing effector delivery. To better understand the function of IpaD, we substituted thirteen residues conserved among homologous proteins in other bacterial species. Generated variants were tested for their ability to surface expose IpaB and IpaD, to control secretion, to insert the translocation pore, and to invade host cells. In addition to a first group of seven ipaD variants that behaved similarly to the wild-type strain, we identified a second group with mutations V314D and I319D that deregulated secretion of all effectors, but remained fully invasive. Moreover, we identified a third group with mutations Y153A, T161D, Q165L and Y276A, that exhibited increased levels of translocators secretion, pore formation, and cell entry. Altogether, our results offer a better understanding of the role of IpaD in the control of Shigella virulence.

  2. Mitochondrial Complex I Deficiency Increases Protein Acetylation and Accelerates Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Karamanlidis, Georgios; Lee, Chi Fung; Garcia-Menendez, Lorena; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Suthammarak, Wichit; Gong, Guohua; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.; Wang, Wang; Tian, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of multiple diseases including heart failure but the specific mechanisms for this link remain largely elusive. We modeled the impairment of mitochondrial respiration by inactivation of the Ndufs4 gene, a protein critical for Complex I (C-I) assembly, in the mouse heart (cKO). While C-I supported respiration decreased by >40%, the cKO mice maintained normal cardiac function in vivo and high-energy phosphate content in isolated perfused hearts. However, the cKO mice developed accelerated heart failure after pressure overload or repeated pregnancy. Decreased NAD+/NADH ratio by C-I deficiency inhibited Sirt3 activity, leading to increase in protein acetylation, and sensitization of the permeability transition in mitochondria (mPTP). NAD+ precursor supplementation to cKO mice partially normalized the NAD+/NADH ratio, protein acetylation and mPTP sensitivity. These findings describe a mechanism connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to the susceptibility to diseases and propose a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23931755

  3. Human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas express extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, M.; Trautmann, B.; Göttler, M.; Peters, S.; Zauner, I.; Maillet, B.; Klöppel, G.

    1994-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are characterised by a dense connective tissue reaction. To test the hypothesis that stroma components are synthesised and produced by the tumour cells themselves, eight cell lines as well as six xenografted tumours from human ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas were examined for the expression of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), using cDNA probes and antibodies to collagen types I, III and IV, vitronectin, fibronectin, undulin and laminin. All tumour cell lines (CAPAN-1, CAPAN-2, AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1, PaCa-2, PaCa-3, PaCa-44) and xenografted human pancreatic tumours expressed at least one of the examined ECM at the RNA (collagen type IV > laminin = fibronectin = vitronectin > collagen type III > undulin > collagen type I) or protein level (collagen type IV = collagen type III > vitronectin > laminin > collagen type I = fibronectin > undulin). In nude mouse tumours expression of laminin and collagen I was most pronounced in well-differentiated carcinomas. In a few tumours, collagen type III, vitronectin and undulin were expressed on the luminal side of the neoplastic glands, suggesting loss of normal polar differentiation. Incubation with fetal calf serum modulated ECM RNA levels to a varying extent in all but one cell line (AsPC-1). The results suggest that human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas cells are capable of synthesising and producing extracellular matrix proteins in vitro and in vivo, but that the extent and pattern of ECM expression differs between the various tumours and conditions tested. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8286197

  4. Increased expression of extracellular proteins as a hallmark of human endothelial cell in vitro senescence.

    PubMed

    Hampel, B; Fortschegger, K; Ressler, S; Chang, M W; Unterluggauer, H; Breitwieser, A; Sommergruber, W; Fitzky, B; Lepperdinger, G; Jansen-Dürr, P; Voglauer, R; Grillari, J

    2006-05-01

    A convenient way to study processes of aging in distinct human tissues consists of a molecular analysis of cells from the tissue in question, that were explanted and grown in vitro until they reach senescence. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), we have established an in vitro senescence model for human endothelial cells. A major hallmark of HUVEC in vitro senescence is the increased frequency of apoptotic cell death, which occurs as a determining feature of HUVEC senescence. Senescent endothelial cells are also found in vivo in atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that the presence of such cells may contribute to the development of vascular pathology. To elucidate mechanisms underlying endothelial cell senescence and age-associated apoptosis, gene expression analyses were carried out. In these experiments, we observed the up-regulation of genes coding for extracellular proteins in senescent HUVEC. In particular, a significant upregulation of interleukin-8, VEGI, and the IGF-binding proteins 3 and 5 was observed. Upregulation of these genes was confirmed by both RT-PCR and Western blot. In the case of interleukin-8, a roughly 50-fold upregulation of the protein was also found in cellular supernatants. The extracellular proteins encoded by these genes are well known for their ability to modulate the apoptotic response of human cells, and in the case of interleukin-8, clear links to the establishment of atherosclerotic lesions have been defined. The results described here support a new model, where changes in the secretome of human endothelial cells contribute to vascular aging and vascular pathology. PMID:16626901

  5. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  6. Nanospray FAIMS fractionation provides significant increases in proteome coverage of unfractionated complex protein digests.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Hoopmann, Michael R; Johnson, Richard S; Saleem, Ramsey A; Aitchison, John D; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that can be used to reduce sample complexity and increase dynamic range in tandem mass spectrometry experiments. FAIMS fractionates ions in the gas-phase according to characteristic differences in mobilities in electric fields of different strengths. Undesired ion species such as solvated clusters and singly charged chemical background ions can be prevented from reaching the mass analyzer, thus decreasing chemical noise. To date, there has been limited success using the commercially available Thermo Fisher FAIMS device with both standard ESI and nanoLC-MS. We have modified a Thermo Fisher electrospray source to accommodate a fused silica pulled tip capillary column for nanospray ionization, which will enable standard laboratories access to FAIMS technology. Our modified source allows easily obtainable stable spray at flow rates of 300 nL/min when coupled with FAIMS. The modified electrospray source allows the use of sheath gas, which provides a fivefold increase in signal obtained when nanoLC is coupled to FAIMS. In this work, nanoLC-FAIMS-MS and nanoLC-MS were compared by analyzing a tryptic digest of a 1:1 mixture of SILAC-labeled haploid and diploid yeast to demonstrate the performance of nanoLC-FAIMS-MS, at different compensation voltages, for post-column fractionation of complex protein digests. The effective dynamic range more than doubled when FAIMS was used. In total, 10,377 unique stripped peptides and 1649 unique proteins with SILAC ratios were identified from the combined nanoLC-FAIMS-MS experiments, compared with 6908 unique stripped peptides and 1003 unique proteins with SILAC ratios identified from the combined nanoLC-MS experiments. This work demonstrates how a commercially available FAIMS device can be combined with nanoLC to improve proteome coverage in shotgun and targeted type proteomics experiments. PMID:22186714

  7. Pomegranate juice consumption increases GSH levels and reduces lipid and protein oxidation in human blood.

    PubMed

    Matthaiou, Chrysoula M; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Sarafoglou, Eleni; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Koulocheri, Sofia D; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of pomegranate juice (PJ) consumption in humans. Thus, 14 healthy volunteers consumed PJ daily for a period of 15days and the changes of oxidative stress markers in their blood were assessed at four different time points, immediately before the experiment (T1), after 15days of juice administration (T2), one (T3) and three weeks (T4) after the interruption of PJ administration. The markers studied were total antioxidant capacity (TAC), levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (CARB) measured in plasma, as well as reduced glutathione (GSH), and catalase activity (CAT) measured in erythrocytes. The MDA was reduced by 24.4% at T3 and CARB were reduced by 19.6% and 17.7% at T2 and T3, respectively, supporting the evidence that PJ consumption enhances the antioxidant status in humans by decreasing lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Moreover, GSH levels were significantly increased (22.6%) at T2, indicating that PJ consumption improves the antioxidant mechanisms in erythrocytes by increasing GSH levels. Finally, it was shown that even a week after stopping PJ consumption some of its beneficial effects on antioxidant status still remained in the organism.

  8. Overexpression of YY1 increases the protein production in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tastanova, Aizhan; Schulz, Alexandra; Folcher, Marc; Tolstrup, Anne; Puklowski, Anja; Kaufmann, Hitto; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-10

    The production of therapeutic antibodies using mammalian cells remains a high-priority in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Bioengineers have targeted different cellular processes, including transcription, translation, secretion and post-translational modifications, to overcome the metabolic bottlenecks limiting production capacity and create high-producing mammalian cell lines. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins belong to a family of chromatin regulators with important roles in multicellular development. By overexpressing and screening genes from the PcG family, we have identified an epigenetic key player for biopharmaceutical manufacturing enhancement: the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). The overexpression of YY1 led to an increase in the production of several product genes (SEAP, VEGF165, IgG including Rituximab), provided that human YY1 (hYY1) was expressed in human cells (HeLa, HT-1080, HEK-293T, FreeStyle™ 293-F) and Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived YY1 (cYY1) was expressed in CHO cells (CHO-K1, CHO-easyC, FreeStyle™ CHO-S, CHO-B13-24, CHO-IgG1). Ectopic expression of cYY1 in the stable CHO-derived IgG producer cell lines CHO-B13-24 and CHO-IgG1 increased the antibody titer up to 6-fold, suggesting that epigenetic engineering of mammalian production cell lines could become a new strategy to improve the manufacturing of complex protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:26686315

  9. Memantine increases brain production of kynurenic acid via protein kinase A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Renata; Luchowska, Elzbieta; Wielosz, Marian; Owe-Larsson, Bjorn; Urbanska, Ewa M

    2008-04-18

    We describe a novel aspect of action of memantine ex vivo, in the brain cortical slices and in vitro, in mixed glial cultures. The drug potently increased the production of kynurenic acid, an endogenous tryptophan metabolite blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and nicotinic alpha7 receptors. In cortical slices memantine, an open-channel NMDA blocker (100-150 microM), but not the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, LY235959 increased the production of kynurenic acid. Neither SCH23390, D1 receptor antagonist (50 microM) nor raclopride, D2 receptor antagonist (10 microM) changed the memantine-induced effects. Propranolol (100 microM) has partially reduced its action. Selective cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 (1 microM), but not selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, NPC15437 (30 microM) totally reversed the action of memantine. In mixed glial cultures, 2-24 h incubation with memantine (2-50 microM) enhanced the production of kynurenic acid. Memantine (up to 0.5 mM) has not affected the activity of kynurenic acid biosynthetic enzymes. The obtained data suggest that memantine enhances the production of kynurenic acid in PKA-mediated way. This effect may partially contribute to the therapeutic actions of memantine and be of a potential clinical importance.

  10. Agouti-related protein increases food hoarding more than food intake in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Day, Diane E; Bartness, Timothy J

    2004-01-01

    Agouti-related protein (AgRP), an endogenous melanocortin 3/4 receptor antagonist, appears to play an important role in the control of food intake and energy balance because exogenous administration in rats and overexpression in mice result in hyperphagia and body mass gain. Furthermore, arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA is increased with fasting in laboratory rats and mice and is decreased with refeeding. In Siberian hamsters, fasting also increases arcuate nucleus AgRP mRNA, but these animals increase food hoarding, rather than food intake with refeeding. Therefore, we tested whether exogenous AgRP increased food hoarding in this species. Hamsters were trained in a hoarding/foraging apparatus to run a programmed number of wheel revolutions to earn food pellets. Four doses of AgRP-(83-132) or vehicle were injected into the third ventricle at the beginning of the dark phase, and food hoarding, food intake, and foraging were measured at various time points subsequently. Overall, food hoarding was stimulated as much as 10 times more than food intake, and both responses occurred as early as 1 h after injection. Food hoarding was increased the greatest at the lowest dose (0.1 nmol), whereas food intake was increased the greatest at the second lowest dose (1 nmol). Food intake and especially food hoarding were increased up to seven days after the AgRP injections. Foraging was increased at all AgRP doses except the highest dose (100 nmol). These results suggest that AgRP triggers the search for food in this species, and once they find it, hoarding predominates over eating.

  11. Energy Dense, Protein Restricted Diet Increases Adiposity and Perturbs Metabolism in Young, Genetically Lean Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kimberly D.; Scheffler, Tracy L.; Kasten, Steven C.; Reinholt, Brad M.; van Eyk, Gregory R.; Escobar, Jeffery; Scheffler, Jason M.; Gerrard, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of obesity and metabolic dysregulation during growth (or childhood) are lacking. Our objective was to increase adiposity and induce metabolic syndrome in young, genetically lean pigs. Pre-pubertal female pigs, age 35 d, were fed a high-energy diet (HED; n = 12), containing 15% tallow, 35% refined sugars and 9.1–12.9% crude protein, or a control corn-based diet (n = 11) with 12.2–19.2% crude protein for 16 wk. Initially, HED pigs self-regulated energy intake similar to controls, but by wk 5, consumed more (P<0.001) energy per kg body weight. At wk 15, pigs were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT); blood glucose increased (P<0.05) in control pigs and returned to baseline levels within 60 min. HED pigs were hyperglycemic at time 0, and blood glucose did not return to baseline (P = 0.01), even 4 h post-challenge. During OGTT, glucose area under the curve (AUC) was higher and insulin AUC was lower in HED pigs compared to controls (P = 0.001). Chronic HED intake increased (P<0.05) subcutaneous, intramuscular, and perirenal fat deposition, and induced hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, and low-density lipoprotein hypercholesterolemia. A subset of HED pigs (n = 7) was transitioned back to a control diet for an additional six weeks. These pigs were subjected to an additional OGTT at 22 wk. Glucose AUC and insulin AUC did not improve, supporting that dietary intervention was not sufficient to recover glucose tolerance or insulin production. These data suggest a HED may be used to increase adiposity and disrupt glucose homeostasis in young, growing pigs. PMID:23991090

  12. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts. PMID:27490089

  13. Defined Essential 8™ Medium and Vitronectin Efficiently Support Scalable Xeno-Free Expansion of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Stirred Microcarrier Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Sara M.; Fernandes, Tiago G.; Cordeiro, Cláudia S. M.; Boucher, Shayne; Kuninger, David; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell culture using Essential 8™ xeno-free medium and the defined xeno-free matrix vitronectin was successfully implemented under adherent conditions. This matrix was able to support hiPS cell expansion either in coated plates or on polystyrene-coated microcarriers, while maintaining hiPS cell functionality and pluripotency. Importantly, scale-up of the microcarrier-based system was accomplished using a 50 mL spinner flask, under dynamic conditions. A three-level factorial design experiment was performed to identify optimal conditions in terms of a) initial cell density b) agitation speed, and c) to maximize cell yield in spinner flask cultures. A maximum cell yield of 3.5 is achieved by inoculating 55,000 cells/cm2 of microcarrier surface area and using 44 rpm, which generates a cell density of 1.4x106 cells/mL after 10 days of culture. After dynamic culture, hiPS cells maintained their typical morphology upon re-plating, exhibited pluripotency-associated marker expression as well as tri-lineage differentiation capability, which was verified by inducing their spontaneous differentiation through embryoid body formation, and subsequent downstream differentiation to specific lineages such as neural and cardiac fates was successfully accomplished. In conclusion, a scalable, robust and cost-effective xeno-free culture system was successfully developed and implemented for the scale-up production of hiPS cells. PMID:26999816

  14. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  15. Aberrant Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Increased Adult Neurogenesis in Mice Lacking Chromatin Protein HMGB2

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Avanish S.; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Aguirre, Adan; Tsirka, Stella E.

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) are distinct groups of cells found in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Previously we determined that members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) B family of chromatin structural proteins modulate NSC proliferation and self-renewal. Among them HMGB2 was found to be dynamically expressed in proliferating and differentiating NSCs, suggesting that it may regulate NSC maintenance. We report now that Hmgb2−/− mice exhibit SVZ hyperproliferation, increased numbers of SVZ NSCs, and a trend towards aberrant increases in newly born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) granule cell layer. Increases in the levels of the transcription factor p21 and the Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), along with down-regulation of the transcription/pluripotency factor Oct4 in the Hmgb2−/− SVZ point to a possible pathway for this increased proliferation/differentiation. Our findings suggest that HMGB2 functions as a modulator of neurogenesis in young adult mice through regulation of NSC proliferation, and identify a potential target via which CNS repair could be amplified following trauma or disease-based neuronal degeneration. PMID:24391977

  16. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M; Serra, Dolors; Herrero, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  17. Glucose deprivation increases tau phosphorylation via P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Elisabetta; Praticò, Domenico

    2015-12-01

    Alterations of glucose metabolism have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Previous studies showed that glucose deprivation increases amyloidogenesis via a BACE-1-dependent mechanism. However, no data are available on the effect that this condition may have on tau phosphorylation. In this study, we exposed neuronal cells to a glucose-free medium and investigated the effect on tau phosphorylation. Compared with controls, cells incubated in the absence of glucose had a significant increase in tau phosphorylation at epitopes Ser202/Thr205 and Ser404, which was associated with a selective activation of the P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacological inhibition of this kinase prevented the increase in tau phosphorylation, while fluorescence studies revealed its co-localization with phosphorylated tau. The activation of P38 was secondary to the action of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, as its down-regulation prevented it. Finally, glucose deprivation induced cell apoptosis, which was associated with a significant increase in both caspase 3 and caspase 12 active forms. Taken together, our studies reveal a new mechanism whereby glucose deprivation can modulate AD pathogenesis by influencing tau phosphorylation and suggest that this pathway may be a new therapeutic target for AD.

  18. The RCN1-encoded A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A increases phosphatase activity in vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deruere, J.; Jackson, K.; Garbers, C.; Soll, D.; Delong, A.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a heterotrimeric serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, comprises a catalytic C subunit and two distinct regulatory subunits, A and B. The RCN1 gene encodes one of three A regulatory subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana. A T-DNA insertion mutation at this locus impairs root curling, seedling organ elongation and apical hypocotyl hook formation. We have used in vivo and in vitro assays to gauge the impact of the rcn1 mutation on PP2A activity in seedlings. PP2A activity is decreased in extracts from rcn1 mutant seedlings, and this decrease is not due to a reduction in catalytic subunit expression. Roots of mutant seedlings exhibit increased sensitivity to the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and cantharidin in organ elongation assays. Shoots of dark-grown, but not light-grown seedlings also show increased inhibitor sensitivity. Furthermore, cantharidin treatment of wild-type seedlings mimics the rcn1 defect in root curling, root waving and hypocotyl hook formation assays. In roots of wild-type seedlings, RCN1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in root tips, and accumulates to lower levels in the pericycle and lateral root primordia. In shoots, RCN1 is expressed in the apical hook and the basal, rapidly elongating cells in etiolated hypocotyls, and in the shoot meristem and leaf primordia of light-grown seedlings. Our results show that the wild-type RCN1-encoded A subunit functions as a positive regulator of the PP2A holoenzyme, increasing activity towards substrates involved in organ elongation and differential cell elongation responses such as root curling.

  19. Lack of Plasma Protein Hemopexin Results in Increased Duodenal Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Veronica; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Silengo, Lorenzo; Aime, Silvio; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The body concentration of iron is regulated by a fine equilibrium between absorption and losses of iron. Iron can be absorbed from diet as inorganic iron or as heme. Hemopexin is an acute phase protein that limits iron access to microorganisms. Moreover, it is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for heme and thus it mediates heme-iron recycling. Considering its involvement in iron homeostasis, it was postulated that hemopexin may play a role in the physiological absorption of inorganic iron. Methods and Results Hemopexin-null mice showed elevated iron deposits in enterocytes, associated with higher duodenal H-Ferritin levels and a significant increase in duodenal expression and activity of heme oxygenase. The expression of heme-iron and inorganic iron transporters was normal. The rate of iron absorption was assessed by measuring the amount of 57Fe retained in tissues from hemopexin-null and wild-type animals after administration of an oral dose of 57FeSO4 or of 57Fe-labelled heme. Higher iron retention in the duodenum of hemopexin-null mice was observed as compared with normal mice. Conversely, iron transfer from enterocytes to liver and bone marrow was unaffected in hemopexin-null mice. Conclusions The increased iron level in hemopexin-null duodenum can be accounted for by an increased iron uptake by enterocytes and storage in ferritins. These data indicate that the lack of hemopexin under physiological conditions leads to an enhanced duodenal iron uptake thus providing new insights to our understanding of body iron homeostasis. PMID:23826373

  20. Vitamin A deficiency increases protein catabolism and induces urea cycle enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, M Pilar; Cabezuelo, Francisco; Moreno, Verónica; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Timoneda, Joaquín; Barber, Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Chronic vitamin A deficiency induces a substantial delay in the rates of weight and height gain in both humans and experimental animals. This effect has been associated with an impaired nutrient metabolism and loss of body protein. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of vitamin A deficiency on endogenous proteolysis and nitrogen metabolism and its reversibility with all-trans retinoic acid (RA). Male weanling rats, housed in pairs, were pair-fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD) or control diet until they were 60 d old. A group of deficient rats were further treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of all-trans RA for 10 d. Final body and tissue (i.e. liver and heart) weights were significantly lower and tissue:body weight ratios were similar in VAD rats and in controls. Conversely, the epididymal white fat:body weight ratio and the plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and adiponectin were significantly higher in VAD rats, which also had hepatic macrovesicular lipid accumulations. Plasma and gastrocnemius muscle 3-methylhistidine, urine nitrogen, and plasma and urine urea concentrations were all significantly higher in the VAD group. The expression of the genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and their activities increased in VAD livers. These changes were partially reverted by all-trans RA. We propose that fuel partitioning in vitamin A deficiency may shift from fatty acids to protein catabolism as an energy source. Our results emphasize the importance of vitamin A on the energy balance control system and they provide an explanation for the role of vitamin A in protein turnover, development, and growth.

  1. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  2. Development of a cell sorting procedure to increase the sensitivity of detection of protein-protein interactions in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wong, Sek Man

    2011-05-01

    To visualize subcellular localization of viral proteins and interactions between viral proteins and host proteins in vivo, transfection of plasmids into protoplasts to over-express transiently fusion proteins with a fluorescent tag is a common method. However, due to the low efficiency (0.1-3.0%) of plasmid transfection into protoplasts, it is difficult to identify protoplasts that emit fluorescence using confocal microscopy. A flow cytometry sorting protocol was developed for separating kenaf protoplasts that emit yellow fluorescence. The sorted protoplasts showed strong fluorescence and the protoplasts were intact. This will improve the use of confocal microscopy for studying subcellular localization and protein interactions in protoplasts isolated from plants with low transfection efficiency.

  3. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  4. IκB kinases increase Myc protein stability and enhance progression of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both IκB kinase (IKK) complex and oncgenic protein Myc play important roles in cancer progression, including cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis. The levels of Myc is regulated by the phosphorylation of Myc at Thr58 and Ser62. Results In this study, we show that the expression of Myc is associated with IKKα and IKKβ in breast cancers and that Myc is an IKKs substrate. Suppression of IKK activity by either chemical inhibitor or transfection of kinase-dead mutants decreases the phosphorylation of Myc at Ser62 and enhances the degradation of Myc. Consequently, these treatments decrease the tumorigenic and invasive ability of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, doxorubicin, a frequently used anticancer drug in breast cancer, activates IKKs and Myc, thereby increasing invasiveness and tumorigenesis of breast carcinoma MCF7 cells. Inhibition of IKKs prevents these doxorubicin-induced effects. Conclusions Our study indicates that IKKs tightly regulate Myc expression through prolonging protein stability, and suggests that IKKs are potentially therapeutic targets and that suppression of IKKs may be used following chemotherapy to reduce the risk of treatment-induced tumor progression. PMID:21575199

  5. Nicotinic Acid Increases Adiponectin Secretion from Differentiated Bovine Preadipocytes through G-Protein Coupled Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Christina; Hosseini, Afshin; Singh, Shiva P.; Regenhard, Petra; Khalilvandi-Behroozyar, Hamed; Sauerwein, Helga; Mielenz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    The transition period in dairy cows (3 weeks prepartum until 3 weeks postpartum) is associated with substantial mobilization of energy stores, which is often associated with metabolic diseases. Nicotinic acid (NA) is an antilipolytic and lipid-lowering compound used to treat dyslipidaemia in humans, and it also reduces non-esterified fatty acids in cattle. In mice the G-protein coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) ligand NA positively affects the secretion of adiponectin, an important modulator of glucose and fat metabolism. In cattle, the corresponding data linking NA to adiponectin are missing. Our objective was to examine the effects of NA on adiponectin and AMPK protein abundance and the expression of mRNAs of related genes such as chemerin, an adipokine that enhances adiponectin secretion in vitro. Differentiated bovine adipocytes were incubated with pertussis toxin (PTX) to verify the involvement of GPR signaling, and treated with 10 or 15 µM NA for 12 or 24 h. NA increased adiponectin concentrations (p ≤ 0.001) and the mRNA abundances of GPR109A (p ≤ 0.05) and chemerin (p ≤ 0.01). Pre-incubation with PTX reduced the adiponectin response to NA (p ≤ 0.001). The NA-stimulated secretion of adiponectin and the mRNA expression of chemerin in the bovine adipocytes were suggestive of GPR signaling-dependent improved insulin sensitivity and/or adipocyte metabolism in dairy cows. PMID:25411802

  6. Increased reliability of nuclear magnetic resonance protein structures by consensus structure bundles.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Lena; Güntert, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structures are represented by bundles of conformers calculated from different randomized initial structures using identical experimental input data. The spread among these conformers indicates the precision of the atomic coordinates. However, there is as yet no reliable measure of structural accuracy, i.e., how close NMR conformers are to the "true" structure. Instead, the precision of structure bundles is widely (mis)interpreted as a measure of structural quality. Attempts to increase precision often overestimate accuracy by tight bundles of high precision but much lower accuracy. To overcome this problem, we introduce a protocol for NMR structure determination with the software package CYANA, which produces, like the traditional method, bundles of conformers in agreement with a common set of conformational restraints but with a realistic precision that is, throughout a variety of proteins and NMR data sets, a much better estimate of structural accuracy than the precision of conventional structure bundles.

  7. Improved MALDI-TOF Imaging Yields Increased Protein Signals at High Molecular Mass *

    PubMed Central

    Leinweber, Barbara D.; Tsaprailis, George; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrum images are created from an array of mass spectra collected over a tissue surface. We have increased the mass range of proteins that can be detected in tissue sections from kidneys of different rodent species, by a modification of the sandwich technique which involves co-crystallizing matrix with analyte. A tissue section is placed upon a drop of sinapinic acid matrix dissolved in 90% ethanol and 0.5% Triton X-100. Once the matrix has dried, a seed layer of sinapinic crystals is added as a dispersion in xylene. Additional layers of sinapinic acid are added as solutions in 90% ethanol followed by 50% acetonitrile. Numerous peaks with signal to noise ratio of four or greater are observed between 25 kDa to 50 kDa. This represents approximately 10 times as many peaks as are detected using traditional matrix spotting and spraying. PMID:18926723

  8. Post-exercise whey protein hydrolysate supplementation induces a greater increase in muscle protein synthesis than its constituent amino acid content.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Fukasawa, Tomoyuki; Koga, Jinichiro; Kanegae, Minoru; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2013-09-28

    It is well known that ingestion of a protein source is effective in stimulating muscle protein synthesis after exercise. In addition, there are numerous reports on the impact of leucine and leucine-rich whey protein on muscle protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling. However, there is only limited information on the effects of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signalling. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of WPH and amino acids on muscle protein synthesis and the initiation of translation in skeletal muscle during the post-exercise phase. Male Sprague–Dawley rats swam for 2 h to depress muscle protein synthesis. Immediately after exercise, the animals were administered either carbohydrate (CHO), CHO plus an amino acid mixture (AA) or CHO plus WPH. At 1 h after exercise, the supplements containing whey-based protein (AA and WPH) caused a significant increase in the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) compared with CHO. WPH also caused a significant increase in FSR compared with AA. Post-exercise ingestion of WPH caused a significant increase in the phosphorylation of mTOR levels compared with AA or CHO. In addition, WPH caused greater phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 than AA and CHO. In contrast, there was no difference in plasma amino acid levels following supplementation with either AA or WPH. These results indicate that WPH may include active components that are superior to amino acids for stimulating muscle protein synthesis and initiating translation.

  9. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  10. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-05-15

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu{sup 2+} binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu{sup 2+} reduction and {sup 64}Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu{sup 2+} reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu{sup 2+} ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu{sup 2+} ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu{sup 2+} reductase activity and increased {sup 64}Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu{sup 2+} reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  11. Neutrophil-derived heparin binding protein--a mediator of increased vascular permeability after burns?

    PubMed

    Johansson, Joakim; Lindbom, Lennart; Herwald, Heiko; Sjöberg, Folke

    2009-12-01

    Increased vascular permeability and oedema formation constitute a major clinical challenge following burns. Several clinical studies show that leukocytes are systemically activated following burns. Neutrophils have the capability to increase vascular permeability via mechanisms thought to involve the release of heparin binding protein (HBP). We hypothesised that HBP is elevated in plasma after major burns due to a systemic inflammatory response and investigated plasma-HBP concentrations in 10 severely burned patients daily for 1 week following the burn. Five-fold higher levels in plasma-HBP concentration compared to a control group were detected on the first day after injury, followed by a steep reduction in the time-period that corresponds to the last part of the hyperpermeability phase. These data are in accordance with the hypothesis that HBP may function as a mediator of the early burn-induced increase in vascular permeability, and call for further studies to confirm a possible cause-and-effect relationship between HBP and oedema formation following burns.

  12. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  13. Oxidized Docosahexaenoic Acid Species and Lipid Peroxidation Products Increase Amyloidogenic Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Haupenthal, Viola J; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P; Blümel, Tamara; Mylonas, Nadine T; Endres, Kristina; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously it has been demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with a reduced risk of AD caused by decreased Aβ production. However, in epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches, the outcomes of DHA-dependent treatment were partially controversial. PUFAs are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are increased during disease pathology. In line with published results, lipid peroxidation was elevated in human postmortem AD brains; especially 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE) was increased. To investigate whether lipid peroxidation is only a consequence or might also influence the processes leading to AD, we analyzed 7 different oxidized lipid species including 5 oxidized DHA derivatives and the lipid peroxidation products of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs, HNE and 4-hydroxy-hexenal, in human neuroblastoma cells and mouse mixed cortical neurons. In the presence of oxidized lipids Aβ and soluble β-secreted APP levels were elevated, whereas soluble α-secreted APP was decreased, suggesting a shift from the nonamyloidogenic to the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing. Furthermore, β- and γ-secretase activity was increased by oxidized lipids via increased gene expression and additionally by a direct effect on β-secretase activity. Importantly, only 1% oxidized DHA was sufficient to revert the protective effect of DHA and to significantly increase Aβ production. Therefore, our results emphasize the need to prevent DHA from oxidation in nutritional approaches and might help explain the divergent results of clinical DHA studies. PMID:26642316

  14. Increased expression of argininosuccinate synthetase protein predicts poor prognosis in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan-Shen; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Lai, Ming-Derg; Yen, Meng-Chi; Luo, Yi-Pey; Chen, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1, also known as ASS) has been found in cancer cells and is involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of ASS expression in human gastric cancer and to determine the possible correlations between ASS expression and clinicopathological findings. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin‑embedded tissues to determine whether ASS was expressed in 11 of 11 specimens from patients with gastric cancer. The protein was localized primarily to the cytoplasm of cancer cells and normal epithelium. In the Oncomine cancer microarray database, expression of the ASS gene was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues. To investigate the clinicopathological and prognostic roles of ASS expression, we performed western blot analysis of 35 matched specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas and normal tissue obtained from patients treated at the National Cheng Kung University Hospital. The ratio of relative ASS expression (expressed as the ASS/β-actin ratio) in tumor tissues to that in normal tissues was correlated with large tumor size (P=0.007) and with the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system (P=0.031). Patients whose cancer had increased the relative expression of ASS were positive for perineural invasion and had poor recurrence-free survival. In summary, ASS expression in gastric cancer was associated with a poor prognosis. Further study of mechanisms to silence the ASS gene or decrease the enzymatic activity of ASS protein has the potential to provide new treatments for patients with gastric cancer.

  15. An amino acid substitution in the human intestinal fatty acid binding protein is associated with increased fatty acid binding, increased fat oxidation, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Baier, L J; Sacchettini, J C; Knowler, W C; Eads, J; Paolisso, G; Tataranni, P A; Mochizuki, H; Bennett, P H; Bogardus, C; Prochazka, M

    1995-03-01

    The intestinal fatty acid binding protein locus (FABP2) was investigated as a possible genetic factor in determining insulin action in the Pima Indian population. A polymorphism at codon 54 of FABP2 was identified that results in an alanine-encoding allele (frequency 0.71) and a threonine-encoding allele (frequency 0.29). Pimas who were homozygous or heterozygous for the threonine-encoding allele were found to have a higher mean fasting plasma insulin concentration, a lower mean insulin-stimulated glucose uptake rate, a higher mean insulin response to oral glucose and a mixed meal, and a higher mean fat oxidation rate compared with Pimas who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele. Since the FABP2 threonine-encoding allele was found to be associated with insulin resistance and increased fat oxidation in vivo, we further analyzed the FABP2 gene products for potential functional differences. Titration microcalorimetry studies with purified recombinant protein showed that the threonine-containing protein had a twofold greater affinity for long-chain fatty acids than the alanine-containing protein. We conclude that the threonine-containing protein may increase absorption and/or processing of dietary fatty acids by the intestine and thereby increase fat oxidation, which has been shown to reduce insulin action. PMID:7883976

  16. Accelerated Growth Rate Induced by Neonatal High-Protein Milk Formula Is Not Supported by Increased Tissue Protein Synthesis in Low-Birth-Weight Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, Agnès; Sève, Bernard; Thibault, Jean-Noël; Floc'h, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Low-birth-weight neonates are routinely fed a high-protein formula to promote catch-up growth and antibiotics are usually associated to prevent infection. Yet the effects of such practices on tissue protein metabolism are unknown. Baby pigs were fed from age 2 to 7 or 28 d with high protein formula with or without amoxicillin supplementation, in parallel with normal protein formula, to determine tissue protein metabolism modifications. Feeding high protein formula increased growth rate between 2 and 28 days of age when antibiotic was administered early in the first week of life. This could be explained by the occurrence of diarrhea when piglets were fed the high protein formula alone. Higher growth rate was associated with higher feed conversion and reduced protein synthesis rate in the small intestine, muscle and carcass, whereas proteolytic enzyme activities measured in these tissues were unchanged. In conclusion, accelerated growth rate caused by high protein formula and antibiotics was not supported by increased protein synthesis in muscle and carcass. PMID:22315674

  17. Protein-enhanced soups: a consumer-accepted food for increasing dietary protein provision among older adults.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Elizabeth; Crowe, Kristi Michele; Lawrence, Jeannine

    2015-02-01

    Protein-enhanced soups (PES) may improve protein intake among older adults. This study examined sensory attributes (aroma, texture, taste, and overall acceptability) and preferences of PES (chicken noodle and cheddar broccoli) compared with flavor-matched control soups (FCS) among older adults (≥65 years) and evaluated dietary profile changes of a standard menu based on the substitution of one PES serving/d for a standard soup. Modified paired preference tests and 5-point facial hedonic scales were administered to participants (n = 44). No significant differences in sensory attributes between either PES compared with FCS were identified, but significant gender- and age-related differences (p < 0.05) were observed. About Sixty-one percent of participants preferred protein-enhanced chicken noodle soup while only 38% preferred protein-enhanced cheddar broccoli soup to their respective FCS. Substituting one PES serving for one non-fortified soup serving per day resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.001) protein profile. Results suggest that all attributes of PES were consistent with sensory expectations and PES substitution could improve protein provision.

