Sample records for protein-losing enteropathy ple

  1. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  2. Successful diuretics treatment of protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Tatsuki; Suda, Kenji; Seki, Yoshitaka; Yanagi, Tadahiro; Yoshimoto, Hironaga; Kudo, Yoshiyuki; Iemura, Motofumi; Tanikawa, Ken; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2015-04-01

    There are few reports on successful high-dose spironolactone treatment of refractory protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) caused by Fontan procedure. We report successful diuretics treatment with spironolactone and furosemide at standard dose, of refractory PLE in a patient with Noonan syndrome and repaired congenital heart disease. This is the first successful application of diuretics treatment in a patient with refractory PLE without Fontan procedure. This case illustrates that diuretics treatment can be the first-line treatment of PLE regardless of the causative physiology, and can be effective in refractory PLE with Noonan syndrome. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Detecting protein losing enteropathy by Tc-99m dextran scintigraphy: a novel experience.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Seema; Ratan, Simmi K; Kashyap, Ravi; Mittal, S K; Rajeshwari, K; Rawat, H; Verma, Jyoti

    2002-09-01

    To evaluate protien using enteropathy by Tc-99m dextran scintigraphy. Methods for detecting protein loss from the intestine revolve around fecal nitrogen excretion, the clearance of alpha-1 antitrypsin in stools and by endoscopic biopsy. The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) can also be established by a scintigraphic method that is noninvasive, simple and requires no patient preparation or motivation. This diagnostic modality can also delineate the site of protein loss, thereby offering a targeted approach, and if need be, surgery. Radiolabelling of a non-protein, noncolloidal, nonparticulate and biofriendly molecule like dextran with Technetium-99m for imaging enteric protein loss was utilized in imaging eight children with PLE. The results were encouraging. The authors advocate the use of this diagnostic tool in identifying patients with PLE, particularly in the pediatric age group.

  4. Somatic PTPN11 Mutation in a Child With Neuroblastoma and Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Obasaju, Patience; Brondon, Jennifer; Mir, Sabina; Fordham, Lynn A; Lee, Sang; Blatt, Julie

    2018-05-01

    Neuroblastoma and protein losing enteropathy (PLE) are diagnoses commonly seen by oncologists and gastroenterologists, respectively. The concurrence of these 2 entities is rare, and not well explained. We describe the sixth case of PLE in a child with neuroblastoma, and the first for which genetic information is available. Tumor DNA had a mutation in the PTPN11 gene, which has been described in neuroblastoma, and in Noonan syndrome-a diagnosis in which neuroblastoma and PLE independently have been reported. Constitutional DNA was normal. Genetic studies in future patients will be needed to support the link between neuroblastoma and PLE.

  5. Transnodal lymphangiography and post-CT for protein-losing enteropathy in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Kudo, Takahiro; Endo, Jun; Hashida, Kazunobu; Tachibana, Nao; Murakoshi, Takatsugu; Hasebe, Terumitsu

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome, which is a multiple congenital disorder, may be associated with lymphatic abnormalities. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) developing in Noonan syndrome is rare. We performed transnodal lymphangiography by directly accessing bilateral inguinal nodes under ultrasound guidance in a 17-year-old female with PLE developing in Noonan syndrome to assess detailed anatomical findings regarding lymphatic vessels. There have been no reports on transnodal lymphangiography for Noonan syndrome. Post-lymphangiographic CT images revealed multiple lymphatic abnormalities and lipiodol extravasation into the duodenum and the proximal jejunum. Transnodal lymphangiography was easy and safe for PLE developing in Noonan syndrome, and post-lymphangiographic CT provided invaluable information.

  6. Recurrent protein-losing enteropathy and tricuspid valve insufficiency in a transplanted heart: a causal relationship?

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Delius, Ralph E; Walters, Henry L; L'Ecuyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes a toddler who developed a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) 4 years after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). He was born with a hypoplastic left heart syndrome for which he underwent a successful Norwood procedure, a Hemi-Fontan palliation, and a Fontan palliation at 18 months of age. Fifteen months following the Fontan operation, he developed a PLE and Fontan failure requiring OHT. Four years after OHT, he developed a severe tricuspid regurgitation and a PLE. His PLE improved after tricuspid valve replacement. It is now 2 years since his tricuspid valve replacement and he remains clinically free of ascites and peripheral edema with a normal serum albumin level. His prosthetic tricuspid valve is functioning normally. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protein-Losing Enteropathy as a Complication of the Ketogenic Diet.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Won Kee; Park, Soyoung; Kim, Heung Dong

    2017-07-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for the patients with intractable epilepsy, however, the diet therapy can sometimes be discontinued by complications. Protein-losing enteropathy is a rarely reported serious complication of the ketogenic diet. We present a 16-month-old Down syndrome baby with protein-losing enteropathy during the ketogenic diet as a treatment for West syndrome. He suffered from diarrhea, general edema and hypoalbuminemia which were not controlled by conservative care for over 1 month. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and stool alpha-1 antitrypsin indicated protein-losing enteropathy. Related symptoms were relieved after cessation of the ketogenic diet. Unexplained hypoalbuminemia combined with edema and diarrhea during ketogenic suggests the possibility of protein-losing enteropathy, and proper evaluation is recommended in order to expeditiously detect it and to act accordingly. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  8. Protein-losing Enteropathy Caused by Intestinal or Colonic Lymphangiectasia Complicated by Sporadic Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Koichi; Yoshimi, Kaku; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Hayashi, Takuo; Mitani, Keiko; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Ichikawa, Masako; Asao, Tetsuhiko; Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Shiota, Satomi; Kodama, Yuzo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    This report describes two patients with sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis complicated by protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). Imaging studies indicated retroperitoneal lymphangioleiomyomas and abnormalities of the adjacent digestive tract. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy revealed colonic lymphangiectasia in one patient; whereas the site in the other patient was intestinal. Treatment with sirolimus led to the complete resolution of PLE within several months; additionally, marked shrinkage was observed in the lymphangioleiomyomas of both cases. These findings suggest that colonic or intestinal lymphatic congestion due to neighboring lymphangioleiomyomas was the mechanism for the development of PLE. At the time of writing this report, the beneficial effect of sirolimus has lasted for more than 3 years. PMID:28420844

  9. Protein-losing Enteropathy Caused by Intestinal or Colonic Lymphangiectasia Complicated by Sporadic Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Koichi; Yoshimi, Kaku; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Hayashi, Takuo; Mitani, Keiko; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Ichikawa, Masako; Asao, Tetsuhiko; Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Shiota, Satomi; Kodama, Yuzo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    This report describes two patients with sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis complicated by protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). Imaging studies indicated retroperitoneal lymphangioleiomyomas and abnormalities of the adjacent digestive tract. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy revealed colonic lymphangiectasia in one patient; whereas the site in the other patient was intestinal. Treatment with sirolimus led to the complete resolution of PLE within several months; additionally, marked shrinkage was observed in the lymphangioleiomyomas of both cases. These findings suggest that colonic or intestinal lymphatic congestion due to neighboring lymphangioleiomyomas was the mechanism for the development of PLE. At the time of writing this report, the beneficial effect of sirolimus has lasted for more than 3 years.

  10. Thromboembolism in Dogs with Protein-Losing Enteropathy with Non-Neoplastic Chronic Small Intestinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Jacinto, Ana M L; Ridyard, Alison E; Aroch, Itamar; Watson, Penny J; Morrison, Linda R; Chandler, Marge L; Kuzi, Sharon

    Dogs with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) are suggested to be at increased risk of developing thromboembolic events. However, with some exceptions, there are very few reports of thromboembolism in such dogs. This multicentre retrospective observational study describes a case series of thromboembolism (TE) in eight dogs with PLE secondary to non-neoplastic, chronic small intestinal disease. Seven dogs had poorly controlled PLE when the thromboembolic event occurred. Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) occurred in six dogs, while one dog developed splenic vein thrombosis and another had concurrent splenic vein and aortic TE. Six dogs died, all with PTE. Antithrombin activity was decreased in one of two dogs in which it was measured. Serum cobalamin and folate concentrations were measured in three dogs and cobalamin was subnormal in all three. Serum magnesium, measured in two dogs, was low in both. Dogs with uncontrolled chronic small intestinal disease and PLE are at risk for developing serious life-threatening TE, mostly PTE.

  11. Protein-losing enteropathy associated with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with a good response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sansinanea, Pierina; Carrica, Sebastián Augusto; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 17 year-old female patient, who presented with ascites, edema and hypoalbuminemia. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the presence of: malar rash, oral ulcers, thrombocytopenia, antinuclear antibodies, IgM anticardiolipin antibody, and lupus anticoagulant. Renal and liver diseases were ruled out. The PLE diagnosis was confirmed with fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin clearance. The PLE was refractory to different lines of immunosuppressive agents like glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and cyclosporine, showing a satisfactory and sustained response with rituximab, allowing steroid sparing and long term remission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of serum biochemical marker concentrations and survival time in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Equilino, Mirjam; Théodoloz, Vincent; Gorgas, Daniela; Doherr, Marcus G; Heilmann, Romy M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M; Burgener Dvm, Iwan A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate serum concentrations of biochemical markers and survival time in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). Prospective study. 29 dogs with PLE and 18 dogs with food-responsive diarrhea (FRD). Data regarding serum concentrations of various biochemical markers at the initial evaluation were available for 18 of the 29 dogs with PLE and compared with findings for dogs with FRD. Correlations between biochemical marker concentrations and survival time (interval between time of initial evaluation and death or euthanasia) for dogs with PLE were evaluated. Serum C-reactive protein concentration was high in 13 of 18 dogs with PLE and in 2 of 18 dogs with FRD. Serum concentration of canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity was high in 3 dogs with PLE but within the reference interval in all dogs with FRD. Serum α1-proteinase inhibitor concentration was less than the lower reference limit in 9 dogs with PLE and 1 dog with FRD. Compared with findings in dogs with FRD, values of those 3 variables in dogs with PLE were significantly different. Serum calprotectin (measured by radioimmunoassay and ELISA) and S100A12 concentrations were high but did not differ significantly between groups. Seventeen of the 29 dogs with PLE were euthanized owing to this disease; median survival time was 67 days (range, 2 to 2,551 days). Serum C-reactive protein, canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, and α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations differed significantly between dogs with PLE and FRD. Most initial biomarker concentrations were not predictive of survival time in dogs with PLE.

  13. Congenital protein losing enteropathy: an inborn error of lipid metabolism due to DGAT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Joshi; Vilboux, Thierry; Haberman, Yael; Pri-Chen, Hadass; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Mazaheri, Sina; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Barel, Ortal; Di Segni, Ayelet; Eyal, Eran; Hout-Siloni, Goni; Lahad, Avishay; Shalem, Tzippora; Rechavi, Gideon; Malicdan, May Christine V; Weiss, Batia; Gahl, William A; Anikster, Yair

    2016-08-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a clinical disorder of protein loss from the gastrointestinal system that results in hypoproteinemia and malnutrition. This condition is associated with a wide range of gastrointestinal disorders. Recently, a unique syndrome of congenital PLE associated with biallelic mutations in the DGAT1 gene has been reported in a single family. We hypothesize that mutations in this gene are responsible for undiagnosed cases of PLE in infancy. Here we investigated three children in two families presenting with severe diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia and PLE, using clinical studies, homozygosity mapping, and exome sequencing. In one family, homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays revealed the DGAT1 gene as the best candidate gene for the proband. Sequencing of all the exons including flanking regions and promoter regions of the gene identified a novel homozygous missense variant, p.(Leu295Pro), in the highly conserved membrane-bound O-acyl transferase (MBOAT) domain of the DGAT1 protein. Expression studies verified reduced amounts of DGAT1 in patient fibroblasts. In a second family, exome sequencing identified a previously reported splice site mutation in intron 8. These cases of DGAT1 deficiency extend the molecular and phenotypic spectrum of PLE, suggesting a re-evaluation of the use of DGAT1 inhibitors for metabolic disorders including obesity and diabetes.

  14. Protein-losing enteropathy as initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, F O A A; Sampaio, L R; Brandão, L A R; Braga, L L B C; Rocha, F A C

    2012-04-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. We report the case of an 18-year-old woman that presented initially with diarrhoea and anasarca. During evaluation, there was low serum albumin of 1.6 g/dl (3.5-5.2 g/dl) and a positive antinuclear antibody test (1:2560). Anti-Sm antibodies (ELISA) were positive in addition to low serum C3 of 35 mg/dl. A scintigraphy using 99mTc-labelled albumin was positive for abdominal protein loss. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus related protein-losing enteropathy was made. She was started on prednisolone 40 mg/day without amelioration; a month later, azathioprine (100 mg/day) was added, leading to normalization of serum albumin and resolution of symptoms within 4 months. After 1.5 years, the patient developed a 2.9 g 24-h proteinuria while still in remission of the protein-losing enteropathy, receiving 5 mg prednisone and 100 mg azathioprine daily.

  15. Protein-losing enteropathy with intestinal lymphangiectasia in skeletal dysplasia with Lys650Met mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Dehner, Louis P

    2016-11-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy is a primary or secondary manifestation of a group of conditions, and etiologies which are broadly divisible into those with mucosal injury on the basis of inflammatory and ulcerative conditions, mucosal injury without erosions or ulcerations, and lymphatic abnormalities. We describe the first case of protein-losing enteropathy in a pediatric patient, with severe skeletal dysplasia consistent with thanatophoric dysplasia type I and DNA analysis that revealed a c.1949A>T (p.Lys650Met) in exon 15 of the FGFR3 gene. She presented with protein-losing enteropathy in her 6th month. Post-mortem examination revealed lymphangiectasia in the small intestine. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal lymphangiectasia as a complication of skeletal dysplasia resulting in severe protein-losing enteropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Immunological changes following protein losing enteropathy after surgery total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) by cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Lenz, Dominik; Mittag, Anja; Sauer, Ursula; Wild, Lena; Hess, John; Schranz, Dietmar; Hambsch, Jörg; Schneider, Peter; Tárnok, Attila

    2008-02-01

    Complex immunophenotyping single-cell analysis are essential for systems biology and cytomics. The application of cytomics in immunology and cardiac research and diagnostics is very broad, ranging from the better understanding of the cardiovascular cell biology to the identification of heart function and immune consequences after surgery. TCPC or Fontan-type circulation is an accepted palliative surgery for patients with a functionally univentricular heart. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), the enteric loss of proteins, is a potential late complication after TCPC surgery. PLE etiology is poorly understood, but immunological factors seem to play a role. This study was aimed to gain insight into immune phenotype alterations following post-TCPC PLE. Patients were studied during routine follow-up up to 5yrs after surgery, blood samples of TCPC patients without (n=21, age 6.8+/-2.6 years at surgery; mean+/-SD) and with manifest PLE (n=12, age 12.8+/- 4.5 years at sampling) and age matched healthy children (control, n=22, age 8.6+/-2.5 years) were collected. Routine laboratory, immune phenotype and serological parameters were determined. Following PLE the immune phenotype dramatically changed with signs of acute inflammation (increased neutrophil and monocyte count, CRP, IL-8). In contrast, lymphocyte count (NK-cells, αβTCR +CD4 +, αβTCR +CD8 + cells) decreased (p<0.001). The residual T-cells had elevated CD25 and CD69 expression. In PLE-patients unique cell populations with CD3 +αβ/γδTCR - and αβTCR +CD4 -8 - phenotype were present in increased frequencies. Our studies show dramatically altered leukocyte phenotype after PLE in TCPC patients. These alterations resemble to changes in autoimmune diseases. We conclude that autoimmune processes may play a role in etiology and pathophysiology of PLE.

  17. [Protein-losing enteropathy with systemic lupus erythematosus effectively treated with octreotide and medium chain triglyceride diet: A case report].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Makoto; Uchida, Kousuke; Nakashima, Tadaaki; Oda, Seiko; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Watada, Toshiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Araki, Jun; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Yano, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    In January 2009, a 62-year-old man presented with diarrhea, leg edema, and thrombopenia and was admitted to our hospital. The past medical history revealed Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis for which he had been administered prednisolone. On admission, a laboratory examination revealed massive hypoalbuminemia and high levels of C-reactive protein and platelet-associated IgG. Anti-double stranded DNA and anti-Sm antibodies were negative. Analysis of the bone marrow aspirate and Tc-99m albumin scintigraphy findings suggested autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) and protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), respectively. We diagnosed him as SLE, because past immunoserological testing had showed positivity for anti-double stranded DNA antibody and LE cells. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were ineffective. Rituximab was ineffective against PLE but was effective against AITP. Cyclosporine and Cyclophosphamide were ineffective against PLE. Subcutaneous injection of 200-μg octreotide daily and a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet was effective against PLE, and the patient's condition dramatically improved. The effectiveness of octreotide treatment and an MCT diet in the treatment of PLE with SLE is discussed.

  18. Applicability of 99m Tc-Labeled Human Serum Albumin Scintigraphy in Dogs With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, N; Ondreka, N; von Pückler, K; Mohrs, S; Sicken, J; Neiger, R

    2017-03-01

    Diagnosis of protein loss into the gastrointestinal tract using noninvasive techniques is challenging. In people, scintigraphy not only is a sensitive tool to confirm protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), but it also allows for localization of protein loss. To investigate the feasibility of 99m Tc-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) scintigraphy in dogs with PLE in comparison with control dogs. A total of 8 clinically healthy control research dogs and 7 client-owned dogs with gastrointestinal clinical signs and hypoalbuminemia (serum albumin concentration <2.0 g/dL). Prospective case-control study. After IV injection of 400 MBq freshly prepared 99m Tc HSA (30 mg/dog), images of the abdomen were obtained 10, 60, 120, and 240 minutes postinjection. Additional images of the salivary and thyroid glands were obtained to rule out free 99m Tc. A scan was considered positive for PLE when radiopharmaceutical exudation was detectable in the intestinal tract. Only 1 control dog showed exudation of the radiopharmaceutical into the intestinal tract. No free 99m Tc was detected in any dog. In dogs with PLE, focal small intestinal and diffuse small intestinal radiopharmaceutical exudation into the bowel was detected in 2 and 3 dogs, respectively, whereas in 2 dogs, there was disagreement about whether radiopharmaceutical exudation was focal or diffuse. 99m Tc-labeled HSA scintigraphy was feasible to diagnose PLE in dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Food hypersensitivity reactions in Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers with protein-losing enteropathy or protein-losing nephropathy or both: gastroscopic food sensitivity testing, dietary provocation, and fecal immunoglobulin E.

    PubMed

    Vaden, S L; Hammerberg, B; Davenport, D J; Orton, S M; Trogdon, M M; Melgarejo, L T; VanCamp, S D; Williams, D A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers (SCWTs) affected with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) or protein-losing nephropathy (PLN) or both for allergy to food. We performed gastroscopic food-sensitivity testing, a provocative dietary trial, and measurement of fecal immunoglobulin E (IgE) in 6 SCWTs affected with PLE or PLN or both. Positive gastroscopic food-sensitivity test reactions were noted in 5 of 6 dogs. Positive reactions were found to milk in 4 dogs, to lamb in 2 dogs, and to wheat and chicken each in 1 dog. Adverse reactions to food (diarrhea, vomiting, or pruritus) were detected in all 6 dogs during the provocative dietary trial. Adverse reactions were found to corn in 5 dogs, to tofu in 3 dogs, to cottage cheese in 2 dogs, to milk in 2 dogs, to farina cream of wheat in 2 dogs, and to lamb in 2 dogs. Serum albumin concentrations significantly decreased and fecal alpha1-protease inhibitor concentration significantly increased 4 days after the provocative trial when compared with baseline values. Antigen-specific fecal IgE varied throughout the provocative trial, with peak levels following ingestion of test meals. We conclude that food hypersensitivities are present in SCWTs affected with the syndrome of PLE/PLN. Mild inflammatory bowel disease was already established in the 6 SCWTs of this report at the time of study, making it impossible to determine if food allergies were the cause or result of the enteric disease.

  20. Treatment of Children with ProteinLosing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Material and methodology Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings

  1. Gastrointestinal haemorrhage due to lymphangiectasia caused by protein-losing enteropathy in the Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Gras, Pauline; Gottrand, Frédéric; Godart, François

    2017-10-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with severe protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan surgery that led to lymphangiectasia, which caused gastrointestinal haemorrhage and required invasive treatment to stop the bleeding. Through this case and a review of the literature on protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan surgery, we highlight a rare and serious presentation of the disease and the difficulties of diagnosis and management.

  2. Towards a proposal for a universal diagnostic definition of protein-losing enteropathy in Fontan patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Udink Ten Cate, Floris Ea; Hannes, Tobias; Germund, Ingo; Khalil, Markus; Huntgeburth, Michael; Apitz, Christian; Brockmeier, Konrad; Sreeram, Narayanswami

    2016-07-15

    A standardised diagnostic definition of protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) in Fontan patients serves both patient care and research. The present study determined whether a diagnostic definition of PLE was routinely used in published clinical Fontan studies, and to identify potentially relevant diagnostic criteria for composing a uniform PLE definition. A systematic review was conducted in adherence to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) recommendations. Published clinical Fontan studies that were written in English and included at least four patients with PLE were selected. PLE definitions were quantitatively analysed using a lateral thinking tool in which definitions were fractionated into constituent pieces of information (building blocks or diagnostic criteria). We identified 364 papers. In the final analysis, data from 62 published articles were extracted. A diagnostic definition of PLE was used in only 27/62 (43.5%) of selected studies, and definitions were very heterogeneous. We identified eight major diagnostic criteria. Hypoalbuminaemia (n=23 studies, 85.2%), clinical presentation (n=18, 66.7%), documentation of enteric protein loss (n=16, 59.3%) and exclusion of other causes of hypoproteinaemia (n=17, 63.0%), were the most frequently used diagnostic criteria. Most studies used three diagnostic variables (n=13/27, 48.1%). Cut-off values for laboratory parameters (serum albumin, protein or faecal α-1-antitrypsin) were frequently incorporated in the PLE definition (n=16, 59.3%). Establishment of a universally accepted PLE definition for routine use in clinical research and daily practice is required. The diagnostic criteria may help constitute a diagnostic PLE definition. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Protein losing enteropathy: comprehensive review of the mechanistic association with clinical and subclinical disease states

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) has been associated with more than 60 different conditions, including nearly all gastrointestinal diseases (Crohn’s disease, celiac, Whipple’s, intestinal infections, and so on) and a large number of non-gut conditions (cardiac and liver disease, lupus, sarcoidosis, and so on). This review presents the first attempt to quantitatively understand the magnitude of the PLE in relation to the associated pathology for three different disease categories: 1) increased lymphatic pressure (e.g., lymphangiectasis); 2) diseases with mucosal erosions (e.g., Crohn’s disease); and 3) diseases without mucosal erosions (e.g., celiac disease). The PLE with lymphangiectasis results from rupture of the mucosal lymphatics, with retrograde drainage of systemic lymph into the intestinal lumen with the resultant loss of CD4 T cells, which is diagnostic. Mucosal erosion PLE results from macroscopic breakdown of the mucosal barrier, with the epithelial capillaries becoming the rate-limiting factor in albumin loss. The equation derived to describe the relationship between the reduction in serum albumin (CP) and PLE indicates that gastrointestinal albumin clearance must increase by at least 17 times normal to reduce the CP by half. The strengths and limitations of the two quantitative measures of PLE (51Cr-albumin or α1-antitrypsin [αAT] clearance) are reviewed. αAT provides a simple quantitative diagnostic test that is probably underused clinically. The strong, unexplained correlation between minor decreases in CP and subsequent mortality in seemingly healthy individuals raises the question of whether subclinical PLE could account for the decreased CP and, if so, could the mechanism responsible for PLE play a role in the increased mortality? A large-scale study correlating αAT clearance with serum albumin concentrations will be required in order to determine the role of PLE in the regulation of the serum albumin concentration of seemingly healthy

  4. Behçet disease and protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Muguruza, Samantha; Caballero, Noemí; Horneros, Judith; Domenech, Eugeni; Mateo, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    We report an unusual case of a patient with Behçet's disease that developed protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypovitaminosis D is associated with negative outcome in dogs with protein losing enteropathy: a retrospective study of 43 cases.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, K; Rizzo, J; Jergens, A E; Chang, Y M

    2017-04-08

    Hypovitaminosis D has previously been shown to be prevalent amongst dogs with protein losing enteropathy (PLE). The hypothesis of this study was that Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH) D) serum concentrations could be a risk factor for negative outcome in dogs with PLE. Forty-three dogs diagnosed with PLE (2005-2014) and which serum Vitamin D serum concentrations were collected and archived at -80 Degrees C were analyzed. Post-diagnostic communication with referring veterinarians was made to determine outcome of PLE dogss: Dogs which died due to PLE within 4 months after diagnosis (negative outcome group, n = 22) and dogs alive or which died due to another disease at the end point of the study (1 year after diagnosis, good outcome group, n = 21). Serum samples taken at the time of diagnosis were analysed for ionized calcium (iCa) concentrations and serum 25(OH) D concentration. Clinical (CCECAI) scores, age at PLE diagnosis, and iCa concentrations were not significantly different between dog groups. A significantly greater (p < 0.001) number of PLE dogs treated with hydrolyzed or elimination diet alone showed good outcome as compared to the PLE negative outcome group. Median serum 25(OH) D concentration was significantly (p = 0.017) lower in dogs with negative outcome versus PLE dogs with good outcome. Using logistic regression analysis, 25(OH) D serum concentration was shown to be a statistically significant factor for outcome determination. Cox regression analysis yielded a hazard ratio of 0.974 (95% CI 0.949, 0.999) per each one nmol/l increase in serum 25(OH) D concentration. Low serum 25(OH) D concentration in PLE dogs was significantly associated with poor outcome. Further studies are required to investigate the clinical efficacy of Vitamin D (cholecalciferol) as a potential therapeutic agent for dogs with PLE.