  18. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A.; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M.; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W.; Cang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele–alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  19. ALDH2(E487K) mutation increases protein turnover and promotes murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengfang; Chen, Jiang; Chen, Lizao; Histen, Gavin; Lin, Zhizhong; Gross, Stefan; Hixon, Jeffrey; Chen, Yue; Kung, Charles; Chen, Yiwei; Fu, Yufei; Lu, Yuxuan; Lin, Hui; Cai, Xiujun; Yang, Hua; Cairns, Rob A; Dorsch, Marion; Su, Shinsan M; Biller, Scott; Mak, Tak W; Cang, Yong

    2015-07-21

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) in the liver removes toxic aldehydes including acetaldehyde, an intermediate of ethanol metabolism. Nearly 40% of East Asians inherit an inactive ALDH2*2 variant, which has a lysine-for-glutamate substitution at position 487 (E487K), and show a characteristic alcohol flush reaction after drinking and a higher risk for gastrointestinal cancers. Here we report the characterization of knockin mice in which the ALDH2(E487K) mutation is inserted into the endogenous murine Aldh2 locus. These mutants recapitulate essentially all human phenotypes including impaired clearance of acetaldehyde, increased sensitivity to acute or chronic alcohol-induced toxicity, and reduced ALDH2 expression due to a dominant-negative effect of the mutation. When treated with a chemical carcinogen, these mutants exhibit increased DNA damage response in hepatocytes, pronounced liver injury, and accelerated development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Importantly, ALDH2 protein levels are also significantly lower in patient HCC than in peritumor or normal liver tissues. Our results reveal that ALDH2 functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability in the liver, and the common human ALDH2 variant would present a significant risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis. Our study suggests that the ALDH2*2 allele-alcohol interaction may be an even greater human public health hazard than previously appreciated. PMID:26150517

  20. Increased liver pathology in hepatitis C virus transgenic mice expressing the hepatitis B virus X protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, Victor V.; Lerat, Herve; Madden, Charles R.; Finegold, Milton J.; McGarvey, Michael J.; Mohammed, Essam M.A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Grona, Shala J.; Hollinger, F. Blaine; Slagle, Betty L. . E-mail: bslagle@bcm.edu

    2006-04-10

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was identified in 21% of HCV/ATX mice, but in none of the single transgenic animals. Analysis of 8-mo animals revealed that, relative to HCV/WT mice, HCV/ATX mice had more severe steatosis, greater liver-to-body weight ratios, and a significant increase in the percentage of hepatocytes staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, primary hepatocytes from HCV, ATX, and HCV/ATX transgenic mice were more resistant to fas-mediated apoptosis than hepatocytes from nontransgenic littermates. These results indicate that HBx expression contributes to increased liver pathogenesis in HCV transgenic mice by a mechanism that involves an imbalance in hepatocyte death and regeneration within the context of severe steatosis.

  1. Mammary gland development of dairy heifers fed diets containing increasing levels of metabolisable protein: metabolisable energy.

    PubMed

    Albino, Ronan L; Marcondes, Marcos I; Akers, Robert M; Detmann, Edenio; Carvalho, Bruno C; Silva, Tadeu E

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the development of the mammary gland in Holstein heifers subjected to different dietary metabolisable protein (MP): metabolisable energy (ME) ratios. Twenty-five Holstein heifers (initial body weight (BW) 213±13·5 kg and initial average age 7·8±0·5 months) were divided into five treatments. The treatments were designed to provide MP:ME ratios equal to 33, 38, 43, 48, and 53 g of MP per Mcal of ME. All diets were formulated to have the same energy content (2·6 Mcal ME/kg dry matter). Actual MP:ME ratios were 36·2, 40·2, 46·2, 47·1, and 50·8 g MP/Mcal ME. The experiment was conducted in a randomised block design, while considering initial BW as a blocking factor to evaluate pre- and post-pubertal periods. Block effect was not observed for all variables evaluated; hence it was considered that the diets had the same influence both on pre- and post-pubertal phases. Dry matter and nutrient intake did not change between treatments, excepting protein intake and digestibility. Serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 increased linearly across treatments. Changes in the pixel brightness of mammary gland ultrasound images, which are associated with lipid content, were significantly influenced by MP:ME ratios in the diet of heifers that were subjected to accelerated growth rates. It is not recommended to use diets of less than 38 g MP/Mcal ME in diets to heifers allowed to gain more than 1 kg/d. PMID:25592631

  2. Increased intestinal protein permeability in a model of lung injury induced by phorbol myristate acetate.

    PubMed

    St John, R C; Mizer, L A; Weisbrode, S E; Dorinsky, P M

    1991-11-01

    Multiple nonpulmonary organ failure is a frequent complication of the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and contributes significantly to the high mortality rate associated with this disorder. Although previous studies suggest that systemic organ injury may be an integral component of ARDS, little is known about the specific functional alterations that occur in these target organs. The present study was designed, therefore, to test the hypothesis that endothelial damage, as assessed by microvascular permeability changes, develops in systemic organs in a model of acute lung injury. To test this postulate, the microvascular permeability for total protein was estimated using the steady-state relationship between the lymph (CL) to plasma (Cp) protein concentration ratio (i.e., CL/Cp) and lymph flow in autoperfused cat ileum preparations. Specifically, CL/Cp was measured in five cats, 2 h after acute lung injury was induced by intravenously administered phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), 15 micrograms/kg, and the results were compared with those of seven time-matched control animals. Prior to PMA infusion, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio was 451 +/- 28 in both groups and remained unchanged (486 +/- 26) in the control group. By contrast, the PaO2/FIO2 ratio fell to 275 +/- 95 after PMA infusion (p less than 0.05). In addition, whereas CL/Cp was 0.099 +/- 0.008 in the control animals, it increased to 0.36 +/- 0.06 in the PMA-injured animals (p less than 0.01). In summary, this study demonstrated that in this model of acute lung injury produced by PMA-induced activation of circulating inflammatory cells, both acute lung injury and systemic organ injury (i.e., morphologic and permeability alterations) occurred.

  3. Increased Infectivity of Anchorless Mouse Scrapie Prions in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katie; Meade-White, Kimberly; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, mostly as a glycoprotein anchored to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Following prion infection, host protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPsen or PrPC) is converted into an abnormal, disease-associated, protease-resistant form (PrPres). Biochemical characteristics, such as the PrP amino acid sequence, and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and GPI anchoring, can affect the transmissibility of prions as well as the biochemical properties of the PrPres generated. Previous in vivo studies on the effects of GPI anchoring on prion infectivity have not examined cross-species transmission. In this study, we tested the effect of lack of GPI anchoring on a species barrier model using mice expressing human PrP. In this model, anchorless 22L prions derived from tg44 mice were more infectious than 22L prions derived from C57BL/10 mice when tested in tg66 transgenic mice, which expressed wild-type anchored human PrP at 8- to 16-fold above normal. Thus, the lack of the GPI anchor on the PrPres from tg44 mice appeared to reduce the effect of the mouse-human PrP species barrier. In contrast, neither source of prions induced disease in tgRM transgenic mice, which expressed human PrP at 2- to 4-fold above normal. IMPORTANCE Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, usually attached to cells by an anchor molecule called GPI. Following prion infection, PrP is converted into a disease-associated form (PrPres). While most prion diseases are species specific, this finding is not consistent, and species barriers differ in strength. The amino acid sequence of PrP varies among species, and this variability affects prion species barriers. However, other PrP modifications, including glycosylation and GPI anchoring, may also influence cross-species infectivity. We studied the effect of PrP GPI anchoring using a mouse-to-human species barrier model. Experiments showed that

  4. Seed-specific expression of the lysine-rich protein gene sb401 significantly increases both lysine and total protein content in maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjuan; Peng, Peng; Zhang, Xiujun; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Sun, Xuehui; Liu, Junqi; Ao, Guangming

    2005-12-01

    The sb401 gene from potato (Solanum berthaultii) encoding a pollen-specific protein with high lysine content was successfully integrated into the genome of maize plants, and its expression was correlated with increased levels of lysine and total protein content in maize seeds. A plasmid vector containing the sb401 gene under the control of a maize seed-specific expression storage protein promoter (P19z) was constructed and introduced into maize calli by microprojectile bombardment. The integration of the sb401 gene into the maize genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis, and its expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Quantification of the lysine and protein contents in R1 maize seeds showed that, compared with the nontransgenic maize control, the lysine content increased by 16.1% to 54.8% and the total protein content increased by 11.6% to 39.0%. There were no visible morphological changes in the vegetative parts and seeds of the transgenic maize plants. Lysine and protein analysis of the transgenic maize grains showed that the levels of lysine and total protein remained high for six continuous generations, indicating that the elevated lysine and total protein levels were heritable. These results indicate that the sb401 gene could be successfully employed in breeding programs aimed at improving the nutritional value of maize.

  5. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  6. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  7. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John E.; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  8. Increased rewarding properties of morphine in perinatally protein-malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Valdomero, A; Velazquez, E E; de Olmos, S; de Olmos, J S; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2007-12-01

    In the current research, we assessed the influence of a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 40 days of age (D-rats) on the rewarding properties of morphine in adult rats by means of the conditioned place preference paradigm. Well-nourished animals (C-rats) administered with different doses of morphine (0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12 or 24 mg/kg i.p.) exhibited a conditioning place preference with doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg, whereas in D-rats such a conditioning effect was observed with doses of 1.5 and 3 mg/kg. No adverse effects were observed in either C- or D-rats for the higher doses of morphine. In addition, when animals of both groups were pretreated twice a day for 3 days with increasing doses of morphine (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg s.c.), only D-rats elicited sensitization to the conditioning effect with the lowest dose of morphine (0.75 mg/kg i.p.). Furthermore, sensitized D-rats showed a selective and significant increase in FosB expression in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell), basolateral amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, brain areas that are functionally related to the rewarding neural circuit. These results demonstrate that a deficient nutritional status during the perinatal period results in adult subjects having neural alterations, leading to an increased responsiveness to morphine and/or enhanced reinforcement effects, which correlates with an overexpression of FosB in selective brain areas related to the rewarding network.

  9. Raised FGF-21 and Triglycerides Accompany Increased Energy Intake Driven by Protein Leverage in Lean, Healthy Individuals: A Randomised Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gosby, Alison K.; Lau, Namson S.; Tam, Charmaine S.; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Morrison, Christopher D.; Caterson, Ian D.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    A dominant appetite for protein drives increased energy intake in humans when the proportion of protein in the diet is reduced down to approximately 10% of total energy. Compensatory feeding for protein is apparent over a 1–2 d period but the mechanisms driving this regulation are not fully understood. Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) has been identified as a candidate protein signal as levels increase in the circulation when dietary protein is low. The aim of this randomised controlled trial was to assess whether changes in percent dietary protein over a 4 d ad libitum experimental period in lean, healthy participants influenced energy intake, metabolic health, circulating FGF-21 and appetite regulating hormones including ghrelin, glucagon like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin. Twenty-two lean, healthy participants were fed ad libitum diets containing 10, 15 and 25% protein, over three, 4 d controlled, in-house experimental periods. Reduced dietary protein intake from 25% to 10% over a period of 4 d was associated with 14% increased energy intake (p = 0.02) as previously reported, and a 6-fold increase in fasting circulating plasma FGF-21 levels (p<0.0001), a 1.5-fold increase in serum triglycerides (p<0.0001), and a 0.9-fold decrease in serum total cholesterol (p = 0.02). Serum HDL cholesterol was reduced with a reduction in dietary protein from 15% to 10% (p = 0.01) over 4 d but not from 25% to 10% (p = 0.1) and the change from baseline was not different between diets. Plasma fasting insulin levels following the 4 d study period were significantly lower following the 25% ad libitum study period compared to the 15% protein period (p = 0.014) but not the 10% protein period (p = 0.2). Variability in interstitial glucose during each study period increased with a decrease in dietary protein from 25% to 15% and 10% (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and cholecystokinin were unchanged. Increases in energy intake, plasma FGF-21

  10. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  11. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%. PMID:27165502

  12. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila. PMID:27388939

  13. Increased protein-coding mutations in the mitochondrial genome of African American women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ding, David; Scott, Nicole M; Thompson, Emma E; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Torres, Raul; Billstrand, Christine; Murray, Kathleen; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Ismail, Mahmoud; Kay, Helen; Levy, Shawn; Romero, Roberto; Lindheimer, Marshall D; Nicolae, Dan L; Ober, Carole

    2012-12-01

    Preeclampsia occurs more frequently in women of African ancestry. The cause of this hypertensive complication is unclear, but placental oxidative stress may play a role. Because mitochondria are the major sites of oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that placentas of preeclamptic pregnancies harbor mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. Next-generation sequencing of placental mtDNA in African American preeclamptics (N = 30) and controls (N = 38) from Chicago revealed significant excesses in preeclamptics of nonsynonymous substitutions in protein-coding genes and mitochondrially encoded nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 5 gene and an increase in the substitution rate (P = .0001). Moreover, 88% of preeclamptics and 53% of controls carried at least one nonsynonymous substitution (P = .005; odds ratio [OR] = 6.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-39.1). These results were not replicated in a sample of African American preeclamptics (N = 162) and controls (N = 171) from Detroit. Differences in study design and heterogeneity may account for this lack of replication. Nonsynonymous substitutions in mtDNA may be risk factors for preeclampsia in some African American women, but additional studies are required to establish this relationship. PMID:22902742

  14. Supplementation with Major Royal-Jelly Proteins Increases Lifespan, Feeding, and Fecundity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yong; Chen, Di; Xiao, Fa; Parnell, Laurence D; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Liang; Ordovas, Jose M; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Shen, Li-Rong

    2016-07-27

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or 5.00% (E). Diets B, C, D, and E increased mean lifespan by 4.3%, 9.0%, 12.4%, and 13.9% in males and by 5.8%, 9.7%, 20.0%, and 11.8% in females in comparison to results from diet A, respectively. The diet supplemented with 2.50% MRJPs seems to have the optimal dose to improve both physiological and biochemical measures related to aging in both sexes. Interestingly, lifespan extension by MRJPs in Drosophila was positively associated with feeding and fecundity and up-regulation of copper and zinc-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and the Egfr-mediated signaling pathway. This study provides strong evidence that MRJPs are important components of RJ for prolonging lifespan in Drosophila.

  15. Activated Protein C Resistance Does Not Increase Risk for Recurrent Stroke or Death in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Christoph; Sonntag, Natalie; Schleef, Michael; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Poppert, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated protein C (APC) resistance is the most common inherited prothrombotic disorder. The role of APC resistance in ischemic stroke is controversially discussed. Objectives The aim of this single center follow up study was to investigate the effect of APC resistance on stroke recurrence and survival in stroke patients. Patients/Methods We retrospectively identified 966 patients who had had an ischemic stroke or transitory ischemic attack (TIA) and in whom laboratory tests for APC resistance had been conducted. These patients were contacted to determine the primary outcomes of recurrent ischemic stroke or death. Results A total of 858 patients with an average follow up time of 8.48 years were included. APC resistance did not influence cumulative incidence functions for stroke free and total survival. In multivariate analyses, crude and adjusted hazard ratios for recurrent stroke as well as for death where not significantly increased in patients with APC resistance. This also applies to the subgroups of young patients, patients with cryptogenic stroke and patients with atrial fibrillation. Conclusion APC-resistance is not a risk factor for subsequent stroke or death in patients with a first ischemic stroke or TIA. Testing for APC-resistance in stroke patients therefore cannot be routinely recommended. PMID:27508300

  16. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  17. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries.

  18. The vitamin E-binding protein afamin increases in maternal serum during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hubalek, Michael; Buchner, Hannes; Mörtl, Manfred G.; Schlembach, Dietmar; Huppertz, Berthold; Firulovic, Branka; Köhler, Wolfgang; Hafner, Erich; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Wildt, Ludwig; Dieplinger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background Afamin is a liver-derived plasma glycoprotein with vitamin E-binding properties and a putative function in fertility. This study evaluated serum afamin concentrations during and postpartum to uncomplicated pregnancies and investigated a potential association between afamin concentrations and pregnancy outcome. Methods Afamin serum concentrations were measured in women with uncomplicated pregnancies in a retrospective cohort (n = 466) at different gestational ages and a prospective observational study (n = 76) in the first, second and third trimester. Furthermore, afamin was determined in the first trimester in a cross-sectional pilot study including women with preeclampsia (PE), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and women without pregnancy complications (n = 13 each). Finally, expression of afamin was investigated in human placental tissue by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Afamin concentrations increased linearly almost two-fold during pregnancy in both retrospective and prospective studies in women without pregnancy complications with median afamin serum concentrations of 61.9 mg/l, 79.6 mg/l, and 98.6 mg/l in the first, second, and third trimester, respectively. After delivery, median afamin concentrations decreased to baseline values of 54.6 mg/l. In the pilot study with pregnancy complications, women with PE displayed significantly higher median afamin concentrations than did women with uncomplicated pregnancy (70.0 mg/l vs. 55.4 mg/l, P = 0.007). Expression analyses revealed no placental afamin expression at either mRNA or protein level in uncomplicated pregnancy. Conclusion A linear increase in the maternally expressed glycoprotein afamin during pregnancy may serve as basic reference for subsequent investigations of afamin in pregnancy-related disorders. PMID:24768783

  19. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries. PMID:26016598

  20. Increased levels of hyper-stable protein aggregates in plasma of older adults.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ke; Trasatti, Hannah; Wymer, James P; Colón, Wilfredo

    2016-06-01

    Proteins that misfold into hyper-stable/degradation-resistant species during aging may accumulate and disrupt protein homeostasis (i.e., proteostasis), thereby posing a survival risk to any organism. Using the method diagonal two-dimensional (D2D) SDS-PAGE, which separates hyper-stable SDS-resistant proteins at a proteomics level, we analyzed the plasma of healthy young (<30 years) and older (60-80 years) adults. We discovered the presence of soluble SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults, but found significantly lower levels in the plasma of young adults. We identified the inflammation-related chaperone protein haptoglobin as the main component of the hyper-stable aggregates. This observation is consistent with the growing link between accumulations of protein aggregates and aging across many organisms. It is plausible higher amounts of SDS-resistant protein aggregates in the plasma of older adults may reflect a compromise in proteostasis that may potentially indicate cellular aging and/or disease risk. The results of this study have implications for further understanding the link between aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates, as well as potential for the development of aging-related biomarkers. More broadly, this novel application of D2D SDS-PAGE may be used to identify, quantify, and characterize the degradation-resistant protein aggregates in human plasma or any biological system. PMID:27179971

  1. Increased intramuscular fat induced by reduced dietary protein in finishing pigs: effects on the longissimus lumborum muscle proteome.

    PubMed

    Pires, V M R; Madeira, M S; Dowle, A A; Thomas, J; Almeida, A M; Prates, J A M

    2016-07-19

    Due to genetic selection towards reduced subcutaneous fat, the amount of intramuscular fat (IMF) in commercial pigs has been reduced (<2.5%), compromising pork quality. The use of reduced protein diets (RPD) is a good strategy to increase IMF in pigs. We have previously shown that increased IMF promoted by RPD is mediated by lysine restriction. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we performed a proteomics study to quantify differentially regulated proteins in the longissimus lumborum muscle of pigs (n = 4) fed a normal protein diet (NPD) (16.0% CP) or a reduced protein diet (RPD) (13.0% CP). Both isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and label-free methods were used. Glycolysis, Krebs cycle, mitochondrion, contractile proteins, respiratory chain, and calcium signalling were significantly enriched in muscle samples. Thirty five proteins shown to be differentially expressed and were classified using gene ontology (GO) terms and functional annotation clustering, highlighting main relevant biological networks and proteins associated with muscle physiology and meat quality. Members of GO categories "muscle contraction" and "structural constituents of cytoskeleton", were the most significantly up-regulated proteins in muscle from pigs fed RPD. Conversely, in animals fed NPD most up-regulated proteins were enzymes involved in the regulation of energy metabolism. Our data revealed that RPD affects the amounts of proteins related to fibre type and structure, and energy metabolism. It is suggested that the increased IMF promoted by dietary protein reduction in growing-finishing pigs is mediated by shifting the metabolic properties of fibres from glycolytic to oxidative. PMID:27279257

  2. Neurofilament architecture combines structural principles of intermediate filaments with carboxy-terminal extensions increasing in size between triplet proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Kaufmann, E; Fischer, S; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1983-01-01

    Mammalian neurofilament triplet proteins (68 K, 160 K and 200 K) have been correlated by a biochemical, immunological and protein chemical study. The 160 K and 200 K triplet proteins are intermediate filament proteins in their own right, since they reveal the alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain analyzed in detail for the 68 K protein. Triplet proteins display two distinct arrays. Their amino-terminal region built analogously to non-neuronal intermediate filament proteins should allow a co-polymerization process via the interaction of coiled-coil domains. The extra mass of all triplet proteins is allocated to carboxy-terminally located extensions of increasing size and unique amino acid sequences. These may provide highly charged scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components. Such a domain of 68 K reveals, in sequence analysis, 47 glutamic acids within 106 residues. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody reacting probably with all intermediate filament proteins has been mapped. It is located within the last 20 residues of the rods, where six distinct intermediate filament proteins point to a consensus sequence. Images Fig. 1. PMID:10872323

  3. Short-term, increasing dietary protein and fat moderately affect energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and uncoupling protein gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Riese, Cornelia; Klaus, Susanne

    2007-06-01

    Macronutrient composition of diets can influence body-weight development and energy balance. We studied the short-term effects of high-protein (HP) and/or high-fat (HF) diets on energy expenditure (EE) and uncoupling protein (UCP1-3) gene expression. Adult male rats were fed ad libitum with diets containing different protein-fat ratios: adequate protein-normal fat (AP-NF): 20% casein, 5% fat; adequate protein-high fat (AP-HF): 20% casein, 17% fat; high protein-normal fat (HP-NF): 60% casein, 5% fat; high protein-high fat (HP-HF): 60% casein, 17% fat. Wheat starch was used for adjustment of energy content. After 4 days, overnight EE and oxygen consumption, as measured by indirect calorimetry, were higher and body-weight gain was lower in rats fed with HP diets as compared with rats fed diets with adequate protein content (P<.05). Exchanging carbohydrates by protein increased fat oxidation in HF diet fed groups. The UCP1 mRNA expression in brown adipose tissue was not significantly different in HP diet fed groups as compared with AP diet fed groups. Expression of different homologues of UCPs positively correlated with nighttime oxygen consumption and EE. Moreover, dietary protein and fat distinctly influenced liver UCP2 and skeletal muscle UCP3 mRNA expressions. These findings demonstrated that a 4-day ad libitum high dietary protein exposure influences energy balance in rats. A function of UCPs in energy balance and dissipating food energy was suggested. Future experiments are focused on the regulation of UCP gene expression by dietary protein, which could be important for body-weight management.

  4. Enteral B-hydroxy-B-methylbutyrate supplementation increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low-birth weight infants are at risk for poor growth due to an inability to achieve adequate protein intake. Administration of the amino acid leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonates. To determine the effects of enteral supplementation of the leucine metabolite B-hydr...

  5. DECREASED PRODUCTION OF SURFACTANT PROTEINS AFTER DIESEL EXHAUST EXPOSURE INCREASES SUSCEPTIBILITY TO INFLUENZA INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), termed collectins, enhance the opsonization of foreign particles and pathogens by phagocytic cells. Inhaled pollutants such as diesel exhaust (DE) have a possible role in suppressing the production of surfactant proteins whic...

  6. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-01-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  7. Separation of sublethal and lethal effects of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mannion, B A; Weiss, J; Elsbach, P

    1990-03-01

    Binding of the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI) of granulocytes to Escherichia coli promptly produces several discrete outer envelope alterations and growth arrest without major impairment of bacterial structure or biosynthetic capabilities, raising the question whether these early effects of BPI are sufficient to cause bacterial death. In this study, the bactericidal action of BPI was examined more closely. We have found that bovine or human serum albumin blocks bacterial killing without preventing BPI binding or an increase in outer membrane permeability. Moreover, addition of serum albumin after BPI results in growth resumption without displacement of bound BPI and without (early) repair of the envelope alterations. These effects are opposite to those produced by Mg2+ (80 mM), which displaces greater than 85% of bound BPI and rapidly initiates outer envelope repair without restoration of bacterial growth. The extent of rescue by serum albumin depends on the time and pH of preincubation of BPI with E. coli: e.g., for E. coli J5 treated with human BPI, t1/2 = 79 min at pH 7.4 and 10 min at pH 6.0. The serum albumin effects on BPI action are the same in wild-type E. coli and in a mutant strain lacking an activatable phospholipase, indicating that serum albumin does not act by sequestering membrane-damaging products of bacterial phospholipid hydrolysis. The progression from reversible to irreversible growth arrest, revealed by the subsequent addition of serum albumin at different times, is paralleled by a decrease in amino acid uptake and an increase in the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane to o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside. These findings demonstrate at least two stages in the action of BPI: (a) an early, reversible, sublethal stage in which BPI has effects on the outer envelope and causes growth arrest, and (b) time- and pH-dependent progression to a lethal stage, apparently involving cytoplasmic membrane damage, possibly caused by

  8. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  9. Molecular modeling of protein-glycosaminoglycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardin, A D; Weintraub, H J

    1989-01-01

    Forty-nine regions in 21 proteins were identified as potential heparin-binding sites based on the sequence organizations of their basic and nonbasic residues. Twelve known heparin-binding sequences in vitronectin, apolipoproteins E and B-100, and platelet factor 4 were used to formulate two search strings for identifying potential heparin-binding regions in other proteins. Consensus sequences for glycosaminoglycan recognition were determined as [-X-B-B-X-B-X-] and [-X-B-B-B-X-X-B-X-] where B is the probability of a basic residue and X is a hydropathic residue. Predictions were then made as to the heparin-binding domains in endothelial cell growth factor, purpurin, and antithrombin-III. Many of the natural sequences conforming to these consensus motifs show prominent amphipathic periodicities having both alpha-helical and beta-strand conformations as determined by predictive algorithms and circular dichroism studies. The heparin-binding domain of vitronectin was modeled and formed a hydrophilic pocket that wrapped around and folded over a heparin octasaccharide, yielding a complementary structure. We suggest that these consensus sequence elements form potential nucleation sites for the recognition of polyanions in proteins and may provide a useful guide in identifying heparin-binding regions in other proteins. The possible relevance of protein-glycosaminoglycans interactions in atherosclerosis is discussed. PMID:2463827

  10. Cardiac-specific deletion of protein phosphatase 1β promotes increased myofilament protein phosphorylation and contractile alterations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Correll, Robert N.; Davis, Jennifer; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; York, Allen J.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Nairn, Angus C.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2015-01-01

    There are 3 protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) catalytic isoforms (α, β and γ) encoded within the mammalian genome. These 3 gene products share ~90% amino acid homology within their catalytic domains but each has unique N- and C-termini that likely underlie distinctive subcellular localization or functionality. In this study, we assessed the effect associated with loss of each PP1 isoform in the heart using a conditional Cre-loxP targeting approach in mice. Ppp1ca-loxP, Ppp1cb-loxP and Ppp1cc-oxP alleles were crossed with either an Nkx2.5-Cre knock-in containing allele for early embryonic deletion or a tamoxifen inducible α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC)-MerCreMer transgene for adult and cardiac-specific deletion. We determined that while deletion of Ppp1ca (PP1α) or Ppp1cc (PP1γ) had little effect on the whole heart, deletion of Ppp1cb (PP1β) resulted in concentric remodeling of the heart, interstitial fibrosis and contractile dysregulation, using either the embryonic or adult-specific Cre-expressing alleles. However, myocytes isolated from Ppp1cb deleted hearts surprisingly showed enhanced contractility. Mechanistically we found that deletion of any of the 3 PP1 gene-encoding isoforms had no effect on phosphorylation of phospholamban, nor were Ca2+ handling dynamics altered in adult myocytes from Ppp1cb deleted hearts. However, loss of Ppp1cb from the heart, but not Ppp1ca or Ppp1cc, resulted in elevated phosphorylation of myofilament proteins such as myosin light chain 2 and cardiac myosin binding protein C, consistent with an enriched localization profile of this isoform to the sarcomeres. These results suggest a unique functional role for the PP1β isoform in affecting cardiac contractile function. PMID:26334248

  11. Does dimethyl sulfoxide increase protein immunomarking efficiency for dispersal and predation studies?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marking biological control agents facilitates studies of dispersal and predation. This study examines the effect of a biological solvent, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), on retention of immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein solutions applied to Diorhabda carinulata (Desbrochers) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) eit...

  12. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Daniele O B; Carvalho, Ana F U; Oliveira, José Tadeu A; Farias, Davi F; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2015-07-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  13. Increased Levels of Antinutritional and/or Defense Proteins Reduced the Protein Quality of a Disease-Resistant Soybean Cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Daniele O. B.; Carvalho, Ana F. U.; Oliveira, José Tadeu A.; Farias, Davi F.; Castelar, Ivan; Oliveira, Henrique P.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and nutritional attributes of two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) cultivars, one susceptible (Seridó) and the other resistant (Seridó-RCH) to stem canker, were examined to assess whether the resistance to pathogens was related to levels of antinutritional and/or defense proteins in the plant and subsequently affected the nutritional quality. Lectin, urease, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase activities were higher in the resistant cultivar. Growing rats were fed with isocaloric and isoproteic diets prepared with defatted raw soybean meals. Those on the Seridó-RCH diet showed the worst performance in terms of protein quality indicators. Based on regression analysis, lectin, trypsin inhibitor, peroxidase and chitinase appear to be involved in the resistance trait but also in the poorer nutritional quality of Seridó-RCH. Thus, the development of cultivars for disease resistance may lead to higher concentrations of antinutritional compounds, affecting the quality of soybean seeds. Further research that includes the assessment of more cultivars/genotypes is needed. PMID:26205163

  14. Spaceflight results in increase of thick filament but not thin filament proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, R.; Takaya, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Higashibata, A.; Ishioka, N.; Kagawa, H.

    We have investigated the effect of microgravity during spaceflight on body-wall muscle fiber size and muscle proteins in the paramyosin mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans. Both mutant and wild-type strains were subjected to 10 days of microgravity during spaceflight and compared to ground control groups. No significant change in muscle fiber size or quantity of the protein was observed in wild-type worms; where as atrophy of body-wall muscle and an increase in thick filament proteins were observed in the paramyosin mutant unc-15(e73) animals after spaceflight. We conclude that the mutant with abnormal muscle responded to microgravity by increasing the total amount of muscle protein in order to compensate for the loss of muscle function.

  15. Dynamic contact angle analysis of protein adsorption on polysaccharide multilayer's films for biomaterial reendothelialization.

    PubMed

    Benni, Safiya; Avramoglou, Thierry; Hlawaty, Hanna; Mora, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte's multilayer (PEM) films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE) as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS) as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS)4 and was labeled D-. The other film was the same as D- but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS)4-DEAE (labeled D+). The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS)4 films. (DEAE-DS)4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation.

  16. Dynamic Contact Angle Analysis of Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide Multilayer's Films for Biomaterial Reendothelialization

    PubMed Central

    Benni, Safiya; Mora, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte's multilayer (PEM) films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE) as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS) as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS)4 and was labeled D−. The other film was the same as D− but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS)4-DEAE (labeled D+). The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS)4 films. (DEAE-DS)4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation. PMID:25276808

  17. Dynamic contact angle analysis of protein adsorption on polysaccharide multilayer's films for biomaterial reendothelialization.

    PubMed

    Benni, Safiya; Avramoglou, Thierry; Hlawaty, Hanna; Mora, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte's multilayer (PEM) films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE) as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS) as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS)4 and was labeled D-. The other film was the same as D- but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS)4-DEAE (labeled D+). The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS)4 films. (DEAE-DS)4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation. PMID:25276808

  18. Betulinic Acid Selectively Increases Protein Degradation and Enhances Prostate Cancer-Specific Apoptosis: Possible Role for Inhibition of Deubiquitinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, Teresita; Parrondo, Ricardo; de las Pozas, Alicia; Palenzuela, Deanna; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation is a valid anti-cancer strategy and has led to the approval of bortezomib for the treatment of multiple myeloma. However, the alternative approach of enhancing the degradation of oncoproteins that are frequently overexpressed in cancers is less developed. Betulinic acid (BA) is a plant-derived small molecule that can increase apoptosis specifically in cancer but not in normal cells, making it an attractive anti-cancer agent. Our results in prostate cancer suggested that BA inhibited multiple deubiquitinases (DUBs), which resulted in the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, decreased levels of oncoproteins, and increased apoptotic cell death. In normal fibroblasts, however, BA did not inhibit DUB activity nor increased total poly-ubiquitinated proteins, which was associated with a lack of effect on cell death. In the TRAMP transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer, treatment with BA (10 mg/kg) inhibited primary tumors, increased apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and proliferation, and lowered androgen receptor and cyclin D1 protein. BA treatment also inhibited DUB activity and increased ubiquitinated proteins in TRAMP prostate cancer but had no effect on apoptosis or ubiquitination in normal mouse tissues. Overall, our data suggests that BA-mediated inhibition of DUBs and induction of apoptotic cell death specifically in prostate cancer but not in normal cells and tissues may provide an effective non-toxic and clinically selective agent for chemotherapy. PMID:23424652

  19. Antimicrobial activity of peptides derived from olive flounder lipopolysaccharide binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI).

    PubMed

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-10-17

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Peptides Derived from Olive Flounder Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein/Bactericidal Permeability-Increasing Protein (LBP/BPI)

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Bo-Hye; Moon, Ji-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kong, Hee Jeong; Kim, Woo-Jin; Jee, Young Ju; An, Cheul Min; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    We describe the antimicrobial function of peptides derived from the C-terminus of the olive flounder LBP BPI precursor protein. The investigated peptides, namely, ofLBP1N, ofLBP2A, ofLBP4N, ofLBP5A, and ofLBP6A, formed α-helical structures, showing significant antimicrobial activity against several Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and the yeast Candida albicans, but very limited hemolytic activities. The biological activities of these five analogs were evaluated against biomembranes or artificial membranes for the development of candidate therapeutic agents. Gel retardation studies revealed that peptides bound to DNA and inhibited migration on an agarose gel. In addition, we demonstrated that ofLBP6A inhibited polymerase chain reaction. These results suggested that the ofLBP-derived peptide bactericidal mechanism may be related to the interaction with intracellular components such as DNA or polymerase. PMID:25329706

  1. Bile-pancreatic juice-independent increases in pancreatic proteases and intestinal cholecystokinin by dietary protein in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1998-02-01

    Luminal bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ) is involved in the induction of pancreatic proteases in rats fed a high-protein diet. Recently, we have demonstrated that a BPJ-independent mechanism is responsible for enhancement of pancreatic secretion after feeding of a dietary protein in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. The aim of the present study was to explore the existence of a BPJ-independent mechanism during adaptation of the exocrine pancreas to dietary protein. Rats, whose BPJ was diverted into the ileum through a common bile-pancreatic duct catheter for 5 days (PBD rat), were fed a fat-free diet containing 25% or 60% casein for 3 days. Messenger RNA levels for pancreatic enzymes, cholecystokinin, and secretin in the jejunal mucosa were evaluated by northern blotting method. Pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities and mRNA levels of their zymogens were higher in PBD rats than in rats whose diverted BPJ was returned into the duodenum (PBD returned rat). In the PBD groups, pancreatic protease activities were further increased by 3-day feeding of a high-protein diet without changes in mRNA levels of these proteases. Cholecystokinin mRNA was increased after feeding of a high-protein diet in the PBD rats. These results indicate that pancreatic proteases are induced by feeding a high-protein diet by a mechanism independent of luminal BPJ, which is associated with an increase in intestinal cholecystokinin mRNA level.

  2. Serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) increases the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells by phosphorylating Shank2E protein.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, Katja; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Madden, Dean R; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-06-13

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone increases cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) abundance in human airway epithelial cells by a mechanism that requires serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 1 (SGK1) activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether SGK1 increases CFTR abundance by phosphorylating Shank2E, a PDZ domain protein that contains two SGK1 phosphorylation consensus sites. We found that SGK1 phosphorylates Shank2E as well as a peptide containing the first SGK1 consensus motif of Shank2E. The dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance was diminished by overexpression of a dominant-negative Shank2E in which the SGK1 phosphorylation sites had been mutated. siRNA-mediated reduction of Shank2E also reduced the dexamethasone-induced increase in CFTR abundance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the glucocorticoid-induced increase in CFTR abundance requires phosphorylation of Shank2E at an SGK1 consensus site.

  3. Fasted Exercise and Increased Dietary Protein Reduces Body Fat and Improves Strength in Jockeys.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G; Pritchard, P P; Papageorgiou, C; Phillips, S; Kumar, P; Langan-Evans, C; Routledge, H; Owens, D J; Morton, J P; Close, G L

    2015-11-01

    The present study assessed the effects of a diet and exercise intervention in jockeys on body composition, metabolism, bone and mental health. 10 jockeys followed an individually prescribed 6-wk diet (Carbohydrate=2.5-3.5 g/kg, Protein=2.5 g/kg, Fat=1.0 g/kg). Body mass (59.2±4.6 vs. 57.6±4.5 kg), fat mass (7.5±3.5 vs. 6.2±2.6) and body fat (13.1±5.9 vs. 11.5±4.9%) all decreased (P<0.05) from pre to post-intervention whilst lean mass (47.1±5.3 vs. 47.0±5.5 kg) was maintained (P=0.80). RMR (1703±329 vs. 1975±313 kcal.d(-1)), VO2max (3.8±0.8 vs. 4.1±0.7 L/min(- 1)) chest strength (65±11 vs. 71±13 kg), leg strength (160±28 vs. 175±29 kg) and jumping height (40±6 vs. 48±5 cm) significantly increased (P<0.05). Bone health (DXA) did not change (P>0.05) at hip (-1.04±1.29 vs. - 0.76±0.71) or lumbar sites (-1.32±0.76 vs. - 1.31±0.77). Psychometrics (GHQ-12 and EAT-26) remained unchanged (10.3±4.3 vs. 8.9±3.8 and 14.8±9.6 vs. 11.0±5.6, P>0.05, respectively). This approach represents a marked difference from jockeys' habitual weight-making that largely involves dehydration and food deprivation.

  4. N-epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine, a product of the chemical modification of proteins by methylglyoxal, increases with age in human lens proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M U; Brinkmann Frye, E; Degenhardt, T P; Thorpe, S R; Baynes, J W

    1997-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products and glycoxidation products, such as Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and pentosidine, accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins with age and are implicated in the aging of tissue proteins and in the development of pathology in diabetes, atherosclerosis and other diseases. In this paper we describe a new advanced glycation end-product, Nepsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), which is formed during the reaction of methylglyoxal with lysine residues in model compounds and in the proteins RNase and collagen. CEL was also detected in human lens proteins at a concentration similar to that of CML, and increased with age in parallel with the concentration of CML. Although CEL was formed in highest yields during the reaction of methylglyoxal and triose phosphates with lysine and protein, it was also formed in reactions of pentoses, ascorbate and other sugars with lysine and RNase. We propose that levels of CML and CEL and their ratio to one another in tissue proteins and in urine will provide an index of glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations in tissues, alterations in glutathione homoeostasis and dicarbonyl metabolism in disease, and sources of advanced glycation end-products in tissue proteins in aging and disease. PMID:9182719

  5. Genetic control of soybean seed oil: II. QTL and genes that increase oil concentration without decreasing protein or with increased seed yield.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-06-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] seed oil is the primary global source of edible oil and a major renewable and sustainable feedstock for biodiesel production. Therefore, increasing the relative oil concentration in soybean is desirable; however, that goal is complex due to the quantitative nature of the oil concentration trait and possible effects on major agronomic traits such as seed yield or protein concentration. The objectives of the present study were to study the relationship between seed oil concentration and important agronomic and seed quality traits, including seed yield, 100-seed weight, protein concentration, plant height, and days to maturity, and to identify oil quantitative trait loci (QTL) that are co-localized with the traits evaluated. A population of 203 F4:6 recombinant inbred lines, derived from a cross between moderately high oil soybean genotypes OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe, was developed and grown across multiple environments in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. Among the 11 QTL associated with seed oil concentration in the population, which were detected using either single-factor ANOVA or multiple QTL mapping methods, the number of QTL that were co-localized with other important traits QTL were six for protein concentration, four for seed yield, two for 100-seed weight, one for days to maturity, and one for plant height. The oil-beneficial allele of the QTL tagged by marker Sat_020 was positively associated with seed protein concentration. The oil favorable alleles of markers Satt001 and GmDGAT2B were positively correlated with seed yield. In addition, significant two-way epistatic interactions, where one of the interacting markers was solely associated with seed oil concentration, were identified for the selected traits in this study. The number of significant epistatic interactions was seven for yield, four for days to maturity, two for 100-seed weight, one for protein concentration, and one for plant height. The identified molecular

  6. Nerve Growth Factor Increases mRNA Levels for the Prion Protein and the β -amyloid Protein Precursor in Developing Hamster Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Neve, Rachael L.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; McKinley, Michael P.

    1988-12-01

    Deposition of amyloid filaments serves as a pathologic hallmark for some neurodegenerative disorders. The prion protein (PrP) is found in amyloid of animals with scrapie and humans with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; the β protein is present in amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome patients. These two proteins are derived from precursors that in the brain are expressed primarily in neurons and are membrane bound. We found that gene expression for PrP and the β -protein precursor (β -PP) is regulated in developing hamster brain. Specific brain regions showed distinct patterns of ontogenesis for PrP and β -PP mRNAs. The increases in PrP and β -PP mRNAs in developing basal forebrain coincided with an increase in choline acetyltransferase activity, raising the possibility that these markers might be coordinately controlled in cholinergic neurons and regulated by nerve growth factor (NGF). Injections of NGF into the brains of neonatal hamsters increased both PrP and β -PP mRNA levels. Increased PrP and β -PP mRNA levels induced by NGF were confined to regions that contain NGF-responsive cholinergic neurons and were accompanied by elevations in choline acetyltransferase. It remains to be established whether or not exogenous NGF acts to increase PrP and β -PP gene expression selectively in forebrain cholinergic neurons in the developing hamster and endogenous NGF regulates expression of these genes.

  7. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  8. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-03-03

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

  9. Increased production of low molecular weight recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Belagaje, R M; Reams, S G; Ly, S C; Prouty, W F

    1997-09-01

    A general method for obtaining high-level production of low molecular weight proteins in Escherichia coli is described. This method is based on the use of a novel Met-Xaa-protein construction which is formed by insertion of a single amino acid residue (preferably Arginine or Lysine) between the N-terminal methionine and the protein of interest. The utility of this method is illustrated by examples for achieving high-level production of human insulin-like growth factor-1, human proinsulin, and their analogs. Furthermore, highly produced insulin-like growth factor-1 derivatives and human proinsulin analogs are converted to their natural sequences by removal of dipeptides with cathepsin C.

  10. Dietary supplementation with aromatic amino acids increases protein synthesis in children with severe acute malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jean W; Badaloo, Asha; Wilson, Lorraine; Taylor-Bryan, Carolyn; Chambers, Bentley; Reid, Marvin; Forrester, Terrence; Jahoor, Farook

    2014-05-01

    Although 2 earlier studies reported that aromatic amino acid (AAA) supplementation of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) improved whole-body protein anabolism during the early postadmission (maintenance) phase of rehabilitation, it is not known whether this positive effect was maintained during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment. This study aimed to determine whether supplementation with an AAA cocktail (330 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)) vs. isonitrogenous Ala would improve measures of protein kinetics in 22 children, aged 4-31 mo, during the catch-up growth and recovery phases of treatment for SAM. Protein kinetics were assessed by measuring leucine, phenylalanine, and urea kinetics with the use of standard stable isotope tracer methods in the fed state. Supplementation started at the end of the maintenance period when the children were clinically/metabolically stable and continued up to full nutritional recovery. Three experiments were performed: at the end of maintenance (at ∼13 d postadmission), at mid-catch-up growth (at ∼23 d post- admission when the children had replenished 50% of their weight deficit), and at recovery (at ∼48 d postadmission when they had achieved at least 90% weight for length). Children in the AAA group had significantly faster protein synthesis compared with those in the Ala group at mid-catch-up growth (101 ± 10 vs. 72 ± 7 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and better protein balance at mid-catch-up growth (49 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 2 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05) and at recovery (37 ± 8 vs. 11 ± 3 μmol phenylalanine · kg(-1) · h(-1); P < 0.05). We conclude that dietary supplementation with AAA accelerates net protein synthesis in children during nutritional rehabilitation for SAM.

  11. Conditioned medium from irradiated bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells stimulates increased protein synthesis by irradiated bovine lung fibroblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Flavin, M.P.; Parton, L.A.; Bowman, C.M. )

    1990-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis, a potentially fatal consequence of radiation exposure, occurs by unknown mechanisms. The hypothesis that endothelial cells, injured by radiation, could alter the biochemical function of lung fibroblasts, was tested by exposing cultures of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells to 0 or 5 Gy radiation and then incubating them in fresh medium for 48 h. This endothelial cell conditioned medium (ECCM) was then applied to irradiated or nonirradiated cultures of bovine lung fibroblasts. Forty-eight hours later the fibroblasts were analyzed for their ability to synthesize DNA and protein. The ECCM from injured cells stimulated fibroblast protein synthesis twofold to threefold in irradiated fibroblasts without increasing DNA synthesis. It also stimulated a significant but less marked increase in protein synthesis in nonirradiated fibroblasts. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed this increased synthesis to be expressed in less than 10% of the 1100 separable fibroblast proteins. This study shows that endothelial cells injured by radiation produce factors that stimulate injured fibroblasts to markedly increase their synthesis of certain intracellular proteins, while not stimulating fibroblast replication.

  12. Copper uptake is required for pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidation and protein level increase of p53 in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Saori; Ortiz, Fausto; Zhu Sun, Xiu; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Mason, Andrew; Momand, Jamil

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumour-suppressor protein is a transcription factor that activates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. The p53 protein is vulnerable to oxidation at cysteine thiol groups. The metal-chelating dithiocarbamates, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate, ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate and H(2)O(2) were tested for their oxidative effects on p53 in cultured human breast cancer cells. Only PDTC oxidized p53, although all oxidants tested increased the p53 level. Inductively coupled plasma MS analysis indicated that the addition of 60 microM PDTC increased the cellular copper concentration by 4-fold, which was the highest level of copper accumulated amongst all the oxidants tested. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid, a membrane-impermeable Cu(I) chelator inhibited the PDTC-mediated copper accumulation. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid as well as the hydroxyl radical scavenger d-mannitol inhibited the PDTC-dependent increase in p53 protein and oxidation. Our results show that a low level of copper accumulation in the range of 25-40 microg/g of cellular protein increases the steady-state levels of p53. At copper accumulation levels higher than 60 microg/g of cellular protein, p53 is oxidized. These results suggest that p53 is vulnerable to free radical-mediated oxidation at cysteine residues. PMID:11964141

  13. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  14. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  15. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  16. Anaerobiosis increases resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to O2-independent antimicrobial proteins from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, S G; Shafer, W M; Spitznagel, J K

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA19 to the O2-independent antimicrobial systems of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Acid extracts of polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules (crude granule extracts) and a purified granule protein (57 kilodaltons) were, at low concentrations, bactericidal for gonococci under aerobic conditions that permitted growth. However, they were less effective under anaerobic conditions that imposed bacteriostasis. We found that adding sodium nitrite to reduced growth media permitted the growth of strain FA19 in an anaerobic environment. Under these conditions with nitrite, anaerobic cultures of strain FA19 were no more resistant to the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton protein than aerobic cultures. In contrast, Salmonella typhimurium SL-1004, a facultative anaerobe, was readily killed by both the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton antimicrobial protein regardless of the presence or absence of free molecular oxygen. This is the first demonstration that an isolated antimicrobial protein from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules is active against bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Our results also indicated that the efficacy of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte O2-independent killing of N. gonorrhoeae may, in part, be inhibited by bacteriostatic conditions imposed by hypoxia. Images PMID:3917976

  17. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  18. INCREASED LIVER PATHOLOGY IN HEPATITIS C VIRUS TRANSGENIC MICE EXPRESSING THE HEPATITIS B VIRUS X PROTEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic mice expressing the full-length HCV coding sequence were crossed with mice that express the HBV X gene-encoded regulatory protein HBx (ATX mice) to test the hypothesis that HBx expression accelerates HCV-induced liver pathogenesis. At 16 months (mo) of age, hepatocellular carcinoma was id...

  19. Supplementation with major royal jelly proteins increases lifespan, feeding and fecundity in Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major royal-jelly proteins (MRJPs) are the main constituents responsible for the specific physiological role of royal jelly (RJ) in honeybees. Male and female Drosophila flies were fed diets containing either no MRJPs (A) or casein (B) at 1.25% (w/w) of diet or MRJPs at 1.25% (C), 2.50% (D), or ...

  20. Peptides identified in soybean protein increase plasma cholesterol in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vitro micellar cholesterol displacement assay has been used to identify peptides that may potentially reduce cholesterol in vivo. We tested two of these peptides, LPYPR and WGAPSI, derived from soybean protein (SP) that have been reported to displace cholesterol from micelles by feeding them...

  1. Deletion of PTEN Produces Deficits in Conditioned Fear and Increases Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lugo, Joaquin N.; Smith, Gregory D.; Morrison, Jessica B.; White, Jessika

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog detected on chromosome 10 (PTEN) gene product modulates activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. The PI3K pathway has been found to be involved in the regulation of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which is important for long-term depression and in the formation of new…

  2. K depletion increases protein tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylation of ROMK

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dao-Hong; Sterling, Hyacinth; Lerea, Kenneth M.; Welling, Paul; Jin, Lianhong; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    We purified Histagged ROMK1 and carried out in vitro phosphorylation assays with 32P-radiolabeled ATP to determine whether ROMK1 protein is a substrate for PTK. Addition of active c-Src and [32P]ATP to the purified ROMK1 protein resulted in the phosphorylation of the ROMK1 protein. However, c-Src did not phosphorylate R1Y337A in which tyrosine residue 337 was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, phosphopeptide mapping identified two phosphopeptides from the trypsin-digested ROMK1 protein. In contrast, no phosphorylated peptide has been found in the trypsin-digested R1Y337A protein. This suggested that two phosphorylated peptides might contain the same tyrosine residue. Also, addition of c-Src and [32P]ATP phosphorylated the synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid sequence 333–362 of the COOH terminus of ROMK1. We then examined the effect of dietary K intake on the tyrosine-phosphorylated ROMK level. Although the ROMK channels pulled down by immunoprecipitation with ROMK antibody were the same from rats on a K-deficient diet or on a high-K diet, more ROMK channels were phosphorylated by PTK in rats on a K-deficient diet than those on a high-K diet. We conclude that ROMK1 can be phosphorylated by PTK and that tyrosine residue 337 is the key site for the phosphorylation. Also, the tyrosine phosphorylation of ROMK is modulated by dietary K intake. This strongly suggests that PTK is an important member of the aldosterone-independent signal transduction pathway for regulating renal K secretion. PMID:12217858

  3. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD.

  4. Increased Milk Protein Concentration in a Rehydration Drink Enhances Fluid Retention Caused by Water Reabsorption in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Saito, Yuri; Ashida, Kinya; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2015-01-01

    A fluid-retention effect is required for beverages that are designed to prevent dehydration. That is, fluid absorbed from the intestines should not be excreted quickly; long-term retention is desirable. Here, we focused on the effect of milk protein on fluid retention, and propose a new effective oral rehydration method that can be used daily for preventing dehydration. We first evaluated the effects of different concentrations of milk protein on fluid retention by measuring the urinary volumes of rats fed fluid containing milk protein at concentrations of 1, 5, and 10%. We next compared the fluid-retention effect of milk protein-enriched drink (MPD) with those of distilled water (DW) and a sports drink (SD) by the same method. Third, to investigate the mechanism of fluid retention, we measured plasma insulin changes in rats after ingesting these three drinks. We found that the addition of milk protein at 5 or 10% reduced urinary volume in a dose-dependent manner. Ingestion of the MPD containing 4.6% milk protein resulted in lower urinary volumes than DW and SD. MPD also showed a higher water reabsorption rate in the kidneys and higher concentrations of plasma insulin than DW and SD. These results suggest that increasing milk protein concentration in a beverage enhances fluid retention, which may allow the possibility to develop rehydration beverages that are more effective than SDs. In addition, insulin-modifying renal water reabsorption may contribute to the fluid-retention effect of MPD. PMID:26235579

  5. Cocaine treatment increases expression of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein in discrete brain regions.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Niki; Chong, Victor Z; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K; Hayes, Robert J; Gardner, Eliot L

    2003-01-01

    Previous reports from our laboratory have described brain-specific catecholamine-regulated proteins, which bind dopamine and related catecholamines. Evidence from the molecular cloning of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein (CRP40) revealed that CRP40 is dopamine-inducible and has properties similar to those of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family. The present study investigates the effects of acute and chronic cocaine treatment on CRP40 expression in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and medulla. Acute treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, whereas chronic treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens only. Neither of these treatments affected CRP40 levels in the prefrontal cortex or medulla. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping agent alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone did not attenuate cocaine-induced expression of CRP40, suggesting that the observed increases in CRP40 levels were not caused by free radicals. On the other hand, pretreatment with anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked the cocaine-induced expression of CRP40. Thus, protein synthesis may be involved in the observed CRP40 level increases. Furthermore, neither acute nor chronic cocaine treatment affected levels of inducible or constitutively expressed HSP70, which indicates a specificity of cocaine's effects on CRP40. Since cocaine has been shown to increase extracellular dopamine levels, these findings suggest that increased expression of CRP40 is associated with high extracellular levels of dopamine (or its metabolites). Elevated levels of CRP40 could play a protective role for dopamine neurons in response to increased oxidative stress that has been shown to be induced by cocaine and that can lead to apoptosis and neurodegeneration. PMID:12422371

  6. A very early induction of major vault protein accompanied by increased drug resistance in U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Stephen, Andrew G; Cao, Jin; Tanzer, Lee R; Slapak, Christopher A; Harrison, Steadman D; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Dantzig, Anne H; Starling, James J; Rome, Leonard H; Moore, Robert E

    2002-01-10

    U-937 human leukemia cells were selected for resistance to doxorubicin in the presence or absence of a specific drug modulator that inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), encoded by the multidrug-resistance gene (MDR1). Parental cells expressed low basal levels of the multidrug-resistance-associated gene (MRP1) and major vault protein (MVP) mRNAs and no MDR1 mRNA. Two doxorubicin-resistant cell lines were selected. Both drug-resistant cell lines upregulated the MVP mRNA level 1.5-fold within 1 cell passage. The MVP mRNA level continued to increase over time as the doxorubicin selection pressure was increased. MVP protein levels generally paralleled the mRNA levels. The 2 high molecular weight vault protein mRNAs were always expressed at constitutive levels. Fully formed vault particles consisting of the MVP, the 2 high molecular weight proteins and the vault RNA assembled and accumulated to increased levels in drug-selected cells. MVP induction is therefore the rate-limiting step for vault particle formation in U-937 cells. By passage 25 and thereafter, the selected cells were resistant to doxorubicin, etoposide, mitoxantrone and 5-fluorouracil by a pathway that was independent of MDR1, MRP1, MRP2 and breast cancer resistance protein. In summary, U-937 doxorubicin-selected cells are programmed to rapidly upregulate MVP mRNA levels, to accumulate vault particles and to become multidrug resistant.

  7. Viscera and Muscle Protein Synthesis in Neonatal Pigs Is Increased More by Intermittent Bolus than Continuous Feeding

    PubMed Central

    El-Kadi, Samer W.; Gazzaneo, María C.; Suryawan, Agus; Orellana, Renán A.; Torrazza, Roberto Murgas; Srivastava, Neeraj; Kimball, Scot R.; Nguyen, Hanh V.; Fiorotto, Marta L.; Davis, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Continuous and intermittent bolus orogastric feedings are strategies used in infants unable to tolerate normal feeds. METHODS To determine the effects of feeding modality on protein synthesis in different tissues, neonatal pigs received a balanced formula by orogastric tube either as an intermittent bolus feed every 4 h or as a continuous infusion, or were fasted overnight. RESULTS Compared to fasting, protein synthesis in gastrocnemius, masseter, and soleus muscles, left ventricle, liver, pancreas, jejunum, and kidney increased in bolus and continuously fed pigs, but the greatest increase occurred after a bolus meal. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC2), the proline-rich AKT substrate of 40 kDa (PRAS40), eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E binding protein (4EBP1) and rp S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation in all tissues and the proportion of ribosomal protein S4 in liver polysomes were enhanced 90 minutes following the bolus meal, but not immediately before the meal or during continuous feeding. Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and eIF2α phosphorylation were unaffected by feeding. CONCLUSION These results suggest that intermittent bolus feeding increases protein synthesis in muscles of different fiber types and visceral tissues to a greater extent than continuous feeding by stimulating translation initiation. PMID:23736770

  8. Short term exercise induces PGC-1α, ameliorates inflammation and increases mitochondrial membrane proteins but fails to increase respiratory enzymes in aging diabetic hearts.

    PubMed

    Botta, Amy; Laher, Ismail; Beam, Julianne; Decoffe, Daniella; Brown, Kirsty; Halder, Swagata; Devlin, Angela; Gibson, Deanna L; Ghosh, Sanjoy

    2013-01-01

    PGC-1α, a transcriptional coactivator, controls inflammation and mitochondrial gene expression in insulin-sensitive tissues following exercise intervention. However, attributing such effects to PGC-1α is counfounded by exercise-induced fluctuations in blood glucose, insulin or bodyweight in diabetic patients. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of PGC-1α on inflammation and mitochondrial protein expressions in aging db/db mice hearts, independent of changes in glycemic parameters. In 8-month-old db/db mice hearts with diabetes lasting over 22 weeks, short-term, moderate-intensity exercise upregulated PGC-1α without altering body weight or glycemic parameters. Nonetheless, such a regimen lowered both cardiac (macrophage infiltration, iNOS and TNFα) and systemic (circulating chemokines and cytokines) inflammation. Curiously, such an anti-inflammatory effect was also linked to attenuated expression of downstream transcription factors of PGC-1α such as NRF-1 and several respiratory genes. Such mismatch between PGC-1α and its downstream targets was associated with elevated mitochondrial membrane proteins like Tom70 but a concurrent reduction in oxidative phosphorylation protein expressions in exercised db/db hearts. As mitochondrial oxidative stress was predominant in these hearts, in support of our in vivo data, increasing concentrations of H2O2 dose-dependently increased PGC-1α expression while inhibiting expression of inflammatory genes and downstream transcription factors in H9c2 cardiomyocytes in vitro. We conclude that short-term exercise-induced oxidative stress may be key in attenuating cardiac inflammatory genes and impairing PGC-1α mediated gene transcription of downstream transcription factors in type 2 diabetic hearts at an advanced age.

  9. Control of grain protein contents through SEMIDWARF1 mutant alleles: sd1 increases the grain protein content in Dee-geo-woo-gen but not in Reimei.

    PubMed

    Terao, Tomio; Hirose, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A new possibility for genetic control of the protein content of rice grains was suggested by the allele differences of the SEMIDWARF1 (SD1) mutation. Two quantitative trait loci-qPROT1 and qPROT12-were found on chromosomes 1 and 12, respectively, using backcrossed inbred lines of Sasanishiki/Habataki//Sasanishiki///Sasanishiki. One of them, qPROT1, increased almost all grain proteins instead of only certain proteins in the recessive Habataki allele. Fine mapping of qPROT1 revealed that two gene candidates-Os01g0883800 and Os01g0883900-were included in this region. Os01g0883800 encoded Gibberellin 20 oxidase 2 as well as SD1, the dwarf gene used in the so-called 'Green Revolution'. Mutant analyses as well as sequencing analysis using the semi-dwarf mutant cultivars Dee-geo-woo-gen and Calrose 76 revealed that the sd1 mutant showed significantly higher grain protein contents than their corresponding wild-type cultivars, strongly suggesting that the high protein contents were caused by sd1 mutation. However, the sd1 mutant Reimei did not have high grain protein contents. It is possible to control the grain protein content and column length separately by selecting for sd1 alleles. From this finding, the genetic control of grain protein content, as well as the column length of rice cultivars, might be possible. This ability might be useful to improve rice nutrition, particularly in areas where the introduction of semi-dwarf cultivars is not advanced.

  10. AMP-activated protein kinase controls exercise training- and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD.

    PubMed

    Brandauer, Josef; Andersen, Marianne A; Kellezi, Holti; Risis, Steve; Frøsig, Christian; Vienberg, Sara G; Treebak, Jonas T

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 3 may mediate exercise training-induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and improvements in reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling. We determined the requirement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle abundance of SIRT3 and other mitochondrial proteins. Exercise training for 6.5 weeks increased SIRT3 (p < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD; p < 0.05) protein abundance in quadriceps muscle of wild-type (WT; n = 13-15), but not AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD; n = 12-13) mice. We also observed a strong trend for increased MnSOD abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle of healthy humans (p = 0.051; n = 6). To further elucidate a role for AMPK in mediating these effects, we treated WT (n = 7-8) and AMPK α2 KD (n = 7-9) mice with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR). Four weeks of daily AICAR injections (500 mg/kg) resulted in AMPK-dependent increases in SIRT3 (p < 0.05) and MnSOD (p < 0.01) in WT, but not AMPK α2 KD mice. We also tested the effect of repeated AICAR treatment on mitochondrial protein levels in mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α KO; n = 9-10). Skeletal muscle SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was reduced in sedentary PGC-1α KO mice (p < 0.01) and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was only observed in WT mice (p < 0.05). Finally, the acetylation status of SIRT3 target lysine residues on MnSOD (K122) or oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP; K139) was not altered in either mouse or human skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise. We propose an important role for AMPK in regulating mitochondrial function and ROS handling in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training. PMID:25852572

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase controls exercise training- and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD

    PubMed Central

    Brandauer, Josef; Andersen, Marianne A.; Kellezi, Holti; Risis, Steve; Frøsig, Christian; Vienberg, Sara G.; Treebak, Jonas T.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 3 may mediate exercise training-induced increases in mitochondrial biogenesis and improvements in reactive oxygen species (ROS) handling. We determined the requirement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) for exercise training-induced increases in skeletal muscle abundance of SIRT3 and other mitochondrial proteins. Exercise training for 6.5 weeks increased SIRT3 (p < 0.01) and superoxide dismutase 2 (MnSOD; p < 0.05) protein abundance in quadriceps muscle of wild-type (WT; n = 13–15), but not AMPK α2 kinase dead (KD; n = 12–13) mice. We also observed a strong trend for increased MnSOD abundance in exercise-trained skeletal muscle of healthy humans (p = 0.051; n = 6). To further elucidate a role for AMPK in mediating these effects, we treated WT (n = 7–8) and AMPK α2 KD (n = 7–9) mice with 5-amino-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR). Four weeks of daily AICAR injections (500 mg/kg) resulted in AMPK-dependent increases in SIRT3 (p < 0.05) and MnSOD (p < 0.01) in WT, but not AMPK α2 KD mice. We also tested the effect of repeated AICAR treatment on mitochondrial protein levels in mice lacking the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α KO; n = 9–10). Skeletal muscle SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was reduced in sedentary PGC-1α KO mice (p < 0.01) and AICAR-induced increases in SIRT3 and MnSOD protein abundance was only observed in WT mice (p < 0.05). Finally, the acetylation status of SIRT3 target lysine residues on MnSOD (K122) or oligomycin-sensitivity conferring protein (OSCP; K139) was not altered in either mouse or human skeletal muscle in response to acute exercise. We propose an important role for AMPK in regulating mitochondrial function and ROS handling in skeletal muscle in response to exercise training. PMID:25852572

  12. Deficiency of circadian protein CLOCK reduces lifespan and increases age-related cataract development in mice.

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, Yulia V; Samsa, William E; Kondratov, Roman V

    2010-12-01

    Circadian clock is implicated in the regulation of aging. The transcription factor CLOCK, a core component of the circadian system, operates in complex with another circadian clock protein BMAL1. Recently it was demonstrated that BMAL1 deficiency results in premature aging in mice. Here we investigate the aging of mice deficient for CLOCK protein. Deficiency of the CLOCK protein significantly affects longevity: the average lifespan of Clock-/- mice is reduced by 15% compared with wild type mice, while maximum lifespan is reduced by more than 20%. CLOCK deficiency also results in the development of two age-specific pathologies in these mice, cataracts and dermatitis, at a much higher rate than in wild type mice. In contrast to BMAL1 deficient animals, Clock-/- mice do not develop a premature aging phenotype and do not develop the multiple age-associated pathologies characteristic of BMAL1 deficiency. Thus, although CLOCK and BMAL1 form a transcriptional complex, the physiological result of their deficiency is different. Our results suggest that CLOCK plays an important role in aging, specifically; CLOCK activity is critical for the regulation of normal physiology and aging of the lens and skin.

  13. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since higher glucose availability results in higher glycosylation rates. In this study we intended to detect the early changes in blood protein glycosylation elicited by an obesogenic diet. Experimental Design. Since albumin is in constant direct contact with plasma glucose, as are the red blood cell (RBC) membranes, we analyzed their degree or glycosylation in female and male rats, either fed a standard diet or subjected to a hyper-energetic self-selected cafeteria diet for 30 days. This model produces a small increase in basal glycaemia and a significant increase in body fat, leaving the animals in the initial stages of development of metabolic syndrome. We also measured the degree of glycosylation of hemoglobin, and the concentration of glucose in contact with this protein, that within the RBC. Glycosylation was measured by colorimetric estimation of the hydroxymethylfurfural liberated from glycosyl residues by incubation with oxalate. Results. Plasma glucose was higher in cafeteria diet and in male rats, both independent effects. However, there were no significant differences induced by sex or diet in either hemoglobin or plasma proteins. Purified RBC membranes showed a marked effect of diet: higher glycosylation in cafeteria rats, which was more marked in females (not in controls). In any case, the number of glycosyl residues per molecule were higher in hemoglobin than in plasma proteins (after correction for molecular weight). The detected levels of glucose in RBC were lower

  14. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since higher glucose availability results in higher glycosylation rates. In this study we intended to detect the early changes in blood protein glycosylation elicited by an obesogenic diet. Experimental Design. Since albumin is in constant direct contact with plasma glucose, as are the red blood cell (RBC) membranes, we analyzed their degree or glycosylation in female and male rats, either fed a standard diet or subjected to a hyper-energetic self-selected cafeteria diet for 30 days. This model produces a small increase in basal glycaemia and a significant increase in body fat, leaving the animals in the initial stages of development of metabolic syndrome. We also measured the degree of glycosylation of hemoglobin, and the concentration of glucose in contact with this protein, that within the RBC. Glycosylation was measured by colorimetric estimation of the hydroxymethylfurfural liberated from glycosyl residues by incubation with oxalate. Results. Plasma glucose was higher in cafeteria diet and in male rats, both independent effects. However, there were no significant differences induced by sex or diet in either hemoglobin or plasma proteins. Purified RBC membranes showed a marked effect of diet: higher glycosylation in cafeteria rats, which was more marked in females (not in controls). In any case, the number of glycosyl residues per molecule were higher in hemoglobin than in plasma proteins (after correction for molecular weight). The detected levels of glucose in RBC were lower

  15. Neutrophil anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody proteins: bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin, and elastase as serological markers of inflammatory bowel and other diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakidi, Kallirroi S.; Tsianos, Vasileios E.; Karvounis, Evaggelos; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Tsianos, Epameinondas V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract comprising Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Although the pathogenesis of the disease is not clearly defined yet, environmental, genetic and other factors contribute to the onset of the disease. Apart from the clinical and histopathological findings, several serological biomarkers are also employed to detect IBD. One of the most thoroughly studied biomarker is anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA). We herein provide an overview of the current knowledge on the use of ANCA and certain ANCA proteins, such as bactericidal increasing protein, lactoferrin, cathepsin G and elastase, as serological markers for IBD and other diseases. PMID:27366026

  16. Aerobic fitness level does not modulate changes in whole-body protein turnover produced by unaccustomed increases in energy expenditure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a sudden increase in energy expenditure (EE) on whole-body protein turnover vary between studies, and the possibility that fitness level modulates those responses has not been fully investigated. We hypothesized that aerobically trained individuals may exhibit adaptations that protec...