  6. Protein-losing enteropathy as a rare complication of the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kengo; Watanabe, Mio; Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Shiihara, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    The ketogenic diet is a valuable therapy for patients with intractable epilepsy, but it can result in a variety of complications that sometimes limits its usefulness. Hypoproteinemia is one of the common adverse effects of this diet, although the underling mechanism is largely unknown except for the diet's reduced protein intake. Only one case of protein-losing enteropathy during the ketogenic diet has been reported. A previously healthy 9-year-old girl experienced fever for 5 days then suddenly developed convulsive seizures that subsequently evolved to severe refractory status epilepticus. After multiple antiepileptic drugs failed to improve the patient's condition, we introduced the ketogenic diet. Although her seizures diminished, her course was complicated by hypoproteinemia. An abdominal dynamic scintigraphy and colonoscopy findings indicated protein-losing enteropathy with nonspecific mucosal inflammation. Her nutritional status deteriorated; thus, we discontinued the ketogenic diet. Her nutritional status gradually improved, whereas her seizures increased. Hypoproteinemia during the ketogenic diet is common, but the underlying etiologies are not well understood. Abdominal dynamic scintigraphy could be valuable for clarifying the etiology of hypoproteinemia during the ketogenic diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein-losing enteropathy in a dog with lymphangiectasia, lymphoplasmacytic enteritis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alarcón, C A; Beristaín-Ruiz, D M; Pérez-Casio, F; Rivera, R; Ochoa, G; Martín-Orozco, U

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of seven-year-old male Akita mixed dog, with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). He had a history of chronic vomiting and diarrhea with anorexia/hyporexia. Previously he suffered acute abdomen about eight months prior to this visit. Our dog showed uncommon combination of diseases that could cause PLE since it was affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL), and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). The dog had most of the abnormalities found in IL, as well as hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, lymphopenia, hypocalcemia, and hypercholesterolemia. During endoscopy exam, we found changes characteristic of IL such as irregular small white spots. We took biopsies from stomach, duodenum, and cecum. These biopsies showed infiltration by lymphocytes and plasmatic cells in the lamina propria also, the duodenal biopsies showed moderate dilation of the lymphatic vessels. The patient had 2.1 µg/mL of TLI, this result was compatible with EPI. We assume that the first pathology in this animal was IBD, which caused chronic pancreatitis (CP) that in turn progressed to EPI. It is also possible that IL was secondary to IBD. We have reported for the first time the correlation of IBD and EPI in dogs. This should change our approach to treating chronic diarrhea in dogs. Therefore, we propose that dogs diagnosed with EPI should also be subjected to endoscopy and intestinal biopsy. Similarly, to rule out secondary EPI, TLI should be measured routinely in dogs with IBD.

  8. Everolimus for Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Michio; Hori, Tomohiro; Kanda, Kaori; Kawamoto, Norio; Ibuka, Takashi; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is an exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities in the intestinal lymphatics. In this article, we describe a 12-year-old boy with PIL that led to protein-losing enteropathy characterized by diarrhea, hypoalbuminemia associated with edema (serum albumin level: 1.0 g/dL), and hypogammaglobulinemia (serum IgG level: 144 mg/dL). Severe hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte abnormalities, and tetany persisted despite a low-fat diet and propranolol. Everolimus (1.6 mg/m(2)/day) was added to his treatment as an antiangiogenic agent. With everolimus treatment, the patient's diarrhea resolved and replacement therapy for hypoproteinemia was less frequent. Hematologic and scintigraphy findings also improved (serum albumin level: 2.5 g/dL). There were no adverse reactions during the 12-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of everolimus use in a patient with PIL. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. [Protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasis: a rare disease. Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Sommaruga, Horacio; Santarcángelo, Salomé Catalina; Quintana, Carlos; Navacchia, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasis (LIP) is a protein-losing enteropathy that appears sporadically in children. It begins with edema due to hypoproteinemia and hypoalbuminemia, and in some cases with ascites, immunodeficience and hypocalcemic tetania. The purpose of this report is to present two patients with LIP which appeared during the first year of life. The diagnosis was certificated by upper gastrointestinal videoendoscopy and histological findings. Both patients were treated with a new formula containing mean chain triglycerides with an adequate response, not obtained before with a common semielemental formula.

  10. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with infantile systemic hyalinosis syndrome: a rare cause of protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Alreheili, Khalid; AlMehaidib, Ali; Alsaleem, Khalid; Banemi, Mohammad; Aldekhail, Wajeeh; Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M

    2012-01-01

    Infantile systemic hyalinosis (ISH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease. Typically, ISH patients present with progressive painful joint contractures, intractable diarrhea, hyperpigmented skin lesions, and peri-anal fleshy nodules. We report a case of a 19-month-old male child with atypical ISH presentation. His main clinical finding was protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangectasia. This report is intended to enhance awareness about the gastrointestinal tract presentation of ISH.

  11. Cryptogenia multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis: an entity on its own as a cause of abdominal pain, iron deficiency anemia and protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guisado Vasco, P; Fraile Rodríguez, G

    2014-01-01

    We studied a patient with edema secondary to protein losing enteropathy, and recurrent bouts of bloating and abdominal pain secondary to intestinal subocclusion episodes. After the clinical study, the patient was diagnosed of cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), that is a rare disease, probably caused by mutations in the gene PLA2G4A, and characterized by multiple short stenosis of the small bowel with superficial ulcers, which do not exceed the submucosa layer. Inflammatory bowel disease (Chron's disease), intestinal tuberculosis and intestinal ulcers secondary to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the main differential diagnosis. To sum up, physicians should included CMUSE in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain, iron deficiency anaemia, occult intestinal bleeding, edema and protein losing enteropathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Protothecal enteritis as a cause of protein-losing enteropathy in a bull.

    PubMed

    Osterstock, Jason B; Mansell, Joanne L; Roussel, Allen J

    2005-11-01

    Prototheca spp are achlorophyllic saprophytic algae found in wastewater, sewage, agricultural waste, and possibly elsewhere in the environment. Infections with these organisms have been reported in cattle, humans, and dogs; affected cattle commonly develop mastitis. A 5-year-old Brahman-cross bull was evaluated because of a history of diarrhea and weight loss. The history and physical examination and clinicopathologic findings were similar to those associated with granulomatous enteritis caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Johne's disease), which is the most common protein-losing enteropathy of cattle. However, diagnostic tests for paratuberculosis yielded negative results. Biopsy specimens from the ileum, jejunum, and ileocecal lymph node were collected for histologic examination and preparation of tissue impression smears; Prototheca-like organisms were identified. Because of the poor prognosis associated with this infection and the lack of safe and economical therapeutic agents for cattle, the owner decided to euthanatize the bull. Infection with Prototheca organisms was confirmed postmortem. As this case illustrates, protothecosis may be a cause of granulomatous enteritis in cattle.

  13. Cholestasis and protein-losing enteropathy secondary to hyperthyroidism in a 6-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Lamia; Charfi, Manel; Maalej, Bayen; Majdoub, Imen; Safi, Faiza; Fourati, Hela; Hentati, Yosr; Daoud, Emna; Mnif, Zeineb; Abid, Mohamed; Mahfoudh, Abdelmajid

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic dysfunctions are not infrequent in patients with hyperthyroidism. These disorders may be related to the effects of the excess thyroid hormone secretion, to the uses of antithyroid drugs, or to the presence of concomitant hepatic diseases. Our aim is to describe the clinical and biochemical features of liver dysfunction related to thyrotoxicosis. We report here a case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted for jaundice and pruritus as a result of the development of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease. On physical examination at admission, she was found to have jaundice and hepatomegaly. Laboratory data show cholestasis and protein-losing enteropathy. Investigations exclude other causes of hepatic disorder. One month after the initiation of antithyroid drug, the patient became euthyroid with improvement in jaundice and pruritus and normalization of hepatic tests and alpha antitrypsine clearance. In conclusion, the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism may be delayed in patients in whom the primary manifestations were pruritus and jaundice. The physician should suspect thyrotoxicosis prior to hepatitis or skin manifestations.

  14. Successful Treatment of Protein-Losing Enteropathy Induced by Intestinal Lymphangiectasia in a Liver Cirrhosis Patient with Octreotide: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak; Kim, Jin Bae; Jeon, Yong Chul; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Hahm, Joon Soo

    2004-01-01

    A 47-yr-old man with hepatitis B virus associated liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital with diarrhea and generalized edema and diagnosed as protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia by intestinal biopsy and 99mTc albumin scan. During hospitalization, he received subcutaneous octreotide therapy. After 2 weeks of octreotide therapy, follow-up albumin scan showed no albumin leakage, and the serum albumin level was sustained. We speculate that liver cirrhosis can be a cause of intestinal lymphangiectasia and administration of octreotide should be considered for patients with intestinal lymphangiectasia whose clinical and biochemical abnormalities do not respond to a low-fat diet. PMID:15201518

  15. Classification of intestinal lymphangiectasia with protein-losing enteropathy: white villi type and non-white villi type.

    PubMed

    Ohmiya, Naoki; Nakamura, Masanao; Yamamura, Takeshi; Yamada, Koji; Nagura, Asuka; Yoshimura, Toru; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Hirata, Ichiro; Goto, Hidemi

    2014-01-01

    We classified intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) into two categories, the white and non-white villi types, and evaluated their clinical characteristics and therapeutic responses. Of the 988 patients who underwent double-balloon enteroscopy, 14 consecutive patients (7 men and 7 women, median age at onset 34 years) were enrolled with immunohistochemically confirmed IL with protein-losing enteropathy. Enteroscopically the white villi type (n = 8) showed white plaques and white-tipped villi were scattered in the small bowel, while non-white villi type (n = 6) showed that apparently normal but under more detailed observation, low and round villi with a normal color were diffused. The serum albumin levels and fecal α1-antitrypsin clearance before treatment were significantly worse in the non-white villi type (p = 0.017 and 0.039, respectively), whereas the serum immunoglobulin A and M levels were significantly lower in the white villi type (p = 0.010 and 0.046, respectively). At gastroscopy, a non-cirrhotic snakeskin appearance was significantly observed in the non-white villi type (p = 0.015). The corticosteroid response was better in the non-white villi type (p = 0.015). Two distinct subgroups were found in IL. This classification was useful in pathophysiological clustering and in predicting the therapeutic response. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [Generalized intestinal CMV infection with protein-losing syndrome in ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Meyenberger, C; Suter, W

    2000-10-28

    Infection by cytomegalovirus (CMV) in immunocompetent patients is rare, and if it occurs it is most often associated with ulcerative colitis. This case illustrates a CMV infection in a patient with an ulcerative colitis combined with CMV-induced protein losing enteropathy, a condition reported in immunocompetent individuals in only a very few cases worldwide. It demonstrates the importance of differentiating between a flare-up of ulcerative colitis and CMV colitis. The indication for antiviral therapy is discussed. A 76-years-old patient with a 23-year history of leftsided ulcerative colitis presented with acute pancolitis sparing the rectum. He showed no evidence of impaired host defence, nor has he ever had taken immunosuppressive drugs. Disseminated primary CMV infection involving of the colon, the oesophagus and the small intestine with protein losing enteropathy was diagnosed on the basis of histology, culture and serology. In view of the long duration of the illness and the highly active infection, antiviral therapy with ganciclovir was given and led to a dramatical improvement of all disease manifestations. The patient subsequently remained in remission from ulcerative colitis for three years.

  17. Use of a Granulocyte Immunofluorescence Assay Designed for Humans for Detection of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies in Dogs with Chronic Enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Florey, J; Viall, A; Streu, S; DiMuro, V; Riddle, A; Kirk, J; Perazzotti, L; Affeldt, K; Wagner, R; Vaden, S; Harris, T; Allenspach, K

    2017-07-01

    Perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) previously have been shown to be serum markers in dogs with chronic enteropathies, with dogs that have food-responsive disease (FRD) having higher frequencies of seropositivity than dogs with steroid-responsive disease (SRD). The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay used in previous publications is time-consuming to perform, with low interobserver agreement. We hypothesized that a commercially available granulocyte IIF assay designed for humans could be used to detect perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in dogs. Forty-four dogs with FRD, 20 dogs with SRD, 20 control dogs, and 38 soft-coated wheaten terrier (SCWT) or SCWT-cross dogs. A granulocyte assay designed for humans was used to detect pANCA, cANCA, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA), as well as antibodies against proteinase-3 protein (PR-3) and myeloperoxidase protein (MPO) in archived serum samples. Sensitivity of the granulocyte assay to predict FRD in dogs was 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.45, 0.75), and specificity was 1.00 (95% CI, 0.91, 1.00). A significant association was identified between positive pANCA or cANCA result and diagnosis of FRD (P < 0.0001). Agreement between the two assays to detect ANCA in the same serum samples from SCWT with protein-losing enteropathy/protein-losing nephropathy (PLE/PLN) was substantial (kappa, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.53, 1.00). Eight ANCA-positive cases were positive for MPO or PR-3 antibodies. The granulocyte immunofluorescence assay used in our pilot study was easy and quick to perform. Agreement with the previously published method was good. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract to absorb proteins ( protein-losing enteropathy ) Malnutrition Kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome Scarring of the ... may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone marrow ...

  19. Food sensitive enteropathy: overview and update.

    PubMed

    Walker-Smith, J

    1994-10-01

    There are two types of food sensitive enteropathy; permanent and temporary. Celiac disease belongs to the former, the temporary food sensitive enteropathies of early childhood to the latter. A food sensitive enteropathy is characterized by an abnormal small intestinal mucosa while having the offending food in the diet; the abnormality is reversed by an elimination diet, only to recur once more on challenge with the relevant food. These disorders are temporary and may follow gastroenteritis. Cow's milk sensitive enteropathy is the most frequent and best known example but soy protein, egg, fish, chicken meat, ground rice and probably gluten may also temporarily damage the small intestinal mucosa in infancy. Treatment is with an elimination diet and protein hydrolysates as a cow's milk substitute. The reason why these enteropathies are temporary has not yet been established.

  20. [Cow's milk protein sensitive enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Harms, H K

    1982-01-01

    Cow's milk protein sensitive enteropathy (CMPSE) is characterized by the following items: 1. The great majority of affected infants have not been breast fed or only for a few days. Additional risks are immaturity, preceding enteritis, trisomy 21, and abdominal operation in the newborn. 2. Half of the patients become ill during the first two weeks after starting cow's milk formula. The main symptoms are watery, mucus containing diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal distension, pallor and rapid weight loss. 3. In CMPSE the small intestinal mucosa shows varying degrees of inflammation and villous atrophy. Bloody stools refer to large bowel affection. 4. CMPSE is always transitory and usually persists for less than one year. Inadequate treatment leads to "severe protracted diarrhea" or "intractable diarrhea" syndrome. Soya-based formula should not be the diet of first choice, since secondary intolerance to soya proteins will frequently develop. Exclusive breast feeding during the first months of life is the best prophylaxis of CMPSE.

  1. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia: a rare differential diagnosis in hypoproteinemia in infants].

    PubMed

    Möller, A; Kalhoff, H; Reuter, T; Friedrichs, N; Wagner, N

    2006-01-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease in childhood, which may already cause protein-losing enteropathy in newborns. This is a case report of an infant with generalized edema and protein-losing enteropathy, in whom intestinal lymphangiectasia was diagnosed at the age of two months. Following repetitive intravenous albumin und gamma globulin infusions, the elimination of long-chain fats from the diet and the substitution with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) led to an improvement of the protein-losing enteropathy. In newborns with low level of serum protein and edema protein-losing enteropathy caused by congenital lymphangiectasia might be considered as a differential diagnosis.

  2. Proposal for Prevention or Alleviation of Protein/Lymph-Losing Enteropathy (PLE/LLE) After Fontan Circulation Treatment of Univentricular Hearts: Restoration of Lymph Balance With a "Lymphatic Right-to-Left Shunt."

    PubMed

    James, H; Witte, M H; Bernas, M; Barber, B

    2016-09-01

    In Fontan circulations created for univentricular hearts, systemic venous return is diverted to the lungs before returning to the heart. The Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) is often the preferred surgical procedure whereby a 4-way anastomosis is created with inflow from the superior vena cava (SVC) and inferior vena cava (IVC) and outflow to the right and left branches of the pulmonary artery. In this arrangement, the systemic venous pressure must be elevated sufficiently to perfuse the lungs passively without the normal boost of the right ventricle. Hence, unlike surgical corrections for other congenital heart conditions, the systemic venous pressures in a Fontan circuit must be elevated to make the circulation work. It is proposed here that the incidence of PLE/LLE is directly related to elevated venous and lymphatic pressures, which cause leakage of proteins/lymph into the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and expulsion from the body. It is commonly held that elevated venous pressures are relatively better tolerated in the upper body, but much less so in the heptatosplanchnic circulation and the lower body. It is also well established that elevated venous pressure increases lymph formation, most of which is produced in the hepatosplanchnic region (liver and intestine). It is further argued here that the increase in lymph filling pressure arising from the higher lymph flow, in association with the backpressure exerted by elevated venous pressure at the main drainage point into the venous system, results in a substantial increase in pressure in the thoracic duct. This pressure is transmitted back to the intestinal lymphatics, causing dilatation with lacteal rupture and protein or bulk lymph leakage into the intestine. We propose in this paper a new approach, based on experimental evidence, to prevent and/or alleviate this condition by draining or redirecting the thoracic duct (or, alternatively, a more localized intestinal lymphatic vessel) into one of the

  3. Osteomalacia and osteoporosis associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ping; Shen, Wen-Bin; Long, Ming-Qing; Meng, Xun-Wu; Lian, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Miao

    2012-05-01

    Primary Intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a common cause of protein losing enteropathy (PLE). It will affect enter-hepatic circulation of lipid-soluble vitamin, and absorption of electrolytes, cause malnutrition related osteomalacia or osteoporosis. While seldom health care workers noted to assess and treat osteomalacia or osteoporosis in PIL. Here we report a related case. We found increased parathyroid hormone, decreased 25(OH)D3, low bone mineral density, which indicated that the PIL patient had osteomalacia and/or osteoporosis. Adequate calcium and vitamin D supply can relieve the condition efficaciously. We should pay attention to osteomalacia and osteoporosis in PIL patients.

  4. Octreotide in Hennekam syndrome-associated intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Al Sinani, Siham; Rawahi, Yusria Al; Abdoon, Hamed

    2012-11-21

    A number of disorders have been described to cause protein losing enteropathy (PLE) in children. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is one mechanism leading to PLE. Few syndromes are associated with PIL; Hennekam syndrome (HS) is one of them. The principal treatment for PIL is a high protein, low fat diet with medium chain triglycerides supplementation. Supportive therapy includes albumin infusion. Few publications have supported the use of octreotide to diminish protein loss and minimize hypoalbuminemia seen in PIL. There are no publications on the treatment of PIL with octreotide in patients with HS. We report two children with HS and PLE in which we used octreotide to decrease intestinal protein loss. In one patient, octreotide increased serum albumin to an acceptable level without further need for albumin infusions. The other patient responded more dramatically with near normal serum albumin levels and cessation of albumin infusions. In achieving a good response to octreotide in both patients, we add to the publications supporting the use of octreotide in PIL and suggest that octreotide should be tried in patients with PIL secondary to HS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the use of octreotide in HS-associated PIL.

  5. Octreotide in Hennekam syndrome-associated intestinal lymphangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Al Sinani, Siham; Rawahi, Yusria Al; Abdoon, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    A number of disorders have been described to cause protein losing enteropathy (PLE) in children. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is one mechanism leading to PLE. Few syndromes are associated with PIL; Hennekam syndrome (HS) is one of them. The principal treatment for PIL is a high protein, low fat diet with medium chain triglycerides supplementation. Supportive therapy includes albumin infusion. Few publications have supported the use of octreotide to diminish protein loss and minimize hypoalbuminemia seen in PIL. There are no publications on the treatment of PIL with octreotide in patients with HS. We report two children with HS and PLE in which we used octreotide to decrease intestinal protein loss. In one patient, octreotide increased serum albumin to an acceptable level without further need for albumin infusions. The other patient responded more dramatically with near normal serum albumin levels and cessation of albumin infusions. In achieving a good response to octreotide in both patients, we add to the publications supporting the use of octreotide in PIL and suggest that octreotide should be tried in patients with PIL secondary to HS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the use of octreotide in HS-associated PIL. PMID:23180957

  6. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-01-01

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:24914370

  7. Patients with mild enteropathy have apoptotic injury of enterocytes similar to that in advanced enteropathy in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Das, Prasenjit; Gahlot, Gaurav P S; Mehta, Ritu; Makharia, Archita; Verma, Anil K; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Panda, Subrat K; Ahuja, Vineet; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Makharia, Govind K

    2016-11-01

    Severity of villous atrophy in celiac disease (CeD) is the cumulative effect of enterocyte loss and cell regeneration. Gluten-free diet has been shown to benefit even in patients having a positive anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG) antibody titre and mild enteropathy. We explored the balance between mucosal apoptotic enterocyte loss and cell regeneration in mild and advanced enteropathies. Duodenal biopsies from patients with mild enteropathy (Marsh grade 0 and 1) (n=26), advanced enteropathy (Marsh grade ≥2) (n=41) and control biopsies (n=12) were subjected to immunohistochemical staining for end-apoptotic markers (M30, H2AX); markers of cell death (perforin, annexin V); and cell proliferation (Ki67). Composite H-scores based on the intensity and distribution of markers were compared. End-apoptotic markers and marker of cell death (perforin) were significantly up-regulated in both mild and advanced enteropathies, in comparison to controls; without any difference between mild and advanced enteropathies. Ki67 labelling index was significantly higher in crypts of mild enteropathy, in comparison to controls, suggesting maintained regenerative activity in the former. Even in patients with mild enteropathy, the rate of apoptosis is similar to those with advanced enteropathy. These findings suggest the necessity of reviewing the existing practice of not treating patients with mild enteropathy. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Diarrhea with malabsorption and exudative enteropathy caused by intestinal myeloid involvement in a patient with myeloproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Molas, G; Ponsot, P; Solal-Celigny, P; Amar, M; Paolaggi, J A; Potet, F; Henin, D

    1992-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman with a myelodysplastic syndrome complained of diarrhea with malabsorption and protein-losing enteropathy after splenectomy. No cause was found and various therapeutic regimens were not effective. Pathological examination of biopsies from stomach, small intestine, and large bowel showed infiltrations interpreted as inflammatory on routine technics. Blast cell infiltration was found on electron microscopy. Treatment by citarabine induced normalization of leukocytosis, and diarrhea disappeared. Six months after the onset of illness, she developed acute myeloblastic leukemia and died of infectious pneumonia. Blastic infiltration of the lamina propria could be responsible for the determinism of symptoms, because of the lack of another etiology, the intensity of the blastic infiltration and the effect of cytotoxic therapy, even in the absence of new biopsies.