  17. Cardiac remodeling associated with protein increase and lipid accumulation in early-stage chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Mieko; Bannai, Kenji; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Yamato, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cardiac remodeling including myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy is frequently observed in CKD patients. In this study, we investigate the mechanism involved in cardiac hypertrophy associated with CKD using a rat model, by morphological and chemical component changes of the hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic hearts. Sprague-Dawley rats were 4/5 nephrectomized (Nx) at 11 weeks of age and assigned to no treatment and treatment with AST-120, which was reported to affect the cardiac damage, at 18 weeks of age. At 26 weeks of age, the rats were euthanized under anesthesia, and biochemical tests as well as analysis of cardiac condition were performed by histological and spectrophotometric methods. Cardiac hypertrophy and CKD were observed in 4/5 Nx rats even though vascular calcification and myocardial fibrosis were not detected. The increasing myocardial protein was confirmed in hypertrophic hearts by infrared spectroscopy. The absorption of amide I and other protein bands in hypertrophic hearts increased at the same position as in normal cardiac absorption. Infrared spectra also showed that lipid accumulation was also detected in hypertrophic heart. Conversely, the absorptions of protein were obviously reduced in the myocardium of non-hypertrophic heart with CKD compared to that of hypertrophic heart. The lipid associated absorption was also decreased in non-hypertrophic heart. Our results suggest that cardiac remodeling associated with relatively early-stage CKD may be suppressed by reducing increased myocardial protein and ameliorating cardiac lipid load.

  18. Increase in cell viability by polyamines through stimulation of the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein and ω protein of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Terui, Yusuke; Akiyama, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akihiko; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Ishihama, Akira; Igarashi, Kazuei; Kashiwagi, Keiko

    2012-02-01

    It is known that polyamines increase cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of several kinds of proteins encoded by the so-called "polyamine modulon". We recently reported that polyamines also increase cell viability at the stationary phase of cell growth through stimulation of the synthesis of ribosome modulation factor, a component of the polyamine modulon. Accordingly, we looked for other proteins involved in cell viability whose synthesis is stimulated by polyamines. It was found that the synthesis of ppGpp regulatory protein (SpoT) and ω protein of RNA polymerase (RpoZ) was stimulated by polyamines at the level of translation. Stimulation of the synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ by polyamines was due to an inefficient initiation codon UUG in spoT mRNA and an unusual location of a Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in rpoZ mRNA. Accordingly, the spoT and rpoZ genes are components of the polyamine modulon involved in cell viability. Reduced cell viability caused by polyamine deficiency was prevented by modified spoT and rpoZ genes whose synthesis was not influenced by polyamines. Under these conditions, the level of ppGpp increased in parallel with increase of SpoT protein. The results indicate that polyamine stimulation of synthesis of SpoT and RpoZ plays important roles for cell viability through stimulation of ppGpp synthesis by SpoT and modulation of RNA synthesis by ppGpp-RpoZ complex.

  19. Low Recent Protein Intake Predicts Cancer-Related Fatigue and Increased Mortality in Patients with Advanced Tumor Disease Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stobäus, Nicole; Müller, Manfred J; Küpferling, Susanne; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Norman, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients, in general, suffer from anorexia hence diminished nutritional intake. In a prospective observational study, we investigated the impact of recent energy and protein intake on cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Recent protein and energy intake was assessed by 24-h recall in 285 patients. Cancer-related fatigue was determined by Brief Fatigue Inventory, and fat free mass index (FFMI) was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Symptoms with the validated German version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (30 questions) and 6-month mortality was documented. Risk factors of cancer-related fatigue and predictors of mortality were investigated with logistic regression analysis and stepwise Cox regression analysis, respectively. Low protein intake (<1 g/kg body weight) was found in 66% of patients, who were characterized by higher age, weight, and body mass index. Recent protein intake emerged as the strongest contributor to cancer-related fatigue followed by nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and age. Reduced protein intake, male sex, number of comorbidities, and FFMI were identified as significant predictors for increased 6-month mortality. In conclusion, a low recent protein intake assessed by 24-h recall is associated with a more than twofold higher risk of cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality. Every effort should be taken to assess and guarantee proper nutritional intake in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  20. Increased chitin biosynthesis contributes to the resistance of Penicillium polonicum against the antifungal protein PgAFP.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Josué; Owens, Rebecca A; Doyle, Sean; Asensio, Miguel A; Núñez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Antifungal proteins from molds have been proposed as a valuable tool against unwanted molds, but the resistance of some fungi limits their use. Resistance to antimicrobial peptides has been suggested to be due to lack of interaction with the mold or to a successful response. The antifungal protein PgAFP produced by Penicillium chrysogenum inhibits the growth of various ascomycetes, but not Penicillium polonicum. To study the basis for resistance to this antifungal protein, localization of PgAFP and metabolic, structural, and morphological changes were investigated in P. polonicum. PgAFP bound the outer layer of P. polonicum but not regenerated chitin, suggesting an interaction with specific molecules. Comparative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and comparative quantitative proteomics revealed changes in the relative abundance of several proteins from ribosome, spliceosome, metabolic, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite pathways. The proteome changes and an altered permeability reveal an active reaction of P. polonicum to PgAFP. The successful response of the resistant mold seems to be based on the higher abundance of protein Rho GTPase Rho1 that would lead to the increased chitin deposition via cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. Thus, combined treatment with chitinases could provide a complementary means to combat resistance to antifungal proteins.

  1. Low Recent Protein Intake Predicts Cancer-Related Fatigue and Increased Mortality in Patients with Advanced Tumor Disease Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stobäus, Nicole; Müller, Manfred J; Küpferling, Susanne; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Norman, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients, in general, suffer from anorexia hence diminished nutritional intake. In a prospective observational study, we investigated the impact of recent energy and protein intake on cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality in patients undergoing chemotherapy. Recent protein and energy intake was assessed by 24-h recall in 285 patients. Cancer-related fatigue was determined by Brief Fatigue Inventory, and fat free mass index (FFMI) was assessed with bioelectrical impedance analysis. Symptoms with the validated German version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (30 questions) and 6-month mortality was documented. Risk factors of cancer-related fatigue and predictors of mortality were investigated with logistic regression analysis and stepwise Cox regression analysis, respectively. Low protein intake (<1 g/kg body weight) was found in 66% of patients, who were characterized by higher age, weight, and body mass index. Recent protein intake emerged as the strongest contributor to cancer-related fatigue followed by nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and age. Reduced protein intake, male sex, number of comorbidities, and FFMI were identified as significant predictors for increased 6-month mortality. In conclusion, a low recent protein intake assessed by 24-h recall is associated with a more than twofold higher risk of cancer-related fatigue and 6-month mortality. Every effort should be taken to assess and guarantee proper nutritional intake in patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:25996582

  2. UU/UA dinucleotide frequency reduction in coding regions results in increased mRNA stability and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Al-Saif, Maher; Khabar, Khalid S A

    2012-05-01

    UU and UA dinucleotides are rare in mammalian genes and may offer natural selection against endoribonuclease-mediated mRNA decay. This study hypothesized that reducing UU and UA (UW) dinucleotides in the mRNA-coding sequence, including the codons and the dicodon boundaries, may promote resistance to mRNA decay, thereby increasing protein production. Indeed, protein expression from UW-reduced coding regions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), luciferase, interferon-α, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was higher when compared to the wild-type protein expression. The steady-state level of UW-reduced EGFP mRNA was higher and the mRNA half-life was also longer. Ectopic expression of the endoribonuclease, RNase L, did not reduce the wild type or UW-reduced mRNA. A mutant form of the mRNA decay-promoting protein, tristetraprolin (TTP/ZFP36), which has a point mutation in the zinc-finger domain (C124R), was used. The wild-type EGFP mRNA but not the UW-reduced mRNA responded to the dominant negative action of the C124R ZFP36/TTP mutant. The results indicate the efficacy of the described rational approach to formulate a general scheme for boosting recombinant protein production in mammalian cells.

  3. Post-harvest light treatment increases expression levels of recombinant proteins in transformed plastids of potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Larraya, Luis M; Fernández-San Millán, Alicia; Ancín, María; Farran, Inmaculada; Veramendi, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genetic engineering represents an attractive system for the production of foreign proteins in plants. Although high expression levels can be achieved in leaf chloroplasts, the results for non-photosynthetic plastids are generally discouraging. Here, we report the expression of two thioredoxin genes (trx f and trx m) from the potato plastid genome to study transgene expression in amyloplasts. As expected, the highest transgene expression was detected in the leaf (up to 4.2% of TSP). The Trx protein content in the tuber was approximately two to three orders of magnitude lower than in the leaf. However, we demonstrate that a simple post-harvest light treatment of microtubers developed in vitro or soil-grown tubers induces up to 55 times higher accumulation of the recombinant protein in just seven to ten days. After the applied treatment, the Trx f levels in microtubers and soil-grown tubers increased to 0.14% and 0.11% of TSP, respectively. Moreover, tubers stored for eight months maintained the capacity of increasing the foreign protein levels after the light treatment. Post-harvest cold induction (up to five times) at 4°C was also detected in microtubers. We conclude that plastid transformation and post-harvest light treatment could be an interesting approach for the production of foreign proteins in potato.

  4. Post-harvest light treatment increases expression levels of recombinant proteins in transformed plastids of potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Larraya, Luis M; Fernández-San Millán, Alicia; Ancín, María; Farran, Inmaculada; Veramendi, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Plastid genetic engineering represents an attractive system for the production of foreign proteins in plants. Although high expression levels can be achieved in leaf chloroplasts, the results for non-photosynthetic plastids are generally discouraging. Here, we report the expression of two thioredoxin genes (trx f and trx m) from the potato plastid genome to study transgene expression in amyloplasts. As expected, the highest transgene expression was detected in the leaf (up to 4.2% of TSP). The Trx protein content in the tuber was approximately two to three orders of magnitude lower than in the leaf. However, we demonstrate that a simple post-harvest light treatment of microtubers developed in vitro or soil-grown tubers induces up to 55 times higher accumulation of the recombinant protein in just seven to ten days. After the applied treatment, the Trx f levels in microtubers and soil-grown tubers increased to 0.14% and 0.11% of TSP, respectively. Moreover, tubers stored for eight months maintained the capacity of increasing the foreign protein levels after the light treatment. Post-harvest cold induction (up to five times) at 4°C was also detected in microtubers. We conclude that plastid transformation and post-harvest light treatment could be an interesting approach for the production of foreign proteins in potato. PMID:26121393

  5. [Effect of increasing protein ingestion on the nitrogen balance of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, A; Verbeek, M J; Schreurs, V V; Akkermans, L M; Vos, A

    1993-01-01

    The amount of protein recommended to minimise N loss in critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) varies in the literature. Therefore, we studied the effect of increased protein intake on the N balance, administering TPN with either 1.2 g protein/kg/day (low N diet) or 1.8 g protein/kg/day (high N diet). Fifteen mechanically ventilated critically ill patients were studied in a surgical intensive care unit. After at least two days of standard TPN, patients were randomly assigned to either the low or the high N diet. Ten patients were studied on the low N diet and 11 on the high N diet; 6 patients were studied on both diets. Nonprotein energy was supplied according to estimated energy requirements. For five consecutive days, the N balance was measured daily. Total urinary nitrogen (TUN) was analysed using the Kjeldahl method. There was no difference in N balance between the groups. On the low N diet, N balance was -0.113 +/- 0.088 and on the high N diet -0.113 +/- 0.109 g N/kg/day. In patients studied twice, N balance was -0.087 +/- 0.054 and -0.050 +/- 0.060 g N/kd/day respectively. Results of a previous pilot study showed that in 20 similar patients the N balance became 80% less negative (from -5.7 +/- 5.1 to -1.1 +/- 8.2 g N/day) when protein intake was increased from 0.9 to 1.5 g/kg/day. Since these results are consistent with other studies, we conclude that the optimal range of protein supply in this type of critically ill patients is approximately 1.1-1.5 g protein/kg/day.

  6. A 32-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein shows a protease-dependent increase in dead boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Tomohito; Shidara, Osamu; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Boar sperm TyrP32 is a 32-kDa tyrosine-phosphorylated protein that increases during the capacitation and acrosome reaction and during cryocapacitation. However, it is still unclear whether the increase in TyrP32 is an event that is limited to the process of sperm fertilization, including cryocapacitation. The aims of the present study were to demonstrate that TyrP32 is increased in dead spermatozoa after freeze-thawing without a cryoprotectant and to find the causal factors for this increase. Washed spermatozoa were resuspended in a salt solution and then frozen. The frozen samples were rapidly thawed in a warm water bath and then used for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)/Western blotting to detect TyrP32, SDS-PAGE/silver staining of sperm proteins and staining of acrosomal contents with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PNA). In the samples before freezing, TyrP32 was barely detectable, and the distribution of the acrosomal contents was normal in most spermatozoa. One cycle of freeze-thawing induced an increase in TyrP32, a decrease in major sperm proteins and disorder in the acrosomal contents. However, the addition of a protease inhibitor (APMSF, 1 mM) suppressed the increase in TyrP32 and the decrease in the major sperm proteins, although it did not have any influence on the disorder in the acrosomal contents. Additionally, the spermatozoa did not exhibit any flagellar movement after freeze-thawing, which showed that almost all of them were dead. These results indicate that TyrP32 can show a protease-dependent increase in dead spermatozoa after freeze-thawing without a cryoprotectant even though the dead spermatozoa do not undergo cryocapacitation. PMID:18787309

  7. Obligate Insect Endosymbionts Exhibit Increased Ortholog Length Variation and Loss of Large Accessory Proteins Concurrent with Genome Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Laura J.; Sabree, Zakee L.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme genome reduction has been observed in obligate intracellular insect mutualists and is an assumed consequence of fixed, long-term host isolation. Rapid accumulation of mutations and pseudogenization of genes no longer vital for an intracellular lifestyle, followed by deletion of many genes, are factors that lead to genome reduction. Size reductions in individual genes due to small-scale deletions have also been implicated in contributing to overall genome shrinkage. Conserved protein functional domains are expected to exhibit low tolerance for mutations and therefore remain relatively unchanged throughout protein length reduction while nondomain regions, presumably under less selective pressures, would shorten. This hypothesis was tested using orthologous protein sets from the Flavobacteriaceae (phylum: Bacteroidetes) and Enterobacteriaceae (subphylum: Gammaproteobacteria) families, each of which includes some of the smallest known genomes. Upon examination of protein, functional domain, and nondomain region lengths, we found that proteins were not uniformly shrinking with genome reduction, but instead increased length variability and variability was observed in both the functional domain and nondomain regions. Additionally, as complete gene loss also contributes to overall genome shrinkage, we found that the largest proteins in the proteomes of nonhost-restricted bacteroidetial and gammaproteobacterial species often were inferred to be involved in secondary metabolic processes, extracellular sensing, or of unknown function. These proteins were absent in the proteomes of obligate insect endosymbionts. Therefore, loss of genes encoding large proteins not required for host-restricted lifestyles in obligate endosymbiont proteomes likely contributes to extreme genome reduction to a greater degree than gene shrinkage. PMID:24671745

  8. Increased expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 during active hepatic fibrogenesis: correlation with monocyte infiltration.

    PubMed Central

    Marra, F.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Milani, S.; Pastacaldi, S.; Pinzani, M.; Romanelli, R. G.; Laffi, G.; Gentilini, P.

    1998-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 is a chemoattractant and activator for circulating monocytes and T lymphocytes. We investigated MCP-1 protein and gene expression during chronic liver disease at different stages, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, respectively. In normal liver, a modest expression of MCP-1 was confined to few peri-sinusoidal cells and to bile duct epithelial cells. During chronic hepatitis, MCP-1 immunostaining and gene expression were evident in the inflammatory infiltrate of the portal tract. In tissue from patients with active cirrhosis, MCP-1 expression was clearly up-regulated and was present in the portal tract, in the epithelial cells of regenerating bile ducts, and in the active septa surrounding regenerating nodules. A combination of in situ hybridization for MCP-1 and immunohistochemistry showed that activated stellate cells and monocyte/macrophages contribute to MCP-1 expression in vivo together with bile duct epithelial cells. Comparison of serial sections of liver biopsies from patients with various degrees of necro-inflammatory activity showed that infiltration of the portal tracts with monocytes/macrophages is directly correlated with the expression of MCP-1. These data expand previous in vitro studies showing that secretion of MCP-1 may contribute to the formation and maintenance of the inflammatory infiltrate observed during chronic liver disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466568

  9. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS.

  10. Instability of buried hydration sites increases protein subdomains fluctuations in the human prion protein by the pathogenic mutation T188R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomobe, Katsufumi; Yamamoto, Eiji; Akimoto, Takuma; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    The conformational change from the cellular prion protein (PrPc) to scrapie prion protein (PrPsc) is a key process in prion diseases. The prion protein has buried water molecules which significantly contribute to the stability of the protein; however, there has been no report investigating the influence on the buried hydration sites by a pathogenic mutation not adjacent to the buried hydration sites. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of wild type (WT) PrPc and pathogenic point mutant T188R to investigate conformational changes and the buried hydration sites. In WT-PrPc, four buried hydration sites are identified by residence time and rotational relaxation analysis. However, there are no stable buried hydration sites in one of T188R simulations, which indicates that T188R sometimes makes the buried hydration sites fragile. We also find that fluctuations of subdomains S1-H1-S2 and H1-H2 increase in T188R when the buried hydration sites become unstable. Since the side chain of arginine which is replaced from threonine in T188R is larger than of threonine, the side chain cannot be embedded in the protein, which is one of the causes of the instability of subdomains. These results show correlations between the buried hydration sites and the mutation which is far from them, and provide a possible explanation for the instability by mutation.

  11. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA.

  12. Environmental neurotoxin interaction with proteins: Dose-dependent increase of free and protein-associated BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) in neonatal rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Oskar; Jiang, Liying; Ersson, Lisa; Malmström, Tim; Ilag, Leopold L.; Brittebo, Eva B.

    2015-01-01

    β-Methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is implicated in the aetiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Neonatal exposure to BMAA induces cognitive impairments and progressive neurodegenerative changes including intracellular fibril formation in the hippocampus of adult rats. It is unclear why the neonatal hippocampus is especially vulnerable and the critical cellular perturbations preceding BMAA-induced toxicity remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the level of free and protein-associated BMAA in neonatal rat brain and peripheral tissues after different exposures to BMAA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that BMAA passed the neonatal blood-brain barrier and was distributed to all studied brain areas. BMAA was also associated to proteins in the brain, especially in the hippocampus. The level in the brain was, however, considerably lower compared to the liver that is not a target organ for BMAA. In contrast to the liver there was a significantly increased level of protein-association of BMAA in the hippocampus and other brain areas following repeated administration suggesting that the degradation of BMAA-associated proteins may be lower in neonatal brain than in the liver. Additional evidence is needed in support of a role for protein misincorporation in the neonatal hippocampus for long-term effects of BMAA. PMID:26498001

  13. High dietary protein exacerbates hypertension and renal damage in Dahl SS rats by increasing infiltrating immune cells in the kidney.

    PubMed

    De Miguel, Carmen; Lund, Hayley; Mattson, David L

    2011-02-01

    The present study evaluated the influence and mechanism of action of dietary protein intake in Dahl SS hypertension and renal disease. Rats were fed isocaloric diets with low (6%), normal (18%), or high (30%) amounts of protein and 0.4% NaCl from 5 to 12 weeks of age; the NaCl content of the diets was then increased to 4.0% NaCl from 12 to 15 weeks of age. Rats fed the high-protein diet developed the highest mean arterial blood pressure and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio when fed the 4.0% NaCl diet (153 ± 7 mm Hg and 8.0 ± 2.4, respectively) compared to rats fed normal protein (132 ± 3 mm Hg, 1.2 ± 0.3) or low-protein (132 ± 6 mm Hg, 0.3 ± 0.1) diets. Significantly greater numbers of infiltrating T lymphocytes were observed in kidneys of SS rats fed the high-protein diet (18.9 ± 3 × 10⁵ cells) than in rats fed the low-protein diet (9.1 ± 3 × 10⁵ cells). Furthermore, treatment of SS rats fed the high-protein diet with the immunosuppressant agent mycophenolate mofetil (20 mg/kg per day, ip) significantly reduced the number of infiltrating T cells in the kidneys (from 18.9 ± 2.7 to 10.6 ± 2.0 × 10⁵ cells) while decreasing blood pressure (from 133 ± 3 to 113 ± 4 mm Hg) and the albumin/creatinine ratio (from 10.9 ± 2.3 to 5.4 ± 1.2). These results demonstrate that restriction of protein intake protects the Dahl SS rats from hypertension and kidney disease and indicates that infiltrating immune cells play a pathological role in Dahl SS rats fed a high-protein diet. Moreover, the results show that hypertension in Dahl SS rats is sensitive to both NaCl and protein intake.

  14. Growth-inhibiting extracellular matrix proteins also inhibit electrical activity by reducing calcium and increasing potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; De-Miguel, F F

    2009-01-23

    Inhibitionof neurite sprouting and electrical activity by extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins was studied during neurite regeneration by using anterior pagoda (AP) neurons of the leech. Adult isolated neurons were plated in culture inside ganglion capsules, which among many ECM proteins, contain a group of inhibitory peanut lectin- (PNA) binding glycoproteins. These proteins inhibit neurite production and contribute to the formation of a bipolar outgrowth pattern by AP neurons. Addition of PNA lectin to the culture medium to block the inhibitory effects of ECM glycoproteins induced an increase of neurite sprouting, the loss of the bipolar pattern, and also an increase in the amplitude and duration of action potentials evoked by intracellular current injection. PNA lectin had independent effects on neurite sprouting and electrical activity, since there was no correlation between the total neurite length and the amplitude of the action potentials. Moreover, action potentials were increased by the presence of PNA lectin even in neurons that did not grow. The changes induced by PNA lectin on the active conductances underlying the action potentials were estimated by quantitative model simulations. We predict that the increases in the amplitude and duration of the action potential induced by PNA lectin were due to an increase in a calcium conductance and a reduction in the delayed rectifier potassium conductance. Our results suggest that inhibitory ECM glycoproteins may use independent signaling pathways to inhibit neurite sprouting and electrical activity. These proteins affect the action potential by changing the proportion of inward and outward active conductances. PMID:18976697

  15. Human osteoblast-like cells respond to mechanical strain with increased bone matrix protein production independent of hormonal regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harter, L. V.; Hruska, K. A.; Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of osteosarcoma cell lines to chronic intermittent strain increases the activity of mechano-sensitive cation (SA-cat) channels. The impact of mechano-transduction on osteoblast function has not been well studied. We analyzed the expression and production of bone matrix proteins in human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells, OHS-4, in response to chronic intermittent mechanical strain. The OHS-4 cells exhibit type I collagen production, 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-inducible osteocalcin, and mineralization of the extracellular matrix. The matrix protein message level was determined from total RNA isolated from cells exposed to 1-4 days of chronic intermittent strain. Northern analysis for type I collagen indicated that strain increased collagen message after 48 h. Immunofluorescent labeling of type I collagen demonstrated that secretion was also enhanced with mechanical strain. Osteopontin message levels were increased several-fold by the application of mechanical load in the absence of vitamin D, and the two stimuli together produced an additive effect. Osteocalcin secretion was also increased with cyclic strain. Osteocalcin levels were not detectable in vitamin D-untreated control cells. However, after 4 days of induced load, significant levels of osteocalcin were observed in the medium. With vitamin D present, osteocalcin levels were 4 times higher in the medium of strained cells compared to nonstrained controls. We conclude that mechanical strain of osteoblast-like cells is sufficient to increase the transcription and secretion of matrix proteins via mechano-transduction without hormonal induction.

  16. In utero exposure to benzene increases embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels in CD-1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M.

    2008-05-01

    Benzene is a known human leukemogen, but its role as an in utero leukemogen remains controversial. Epidemiological studies have correlated parental exposure to benzene with an increased incidence of childhood leukemias. We hypothesize that in utero exposure to benzene may cause leukemogenesis by affecting the embryonic c-Myb/Pim-1 signaling pathway and that this is mediated by oxidative stress. To investigate this hypothesis, pregnant CD-1 mice were treated with either 800 mg/kg of benzene or corn oil (i.p.) on days 10 and 11 of gestation and in some cases pretreated with 25 kU/kg of PEG-catalase. Phosphorylated and total embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels were assessed using Western blotting and maternal and embryonic oxidative stress were assessed by measuring reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios. Our results show increased oxidative stress at 4 and 24 h after exposure, increased phosphorylated Pim-1 protein levels 4 h after benzene exposure, and increased Pim-1 levels at 24 and 48 h after benzene exposure. Embryonic c-Myb levels were elevated at 24 h after exposure. PEG-catalase pretreatment prevented benzene-mediated increases in embryonic c-Myb and Pim-1 protein levels, and benzene-induced oxidative stress. These results support a role for ROS in c-Myb and Pim-1 alterations after in utero benzene exposure.

  17. Age-dependent increase in the expression of antioxidant-like protein-1 in the gerbil hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-A; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant-like protein-1 (AOP-1) reduces the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the age-related change in AOP-1 expression in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged gerbils was compared using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the protein expression of AOP-1 was gradually and significantly increased in the hippocampus during the normal aging process. In addition, the age-dependent increase in AOP-1 immunoreactivity was also observed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus proper; however, in the dentate gyrus, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was not altered during the normal aging process. These results indicated that the expression of AOP-1 is significantly increased in the hippocampus proper, but not in the dentate gyrus, during the normal aging process. PMID:27511601

  18. Disruption of BCATm in mice leads to increased energy expenditure associated with the activation of a futile protein turnover cycle

    PubMed Central

    She, Pengxiang; Reid, Tanya M.; Bronson, Sarah K.; Vary, Thomas C.; Hajnal, Andras; Lynch, Christopher J; Hutson, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leucine is recognized as a nutrient signal, however the long-term in vivo consequences of leucine signaling and the role of branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism in this signaling remains unclear. To investigate these questions, the BCATm gene encoding the enzyme catalyzing the first step in peripheral BCAA metabolism was disrupted. BCATm−/− mice exhibited elevated plasma BCAAs, decreased adiposity and body weight, despite eating more food, along with increased energy expenditure, remarkable improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance, and protection from diet induced obesity. The increased energy expenditure did not seem to be due to altered locomotor activity, uncoupling proteins, sympathetic activity, and thyroid hormones but was strongly associated with food consumption and an active futile cycle of increased protein degradation and synthesis. These observations suggest that either elevated BCAAs and/or loss of BCAA catabolism in peripheral tissues play an important role in regulating insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure. PMID:17767905

  19. Neutrophil bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus adherent on biological surfaces. Surface-bound extracellular matrix proteins activate intracellular killing by oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M; Jaconi, M E; Dahlgren, C; Waldvogel, F A; Stendahl, O; Lew, D P

    1990-01-01

    The activation patterns of surface adherent neutrophils are modulated via interaction of extracellular matrix proteins with neutrophil integrins. To evaluate neutrophil bactericidal activity, Staphylococcus aureus adherent to biological surfaces were incubated with neutrophils and serum, and the survival of surface bacteria was determined. When compared to albumin-coated surfaces, the bactericidal activity of neutrophils adherent to purified human extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced (mean survival: 34.2% +/- 9.0% of albumin, P less than 0.0001) despite similar efficient ingestion of extracellular bacteria. Enhancement of killing was observed when surfaces were coated with purified constituents of extracellular matrix, i.e., fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, vitronectin, or type IV collagen. In addition to matrix proteins, the tetrapeptide RGDS (the sequence recognized by integrins) crosslinked to surface bound albumin was also active (survival: 74.5% +/- 5.5% of albumin, P less than 0.02), and fibronectin-increased killing was inhibited by soluble RGDS. Chemiluminescence measurements and experiments with CGD neutrophils revealed that both oxygen-dependent and -independent bactericidal mechanisms are involved. In conclusion, matrix proteins enhance intracellular bactericidal activity of adherent neutrophils, presumably by integrin recognition of RGDS-containing ligands. These results indicate a role for extracellular matrix proteins in the enhancement of the host defense against pyogenic infections. Images PMID:2394841

  20. Laboratory adaptation of Bactrocera tryoni (Diptera: Tephritidae) decreases mating age and increases protein consumption and number of eggs produced per milligram of protein.

    PubMed

    Meats, A; Holmes, H M; Kelly, G L

    2004-12-01

    A significant reduction in age of mating occurred during the first four generations (G1-G4) of laboratory adaptation of wild Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) and this was associated with the earlier attainment of peak egg load although no significant differences were detected in the peak egg load itself. A long term laboratory (LTL) strain had a significantly earlier mating age and higher peak egg load than flies of wild origin or those from the first four laboratory generations. The amount of protein consumed by females in the first week of adult life was significantly higher in the LTL strain than in flies of wild origin or G1-G4 but there were no significant changes (or only slight changes) with laboratory adaptation in the amounts of protein consumed up to the ages of mating and peak egg load. Laboratory adaptation resulted in no significant changes in egg size, egg dry weight, puparial fresh weight and the dry weight of newly emerged females. The large increase in fecundity with laboratory adaptation is associated with a 4- to 5-fold increase in the rate of conversion of dietary protein to eggs (i.e. eggs produced per mg of protein consumed). PMID:15541191

  1. Fas/APO-1 protein is increased in spaceflown lymphocytes (Jurkat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cubano, L. A.; Lewis, M. L.

    2000-01-01

    Human lymphocytes flown on the Space Shuttle respond poorly to mitogen stimulation and populations of the lymphoblastoid T cell line, Jurkat, manifest growth arrest, increase in apoptosis and time- and microgravity-dependent increases in the soluble form of the cell death factor, Fas/APO-1 (sFas). The potential role of apoptosis in population dynamics of space-flown lymphocytes has not been investigated previously. We flew Jurkat cells on Space Transportation System (STS)-80 and STS-95 to determine whether apoptosis and the apparent microgravity-related release of sFas are characteristic of lymphocytes in microgravity. The effects of spaceflight and ground-based tests simulating spaceflight experimental conditions, including high cell density and low serum concentration, were assessed. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed increased cell associated Fas in flown cells. Results of STS-80 and STS-95 confirmed increase in apoptosis during spaceflight and the release of sFas as a repeatable, time-dependent and microgravity-related response. Ground-based tests showed that holding cells at 1.5 million/ml in medium containing 2% serum before launch did not increase sFas. Reports of increased Fas in cells of the elderly and the increases in spaceflown cells suggest possible similarities between aging and spaceflight effects on lymphocytes.

  2. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  3. The RNA Polymerase II CTD: The Increasing Complexity of a Low-Complexity Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Collin, Pierre; Robert, François

    2016-06-19

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that plays key roles in coordinating transcription with co-transcriptional events. The heptapeptide repeats that form the CTD are dynamically phosphorylated on serine, tyrosine and threonine residues during the various steps of transcription, thereby regulating the recruitment of various proteins involved in gene expression. In this "Perspective," we review the recent literature related to the function of the CTD, to CTD kinases (Kin28, CDK7, CDK9, CDK12, ERK1/2 and DYRK1A) and to CTD phosphatases (Rtr1, RPAP2, Ssu72, Fcp1 and Gcl7). We discuss unresolved and controversial issues and try to provide constructive suggestions. This review also highlights emerging themes in the CTD field, such as crosstalk and feedback mechanisms, as well as gene-specific and tissue-specific functions of the CTD. Finally, promising therapeutic avenues for a recently developed CTD kinase inhibitor are discussed.

  4. Parallel β-sheet vibration band increases with proteins dipole moment under exposure to 1765 MHz microwaves.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Effects of exposure of 4 h to mobile phones microwaves at 1765 MHz at a power density around 940 mW/m(2) on four typical proteins (hemoglobin in H2 O solution, and myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme in D2 O solution) were studied by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and Fourier self-deconvolution analysis. Increase in intensity of parallel β-sheet component around 1635 cm(-1) was observed after exposure of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that a mechanism of unfolding occurred after exposure, whereas no appreciable change in the amide I region occurred after lysozyme exposure. In addition, a relationship between protein dipole moment and protein unfolding rate was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient r = 0.973 and 95% confidence interval.

  5. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  6. Protein-energy malnutrition contributes to increased structural chromosomal alteration frequencies in Argentinean children.

    PubMed

    Padula, Gisel; Salceda, Susana A; Seoane, Analia I

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between protein-energy malnutrition and genetic damage has been studied in human beings and laboratory animals, but results are still conflicting. The aim of the present study was to assess the induction of structural chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of children with primary protein-energy malnutrition. A case-control study was performed. Samples were obtained from 25 primary malnourished infants (mean age, 22 months; range, 1-66 months). The control group consisted of 25 eutrophic children from the same population who were matched 1:1 by age and sex. Anthropometric and clinic evaluations were performed to assess nutritional condition. Before blood collection, we interviewed each individual's parent to complete a semi-structural survey specifying age, dietary habits, viral or bacterial diseases; previous exposure to diagnostic x-rays; and use of therapeutic drugs. After 48 hours, 100 cultured lymphocytes were analyzed per patient. Statistical analysis was performed using the Epi Dat 3.0 program (P < or = .05). The chromosomal aberration frequency was nearly 7 times higher in malnourished infants than in controls (14.61% vs 2.2%, respectively). This difference was statistically significant (P < .001) and may be explained by the occurrence of achromatic lesions, breaks, and telomeric associations. DNA damage could be attributed to several factors: severe deficiency of essential nutrients (ie zinc, iron, and vitamin A) required in the synthesis of DNA maintenance factors; deterioration of repair mechanisms allowing the persistence of an unusually high number of structural chromosomal aberrations; and/or the absence of specific factors needed to protect the cell against oxidative DNA damage.

  7. Phenotypically Dormant and Immature Leukaemia Cells Display Increased Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pallis, Monica; Harvey, Tamsin; Russell, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity drives a number of key metabolic processes including growth and protein synthesis. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway promotes cellular dormancy. Since cells from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) can be phenotypically dormant (quiescent), we examined biomarkers of their mTOR pathway activity concurrently with Ki-67 and CD71 (indicators of cycling cells) by quantitative flow cytometry. Using antibodies to phosphorylated epitopes of mTOR (S2448) and its downstream targets ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6, S235/236) and 4E-BP1 (T36/45), we documented that these phosphorylations were negligible in lymphocytes, but evident in dormant as well as proliferating subsets of both mobilised normal stem cell harvest CD34+ cells and AML blasts. Although mTOR phosphorylation in AML blasts was lower than that of the normal CD34+ cells, p-4E-BP1 was 2.6-fold higher and p-rpS6 was 22-fold higher. Moreover, in contrast to 4E-BP1, rpS6 phosphorylation was higher in dormant than proliferating AML blasts, and was also higher in the immature CD34+CD38- blast subset. Data from the Cancer Genome Atlas show that rpS6 expression is associated with that of respiratory chain enzymes in AML. We conclude that phenotypic quiescence markers do not necessarily predict metabolic dormancy and that elevated rpS6 ser235/236 phosphorylation is characteristic of AML. PMID:26985829

  8. Simvastatin increases liver branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase activity in rats fed with low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Knapik-Czajka, Malgorzata

    2014-11-01

    The rate-limiting step in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) disposal is catalyzed by the mitochondrial branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDH). BCKDH activity is regulated mainly by a reversible dephosphorylation (activation)/phosphorylation (inactivation) cycle catalyzed by a specific phosphatase (BDP) and kinase (BDK). Current catalytic activity of BCKDH, described as BCKDH activity state, and thus also BCAAs catabolic rate depend directly on the portion of BCKDH occurring in its active dephosphorylated form. Liver BCKDH activity state alters in response to different nutritional factors. Feeding rats a low-protein diet decreases BCKDH activity. It has been previously shown that lipid lowering drugs, fibrates upregulate liver BCKDH activity and stimulate BCAAs catabolism, especially under the condition of dietary protein deprivation. Effect of statins on liver BCKDH activity has not been studied yet. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vivo effect of simvastatin on liver BCKDH activity, as well as E1, E2 and BDP and BDK mRNA levels in rats fed with either a standard (23% protein) or a low protein (8% protein) diet. For 14 days, simvastatin (80 mg/kg b wt/day) or the vehicle (0.3% methylcellulose) were administrated orally by gavage to the treated and control groups, respectively. The actual BCKDH and total BCKDH activities were assayed spectrophotometrically prior to and following incubation with lambda phosphatase, respectively. The mRNA levels of the selected genes were quantified by means of a semi-quantitative RT-PCR. In rats fed with the low protein diet simvastatin administration reversed physiological adaptation of liver BCKDH to protein restriction and increased liver BCKDH activity state by 39% (p<0.05). Changes in BCKDH activity did not correspond to any changes in mRNA levels for BCKDH catalytic and regulatory enzymes. On the contrary, in rats fed with standard diet liver BCKDH activity state did not alter substantially

  9. Elevated intracellular calcium concentration increases secretory processing of the amyloid precursor protein by a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Petryniak, M A; Wurtman, R J; Slack, B E

    1996-01-01

    Secretory cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a process that releases soluble APP derivatives (APPs) into the extracellular space, is stimulated by the activation of muscarinic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The signalling pathways involved in the release process exhibit both protein kinase C- and protein tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent components [Slack, Breu, Petryniak, Srivastava and Wurtman (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 8337-8344]. The possibility that elevations in intracellular Ca2+ concentration initiate the tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent release of APPs was examined in human embryonic kidney cells expressing muscarinic m3 receptors. Inhibition of protein kinase C with the bisindolylmaleimide GF 109203X decreased the carbachol-evoked release of APPs by approx. 30%, as shown previously. The residual response was further decreased, in an additive manner, by the Ca2+ chelator EGTA, or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A25. The Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin, like carbachol, stimulated both the release of APPs and the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, one of which was identified as paxillin, a component of focal adhesions. The effects of ionomycin on APPs release and on protein tyrosine phosphorylation were concentration-dependent, and occurred over similar concentration ranges; both effects were inhibited only partly by GF 109203X, but were abolished by EGTA or by tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The results demonstrate for the first time that ionophore-induced elevations in intracellular Ca2+ levels elicit APPs release via increased tyrosine phosphorylation. Part of the increase in APPs release evoked by muscarinic receptor activation might be attributable to a similar mechanism. PMID:9003386

  10. Increased production of beta-1,3 glucanase and proteins in Bipolaris sorokiniana pathosystem treated using commercial xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Castro, Osvair L; Bach, Erna E

    2004-02-01

    Barley plants (cultivars Embrapa 127, 128 and 129) treated with xanthan gum, and with different time intervals between the administration of the inducer and the pathogen. demonstrated induction of resistance against Bipolaris sorokiniana. Induction was shown to have local and systemic action. In order to prove the resistance effect, biochemical analyses were performed to quantify proteins and the enzymatic activity of beta-1,3 glucanase. Results demonstrated that barley plants treated with the inducer, showed an increase in the concentration of proteins, as well as in the activity of the enzyme beta-1,3 glucanase, when compared with the extract from healthy plants. In infected plants, protein concentrations decreased and enzymatic activity was lower than in healthy plants. Results suggest that barley plants treated with xanthan gum developed mechanisms responsible for induced resistance, which are still unknown. The most important macromolecule in the defense mechanism was demonstrated to be PR-protein, due to its accumulation and concentration of proteins. However, it may not be the only macromolecule responsible for the resistance effect.

  11. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shireesh; Kashiwaya, Yoshihiro; King, M. Todd; Baxa, Ulrich; Tam, Joseph; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Clarke, Kieran; Veech, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the effects of a diet in which d-β-hydroxybutyrate-(R)-1,3 butanediol monoester [ketone ester (KE)] replaced equicaloric amounts of carbohydrate on 8-wk-old male C57BL/6J mice. Diets contained equal amounts of fat, protein, and micronutrients. The KE group was fed ad libitum, whereas the control (Ctrl) mice were pair-fed to the KE group. Blood d-β-hydroxybutyrate levels in the KE group were 3-5 times those reported with high-fat ketogenic diets. Voluntary food intake was reduced dose dependently with the KE diet. Feeding the KE diet for up to 1 mo increased the number of mitochondria and doubled the electron transport chain proteins, uncoupling protein 1, and mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in IBAT of the KE group was twice that in IBAT of the Ctrl group. Plasma leptin levels of the KE group were more than 2-fold those of the Ctrl group and were associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity to IBAT. The KE group exhibited 14% greater resting energy expenditure, but the total energy expenditure measured over a 24-h period or body weights was not different. The quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was 73% higher in the KE group. These results identify KE as a potential antiobesity supplement.—Srivastava, S., Kashiwaya, Y., King, M. T. Baxa, U., Tam, J., Niu, G., Chen, X., Clarke, K., Veech, R. L. Mitochondrial biogenesis and increased uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue of mice fed a ketone ester diet. PMID:22362892

  12. Recombinant Treponema pallidum Protein Tp0965 Activates Endothelial Cells and Increases the Permeability of Endothelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  13. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E.

    2013-09-15

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • Ski oncoprotein levels increase during progression of HPV16-transformed cells. • Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent. • Ski knock-down in HPV16-transformed keratinocytes inhibited cell proliferation. • Cervical cancer samples overexpress Ski.

  14. Interleukin 6 increases the in vitro expression of key proteins associated with steroidogenesis in the bovine adrenal zona fasciculata.

    PubMed

    McIlmoil, S; Strickland, J; Judd, A M

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro effects of interleukin 6 (IL-6) on the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and proteins for key steroidogenic factors in the bovine adrenal zona fasciculata (ZF) were determined. Bovine adrenal glands were obtained from an abattoir, and the ZF was isolated. Strips of ZF were then exposed to different concentration of murine IL-6 and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for various intervals, the protein and mRNA extracted, and the mRNA and protein expression determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blots. Exposure (1 h) to IL-6 increased in a concentration-dependent manner (10-pg IL-6/mL, P < 0.05 vs control; 100-pg IL-6/mL, P < 0.01 vs control) the relative expression of the mRNAs and proteins for steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (3β HSD), 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase/17,20-desmolase (P450 17OH), steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450 21OH), steroid 11-β-hydroxylase type 1 (P450 11βOH), and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), a nuclear factor that increases StAR and steroidogenic enzymes (SEs) expression. Similarly, IL-6 (10 pg/mL) increased the relative expression of proteins and mRNAs for StAR, P450scc, 3β HSD, P450 17OH, P450 21 OH, P450 11βOH, and SF-1 in a time-dependent manner (30 min, P < 0.05 vs control; 60, 120, and 240 min, P < 0.01 vs control). In contrast, IL-6 decreased in a concentration-dependent (P < 0.01 vs control for 1, 10, and 100 pg IL-6/mL) and time-dependent (P < 0.05 vs control for 30, 60,120, and 240 min of 10 pg IL-6/mL) manner the relative expression of the mRNA and protein for adrenal hypoplasia congenita-like protein (DAX-1), a nuclear factor that decreases expression of StAR and SEs. Incubation (1 h) of ZF with 100-nM ACTH increased (P < 0.05 vs control) the relative expression of StAR, P450scc, 3β HSD, P450 17OH, P450 21OH, P450 11βOH, and SF-1 and decreased (P < 0.01 vs control) the relative expression

  15. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  16. Increased Circulating Levels of Vitamin D Binding Protein in MS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Arturo Ottavio; Sanseverino, Isabella; Purificato, Cristina; Cortese, Antonio; Mechelli, Rosella; Francisci, Silvia; Salvetti, Marco; Millefiorini, Enrico; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D (vitD) low status is currently considered a main environmental factor in multiple sclerosis (MS) etiology and pathogenesis. VitD and its metabolites are highly hydrophobic and circulate mostly bound to the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and with lower affinity to albumin, while less than 1% are in a free form. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the circulating levels of either of the two vitD plasma carriers and/or their relationship are altered in MS. We measured DBP and albumin plasma levels in 28 MS patients and 24 healthy controls. MS patients were found to have higher DBP levels than healthy subjects. Concomitant interferon beta therapy did not influence DBP concentration, and the difference with the control group was significant in both females and males. No significant correlation between DBP and albumin levels was observed either in healthy controls or in patients. These observations suggest the involvement of DBP in the patho-physiology of MS. PMID:25590278

  17. Whey protein coating increases bilayer rigidity and stability of liposomes in food-like matrices.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Monika; Steffen-Heins, Anja

    2015-04-15

    Liposomes are suitable for encapsulating lipophilic bioactive compounds, enhancing compound solubility, stability and bioavailability. To enhance physical stability of liposomes in food-like matrices they were coated with positively charged whey protein isolate (WPI). WPI concentration, for a successful coating, was optimised by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. Membrane properties of coated and uncoated vesicles were investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with site-directed and non-site-directed spin probes. Coexistence of two or three simulated spin probe populations indicated a less fluid membrane and higher concentration of water molecules in the phosphate/glycerol moiety with WPI coating. This relies on the insertion of WPI into the membrane, which is favoured by the molten globule state under investigated acidic conditions. Physical stability of liposomes benefits from WPI coating, as indicated by prolonged shelf-life, cancellation of osmotic effects in the presence of salts or sugars and a lower sensitivity towards low pH values during in vitro gastric digestion.

  18. The RNA Polymerase II CTD: The Increasing Complexity of a Low-Complexity Protein Domain.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Collin, Pierre; Robert, François

    2016-06-19

    The largest subunit of RNA polymerase II contains a C-terminal domain (CTD) that plays key roles in coordinating transcription with co-transcriptional events. The heptapeptide repeats that form the CTD are dynamically phosphorylated on serine, tyrosine and threonine residues during the various steps of transcription, thereby regulating the recruitment of various proteins involved in gene expression. In this "Perspective," we review the recent literature related to the function of the CTD, to CTD kinases (Kin28, CDK7, CDK9, CDK12, ERK1/2 and DYRK1A) and to CTD phosphatases (Rtr1, RPAP2, Ssu72, Fcp1 and Gcl7). We discuss unresolved and controversial issues and try to provide constructive suggestions. This review also highlights emerging themes in the CTD field, such as crosstalk and feedback mechanisms, as well as gene-specific and tissue-specific functions of the CTD. Finally, promising therapeutic avenues for a recently developed CTD kinase inhibitor are discussed. PMID:26876604

  19. Effect of Increased CRM197 Carrier Protein Dose on Meningococcal C Bactericidal Antibody Response

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Milan S.

    2012-01-01

    New multivalent CRM197-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM197 coadministration with CRM197-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM197 carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM197 conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules. PMID:22336285

  20. Up-regulation of lipolysis genes and increased production of AMP-activated protein kinase protein in the skeletal muscle of rats after resistance training.

    PubMed

    An, Jae-Heung; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Suk, Min-Hwa; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lipogenesis- and lipolysis-related genes and proteins in skeletal muscles after 12 weeks of resistance training. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) were randomly divided into control (resting) and resistance training groups. A tower-climbing exercise, in which rats climbed to the top of their cage with a weight applied to their tails, used for resistance training. After 12 weeks, rats from the resistance training group had lower body weights (411.66±14.71 g vs. 478.33±24.63 g in the control), there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol, and high or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the concentration of triglyceride was lower in resistance-trained rats (59.83±14.05 μg/mL vs 93.33±33.89 μg/mL in the control). The mRNA expression levels of the lipogenesis-related genes sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase were not significantly different between the resistance-trained and control rats; however, mRNA expression of the lipolysis-related carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase increased significantly with resistance training. AMP-activated protein kinase protein levels also significantly increased in resistance training group compared with in the control group. These results suggested that resistance exercise training contributing to reduced weight gain may be in part be due to increase the lipolysis metabolism and energy expenditure in response to resistance training. PMID:27419110

  1. Up-regulation of lipolysis genes and increased production of AMP-activated protein kinase protein in the skeletal muscle of rats after resistance training

    PubMed Central

    An, Jae-Heung; Yoon, Jin-Hwan; Suk, Min-Hwa; Shin, Yun-A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lipogenesis- and lipolysis-related genes and proteins in skeletal muscles after 12 weeks of resistance training. Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) were randomly divided into control (resting) and resistance training groups. A tower-climbing exercise, in which rats climbed to the top of their cage with a weight applied to their tails, used for resistance training. After 12 weeks, rats from the resistance training group had lower body weights (411.66±14.71 g vs. 478.33±24.63 g in the control), there was no significant difference between the two groups in the concentrations of total cholesterol, and high or low density lipoprotein cholesterol. However, the concentration of triglyceride was lower in resistance-trained rats (59.83±14.05 μg/mL vs 93.33±33.89 μg/mL in the control). The mRNA expression levels of the lipogenesis-related genes sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase were not significantly different between the resistance-trained and control rats; however, mRNA expression of the lipolysis-related carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 and malonyl-CoA decarboxylase increased significantly with resistance training. AMP-activated protein kinase protein levels also significantly increased in resistance training group compared with in the control group. These results suggested that resistance exercise training contributing to reduced weight gain may be in part be due to increase the lipolysis metabolism and energy expenditure in response to resistance training. PMID:27419110

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 activates NADPH oxidase to increase endoplasmic reticulum stress and human coronary artery smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Marcel; Johnson, Rebecca C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2011-09-30

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) increases oxidant stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of these signaling pathways in the transition of smooth muscle cells to a calcifying osteoblast-like phenotype remains incompletely characterized. We, therefore, treated human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCSMC) with BMP-2 (100ng/mL) and found an increase in NADPH oxidase activity and oxidant stress that occurred via activation of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Smad 1 signaling. BMP-2-mediated oxidant stress also increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress demonstrated by increased expression of GRP78, phospho-IRE1α, and the transcription factor XBP1. Analysis of a 1kb segment of the Runx2 promoter revealed an XBP1 binding site; electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that XBP1 bound to the Runx2 promoter at this site in BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Inhibition of oxidant stress or ER stress decreased Runx2 expression, intracellular calcium deposition, and mineralization of BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Thus, in HCSMC, BMP-2 increases oxidant stress and ER stress to increase Runx2 expression and promote vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

  3. Muscle enzyme and fiber type-specific sarcomere protein increases in serum after inertial concentric-eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Guerrero, M; Cussó, R; Padullés, J M; Moras, G; Lloret, M; Bedini, J L; Cadefau, J A

    2015-12-01

    Muscle damage induced by inertial exercise performed on a flywheel device was assessed through the serum evolution of muscle enzymes, interleukin 6, and fiber type-specific sarcomere proteins such as fast myosin (FM) and slow myosin (SM). We hypothesized that a model of muscle damage could be constructed by measuring the evolution of serum concentration of muscle proteins following inertial exercise, according to their molecular weight and the fiber compartment in which they are located. Moreover, by measuring FM and SM, the type of fibers that are affected could be assessed. Serum profiles were registered before and 24, 48, and 144 h after exercise in 10 healthy and recreationally active young men. Creatine kinase (CK) and CK-myocardial band isoenzyme increased in serum early (24 h) and returned to baseline values after 48 h. FM increased in serum late (48 h) and remained elevated 144 h post-exercise. The increase in serum muscle enzymes suggests increased membrane permeability of both fast and slow fibers, and the increase in FM reveals sarcomere disruption as well as increased membrane permeability of fast fibers. Consequently, FM could be adopted as a fiber type-specific biomarker of muscle damage. PMID:25441613

  4. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: VI. Partial charge neutralization drastically increases uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yangyang; Dong, Xiaoyan; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption and elution behaviors of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose FF resins were recently studied and a critical ionic capacity (cIC; 600 mmol/L) was found, above which the uptake rate increased drastically due to the occurrence of significant "chain delivery" effect. Moreover, above the cIC value, higher salt concentrations were required for protein elution due to the high charge density of the resins. In this work, we have reduced the charge density on the PEI chains of a PEI-grafted resin by neutralization of the amine groups with sodium acetate. PEI-modified resin with IC of 740 mmol/L (FF-PEI-L740, IC>cIC) was chosen as the starting material, and three resins with residual IC values of 660, 560 and 440 mmol/L (FF-PEI-R440) were obtained. The adsorption and chromatographic behaviors of these resins for BSA were investigated. It was found that, with IC decreasing from 740 to 440 mmol/L, the adsorption capacity kept almost unchanged; the effective protein diffusivity (De) also showed negligible variations as IC decreased from 740 to 560 mmol/L (De/D0=0.38 ± 0.04). However, it was interesting to observe a three-fold increase of the De value for FF-PEI-R440 (De/D0=1.23 ± 0.08). It is considered that the occurrence of the drastic uptake rate increase in FF-PEI-R440 was attributed to the decreased available binding sites for protein molecule, which led to the decrease of binding strength, thus facilitated the happenings of "chain delivery" effect of bound proteins. Besides, a study on the effect of ionic strength clarified that the lower the IC value, the higher the sensitivity of protein binding to salt concentration due to the easily screened electrostatic interactions at low surface charge densities. The ionic strength at the elution peak also decreased with decreasing IC in accordance with the salt sensitivity order. Column breakthrough studies demonstrated that the dynamic adsorption capacity of FF-PEI-R440 was

  5. Cyclic stretch reduces myofibrillar protein synthesis despite increases in FAK and anabolic signalling in L6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, P J; Szewczyk, N J; Selby, A; Rankin, D; Hillier, K; Smith, K; Rennie, M J; Loughna, P T

    2009-01-01

    Muscle protein synthesis is increased after exercise, but evidence is now accruing that during muscular activity it is suppressed. In life, muscles are subjected to shortening forces due to contraction, but may also be subject to stretching forces during lengthening. It would be biologically inefficient if contraction and stretch have different effects on muscle protein turnover, but little is known about the metabolic effects of stretch. To investigate this, we assessed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis (MPS, SPS, respectively) by incorporation of [1-13C]proline (using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry) and anabolic signalling (by phospho-immunoblotting and kinase assays) in cultured L6 skeletal muscle cells during 30 min of cyclic stretch and over 30 min intervals for up to 120 min afterwards. SPS was unaffected, whereas MPS was suppressed by 40 ± 0.03% during stretch, before returning to basal rates by 90–20 min afterwards. Paradoxically, stretch stimulated anabolic signalling with peak values after 2–30 min: e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK Tyr576/577; +28 ± 6%), protein kinase B activity (Akt; +113 ± 31%), p70S6K1 (ribosomal S6 kinase Thr389; 25 ± 5%), 4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1 Thr37/46; 14 ± 3%), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2 Thr56; −47 ± 4%), extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 Tyr202/204; +65%± 9%), eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α Ser51; −20 ± 5%, P < 0.05) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E Ser209; +33 ± 10%, P < 0.05). After stretch, except for Akt activity, stimulatory phosphorylations were sustained: e.g. FAK (+26 ± 11%) for ≥30 min, eEF2 for ≥60 min (peak −45 ± 4%), 4EBP1 for ≥90 min (+33 ± 5%), and p70S6K1 remained elevated throughout (peak +64 ± 7%). Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation was unchanged throughout. We report for the first time that acute cyclic stretch specifically suppresses MPS, despite increases in activity

  6. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: VI. Partial charge neutralization drastically increases uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yangyang; Dong, Xiaoyan; Yu, Linling; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption and elution behaviors of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-grafted Sepharose FF resins were recently studied and a critical ionic capacity (cIC; 600 mmol/L) was found, above which the uptake rate increased drastically due to the occurrence of significant "chain delivery" effect. Moreover, above the cIC value, higher salt concentrations were required for protein elution due to the high charge density of the resins. In this work, we have reduced the charge density on the PEI chains of a PEI-grafted resin by neutralization of the amine groups with sodium acetate. PEI-modified resin with IC of 740 mmol/L (FF-PEI-L740, IC>cIC) was chosen as the starting material, and three resins with residual IC values of 660, 560 and 440 mmol/L (FF-PEI-R440) were obtained. The adsorption and chromatographic behaviors of these resins for BSA were investigated. It was found that, with IC decreasing from 740 to 440 mmol/L, the adsorption capacity kept almost unchanged; the effective protein diffusivity (De) also showed negligible variations as IC decreased from 740 to 560 mmol/L (De/D0=0.38 ± 0.04). However, it was interesting to observe a three-fold increase of the De value for FF-PEI-R440 (De/D0=1.23 ± 0.08). It is considered that the occurrence of the drastic uptake rate increase in FF-PEI-R440 was attributed to the decreased available binding sites for protein molecule, which led to the decrease of binding strength, thus facilitated the happenings of "chain delivery" effect of bound proteins. Besides, a study on the effect of ionic strength clarified that the lower the IC value, the higher the sensitivity of protein binding to salt concentration due to the easily screened electrostatic interactions at low surface charge densities. The ionic strength at the elution peak also decreased with decreasing IC in accordance with the salt sensitivity order. Column breakthrough studies demonstrated that the dynamic adsorption capacity of FF-PEI-R440 was

  7. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  8. Friction Coefficient and Superficial Zone Protein are Increased in Patients with Advanced Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Neu, C.P.; Reddi, A.H.; Komvopoulos, K.; Schmid, T.M.; Di Cesare, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To quantify the concentration of superficial zone protein (SZP) in articular cartilage and synovial fluid of patients with advanced osteoarthritis (OA), and to further correlate the SZP content with the friction coefficient, OA severity, and levels of inflammatory cytokines. Methods Samples of articular cartilage and synovial fluid were obtained from patients undergoing elective total knee replacement surgery. Additional normal samples were obtained from donated body program and tissue bank sources. Regional SZP expression in cartilage obtained from the femoral condyles was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and visualized by immunohistochemistry. Friction coefficient measurements were obtained from cartilage plugs slid in the boundary lubrication regime. OA severity was graded using histochemical analyses. The concentration of SZP and inflammatory cytokines in synovial fluid were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. Results A pattern of SZP localization in knee cartilage was identified, with load-bearing regions exhibiting high SZP expression. SZP patterns correlated to friction coefficient and OA severity; however SZP expression was observed in all samples at the articular surface, regardless of OA severity. SZP expression and aspirate volume of synovial fluid were higher in OA patients compared to normal controls. Expressions of cytokines were elevated in the synovial fluid of some patients. Conclusion The results reveal a mechano-chemical coupling in which physical forces regulate OA severity and joint lubrication. The findings of this study also suggest that SZP may be ineffective in reducing joint friction in the boundary lubrication regime at an advanced OA stage where other mechanisms may dominate the observed tribological behavior. PMID:20499384

  9. The Increase in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine Protein Modification Stimulates Chondrogenic Differentiation Both in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-Bergós, Jessica; Tardio, Lidia; Larranaga-Vera, Ane; Gómez, Rodolfo; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Largo, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Insulin is an inducer of chondrocyte hypertrophy and growth plate chondrogenesis, although the specific molecular mechanisms behind these effects are mostly unknown. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin-induced chondrocyte hypertrophy occurs through a modification in the amount of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified proteins and in the expression of the key enzymes of this pathway, O-GlcNAc transferase and O-GlcNAcase (OGA). We also studied if O-GlcNAc accumulation per se, induced by an OGA inhibitor, was able to induce pre-hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Insulin-induced differentiation of ATDC5 pre-chondrocytes occurred alongside a gradual increase in the accumulation of O-GlcNac-modified proteins (O-GlcNAcylated proteins), as well as an increase in the expression of O-GlcNAc transferase and OGA. In the absence of insulin, O-GlcNAc accumulation induced by thiamet-G, a specific OGA inhibitor, was able to increase the gene expression of differentiation markers, as well as the activity of MMP-2 and -9. Thiamet-G also activated pERK, p-JNK, and p-p38 and the O-GlcNAcylation of Akt. Thiamet-G administration to C57/bl mice induced a significant expansion in the growth plate height and in the hypertrophic zone height. Therefore, our results show that O-GlcNAc glycosylation has chondromodulating activity. PMID:22859309

  10. Activation of Protein Kinase C-α and Src Kinase Increases Urea Transporter A1 α-2, 6 Sialylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuechen; Yang, Baoxue; Chen, Minguang; Klein, Janet D.; Sands, Jeff M.

    2015-01-01

    The urea transporter A1 (UT-A1) is a glycosylated protein with two glycoforms: 117 and 97 kD. In diabetes, the increased abundance of the heavily glycosylated 117-kD UT-A1 corresponds to an increase of kidney tubule urea permeability. We previously reported that diabetes not only causes an increase of UT-A1 protein abundance but also, results in UT-A1 glycan changes, including an increase of sialic acid content. Because activation of the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway is elevated in diabetes and PKC-α regulates UT-A1 urea transport activity, we explored the role of PKC in UT-A1 glycan sialylation. We found that activation of PKC specifically promotes UT-A1 glycan sialylation in both UT-A1-MDCK cells and rat kidney inner medullary collecting duct suspensions, and inhibition of PKC activity blocks high glucose-induced UT-A1 sialylation. Overexpression of PKC-α promoted UT-A1 sialylation and membrane surface expression. Conversely, PKC-α–deficient mice had significantly less sialylated UT-A1 compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, the effect of PKC-α–induced UT-A1 sialylation was mainly mediated by Src kinase but not Raf-1 kinase. Functionally, increased UT-A1 sialylation corresponded with enhanced urea transport activity. Thus, our results reveal a novel mechanism by which PKC regulates UT-A1 function by increasing glycan sialylation through Src kinase pathways, which may have an important role in preventing the osmotic diuresis caused by glucosuria under diabetic conditions. PMID:25300290

  11. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  12. Protein engineering of Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase to increase its pH optimum.

    PubMed

    Fang, T Y; Ford, C

    1998-05-01

    To increase the pH optimum of glucoamylase (GA), five mutations-S411G, S411A, S411C, S411H and S411D--were designed to destabilize the carboxylate ion form of Glu400, the catalytic base, by removing or weakening the hydrogen bond between Ser411 and Glu400, and thereby raising its pK. The substitution of alanine, histidine and aspartate were also designed to study the additional effects of polarity and both positive and negative charges, respectively. S411G GA had catalytic efficiencies like those of wild-type GA for isomaltose, maltose and maltoheptaose hydrolysis at pH 4.4, while S411A and S411C GAs had 54-74% and S411H and S411D GAs had only about 6-12% of wild-type catalytic efficiencies. All five mutations increased the pH optimum in the enzyme-substrate complex, mainly by raising pK1 values. S411A is the best performing and most industrially promising of the pH mutants isolated to date. S411A GA increased the pH optimum by 0.8 units for both maltose and maltoheptaose hydrolysis while maintaining a high level of activity and catalytic efficiency. In hydrolysis of 28% DE 10 maltodextrin, S411A GA had a pH optimum of 7 compared with pH 5.6 for wild-type GA, and had higher initial rates of glucose production than wild-type GA at all pH values tested above pH 6.6. PMID:9681871

  13. Ginsenoside Rb1 increases insulin sensitivity by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in male rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ling; Haas, Michael; Wang, David Q-H; May, Aaron; Lo, Chunmin C; Obici, Silvana; Tso, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2015-09-01

    Although ginseng has been reported to ameliorate hyperglycemia in animal models and clinical studies, the molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. We previously reported that chronic treatment with ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), a major component of ginseng, significantly reduced fasting glucose and improved glucose tolerance in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats. These effects were greater than those observed in pair-fed rats, suggesting a direct effect of Rb1 on glucose homeostasis, and this possibility was confirmed in the present study. In lean rats fed standard rodent chow, 5-day treatment with Rb1 significantly improved glucose tolerance and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Notably, those effects were not accompanied by reduced food intake or changed body weight. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, rats fed a HFD for 4 weeks were treated with Rb1 for 5 days. Subsequently, euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies found that compared to vehicle, Rb1, while not changing food intake or body weight, significantly increased glucose infusion rate required to maintain euglycemia. Consistent with this, insulin-induced inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis was significantly enhanced and hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression was suppressed. Additionally, glucose uptake was significantly increased in skeletal muscle. While proximal insulin signaling was not changed after Rb1 treatment, increased phosphorylation of TBC1D4, a downstream target of AMPK signaling, appears to be a key part of the mechanism for Rb1-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. These findings indicate that Rb1 has multiple effects on glucose homeostasis, and provide strong rationale for further evaluation of its potential therapeutic role. PMID:26359241

  14. Increase in Mechanical Resistance to Force in a Shear-Activated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botello, Eric; Harris, Nolan; Choi, Huiwan; Zhou, Zhou; Bergeron, Angela; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2009-03-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is the largest multimeric adhesion ligand found in human blood. Plasma VWF (pVWF) must be exposed to shear stress, like at sites of vascular injury, to be activated to bind platelets to induce blood clotting. In addition, adhesion activity of VWF is related to its polymer size, with the ultra-large form of VWF (ULVWF) being hyper-active, and forming fibers even without exposure to shear stress. We used the AFM to stretch pVWF, sheared VWF (sVWF) and ULVWF, and monitor the forces as a function of molecular extension. We showed a similar increase in force resistance to unfolding for sVWF and ULVWF when compared to pVWF. The increase in force is reduced when other molecules that are known to disrupt their fibril formation are present. Our results provide evidence that the common higher order structure of sVWF and ULVWF may affect the domain structure that causes difference in their adhesion activity compared to pVWF.

  15. Dynamic competitive adsorption of bone-related proteins on calcium phosphate ceramic particles with different phase composition and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Huijie; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Hongsong; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2013-08-01

    The biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomaterials used for hard tissue repair are closely related to their adsorption capacities for bone-related proteins. In the present study, three types of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic particles with different phase composition or microstructure were fabricated, and their protein adsorption abilities were investigated by a self-made device under the simulated dynamic physiological circumstance. The results of X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, mercury penetration test, and nitrogen sorption test showed that the irregular hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic particles obtained by conventional drying and sintering (named as HA-C) had fewer micropores and lower specific surface area (SSA) than did the spherical HA or biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic particles made by spray drying and sintering (named as HA-S and BCP-S, respectively). The dynamic protein adsorption study proved that both the phase composition and microstructure of CaP ceramic particles affected their adsorption capacities for those bone-related proteins. The spherical HA-S and BCP-S particles with abundant micropores and high SSA showed higher adsorption of serum proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin, than the irregular HA-C did. On the other hand, in spite of the relatively high concentration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the binary bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)/BSA solution, BMP-2 adsorption on the three CaP ceramic particles increased with the increase in its initial concentration. Similarly, HA-S and BCP-S particles had a larger amount of the adsorbed BMP-2 per gram solid than HA-C did. Therefore, it could be believed that the difference of various CaP ceramics in the phase composition and microporous structure would affect their binding capacity for those bone-related proteins and thus lead to their difference in osteoinduction.