  9. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ( 99m Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  10. Tropical enteropathy in Rhodesia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G; Clain, D J; Wicks, A C

    1976-11-01

    Tropical enteropathy, which may be related to tropical sprue, has been described in many developing countries including parts of Africa. The jejunal changes of enteropathy are seen in Rhodesians of all social and racial categories. Xylose excretion, however, is related to socioeconomic status, but not race. Upper socioeconomic Africans and Europeans excrete significantly more xylose than lower socioeconomic Africans. Vitamin B12 and fat absorption are normal, suggesting predominant involvement of the proximal small intestine. Tropical enteropathy in Rhodesia is similar to that seen in Nigeria but is associated with less malabsorption than is found in the Caribbean, the Indian subcontinent, and South East Asia. The possible aetiological factors are discussed. It is postulated that the lighter exposure of upper class Africans and Europeans to repeated gastrointestinal infections may accound for their superior xylose absorption compared with Africans of low socioeconomic circumstances. It is further suggested that the milder enteropathy seen in Africa may be explained by a lower prevalence of acute gastroenteritis than in experienced elsewhere in the tropics.

  11. PLE in the analysis of plant compounds. Part II: One-cycle PLE in determining total amount of analyte in plant material.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Wianowska, Dorota

    2005-04-29

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is recognised as one of the most effective sample preparation methods. Despite the enhanced extraction power of PLE, the full recovery of an analyte from plant material may require multiple extractions of the same sample. The presented investigations show the possibility of estimating the true concentration value of an analyte in plant material employing one-cycle PLE in which plant samples of different weight are used. The performed experiments show a linear dependence between the reciprocal value of the analyte amount (E*), extracted in single-step PLE from a plant matrix, and the ratio of plant material mass to extrahent volume (m(p)/V(s)). Hence, time-consuming multi-step PLE can be replaced by a few single-step PLEs performed at different (m(p)/V(s)) ratios. The concentrations of rutin in Sambucus nigra L. and caffeine in tea and coffee estimated by means of the tested procedure are almost the same as their concentrations estimated by multiple PLE.

  12. Social media methods for studying rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Stringer, Kathleen A; Donohue, Janet E; Yu, Sunkyung; Shaver, Ashley; Caruthers, Regine L; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Fifer, Carlen; Goldberg, Caren; Russell, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    For pediatric rare diseases, the number of patients available to support traditional research methods is often inadequate. However, patients who have similar diseases cluster "virtually" online via social media. This study aimed to (1) determine whether patients who have the rare diseases Fontan-associated protein losing enteropathy (PLE) and plastic bronchitis (PB) would participate in online research, and (2) explore response patterns to examine social media's role in participation compared with other referral modalities. A novel, internet-based survey querying details of potential pathogenesis, course, and treatment of PLE and PB was created. The study was available online via web and Facebook portals for 1 year. Apart from 2 study-initiated posts on patient-run Facebook pages at the study initiation, all recruitment was driven by study respondents only. Response patterns and referral sources were tracked. A total of 671 respondents with a Fontan palliation completed a valid survey, including 76 who had PLE and 46 who had PB. Responses over time demonstrated periodic, marked increases as new online populations of Fontan patients were reached. Of the responses, 574 (86%) were from the United States and 97 (14%) were international. The leading referral sources were Facebook, internet forums, and traditional websites. Overall, social media outlets referred 84% of all responses, making it the dominant modality for recruiting the largest reported contemporary cohort of Fontan patients and patients who have PLE and PB. The methodology and response patterns from this study can be used to design research applications for other rare diseases. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. PLE in the analysis of plant compounds. Part I. The application of PLE for HPLC analysis of caffeine in green tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Wianowska, Dorota

    2005-04-29

    A broad spectrum of sample preparation methods is currently used for the isolation of pharmacologically active compounds from plant and herbal materials. The paper compares the effectiveness of infusion, microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE), matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) and pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) as sample preparation methods for the isolation of caffeine from green tea leaves. The effect of PLE variables, such as extraction temperature, pressure and time, on the yield of caffeine from the investigated matrix is discussed. The obtained results revealed that PLE, in comparison with other sample preparation methods applied, has significantly lower efficacy for caffeine isolation from green tea leaves. The evaluation of PLE conditions leads to the conclusion that elevated pressure applied in the PLE process is the factor hindering the extraction.

  14. Is non‐steroidal anti‐inflammaory drug (NSAID) enteropathy clinically more important than NSAID gastropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Adebayo, D; Bjarnason, I

    2006-01-01

    The side effects of conventional non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the stomach is undoubtedly a serious public health problem contributing significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving these drugs. However, the damage of NSAIDs is not confined to the stomach. Indeed the short term and long term damage of NSAIDs on the small bowel (NSAID enteropathy) is more frequent than NSAID gastropathy. Furthermore, NSAID enteropathy is associated with complications (bleeding and protein loss). While many of these are mild, the serious events (significant bleeding, perforation, obstruction, and sudden death) are frequent as that reported for NSAID gastropathy. The diagnosis of NSAID enteropathy has been greatly aided by the introduction of wireless capsule enteroscopy. PMID:16517800

  15. Is non-steroidal anti-inflammaory drug (NSAID) enteropathy clinically more important than NSAID gastropathy?

    PubMed

    Adebayo, D; Bjarnason, I

    2006-03-01

    The side effects of conventional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the stomach is undoubtedly a serious public health problem contributing significantly to the morbidity and mortality of patients receiving these drugs. However, the damage of NSAIDs is not confined to the stomach. Indeed the short term and long term damage of NSAIDs on the small bowel (NSAID enteropathy) is more frequent than NSAID gastropathy. Furthermore, NSAID enteropathy is associated with complications (bleeding and protein loss). While many of these are mild, the serious events (significant bleeding, perforation, obstruction, and sudden death) are frequent as that reported for NSAID gastropathy. The diagnosis of NSAID enteropathy has been greatly aided by the introduction of wireless capsule enteroscopy.

  16. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adriaanse, Marlou P. M.; van der Sande, Linda J. T. M.; van den Neucker, Anita M.; Menheere, Paul P. C. A.; Dompeling, Edward; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF), which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use. Methods Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1), exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), CF-related diabetes (CFRD) and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were obtained from the medical charts. Results Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001), and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05). Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05). No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use. Conclusion This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance. PMID:26484665

  17. Prevalence of food-responsive enteropathy among dogs with chronic enteropathy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Koji; Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Nagata, Noriyuki; Masashi, Yuki; Suto, Akemi; Suto, Yukinori; Uto, Shohei; Ueno, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Takehiro; Ushigusa, Takahiro; Nagai, Takashi; Arawatari, Yasunori; Miyaji, Kazuki; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    There have been limited reports on the prevalence of adverse food reactions among dogs suffering from chronic enteropathy (CE) in Japan. We examined the prevalence and histological features of food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) in a total of 32 dogs with history of CE. Fourteen of 18 cases (56.2%) diagnosed as FRE had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or eosinophilic enteritis by histopathological examination. Characteristic histopathological changes indicating FRE were not identified in 18 cases, though 4 cases did not show any abnormalities. Results collected from this study provided important information that can help to change the way dogs with CE are treated in the future.

  18. Prevalence of food-responsive enteropathy among dogs with chronic enteropathy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KAWANO, Koji; SHIMAKURA, Hidekatsu; NAGATA, Noriyuki; MASASHI, Yuki; SUTO, Akemi; SUTO, Yukinori; UTO, Shohei; UENO, Hiromichi; HASEGAWA, Takehiro; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; NAGAI, Takashi; ARAWATARI, Yasunori; MIYAJI, Kazuki; OHMORI, Keitaro; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    There have been limited reports on the prevalence of adverse food reactions among dogs suffering from chronic enteropathy (CE) in Japan. We examined the prevalence and histological features of food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) in a total of 32 dogs with history of CE. Fourteen of 18 cases (56.2%) diagnosed as FRE had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or eosinophilic enteritis by histopathological examination. Characteristic histopathological changes indicating FRE were not identified in 18 cases, though 4 cases did not show any abnormalities. Results collected from this study provided important information that can help to change the way dogs with CE are treated in the future. PMID:27150023

  19. Educational clinical case series for pediatric allergy and immunology: allergic proctocolitis, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis with protein-losing gastroenteropathy as manifestations of non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jennifer; Nowak-Wegrzyn, Anna

    2007-06-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy is the most common food allergy in infants and young children. It is estimated that up to 50% of pediatric cow's milk allergy is non-IgE-mediated. Allergic proctocolitis is a benign disorder manifesting with blood-streaked stools in otherwise healthy-appearing infants who are breast- or formula-fed. Symptoms resolve within 48-72 h following elimination of dietary cow's milk protein. Most infants tolerate cow's milk by their first birthday. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome presents in young formula-fed infants with chronic emesis, diarrhea, and failure to thrive. Reintroduction of cow's milk protein following a period of avoidance results in profuse, repetitive emesis within 2-3 h following ingestion; 20% of acute exposures may be associated with hypovolemic shock. Treatment of acute reactions is with vigorous hydration. Most children become tolerant with age; attempts of re-introduction of milk must be done under physician supervision and with secure i.v. access. Allergic eosinophilic gastroenteritis affects infants as well as older children and adolescents. Abdominal pain, emesis, diarrhea, failure to thrive, or weight loss are the most common symptoms. A subset of patients may develop protein-losing enteropathy. Fifty percent of affected children are atopic and have evidence of food-specific IgE antibody but skin prick tests and serum food-IgE levels correlate with response to elimination diet poorly. Elemental diet based on the amino-acid formula leads to resolutions of gastrointestinal eosinophilic inflammation typically within 6 wk.

  20. May I Suggest? Comparing Three PLE Recommender Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modritscher, Felix; Krumay, Barbara; El Helou, Sandy; Gillet, Denis; Nussbaumer, Alexander; Albert, Dietrich; Dahn, Ingo; Ullrich, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Personal learning environment (PLE) solutions aim at empowering learners to design (ICT and web-based) environments for their learning activities, mashing-up content and people and apps for different learning contexts. Widely used in other application areas, recommender systems can be very useful for supporting learners in their PLE-based…

  1. Genetics Home Reference: immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions IPEX syndrome Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome primarily affects males and is ...

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel DGAT1 missense mutation associated with congenital diarrhea[S

    PubMed Central

    Gluchowski, Nina L.; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Picoraro, Joseph A.; Mejhert, Niklas; Pinto, Shirly; Xin, Winnie; Kamin, Daniel S.; Winter, Harland S.; Chung, Wendy K.; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2017-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 and DGAT2 catalyze triglyceride (TG) biosynthesis in humans. Biallelic loss-of-function mutations in human DGAT1 result in severe congenital diarrhea and protein-losing enteropathy. Additionally, pharmacologic inhibition of DGAT1 led to dose-related diarrhea in human clinical trials. Here we identify a previously unknown DGAT1 mutation in identical twins of South Asian descent. These male patients developed watery diarrhea shortly after birth, with protein-losing enteropathy and failure to thrive. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous recessive mutation in DGAT1, c.314T>C, p.L105P. We show here that the p.L105P DGAT1 enzyme produced from the mutant allele is less abundant, resulting in partial loss of TG synthesis activity and decreased formation of lipid droplets in patient-derived primary dermal fibroblasts. Thus, in contrast with complete loss-of-function alleles of DGAT1, the p.L105P missense allele partially reduces TG synthesis activity and causes a less severe clinical phenotype. Our findings add to the growing recognition of DGAT1 deficiency as a cause of congenital diarrhea with protein-losing enteropathy and indicate that DGAT1 mutations result in a spectrum of diseases. PMID:28373485

  3. Selenium status and fungi in the protein-losing enteropathy of persistent diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Dwipoerwantoro, Pramita G; Lukito, Widjaja; Aulia, Diana; Arnaud, Josiane; Roussel, Anne-Marie

    2017-06-01

    A vicious cycle of infection, malabsorption, and malnutrition has been implicated in the perpetuation of diarrheal disease. This study examined whether persistent diarrhea is associated with changes in selenium status and stool alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) concentration. This cross-sectional study included 30 children aged 1-12 years with persistent diarrhea who were hospitalized in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Fatmawati Hospital, Jakarta, and 30 apparently healthy children who were matched by age and sex and lived in a rural area of Jakarta. Clinical examinations, blood routine tests, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and plasma selenium levels as well as AAT in fresh stool samples were performed in all the subjects. Of 30 children with persistent diarrhea, 17 had moderate malnutrition and 13 had severe malnutrition. The mean plasma selenium was significantly lower in children with persistent diarrhea than in children without diarrhea (86.0 μg/L [95% CI: 76.1-95.9] vs 110 μg/L [95% CI: 104-116, p<0.0001). The mean stool AAT concentration was significantly higher in children with persistent diarrhea than in those without diarrhea (115 mg/dL [95% CI: 38.5-191] vs 16 mg/dL [95% CI: 4.0-13.5, p<0.0001]). Selenium correlated with AAT (p=0.05). Fecal fungi were persistently present. Although selenium status in both groups was optimal for the obtained plasma GPX activity, children with persistent diarrhea exhibited lower plasma selenium levels. This study suggests that the decrease in the plasma selenium level may be the consequence of protein loss and that fungi may be involved.

  4. Lessons Learnt from and Sustainability of Adopting a Personal Learning Environment & Network (Ple&N)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, Eric; Sabetzadeh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the feedback from the configuration and deployment of a Personal Learning Environment & Network (PLE&N) tool to support peer-based social learning for university students and graduates. An extension of an earlier project in which a generic and PLE&N was deployed for all learners, the current PLE&N is a…

  5. Uric acid ameliorates indomethacin-induced enteropathy in mice through its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Yasutake, Yuichi; Tomita, Kengo; Higashiyama, Masaaki; Furuhashi, Hirotaka; Shirakabe, Kazuhiko; Takajo, Takeshi; Maruta, Koji; Sato, Hirokazu; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Okada, Yoshikiyo; Kurihara, Chie; Watanabe, Chikako; Komoto, Shunsuke; Nagao, Shigeaki; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Miura, Soichiro; Hokari, Ryota

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid is excreted from blood into the intestinal lumen, yet the roles of uric acid in intestinal diseases remain to be elucidated. The study aimed to determine whether uric acid could reduce end points associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced enteropathy. A mouse model of NSAID-induced enteropathy was generated by administering indomethacin intraperitoneally to 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice, and then vehicle or uric acid was administered orally. A group of mice treated with indomethacin was also concurrently administered inosinic acid, a uric acid precursor, and potassium oxonate, an inhibitor of uric acid metabolism, intraperitoneally. For in vitro analysis, Caco-2 cells treated with indomethacin were incubated in the presence or absence of uric acid. Oral administration of uric acid ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice even though serum uric acid levels did not increase. Intraperitoneal administration of inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly elevated serum uric acid levels and ameliorated NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice. Both oral uric acid treatment and intraperitoneal treatment with inosinic acid and potassium oxonate significantly decreased lipid peroxidation in the ileum of mice with NSAID-induced enteropathy. Treatment with uric acid protected Caco-2 cells from indomethacin-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and cytotoxicity. Uric acid within the intestinal lumen and in serum had a protective effect against NSAID-induced enteropathy in mice, through its antioxidant activity. Uric acid could be a promising therapeutic target for NSAID-induced enteropathy. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. PLE-based instruction concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorcik, Tomas

    2017-11-01

    The paper is aimed at the description of a PLE (Personal Learning Environment)-based teaching model suitable for implementation in the instruction of upper primary school students. The paper describes the individual stages of the model and its use of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) tools. The Personal Learning Environment is a form of instruction which allows for the meaningful use of information and communication technologies (including mobile technologies) in their entirety.

  7. Olmesartan-induced Enteropathy Manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hirota, Yusuke

    Cases of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan have sporadically been encountered since it was first reported in 2012, and their most characteristic manifestation is severe diarrhea. We herein report the first case of sprue-like enteropathy manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome due to vitamin B1 malabsorption with only minimally increased bowel movements. When patients are receiving olmesartan and they complain of nonspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important to consider changing the drugs before any serious malabsorption syndrome develops.

  8. Olmesartan-induced Enteropathy Manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hirota, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Cases of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan have sporadically been encountered since it was first reported in 2012, and their most characteristic manifestation is severe diarrhea. We herein report the first case of sprue-like enteropathy manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome due to vitamin B1 malabsorption with only minimally increased bowel movements. When patients are receiving olmesartan and they complain of nonspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important to consider changing the drugs before any serious malabsorption syndrome develops. PMID:27980272

  9. The clinical efficacy of dietary fat restriction in treatment of dogs with intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Okanishi, H; Yoshioka, R; Kagawa, Y; Watari, T

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL), a type of protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), is a dilatation of lymphatic vessels within the gastrointestinal tract. Dietary fat restriction previously has been proposed as an effective treatment for dogs with PLE, but limited objective clinical data are available on the efficacy of this treatment. To investigate the clinical efficacy of dietary fat restriction in dogs with IL that were unresponsive to prednisolone treatment or showed relapse of clinical signs and hypoalbuminemia when the prednisolone dosage was decreased. Twenty-four dogs with IL. Retrospective study. Body weight, clinical activity score, and hematologic and biochemical variables were compared before and 1 and 2 months after treatment. Furthermore, the data were compared between the group fed only an ultra low-fat (ULF) diet and the group fed ULF and a low-fat (LF) diet. Nineteen of 24 (79%) dogs responded satisfactorily to dietary fat restriction, and the prednisolone dosage could be decreased. Clinical activity score was significantly decreased after dietary treatment compared with before treatment. In addition, albumin (ALB), total protein (TP), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration were significantly increased after dietary fat restriction. At 2 months posttreatment, the ALB concentrations in the ULF group were significantly higher than that of the ULF + LF group. Dietary fat restriction appears to be an effective treatment in dogs with IL that are unresponsive to prednisolone treatment or that have recurrent clinical signs and hypoalbuminemia when the dosage of prednisolone is decreased. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Selective Activation of N,N'-Diacyl Rhodamine Pro-fluorophores Paired with Releasing Enzyme, Porcine Liver Esterase (PLE).

    PubMed

    Abney, Kristopher K; Ramos-Hunter, Susan J; Romaine, Ian M; Godwin, J Shawn; Sulikowski, Gary A; Weaver, Charles David

    2018-04-21

    This study reports the synthesis and testing of a family of rhodamine pro-fluorophores and an enzyme capable of converting pro-fluorophores to Rhodamine 110. We prepared a library of simple N,N'-diacyl rhodamines and investigated Porcine Liver Esterase (PLE) as an enzyme to activate rhodamine-based pro-fluorophores. A PLE-expressing cell line generated an increase in fluorescence rapidly upon pro-fluorophore addition demonstrating the rhodamine pro-fluorophores are readily taken up and fluorescent upon PLE-mediated release. Rhodamine pro-fluorophore amides trifluoroacetamide (TFAm) and proponamide (PAm) appeared to be the best substrates using a cell-based assay using PLE expressing HEK293. Our pro-fluorophore series showed diffusion into live cells and resisted endogenous hydrolysis. The use of our engineered cell line containing the exogenous enzyme PLE demonstrated the rigorousness of amide masking when compared to cells not containing PLE. This simple and selective pro-fluorophore rhodamine pair with PLE offers the potential to be used in vitro and in vivo fluorescence based assays. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. [Gluten enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Macić-Dzanković, A; Sudí, J

    1997-01-01

    In this case report has been shown 32-old women patient. She was received on Department of Internal medicine of State Hospital "Sarajevo" because of prostration, weight loss (more than 20 kg) and frequently, abundant diarrheas. Clinical treatment, including biopsy of small intestine, referred on gluten-enteropathy. In war-stricken Sarajevo, when major part of food were bread, macaroni and pies, obviously there was perception of sensibility on gluten in this women who hadn't got any similar problem for her life. After adequate diet without gluten, on the control examination two month later, we can hardly recognize our patient. She can get more than 20 kg, without mental depression and would be married soon.

  12. Newcomers in paediatric GI pathology: childhood enteropathies including very early onset monogenic IBD.

    PubMed

    Ensari, Arzu; Kelsen, Judith; Russo, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Childhood enteropathies are a group of diseases causing severe chronic (>2-3 weeks) diarrhoea often starting in the first week of life with the potential for fatal complications for the affected infant. Early identification and accurate classification of childhood enteropathies are, therefore, crucial for making treatment decisions to prevent life-threatening complications. Childhood enteropathies are classified into four groups based on the underlying pathology: (i) conditions related to defective digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients and electrolytes; (ii) disorders related to enterocyte differentiation and polarization; (iii) defects of enteroendocrine cell differentiation; and (iv) disorders associated with defective modulation of intestinal immune response. While the intestinal mucosa is usually normal in enteropathies related to congenital transport or enzyme deficiencies, the intestinal biopsy in other disorders may reveal a wide range of abnormalities varying from normal villous architecture to villous atrophy and/or inflammation, or features specific to the underlying disorder including epithelial abnormalities, lipid vacuolization in the enterocytes, absence of plasma cells, lymphangiectasia, microorganisms, and mucosal eosinophilic or histiocytic infiltration. This review intends to provide an update on small intestinal biopsy findings in childhood enteropathies, the "newcomers", including very early onset monogenic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in particular, for the practicing pathologist.

  13. Sensitization to Gliadin Induces Moderate Enteropathy and Insulitis in Nonobese Diabetic-DQ8 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Heather J.; Rulli, Nestor E.; Jury, Jennifer; Huang, Xianxi; Araya, Romina; Murray, Joseph A.; David, Chella S.; Chirdo, Fernando G.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Verdu, Elena F.

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently diagnosed in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and T1D patients can exhibit Abs against tissue transglutaminase, the auto-antigen in CD. Thus, gliadin, the trigger in CD, has been suggested to have a role in T1D pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether gliadin contributes to enteropathy and insulitis in NOD-DQ8 mice, an animal model that does not spontaneously develop T1D. Gliadin-sensitized NOD-DQ8 mice developed moderate enteropathy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and barrier dysfunction, but not insulitis. Administration of anti-CD25 mAbs before gliadin-sensitization induced partial depletion of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and led to severe insulitis, but did not exacerbate mucosal dysfunction. CD4+ T cells isolated from pancreatic lymph nodes of mice that developed insulitis showed increased proliferation and proinflammatory cytokines after incubation with gliadin but not with BSA. CD4+ T cells isolated from nonsensitized controls did not response to gliadin or BSA. In conclusion, gliadin sensitization induced moderate enteropathy in NOD-DQ8 mice. However, insulitis development required gliadin-sensitization and partial systemic depletion of CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. This humanized murine model provides a mechanistic link to explain how the mucosal intolerance to a dietary protein can lead to insulitis in the presence of partial regulatory T cell deficiency. PMID:21911598

  14. Can the Integration of a PLE in an E-Portfolio Platform Improve Generic Competences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galván-Fernández, Cristina; Rubio-Hurtado, María José; Martínez-Olmo, Francesc; Rodríguez-Illera, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    The study analyzes the improvement in generic competences through e-portfolio/PLE platform and didactic planning. The new version of the platform, Digital Folder, contains utilities for students and teachers and some PLE components that help the learning process through e-portfolios. Didactic planning is compared for students from the University…

  15. Antigenic analysis of Campylobacter species and an intracellular Campylobacter-like organism associated with porcine proliferative enteropathies.

    PubMed Central

    McOrist, S; Boid, R; Lawson, G H

    1989-01-01

    Whole-cell and outer membrane preparations of Campylobacter mucosalis, C. hyointestinalis, C. jejuni, and C. coli isolated from porcine intestines were compared with preparations of intracellular Campylobacter-like organisms extracted directly from the lesions of pigs with proliferative enteropathy. By gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, outer membrane and total protein profiles of C. mucosalis, C. hyointestinalis, C. jejuni, and C. coli were significantly different from each other and from those of the Campylobacter-like organisms. Immunoblotting of these preparations with rabbit antisera or monoclonal antibodies prepared against the intracellular Campylobacter-like organisms showed strong reactions only with a 25,000- to 27,000-molecular-weight component of preparations of the intracellular organisms. Antisera to cultivable Campylobacter species isolates did not react with preparations of intracellular organisms. Isoelectric focusing of sonicated preparations showed protein profile differences and an immune-reactive component in the intracellular organisms with a pI of 4.5. This study suggests that the intracellular Campylobacter-like organism associated with proliferative enteropathy may be a novel bacterium with significant antigenic differences from the Campylobacter species previously associated with the disease. Images PMID:2917794

  16. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome with autoimmune-like liver disease and enteropathy mimicking celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Veropalumbo, Claudio; Campanozzi, Angelo; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Correra, Antonio; Raia, Valeria; Vajro, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Liver abnormalities that normalize during infancy as well an enteropathy are reported in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS). The pathogenesis of both conditions is unknown. We report two SDS cases with autoimmune-like (antismooth muscle and/or antinuclear antibody positivity) liver disease and antigliadin antibody positive inflammatory enteropathy. Hypertransaminasemia did not resolve after immunosuppressive therapy and/or a gluten-free diet. These transient autoimmune phenomena and gut-liver axis perturbations may have played a role in transient SDS hepatopathy and enteropathy. Our report may stimulate other studies to define the relationship between the SDS genetic defect and intestinal permeability as the pathogenic mechanism underlying SDS related liver and intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Digital clubbing in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Christian J; Kob, Michael; Benvenuti, Stefano; Carella, Rodolfo; Lucchin, Lucio; Piazzi, Lucia; Chilovi, Fausto; Mazzoleni, Guido

    2010-08-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), also known as Waldmann's disease, is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. The symptoms usually start in early infancy. We report a case of secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteopenia, monoclonal gammopathy and digital clubbing in a 57-year-old patient with a 12-year history of discontinuous diarrhea. Malabsorption with inability to gain weight, and finally weight loss and formation of leg edema were associated with protein-losing enteropathy. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation was clinically effective as medical management in reducing diarrhea and leg edema, and promoting weight gain. Double-balloon enteroscopy and small bowel biopsy histopathology confirmed dilated intestinal lacteals. Digital clubbing associated with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia which may causally be related to chronic platelet excess has not been reported before.

  18. Pattern-recognition receptors: signaling pathways and dysregulation in canine chronic enteropathies-brief review.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Allenspach, Karin

    2017-11-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) are expressed by innate immune cells and recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as well as endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecules. With a large potential for synergism or convergence between their signaling pathways, PRRs orchestrate a complex interplay of cellular mediators and transcription factors, and thus play a central role in homeostasis and host defense. Aberrant activation of PRR signaling, mutations of the receptors and/or their downstream signaling molecules, and/or DAMP/PAMP complex-mediated receptor signaling can potentially lead to chronic auto-inflammatory diseases or development of cancer. PRR signaling pathways appear to also present an interesting new avenue for the modulation of inflammatory responses and to serve as potential novel therapeutic targets. Evidence for a dysregulation of the PRR toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)2, and the receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) exists in dogs with chronic enteropathies. We describe the TLR, NOD2, and RAGE signaling pathways and evaluate the current veterinary literature-in comparison to human medicine-to determine the role of TLRs, NOD2, and RAGE in canine chronic enteropathies.

  19. Losing weight after pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... choices such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein. DO NOT drop ... Weight loss that happens too fast can make you produce less milk. Losing about a pound and a half (670 ...

  20. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Suresh, N; Ganesh, R; Sankar, Janani; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi

    2009-10-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disease of intestinal lymphatics presenting with hypoproteinemia, bilateral lower limb edema, ascites, and protein losing enteropathy. We report a series of 4 children from Chennai, India presenting with anasarca, recurrent diarrhea, hypoproteinemia and confirmatory features of PIL on endoscopy and histopathology.

  1. Severe Refractory Anemia in Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Vasile Daniel; Popp, Alina; Grasu, Mugur; Vasilescu, Florina; Jinga, Mariana

    2015-09-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is a rare disease characterized by dilated lymphatics in the small bowel leading to an exudative enteropathy with lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. We report the case of a 23 year-old male who presented with chronic anemia and in whom primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was diagnosed. A low-fat diet along with nutritional therapy with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation improved the protein-losing enteropathy, but did not solve the anemia. Octreotide was also unsuccessful, and after attempting angiographic embolization therapy, limited small bowel resection together with antiplasmin therapy managed to correct the anemia and control the exudative enteropathy. Although primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is usually adequately managed by nutritional therapy, complications such as anemia can occur and can prove to be a therapeutic challenge.

  2. Unsafe Child Feces Disposal is Associated with Environmental Enteropathy and Impaired Growth.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Oldja, Lauren; Biswas, Shwapon; Perin, Jamie; Sack, R Bradley; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Haque, Rashidul; Parvin, Tahmina; Azmi, Ishrat J; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Talukder, Kaisar A; Faruque, Abu G

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between unsafe child feces disposal, environmental enteropathy, and impaired growth, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 216 young children in rural Bangladesh. Using a prospective cohort study design in rural Bangladesh, unsafe child feces disposal, using the Joint Monitoring Program definition, was assessed using 5-hour structured observation by trained study personnel as well as caregiver reports. Anthropometric measurements were collected at baseline and at a 9-month follow-up. Stool was analyzed for fecal markers of environmental enteropathy: alpha-1-antitrypsin, myeloperoxidase, neopterin (combined to form an environmental enteropathy disease activity score), and calprotectin. Among 216 households with young children, 84% had an unsafe child feces disposal event during structured observation and 75% had caregiver reported events. There was no significant difference in observed unsafe child feces disposal events for households with or without an improved sanitation option (82% vs 85%, P = .72) or by child's age (P = .96). Children in households where caregivers reported unsafe child feces disposal had significantly higher environmental enteropathy scores (0.82-point difference, 95% CI 0.11-1.53), and significantly greater odds of being wasted (weight-for-height z score <-2 SDs) (9% vs 0%, P = .024). In addition, children in households with observed unsafe feces disposal had significantly reduced change in weight-for-age z-score (-0.34 [95% CI -0.68, -0.01] and weight-for-height z score (-0.52 [95% CI -0.98, -0.06]). Unsafe child feces disposal was significantly associated with environmental enteropathy and impaired growth in a pediatric population in rural Bangladesh. Interventions are needed to reduce this high-risk behavior to protect the health of susceptible pediatric populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. NSAID gastropathy and enteropathy: distinct pathogenesis likely necessitates distinct prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to cause ulceration in the stomach and proximal duodenum are well understood, and this injury can largely be prevented through suppression of gastric acid secretion (mainly with proton pump inhibitors). In contrast, the pathogenesis of small intestinal injury induced by NSAIDs is less well understood, involving more complex mechanisms than those in the stomach and proximal duodenum. There is clear evidence for important contributions to NSAID enteropathy of enteric bacteria, bile and enterohepatic recirculation of the NSAID. There is no evidence that suppression of gastric acid secretion will reduce the incidence or severity of NSAID enteropathy. Indeed, clinical data suggest little, if any, benefit. Animal studies suggest a significant exacerbation of NSAID enteropathy when proton pump inhibitors are co-administered with the NSAID. This worsening of damage appears to be linked to changes in the number and types of bacteria in the small intestine during proton pump inhibitor therapy. The distinct mechanisms of NSAID-induced injury in the stomach/proximal duodenum versus the more distal small intestine likely dictate distinct strategies for prevention. PMID:21627632

  4. NSAID gastropathy and enteropathy: distinct pathogenesis likely necessitates distinct prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Wallace, John L

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the ability of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to cause ulceration in the stomach and proximal duodenum are well understood, and this injury can largely be prevented through suppression of gastric acid secretion (mainly with proton pump inhibitors). In contrast, the pathogenesis of small intestinal injury induced by NSAIDs is less well understood, involving more complex mechanisms than those in the stomach and proximal duodenum. There is clear evidence for important contributions to NSAID enteropathy of enteric bacteria, bile and enterohepatic recirculation of the NSAID. There is no evidence that suppression of gastric acid secretion will reduce the incidence or severity of NSAID enteropathy. Indeed, clinical data suggest little, if any, benefit. Animal studies suggest a significant exacerbation of NSAID enteropathy when proton pump inhibitors are co-administered with the NSAID. This worsening of damage appears to be linked to changes in the number and types of bacteria in the small intestine during proton pump inhibitor therapy. The distinct mechanisms of NSAID-induced injury in the stomach/proximal duodenum versus the more distal small intestine likely dictate distinct strategies for prevention. © 2011 The Author. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Hydrogen sulphide protects against NSAID-enteropathy through modulation of bile and the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Blackler, Rory W; Motta, Jean-Paul; Manko, Anna; Workentine, Matthew; Bercik, Premysl; Surette, Michael G; Wallace, John L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide is an important mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal defence. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is significantly limited by their toxicity in the gastrointestinal tract. Particularly concerning is the lack of effective preventative or curative treatments for NSAID-induced intestinal damage and bleeding. We evaluated the ability of a hydrogen sulphide donor to protect against NSAID-induced enteropathy. Experimental Approach Intestinal ulceration and bleeding were induced in Wistar rats by oral administration of naproxen. The effects of suppression of endogenous hydrogen sulphide synthesis or administration of a hydrogen sulphide donor (diallyl disulphide) on naproxen-induced enteropathy was examined. Effects of diallyl disulphide on small intestinal inflammation and intestinal microbiota were also assessed. Bile collected after in vivo naproxen and diallyl disulphide administration was evaluated for cytotoxicity in vitro using cultured intestinal epithelial cells. Key Results Suppression of endogenous hydrogen sulphide synthesis by β-cyano-L-alanine exacerbated naproxen-induced enteropathy. Diallyl disulphide co-administration dose-dependently reduced the severity of naproxen-induced small intestinal damage, inflammation and bleeding. Diallyl disulphide administration attenuated naproxen-induced increases in the cytotoxicity of bile on cultured enterocytes, and prevented or reversed naproxen-induced changes in the intestinal microbiota. Conclusions and Implications Hydrogen sulphide protects against NSAID-enteropathy in rats, in part reducing the cytotoxicity of bile and preventing NSAID-induced dysbiosis. PMID:25297699

  6. FIV diversity: FIV Ple subtype composition may influence disease outcome in African lions.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Jennifer L; Roelke, Melody E; Jespersen, Jillian M; Baggett, Natalie; Buckley-Beason, Valerie; MacNulty, Dan; Craft, Meggan; Packer, Craig; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2011-10-15

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infects domestic cats and at least 20 additional species of non-domestic felids throughout the world. Strains specific to domestic cat (FIV(Fca)) produce AIDS-like disease progression, sequelae and pathology providing an informative model for HIV infection in humans. Less is known about the immunological and pathological influence of FIV in other felid species although multiple distinct strains of FIV circulate in natural populations. As in HIV-1 and HIV-2, multiple diverse cross-species infections may have occurred. In the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, three divergent subtypes of lion FIV (FIV(Ple)) are endemic, whereby 100% of adult lions are infected with one or more of these strains. Herein, the relative distribution of these subtypes in the population are surveyed and, combined with observed differences in lion mortality due to secondary infections based on FIV(Ple) subtypes, the data suggest that FIV(Ple) subtypes may have different patterns of pathogenicity and transmissibility among wild lion populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling Physical Systems Using Vensim PLE Systems Dynamics Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmark, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Many physical systems are described by time-dependent differential equations or systems of such equations. This makes it difficult for students in an introductory physics class to solve many real-world problems since these students typically have little or no experience with this kind of mathematics. In my high school physics classes, I address this problem by having my students use a variety of software solutions to model physical systems described by differential equations. These include spreadsheets, applets, software my students themselves create, and systems dynamics software. For the latter, cost is often the main issue in choosing a solution for use in a public school and so I researched no-cost software. I found Sphinx SD,2OptiSim,3 Systems Dynamics,4 Simile (Trial Edition),5 and Vensim PLE.6 In evaluating each of these solutions, I looked for the fewest restrictions in the license for educational use, ease of use by students, power, and versatility. In my opinion, Vensim PLE best fulfills these criteria.7

  8. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia as a component of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Govind K; Tandon, Nikhil; Stephen, Neil de Jesus Rangel; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Tandon, Rakesh K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea and steatorrhea occur frequently in patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type I. Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported earlier as a cause of steatorrhea in a young girl with APS Type I. We describe 2 patients with APS Type I who were found to have intestinal lymphangiectasia, one of whom had symptomatic protein-losing enteropathy.

  9. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic, in the treatment of tropical enteropathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tropical enteropathy is characterized by an increased urinary lactulose-to-mannitol (L:M) ratio on a site-specific sugar absorption test and is associated with increased intestinal permeability and decreased nutrient absorptive capacity. The etiology of tropical enteropathy is postulated to be intes...

  10. Household Environmental Conditions Are Associated with Enteropathy and Impaired Growth in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Audrie; Arnold, Benjamin F.; Afreen, Sadia; Goto, Rie; Huda, Tarique Mohammad Nurul; Haque, Rashidul; Raqib, Rubhana; Unicomb, Leanne; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Colford, John M.; Luby, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the relationship of fecal environmental contamination and environmental enteropathy. We compared markers of environmental enteropathy, parasite burden, and growth in 119 Bangladeshi children (≤ 48 months of age) across rural Bangladesh living in different levels of household environmental cleanliness defined by objective indicators of water quality and sanitary and hand-washing infrastructure. Adjusted for potential confounding characteristics, children from clean households had 0.54 SDs (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.06, 1.01) higher height-for-age z scores (HAZs), 0.32 SDs (95% CI = −0.72, 0.08) lower lactulose:mannitol (L:M) ratios in urine, and 0.24 SDs (95% CI = −0.63, 0.16) lower immunoglobulin G endotoxin core antibody (IgG EndoCAb) titers than children from contaminated households. After adjusting for age and sex, a 1-unit increase in the ln L:M was associated with a 0.33 SDs decrease in HAZ (95% CI = −0.62, −0.05). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental contamination causes growth faltering mediated through environmental enteropathy. PMID:23629931

  11. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ze-Yu; Sun, Bin-Bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-Shi; Tang, Xian-Ge; Ling, Zhao-Li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-Jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-Zhu; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineenteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via the inhibition of intestinal

  12. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineenteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via

  13. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma--a clinicopathologic and array comparative genomic hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Hyeh; Karnan, Sivasundaram; Kim, Kyeong Mee; Park, Cheol Keun; Kang, Eun Suk; Kim, Young Ho; Kang, Won Ki; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho Kyung; Seto, Masao

    2010-09-01

    According to the new World Health Organization classification system, there are 2 types of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Type 1 is associated with celiac disease and accounts for the majority of cases in Western countries, whereas type 2 is not associated with celiac disease. To characterize enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma types in Korea, we carried out clinicopathologic and immunophenotypic analyses of 8 Koreans with enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma and investigated genomic profile using array comparative genomic hybridization. The tumors involved the small intestine in 5 patients and the colorectum in 3 patients. Two patients carried an HLA DQB10302 allele that corresponds to HLA DQ8. None of the patients had gluten-sensitive malabsorption syndrome. Intraepithelial lymphocytosis was observed in all patients. The sizes of the tumor cells were small or small-to-medium in 7 cases and medium-to-large in 1 case. The immunophenotypes of the tumor cells were CD4-CD8+CD56+ in 4 cases, CD4-CD8+CD56- in 1 case, CD4-CD8-CD56+ in 2 cases, and CD4-CD8-CD56- in 1 case. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed that chromosome 9q33-q34.1 gain was present in 4 (80%) of the 5 cases examined. Other recurrent genomic alterations were gain of 6p21.1-21.31 (3/5, 60%), gain of 19q (2/5), and the loss of 3p12.1-p12.2 (2/5) and 3q26.31 (2/5). These results suggest that the most prevalent type of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma in this geographic region is type 2, and the genetic changes associated with it are similar to those in Western countries. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-dimensional grayscale ultrasound and spectral Doppler waveform evaluation of dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie; Kircher, Patrick

    2007-08-01

    Sonography is an important diagnostic tool to examine the gastrointestinal tract of dogs with chronic diarrhea. Two-dimensional grayscale ultrasound parameters to assess for various enteropathies primarily focus on wall thickness and layering. Mild, generalized thickening of the intestinal wall with maintenance of the wall layering is common in inflammatory bowel disease. Quantitative and semi-quantitative spectral Doppler arterial waveform analysis can be utilized for various enteropathies, including inflammatory bowel disease and food allergies. Dogs with inflammatory bowel disease have inadequate hemodynamic responses during digestion of food. Dogs with food allergies have prolonged vasodilation and lower resistive and pulsatility indices after eating allergen-inducing foods.

  15. Warfarin hypersensitivity due to gluten-sensitive enteropathy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kwolek, Sara; Deming, Paula

    2012-01-01

    A 53 year old female who was maintained on long-term warfarin therapy due to history of pulmonary embolism, repeatedly presents with an abnormally prolonged Prothrombin Time (PT) and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT). After many asymptomatic episodes were corrected with Vitamin K therapy to temporarily reverse the effects of the warfarin, the cause of the apparent coagulopathy was further investigated. Factor Activity Assays of the common pathway factors II, IX, and X all revealed critically low values; below the threshold even a loading dose of warfarin is typically capable of eliciting. The patient tested strongly positive for Tissue Transglutaminase IgA, which is highly suggestive of a gluten-sensitive enteropathy. One effect of this condition is malabsorption due to flattened intestinal villi. The patient was determined to have an acquired vitamin K deficiency secondary to gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Her condition was exacerbated by the long-term warfarin therapy, resulting in the prolonged PT and PTT. The patient was treated with vitamin K therapy, which reversed the deficiency and corrected her abnormal coagulation results.

  16. TriPleX: a versatile dielectric photonic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörhoff, Kerstin; Heideman, René G.; Leinse, Arne; Hoekman, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Photonic applications based on planar waveguide technology impose stringent requirements on properties such as optical propagation losses, light coupling to optical fibers, integration density, as well as on reliability and reproducibility. The latter is correlated to a high level of control of the refractive index and waveguide geometry. In this paper, we review a versatile dielectric waveguide platform, called TriPleX, which is based on alternating silicon nitride and silicon dioxide films. Fabrication with CMOS-compatible equipment based on low-pressure chemical vapor deposition enables the realization of stable material compositions being a prerequisite to the control of waveguide properties and modal shape. The transparency window of both materials allows for the realization of low-loss waveguides over a wide wavelength range (400 nm-2.35 μm). Propagation losses as low as 5×10-4 dB/cm are reported. Three basic geometries (box shell, double stripe, and filled box) can be distinguished. A specific tapering technology is developed for on-chip, low-loss (<0.1 dB) spotsize convertors, allowing for combining efficient fiber to chip coupling with high-contrast waveguides required for increased functional complexity as well as for hybrid integration with other photonic platforms such as InP and SOI. The functionality of the TriPleX platform is captured by verified basic building blocks. The corresponding library and associated design kit is available for multi-project wafer (MPW) runs. Several applications of this platform technology in communications, biomedicine, sensing, as well as a few special fields of photonics are treated in more detail.

  17. Renal involvement in the immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) disorder.

    PubMed

    Sheikine, Yuri; Woda, Craig B; Lee, Pui Y; Chatila, Talal A; Keles, Sevgi; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Schmidt, Birgitta; Rosen, Seymour; Rodig, Nancy M

    2015-07-01

    Immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) disorder is an autoimmune disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) transcription factor. These mutations affect the normal function of circulating regulatory T cells. IPEX is characterized by profound immune dysregulation leading to dermatitis, enteropathy, multiple endocrinopathies and failure to thrive. Different forms of renal injury have also been noted in these patients but these have been described to a very limited extent. Three patients with IPEX with characteristic renal findings and mutations in FOXP3, including one novel mutation, are described. Case presentations are followed by a review of the renal manifestations noted in IPEX and the range of therapeutic options for this disorder. We recommend that IPEX be considered in the differential diagnosis of young children who present with signs of immune dysregulation with a concomitant renal biopsy demonstrating immune complex deposition in a membranous-like pattern and/or interstitial nephritis.

  18. Perturbed zinc homeostasis in rural 3-5-y-old Malawian children is associated with abnormalities in intestinal permeability attributed to tropical enteropathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tropical enteropathy and zinc deficiency are major public health problems worldwide. Tropical enteropathy is characterized by reduced mannitol absorption with normal or increased lactulose absorption when a dual sugar absorption test is administered, the results of which are reported as the lactulos...

  19. FFA3 Activation Stimulates Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion and Prevents NSAID-Induced Enteropathy via the GLP-2 Pathway in Rats.

    PubMed

    Said, Hyder; Akiba, Yasutada; Narimatsu, Kazuyuki; Maruta, Koji; Kuri, Ayaka; Iwamoto, Ken-Ichi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with enteropathy in humans and experimental animals, a cause of considerable morbidity. Unlike foregut NSAID-associated mucosal lesions, most treatments for this condition are of little efficacy. We propose that the endogenously released intestinotrophic hormone glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) prevents the development of NSAID-induced enteropathy. Since the short-chain fatty acid receptor FFA3 is expressed on enteroendocrine L cells and on enteric nerves in the gastrointestinal tract, we further hypothesized that activation of FFA3 on L cells protects the mucosa from injury via GLP-2 release with enhanced duodenal HCO 3 - secretion. We thus investigated the effects of synthetic selective FFA3 agonists with consequent GLP-2 release on NSAID-induced enteropathy. We measured duodenal HCO 3 - secretion in isoflurane-anesthetized rats in a duodenal loop perfused with the selective FFA3 agonists MQC or AR420626 (AR) while measuring released GLP-2 in the portal vein (PV). Intestinal injury was produced by indomethacin (IND, 10 mg/kg, sc) with or without MQC (1-10 mg/kg, ig) or AR (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, ig or ip) treatment. Luminal perfusion with MQC or AR (0.1-10 µM) dose-dependently augmented duodenal HCO 3 - secretion accompanied by increased GLP-2 concentrations in the PV. The effect of FFA3 agonists was inhibited by co-perfusion of the selective FFA3 antagonist CF3-MQC (30 µM). AR-induced augmented HCO 3 - secretion was reduced by iv injection of the GLP-2 receptor antagonist GLP-2(3-33) (3 nmol/kg), or by pretreatment with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitor CFTR inh -172 (1 mg/kg, ip). IND-induced small intestinal ulcers were dose-dependently inhibited by intragastric administration of MQC or AR. GLP-2(3-33) (1 mg/kg, ip) or CF3-MQC (1 mg/kg, ig) reversed AR-associated reduction in IND-induced enteropathy. In contrast, ip injection of AR had no effect

  20. MaPLE: A MapReduce Pipeline for Lattice-based Evaluation and Its Application to SNOMED CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Mengmeng; Tao, Shiqiang; Bodenreider, Olivier; Cui, Licong

    2015-01-01

    Non-lattice fragments are often indicative of structural anomalies in ontological systems and, as such, represent possible areas of focus for subsequent quality assurance work. However, extracting the non-lattice fragments in large ontological systems is computationally expensive if not prohibitive, using a traditional sequential approach. In this paper we present a general MapReduce pipeline, called MaPLE (MapReduce Pipeline for Lattice-based Evaluation), for extracting non-lattice fragments in large partially ordered sets and demonstrate its applicability in ontology quality assurance. Using MaPLE in a 30-node Hadoop local cloud, we systematically extracted non-lattice fragments in 8 SNOMED CT versions from 2009 to 2014 (each containing over 300k concepts), with an average total computing time of less than 3 hours per version. With dramatically reduced time, MaPLE makes it feasible not only to perform exhaustive structural analysis of large ontological hierarchies, but also to systematically track structural changes between versions. Our change analysis showed that the average change rates on the non-lattice pairs are up to 38.6 times higher than the change rates of the background structure (concept nodes). This demonstrates that fragments around non-lattice pairs exhibit significantly higher rates of change in the process of ontological evolution. PMID:25705725

  1. MaPLE: A MapReduce Pipeline for Lattice-based Evaluation and Its Application to SNOMED CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Mengmeng; Tao, Shiqiang; Bodenreider, Olivier; Cui, Licong

    2014-10-01

    Non-lattice fragments are often indicative of structural anomalies in ontological systems and, as such, represent possible areas of focus for subsequent quality assurance work. However, extracting the non-lattice fragments in large ontological systems is computationally expensive if not prohibitive, using a traditional sequential approach. In this paper we present a general MapReduce pipeline, called MaPLE (MapReduce Pipeline for Lattice-based Evaluation), for extracting non-lattice fragments in large partially ordered sets and demonstrate its applicability in ontology quality assurance. Using MaPLE in a 30-node Hadoop local cloud, we systematically extracted non-lattice fragments in 8 SNOMED CT versions from 2009 to 2014 (each containing over 300k concepts), with an average total computing time of less than 3 hours per version. With dramatically reduced time, MaPLE makes it feasible not only to perform exhaustive structural analysis of large ontological hierarchies, but also to systematically track structural changes between versions. Our change analysis showed that the average change rates on the non-lattice pairs are up to 38.6 times higher than the change rates of the background structure (concept nodes). This demonstrates that fragments around non-lattice pairs exhibit significantly higher rates of change in the process of ontological evolution.