  16. Increase in c-Fos and Arc protein in retrosplenial cortex after memory-improving lateral hypothalamic electrical stimulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Elisabeth; Vico-Varela, Eva; Aldavert-Vera, Laura; Huguet, Gemma; Morgado-Bernal, Ignacio; Segura-Torres, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Post-training Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the lateral hypothalamus (LH), a kind of rewarding deep-brain stimulation, potentiates learning and memory and increases c-Fos protein expression in specific memory-related brain regions. In a previous study, Aldavert-Vera et al. (2013) reported that post-acquisition LH-ICSS improved 48 h retention of a delay two-way active avoidance conditioning (TWAA) and induced c-Fos expression increase in CA3 at 90 min after administration. Nevertheless, this c-Fos induction was only observed after the acquisition session and not after the retention test at 48 h, when the ICSS improving effect was observed on memory. This current study aims to examine the hypothesis that post-training ICSS treatment may stimulate c-Fos expression at the time of the TWAA retention test in retrosplenial cortex (RSC), a hippocampus-related brain region more closely related with long-lasting memory storage. Effects of ICSS on Arc protein, a marker of memory-associated synaptic plasticity, were also measured by immunohistochemistry in granular and agranular RSC. The most innovative results are that the ICSS treatment potentiates the c-Fos induction across TWAA conditions (no conditioning, acquisition and retention), specifically in layer V of the granular RSC, along with increases of Arc protein levels in the granular but not in agranular areas of RSC ipsilaterally few hours after ICSS. This leads us to suggest that plasticity-related protein activation in the granular RSC could be involved in the positive modulatory effects of ICSS on TWAA memory consolidation, opening a new approach for future research in ICSS memory facilitation.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Tat Protein Increases the Number of Inhibitory Synapses between Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptodendritic damage correlates with cognitive decline in many neurodegenerative diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because HIV-1 does not infect neurons, viral-mediated toxicity is indirect, resulting from released neurotoxins such as the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat). We compared the effects of Tat on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections between rat hippocampal neurons using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding proteins gephyrin or PSD95 fused to GFP. Tat (24 h) increased the number of GFP–gephyrin puncta and decreased the number of PSD95–GFP puncta. The effects of Tat on inhibitory and excitatory synapse number were mediated via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and subsequent Ca2+ influx through GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs). The effects of Tat on synapse number required cell-autonomous activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Ca2+ buffering experiments suggested that loss of excitatory synapses required activation of CaMKII in close apposition to the NMDAR, whereas the increase in inhibitory synapses required Ca2+ diffusion to a more distal site. The increase in inhibitory synapses was prevented by inhibiting the insertion of GABAA receptors into the membrane. Synaptic changes induced by Tat (16 h) were reversed by blocking either GluN2B-containing NMDARs or neuronal nitric oxide synthase, indicating changing roles for pathways activated by NMDAR subtypes during the neurotoxic process. Compensatory changes in the number of inhibitory and excitatory synapses may serve as a novel mechanism to reduce network excitability in the presence of HIV-1 neurotoxins; these changes may inform the development of treatments for HAND. PMID:24198379

  18. Increase in c-Fos and Arc protein in retrosplenial cortex after memory-improving lateral hypothalamic electrical stimulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Elisabeth; Vico-Varela, Eva; Aldavert-Vera, Laura; Huguet, Gemma; Morgado-Bernal, Ignacio; Segura-Torres, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Post-training Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the lateral hypothalamus (LH), a kind of rewarding deep-brain stimulation, potentiates learning and memory and increases c-Fos protein expression in specific memory-related brain regions. In a previous study, Aldavert-Vera et al. (2013) reported that post-acquisition LH-ICSS improved 48 h retention of a delay two-way active avoidance conditioning (TWAA) and induced c-Fos expression increase in CA3 at 90 min after administration. Nevertheless, this c-Fos induction was only observed after the acquisition session and not after the retention test at 48 h, when the ICSS improving effect was observed on memory. This current study aims to examine the hypothesis that post-training ICSS treatment may stimulate c-Fos expression at the time of the TWAA retention test in retrosplenial cortex (RSC), a hippocampus-related brain region more closely related with long-lasting memory storage. Effects of ICSS on Arc protein, a marker of memory-associated synaptic plasticity, were also measured by immunohistochemistry in granular and agranular RSC. The most innovative results are that the ICSS treatment potentiates the c-Fos induction across TWAA conditions (no conditioning, acquisition and retention), specifically in layer V of the granular RSC, along with increases of Arc protein levels in the granular but not in agranular areas of RSC ipsilaterally few hours after ICSS. This leads us to suggest that plasticity-related protein activation in the granular RSC could be involved in the positive modulatory effects of ICSS on TWAA memory consolidation, opening a new approach for future research in ICSS memory facilitation. PMID:26774022

  19. Palmitic acid increase levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 and p38/stress-activated protein kinase in islets from rats maintained on a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Vanessa C; Reis, Marise A B; Latorraca, Márcia Q; Ferreira, Fabiano; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrízio; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C

    2006-12-01

    A severe reduction in insulin release in response to glucose is consistently noticed in protein-deprived rats and is attributed partly to the chronic exposure to elevated levels of NEFA. Since the pancreatic and duodenal transcription factor homeobox 1 (PDX-1) is important for the maintenance of beta-cell physiology, and since PDX-1 expression is altered in the islets of rats fed a low protein (LP) diet and that rats show high NEFA levels, we assessed PDX-1 and insulin mRNA expression, as well as PDX-1 and p38/stress activated protein kinase 2 (SAPK2) protein expression, in islets from young rats fed low (6%) or normal (17%; control) protein diets and maintained for 48 h in culture medium containing 5.6 mmol/l glucose, with or without 0.6 mmol/l palmitic acid. We also measured glucose-induced insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Insulin secretion by isolated islets in response to 16.7 mmol/l glucose was reduced in LP compared with control rats. In the presence of NEFA, there was an increase in insulin secretion in both groups. At 2.8 mmol/l glucose, the metabolism of this sugar was reduced in LP islets, regardless of the presence of this fatty acid. However, when challenged with 16.7 mmol/l glucose, LP and control islets showed a severe reduction in glucose oxidation in the presence of NEFA. The PDX-1 and insulin mRNA were significantly higher when NEFA was added to the culture medium in both groups of islets. The effect of palmitic acid on PDX-1 and p38/SAPK2 protein levels was similar in LP and control islets, but the increase was much more evident in LP islets. These results demonstrate the complex interrelationship between nutrients in the control of insulin release and support the view that fatty acids play an important role in glucose homeostasis by affecting molecular mechanisms and stimulus/secretion coupling pathways. PMID:17181874

  20. Nesfatin-1 increases intracellular calcium concentration by protein kinase C activation in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Gok, Zeynep Betul; Kacar, Emine; Serhatlioglu, Ihsan; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2016-04-21

    Nesfatin-1 is a recently identified anorexigenic hypothalamic polypeptide derived from the posttranslational processing of nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2). Several studies have indicated that this neuropeptide may be participated in somatosensory and visceral transmission including pain signals in addition to energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to explore the possible role of nesfatin-1 in the transmission of peripheral neural signals by investigating the effects of nesfatin-1 on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i in DRG neurons were investigated by using an in vitro calcium imaging system. DRG neurons were grown in primary culture following enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of ganglia from 1-or 2-day-old neonatal Wistar rats. Using the fura-2-based calcium imaging technique, the effects of nesfatin-1 on [Ca(2+)]i and role of the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway in nesfatin-1 effect were assessed. Nesfatin-1 elevated [Ca(2+)]i in cultured DRG neurons. The response was prevented by pretreating the cells with pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine chloride suppressed nesfatin-1-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i. The result shows that nesfatin-1 interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor, leading to an increase of [Ca(2+)]i, which is linked to protein kinase C activation in cultured rat DRG neurons.

  1. The Cyanobacterial Hepatotoxin Microcystin Binds to Proteins and Increases the Fitness of Microcystis under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zilliges, Yvonne; Kehr, Jan-Christoph; Meissner, Sven; Ishida, Keishi; Mikkat, Stefan; Hagemann, Martin; Kaplan, Aaron; Börner, Thomas; Dittmann, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial toxins that represent a serious threat to drinking water and recreational lakes worldwide. Here, we show that microcystin fulfils an important function within cells of its natural producer Microcystis. The microcystin deficient mutant ΔmcyB showed significant changes in the accumulation of proteins, including several enzymes of the Calvin cycle, phycobiliproteins and two NADPH-dependent reductases. We have discovered that microcystin binds to a number of these proteins in vivo and that the binding is strongly enhanced under high light and oxidative stress conditions. The nature of this binding was studied using extracts of a microcystin-deficient mutant in vitro. The data obtained provided clear evidence for a covalent interaction of the toxin with cysteine residues of proteins. A detailed investigation of one of the binding partners, the large subunit of RubisCO showed a lower susceptibility to proteases in the presence of microcystin in the wild type. Finally, the mutant defective in microcystin production exhibited a clearly increased sensitivity under high light conditions and after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Taken together, our data suggest a protein-modulating role for microcystin within the producing cell, which represents a new addition to the catalogue of functions that have been discussed for microbial secondary metabolites. PMID:21445264

  2. The Thermal Structural Transition of Alpha-Crystallin Modulates Subunit Interactions and Increases Protein Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; De Spirito, Marco; Arcovito, Giuseppe; Papi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract), is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K). Methods/Results To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ) and the interfacial tension (γ) of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. Conclusions/General Significance The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing. PMID:22347398

  3. Macroautophagy-generated increase of lysosomal amyloid β-protein mediates oxidant-induced apoptosis of cultured neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Terman, Alexei; Hallbeck, Martin; Dehvari, Nodi; Cowburn, Richard F.; Benedikz, Eirikur; Kågedal, Katarina; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Marcusson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests the toxicity of intracellular amyloid β-protein (Aβ) to neurons, as well as the involvement of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease (AD). Here we show that normobaric hyperoxia (exposure of cells to 40% oxygen for five days), and consequent activation of macroautophagy and accumulation of Aβ within lysosomes, induced apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cells under hyperoxia showed: (1) increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles that contained amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as Aβ monomers and oligomers, (2) increased reactive oxygen species production, and (3) enhanced apoptosis. Oxidant-induced apoptosis positively correlated with cellular Aβ production, being the highest in cells that were stably transfected with APP Swedish KM670/671NL double mutation. Inhibition of γ-secretase, prior and/or in parallel to hyperoxia, suggested that the increase of lysosomal Aβ resulted mainly from its autophagic uptake, but also from APP processing within autophagic vacuoles. The oxidative stress-mediated effects were prevented by macroautophagy inhibition using 3-methyladenine or ATG5 downregulation. Our results suggest that upregulation of macroautophagy and resulting lysosomal Aβ accumulation are essential for oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured neuroblastoma cells and provide additional support for the interactive role of oxidative stress and the lysosomal system in AD-related neurodegeneration. PMID:22108004

  4. Childhood trauma is associated with increased Body Mass Index and increased C-reactive protein levels in first-episode psychosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hepgul, Nilay; Pariante, Carmine M.; Dipasquale, Salvatore; DiForti, Marta; Taylor, Heather; Marques, Tiago Reis; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Murray, Robin M.; Mondelli, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Background The high incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with psychosis is mainly attributed to antipsychotic treatment. However, it has been suggested that psychological stress also plays a role, by inducing a chronic inflammatory process which may predispose to the development of metabolic abnormalities. We investigated the association between psychosocial stress and inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers in subjects with first-episode psychosis and healthy controls. Methods Body Mass Index (BMI), weight and waist circumference were measured in 96 first-episode psychosis patients and 99 healthy controls. High sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and leptin were measured in a sub-sample of 37 patients and 49 controls. In all the subjects we collected information on childhood trauma and recent stressors. Results Only patients with childhood trauma had higher BMI (24.9±0.5 kg/m2) and higher hsCRP (0.8±0.3 mg/dl) when compared with healthy controls (23.4±0.4 kg/m2, p=0.018 and 0.2±0.1 mg/dl, p=0.043 respectively). This was specific to childhood sexual abuse; patients who had experienced childhood sexual abuse had higher BMI (26.2±1.0 kg/m2) and hsCRP (1.9±2.5 mg/dl) not only compared with controls, but also compared with patients who had not experienced childhood sexual abuse (24.3±0.5 kg/m2, p=0.055; 0.5±0.2 mg/dl, p=0.001). Conclusions Childhood trauma is cross-sectionally associated with both increased inflammation and worse metabolic profile in first-episode psychosis. Further studies need to confirm the causal relationship between childhood trauma and higher BMI, and whether this is indeed mediated by the increased inflammation. PMID:22260948

  5. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  6. Increased Leptin Response and Inhibition of Apoptosis in Thymocytes of Young Rats Offspring from Protein Deprived Dams during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Simone Vargas; Salama, Carolina; Renovato-Martins, Mariana; Helal-Neto, Edward; Citelli, Marta; Savino, Wilson; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of mild maternal malnutrition in rat dams, in terms of thymocyte responses and the putative role of leptin. The young progeny of dams submitted to protein deprivation (PD) during lactation showed at 30 days of age lower body and thymus weights, significant alterations in CD4/CD8-defined T cell subsets without modifications in total thymocyte number as well as in proliferative response. Despite, the rats from PD group did not present alterations in leptin circulating levels, the expression of leptin receptor ObRb was enhanced in their thymocytes. This change was accompanied by an increase in leptin signaling response of thymocytes from PD rats, with an increase in JAK2 and STAT3 phosphorylation after leptin stimulation. Thymocytes from PD rats also presented a decreased rate of spontaneous apoptosis when compared to controls. Accordingly, higher expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and lower of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, with no change of pro-apoptotic Bad, and higher pro-caspase 3 content were detected in PD thymocytes. Moreover, thymocytes from PD group exhibited a constitutive higher nuclear content of p65 NF-kB associated to a lower IkB content in the cytoplasm. Finally, although there was no change in ob gene expression in PD thymocytes, a higher mRNA expression for the Ob gene was observed in the thymic microenvironment from PD animals. Taken together, the results show that mild maternal protein deprivation during lactation affects thymic homeostasis, enhancing leptin activity, which in turn protects thymocytes from apoptosis in the young progeny, with possible consequences upon the immune response of these animals in adult life. PMID:23675529

  7. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in the Core Protein of West Nile Virus Increases Resistance to Acidotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A.; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses. PMID:23874963

  8. A single amino acid substitution in the core protein of West Nile virus increases resistance to acidotropic compounds.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Blázquez, Ana-Belén; de Oya, Nereida Jiménez; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Shi, Pei-Yong; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2013-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a worldwide distributed mosquito-borne flavivirus that naturally cycles between birds and mosquitoes, although it can infect multiple vertebrate hosts including horses and humans. This virus is responsible for recurrent epidemics of febrile illness and encephalitis, and has recently become a global concern. WNV requires to transit through intracellular acidic compartments at two different steps to complete its infectious cycle. These include fusion between the viral envelope and the membrane of endosomes during viral entry, and virus maturation in the trans-Golgi network. In this study, we followed a genetic approach to study the connections between viral components and acidic pH. A WNV mutant with increased resistance to the acidotropic compound NH4Cl, which blocks organelle acidification and inhibits WNV infection, was selected. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that this mutant displayed a single amino acid substitution (Lys 3 to Glu) on the highly basic internal capsid or core (C) protein. The functional role of this replacement was confirmed by its introduction into a WNV infectious clone. This single amino acid substitution also increased resistance to other acidification inhibitor (concanamycin A) and induced a reduction of the neurovirulence in mice. Interestingly, a naturally occurring accompanying mutation found on prM protein abolished the resistant phenotype, supporting the idea of a genetic crosstalk between the internal C protein and the external glycoproteins of the virion. The findings here reported unveil a non-previously assessed connection between the C viral protein and the acidic pH necessary for entry and proper exit of flaviviruses.

  9. Increasing protein intake modulates lipid metabolism in healthy young men and women consuming a high-fat hypercaloric diet.

    PubMed

    Rietman, Annemarie; Schwarz, Jessica; Blokker, Britt A; Siebelink, Els; Kok, Frans J; Afman, Lydia A; Tomé, Daniel; Mensink, Marco

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing protein intake, at the expense of carbohydrates, on intrahepatic lipids (IHLs), circulating triglycerides (TGs), and body composition in healthy humans consuming a high-fat, hypercaloric diet. A crossover randomized trial with a parallel control group was performed. After a 2-wk run-in period, participants were assigned to either the control diet [n = 10; 27.8 energy percent (en%) fat, 16.9 en% protein, 55.3 en% carbohydrates] for 4 wk or a high-fat, hypercaloric diet (n = 17; >2 MJ/d) crossover trial with 2 periods of 2 wk, with either high-protein (HP) (37.7 en% fat, 25.7 en% protein, 36.6 en% carbohydrates) or normal-protein (NP) (39.4 en% fat, 15.4 en% protein, 45.2 en% carbohydrates) content. Measurements were performed after 2 wk of run-in (baseline), 2 wk of intervention (period 1), and 4 wk of intervention (period 2). A trend toward lower IHL and plasma TG concentrations during the HP condition compared with the NP condition was observed (IHL: 0.35 ± 0.04% vs. 0.51 ± 0.08%, P = 0.08; TG: 0.65 ± 0.03 vs. 0.77 ± 0.05 mmol/L, P = 0.07, for HP and NP, respectively). Fat mass was significantly lower (10.6 ± 1.72 vs. 10.9 ± 1.73 kg; P = 0.02) with the HP diet than with the NP diet, whereas fat-free mass was higher (55.7 ± 2.79 vs. 55.2 ± 2.80 kg; P = 0.003). This study indicated that an HP, high-fat, hypercaloric diet affects lipid metabolism. It tends to lower the IHL and circulating TG concentrations and significantly lowers fat mass and increases fat-free mass compared with an NP, high-fat, hypercaloric diet. This trail was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01354626.

  10. Liver failure induces a systemic inflammatory response. Prevention by recombinant N-terminal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed

    Boermeester, M A; Houdijk, A P; Meyer, S; Cuesta, M A; Appelmelk, B J; Wesdorp, R I; Hack, C E; Van Leeuwen, P A

    1995-11-01

    The observed increased susceptibility of patients with fulminant hepatic failure for local and systemic infections has been hypothesized to be due to a failure for the hepatic clearance function and subsequent leaking of endogenous endotoxins into the systemic circulation. However, experimental evidence for such a systemic inflammation during liver failure due to endogenous endotoxemia is lacking. Therefore, we designed a study to clarify whether circulating endotoxins due to liver failure could lead to the development of systemic inflammations. In a rat model for liver failure induced by a two-thirds partial hepatectomy, we evaluated the course of circulating tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6, changes in blood chemistry and hemodynamics, and histopathological changes in the lungs. Partially hepatectomized animals, but not sham-operated animals, demonstrated cardiac failure, increased levels of creatinin and urea, metabolic acidosis, high plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6, and an influx of PMNs in the lungs-together indicating the development of a systemic inflammatory response. Continuous infusion of recombinant N-terminal bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI23), a well described endotoxin-neutralizing protein, prevented these inflammatory reactions. Ex vivo experiments with rat plasma samples confirmed the presence of circulating endotoxins in partially hepatectomized rats as opposed to those treated with rBPI23. Thus, our results indicate that the early phase of liver failure induces a systemic inflammatory response triggered by circulating endotoxins, which can be prevented by perioperative infusion of rBPI23.

  11. Increased BDNF protein expression after ischemic or PKC epsilon preconditioning promotes electrophysiologic changes that lead to neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Jake T; Thompson, John W; Raval, Ami P; Cohan, Charles H; Koronowski, Kevin B; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) via protein kinase C epsilon (PKCɛ) activation induces neuroprotection against lethal ischemia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a pro-survival signaling molecule that modulates synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Interestingly, BDNF mRNA expression increases after IPC. In this study, we investigated whether IPC or pharmacological preconditioning (PKCɛ activation) promoted BDNF-induced neuroprotection, if neuroprotection by IPC or PKCɛ activation altered neuronal excitability, and whether these changes were BDNF-mediated. We used both in vitro (hippocampal organotypic cultures and cortical neuronal-glial cocultures) and in vivo (acute hippocampal slices 48 hours after preconditioning) models of IPC or PKCɛ activation. BDNF protein expression increased 24 to 48 hours after preconditioning, where inhibition of the BDNF Trk receptors abolished neuroprotection against oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in vitro. In addition, there was a significant decrease in neuronal firing frequency and increase in threshold potential 48 hours after preconditioning in vivo, where this threshold modulation was dependent on BDNF activation of Trk receptors in excitatory cortical neurons. In addition, 48 hours after PKCɛ activation in vivo, the onset of anoxic depolarization during OGD was significantly delayed in hippocampal slices. Overall, these results suggest that after IPC or PKCɛ activation, there are BDNF-dependent electrophysiologic modifications that lead to neuroprotection. PMID:25370861

  12. Suppression of lipin-1 expression increases monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Hiranaka, Natsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yui, Tomoo; Akanuma, Masayasu; Oka, Kazuya; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Yoshida, Mika; Naito, Sumiyoshi; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 affects lipid metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adipose lipin-1 expression is reduced in obesity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 depletion using siRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes increased MCP-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipin-1 is involved in adipose inflammation. -- Abstract: Lipin-1 plays a crucial role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and cell differentiation in adipocytes. Expression of adipose lipin-1 is reduced in obesity, and metabolic syndrome. However, the significance of this reduction remains unclear. This study investigated if and how reduced lipin-1 expression affected metabolism. We assessed mRNA expression levels of various genes related to adipocyte metabolism in lipin-1-depleted 3T3-L1 adipocytes by introducing its specific small interfering RNA. In lipin-1-depleted adipocytes, mRNA and protein expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased, although the other genes tested were not altered. The conditioned media from the cells promoted monocyte chemotaxis. The increase in MCP-1 expression was prevented by treatment with quinazoline or salicylate, inhibitors of nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation. Because MCP-1 is related to adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance, these results suggest that a reduction in adipose lipin-1 in obesity may exacerbate adipose inflammation and metabolism.

  13. Protein Kinase Cζ-dependent LKB1 Serine 428 Phosphorylation Increases LKB1 Nucleus Export and Apoptosis in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ping; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Xu, Jian; Dong, Yunzhou; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2008-01-01

    LKB1 is a serine-threonine protein kinase that, when inhibited, may result in unregulated cell growth and tumor formation. However, how LKB1 is regulated remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to define the upstream signaling events responsible for peroxynitrite (ONOO-)-induced LKB1 activation. Exposure of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells to a low concentration of ONOO- (5 μm) significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser428 and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) at Thr410. These effects were accompanied by increased activity of the lipid phosphatase PTEN, decreased activity and phosphorylation (Ser473) of Akt, and induction of apoptosis. ONOO- enhanced Akt-Ser473 phosphorylation in LKB1-deficient HeLa S3 cells or in HeLa S3 cells transfected with kinase-dead LKB1. Conversely, ONOO- inhibited Akt Ser473 phosphorylation when wild type LKB1 were reintroduced in HeLa S3 cells. Further analysis revealed that PKCζ directly phosphorylated LKB1 at Ser428 in vitro and in intact cells, resulting in increased PTEN phosphorylation at Ser380/Thr382/383. Finally, ONOO- enhanced PKCζ nuclear import and LKB1 nuclear export. We conclude that PKCζ mediates LKB1-dependent Akt inhibition in response to ONOO-, resulting in endothelial apoptosis. PMID:18321849

  14. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitor, sodium butyrate, attenuates gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity by increasing prohibitin protein expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefeng; Zhang, Baimin; Hong, Xin; Zhang, Xiuhe; Kong, Xiangbo

    2013-05-01

    The major purpose in our study was to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (NaBu) on nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin in rats and determine further whether the protective effect is mediated by modulation of prohibitin protein expression. Gentamicin was injected intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 8 days to induce nephrotoxicity. The effect of acute and chronic treatment of sodium butyrate on nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin was assessed. Various doses of sodium butyrate (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min prior to the daily gentamicin injection. Histological analysis was used to evaluate the lesions in kidney after gentamicin administration. Expression of prohibitin was evaluated with immunohistochemical and western blot analysis. The present study demonstrated that gentamicin treatment for 8 consecutive days significantly increased in the levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) which indicated nephrotoxicity induced by gentamicin. In addition, chronic treatment with NaBu significantly attenuated gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity by increasing activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione. Immunohistochemical studies in gentamicin-induced rats also demonstrated an increase in the levels of inducible prohibitin after treatment with sodium butyrate. Our results indicated that sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, decreased gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity by enhancing renal antioxidant enzymes activity and the expression of prohibitin protein.

  16. The chitinase-like protein YKL-40 increases mucin5AC production in human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M.

    2013-11-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production remain elusive. Recently, the level of YKL-40, a chitinase-like protein, has been found to be significantly increased in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. In this study, we sought to explore the effect of YKL-40 on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that elevated YKL-40 levels increased the mRNA and protein expression of MUC5AC in a dose- and time-dependent manner, in association with the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), reflecting their activation. These responses were significantly suppressed by the knockdown of protease-activating receptor 2 (PAR2) with specific small interfering RNA or the inhibitors of ERK and NF-κB. YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overproduction was also effectively attenuated by the inhibitor of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Taken together, these results imply that YKL-40 can stimulate excessive MUC5AC production through PAR2- and FAK-mediated mechanisms. - Highlights: • MUC5AC is the major secreted mucin in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 is a prototype of the chitinase-like protein in mammals. • YKL-40 is an active player in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. • YKL-40 can increase MUC5AC production via PAR2-mediated pathway. • FAK is another candidate to mediate YKL-40-induced MUC5AC overexpression.

  17. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP. PMID:26852865

  18. Increased Systemic Exposure of Methotrexate by a Polyphenol-Rich Herb via Modulation on Efflux Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Ping; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Shia, Chi-Sheng; Hsu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Jen-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Yo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Scutellariae radix (SR, roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi), a popular Chinese medicine, contains plenty of flavonoids such as baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, and wogonin. Methotrexate (MTX), an important immunosuppressant with a narrow therapeutic index, is a substrate of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). This study investigated the effect of SR on MTX pharmacokinetics and the underlying mechanisms. Rats were orally administered MTX alone and with 1.0 or 2.0 g/kg of SR. The serum concentrations of MTX were determined by a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Cell models were used to explore the involvement of MRP2 and BCRP in the interaction. The results showed that 1.0 g/kg of SR significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-30), AUC(0-2880), and mean residence time (MRT) of MTX by 50%, 45%, 501%, and 347%, respectively, and 2.0 g/kg of SR significantly enhanced the AUC(0-2880) and MRT by 242% and 293%, respectively, but decreased AUC(0-30) by 41%. Cell line studies indicated that SR activated the BCRP-mediated efflux transport, whereas the serum metabolites of SR inhibited both the BCRP- and MRP2-mediated efflux transports. In conclusion, SR ingestion increased the systemic exposure and MRT of MTX via modulation on MRP2 and BCRP.

  19. Pharmacological characterization of the involvement of protein kinase C in oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morita, Mitsuhiro; Nakane, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Kudo, Yoshihisa

    2015-09-01

    Evidence increasingly shows that astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology via calcium dependent processes, thus the characterization of the calcium dynamics in astrocytes is of growing importance. We have previously reported that the epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor up-regulate the oscillation of the calcium releases that are induced by stimuli, including glutamate in cultured astrocytes. This calcium oscillation is assumed to involve protein kinase C (PKC), which is activated together with the calcium releases as a consequence of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. In the present study, this issue has been investigated pharmacologically by using astrocytes cultured with and without the growth factors. The pharmacological activation of PKC largely reduced the glutamate-induced oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases. Meanwhile, PKC inhibitors increased the total amounts of both calcium increases without affecting the peak amplitudes and converted the calcium oscillations to non-oscillatory sustained calcium increases by abolishing the falling phases of the repetitive calcium increases. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects were consistent between both glutamate- and histamine-induced calcium oscillations. These results suggest that PKC up-regulates the removal of cytosolic calcium in astrocytes, and this up-regulation is essential for calcium oscillation in astrocytes cultured with growth factors.

  20. O-GlcNAc Protein Modification in Cancer Cells Increases in Response to Glucose Deprivation through Glycogen Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong Gu; Park, Sang Yoon; Ji, Suena; Jang, Insook; Park, Sujin; Kim, Hyun Sil; Kim, Sung-Min; Yook, Jong In; Park, Yong-Il; Roth, Jürgen; Cho, Jin Won

    2009-01-01

    When cellular glucose concentrations fall below normal levels, in general the extent of protein O-GlcNAc modification (O-GlcNAcylation) decreases. However, recent reports demonstrated increased O-GlcNAcylation by glucose deprivation in HepG2 and Neuro-2a cells. Here, we report increased O-GlcNAcylation in non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells and various other cells in response to glucose deprivation. Although the level of O-GlcNAc transferase was unchanged, the enzyme contained less O-GlcNAc, and its activity was increased. Moreover, O-GlcNAcase activity was reduced. The studied cells contain glycogen, and we show that its degradation in response to glucose deprivation provides a source for UDP-GlcNAc required for increased O-GlcNAcylation under this condition. This required active glycogen phosphorylase and resulted in increased glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. Interestingly, glucose deprivation reduced the amount of phosphofructokinase 1, a regulatory glycolytic enzyme, and blocked ATP synthesis. These findings suggest that glycogen is the source for increased O-GlcNAcylation but not for generating ATP in response to glucose deprivation and that this may be useful for cancer cells to survive. PMID:19833729

  1. Fluorescent Probe Encapsulated in SNAP-Tag Protein Cavity To Eliminate Nonspecific Fluorescence and Increase Detection Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Syun; Gao, Ruo-Cing; Wu, Ting-Wei; Cho, Chien; Tan, Kui-Thong

    2016-08-17

    Despite the promising improvements made recently on fluorescence probes for the detection of enzymes and reactive small molecules, two fundamental problems remain: weaker fluorescence of many dyes in aqueous buffers and strong nonspecific signals in samples containing high protein levels. In this paper, we introduce a novel fluorescent probe encapsulated in protein cavity (FPEPC) concept as demonstrated by SNAP-tag protein and three environment-sensitive fluorescence probes to overcome these two problems. The probes were constructed by following the current probe design for enzymes and reactive small molecules but with an additional benzylguanine moiety for selective SNAP-tag conjugation. The SNAP-tag conjugated probes achieved quantitative nitroreductase and hydrogen sulfide detection in blood plasma, whereas analyte concentrations were overestimated up to 700-fold when bare fluorescent probes were employed for detection. Furthermore, detection sensitivity was increased dramatically, as our probes displayed 390-fold fluorescence enhancement upon SNAP-tag conjugation, in stark contrast to the weak fluorescence of the free probes in aqueous solutions. Compared with the conventional approaches where fluorescent probes are encapsulated into polymers and nanoparticles, our simple and general approach successfully overcame many key issues such as dye leakage, long preparation steps, inconsistent dye-host ratios, difficulty in constructing in situ in a complex medium, and limited application to detect only small metabolites. PMID:27463260

  2. Caffeine promotes autophagy in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mathew, T S; Ferris, R K; Downs, R M; Kinsey, S T; Baumgarner, B L

    2014-10-24

    Caffeine has been shown to promote calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AMPK-dependent glucose and fatty acid uptake in mammalian skeletal muscle. Though caffeine has been shown to promote autophagy in various mammalian cell lines it is unclear if caffeine-induced autophagy is related to the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of calcium-dependent AMPK activation in regulating caffeine-induced autophagy in mammalian skeletal muscle cells. We discovered that the addition of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C could significantly reduce the expression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b-II (LC3b-II) and autophagic vesicle accumulation in caffeine treated skeletal muscle cells. Additional experiments using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinases CaMKKβ and CaMKII contributed to the AMPK-dependent expression of LC3b-II and autophagic vesicle accumulation in a caffeine dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that in skeletal muscle cells caffeine increases autophagy by promoting the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK.

  3. Increased recombinant protein production owing to expanded opportunities for vector integration in high chromosome number Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Noriko; Takahashi, Mai; Ali Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad; Onitsuka, Masayoshi; Kumamoto, Toshitaka; Frank, Jana; Omasa, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal instability is a characteristic of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cultures of these cells gradually develop heterogeneity even if established from a single cell clone. We isolated cells containing different numbers of chromosomes from a CHO-DG44-based human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF)-producing cell line and found that high chromosome number cells showed higher hGM-CSF productivity. Therefore, we focused on the relationship between chromosome aneuploidy of CHO cells and high recombinant protein-producing cell lines. Distribution and stability of chromosomes were examined in CHO-DG44 cells, and two cell lines expressing different numbers of chromosomes were isolated from the original CHO-DG44 cell line to investigate the effect of aneuploid cells on recombinant protein production. Both cell lines were stably transfected with a vector that expresses immunoglobulin G3 (IgG3), and specific antibody production rates were compared. Cells containing more than 30 chromosomes had higher specific antibody production rates than those with normal chromosome number. Single cell analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (Egfp)-gene transfected cells revealed that increased GFP expression was relative to the number of gene integration sites rather than the difference in chromosome numbers or vector locations. Our results suggest that CHO cells with high numbers of chromosomes contain more sites for vector integration, a characteristic that could be advantageous in biopharmaceutical production.

  4. Ski protein levels increase during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Pirisi, Lucia; Creek, Kim E

    2013-09-01

    We compared the levels of the Ski oncoprotein, an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling, in normal human keratinocytes (HKc), HPV16 immortalized HKc (HKc/HPV16), and differentiation resistant HKc/HPV16 (HKc/DR) in the absence and presence of TGF-β. Steady-state Ski protein levels increased in HKc/HPV16 and even further in HKc/DR, compared to HKc. TGF-β treatment of HKc, HKc/HPV16, and HKc/DR dramatically decreased Ski. TGF-β-induced Ski degradation was delayed in HKc/DR. Ski and phospho-Ski protein levels are cell cycle dependent with maximal Ski expression and localization to centrosomes and mitotic spindles during G2/M. ShRNA knock down of Ski in HKc/DR inhibited cell proliferation. More intense nuclear and cytoplasmic Ski staining and altered Ski localization were found in cervical cancer samples compared to adjacent normal tissue in a cervical cancer tissue array. Overall, these studies demonstrate altered Ski protein levels, degradation and localization in HPV16-transformed human keratinocytes and in cervical cancer.