  2. A Case of Primary Intestinal Lymphangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyu Chang; Jang, Byeong Ik; Kim, Tae Nyeun; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Moon Kwan; Lee, Hyun Woo

    1993-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient who had an 8 years history of recurrent peripheral edema with diarrhea and hypoproteinemia was evaluated. Endoscopic jejunal and ileal biopsy revealed markedly dilated mucosal lymph vessels with no evidence of inflammation. 99mTc-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) scintigraphy showed significant activity accumulating in the gastrointestinal tract to represent 99mTc-HSA leakage into the bowel lumen. A diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy and intestinal lymphangiectasia could be made. After treatment with a high protein and fat restricted diet, his symptoms subsided and the serum protein level was normalized. PMID:8268148

  3. Effect of Saccharomyces boulardii in dog with chronic enteropathies: double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Simona; Fracassi, Federico; Bresciani, Francesca; Galuppi, Roberta; Diana, Alessia; Linta, Nikolina; Bettini, Giuliano; Morini, Maria; Pietra, Marco

    2018-03-03

    Saccharomyces boulardii is used to treat acute and chronic enteropathies in humans, but to date, no studies have evaluated the use of this yeast in dogs. The current study, a prospective non-randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, evaluated the effects of S boulardii in healthy dogs and dogs with chronic enteropathies (CE). Four healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CE were included. In healthy dogs, S boulardii was administered for 10 days. Possible short-term adverse effects were recorded, and quantitative stool cultures for yeasts were performed. In dogs with CE, S boulardii or a placebo was administered in addition to standard treatment protocols. Canine Chronic Enteropathy Clinical Activity Index, abdominal ultrasonography, gastroenteroscopy and histology were performed at the time of diagnosis and after 60 days of treatment. In healthy dogs, S boulardii reached a steady state in five days and was completely eliminated on day 4 after administration. No short-term side effects were seen. Clinical activity index, stool frequency, stool consistency and body condition score improved significantly in dogs with CE receiving S boulardii versus the placebo. In conclusion, S boulardii can be safely used in dogs with CE and seems to achieve better control of clinical signs than standard therapy alone. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  5. Self-limited coeliac-like enteropathy: a series of 18 cases highlighting another coeliac disease mimic.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian S; Bettington, Andrew; Bettington, Mark; Rosty, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    To describe the clinical and pathological features of a series of patients with biopsy findings of a coeliac disease-like enteropathy in the setting of an acute illness. Eighteen cases of an abrupt-onset, self-limited illness with coeliac-like enteropathy (SLCE) were collected prospectively. Medication reaction, immune disorder, food allergy and parasitic infection were excluded. Coeliac disease was excluded by the transient nature of the illness and absence of tissue transglutaminase (TTG) elevation (nine of nine) or human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/DQ8 haplotype (eight of nine). Clinical symptoms were recorded and histopathological findings in all gastrointestinal sites were quantified. Findings in the duodenum were compared to a coeliac disease control group. In 12 cases the clinical diagnosis was infective enteritis, probably viral in type. In six cases, a definite diagnosis was not established. Histological differences from coeliac disease included intra-epithelial neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.001), fewer intra-epithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.038) and uniform or crypt predominant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in SCLE. One case displayed pan-gastrointestinal tract lymphocytosis. All resolved within 6 months. Histopathologists need to be aware that a coeliac disease-like enteropathy may occur in the setting of an acute gastrointestinal illness and resolve without sequelae. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-associated enteropathy as a complication of infectious mononucleosis mimicking peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinobu; Maruyama, Dai; Miyagi Maeshima, Akiko; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Mori, Masakazu; Azuma, Teruhisa; Kim, Sung-Won; Watanabe, Takashi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Tobinai, Kensei

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old man presented with a fever. A laboratory examination detected atypical lymphocytes and liver enzyme elevation. The serological tests for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were consistent with an acute infection pattern. Computed tomograpy showed bowel wall thickening, and colonoscopy revealed numerous ulcerations. The histological findings from the biopsy specimens from the colon were consistent with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), and in situ hybridization detected EBER-1 in the atypical lymphocytes. Because his clinical and endoscopic abnormalities improved without medication, we diagnosed the patient with EBV-associated enteropathy. We herein report a rare case of EBV-associated enteropathy that required careful differentiation from PTCL.

  7. The microbiota-derived metabolite indole decreases mucosal inflammation and injury in a murine model of NSAID enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan M.; Cohen, Noah D.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Weeks, Brad R.; Davidson, Laurie A.; Goldsby, Jennifer S.; Hunt, Carrie L.; Steinmeyer, Shelby H.; Menon, Rani; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Jayaraman, Arul; Alaniz, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently used classes of medications in the world. Unfortunately, NSAIDs induce an enteropathy associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the pathophysiology of this condition involves the interaction of the gut epithelium, microbiota, and NSAIDs, the precise mechanisms by which microbiota influence NSAID enteropathy are unclear. One possible mechanism is that the microbiota may attenuate the severity of disease by specific metabolite-mediated regulation of host inflammation and injury. The microbiota-derived tryptophan-metabolite indole is abundant in the healthy mammalian gut and positively influences intestinal health. We thus examined the effects of indole administration on NSAID enteropathy. Mice (n = 5 per group) were treated once daily for 7 days with an NSAID (indomethacin; 5 mg/kg), indole (20 mg/kg), indomethacin plus indole, or vehicle only (control). Outcomes compared among groups included: microscopic pathology; fecal calprotectin concentration; proportion of neutrophils in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes; fecal microbiota composition and diversity; small intestinal mucosal transcriptome; and, fecal tryptophan metabolites. Co-administration of indole with indomethacin: significantly reduced mucosal pathology scores, fecal calprotectin concentrations, and neutrophilic infiltration of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes induced by indomethacin; modulated NSAID-induced perturbation of the microbiota, fecal metabolites, and inferred metagenome; and, abrogated a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile in the small intestinal mucosa induced by indomethacin. The microbiota-derived metabolite indole attenuated multiple deleterious effects of NSAID enteropathy, including modulating inflammation mediated by innate immune responses and altering indomethacin-induced shift of the microbiota. PMID:27007819

  8. Zinc or albendazole attenuates the progression of environmental enteropathy a randomized controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical condition among children in the developing world, characterized by T-cell infiltration of the small-bowel mucosa and diffuse villous atrophy. EE leads to macronutrient and micronutrient malabsorption and stunting, with a resultant increased risk for in...

  9. [The conversion of a modified Fontan procedure to a total extracardiac cavo-pulmonary conduit. The Medico-Surgical Cardiology Group].

    PubMed

    Abella, R F; Marianeschi, S M; De la Torre, T; Smedile, G; Masetti, P; Cipriani, A; Magherini, A; Meli, M; Iorio, F S; Marcelletti, C F

    1998-06-01

    After a modified Fontan procedure with atriopulmonary or atrioventricular conduit, some patients present stress intolerance, supraventricular arrhythmia, recurrent pleuropericardial or ascitic effusions, and protein-losing enteropathy, all of which are signs that the previous procedure has failed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the midterm outcome after surgical therapy for this condition. Between August 1994 and December 1997, nine patients (6 males and 3 females), age 10 to 39 (mean 21.5) years, underwent conversion of previous modified Fontan procedure to total extracardiac cavo-pulmonary connection. Time from the previous procedure was 6 to 18 years (mean 10). Diagnosis was tricuspid atresia with pulmonary stenosis (n = 2), double-inlet left ventricle and concordant ventriculoarterial connection (n = 3), double-inlet left ventricle and discordant ventriculoarterial connection (n = 3), Holmes heart (n = 1). Nine patients presented decreased stress tolerance, seven had arrhythmia, five had pleuropericardial effusions and two had protein-losing enteropathy. In all but one patient, right atrial pressure was higher than 15 mmHg, while in six patients the cardiac index was less than 2 l/min/m2. A polytetrafluoroethylene non-valved conduit was interposed between the inferior vena cava and the right pulmonary artery for conversion in all patients. A bidirectional cavo-pulmonary anastomosis (modified Glenn) was associated in all patients. Evaluation was done by NYHA Class and by an arbitrary score assigned to patients based on 7 parameters. There was no perioperative mortality. All patients were clinically improved at a mean follow-up of 24 months (range: 3 to 46). No patient had effusions, and the arrhythmias disappeared in 4 patients and were controlled by medical therapy in one. The two patients with protein-losing enteropathy improved markedly within 30 days and the score dropped below 10 points. The conversion of the modified Fontan procedure to total

  10. Mouthing of Soil Contaminated Objects is Associated with Environmental Enteropathy in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomohiko; Perin, Jamie; Oldja, Lauren; Biswas, Shwapon; Sack, R Bradley; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Haque, Rashidul; Bhuiyan, Nurul Amin; Parvin, Tahmina; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Akter, Mahmuda; Talukder, Kaisar A; Shahnaij, Mohammad; Faruque, Abu G; George, Christine Marie

    2017-06-01

    To characterise childhood mouthing behaviours and to investigate the association between object-to-mouth and food-to-mouth contacts, diarrhoea prevalence and environmental enteropathy. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 216 children ≤30 months of age in rural Bangladesh. Mouthing contacts with soil and food and objects with visible soil were assessed by 5-h structured observation. Stool was analysed for four faecal markers of intestinal inflammation: alpha-1-antitrypsin, myeloperoxidase, neopterin and calprotectin. Overall 82% of children were observed mouthing soil, objects with visible soil, or food with visible soil during the structured observation period. Sixty two percent of children were observed mouthing objects with visible soil, 63% were observed mouthing food with visible soil, and 18% were observed mouthing soil only. Children observed mouthing objects with visible soil had significantly elevated faecal calprotectin concentrations (206.81 μg/g, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.27, 407.36). There was also a marginally significant association between Escherichia coli counts in soil from a child's play space and the prevalence rate of diarrhoea (diarrhoea prevalence ratio: 2.03, 95% CI 0.97, 4.25). These findings provide further evidence to support the hypothesis that childhood mouthing behaviour in environments with faecal contamination can lead to environmental enteropathy in susceptible paediatric populations. Furthermore, these findings suggest that young children mouthing objects with soil, which occurred more frequently than soil directly (60% vs. 18%), was an important exposure route to faecal pathogens and a risk factor for environmental enteropathy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Deterioration of duodenal lymphangiectasia after radiotherapy for gastric MALT lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Tanaka, Takehiro; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Kawano, Seiji; Kawahara, Yoshiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    A 68-year-old Japanese woman underwent radiotherapy for gastric lymphoma. Although lymphangiectasia was sparsely observed in the second portion of the duodenum before radiotherapy, the number of pinpoint white spots obviously increased after the treatment. Although the duodenal lymphangiectasia gradually progressed, the patient had no features of protein-losing enteropathy. This case highlights the importance of endoscopic observation of the duodenum after irradiation to the abdomen as radiotherapy may secondarily cause intestinal lymphangiectasia. PMID:28798810

  12. Jejunal enteropathy associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection: quantitative histology.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Miller, A R; Forster, S M; Harris, J R; Pinching, A J; Griffin, G E

    1989-01-01

    Jejunal biopsy specimens from 20 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive male homosexual patients were analysed and compared with those of a control group to determine whether the abnormalities were caused by the virus or by opportunistic infection. The degree of villous atrophy was estimated with a Weibel eyepiece graticule, and this correlated strongly with the degree of crypt hyperplasia, which was assessed by deriving the mean number of enterocytes in the crypts. The density of villous intraepithelial lymphocytes fell largely within the normal range, either when expressed in relation to the number of villous enterocytes or in relation to the length of muscularis mucosae. Villous enterocytes showed mild non-specific abnormalities. Pathogens were sought in biopsy sections and in faeces. Crypt hyperplastic villous atrophy occurred at all clinical stages of HIV disease and in the absence of detectable enteropathogens. An analogy was drawn between HIV enteropathy and the small bowel changes seen in experimental graft-versus-host disease. It is suggested that the pathogenesis of villous atrophy is similar in the two states, the damage to the jejunal mucosa in HIV enteropathy being inflicted by an immune reaction mounted in the lamina propria against cells infected with HIV. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:2703544

  13. Potential coeliac disease markers and autoimmunity in olmesartan induced enteropathy: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Maria; Temiño, Rocío; Carrasco, Anna; Batista, Lissette; Del Val, Adolfo; Blé, Michel; Santaolaria, Santos; Molina-Infante, Javier; Soriano, Germán; Agudo, Sandra; Zabana, Yamile; Andújar, Xavier; Aceituno, Montserrat; Ribes, Josepa; Madridejos, Rosa; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    (1) Assess the population-based incidence of severe olmesartan-associated enteropathy. (2) To describe patients of the Spanish registry. (3) Evaluate markers of potential coeliac disease and associated autoimmunity. Crude incidence rates in the area of Terrassa (Catalonia) were calculated. Clinical characteristics of patients in the Spanish registry were collected. Duodenal lymphocyte subpopulations and anti-TG2 IgA deposits were assessed in a subset of patients. Annual incidence rates (2011-2014) ranged from 0 to 22 cases per 10(4) treated patients. Twenty patients were included in the Spanish registry. Nineteen (95%) exhibited villous atrophy and 16 (80%) had severe enteropathy. Lupus-like disease occurred during olmesartan treatment in 3 patients. HLA-DQ2/DQ8 was positive in 64%. Markers of potential coeliac disease were present in 4 out of 8 patients (positive anti-TG2 deposits and/or increased CD3+gammadelta+ intraepithelial lymphocytes and reduced CD3-). Histopathological changes and clinical manifestations including autoimmune disorders improved after olmesartan discontinuation but not after gluten-free diet, irrespective of the presence or absence of coeliac markers. Incidence of severe olmesartan-associated enteropathy was low. Autoimmune phenomena were present in a subset of cases and reversed after olmesartan removal. A genetic coeliac disease background and the presence of potential coeliac markers might uncover predisposing factors. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measuring Black men's police-based discrimination experiences: Development and validation of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale.

    PubMed

    English, Devin; Bowleg, Lisa; Del Río-González, Ana Maria; Tschann, Jeanne M; Agans, Robert P; Malebranche, David J

    2017-04-01

    Although social science research has examined police and law enforcement-perpetrated discrimination against Black men using policing statistics and implicit bias studies, there is little quantitative evidence detailing this phenomenon from the perspective of Black men. Consequently, there is a dearth of research detailing how Black men's perspectives on police and law enforcement-related stress predict negative physiological and psychological health outcomes. This study addresses these gaps with the qualitative development and quantitative test of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale. In Study 1, we used thematic analysis on transcripts of individual qualitative interviews with 90 Black men to assess key themes and concepts and develop quantitative items. In Study 2, we used 2 focus groups comprised of 5 Black men each (n = 10), intensive cognitive interviewing with a separate sample of Black men (n = 15), and piloting with another sample of Black men (n = 13) to assess the ecological validity of the quantitative items. For Study 3, we analyzed data from a sample of 633 Black men between the ages of 18 and 65 to test the factor structure of the PLE, as we all as its concurrent validity and convergent/discriminant validity. Qualitative analyses and confirmatory factor analyses suggested that a 5-item, 1-factor measure appropriately represented respondents' experiences of police/law enforcement discrimination. As hypothesized, the PLE was positively associated with measures of racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. Preliminary evidence suggests that the PLE is a reliable and valid measure of Black men's experiences of discrimination with police/law enforcement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Mechanisms, prevention and clinical implications of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, John L

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the latest developments in understanding the pathogenesis, detection and treatment of small intestinal damage and bleeding caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). With improvements in the detection of NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine, it is now clear that this injury and the associated bleeding occurs more frequently than that occurring in the stomach and duodenum, and can also be regarded as more dangerous. However, there are no proven-effective therapies for NSAID-enteropathy, and detection remains a challenge, particularly because of the poor correlation between tissue injury and symptoms. Moreover, recent studies suggest that commonly used drugs for protecting the upper gastrointestinal tract (i.e., proton pump inhibitors) can significantly worsen NSAID-induced damage in the small intestine. The pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy is complex, but studies in animal models are shedding light on the key factors that contribute to ulceration and bleeding, and are providing clues to the development of effective therapies and prevention strategies. Novel NSAIDs that do not cause small intestinal damage in animal models offer hope for a solution to this serious adverse effect of one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PMID:23569332

  16. Kocuria kristinae-caused sepsis in an infant with congenital tufting enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Malik; Ganschow, Rainer; Jankofsky, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aydin M, Ganschow R, Jankofsky M. Kocuria kristinae-caused sepsis in an infant with congenital tufting enteropathy. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 93-96. Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is characterized by the early-onset of chronic diarrhea and the inability to develop. It is a rare congenital disease with a low prevalence of 1:50,000 - 100,000 live births p.a. The histopathology is characterized by villous atrophy and the characteristic epithelial tufts. Recent identification of causative mutations in EpCAM has enhanced our understanding of this disease. Due to its severe clinical course, patients are dependent on parenteral nutrition to thrive successfully. Catheter-associated blood stream infections have become the primary problem for pediatric patients. Infections with Kocuria kristinae are rare. This report is about a 3-month-old girl with CTE suffering from a central venous catheter related mono-sepsis by K. kristinae. A sepsis therapy with meropenem and vancomycin improved her general state rapidly. Only few cases in the literature with CTE and K. kristinae are described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report presenting two coincidences in one case.

  17. Measuring Black Men’s Police-Based Discrimination Experiences: Development and Validation of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) Scale

    PubMed Central

    English, Devin; Bowleg, Lisa; del Río-González, Ana Maria; Tschann, Jeanne M.; Agans, Robert; Malebranche, David J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although social science research has examined police and law enforcement-perpetrated discrimination against Black men using policing statistics and implicit bias studies, there is little quantitative evidence detailing this phenomenon from the perspective of Black men. Consequently, there is a dearth of research detailing how Black men’s perspectives on police and law enforcement-related stress predict negative physiological and psychological health outcomes. This study addresses these gaps with the qualitative development and quantitative test of the Police and Law Enforcement (PLE) scale. Methods In Study 1, we employed thematic analysis on transcripts of individual qualitative interviews with 90 Black men to assess key themes and concepts and develop quantitative items. In Study 2, we used 2 focus groups comprised of 5 Black men each (n=10), intensive cognitive interviewing with a separate sample of Black men (n=15), and piloting with another sample of Black men (n=13) to assess the ecological validity of the quantitative items. For study 3, we analyzed data from a sample of 633 Black men between the ages of 18 and 65 to test the factor structure of the PLE, as we all as its concurrent validity and convergent/discriminant validity. Results Qualitative analyses and confirmatory factor analyses suggested that a 5-item, 1-factor measure appropriately represented respondents’ experiences of police/law enforcement discrimination. As hypothesized, the PLE was positively associated with measures of racial discrimination and depressive symptoms. Conclusions Preliminary evidence suggests that the PLE is a reliable and valid measure of Black men’s experiences of discrimination with police/law enforcement. PMID:28080104

  18. [Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    PubMed

    Vignes, S; Bellanger, J

    2017-08-31

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL), Waldmann's disease, is a rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals leading to lymph leakage into the small-bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. The main symptom is bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe including pleural effusion, pericarditis or ascites. Protein-losing enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance and diagnosis by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of biopsies. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Several B-cell lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A long-term strictly low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride and liposoluble vitamin supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. Octreotide, a somatostatin analog, have been proposed with an inconsistent efficacy in association with diet. Surgical small-bowel resection is useful in the rare cases with segmental and localized intestinal lymphangiectasia. A prolonged clinical and biological follow-up is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mucosal healing effect of mesalazine granules in naproxen-induced small bowel enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rácz, István; Szalai, Milán; Kovács, Valéria; Regőczi, Henriett; Kiss, Gyöngyi; Horváth, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of mesalazine granules on small intestinal injury induced by naproxen using capsule endoscopy (CE). METHODS: This was a single center, non-randomized, open-label, uncontrolled pilot study, using the PillCam SB CE system with RAPID 5 software. The Lewis Index Score (LIS) for small bowel injury was investigated to evaluate the severity of mucosal injury. Arthropathy patients with at least one month history of daily naproxen use of 1000 mg and proton pump inhibitor co-therapy were screened. Patients with a minimum LIS of 135 were eligible to enter the 4-wk treatment phase of the study. During this treatment period, 3 × 1000 mg/d mesalazine granules were added to ongoing therapies of 1000 mg/d naproxen and 20 mg/d omeprazole. At the end of the 4-wk combined treatment period, a second small bowel CE was performed to re-evaluate the enteropathy according to the LIS results. The primary objective of this study was to assess the mucosal changes after 4 wk of mesalazine treatment. RESULTS: A total of 18 patients (16 females), ranging in age from 46 to 78 years (mean age 60.3 years) were screened, all had been taking 1000 mg/d naproxen for at least one month. Eight patients were excluded from the mesalazine therapeutic phase of the study for the following reasons: the screening CE showed normal small bowel mucosa or only insignificant damages (LIS < 135) in five patients, the screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed gastric ulcer in one patient, capsule technical failure and incomplete CE due to poor small bowel cleanliness in two patients. Ten patients (9 female, mean age 56.2 years) whose initial LIS reached mild and moderate-to-severe enteropathy grades (between 135 and 790 and ≥ 790) entered the 4-wk therapeutic phase and a repeat CE was performed. When comparing the change in LIS from baseline to end of treatment in all patients, a marked decrease was seen (mean LIS: 1236.4 ± 821.9 vs 925.2 ± 543.4, P = 0.271). Moreover, a

  20. [Videocapsule endoscopy as a useful tool to diagnose primary intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Vignes, S; Bellanger, J

    2007-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) lead to a protein-losing enteropathy due to lymph leak into intestinal tract. A 28-year-old woman presented a bilateral lower limb lymphedema. Laboratory examination showing lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia suggested the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. Gastroscopy was normal and second duodenum biopsies were negative. Videocapsule endoscopy gave evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia of the small bowel. Videocapsule endoscopy may be proposed to confirm intestinal lymphangiectasia and to precise their localization when gastroscopy is not conclusive.

  1. Secondary lymphangiectasia of the small bowel: utility of double balloon enteroscopy for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Iriya, Kiyoshi; Couto, Décio Sampaio; Kawaguti, Fábio Shiguehiss; Retes, Felipe; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Sakai, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic lymphangiectasias are commonly found throughout the small bowel and are considered to be normal. Not uncommonly, lymphangiectasias are pathologic and can lead to mid-gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain and protein-losing enteropathy. Pathologic lymphangiectasias of the small bowel include primary lymphangiectasia, secondary lymphangiectasia and lymphaticovenous malformations. In this report we present three different cases of small bowel lymphangiectasia detected by double balloon enteroscopy. The patients were diagnosed with South American blastomycosis, tuberculosis and primary small bowel lymphangioma. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. The loss of essential oil components induced by the Purge Time in the Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) procedure of Cupressus sempervirens.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Czapczyńska, Natalia B; Wianowska, Dorota

    2012-05-30

    The influence of different Purge Times on the effectiveness of Pressurized Liquid Extraction (PLE) of volatile oil components from cypress plant matrix (Cupressus sempervirens) was investigated, applying solvents of diverse extraction efficiencies. The obtained results show the decrease of the mass yields of essential oil components as a result of increased Purge Time. The loss of extracted components depends on the extrahent type - the greatest mass yield loss occurred in the case of non-polar solvents, whereas the smallest was found in polar extracts. Comparisons of the PLE method with Sea Sand Disruption Method (SSDM), Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion Method (MSPD) and Steam Distillation (SD) were performed to assess the method's accuracy. Independent of the solvent and Purge Time applied in the PLE process, the total mass yield was lower than the one obtained for simple, short and relatively cheap low-temperature matrix disruption procedures - MSPD and SSDM. Thus, in the case of volatile oils analysis, the application of these methods is advisable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Rifaximin, a Nonabsorbable Antibiotic, in the Treatment of Tropical Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Trehan, Indi; Shulman, Robert J.; Ou, Ching-Nan; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Tropical enteropathy is characterized by an increased urinary lactulose-to-mannitol (L:M) ratio on a site-specific sugar absorption test and is associated with increased intestinal permeability and decreased nutrient absorptive capacity. The etiology of tropical enteropathy is postulated to be intestinal bacterial overgrowth. This study tested the hypothesis that treatment with a nonabsorbable, broad-spectrum antibiotic, rifaximin, reduces the L:M ratio in rural Malawian children, among whom tropical enteropathy is common. METHODS All children aged 3–5 years from one village were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of treatment with rifaximin for 7 days. The L:M ratio was measured before and after treatment, and the change in the L:M ratio was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were changes in the urinary sucrose-to-lactulose (SUC:L) and sucralose-to-lactulose (SCL:L) ratios, as well as changes in the fractions of each test sugar recovered in the urine. RESULTS A total of 144 children participated in this study, of whom 76% had an elevated L:M ratio on enrollment (L:M≥0.10). Children who received rifaximin did not show an improvement in their L:M ratio compared with those who received placebo (−0.01±0.12 vs. 0.02±0.16, respectively, P = 0.51, mean±s.d.), nor were there significant differences between the two groups in excretion of lactulose, mannitol, sucralose, or sucrose, or in the SUC:L and SCL:L ratios. CONCLUSIONS Rifaximin had no effect on the tropical enteropathy of 3–5-year-old Malawian children, suggesting that small-bowel bacterial overgrowth is not an important etiological factor in this condition. PMID:19491826

  4. The DivJ, CbrA and PleC system controls DivK phosphorylation and symbiosis in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Francesco; Frage, Benjamin; Ferri, Lorenzo; De Nisco, Nicole J.; Mohapatra, Saswat S.; Taddei, Lucilla; Fioravanti, Antonella; Dewitte, Frederique; Galardini, Marco; Brilli, Matteo; Villeret, Vincent; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Mengoni, Alessio; Walker, Graham C.; Becker, Anke; Biondi, Emanuele G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Sinorhizobium meliloti is a soil bacterium that invades the root nodules it induces on Medicago sativa, whereupon it undergoes an alteration of its cell cycle and differentiates into nitrogen-fixing, elongated and polyploid bacteroid with higher membrane permeability. In Caulobacter crescentus, a related alphaproteobacterium, the principal cell cycle regulator, CtrA, is inhibited by the phosphorylated response regulator DivK. The phosphorylation of DivK depends on the histidine kinase DivJ, while PleC is the principal phosphatase for DivK. Despite the importance of the DivJ in C. crescentus, the mechanistic role of this kinase has never been elucidated in other Alphaproteobacteria. We show here that the histidine kinases DivJ together with CbrA and PleC participate in a complex phosphorylation system of the essential response regulator DivK in S. meliloti. In particular, DivJ and CbrA are involved in DivK phosphorylation and in turn CtrA inactivation, thereby controlling correct cell cycle progression and the integrity of the cell envelope. In contrast, the essential PleC presumably acts as a phosphatase of DivK. Interestingly, we found that a DivJ mutant is able to elicit nodules and enter plant cells, but fails to establish an effective symbiosis suggesting that proper envelope and/or low CtrA levels are required for symbiosis. PMID:23909720

  5. CRYPTOCOCCUS NEOFORMANS VAR. GRUBII-ASSOCIATED RENAL AMYLOIDOSIS CAUSING PROTEIN-LOSING NEPHROPATHY IN A RED KANGAROO (MACROPUS RUFUS).

    PubMed

    Thurber, Mary Irene; Gjeltema, Jenessa; Sheley, Matthew; Wack, Ray F

    2017-09-01

    A 10-year-old male castrated red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) presented with mandibular swelling. Examination findings included pitting edema with no dental disease evident on examination or radiographs. The results of blood work were moderate azotemia, hypoalbuminemia, and severely elevated urine protein:creatinine ratio (9.9). Radiographs showed an interstitial pattern of the caudal right lung, and an abdominal ultrasound demonstrated scant effusion. Symptomatic and empirical therapy with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor did not resolve clinical signs. Due to poor prognosis and declining quality of life, euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed chronic granulomatous pneumonia of the caudal right lung lobe with intralesional Cryptococcus, identified as C. neoformans var. grubii by DNA sequencing. Severe bilateral glomerular and tubulointerstitial amyloidosis induced protein-losing nephropathy, leading to tri-cavitary effusion, subcutaneous edema, and cachexia. The authors speculate that renal amyloidosis was associated with chronic cryptococcal pneumonia in this red kangaroo.

  6. How nanobubbles lose stability: Effects of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qianxiang; Liu, Yawei; Guo, Zhenjiang; Liu, Zhiping; Zhang, Xianren

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to stability theories of nanobubbles, the molecular mechanism of how nanobubbles lose stability is far from being understood. In this work, we try to interpret recent experimental observations that the addition of surfactants destabilizes nanobubbles with an unclear mechanism. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we identify two surfactant-induced molecular mechanisms for nanobubbles losing stability, either through depinning of a contact line or reducing vapor-liquid surface tension. One corresponds to the case with significant adsorption of surfactants on the substrates, which causes depinning of the nanobubble contact line and thus leads to nanobubble instability. The other stresses surfactant adsorption on the vapor-liquid interface of nanobubbles, especially for insoluble surfactants, which reduces the surface tension of the interface and leads to an irreversible liquid-to-vapor phase transition. Our finding can help improve our understanding in nanobubble stability, and the insight presented here has implications for surface nanobubbles involving with other amphiphilic molecules, such as proteins and contaminations.

  7. High SMAD7 and p-SMAD2,3 expression is associated with environmental enteropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Dinallo, Vincenzo; Iqbal, Najeeha T; Di Iorio, Laura; Di Fusco, Davide; Guleria, Shan; Amadi, Beatrice C; Sadiq, Kamran; Moskaluk, Christopher; Ali, S Asad; Kelly, Paul; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    Enteropathies such as Crohn's disease are associated with enteric inflammation characterized by impaired TGF-β signaling, decreased expression of phosphorylated (p)-SMAD2,3 and increased expression of SMAD7 (an inhibitor of SMAD3 phosphorylation). Environmental enteropathy (EE) is an acquired inflammatory disease of the small intestine (SI), which is associated with linear growth disruption, cognitive deficits, and reduced oral vaccine responsiveness in children <5 y in resource-poor countries. We aimed to characterize EE inflammatory pathways by determining SMAD7 and p-SMAD2,3 levels (using Western blotting) in EE duodenal biopsies (N = 19 children, 7 from Pakistan, 12 from Zambia) and comparing these with healthy controls (Ctl) and celiac disease (CD) patients from Italy. Densitometric analysis of immunoblots showed that EE SI biopsies expressed higher levels of both SMAD7 (mean±SD in arbitrary units [a.u.], Ctl = 0.47±0.20 a.u., EE = 1.13±0.25 a.u., p-value = 0.03) and p-SMAD2,3 (mean±SD, Ctl = 0.38±0.14 a.u., EE = 0.60±0.10 a.u., p-value = 0.03). Immunohistochemistry showed that, in EE, SMAD7 is expressed in both the epithelium and in mononuclear cells of the lamina propria (LP). In contrast, p-SMAD3 in EE is expressed much more prominently in epithelial cells than in the LP. The high SMAD7 immunoreactivity and lack of p-SMAD3 expression in the LP suggests defective TGF-β signaling in the LP in EE similar to a previously reported SMAD7-mediated inflammatory pathway in refractory CD and Crohn's disease. However, Western blot densitometry showed elevated p-SMAD2,3 levels in EE, possibly suggesting a different inflammatory pathway than Crohn's disease but more likely reflecting cumulative protein expression from across all compartments of the mucosa as opposed to the LP alone. Further studies are needed to substantiate these preliminary results and to illustrate the relationship between SMAD proteins, TGF-β signaling, and inflammatory cytokine production

  8. Intestinal lymphangiectasia and reversible high liver stiffness.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Laura; Peri, Anna Maria; Lodi, Lucia; Gubertini, Guido; Ridolfo, Anna Lisa; Antinori, Spinello

    2014-08-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a protein-losing enteropathy characterized by tortuous and dilated lymph channels of the small bowel. The main symptoms are bilateral lower limb edema, serosal effusions, and vitamin D malabsorption resulting in osteoporosis. We report here a case of long-lasting misdiagnosed PIL with a peculiar liver picture, characterized by a very high stiffness value at transient elastography, which decreased with clinical improvement. The complex interplay between lymphatic and hepatic circulatory system is discussed. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Retained Capsule Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Aihole, Jayalaxmi S; Vishnumurthy, G S; Babu, M Narendra

    2016-11-15

    Capsule endoscopy was invented to visualize the entire small intestine in a non- invasive manner in adults. 1 y, 9 mo-old boy presented with generalized edema for last 3 months. His routine investigations, including the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, and contrast enhanced computed tomography scan (CECT) were normal. In view of clinical suspicion of protein losing enteropathy, we planned capsule endoscopy. The capsule was not passed even after 3 weeks. Laparoscopy revealed impacted capsule in a dilated intestinal loop proximal to an ileal stricuture. Capsule endoscopy should be used judiciously in children.

  10. Pharmacologic targeting of bacterial β-glucuronidase alleviates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy in mice.

    PubMed

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Wallace, Bret D; Bendel, Lauren; Redinbo, Matthew R; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2012-05-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury is a frequent adverse effect caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, but topical (luminal) effects have been implicated. Many carboxylic acid-containing NSAIDs, including diclofenac (DCF), are metabolized to acyl glucuronides (AGs), and/or ether glucuronides after ring hydroxylation, and exported into the biliary tree. In the gut, these conjugates are cleaved by bacterial β-glucuronidase, releasing the potentially harmful aglycone. We first confirmed that DCF-AG was an excellent substrate for purified Escherichia coli β-D-glucuronidase. Using a previously characterized novel bacteria-specific β-glucuronidase inhibitor (Inhibitor-1), we then found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of DCF-AG in vitro was inhibited concentration dependently (IC₅₀ ∼164 nM). We next hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of bacterial β-glucuronidase would reduce exposure of enterocytes to the aglycone and, as a result, alleviate enteropathy. C57BL/6J mice were administered an ulcerogenic dose of DCF (60 mg/kg i.p.) with or without oral pretreatment with Inhibitor-1 (10 μg per mouse, b.i.d.). Whereas DCF alone caused the formation of numerous large ulcers in the distal parts of the small intestine and increased (2-fold) the intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, Inhibitor-1 cotreatment significantly alleviated mucosal injury and reduced all parameters of enteropathy. Pharmacokinetic profiling of DCF plasma levels in mice revealed that Inhibitor-1 coadministration did not significantly alter the C(max), half-life, or area under the plasma concentration versus time curve of DCF. Thus, highly selective pharmacologic targeting of luminal bacterial β-D-glucuronidase by a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors protects against DCF-induced enteropathy without altering systemic drug exposure.

  11. Pharmacologic Targeting of Bacterial β-Glucuronidase Alleviates Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Enteropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Wallace, Bret D.; Bendel, Lauren; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury is a frequent adverse effect caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood, but topical (luminal) effects have been implicated. Many carboxylic acid-containing NSAIDs, including diclofenac (DCF), are metabolized to acyl glucuronides (AGs), and/or ether glucuronides after ring hydroxylation, and exported into the biliary tree. In the gut, these conjugates are cleaved by bacterial β-glucuronidase, releasing the potentially harmful aglycone. We first confirmed that DCF-AG was an excellent substrate for purified Escherichia coli β-d-glucuronidase. Using a previously characterized novel bacteria-specific β-glucuronidase inhibitor (Inhibitor-1), we then found that the enzymatic hydrolysis of DCF-AG in vitro was inhibited concentration dependently (IC50 ∼164 nM). We next hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of bacterial β-glucuronidase would reduce exposure of enterocytes to the aglycone and, as a result, alleviate enteropathy. C57BL/6J mice were administered an ulcerogenic dose of DCF (60 mg/kg i.p.) with or without oral pretreatment with Inhibitor-1 (10 μg per mouse, b.i.d.). Whereas DCF alone caused the formation of numerous large ulcers in the distal parts of the small intestine and increased (2-fold) the intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran, Inhibitor-1 cotreatment significantly alleviated mucosal injury and reduced all parameters of enteropathy. Pharmacokinetic profiling of DCF plasma levels in mice revealed that Inhibitor-1 coadministration did not significantly alter the Cmax, half-life, or area under the plasma concentration versus time curve of DCF. Thus, highly selective pharmacologic targeting of luminal bacterial β-d-glucuronidase by a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors protects against DCF-induced enteropathy without altering systemic drug exposure. PMID:22328575

  12. Sjögren's syndrome associated with protein losing gastroenteropathy manifested by intestinal lymphangiectasia successfully treated with prednisolone and hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Liao, C-Y; Chien, S-T; Wang, C-C; Chen, I-H; Chiu, H-W; Liu, M-Y; Lin, C-H; Ben, R-J; Tsai, M-K

    2015-12-01

    Protein-losing gastroenteropathy (PLGE), a rare manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), is characterized by profound edema and severe hypoalbuminemia secondary to excessive serum protein loss from the gastrointestinal tract and is clinically indistinguishable from nephrotic syndrome. We report a case of a 30-year-old Taiwanese woman with PLGE-associated SS. In addition to a positive Schirmer's test, she had eye-dryness, thirst, and high levels of anti-SSA antibodies, fulfilling SS criteria. PLGE diagnosis was highly appropriate given the clinical profile of hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, pleural effusion, and ascites, with absent cardiac, hepatic, or renal disease. We were unable to perform technetium-99 m-labeled human serum albumin scintigraphy ((99m)Tc-HAS). However, the patient's edema and albumin level improved dramatically in response to a 3-month regime of oral prednisolone followed by oral hydroxychloroquine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Drop of egg production in chickens by experimental infection with an avian metapneumovirus strain PLE8T1 derived from swollen head syndrome and the application to evaluate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Miki; Koimaru, Hiroyuki; Shiba, Masahiro; Ono, Eriko; Nagata, Tadashi; Ito, Toshihiro

    2006-08-01

    Decreases in egg production and increased incidence of abnormal eggs due to malformation of egg shells were observed in specific pathogen free (SPF) 173-day-old laying hens inoculated intravenously with an avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) strain PLE8T1. This strain was derived from an isolate from broiler birds exhibiting swollen head syndrome (SHS). Some SPF birds inoculated with the virus showed, slight diarrhea without any respiratory symptoms. Thus, the PLE8T1 strain was used as a challenge virus to evaluate efficacy of aMPV vaccines. SPF chickens which received a live attenuated aMPV vaccine (NEMOVAC; Merial) at 7 or 77 days old and an inactivated aMPV vaccine (OVO-4; Merial) at 105 days old were protected against poor egg production caused by the challenge with the PLE8T1 strain. Thus, aMPV, the PLE8T1 strain passaged 22 times after isolation, from birds exhibiting SHS, could induce a drop in egg production in laying hens accompanied by malformation of egg shells. It was suggested that this challenge system could be applied to evaluate the efficacy of aMPV vaccine.

  14. Application of PLE for the determination of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota; Mardarowicz, Marek; Gawdzik, Jan

    2008-08-15

    Essential plants, due to their long presence in human history, their status in culinary arts, their use in medicine and perfume manufacture, belong to frequently examined stock materials in scientific and industrial laboratories. Because of a large number of freshly cut, dried or frozen plant samples requiring the determination of essential oil amount and composition, a fast, safe, simple, efficient and highly automatic sample preparation method is needed. Five sample preparation methods (steam distillation, extraction in the Soxhlet apparatus, supercritical fluid extraction, solid phase microextraction and pressurized liquid extraction) used for the isolation of aroma-active components from Thymus vulgaris L. are compared in the paper. The methods are mainly discussed with regard to the recovery of components which typically exist in essential oil isolated by steam distillation. According to the obtained data, PLE is the most efficient sample preparation method in determining the essential oil from the thyme herb. Although co-extraction of non-volatile ingredients is the main drawback of this method, it is characterized by the highest yield of essential oil components and the shortest extraction time required. Moreover, the relative peak amounts of essential components revealed by PLE are comparable with those obtained by steam distillation, which is recognized as standard sample preparation method for the analysis of essential oils in aromatic plants.

  15. Intraluminal Administration of Poly I:C Causes an Enteropathy That Is Exacerbated by Administration of Oral Dietary Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Romina E.; Jury, Jennifer; Bondar, Constanza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), mimics virally-induced activation of TLR3 signalling causing acute small intestine damage, but whether and how mucosal administration of poly I:C causes enteropathy is less clear. Our aim was to investigate the inflammatory pathways elicited after intraluminal administration of poly I:C and determine acute and delayed consequences of this locally induced immune activation. Intraluminal poly I:C induced rapid mucosal immune activation in C57BL/6 mice involving IFNβ and the CXCL10/CXCR3 axis, that may drive inflammation towards a Th1 profile. Intraluminal poly I:C also caused enteropathy and gut dysfunction in gliadin-sensitive NOD-DQ8 mice, and this was prolonged by concomitant oral administration of gliadin. Our results indicate that small intestine pathology can be induced in mice by intraluminal administration of poly I:C and that this is exacerbated by subsequent oral delivery of a relevant dietary antigen. PMID:24915573

  16. Intraluminal administration of poly I:C causes an enteropathy that is exacerbated by administration of oral dietary antigen.

    PubMed

    Araya, Romina E; Jury, Jennifer; Bondar, Constanza; Verdu, Elena F; Chirdo, Fernando G

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), mimics virally-induced activation of TLR3 signalling causing acute small intestine damage, but whether and how mucosal administration of poly I:C causes enteropathy is less clear. Our aim was to investigate the inflammatory pathways elicited after intraluminal administration of poly I:C and determine acute and delayed consequences of this locally induced immune activation. Intraluminal poly I:C induced rapid mucosal immune activation in C57BL/6 mice involving IFNβ and the CXCL10/CXCR3 axis, that may drive inflammation towards a Th1 profile. Intraluminal poly I:C also caused enteropathy and gut dysfunction in gliadin-sensitive NOD-DQ8 mice, and this was prolonged by concomitant oral administration of gliadin. Our results indicate that small intestine pathology can be induced in mice by intraluminal administration of poly I:C and that this is exacerbated by subsequent oral delivery of a relevant dietary antigen.

  17. Functional characterization of IgA-targeted bacterial taxa from malnourished Malawian children that produce diet-dependent enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kau, Andrew L.; Planer, Joseph D.; Liu, Jie; Rao, Sindhuja; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Trehan, Indi; Manary, Mark J.; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G.; Houpt, Eric R.; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the interrelationships among childhood undernutrition, the gut microbiota, and gut mucosal immune/barrier function, we purified bacterial strains targeted by IgA from the fecal microbiota of two cohorts of Malawian infants and children. IgA responses to several bacterial taxa, including Enterobacteriaceae, correlated with anthropometric measurements of nutritional status in longitudinal studies. The relationship between IgA responses and growth was further explained by enteropathogen burden. Gnotobiotic mouse recipients of an IgA+-bacterial consortium purified from the gut microbiota of undernourished children exhibited a diet-dependent enteropathy characterized by rapid disruption of the small intestinal and colonic epithelial barrier, weight loss and sepsis that could be prevented by administering two IgA-targeted bacterial species from a healthy microbiota. Dissection of a culture collection of 11 IgA-targeted strains from an undernourished donor, sufficient to transmit these phenotypes, disclosed that Enterobacteriaceae interacted with other consortium members to produce enteropathy. These findings indicate that bacterial targets of IgA responses have etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for childhood undernutrition. PMID:25717097

  18. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP3 Levels Control Human Colonic Stem Cell Function and Are Disrupted in Diabetic Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Francesca; La Rosa, Stefano; Maestroni, Anna; Jung, Peter; Orsenigo, Elena; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Tezza, Sara; Bassi, Roberto; Finzi, Giovanna; Marando, Alessandro; Vergani, Andrea; Frego, Roberto; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Manuguerra, Roberta; Viale, Edi; Staudacher, Carlo; Corradi, Domenico; Batlle, Eduard; Breault, David; Secchi, Antonio; Folli, Franco; Fiorina, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    The role of circulating factors in regulating colonic stem cells (CoSCs) and colonic epithelial homeostasis is unclear. Individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D) frequently have intestinal symptoms, termed diabetic enteropathy (DE), though its etiology is unknown. Here, we report that T1D patients with DE exhibit abnormalities in their intestinal mucosa and CoSCs, which fail to generate in vitro mini-guts. Proteomic profiling of T1D+DE patient serum revealed altered levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) and its binding protein 3 (IGFBP3). IGFBP3 prevented in vitro growth of patient-derived organoids via binding its receptor TMEM219, in an IGF-I-independent manner, and disrupted in vivo CoSC function in a preclinical DE model. Restoration of normoglycemia in patients with long-standing T1D via kidney-pancreas transplantation or in diabetic mice by treatment with an ecto-TMEM219 recombinant protein normalized circulating IGF-I/IGFBP3 levels and reestablished CoSC homeostasis. These findings demonstrate that peripheral IGF-I/IGFBP3 controls CoSCs and their dysfunction in DE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Circulating IGF-I and IGFBP3 levels control human colonic stem cell function and are disrupted in diabetic enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Maestroni, Anna; Jung, Peter; Orsenigo, Elena; Nasr, Moufida Ben; Tezza, Sara; Bassi, Roberto; Finzi, Giovanna; Marando, Alessandro; Vergani, Andrea; Frego, Roberto; Albarello, Luca; Andolfo, Annapaola; Manuguerra, Roberta; Viale, Edi; Staudacher, Carlo; Corradi, Domenico; Batlle, Eduard; Breault, David; Secchi, Antonio; Folli, Franco; Fiorina, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The role of circulating factors in regulating colonic stem cells (CoSCs) and colonic epithelial homeostasis is unclear. Individuals with long-standing type 1 diabetes (T1D) frequently have intestinal symptoms, termed diabetic enteropathy (DE), though its etiology is unknown. Here, we report T1D patients with DE exhibit abnormalities in their intestinal mucosa and CoSCs, which fail to generate in vitro mini-guts. Proteomic profiling of T1D+DE patient serum revealed altered levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and its binding protein-3 (IGFBP3). IGFBP3 prevented in vitro growth of patient-derived organoids via binding its receptor TMEM219, in an IGF-1-independent manner, and disrupted in vivo CoSC function in a preclinical DE model. Restoration of normoglycemia in patients with long-standing T1D via kidney-pancreas transplantation or in diabetic mice by treatment with an ecto-TMEM219 recombinant protein normalized circulating IGF-1/IGFBP3 levels and reestablished CoSC homeostasis. These findings demonstrate that peripheral IGF-1/IGFBP3 control CoSCs and their dysfunction in DE. PMID:26431183

  20. Specific nongluten proteins of wheat are novel target antigens in celiac disease humoral response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy that is generally understood to be triggered by the ingestion of gluten proteins of wheat and related cereals. The skin manifestation of the condition is known as dermatitis herpetiformis. Antibody response to native and deamidated seque...