  5. Protein kinase A induces UCP1 expression in specific adipose depots to increase energy expenditure and improve metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Lorna M; Gandhi, Shriya; Layden, Brian T; Cohen, Ronald N; Wicksteed, Barton

    2016-07-01

    Adipose tissue PKA has roles in adipogenesis, lipolysis, and mitochondrial function. PKA transduces the cAMP signal downstream of G protein-coupled receptors, which are being explored for therapeutic manipulation to reduce obesity and improve metabolic health. This study aimed to determine the overall physiological consequences of PKA activation in adipose tissue. Mice expressing an activated PKA catalytic subunit in adipose tissue (Adipoq-caPKA mice) showed increased PKA activity in subcutaneous, epididymal, and mesenteric white adipose tissue (WAT) depots and brown adipose tissue (BAT) compared with controls. Adipoq-caPKA mice weaned onto a high-fat diet (HFD) or switched to the HFD at 26 wk of age were protected from diet-induced weight gain. Metabolic health was improved, with enhanced insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and β-cell function. Adipose tissue health was improved, with smaller adipocyte size and reduced macrophage engulfment of adipocytes. Using metabolic cages, we found that Adipoq-caPKA mice were shown to have increased energy expenditure, but no difference to littermate controls in physical activity or food consumption. Immunoblotting of adipose tissue showed increased expression of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) in BAT and dramatic UCP1 induction in subcutaneous WAT, but no induction in the visceral depots. Feeding a HFD increased PKA activity in epididymal WAT of wild-type mice compared with chow, but did not change PKA activity in subcutaneous WAT or BAT. This was associated with changes in PKA regulatory subunit expression. This study shows that adipose tissue PKA activity is sufficient to increase energy expenditure and indicates that PKA is a beneficial target in metabolic health. PMID:27097660

  6. Introducing a Rigid Loop Structure from Deer into Mouse Prion Protein Increases Its Propensity for Misfolding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Leah M.; John, Theodore R.; Schätzl, Hermann M.; Lewis, Randolph V.

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPc) into the disease-associated isoform (PrPSc) that has increased β-sheet content and partial resistance to proteolytic digestion. Prion diseases from different mammalian species have varying propensities for transmission upon exposure of an uninfected host to the infectious agent. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a highly transmissible prion disease that affects free ranging and farmed populations of cervids including deer, elk and moose, as well as other mammals in experimental settings. The molecular mechanisms allowing CWD to maintain comparatively high transmission rates have not been determined. Previous work has identified a unique structural feature in cervid PrP, a rigid loop between β-sheet 2 and α-helix 2 on the surface of the protein. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the rigid loop has a direct influence on the misfolding process. The rigid loop was introduced into murine PrP as the result of two amino acid substitutions: S170N and N174T. Wild-type and rigid loop murine PrP were expressed in E. coli and purified. Misfolding propensity was compared for the two proteins using biochemical techniques and cell free misfolding and conversion systems. Murine PrP with a rigid loop misfolded in cell free systems with greater propensity than wild type murine PrP. In a lipid-based conversion assay, rigid loop PrP converted to a PK resistant, aggregated isoform at lower concentrations than wild-type PrP. Using both proteins as substrates in real time quaking-induced conversion, rigid loop PrP adopted a misfolded isoform more readily than wild type PrP. Taken together, these findings may help explain the high transmission rates observed for CWD within cervids. PMID:23825561

  7. Cucumber metal transport protein MTP8 confers increased tolerance to manganese when expressed in yeast and Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Migocka, Magdalena; Papierniak, Anna; Maciaszczyk-Dziubińska, Ewa; Poździk, Piotr; Posyniak, Ewelina; Garbiec, Arnold; Filleur, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) proteins are ubiquitous divalent cation transporters that have been proved to be essential for metal homeostasis and tolerance in Archaebacteria, Bacteria, and Eukaryota. In plants, CDFs are designated as metal tolerance proteins (MTPs). Due to the lack of genomic resources, studies on MTPs in other plants, including cultivated crops, are lacking. Here, the identification and organization of genes encoding members of the MTP family in cucumber are described. The first functional characterization of a cucumber gene encoding a member of the Mn-CDF subgroup of CDF proteins, designated as CsMTP8 based on the highest homology to plant MTP8, is also presented. The expression of CsMTP8 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to increased Mn accumulation in yeast cells and fully restored the growth of mutants hypersensitive to Mn in Mn excess. Similarly, the overexpression of CsMTP8 in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced plant tolerance to high Mn in nutrition media as well as the accumulation of Mn in plant tissues. When fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), CsMTP8 localized to the vacuolar membranes in yeast cells and to Arabidopsis protoplasts. In cucumber, CsMTP8 was expressed almost exclusively in roots, and the level of gene transcript was markedly up-regulated or reduced under elevated Mn or Mn deficiency, respectively. Taken together, the results suggest that CsMTP8 is an Mn transporter localized in the vacuolar membrane, which participates in the maintenance of Mn homeostasis in cucumber root cells. PMID:25039075

  8. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) Host Cell Engineering to Increase Sialylation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins by Modulating Sialyltransferase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nan; Mascarenhas, Joaquina; Sealover, Natalie R.; George, Henry J.; Brooks, Jeanne; Kayser, Kevin J.; Gau, Brian; Yasa, Isil; Azadi, Parastoo; Archer-Hartmann, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans of human proteins possess both α2,6- and α2,3-linked terminal sialic acid (SA). Recombinant glycoproteins produced in Chinese hamster overy (CHO) only have α2,3-linkage due to the absence of α2,6-sialyltransferase (St6gal1) expression. The Chinese hamster ST6GAL1 was successfully overexpressed using a plasmid expression vector in three recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG)-producing CHO cell lines. The stably transfected cell lines were enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression using FITC-Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectin that preferentially binds α2,6-linked SA. The presence of α2,6-linked SA was confirmed using a novel LTQ Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (LTQ MS) method including MSn fragmentation in the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27. Furthermore, the total SA (mol/mol) in IgG produced by the enriched ST6GAL1 Clone 27 increased by 2-fold compared to the control. For host cell engineering, the CHOZN® GS host cell line was transfected and enriched for ST6GAL1 overexpression. Single-cell clones were derived from the enriched population and selected based on FITC-SNA staining and St6gal1 expression. Two clones (“ST6GAL1 OE Clone 31 and 32”) were confirmed for the presence of α2,6-linked SA in total host cell protein extracts. ST6GAL1 OE Clone 32 was subsequently used to express SAFC human IgG1. The recombinant IgG expressed in this host cell line was confirmed to have α2,6-linked SA and increased total SA content. In conclusion, overexpression of St6gal1 is sufficient to produce recombinant proteins with increased sialylation and more human-like glycoprofiles without combinatorial engineering of other sialylation pathway genes. This work represents our ongoing effort of glycoengineering in CHO host cell lines for the development of “bio-better” protein therapeutics and cell culture vaccine production. PMID:25641927

  9. Modulating bone cells response onto starch-based biomaterials by surface plasma treatment and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Alves, Catarina M; Yang, Y; Carnes, D L; Ong, J L; Sylvia, V L; Dean, D D; Agrawal, C M; Reis, R L

    2007-01-01

    The effect of oxygen-based radio frequency glow discharge (rfGD) on the surface of different starch-based biomaterials (SBB) and the influence of proteins adsorption on modulating bone-cells behavior was studied. Bovine serum albumin, fibronectin and vitronectin were used in single and complex protein systems. RfGD-treated surfaces showed to increase in hydrophilicity and surface energy when compared to non-modified SBB. Biodegradable polymeric blends of cornstarch with cellulose acetate (SCA; 50/50wt%), ethylene vinyl alcohol (SEVA-C; 50/50wt%) and polycaprolactone (SPCL; 30/70wt%) were studied. SCA and SCA reinforced with 10% hydroxyapatite (HA) showed the highest degree of modification as result of the rfGD treatment. Protein and control solutions were used to incubate with the characterized SBB and, following this, MG63 osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells were seeded over the surfaces. Cell adhesion and proliferation onto SCA was found to be enhanced for non-treated surfaces and on SCA+10%HA no alteration was brought up by the plasma modification. Onto SCA surfaces, BSA, FN and VN single solutions improved cell adhesion, and this same effect was found upscaled for ternary systems. In addition, plasma treated SEVA-C directed an increase in both adhesion and proliferation comparing to non-treated surfaces. Even though adhesion onto treated and untreated SPCL was quite similar, plasma modification clearly promoted MG63 cells proliferation. Regarding MG63 cells morphology it was shown that onto SEVA-C surfaces the variation of cell shape was primarily defined by the protein system, while onto SPCL it was mainly affected by the plasma treatment. PMID:17011619

  10. Modulating bone cells response onto starch-based biomaterials by surface plasma treatment and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Alves, Catarina M; Yang, Y; Carnes, D L; Ong, J L; Sylvia, V L; Dean, D D; Agrawal, C M; Reis, R L

    2007-01-01

    The effect of oxygen-based radio frequency glow discharge (rfGD) on the surface of different starch-based biomaterials (SBB) and the influence of proteins adsorption on modulating bone-cells behavior was studied. Bovine serum albumin, fibronectin and vitronectin were used in single and complex protein systems. RfGD-treated surfaces showed to increase in hydrophilicity and surface energy when compared to non-modified SBB. Biodegradable polymeric blends of cornstarch with cellulose acetate (SCA; 50/50wt%), ethylene vinyl alcohol (SEVA-C; 50/50wt%) and polycaprolactone (SPCL; 30/70wt%) were studied. SCA and SCA reinforced with 10% hydroxyapatite (HA) showed the highest degree of modification as result of the rfGD treatment. Protein and control solutions were used to incubate with the characterized SBB and, following this, MG63 osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells were seeded over the surfaces. Cell adhesion and proliferation onto SCA was found to be enhanced for non-treated surfaces and on SCA+10%HA no alteration was brought up by the plasma modification. Onto SCA surfaces, BSA, FN and VN single solutions improved cell adhesion, and this same effect was found upscaled for ternary systems. In addition, plasma treated SEVA-C directed an increase in both adhesion and proliferation comparing to non-treated surfaces. Even though adhesion onto treated and untreated SPCL was quite similar, plasma modification clearly promoted MG63 cells proliferation. Regarding MG63 cells morphology it was shown that onto SEVA-C surfaces the variation of cell shape was primarily defined by the protein system, while onto SPCL it was mainly affected by the plasma treatment.

  11. Amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) affects the actin cytoskeleton and increases pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sheinin, Yuri; Naslavsky, Naava; Pan, Zenggang; Smith, Brittney L.; Peters, Haley L.; Radhakrishnan, Prakash; McKenna, Nicole R.; Giridharan, Sai Srinivas Panapakkam; Haridas, Dhanya; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; MacDonald, Richard G.; Meza, Jane L.; Caplan, Steve; Batra, Surinder K.; Solheim, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) is aberrantly expressed in pancreatic cancer. Here we showed that APLP2 is increased in pancreatic cancer metastases, particularly in metastatic lesions found in the diaphragm and intestine. Examination of matched human primary tumor-liver metastasis pairs showed that 38.1% of the patients had positive APLP2 expression in both the primary tumor and the corresponding liver metastasis. Stable knock-down of APLP2 expression (with inducible shRNA) in pancreatic cancer cells reduced the ability of these cells to migrate and invade. Loss of APLP2 decreased cortical actin and increased intracellular actin filaments in pancreatic cancer cells. Down-regulation of APLP2 decreased the weight and metastasis of orthotopically transplanted pancreatic tumors in nude mice. PMID:25576918

  12. Endothelin stimulates a sustained 1,2-diacylglycerol increase and protein kinase C activation in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.; Chao, T.; Hu, K.Q.; King, G.L.

    1989-07-14

    Endothelin is a long-lasting potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We report here that in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells, endothelin biphasically increased total cellular diacylglycerol (DAG) content. When cellular DAG was labeled with (/sup 14/C) glycerol for 48h, endothelin stimulated (/sup 14/C)DAG formation in a biphasic pattern. Only one prolonged phase of DAG accumulation was observed when cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)glycerol for 2 h. Endothelin induced an increase in the membranous protein kinase C (PKC) activities, which lasted for more than 20 min. These data suggest that (i) endothelin stimulates a sustained generation of DAG, (ii) this accumulation of DAG results in a sustained translocation of cytosolic PKC activities to the membrane.

  13. 17-AAG improves cognitive process and increases heat shock protein response in a model lesion with Aβ25-35.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Laura; Calvillo, Minerva; Luna, Félix; Pérez-Severiano, Francisca; Rubio-Osornio, Moisés; Guevara, Jorge; Limón, Ilhuicamina Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Molecular chaperones, or heat shock proteins (HSP), have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates, such as Alzheimer disease. The agglomeration of insoluble structures of Aβ is thought to be responsible for neuronal death, which in turn leads to the loss of cognitive functions. Recent findings have shown that the induction of HSP decreases the level of abnormal protein aggregates, as well as demonstrating that 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an analogue of geldanamycin (GA), increases Aβ clearance through the induction of molecular chaperones in cell culture. In light of this discovery that HSP overexpression can be neuroprotective, the search for a way to pharmacologically induce the overexpression of HSP and other associated chaperones may lead to a promising approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate both the effect of 17-AAG on the cognitive process and the HSP response in rats injected with Aβ25-35 into the CA1 of the hippocampus. The results show that the injection of Aβ caused a significant increase in the expression of the HSP involved in the regulation of cellular proteostasis. While the HSP did not reverse excitotoxic damage, given that experimental subjects showed learning and memory deficits, the administration of 17-AAG prior to the injection of Aβ25-35 did show an improvement in the behavioral assessment that correlated with the upregulation of HSP70 in subjects injured with Aβ. Overall, our data shows that the pharmacological induction of HSP using 17-AAG may be an alternative treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. 17-AAG improves cognitive process and increases heat shock protein response in a model lesion with Aβ25-35.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Laura; Calvillo, Minerva; Luna, Félix; Pérez-Severiano, Francisca; Rubio-Osornio, Moisés; Guevara, Jorge; Limón, Ilhuicamina Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Molecular chaperones, or heat shock proteins (HSP), have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates, such as Alzheimer disease. The agglomeration of insoluble structures of Aβ is thought to be responsible for neuronal death, which in turn leads to the loss of cognitive functions. Recent findings have shown that the induction of HSP decreases the level of abnormal protein aggregates, as well as demonstrating that 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), an analogue of geldanamycin (GA), increases Aβ clearance through the induction of molecular chaperones in cell culture. In light of this discovery that HSP overexpression can be neuroprotective, the search for a way to pharmacologically induce the overexpression of HSP and other associated chaperones may lead to a promising approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate both the effect of 17-AAG on the cognitive process and the HSP response in rats injected with Aβ25-35 into the CA1 of the hippocampus. The results show that the injection of Aβ caused a significant increase in the expression of the HSP involved in the regulation of cellular proteostasis. While the HSP did not reverse excitotoxic damage, given that experimental subjects showed learning and memory deficits, the administration of 17-AAG prior to the injection of Aβ25-35 did show an improvement in the behavioral assessment that correlated with the upregulation of HSP70 in subjects injured with Aβ. Overall, our data shows that the pharmacological induction of HSP using 17-AAG may be an alternative treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24819277

  15. Increased protein kinase C gamma activity induces Purkinje cell pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia 14.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jingmin; Hassler, Melanie L; Shimobayashi, Etsuko; Paka, Nagendher; Streit, Raphael; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2014-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are hereditary diseases leading to Purkinje cell degeneration and cerebellar dysfunction. Most forms of SCA are caused by expansion of CAG repeats similar to other polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease. In contrast, in the autosomal dominant SCA-14 the disease is caused by mutations in the protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) gene which is a well characterized signaling molecule in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The study of SCA-14, therefore, offers the unique opportunity to reveal the molecular and pathological mechanism eventually leading to Purkinje cell dysfunction and degeneration. We have created a mouse model of SCA-14 in which PKCγ protein with a mutation found in SCA-14 is specifically expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. We find that in mice expressing the mutated PKCγ protein the morphology of Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures is drastically altered and mimics closely the morphology seen after pharmacological PKC activation. Similar morphological abnormalities were seen in localized areas of the cerebellum of juvenile transgenic mice in vivo. In adult transgenic mice there is evidence for some localized loss of Purkinje cells but there is no overall cerebellar atrophy. Transgenic mice show a mild cerebellar ataxia revealed by testing on the rotarod and on the walking beam. Our findings provide evidence for both an increased PKCγ activity in Purkinje cells in vivo and for pathological changes typical for cerebellar disease thus linking the increased and dysregulated activity of PKCγ tightly to the development of cerebellar disease in SCA-14 and possibly also in other forms of SCA.

  16. Nitric oxide increases Wnt-induced secreted protein-1 (WISP-1/CCN4) expression and function in colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongying; Zhang, Rui; Wen, Shoubin; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Beck, Paul L; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) derived from the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) is an important and complex mediator of inflammation in the intestine. Wnt-inducible secreted protein (WISP)-1 (CCN4), a member of the connective tissue growth factor family, is involved in tissue repair. We sought to determine the relationship between iNOS and WISP-1 in colitis. By analyzing human colonic biopsy samples, we showed that the expression of mRNA for both iNOS and WISP-1 was significantly higher in ulcerative colitis samples compared with control tissue. The upregulation of WISP-1 was positively correlated with iNOS expression in two models of colitis, induced by intrarectal trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) or occurring spontaneously in IL-10 deficient mice. Loss of iNOS, studied using iNOS(-/-) mice in both TNBS-induced and IL-10(-/-) colitis models, significantly attenuated the colitis-related WISP-1 increase. In human colonic epithelial cell lines, the NO donor, DETA-NONOate, elevated WISP-1 mRNA and protein expression through a beta-catenin and CREB-dependent, but Wnt-1-independent, pathway. In addition, NO-induced WISP-1 directly induced secretion of soluble collagen in colonic fibroblast cells. NO increases WISP-1 expression both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a new role for iNOS and NO in colitis.

  17. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39-40, 56-57 and 79-80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  18. Modified recombinant adenoviruses increase porcine circovirus 2 capsid protein expression and induce enhanced immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, D L; Huang, Y; Chang, L L; DU, Q; Chen, Y; Wang, T T; Luo, X M; Zhao, X M; Tong, D W

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary viral pathogen of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD) and vaccination is an important method to prevent and control the disease. The expression of PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) in adenovirus vector system has been investigated, but the poor immune responses limit its application. In this study, transcriptional enhancer element largest intron of the human cytomegalovirus (Intron A) and woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) were applied to increase the immunogenicity of PCV2 Cap adenovirus-based vaccine. Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) analysis showed that modified adenoviruses with Intron A and WPRE alone or both could significantly increase the expression of Cap compared to the unmodified adenoviruses. Furthermore, the humoral and cellular immune responses of the constructed recombinant adenoviruses were evaluated in mice. Indirect ELISA, virus neutralizing test and western blot showed that modified adenoviruses elicited higher humoral immune responses than unmodified adenovirus, and Intron A-WPRE-modified virus immunized group had better immune response than the others. Besides, the results of lymphocyte proliferation response and cytokines release assay showed that enhanced cellular immune responses were induced by modified adenoviruses. These results demonstrated that Intron A and WPRE significantly improved the expression of the Cap protein in adenovirus vector system and enhanced the immune responses in mice, making the adenovirus vector system more applicable against PCV2. PMID:27640437

  19. Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein Fold–Containing Family Member A1 in Airway Host Protection and Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Clemente J.

    2015-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold–containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease. PMID:25265466

  20. Loss of Oca2 disrupts the unfolded protein response and increases resistance to endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsing; Orlow, Seth J; Manga, Prashiela

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) typically induces stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR) to facilitate recovery. If homeostasis is not restored, apoptosis is induced. However, adaptation to chronic UPR activation can increase resistance to subsequent acute ER stress. We therefore investigated adaptive mechanisms in Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (Oca2)-null melanocytes where UPR signaling is arrested despite continued tyrosinase accumulation leading to resistance to the chemical ER stressor thapsigargin. Although thapsigargin triggers UPR activation, instead of Perk-mediated phosphorylation of eIF2α, in Oca2-null melanocytes, eIF2α was rapidly dephosphorylated upon treatment. Dephosphorylation was mediated by the Gadd34-PP1α phosphatase complex. Gadd34-complex inhibition blocked eIF2α dephosphorylation and significantly increased Oca2-null melanocyte sensitivity to thapsigargin. Thus, Oca2-null melanocytes adapt to acute ER stress by disruption of pro-apoptotic Perk signaling, which promotes cell survival. This is the first study to demonstrate rapid eIF2α dephosphorylation as an adaptive mechanism to ER stress.

  1. Increased DUX4 expression during muscle differentiation correlates with decreased SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4.

    PubMed

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E; Shadle, Sean; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; van der Vliet, Patrick J; Krom, Yvonne D; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L; de Jong, Annika; F Lemmers, Richard J L; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is caused by incomplete epigenetic repression of the transcription factor DUX4 in skeletal muscle. A copy of DUX4 is located within each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array and its derepression in somatic cells is caused by either repeat array contraction (FSHD1) or by mutations in the chromatin repressor SMCHD1 (FSHD2). While DUX4 expression has thus far only been detected in FSHD muscle and muscle cell cultures, and increases with in vitro myogenic differentiation, the D4Z4 chromatin structure has only been studied in proliferating myoblasts or non-myogenic cells. We here show that SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4 decline during muscle cell differentiation and correlate with DUX4 derepression. In FSHD2, but not FSHD1, the loss of SMCHD1 repressor activity is partially compensated by increased Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated H3K27 trimethylation at D4Z4, a situation that can be mimicked by SMCHD1 knockdown in control myotubes. In contrast, moderate overexpression of SMCHD1 results in DUX4 silencing in FSHD1 and FSHD2 myotubes demonstrating that DUX4 derepression in FSHD is reversible. Together, we show that in FSHD1 and FSHD2 the decline in SMCHD1 protein levels during muscle cell differentiation renders skeletal muscle sensitive to DUX4. PMID:26575099

  2. Increased DUX4 expression during muscle differentiation correlates with decreased SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Judit; Thijssen, Peter E.; Shadle, Sean; Straasheijm, Kirsten R.; van der Vliet, Patrick J.; Krom, Yvonne D.; van den Boogaard, Marlinde L.; de Jong, Annika; F Lemmers, Richard J. L.; Tawil, Rabi; Tapscott, Stephen J.; van der Maarel, Silvère M.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is caused by incomplete epigenetic repression of the transcription factor DUX4 in skeletal muscle. A copy of DUX4 is located within each unit of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array and its derepression in somatic cells is caused by either repeat array contraction (FSHD1) or by mutations in the chromatin repressor SMCHD1 (FSHD2). While DUX4 expression has thus far only been detected in FSHD muscle and muscle cell cultures, and increases with in vitro myogenic differentiation, the D4Z4 chromatin structure has only been studied in proliferating myoblasts or non-myogenic cells. We here show that SMCHD1 protein levels at D4Z4 decline during muscle cell differentiation and correlate with DUX4 derepression. In FSHD2, but not FSHD1, the loss of SMCHD1 repressor activity is partially compensated by increased Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)–mediated H3K27 trimethylation at D4Z4, a situation that can be mimicked by SMCHD1 knockdown in control myotubes. In contrast, moderate overexpression of SMCHD1 results in DUX4 silencing in FSHD1 and FSHD2 myotubes demonstrating that DUX4 derepression in FSHD is reversible. Together, we show that in FSHD1 and FSHD2 the decline in SMCHD1 protein levels during muscle cell differentiation renders skeletal muscle sensitive to DUX4. PMID:26575099

  3. Bactericidal/Permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 in airway host protection and respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Britto, Clemente J; Cohn, Lauren

    2015-05-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease.

  4. Ligand binding to an Allergenic Lipid Transfer Protein Enhances Conformational Flexibility resulting in an Increase in Susceptibility to Gastroduodenal Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Syed Umer; Alexeev, Yuri; Johnson, Philip E.; Rigby, Neil M.; Mackie, Alan R.; Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Mills, E. N. Clare

    2016-01-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are a family of lipid-binding molecules that are widely distributed across flowering plant species, many of which have been identified as allergens. They are highly resistant to simulated gastroduodenal proteolysis, a property that may play a role in determining their allergenicity and it has been suggested that lipid binding may further increase stability to proteolysis. It is demonstrated that LTPs from wheat and peach bind a range of lipids in a variety of conditions, including those found in the gastroduodenal tract. Both LTPs are initially cleaved during gastroduodenal proteolysis at three major sites between residues 39–40, 56–57 and 79–80, with wheat LTP being more resistant to cleavage than its peach ortholog. The susceptibility of wheat LTP to proteolyic cleavage increases significantly upon lipid binding. This enhanced digestibility is likely to be due to the displacement of Tyr79 and surrounding residues from the internal hydrophobic cavity upon ligand binding to the solvent exposed exterior of the LTP, facilitating proteolysis. Such knowledge contributes to our understanding as to how resistance to digestion can be used in allergenicity risk assessment of novel food proteins, including GMOs. PMID:27458082

  5. Extinction, applied after retrieval of auditory fear memory, selectively increases zinc-finger protein 268 and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 expression in prefrontal cortex and lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Vincenzo; Roquet, Rheall F; DeMis, John; Chiamulera, Cristiano; Monfils, Marie-H

    2014-11-01

    Retrieval of consolidated memories induces a labile phase during which memory can be disrupted or updated through a reconsolidation process. A central component of behavioral updating during reconsolidation using a retrieval-extinction manipulation (Ret+Ext) is the synaptic removal of a calcium-permeable-α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (CP-AMPARs) in the lateral amygdala-a metabotropic GluR1 receptor (mGluR1) dependent mechanism. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Ret+Ext on the expression of molecular markers that could play a role in the reconsolidation process. Specifically, we tested the effects of Ret+Ext on the global expression of zinc-finger 268 protein (Zif268), a marker previously found to be implicated in memory reconsolidation, to confirm its occurrence after retrieval (Ret) and Ret+Ext. We also evaluated the global expression of phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6P), here proposed as a marker of the mGluR1-mediated memory process induced by Ret+Ext. The expression of both markers (zif268, rpS6P) was assessed by immunolocalization in prelimbic cortex (PRL), infralimbic cortex (IL), ventral subdivision of the lateral amygdala (LA) and hippocampus CA1 (CA1) in fear-conditioned rats. Our results showed that retrieval and Ret+Ext, but not extinction alone, increased Zif268 expression in prefrontal cortex and lateral amygdala. Ret+Ext, but not retrieval, retrieval followed by context exposure or extinction alone, increased the expression of rpS6P in prefrontal cortex and LA. In summary, (i) Zif268 increased after retrieval confirming that reconsolidation is engaged in our conditions, (ii) Zif268 increased after Ret+Ext confirming that it does not simply reflect an extinction or reconsolidation disruption (Zif268 level of expression should be lower in both cases) and (iii) rpS6P increased after Ret+Ext, but not after extinction, suggesting, as expected, a potential mGluR1 mediated molecular mechanism specific

  6. Inflammation increases plasma angiopoietin-like protein 4 in patients with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Georgiadi, Anastasia; Jonker, Jacqueline T; van Glabbeek, Marjolijn; Dehnavi, Reza Alizadeh; Tamsma, Jouke T; Smit, Johannes W A; Kersten, Sander; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) inhibits lipoprotein lipase and associates with dyslipidemia. The expression of ANGPTL4 is regulated by free fatty acids (FFA) that activate lipid-sensing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), but FFA can also activate pattern recognition receptors including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in macrophages. Objective To assess whether systemic low-grade inflammation is a determinant for plasma ANGPTL4 levels in patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design We studied 335 male participants: healthy controls (Controls), patients with the MetS without inflammation (MetS−I) and with low-grade inflammation (MetS+I), and patients with T2DM. All patients without diabetes included in the present study were initially matched for waist circumference. In plasma, ANGPTL4, C reactive protein (CRP) and metabolic parameters were determined. Underlying mechanisms were examined using human macrophages in vitro. Results As compared with Controls, plasma ANGPTL4 levels were increased in patients with MetS−I, MetS+I, and T2DM. Furthermore, ANGPTL4 was increased in T2DM compared with MetS−I. In fact, plasma CRP correlated positively with plasma ANGPTL4. In vitro studies showed that TLR 3/4 activation largely increased the expression and release of ANGPTL4 by macrophages. Conclusions Plasma ANGPTL4 levels in humans are predicted by CRP, a marker of inflammation, and ANGPTL4 expression by macrophages is increased by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:25512873

  7. Phosphorylation of Transcription Factor Specificity Protein 4 Is Increased in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of First-Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Montserrat; Meléndez-Pérez, Iria; Villalta-Gil, Victoria; Haro, Josep Maria; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Background Altered expression of transcription factor specificity protein 4 (SP4) has been found in the postmortem brain of patients with psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Reduced levels of SP4 protein have recently been reported in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis. Also, SP4 levels are modulated by lithium treatment in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of SP4 at S770 is increased in the cerebellum of bipolar disorder subjects and upon inhibition of NMDA receptor signaling in cultured neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes of first-episode psychosis patients and the effect of lithium treatment on this phosphorylation. Methods A cross-sectional study of S770 phosphorylation relative to total SP4 immunoreactivity using specific antibodies in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in first-episode psychosis patients (n = 14, treated with lithium or not) and matched healthy controls (n = 14) by immunoblot was designed. We also determined the effects of the prescribed drugs lithium, olanzapine or valproic acid on SP4 phosphorylation in rat primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Results We found that SP4 S770 phosphorylation was significantly increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis compared to controls and decreased in patients treated with lithium compared to patients who did not receive lithium. Moreover, incubation with lithium but not olanzapine or valproic acid reduced SP4 phosphorylation in rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Conclusions The findings presented here indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in lymphocytes in first-episode psychosis which may be reduced by lithium treatment in patients. Moreover, our study shows lithium treatment prevents this phosphorylation in vitro in neurons. This pilot study suggests that S770 SP4 phosphorylation could be a peripheral biomarker of psychosis, and may

  8. Heat Shock Protein-90 Inhibitors Enhance Antigen Expression on Melanomas and Increase T Cell Recognition of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Timothy J.; Dunn, Ian S.; Rose, Lenora B.; Newton, Estelle E.; Pandolfi, Franco; Kurnick, James T.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90) share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:25503774

  9. Dephosphorylation of eIF2α is essential for protein synthesis increase and cell cycle progression after sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Costache, Vlad; Bilotto, Stefania; Laguerre, Laurent; Bellé, Robert; Cosson, Bertrand; Cormier, Patrick; Morales, Julia

    2012-05-01

    The eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2) is a key regulator of protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, implicated in the initiation step of translation. Fertilization of the sea urchin eggs triggers a rapid increase in protein synthesis activity, which is necessary for the progress into embryonic cell cycles. Here we demonstrate that fertilization triggers eIF2α dephosphorylation, concomitant with an increase in protein synthesis and that induction of the eIF2α phosphorylation is intimately linked with an inhibition of protein synthesis and cell cycle arrest. Using a phospho-mimetic protein microinjected into sea urchin eggs, we showed that dephosphorylation of eIF2α is necessary for protein synthesis activity and cell division progression following fertilization. Our results demonstrate that regulation of eIF2α plays an important role in the protein synthesis rise that occurs during early development following fertilization.

  10. Seed-Specific Expression of the Arabidopsis AtMAP18 Gene Increases both Lysine and Total Protein Content in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yujie; Shen, Erli; Wen, Liuying; Yu, Jingjuan; Zhu, Dengyun; Zhao, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Lysine is the most limiting essential amino acid for animal nutrition in maize grains. Expression of naturally lysine-rich protein genes can increase the lysine and protein contents in maize seeds. AtMAP18 from Arabidopsis thaliana encoding a microtubule-associated protein with high-lysine content was introduced into the maize genome with the seed-specific promoter F128. The protein and lysine contents of different transgenic offspring were increased prominently in the six continuous generations investigated. Expression of AtMAP18 increased both zein and non-zein protein in the transgenic endosperm. Compared with the wild type, more protein bodies were observed in the endosperm of transgenic maize. These results implied that, as a cytoskeleton binding protein, AtMAP18 facilitated the formation of protein bodies, which led to accumulation of both zein and non-zein proteins in the transgenic maize grains. Furthermore, F1 hybrid lines with high lysine, high protein and excellent agronomic traits were obtained by hybridizing T6 transgenic offspring with other wild type inbred lines. This article provides evidence supporting the use of cytoskeleton-associated proteins to improve the nutritional value of maize. PMID:26580206

  11. GLUT2 proteins and PPARγ transcripts levels are increased in liver of ovariectomized rats: reversal effects of resistance training

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Luciane M.; Barbosa, Marina R.; Farahnak, Zahra; Lagoeiro, Cristiani G.; Magosso, Natalia S.S; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Perez, Sérgio E. A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of ovariectomy (Ovx) and 12 weeks of resistance training (RT) on gene expression of GLUT2, the main glucose transporter in the liver, and on PPARγ, a transcription factor known to target GLUT2 expression. [Methods] Forty Holtzman rats were divided into 5 groups: Sham-sedentary (Sed), Sham- RT, Ovx-Sed, Ovx-RT, and Ovx-Sed with hormone replacement (E2). The RT protocol consisted of sessions held every 72 h for 12 weeks, during which the animals performed 4 to 9 vertical climbs (1.1 m) at 2 min intervals with progressively heavier weights (30 g after the fourth climb) tied to the tail. The E2 silastic capsule was inserted into the rats’ backs 48 hours before the first RT session. [Results] In addition to liver fat, GLUT2 protein levels and PPARγ transcripts were increased (P < 0.05) in Ovx compared to Sham-Sed animals, suggesting increased hepatic glucose uptake under estrogen deficient conditions. RT and E2 in Ovx rats decreased liver fat accumulation as well as GLUT2 and PPARγ gene expression to the level of Sham- Sed animals. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that liver GLUT2 as well as PPARγ expression in Ovx rats are accompanied by increased fat accumulation and glucose uptake, thus providing a substrate for increased de novo lipogenesis. RT appears to be an appropriate exercise model to circumvent these effects. PMID:27508154

  12. An Herbal Galactagogue Mixture Increases Milk Production and Aquaporin Protein Expression in the Mammary Glands of Lactating Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haibin; Hua, Ying; Luo, Hui; Shen, Zhaojun; Tao, Xuejiao

    2015-01-01

    Background. Herbal galactagogues have been increasingly used to treat postpartum hypogalactia. The mechanism of action of herbal galactagogues remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an herbal galactagogue mixture on milk production and aquaporin (AQP) expression in lactating rats. Methods. Thirty female Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into virgin, lactating + H2O, and lactating + galactagogue groups (n = 10 per group). Lactating rats were administered the decoction of an herbal galactagogue mixture by oral gavage or the same amount of distilled water. Results. The herbal decoction significantly increased milk production in lactating rats (P < 0.05). Both immunohistochemical staining and western blot showed that protein levels of AQP-3 and AQP-5 were significantly increased during lactation compared with virgin stage and the herbal decoction further elevated their expression (P < 0.05). AQP-1 was predominantly expressed in the capillaries whereas AQP-3 and AQP-5 were mainly detected in the epithelial cells and ducts of the mammary glands. Conclusion. The expression of AQPs in the mammary glands of rats was developmentally regulated. Herbal galactagogues might have increased milk secretion by regulating the expression and function of AQPs in the mammary glands. PMID:26075000

  13. Hepatocyte X-box binding protein 1 deficiency increases liver injury in mice fed a high-fat/sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Henkel, Anne S; LeCuyer, Brian E; Schipma, Matthew J; Anderson, Kristy A; Green, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Fatty liver is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the hepatic unfolded protein response (UPR). Reduced hepatic expression of the UPR regulator X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP1s) is associated with human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and feeding mice a high-fat diet with fructose/sucrose causes progressive, fibrosing steatohepatitis. This study examines the role of XBP1 in nonalcoholic fatty liver injury and fatty acid-induced cell injury. Hepatocyte-specific Xbp1-deficient (Xbp1(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat/sugar (HFS) diet for up to 16 wk. HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice exhibited higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) controls. RNA sequencing and Gene Ontogeny pathway analysis of hepatic mRNA revealed that apoptotic process, inflammatory response, and extracellular matrix structural constituent pathways had enhanced activation in HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Liver histology demonstrated enhanced injury and fibrosis but less steatosis in the HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Hepatic Col1a1 and Tgfβ1 gene expression, as well as Chop and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK), were increased in Xbp1(-/-) compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) mice after HFS feeding. In vitro, stable XBP1-knockdown Huh7 cells (Huh7-KD) and scramble control cells (Huh7-SCR) were generated and treated with palmitic acid (PA) for 24 h. PA-treated Huh7-KD cells had increased cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release, apoptotic nuclei, and caspase3/7 activity assays compared with Huh7-SCR cells. CHOP and p-JNK expression was also increased in Huh7-KD cells following PA treatment. In conclusion, loss of XBP1 enhances injury in both in vivo and in vitro models of fatty liver injury. We speculate that hepatic XBP1 plays an important protective role in pathogenesis of NASH.