  1. Multiple micronutrient supplementation transiently ameliorates environmental enteropathy in Malawian children aged 12-35 months in a randomized controlled clinical trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is subclinical, diffuse villous atrophy characterized by T cell infiltration of the small intestinal mucosa associated with nutrient malabsorption and stunting. EE is assessed by the lactulose:mannitol (L:M) test, whereby nonmetabolized sugars are ingested and quantifi...

  2. Fibrinogen deficiency suppresses the development of early and delayed radiation enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junru; Pathak, Rupak; Garg, Sarita; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the mechanistic role of fibrinogen, a key regulator of inflammation and fibrosis, in early and delayed radiation enteropathy. METHODS Fibrinogen wild-type (Fib+/+), fibrinogen heterozygous (Fib+/-), and fibrinogen knockout (Fib-/-) mice were exposed to localized intestinal irradiation and assessed for early and delayed structural changes in the intestinal tissue. A 5-cm segment of ileum of mice was exteriorized and exposed to 18.5 Gy of x-irradiation. Intestinal tissue injury was assessed by quantitative histology, morphometry, and immunohistochemistry at 2 wk and 26 wk after radiation. Plasma fibrinogen level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS There was no difference between sham-irradiated Fib+/+ and Fib+/- mice in terms of fibrinogen concentration in plasma and intestinal tissue, intestinal histology, morphometry, intestinal smooth muscle cell proliferation, and neutrophil infiltration. Therefore, Fib+/- mice were used as littermate controls. Unlike sham-irradiated Fib+/+ and Fib+/- mice, no fibrinogen was detected in the plasma and intestinal tissue of sham-irradiated Fib-/- mice. Moreover, fibrinogen level was not elevated after irradiation in the intestinal tissue of Fib-/- mice, while significant increase in intestinal fibrinogen level was noticed in irradiated Fib+/+ and Fib+/- mice. Importantly, irradiated Fib-/- mice exhibited substantially less overall intestinal structural injury (RIS, P = 0.000002), intestinal wall thickness (P = 0.003), intestinal serosal thickness (P = 0.009), collagen deposition (P = 0.01), TGF-β immunoreactivity (P = 0.03), intestinal smooth muscle proliferation (P = 0.046), neutrophil infiltration (P = 0.01), and intestinal mucosal injury (P = 0.0003), compared to irradiated Fib+/+ and Fib+/- mice at both 2 wk and 26 wk. CONCLUSION These data demonstrate that fibrinogen deficiency directly attenuates development of early and delayed radiation enteropathy. Fibrinogen could be a novel target

  3. Association of fecal calprotectin concentrations with disease severity, response to treatment, and other biomarkers in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Nora; Mansell, Joanne; Grützner, Niels; Parnell, Nolie K.; Gurtner, Corinne; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Steiner, Jörg M.

    2018-01-01

    Background Calprotectin is a marker of inflammation, but its clinical utility in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies (CIE) is unknown. Objective Evaluation of fecal calprotectin in dogs with biopsy‐confirmed CIE. Animals 127 dogs. Methods Prospective case‐control study. Dogs were assigned a canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI) score, and histologic lesions severity was assessed. Fecal calprotectin, fecal S100A12, and serum C‐reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Food‐ or antibiotic‐responsive cases (FRE/ARE, n = 13) were distinguished from steroid‐/immunosuppressant‐responsive or ‐refractory cases (SRE/IRE, n = 20). Clinical response to treatment in SRE/IRE dogs was classified as complete remission (CR), partial response (PR), or no response (NR). Results Fecal calprotectin correlated with CCECAI (ρ = 0.27, P = .0065) and fecal S100A12 (ρ = 0.90, P < .0001), some inflammatory criteria, and cumulative inflammation scores, but not serum CRP (ρ = 0.16, P = .12). Dogs with SRE/IRE had higher fecal calprotectin concentrations (median: 2.0 μg/g) than FRE/ARE dogs (median: 1.4 μg/g), and within the SRE/IRE group, dogs with PR/NR had higher fecal calprotectin (median: 37.0 μg/g) than dogs with CR (median: 1.6 μg/g). However, both differences did not reach statistical significance (both P = .10). A fecal calprotectin ≥15.2 μg/g separated both groups with 80% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 28%‐100%) and 75% specificity (95%CI: 43%‐95%). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Fecal calprotectin could be a useful surrogate marker of disease severity in dogs with CIE, but larger longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate its utility in predicting the response to treatment. PMID:29460444

  4. [Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: twenty years of experience at a Mexican tertiary care hospital].

    PubMed

    Valdovinos-Oregón, D; Ramírez-Mayans, J; Cervantes-Bustamante, R; Toro-Monjaraz, E; Cázares-Méndez, M; Cadena-León, J; Zárate-Mondragón, F; Montijo-Barrios, E

    2014-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare congenital disease described by Waldmann in 1961 that is a consequence of obstruction of the lymphatic drainage of the small bowel with secondary lymph vessel dilation. This distorts the architecture of the villi and causes a leakage of lymph into the intestinal lumen, resulting in protein-losing enteropathy and malabsorption. To describe the clinical, biochemical, radiologic, endoscopic, and histologic characteristics in children with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. A retrospective observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted that reviewed the case records of children diagnosed with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia that were seen at the Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría within the time frame of January 1, 1992 to September 30, 2012. Four patients were found that presented with primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. Three of them had been diagnosed before 3 years of age. All the patients presented with chronic diarrhea, edema, lymphopenia, hypocalcemia, and hypogammaglobulinemia, and 3 patients presented with hypocholesterolemia. Bowel transit time, endoscopy, and intestinal biopsies were characteristic of this pathology. Intestinal lymphangiectasia should be suspected when there is a clinical picture of chronic diarrhea and protein-losing enteropathy accompanied with edema at any level, as well as hypoalbuminemia, hypocalcemia, lymphopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and hypocholesterolemia, which are the main biochemical findings of this pathology. All children presenting with intestinal lymphangiectasia should undergo an upper gastrointestinal series with bowel transit time and endoscopy with biopsies taken at the level of the duodenum. Treatment includes diet and the periodic administration of albumin and gamma globulin. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S.; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T.; Leung, Daniel T.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3–14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3–14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV. PMID:27824883

  6. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T; Leung, Daniel T; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-11-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3-14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3-14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV.

  7. Determining optimal therapy of dogs with chronic enteropathy by measurement of serum citrulline

    PubMed Central

    Gerou‐Ferriani, Magda; Allen, Rhiannon; Noble, Peter‐John M.; German, Alexander J.; Caldin, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Background Serum concentration of citrulline is a useful biomarker in human intestinal disease and indicates globally reduced enterocyte mass and absorptive function in various disease states. Objectives To determine whether serum citrulline concentration is a biomarker in chronic enteropathy (CE) in dogs, to provide useful information regarding optimal treatment or to predict outcome. Animals Seventy‐four dogs with CE and 83 breed‐ and age‐matched hospital controls with no clinical signs of intestinal disease. Methods Retrospective study. Outcome was determined and dogs were categorized by response to treatment as having food‐responsive enteropathy (FRE), antibiotic‐responsive diarrhea (ARD), or idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Disease severity was quantified by the CIBDAI scoring index. Results Serum citrulline concentration did not differ between dogs with CE (median, 8.4 µg/mL, 5th‐95th percentile 2.0‐19.6) and controls (median, 8.1 µg/mL, 5th‐95th percentile 2.2‐19.7, P = .91). Serum citrulline concentration was similar between dogs with FRE (median, 9.1 µg/mL, 5th‐95th percentile 2.0‐18.9), ARD (median, 13.0 µg/mL, 5th‐95th percentile 1.6‐19.2), IBD (median, 8.4 µg/mL, 5th‐95th percentile 2.1‐21.0; P = .91). Serum citrulline did not correlate to CIBDAI or to serum albumin concentration. Conclusions and Clinical Importance In our study, serum citrulline concentration was not associated with efficacy of treatment or outcome in dogs with CE. PMID:29663515

  8. Functional characterization of IgA-targeted bacterial taxa from undernourished Malawian children that produce diet-dependent enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Kau, Andrew L; Planer, Joseph D; Liu, Jie; Rao, Sindhuja; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Trehan, Indi; Manary, Mark J; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G; Houpt, Eric R; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-02-25

    To gain insights into the interrelationships among childhood undernutrition, the gut microbiota, and gut mucosal immune/barrier function, we purified bacterial strains targeted by immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the fecal microbiota of two cohorts of Malawian infants and children. IgA responses to several bacterial taxa, including Enterobacteriaceae, correlated with anthropometric measurements of nutritional status in longitudinal studies. The relationship between IgA responses and growth was further explained by enteropathogen burden. Gnotobiotic mouse recipients of an IgA(+) bacterial consortium purified from the gut microbiota of undernourished children exhibited a diet-dependent enteropathy characterized by rapid disruption of the small intestinal and colonic epithelial barrier, weight loss, and sepsis that could be prevented by administering two IgA-targeted bacterial species from a healthy microbiota. Dissection of a culture collection of 11 IgA-targeted strains from an undernourished donor, sufficient to transmit these phenotypes, disclosed that Enterobacteriaceae interacted with other consortium members to produce enteropathy. These findings indicate that bacterial targets of IgA responses have etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for childhood undernutrition. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. [Zinc and chronic enteropathies].

    PubMed

    Giorgi, P L; Catassi, C; Guerrieri, A

    1984-01-01

    In recent years the nutritional importance of zinc has been well established; its deficiency and its symptoms have also been recognized in humans. Furthermore, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica has been isolated, a rare but severe disease, of which skin lesions, chronic diarrhoea and recurring infections are the main symptoms. The disease is related to the malfunctioning of intestinal absorption of zinc and can be treated by administering pharmacological doses of zinc orally. Good dietary sources of zinc are meat, fish and, to a less extent, human milk. The amount of zinc absorbed in the small intestine is influenced by other nutrients: some compounds inhibit this process (dietary fiber, phytate) while others (picolinic acid, citric acid), referred to as Zn-binding ligands (ZnBL) facilitate it. Citric acid is thought to be the ligand which accounts for the high level of bioavailability of zinc in human milk. zinc absorption occurs throughout the small intestine, not only in the prossimal tract (duodenum and jejunum) but also in the distal tract (ileum). Diarrhoea is one of the clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency, thus many illnesses distinguished by chronic diarrhoea entail a bad absorption of zinc. In fact, in some cases of chronic enteropathies in infants, like coeliac disease and seldom cystic fibrosis, a deficiency of zinc has been isolated. Some of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, like retarded growth and hypogonadism, have been related to hypozinchemia which is present in this illness. Finally, it is possible that some of the dietary treatments frequently used for persistent post-enteritis diarrhoea (i.e. cow's milk exclusion, abuse and misuse of dietary fiber like carrot and carub powder, use of soy formula) can constitute a scarce supply of zinc and therefore could promote the persistency of diarrhoea itself.

  10. Histopathological and electron microscopic studies of lymphangiectasia of the small intestine in Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Hitoshi; Morita, Akira; Morishita, Tetsuo; Tsuchiya, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yoonosuke; Enomoto, Yasuhiro

    1973-01-01

    The gastrointestinal involvement and immunological findings in 16 patients with Behçet's disease are described. Four of 15 biopsy specimens of jejunal mucosa showed marked lymphangiectasia in the lamina propria similar to the appearance which was thought to be a characteristic finding in protein-losing enteropathy. None of the patients had hypoproteinaemia. Increases in serum immunoglobulin IgA were proved in six of 15 cases; in IgM, five of 15; and in IgG, one of 15. Electron microscopic studies showed that there were thousands of precipitated lymph protein bodies in the extracellular spaces of the lamina propria. Ulcers and healed ulcers of the large intestine were studied by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4700433

  11. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight basis...

  13. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight basis...

  14. 21 CFR 182.1745 - Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. 182.1745 Section... GRAS Food Substances § 182.1745 Sodium carboxymethylcellu-lose. (a) Product. Sodium carboxy-methylcellulose is the sodium salt of carboxymethylcellulose not less than 99.5 percent on a dry-weight basis...

  15. You Can Lose What You Never Had

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2016-01-01

    An often-used idiom states: "you can't lose what you never had." Yet contrary to this expression, it "is" possible to lose what you never had--at least when special education support is concerned. In Ontario, as in other jurisdictions, special education exists as a codified system. An ever-changing nexus of discourses and…

  16. Disrupted apical exocytosis of cargo vesicles causes enteropathy in FHL5 patients with Munc18-2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Georg F; van Rijn, Jorik M; Krainer, Iris M; Janecke, Andreas R; Posovszky, Carsten; Cohen, Marta; Searle, Claire; Jantchou, Prevost; Escher, Johanna C; Patey, Natalie; Cutz, Ernest; Müller, Thomas; Middendorp, Sabine; Hess, Michael W; Huber, Lukas A

    2017-07-20

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis 5 (FHL5) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in STXBP2, coding for Munc18-2, which is required for SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. FHL5 causes hematologic and gastrointestinal symptoms characterized by chronic enteropathy that is reminiscent of microvillus inclusion disease (MVID). However, the molecular pathophysiology of FHL5-associated diarrhea is poorly understood. Five FHL5 patients, including four previously unreported patients, were studied. Morphology of duodenal sections was analyzed by electron and fluorescence microscopy. Small intestinal enterocytes and organoid-derived monolayers displayed the subcellular characteristics of MVID. For the analyses of Munc18-2-dependent SNARE-protein interactions, a Munc18-2 CaCo2-KO model cell line was generated by applying CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Munc18-2 is required for Slp4a/Stx3 interaction in fusion of cargo vesicles with the apical plasma membrane. Cargo trafficking was investigated in patient biopsies, patient-derived organoids, and the genome-edited model cell line. Loss of Munc18-2 selectively disrupts trafficking of certain apical brush-border proteins (NHE3 and GLUT5), while transport of DPPIV remained unaffected. Here, we describe the molecular mechanism how the loss of function of Munc18-2 leads to cargo-selective mislocalization of brush-border components and a subapical accumulation of cargo vesicles, as it is known from the loss of polarity phenotype in MVID.

  17. Rifaximin is an effective alternative to metronidazole for the treatment of chronic enteropathy in dogs: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Menozzi, Alessandro; Dall'Aglio, Manuel; Quintavalla, Fausto; Dallavalle, Luca; Meucci, Valentina; Bertini, Simone

    2016-10-06

    A clinical trial was conducted in order to assess the efficacy of rifaximin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic with negligible gastrointestinal absorption, in comparison with metronidazole, a commonly employed antimicrobial drug, in dogs with chronic enteropathy. Twenty-four pet dogs were randomly enrolled into two different groups: MET group (10 dogs) and RIF group (14 dogs). Dogs of MET group received metronidazole 15 mg/kg q12h for 21 days by oral route, whereas dogs of RIF group, were given rifaximin 25 mg/kg q12h for 21 days by oral route. Clinical signs of disease were evaluated the day before the beginning of drug administration (D0), and at the end of treatment (D21), by means of Canine IBD Activity Index (CIBDAI). Blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at D0 and D21 were also measured, as another parameter of treatment efficacy. The primary outcome measure of efficacy was the complete remission at D21, defined as a 75 % or greater decrease of CIBDAI; secondary outcome measures were the variation of mean CIBDAI scores, of mean CRP serum levels, and any observed adverse effect from D0 to D21. Treatment with metronidazole or rifaximin greatly improved the clinical signs of disease in each group: in MET group the complete remission was achieved in 8 of 10 dogs (80.0 %), and partial remission in 2 subjects (20.0 %). In RIF group, 12 of 14 dogs showed complete remission (85.7 %), and the remaining 2 dogs were in partial remission (14.3 %). There were also significant decreases of CIBDAI scores (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0002 for MET and RIF, respectively), and CRP levels (P = 0.002 and P = 0.0001 for MET and RIF, respectively) compared to pre-treatment values in both groups. No significant difference, however, was found when comparing MET and RIF groups. No relevant side-effect was reported during the trial with either drugs. The present study showed, for the first time, that oral rifaximin could represent an effective alternative to metronidazole

  18. A recessive contiguous gene deletion causing infantile hyperinsulinism, enteropathy and deafness identifies the Usher type 1C gene.

    PubMed

    Bitner-Glindzicz, M; Lindley, K J; Rutland, P; Blaydon, D; Smith, V V; Milla, P J; Hussain, K; Furth-Lavi, J; Cosgrove, K E; Shepherd, R M; Barnes, P D; O'Brien, R E; Farndon, P A; Sowden, J; Liu, X Z; Scanlan, M J; Malcolm, S; Dunne, M J; Aynsley-Green, A; Glaser, B

    2000-09-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 describes the association of profound, congenital sensorineural deafness, vestibular hypofunction and childhood onset retinitis pigmentosa. It is an autosomal recessive condition and is subdivided on the basis of linkage analysis into types 1A through 1E. Usher type 1C maps to the region containing the genes ABCC8 and KCNJ11 (encoding components of ATP-sensitive K + (KATP) channels), which may be mutated in patients with hyperinsulinism. We identified three individuals from two consanguineous families with severe hyperinsulinism, profound congenital sensorineural deafness, enteropathy and renal tubular dysfunction. The molecular basis of the disorder is a homozygous 122-kb deletion of 11p14-15, which includes part of ABCC8 and overlaps with the locus for Usher syndrome type 1C and DFNB18. The centromeric boundary of this deletion includes part of a gene shown to be mutated in families with type 1C Usher syndrome, and is hence assigned the name USH1C. The pattern of expression of the USH1C protein is consistent with the clinical features exhibited by individuals with the contiguous gene deletion and with isolated Usher type 1C.

  19. Eating Well and Losing Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking - Eating Well and Losing Weight • Tools & Resources Sodium & High Blood Pressure Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms in Women ...

  20. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Aggregation Behaviors of a Two-Species System with Lose-Lose Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Mei-Xia; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ke, Jian-Hong

    2010-06-01

    We propose an aggregation evolution model of two-species (A- and B-species) aggregates to study the prevalent aggregation phenomena in social and economic systems. In this model, A- and B-species aggregates perform self-exchange-driven growths with the exchange rate kernels K (k,l) = Kkl and L(k,l) = Lkl, respectively, and the two species aggregates perform self-birth processes with the rate kernels J1(k) = J1k and J2(k) = J2k, and meanwhile the interaction between the aggregates of different species A and B causes a lose-lose scheme with the rate kernel H(k,l) = Hkl. Based on the mean-field theory, we investigated the evolution behaviors of the two species aggregates to study the competitions among above three aggregate evolution schemes on the distinct initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 of the two species. The results show that the evolution behaviors of A- and B-species are crucially dominated by the competition between the two self-birth processes, and the initial monomer concentrations A0 and B0 play important roles, while the lose-lose scheme play important roles in some special cases.

  1. Losing Libraries, Saving Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This summer, as public libraries continued to get budget hit after budget hit across the country, several readers asked for a comprehensive picture of the ravages of the recession on library service. In partnership with 2010 Movers & Shakers Laura Solomon and Mandy Knapp, Ohio librarians who bought the Losing Libraries domain name,…

  2. Severe Enteropathy and Hypogammaglobulinemia Complicating Refractory Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Disseminated Disease in a Child with IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Arias, Andrés Augusto; Perez-Velez, Carlos M; Orrego, Julio César; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Rojas, Jessica Lineth; Wilches, Alejandra; Restrepo, Andrea; Trujillo, Mónica; Garcés, Carlos; Arango-Ferreira, Catalina; González, Natalia; Oleaga-Quintas, Carmen; Fernández, Diana; Isaza-Correa, Johana Marcela; Gongóra, Diego Eduardo; Gonzalez-Loaiza, Daniel; Sierra, Juan Esteban; Casanova, Jean Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta; Franco, José Luis

    2017-10-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease is a rare clinical condition characterized by a predisposition to infectious diseases caused by poorly virulent mycobacteria. Other infections such as salmonellosis and candidiasis are also reported. The purpose of this article is to describe a young boy affected with various infectious diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Salmonella sp, Klebsiella pneumonie, Citrobacter sp., and Candida sp, complicated with severe enteropathy and transient hypogammaglobulinemia. We reviewed medical records and performed flow cytometry staining for lymphocyte populations, lymphocyte proliferation in response to PHA, and intracellular IFN-γ production in T cell PHA blasts in the patient and a healthy control. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the genetic variants in the patient and relatives. Genetic analysis revealed a bi-allelic mutation in IL12RB1 (C291Y) resulting in complete IL-12Rβ1 deficiency. Functional analysis demonstrated the lack of intracellular production of IFN-γ in CD3+ T lymphocytes from the patient in response to rhIL-12p70. To our knowledge, this is the third patient with MSMD due to IL-12Rβ1 deficiency complicated with enteropathy and hypogammaglobulinemia and the first case of this disease to be described in Colombia.

  3. [Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Popović, Dugan D j; Spuran, Milan; Alempijević, Tamara; Krstić, Miodrag; Djuranović, Srdjan; Kovacević, Nada; Damnjanović, Svetozar; Micev, Marjan

    2011-03-01

    Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortuous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and supportive therapy. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  4. Bacterial β-glucuronidase inhibition protects mice against enteropathy induced by indomethacin, ketoprofen or diclofenac: mode of action and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Saitta, Kyle S.; Zhang, Carmen; Lee, Kang Kwang; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a small molecule inhibitor of bacterial β-glucuronidase (Inh-1; [1-((6,8-dimethyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-3-yl)-3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)thiourea]) protected mice against diclofenac (DCF)-induced enteropathy. Here we report that Inh-1 was equally protective against small intestinal injury induced by other carboxylic acid-containing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), indomethacin (10 mg/kg, ip) and ketoprofen (100 mg/kg, ip).Inh-1 provided complete protection if given prior to DCF (60 mg/kg, ip), and partial protection if administered 3-h post-DCF, suggesting that the temporal window of mucosal protection can be extended for drugs undergoing extensive enterohepatic circulation.Pharmacokinetic analysis of Inh-1 revealed an absolute bioavailability (F) of 21% and a short t1/2 of <1 h. This low F was shown to be due to hepatic first-pass metabolism, as confirmed with the pan-CYP inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole.Using the fluorescent probe 5 (and 6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein, we demonstrated that Inh-1 did not interfere with hepatobiliary export of glucuronides in gall bladder-cannulated mice.These data are compatible with the hypothesis that pharmacological inhibition of bacterial β-glucuronidase-mediated cleavage of NSAID glucuronides in the small intestinal lumen can protect against NSAID-induced enteropathy caused by locally high concentrations of NSAID aglycones. PMID:23829165

  5. Essential oils (EOs), pressurized liquid extracts (PLE) and carbon dioxide supercritical fluid extracts (SFE-CO2) from Algerian Thymus munbyanus as valuable sources of antioxidants to be used on an industrial level.