  14. Hepatocyte X-box binding protein 1 deficiency increases liver injury in mice fed a high-fat/sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Henkel, Anne S; LeCuyer, Brian E; Schipma, Matthew J; Anderson, Kristy A; Green, Richard M

    2015-12-15

    Fatty liver is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and activation of the hepatic unfolded protein response (UPR). Reduced hepatic expression of the UPR regulator X-box binding protein 1 spliced (XBP1s) is associated with human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and feeding mice a high-fat diet with fructose/sucrose causes progressive, fibrosing steatohepatitis. This study examines the role of XBP1 in nonalcoholic fatty liver injury and fatty acid-induced cell injury. Hepatocyte-specific Xbp1-deficient (Xbp1(-/-)) mice were fed a high-fat/sugar (HFS) diet for up to 16 wk. HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice exhibited higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) controls. RNA sequencing and Gene Ontogeny pathway analysis of hepatic mRNA revealed that apoptotic process, inflammatory response, and extracellular matrix structural constituent pathways had enhanced activation in HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Liver histology demonstrated enhanced injury and fibrosis but less steatosis in the HFS-fed Xbp1(-/-) mice. Hepatic Col1a1 and Tgfβ1 gene expression, as well as Chop and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK), were increased in Xbp1(-/-) compared with Xbp1(fl/fl) mice after HFS feeding. In vitro, stable XBP1-knockdown Huh7 cells (Huh7-KD) and scramble control cells (Huh7-SCR) were generated and treated with palmitic acid (PA) for 24 h. PA-treated Huh7-KD cells had increased cytotoxicity measured by lactate dehydrogenase release, apoptotic nuclei, and caspase3/7 activity assays compared with Huh7-SCR cells. CHOP and p-JNK expression was also increased in Huh7-KD cells following PA treatment. In conclusion, loss of XBP1 enhances injury in both in vivo and in vitro models of fatty liver injury. We speculate that hepatic XBP1 plays an important protective role in pathogenesis of NASH. PMID:26472223

  15. Whey protein gel composites in the diet of goats increased the omega-3 and omega-6 content of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J A; Taylor, S J; Rosenberg, M; DePeters, E J

    2016-08-01

    Previously, feeding whey protein gels containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduced their rumen biohydrogenation and increased their concentration in milk fat of Holstein cows. Our objective was to test the efficacy of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels produced in a steam tunnel as a method to alter the fatty acid (FA) composition of the milk lipids. Four primiparous Lamancha goats in midlactation were fed three diets in a 3 × 4 Latin square design. The WPI gels were added to a basal concentrate mix that contained one of three lipid sources: (i) 100% soya bean oil (S) to create (WPI/S), (ii) a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of S and linseed (L) oil to create (WPI/SL), or (iii) 100% L to create (WPI/L). Periods were 22 days with the first 10 days used as an adjustment phase followed by a 12-day experimental phase. During the adjustment phase, all goats received a rumen available source of lipid, yellow grease, to provide a baseline for milk FA composition. During the experimental phase, each goat received its assigned WPI. Milk FA concentration of C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 reached 9.3 and 1.64 g/100 g FA, respectively, when goats were fed WPI/S. Feeding WPI/SL increased the C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 concentration to 6.22 and 4.36 g/100 g FA, and WPI/L increased C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 to 3.96 and 6.13 g/100 g FA respectively. The adjusted transfer efficiency (%) of C18:3 n-3 to milk FA decreased significantly as dietary C18:3 n-3 intake increased. Adjusted transfer efficiency for C18:2 n-6 did not change with increasing intake of C18:2 n-6. The WPI gels were effective at reducing rumen biohydrogenation of PUFA; however, we observed a change in the proportion increase of C18:3 n-3 in milk FA suggesting possible regulation of n-3 FA to the lactating caprine mammary gland. PMID:26249647

  16. Whey protein gel composites in the diet of goats increased the omega-3 and omega-6 content of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J A; Taylor, S J; Rosenberg, M; DePeters, E J

    2016-08-01

    Previously, feeding whey protein gels containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) reduced their rumen biohydrogenation and increased their concentration in milk fat of Holstein cows. Our objective was to test the efficacy of whey protein isolate (WPI) gels produced in a steam tunnel as a method to alter the fatty acid (FA) composition of the milk lipids. Four primiparous Lamancha goats in midlactation were fed three diets in a 3 × 4 Latin square design. The WPI gels were added to a basal concentrate mix that contained one of three lipid sources: (i) 100% soya bean oil (S) to create (WPI/S), (ii) a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of S and linseed (L) oil to create (WPI/SL), or (iii) 100% L to create (WPI/L). Periods were 22 days with the first 10 days used as an adjustment phase followed by a 12-day experimental phase. During the adjustment phase, all goats received a rumen available source of lipid, yellow grease, to provide a baseline for milk FA composition. During the experimental phase, each goat received its assigned WPI. Milk FA concentration of C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 reached 9.3 and 1.64 g/100 g FA, respectively, when goats were fed WPI/S. Feeding WPI/SL increased the C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 concentration to 6.22 and 4.36 g/100 g FA, and WPI/L increased C18:2 n-6 and C18:3 n-3 to 3.96 and 6.13 g/100 g FA respectively. The adjusted transfer efficiency (%) of C18:3 n-3 to milk FA decreased significantly as dietary C18:3 n-3 intake increased. Adjusted transfer efficiency for C18:2 n-6 did not change with increasing intake of C18:2 n-6. The WPI gels were effective at reducing rumen biohydrogenation of PUFA; however, we observed a change in the proportion increase of C18:3 n-3 in milk FA suggesting possible regulation of n-3 FA to the lactating caprine mammary gland.

  17. Dietary protein-induced increases in urinary calcium are accompanied by similar increases in urinary nitrogen and urinary urea: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bihuniak, Jessica D; Simpson, Christine A; Sullivan, Rebecca R; Caseria, Donna M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-03-01

    To determine the usefulness of urinary urea as an index of dietary protein intake, 10 postmenopausal women were enrolled in and completed a randomized, double-blind, cross-over feeding trial from September 2008 to May 2010 that compared 10 days of a 45-g whey supplement with 10 days of a 45-g maltodextrin control. Urinary nitrogen, urinary calcium, urinary urea, and bone turnover markers were measured at days 0, 7, and 10. Paired sample t tests, Pearson's correlation statistic, and simple linear regression were used to assess differences between treatments and associations among urinary metabolites. Urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine rose from 12.3±1.7 g/g (99.6±13.8 mmol/mmol) to 16.8±2.2 g/g (135.5±17.8 mmol/mmol) with whey supplementation, but did not change with maltodextrin. Whey supplementation caused urinary calcium to rise by 4.76±1.84 mg (1.19±0.46 mmol) without a change in bone turnover markers. Because our goal was to estimate protein intake from urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we used our data to develop the following equation: protein intake (g/day)=71.221+1.719×(urinary nitrogen, g)/creatinine, g) (R=0.46, R(2)=0.21). As a more rapid and less costly alternative to urinary nitrogen/urinary creatinine, we next determined whether urinary urea could predict protein intake and found that protein intake (g/day)=63.844+1.11×(urinary urea, g/creatinine, g) (R=0.58, R(2)=0.34). These data indicate that urinary urea/urinary creatinine is at least as good a marker of dietary protein intake as urinary nitrogen and is easier to quantitate in nutrition intervention trials.

  18. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {beta} deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Shaikh M.; Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; Baquero, Karalee C.; Miyazaki, Makoto; Friedman, Jacob E.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP{beta}) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBP{beta} expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBP{beta} deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBP{beta} in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBP{beta} might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR

  19. Commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (starch stopper) increases ileal endogenous amino acid and crude protein losses in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Deglaire, A; Moughan, P J; Bos, C; Tome, D

    2006-07-12

    The effect of a commercial Phaseolus vulgaris extract (PVE, starch stopper) on ileal and fecal endogenous protein losses was studied. Growing rats were fed for 14 days a protein-free diet containing PVE at a nutritional concentration of 0% (PF1), 0.4% (PF2), or 1.1% PVE (PF3) or 1.1% autoclaved PVE (PF4). An indigestible marker (TiO(2)) was included in each diet. Ileal endogenous amino acid (AA) losses were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3 (20% higher than in PF1), except for Pro, Gly, Ala, and His. Endogenous ileal N losses were 22% higher in PF3 than in PF1. Endogenous fecal AA and N losses were all significantly higher (P < 0.05) in PF3. Starch digestibility ( approximately 100%), food intake (single daily meal, d10-23), and body weight loss were not significantly different among the groups. PVE, at 1.1% of the diet, not only was ineffective in reducing starch digestibility but also led to increased ileal endogenous N losses, possibly due to the antinutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor, lectin) present in the PVE. PMID:16819935

  20. Restoring E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion increases PTEN protein level and stability in human breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zengxia; Wang Liying; Zhang Wen; Fu Yi; Zhao Hongbo; Hu Yali; Prins, Bram Peter; Zha Xiliang

    2007-11-09

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a well-characterized tumor suppressor that negatively regulates cell growth and survival. Despite the critical role of PTEN in cell signaling, the mechanisms of its regulation are still under investigation. We reported here that PTEN expression could be controlled by overexpression or knock-down of E-cadherin in several mammary carcinoma cell lines. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of PTEN protein in E-cadherin overexpressing cells was due to increased PTEN protein stability rather than the regulation of its transcription. The proteasome-dependent PTEN degradation pathway was impaired after restoring E-cadherin expression. Moreover, maintenance of E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was necessary for its regulating PTEN. Altogether, our results suggested that E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion was essential for preventing the proteasome degradation of PTEN, which might explain how breast carcinoma cells which lost cell-cell contact proliferate rapidly and are prone to metastasis.

  1. Vanadium compounds modulate PPARγ activity primarily by increasing PPARγ protein levels in mouse insulinoma NIT-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pan; Yang, Xiaoda

    2013-06-01

    Vanadium compounds are promising agents in the therapeutic treatment of diabetes; however, their mechanism of action has not been clearly elucidated. The current study investigated the effects of vanadium compounds, vanadyl acetylacetonate [V(IV)O(acac)2] and sodium metavanadate (NaV(V)O3), on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), especially PPARγ, which are important targets of anti-diabetic drugs. Our experimental results revealed that treatment of NIT-1 β-pancreas cells with vanadium compounds resulted in PPARγ activation and elevation of PPARγ protein levels. Vanadium compounds did not increase PPARγ transcription but ameliorated PPARγ degradation induced by inflammatory stimulators TNF-α/IL-6. Vanadium compounds induced binding of PPARγ to heat shock protein (Hsp60). This PPARγ-Hsp60 interaction might cause inhibition of PPARγ degradation, thus elevating the PPARγ level. In addition, modulation of PPARγ phosphorylation was also observed upon vanadium treatment. The present work demonstrated for the first time that vanadium compounds are novel PPARγ modulators. The results may provide new insights for the mechanism of anti-diabetic action of vanadium compounds.

  2. A single bout of resistance exercise improves memory consolidation and increases the expression of synaptic proteins in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jansen; Soares, Juliana Carlota Kramer; do Amaral Baliego, Luiz Guilherme Zaccaro; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have indicated that chronic resistance exercise (i.e., strength training, weight lifting, etc.) is beneficial for brain health and cognitive function. However, little is known about the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise on brain function, particularly on memory consolidation. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the effects of a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after the training of fear conditioning on memory consolidation and on the expression of IGF-1 and synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were familiarized with climbing a ladder without a load for 3 days and randomly assigned into control (CTL) and resistance exercise (RES) groups. The RES group was subjected to a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after fear conditioning training. Subsequently, the animals were tested for contextual (24 h) and tone (48 h) fear memory. Another group of animals were subjected to a single bout of resistance exercise and euthanized 24 h later for hippocampal analysis of IGF-1 and synaptic proteins (synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95). The exercised rats improved contextual but not tone fear memory. Hippocampal IGF-1 was not altered by resistance exercise. However, the levels of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 increased significantly in the RES group. The results suggested that a single bout of resistance exercise applied immediately after fear conditioning could improve contextual memory, probably through the activation of pre- and postsynaptic machinery required for memory consolidation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Differentially expressed proteins in the blood serum of piglets in response to a diet supplemented with inulin.

    PubMed

    Herosimczyk, A; Lepczyński, A; Ożgo, M; Skomiał, J; Dratwa-Chałupnik, A; Tuśnio, A; Taciak, M; Barszcz, M

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we introduced a two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to identify proteins that show altered expression as a result of the addition of 2% of water extract of inulin-type fructans to the diet of growing piglets. This analysis allowed us to detect an average of 240 spots per gel with a mass range from 10 to 250 kDa and a pH ranging from 3 to 10. Twenty protein spots were found to show statistically significant differences in their expression. Of these, 7 protein spots were up-regulated, whereas 13 showed down-regulation in response to the experimental diet. In total, 13 spots were identified, representing 8 distinct gene products. The experimental diet caused a significant change in proteins directly or indirectly involved in hemostasis and the innate immune response. Increased levels of fibrinogen along with decreased plasminogen expression may indicate that a fructan-rich diet favours the deposits of fibrin and promotes blood clotting. We also found increased expression of vitronectin and the alpha subunit of the complement component C8 which may protect the host organism against excessive cytolitic activity of the activated complement. The piglets from the experimental group had slightly increased values of IgG and IgA, whereas the IgM level tended to be decreased. The fructan-rich diet did not have any influence on plasma total cholesterol, HDL and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

  4. Protein kinase D is increased and activated in lung epithelial cells and macrophages in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Huachen; McKenzie, Raymond; Hao, Qin; Idell, Steven; Tang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentlessly progressive and usually fatal lung disease of unknown etiology for which no effective treatments currently exist. Hence, there is a profound need for the identification of novel drugable targets to develop more specific and efficacious therapeutic intervention in IPF. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analyses to assess the cell type-specific expression and activation of protein kinase D (PKD) family kinases in normal and IPF lung tissue sections. We also analyzed PKD activation and function in human lung epithelial cells. We found that PKD family kinases (PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3) were increased and activated in the hyperplastic and regenerative alveolar epithelial cells lining remodeled fibrotic alveolar septa and/or fibroblast foci in IPF lungs compared with normal controls. We also found that PKD family kinases were increased and activated in alveolar macrophages, bronchiolar epithelium, and honeycomb cysts in IPF lungs. Interestingly, PKD1 was highly expressed and activated in the cilia of IPF bronchiolar epithelial cells, while PKD2 and PKD3 were expressed in the cell cytoplasm and nuclei. In contrast, PKD family kinases were not apparently increased and activated in IPF fibroblasts or myofibroblasts. We lastly found that PKD was predominantly activated by poly-L-arginine, lysophosphatidic acid and thrombin in human lung epithelial cells and that PKD promoted epithelial barrier dysfunction. These findings suggest that PKD may participate in the pathogenesis of IPF and may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  5. Genomic mosaicism with increased amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number in single neurons from sporadic Alzheimer's disease brains

    PubMed Central

    Bushman, Diane M; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Siddoway, Benjamin; Westra, Jurgen W; Rivera, Richard R; Rehen, Stevens K; Yung, Yun C; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that individual neurons of the brain can display somatic genomic mosaicism of unknown function. In this study, we report altered genomic mosaicism in single, sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons characterized by increases in DNA content and amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene copy number. AD cortical nuclei displayed large variability with average DNA content increases of ∼8% over non-diseased controls that were unrelated to trisomy 21. Two independent single-cell copy number analyses identified amplifications at the APP locus. The use of single-cell qPCR identified up to 12 copies of APP in sampled neurons. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes targeting APP, combined with super-resolution microscopy detected primarily single fluorescent signals of variable intensity that paralleled single-cell qPCR analyses. These data identify somatic genomic changes in single neurons, affecting known and unknown loci, which are increased in sporadic AD, and further indicate functionality for genomic mosaicism in the CNS. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05116.001 PMID:25650802

  6. Increased interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 concentrations in mechanically ventilated preterm infants with pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Baier, R John; Loggins, John; Kruger, Thomas E

    2002-08-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) is a serious complication causing acute respiratory distress in the premature infant, and it is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The role of inflammatory mediators in this condition is largely undefined. Serial tracheal aspirates (TA) were obtained at intervals from 65 mechanically ventilated infants with birth weights less than 1,250 g during the first 21 days of life. Clinically significant PH developed in 15 infants. TA concentrations of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).PH was associated with an increased risk of death, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, and prolonged need for mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen. TA aspirate concentrations of IL-8 and MCP-1 (P = 0.001, ANOVA) were significantly increased in infants with PH compared to infants who did not develop this condition. TA cytokine concentrations were also significantly increased in infants who developed bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Peak TA concentrations of IL-8 and MCP-1 were significantly higher in infants with poor outcome (BPD or death). TA MCP-1 but not IL-8 concentrations were significantly higher in infants who were oxygen-dependent at 36 weeks postconceptional age. These data suggest a pathogenic role for IL-8 and MCP-1 in the development of adverse pulmonary outcome in preterm infants with clinically significant PH.

  7. Chronic leucine supplementation of a low protein diet increases protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs through mTOR signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leucine acutely stimulates protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. We hypothesized that leucine supplementation of a low protein diet will enhance protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in the neonate for prolonged periods. Fasted 5-d-old pigs (n=6–8...

  8. Increased Expression of the dsRNA-Activated Protein Kinase PKR in Breast Cancer Promotes Sensitivity to Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Richard L.; Carruthers, Aubrey L.; Hui, Teng; Kerney, Krystal R.; Liu, Xiangfei; May, W. Stratford

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that the expression and activity of the interferon-inducible, dsRNA-dependent protein kinase, PKR, is increased in mammary carcinoma cell lines and primary tumor samples. To extend these findings and determine how PKR signaling may affect breast cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy, we measured PKR expression by immunohistochemical staining of 538 cases of primary breast cancer and normal tissues. Significantly, PKR expression was elevated in ductal, lobular and squamous cell carcinomas or lymph node metastases but not in either benign tumor specimens or cases of inflammation compared to normal tissues. Furthermore, PKR expression was increased in precancerous stages of mammary cell hyperplasia and dysplasia compared to normal tissues, indicating that PKR expression may be upregulated by the process of tumorigenesis. To test the function of PKR in breast cancer, we generated MCF7, T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with significantly reduced PKR expression by siRNA knockdown. Importantly, while knockdown of PKR expression had no effect on cell proliferation under normal growth conditions, MCF7, T-47D or MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced PKR expression or treated with a small molecule PKR inhibitor were significantly less sensitive to doxorubicin or H2O2-induced toxicity compared to control cells. In addition, the rate of eIF2α phosphorylation following treatment with doxorubicin was delayed in breast cancer cell lines with decreased PKR expression. Significantly, treatment of breast cancer lines with reduced PKR expression with either interferon-α, which increases PKR expression, or salubrinal, which increases eIF2α phosphorylation, restored doxorubicin sensitivity to normal levels. Taken together these results indicate that increased PKR expression in primary breast cancer tissues may serve as a biomarker for response to doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy and that future therapeutic approaches to promote PKR expression

  9. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. PMID:24942546

  10. Increased Expression of miR-23a Mediates a Loss of Expression in the RAF Kinase Inhibitor Protein RKIP

    PubMed Central

    Hatzl, Stefan; Geiger, Olivia; Kuepper, Maja Kim; Caraffini, Veronica; Seime, Till; Furlan, Tobias; Nussbaumer, Erika; Wieser, Rotraud; Pichler, Martin; Scheideler, Marcel; Nowek, Katarzyna; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Quehenberger, Franz; Wölfler, Albert; Troppmair, Jakob; Sill, Heinz; Zebisch, Armin

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) is a seminal regulator of intracellular signaling and exhibits both antimetastatic and antitumorigenic properties. Decreased expression of RKIP has been described in several human malignancies, including acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). As the mechanisms leading to RKIP loss in AML are still unclear, we aimed to analyze the potential involvement of miRNAs within this study. miRNA microarray and qPCR data of more than 400 AML patient specimens revealed correlation between decreased expression of RKIP and increased expression of miR-23a, a member of the miR-23a/27a/24-2 cluster. In functional experiments, overexpression of miR-23a decreased RKIP mRNA and protein expression, whereas miR-23a inhibition caused the opposite effect. By using an RKIP 3′-untranslated region luciferase reporter construct with and without mutation or deletion of the putative miR-23a–binding site, we could show that RKIP modulation by miR-23a is mediated via direct binding to this region. Importantly, miR-23a overexpression induced a significant increase of proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Simultaneous transfection of an RKIP expression construct lacking the miR-23a–binding sites reversed this phenotype, indicating that this effect is truly mediated via downregulation of RKIP. Finally, by analyzing more than 4,300 primary patient specimens via database retrieval from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we could highlight the importance of the miR-23a/RKIP axis in a broad range of human cancer entities. In conclusion, we have identified miR-23a as a negative regulator of RKIP expression in AML and have provided data that suggest the importance of our observation beyond this tumor entity. PMID:27197200

  11. ROLE OF TYROSINE-SULFATED PROTEINS IN RETINAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Kanan, Y.; Al-Ubaidi, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a significant role in cellular and retinal health. The study of retinal tyrosine-sulfated proteins is an important first step toward understanding the role of ECM in retinal health and diseases. These secreted proteins are members of the retinal ECM. Tyrosine sulfation was shown to be necessary for the development of proper retinal structure and function. The importance of tyrosine sulfation is further demonstrated by the evolutionary presence of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferases, enzymes that catalyze proteins’ tyrosine sulfation, and the compensatory abilities of these enzymes. Research has identified four tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins: fibulin 2, vitronectin, complement factor H (CFH), and opticin. Vitronectin and CFH regulate the activation of the complement system and are involved in the etiology of some cases of age-related macular degeneration. Analysis of the role of tyrosine sulfation in fibulin function showed that sulfation influences the protein's ability to regulate growth and migration. Although opticin was recently shown to exhibit anti-angiogenic properties, it is not yet determined what role sulfation plays in that function. Future studies focusing on identifying all of the tyrosine-sulfated retinal proteins would be instrumental in determining the impact of sulfation on retinal protein function in retinal homeostasis and diseases. PMID:25819460

  12. Plasma surface modification of poly(D,L-lactic acid) as a tool to enhance protein adsorption and the attachment of different cell types.

    PubMed

    Alves, C M; Yang, Y; Marton, D; Carnes, D L; Ong, J L; Sylvia, V L; Dean, D D; Reis, R L; Agrawal, C M

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the influence of oxygen radio frequency glow discharge (RfGD) on the surface and bulk properties of poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) and the effect of this surface modification on both protein adsorption and bone cell behavior. PDLLA films were characterized before and after plasma surface modification by water contact angle, surface energy, and adhesion tension of water as well as by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray electron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy. RfGD-films showed an increase in hydrophilicity and surface energy when compared with untreated films. Surface morphological changes were observed by SEM. Chemical analysis indicated significant differences in both atomic percentages and oxygen functional group. Protein adsorption was evaluated by combining solute depletion and spectroscopic techniques. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibronectin (FN), vitronectin (VN), and fetal bovine serum (FBS) were used in this study. RfGD-treated surfaces adsorbed more BSA and FN from single specie solutions than FBS that is a more complex, multi-specie solution. MG63 osteoblast-like cells and primary cultures of fetal rat calvarial (FRC) cells were used to assess both the effect of RfGD treatment and protein adsorption on cell attachment and proliferation. In the absence of preadsorbed proteins, cells could not distinguish between treated and untreated surfaces, with the exception of MG63 cells cultured for longer periods of time. In contrast, the adsorption of proteins increased the cells' preference for treated surfaces, thus indicating a crucial role for adsorbed proteins in mediating the response of osteogenic cells to the RfGD-treated PDLLA surface. PMID:18360882

  13. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA increases adipocyte lipolysis and alters lipid droplet-associated proteins: role of mTOR and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soonkyu; Brown, Jonathan Mark; Sandberg, Maria Boysen; McIntosh, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Lipid droplet-associated proteins play an important role in adipocyte triglyceride (TG) metabolism. Here, we show that trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), but not cis-9,trans-11 CLA, increased lipolysis and altered human adipocyte lipid droplet morphology. Before this change in morphology, there was a rapid trans-10,cis-12 CLA-induced increase in the accumulation of perilipin A in the cytosol, followed by the disappearance of perilipin A protein. In contrast, protein levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) were increased in cultures treated with trans-10,cis-12 CLA. Immunostaining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of small lipid droplets, displacing perilipin. Intriguingly, trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased ADRP protein expression to a much greater extent than ADRP mRNA without affecting stability, suggesting translational control of ADRP. To this end, we found that trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase/S6 ribosomal protein (mTOR/p70S6K/S6) pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the trans-10,cis-12 CLA-mediated reduction of human adipocyte TG content is associated with the differential localization and expression of lipid droplet-associated proteins. This process involves both the translational control of ADRP through the activation of mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling and transcriptional control of perilipin A. PMID:15716587

  14. Long-term oxandrolone treatment increases muscle protein net deposition via improving amino acid utilization in pediatric patients 6 months after burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, D.; Chinkes, DL.; Zhang, XJ.; Suman, OE.; Aarsland, A.; Ferrando, A.; Kulp, GA; Jeschke, MG.; Wolfe, RR.; Herndon, DN.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently showed that mechanisms of protein turnover in skeletal muscle are unresponsive to amino acid (AA) infusion in severely burned pediatric patients at 6 months postinjury. In the current study, we evaluated if oxandrolone treatment affects mechanisms of protein turnover in skeletal muscle and whole-body protein breakdown in pediatric burn patients 6 months postinjury. Methods At the time of admission, patients were randomized to control or oxandrolone treatments. The treatment regimens were continued until 6 months postinjury, at which time patients (n = 26) underwent study with a stable isotope tracer infusion to measure muscle and whole-body protein turnover. Results Protein kinetics in leg muscle were expressed in nmol/min/100 ml leg volume (mean±SE). During AA infusion, rates of protein synthesis in leg muscle were increased (p < .05) in both groups (Basal vs. AA: control, 51±8 vs. 86±21; oxandrolone, 56±7 vs. 96±12). In the control group, there was also a simultaneous increase in breakdown (Basal vs. AA: 65±10 vs. 89±25), which resulted in no change in the net balance of leg muscle protein (Basal vs. AA: − 15±4 vs. − 2±10). In the oxandrolone group, protein breakdown did not change (Basal vs. AA: 80±12 vs. 77±9), leading to increased net balance (Basal vs. AA: − 24±7 vs. 19±7, p < .05). Protein breakdown at the whole-body level was not different between the groups. Conclusion Long-term oxandrolone treatment increased net deposition of leg muscle protein during AA infusion by attenuating protein breakdown, but did not affect whole-body protein breakdown. PMID:21333314

  15. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Colin T.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Shearn, Alisabeth H.; Saba, Laura M.; Mercer, Kelly E.; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J.; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J.; Ronis, Martin J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an

  16. Increased chemoresistance via Snail–Raf kinase inhibitor protein signaling in colorectal cancer in response to a nicotine derivative

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tsai-Yu; Liu, Chia-Lin; Chang, Yun-Ching; Nieh, Shin; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Jao, Shu-Wen; Chen, Su-Feng; Liu, Tsung-Yun

    2016-01-01

    A tobacco-specific component, 4-methylnitrosamino-1-3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK), is a major risk factor for many cancers. Recent reports have demonstrated that NNK exposure may be associated with tumor progression and chemoresistance in certain cancers. However, the underlying NNK-induced mechanism contributing to the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been thoroughly studied. In this study, we used HT29 cells treated with NNK to simulate the long-term exposure of cigarette smoke. A comparative analysis was performed to evaluate cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and drug-resistance genes expression, cancer stem cell (CSC) properties, and anti-apoptotic activity. Signaling pathways related to chemoresistance were also investigated. As a result, NNK exposure dose-dependently stimulates cell proliferation, enhance abilities of migration and invasion, induce EMT phenomenon, and attenuate apoptosis. Furthermore, NNK exposure also promotes the capabilities of sphere formation, upregulation of Snail, and overexpression of CD133, Nanog, OCT4, and the drug-resistant genes. Knockdown of Snail results in upregulation of Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), increased apoptosis, reversal of EMT phenomenon, and reducation of expression of CSC markers, all of which contribute to a decrease of chemoresistance. Our study demonstrates a number of related mechanisms that mediate the effect of NNK exposure on increasing CRC therapeutic resistance via the Snail signaling pathway. Targeting Snail may provide a feasible strategy for the treatment of CRC. PMID:26992205

  17. Paroxetine Is a Direct Inhibitor of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 and Increases Myocardial Contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Homan, Kristoff T.; Chen, Jun; Wu, Emily K.; Hinkle, Patricia M.; Huang, Z. Maggie; Chuprun, J. Kurt; Song, Jianliang; Gao, Erhe; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Sklar, Larry A.; Koch, Walter J.; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-08-10

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a well-established therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure. In this paper we identify the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine as a selective inhibitor of GRK2 activity both in vitro and in living cells. In the crystal structure of the GRK2·paroxetine–Gβγ complex, paroxetine binds in the active site of GRK2 and stabilizes the kinase domain in a novel conformation in which a unique regulatory loop forms part of the ligand binding site. Isolated cardiomyocytes show increased isoproterenol-induced shortening and contraction amplitude in the presence of paroxetine, and pretreatment of mice with paroxetine before isoproterenol significantly increases left ventricular inotropic reserve in vivo with no significant effect on heart rate. Neither is observed in the presence of the SSRI fluoxetine. Our structural and functional results validate a widely available drug as a selective chemical probe for GRK2 and represent a starting point for the rational design of more potent and specific GRK2 inhibitors.

  18. Deficiency in macrophage-stimulating protein results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility toward epithelial damage in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Witte, Merlijn; Huitema, Leonie F A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Brugman, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have identified the genes encoding for macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) and its receptor RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais) as possible susceptibility factors in inflammatory bowel disease. While it has been shown that the MSP-RON signaling pathway is involved in tissue injury responses, current mouse models for MSP and RON deficiency have not clearly demonstrated a role of MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation. In this study, we report that the recently identified zebrafish Msp mutant (msp(t34230)) develops spontaneous intestinal inflammation over time. From 14 to 28 weeks postfertilization Msp-deficient zebrafish show intestinal eosinophilia, increased intestinal expression of inflammatory marker mmp9, and activation of intestinal goblet cells. Moreover, these Msp mutant zebrafish are more susceptible toward ethanol-induced epithelial damage, which resulted in increased infiltration and proliferation of immune cells within the lamina propria and prolonged intestinal proinflammatory cytokine responses in some mutant fish. In light of the recent development of many tools to visualize, monitor, and genetically modify zebrafish, these Msp-deficient zebrafish will enable in-depth in vivo analysis of epithelial and macrophage-specific MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation.

  19. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  20. Deficiency in macrophage-stimulating protein results in spontaneous intestinal inflammation and increased susceptibility toward epithelial damage in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Witte, Merlijn; Huitema, Leonie F A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Brugman, Sylvia

    2014-12-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have identified the genes encoding for macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP) and its receptor RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais) as possible susceptibility factors in inflammatory bowel disease. While it has been shown that the MSP-RON signaling pathway is involved in tissue injury responses, current mouse models for MSP and RON deficiency have not clearly demonstrated a role of MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation. In this study, we report that the recently identified zebrafish Msp mutant (msp(t34230)) develops spontaneous intestinal inflammation over time. From 14 to 28 weeks postfertilization Msp-deficient zebrafish show intestinal eosinophilia, increased intestinal expression of inflammatory marker mmp9, and activation of intestinal goblet cells. Moreover, these Msp mutant zebrafish are more susceptible toward ethanol-induced epithelial damage, which resulted in increased infiltration and proliferation of immune cells within the lamina propria and prolonged intestinal proinflammatory cytokine responses in some mutant fish. In light of the recent development of many tools to visualize, monitor, and genetically modify zebrafish, these Msp-deficient zebrafish will enable in-depth in vivo analysis of epithelial and macrophage-specific MSP-RON signaling in the context of intestinal inflammation. PMID:25353089