    PubMed

    Bendif, Hamdi; Adouni, Khaoula; Miara, Mohamed Djamel; Baranauskienė, Renata; Kraujalis, Paulius; Venskutonis, Petras Rimantas; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Maggi, Filippo

    2018-09-15

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of extracts from Algerian Thymus munbyanus as a valuable source of antioxidants for use on an industrial level. To this end, a study was conducted on the composition and antioxidant activities of essential oils (EOs), pressurized liquid extracts (PLE) and supercritical fluid extracts (SFE-CO 2 ) obtained from Thymus munbyanus subsp. coloratus (TMC) and subsp. munbyanus (TMM). EOs and SFE-CO 2 extracts were analysed by GC-FID and GC×GC-TOFMS revealing significant differences. A successive extraction of the solid SFE-CO 2 residue by PLE extraction with solvents of increasing polarity such as acetone, ethanol and water, was carried out. The extracts were evaluated for total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, while the antioxidant power was assessed by DPPH, FRAP, and ORAC assays. SFE-CO 2 extracts were also analysed for their tocopherol content. The antioxidant activity of PLE extracts was found to be higher than that of SFE-CO 2 extracts, and this increased with solvent polarity (water > ethanol > acetone). Overall, these results support the use of T. munbyanus as a valuable source of substances to be used on an industrial level as preservative agents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility on...

  7. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility on...

  8. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility on...

  9. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility on...

  10. 42 CFR 136a.34 - Care and treatment of people losing eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. 136a.34 Section 136a.34 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES....34 Care and treatment of people losing eligibility. (a) Individuals who lose their eligibility on...

  11. The nondietary determinants of vitamin D status in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Veit, Lauren E; Maranda, Louise; Nwosu, Benjamin Udoka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D) and markers of vitamin D status in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We conducted a retrospective case-control study of 59 pediatric patients with IBD (age 16.4 ± 2.2 y) and 116 controls (age 14.6 ± 4.4 y), to investigate the association between 25(OH)D and albuminemia for protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) and hepatic dysfunction; alanine transaminase (ALT) for hepatic inflammation; erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) for intestinal inflammation; body mass index (BMI) for adiposity; seasons and skin pigmentation for insolation. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L; abnormal liver enzyme by ALT >40 U/L; overweight status by BMI of ≥85th but <95th percentile, and obesity by BMI ≥95th percentile. Seasons were categorized as summer, winter, spring, and fall. Patients with IBD had a higher prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (42.4% versus 26.7%; P = 0.04), elevated ALT (16.9% versus 2.6%; P < 0.001), and lower albumin (41.1 ± 4.8 versus 45.1 ± 3.8; P < 0.001) than controls. In both the IBD cohort and controls, 25(OH)D was highest in summer and lowest in winter, and significantly higher in white than in non-white patients. ESR varied significantly with 25(OH)D (R(2) = 0.24; β = -0.32; P = 0.010), and only patients with IBD with elevated ESR had lower 25(OH)D than controls (49.5 ± 25.2 versus 65.3 ± 28.0 nmol/L; P = 0.045). Intestinal inflammation, not the loss of albumin-bound vitamin D in the gut, is the primary intestinal determinant of vitamin D status in IBD. The extraintestinal determinants are seasons and skin pigmentation, but not adiposity and hepatic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Epizootic rabbit enteropathy inoculum (TEC4): antibiograms and antibiotic fractionation.

    PubMed

    Huybens, Nathalie; Houeix, Julien; Licois, Dominique; Mainil, Jacques; Marlier, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Epizootic rabbit enteropathy (ERE) emerged and spread in Europe within the last 13 years causing major economical loss. The aims of the study was to evaluate antibiograms of TEC4, an inoculum composed of an extract of intestinal content of affected rabbits, and to test the potential of different antibiotic-based TEC4 fractions to reproduce the disease. Twenty nine different antibiotic discs were incubated for determining bacteria resistance. In a complementary study, nine tubes of liquid medium were inoculated with TEC4, incubated and added individually with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, bacitracin, ceftiofur, doxycycline, novobiocin, streptomycyin, tylosin, vancomycin and 0.9% saline solution as control. The content of each tube was washed by centrifugation and suspended in saline. The three most effective antibiotics are florfenicol, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid and tylosin. A high concentration of Clostridium sordelli and Bacillus firmus were isolated in all fractions. Species never cultured from TEC4 were identified as Fusobacterium necrogenes (in vancomycin fraction), Cellulomonas sp (in novobiocin fraction) and Bacteroides distasonis (in doxycycline fraction). The ERE was reproduced when bacitracin, doxycycline and 0.9% fractions were inoculated. Rabbits showed ERE clinical signs with the specific drop in daily weight gain.

  13. Use of tylvalosin-medicated feed to control porcine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guedes, R M C; França, S A; Machado, G S; Blumer, M A; da Costa Cruz, E C

    2009-09-19

    The effect of an oral treatment with the tartrate salt of tylvalosin on the development of proliferative enteropathy in 60 experimentally challenged pigs was studied. Thirty of the pigs were fed a diet medicated with 50 ppm tylvalosin and 30 were fed the unmedicated diet. The treated animals started to receive the medicated feed the day before they were inoculated, and continued to receive it for 14 days. The pigs' bodyweight, feed consumption and clinical signs were evaluated, and they were examined postmortem 20 days after inoculation, and samples of ileum were collected for immunohistochemistry (IHC) for Lawsonia intracellularis. Clinical signs of the disease were more evident in the untreated group than in the treated group. The average daily weight gain, average daily feed consumption and feed conversion efficiency were better in the treated group. The combined length of intestine with lesions was 2847 cm in the untreated group and 183 cm in the treated group. The tylvalosin treatment significantly reduced the level of L intracellularis infection; almost half of the treated pigs were IHC-negative compared with 3.3 per cent of the untreated pigs.

  14. Primary intestinal and thoracic lymphangiectasia: a response to antiplasmin therapy.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Joanna E; Cohen, Eyal; Weinstein, Michael

    2002-06-01

    Lymphangiectasia is a congenital or acquired disorder characterized by abnormal, dilated lymphatics with a variable age of presentation. We describe a case of lymphangiectasia with intestinal and pulmonary involvement in an adolescent female, who presented with many of the classic features including chylous pleural effusions, lymphopenia, hypogammaglobinemia, and a protein-losing enteropathy. She also presented with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding, which is infrequently described. The patient did not improve with bowel rest and a low-fat medium-chain triglyceride diet and had little improvement with octreotide acetate therapy. However, she had a clinical response to antiplasmin therapy, trans-4-aminothylcyclohexamine carboxylic acid (tranexamic acid) in terms of serum albumin and gastrointestinal bleeding. She continues to have exacerbations of her condition, as well as persistent lymphopenia and chronic pleural effusions.

  15. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia successfully treated by segmental resections of small bowel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Rae; Lee, Suk-Koo; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2009-10-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare cause of protein-losing enteropathy and usually presents with intermittent diarrhea or malnutrition. Diagnosis depends largely on its pathologic condition demonstrating greatly dilated lymphatics mainly in the lamina propria of the mucosa. We report a case of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, of the diffuse type, presenting with abdominal pain and voluminous diarrhea in a previously healthy 8-year-old boy. He had periumbilical pain for 3 months before presentation. He was managed by segmental bowel resections and end-to-end anastomoses. The histopathologic condition of the resected small intestine showed lymphatic dilation limited mainly to the subserosa and mesentery but was not prominent in the mucosa. Abdominal pain and diarrhea subsided postoperatively. The present case is the fourth report describing a response to operative resection.

  16. [Sucessful dietetic-therapy in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia and recurrent chylous ascites: a case report].

    PubMed

    Martín, C Campos; García, A Fernández-Argüelles; Restrepo, J M Rabat; Pérez, A Sendón

    2007-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a lymphatic system's disorder, where lymphatic drainage is blockaged. Clinically it produces malabsorption, protein-losing enteropathy, hypogammaglobulin in blood, and several degrees of malnutrition. Its treatment is not easy and includes dietetic-therapy and drugs. A 35-year-old-woman case report is exposed. She has recurrent chylosa ascites, requiring several admissions and evacuatory paracentesis. After food-fat was replaced by medium-chain triacyl-glicerol-enriched diet, a clinical, analytical and anthropometric improvement was demonstrated. The major way of treatment in intestinal lymphangiectasia in this case is the employement of specific-diet and adaptaded-basic-food. It's difficult and high collaboration of the patient is required, being necessary medical revisions during the whole life, due to the not well known evolution of this long-standing disease.

  17. Mass-losing red giants in open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mass-losing stars in open clusters with main-sequence turn-offs at intermediate mass have been searched for by using the IRAS data base. The absence of many strong 60 micron sources in open clusters implies that intermediate-mass stars lose much of their mass during an intense wind phase of rather short duration. For stars of about seven solar masses, this phase, if it exists at all, lasts for not much more than 100,000 yr. For stars of about four solar masses, the intense wind phase appears to last considerably less than 10 million yr; it may well last for less than a million yr.

  18. Significance of clonal rearrangements of lymphocyte antigen receptor genes on the prognosis of chronic enteropathy in 22 Shiba dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohmi, Aki; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Tomiyasu, Hirotaka; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-09-29

    Shiba dogs are predisposed to chronic enteropathy (CE) and have poorer prognosis than other dog breeds. The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) results on clinical findings and prognosis of Shiba dogs with CE. We retrospectively collected data on 22 Shiba dogs diagnosed as having CE. Fifty-nine percent of the dogs had clonality-positive results on PARR analysis. Furthermore, on histopathology, epitheliotropic behavior of small lymphocytes of the intestinal mucosa was observed significantly more frequently in dogs with clonal rearrangement of antigen receptor genes (P=0.027). The median overall survival time of clonality-positive dogs was 48 days (range, 4-239 days), compared to 271 days (range, 45-1,316+ days) in clonality-negative dogs. The median overall survival time of epitheliotropism-positive dogs was 76 days (range, 30-349 days) compared to 239 days (range, 4-1,316+ days) for epitheliotropism-negative dogs. Statistical analysis revealed that the clonality-positive result was associated with significantly shorter survival time (P=0.036). In contrast, presence or absence of epitheliotropism had no statistically significant effect on survival time (P=0.223). These cases might appropriately be diagnosed as small T-cell intestinal lymphoma; there are some common clinical and pathogenic features with human enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma type 2. The pathogenesis and poor prognosis for Shiba dogs with CE seem to be associated with this type of lymphoma, although further investigation is warranted.

  19. CelR, an Ortholog of the Diguanylate Cyclase PleD of Caulobacter, Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, D. Michael; Su, Shengchang; Baccaro, Brenna E.; Banta, Lois M.

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose fibrils play a role in attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. While the genes for cellulose biosynthesis in the bacterium have been identified, little is known concerning the regulation of the process. The signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has been linked to the regulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many bacterial species, including A. tumefaciens. In this study, we identified two putative diguanylate cyclase genes, celR (atu1297) and atu1060, that influence production of cellulose in A. tumefaciens. Overexpression of either gene resulted in increased cellulose production, while deletion of celR, but not atu1060, resulted in decreased cellulose biosynthesis. celR overexpression also affected other phenotypes, including biofilm formation, formation of a polar adhesion structure, plant surface attachment, and virulence, suggesting that the gene plays a role in regulating these processes. Analysis of celR and Δcel mutants allowed differentiation between phenotypes associated with cellulose production, such as biofilm formation, and phenotypes probably resulting from c-di-GMP signaling, which include polar adhesion, attachment to plant tissue, and virulence. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that species containing both celR and celA, which encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase, adapted the CelR protein to regulate cellulose production while those that lack celA use CelR, called PleD, to regulate specific processes associated with polar localization and cell division. PMID:24038703

  20. Detection of Celiac Disease and Lymphocytic Enteropathy by Parallel Serology and Histopathology in a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Marjorie M.; Murray, Joseph A.; Ronkainen, Jukka; Aro, Pertti; Storskrubb, Tom; D’Amato, Mauro; Lahr, Brian; Talley, Nicholas J.; Agreus, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Although serological analysis is used in diagnosis of celiac disease, histopathology is considered most reliable. We performed a prospective study to determine the clinical, pathological and serological spectrum of celiac disease in a general population (Kalixanda study). Methods A random sample of an adult general population (n=1000) was analyzed by upper endoscopy, duodenal biopsy, and serological analysis of tissue transglutaminase (tTg) levels; endomysial antibody (EMA) levels were analyzed in samples that were tTg+. The cutoff values for diagnosis of celiac disease were villous atrophy with 40 intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs)/100 enterocytes (ECs). Results Samples from 33 subjects were tTg+ and 16 were EMA+. Histological analysis identified 7/1000 subjects (0.7%) with celiac disease; all were tTg+ and 6/7 were EMA+. Another 26 subjects were tTg+ (7/26 EMA+). This was addressed by a second quantitative pathology study, (nested case-control design) using a threshold of 25 IELS/100 ECs. In this analysis, all 13 samples that were tTg+ and EMA+ had ≥25 IELs/100ECs. In total, 16 subjects (1.6%) had serological and histological evidence of gluten-sensitive enteropathy. IELs were quantified in duodenal biopsy samples from seronegative individuals (n=500); 19 (3.8%) had >25 IELs and lymphocytic duodenosis (LD). Conclusions Measurement of ≥25 IELs/100 ECs correlated with serological indicators of celiac disease; a higher IEL threshold could miss 50% of cases. Quantification of tTg is a sensitive test for celiac disease; diagnosis can be confirmed by observation of ≥25 IELs/100ECs in duodenal biopsies. Lymphocytic enteropathy (celiac disease and LD) is common in the population (5.4%). PMID:20398668

  1. How to treat an extensive form of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia?

    PubMed

    Troskot, Rosana; Jurčić, Dragan; Bilić, Ante; Gomerčić Palčić, Marija; Težak, Stanko; Brajković, Ivana

    2015-06-21

    We report a case of a 42-year-old man with a rare disorder known as primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, which is characterized by dilated intestinal lymphatics that lead to the development of protein-losing enteropathy. The patient presented with a grand mal seizure caused by malabsorption-derived electrolytes and a protein disorder. Signs of the disease, including chronic diarrhea and peripheral edema, manifested 10 years ago, but a diagnosis was never made. The diagnosis was suspected because of the clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, imaging and endoscopic findings. Hyperemic and edematous mucosa of the small intestine corresponded to scattered white spots with dilated intestinal lymphatics and whitish villi in the histological specimen of the biopsied jejunal mucosa. Although numerous therapeutic strategies are available, only octreotide therapy proved to be an effective means of therapeutic resolution in this patient. Although the patient had a partial remission following the use of a slow release formula of octreotide, his prognosis, clinical course, and future treatment challenges are yet to be determined.

  2. Evaluation of use and lose laws.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-06-01

    The term 'Use and Lose' describes laws that authorize driver licensing actions against persons found to be using or in possession of illicit drugs, and against young persons found to be drinking, purchasing or in possession of alcoholic beverages.

  3. Evaluation of use and lose laws

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-06-01

    The term "Use and Lose" describes laws that authorize driver licensing actions against persons found to be using or in possession of illicit drugs, and against young persons found to be drinking, purchasing or in possession of alcoholic beverages. Th...

  4. Increased expression of phosphorylated forms of RNA-dependent protein kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α may signal skeletal muscle atrophy in weight-losing cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Eley, H L; Skipworth, R J E; Deans, D A C; Fearon, K C H; Tisdale, M J

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that the activation (autophosphorylation) of dsRNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) can stimulate protein degradation, and depress protein synthesis in skeletal muscle through phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) on the α-subunit. To understand whether these mediators are important in muscle wasting in cancer patients, levels of the phospho forms of PKR and eIF2α have been determined in rectus abdominus muscle of weight losing patients with oesophago-gastric cancer, in comparison with healthy controls. Levels of both phospho PKR and phospho eIF2α were significantly enhanced in muscle of cancer patients with weight loss irrespective of the amount and there was a linear relationship between phosphorylation of PKR and phosphorylation of eIF2α (correlation coefficient 0.76, P=0.005). This suggests that phosphorylation of PKR led to phosphorylation of eIF2α. Myosin levels decreased as the weight loss increased, and there was a linear relationship between myosin expression and the extent of phosphorylation of eIF2α (correlation coefficient 0.77, P=0.004). These results suggest that phosphorylation of PKR may be an important initiator of muscle wasting in cancer patients. PMID:18087277

  5. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, scores, mimickers and challenges in diagnosing gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato; Shen, Fan; Bouma, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The upper digestive tract is routinely scoped for several causes of malabsorption, and the number of duodenal biopsy specimens has increased notably in the last 10 years. Gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) is an autoimmune disease, which shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and requires a joint clinico-pathological approach. The classical histopathology of GSE with partial or total villous blunting is well recognized, but the classification of GSE is not straightforward. Moreover, several mimickers of GSE with intraepithelial lymphocytosis have been identified in the last 20 years, with drug interactions and medical comorbidities adding to the conundrum. In this review, we report on the normal duodenal mucosa, the clinical presentation and laboratory diagnosis of GSE, the duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes and immunophenotype of GSE-associated lymphocytes, the GSE mimickers, the differences “across oceans” among guidelines in diagnosing GSE, and the use of a synoptic report for reporting duodenal biopsies in both children and adults in the 21st century. PMID:28216964

  6. Weight loss without losing muscle mass in pre-obese and obese subjects induced by a high-soy-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Deibert, P; König, D; Schmidt-Trucksaess, A; Zaenker, K S; Frey, I; Landmann, U; Berg, A

    2004-10-01

    To determine change of weight, body composition, metabolic and hormonal parameters induced by different intervention protocols. Randomized, controlled study including participants exhibiting a BMI between 27.5 and 35. Three different interventions containing lifestyle education (LE-G), or a substitutional diet containing a high-soy-protein low-fat diet with (SD/PA-G) or without (SD-G) a guided physical activity program. A total of 90 subjects (mean weight 89.9 kg; mean BMI 31.5), randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups. Change in body weight, fat mass and lean body mass measured with the Bod Pod device at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months; change in metabolic and hormonal parameters. In all, 83 subjects completed the 6-months study. BMI dropped highly significantly in all groups (LE-G: -2.2+/-1.43 kg/m(2); SD-G: -3.1+/-1.29 kg/m(2); SD/PA-G: -3.0+/-1.29 kg/m(2)). Subjects in the SD-G and in the SD/PA-G lost more weight during the 6-months study (-8.9+/-3.9; -8.9+/-3.9 kg) than did those in the LE-G (-6.2+/-4.2 kg), and had a greater decrease in fat mass (-8.8+/-4.27; -9.4+/-4.54 kg) than those in the LE-G (-6.6+/-4.59 kg). In contrast, no significant intraindividual or between-group changes in the fat-free mass were seen. In all groups, metabolic parameters showed an improvement in glycemic control and lipid profile. Our data suggest that a high-soy-protein and low-fat diet can improve the body composition in overweight and obese people, losing fat but preserving muscle mass.

  7. A novel method of sensing temperatures of magnet coils of SINP-MaPLE plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, A. M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biswas, S.; Basu, S.; Pal, R.

    2014-03-01

    A set of 36 magnet coils is used to produce a continuous, uniform magnetic field of about 0.35 Tesla inside the vacuum chamber of the MaPLE Device, a linear laboratory plasma device (3 m long and 0.30 m in diameter) built for studying basic magnetized plasma physics phenomena. To protect the water cooled-coils from serious damage due to overheating temperatures of all the coils are monitored electronically using low cost temperature sensor IC chips, a technique first being used in similar magnet system. Utilizing the Parallel Port of a Personal Computer a novel scheme is used to avoid deploying microprocessor that is associated with involved circuitry and low level programming to address and control the large number of sensors. The simple circuits and a program code to implement the idea are developed, tested and presently in operation. The whole arrangement comes out to be not only attractive, but also simple, economical and easy to install elsewhere.

  8. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy and treated by medium-chain triglycerides: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Li-Na; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2013-01-14

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disorder characterized by exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities of the intestinal lymphatics. Intestinal lymphangiectasia can be primary or secondary, so the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia must first exclude the possibility of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia. A double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy, as well as the pathology can be used to confirm the diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia. A polymeric diet containing medium-chain triglycerides and total parenteral nutrition may be a useful therapy. A 17-year-old girl of Mongoloid ethnicity was admitted to our hospital with a history of diarrhea and edema. She was diagnosed with protein-losing enteropathy caused by intestinal lymphangiectasia. This was confirmed by a double-balloon enteroscopy and multi-dot biopsy. After treatment with total parenteral nutrition in hospital, which was followed by a low-fat and medium-chain triglyceride diet at home, she was totally relieved of her symptoms. Intestinal lymphangiectasia can be diagnosed with a double-balloon enteroscopy and multi-dot biopsy, as well as the pathology of small intestinal tissue showing edema of the submucosa and lymphangiectasia. Because intestinal lymphangiectasia can be primary or secondary, the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia must first exclude the possibility of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia. A positive clinical response to the special diet therapy, namely a low-fat and medium-chain triglyceride diet, can further confirm the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  9. Perilla frutescens leaves extract ameliorates ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung-Soo; Han, Mira; Shin, Hee Soon; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup; Lee, Dong Hun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2017-01-04

    Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. (Lamiaceae) is a traditional herb that is consumed in East Asian countries as a traditional medicine. This traditional herb has been documented for centuries to treat various diseases such as depression, allergies, inflammation and asthma. However, the effect of Perilla frutescens on skin has not been characterized well. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of Perilla frutescens leaves extract (PLE) on ultraviolet radiation-induced extracellular matrix damage in human dermal fibroblasts and hairless mice skin. Human dermal fibroblasts and Skh-1 hairless mice were irradiated with UV and treated with PLE. Protein and mRNA levels of various target molecules were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Histological changes of mouse skin were analyzed by H&E staining. To elucidate underlying mechanism of PLE, activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA binding assay and the measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed. PLE significantly inhibited basal and UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-3 expression dose-dependently, and also decreased UV-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and c-Jun N-terminal kinases. This inhibitory effects of PLE on MMP-1 and MMP-3 were mediated by reduction of ROS generation and AP-1 DNA binding activity induced by UV. Furthermore, PLE promoted type I procollagen production irrespective of UV irradiation. In the UV-irradiated animal model, PLE significantly reduced epidermal skin thickness and MMP-13 expression induced by UV. Our results demonstrate that PLE has the protective effect against UV-induced dermal matrix damage. Therefore, we suggest that PLE can be a potential agent for prevention of skin aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Building Muscles, Keeping Muscles: Protein Turnover During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, Arny; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As we age we lose muscle mass and strength. The problem is a matter of use it or lose it and more - a fact to which any active senior can attest. An imbalance in the natural cycle of protein turnover may be a contributing factor to decreased muscle mass. But the answer is not so simple, since aging is associated with changes in hormones, activity levels, nutrition, and often, disease. The human body constantly uses amino acids to build muscle protein, which then breaks down and must be replaced. When protein turnover gets out of balance, so that more protein breaks down than the body can replace, the result is muscle loss. This is not just the bane of aging, however. Severely burned people may have difficulty building new muscle long after the burned skin has been repaired. Answers to why we lose muscle mass and strength - and how doctors can fix it - may come from space. Astronauts usually eat a well-balanced diet and maintain an exercise routine to stay in top health. During long-duration flight, they exercise regularly to reduce the muscle loss that results from being in a near-weightless environment. Despite these precautions, astronauts lose muscle mass and strength during most missions. They quickly recover after returning to Earth - this is a temporary condition in an otherwise healthy population. Members of the STS-107 crew are participating in a study of the effects of space flight, hormone levels, and stress on protein turnover. When we are under stress, the body responds with a change in hormone levels. Researchers hypothesize that this stress-induced change in hormones along with the near-weightlessness might result in the body synthesizing less muscle protein, causing muscles to lose their strength and size. Astronauts, who must perform numerous duties in a confined and unusual environment, experience some stress during their flight, making them excellent candidates for testing the researchers' hypothesis.

  11. [A Case of Huge Colon Cancer Accompanied with Severe Hypoproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Hiraki, Sakurao; Kanesada, Kou; Harada, Toshio; Tada, Kousuke; Fukuda, Shintaro

    2017-11-01

    We report a case of huge colon cancer accompanied with severe hypoproteinemia. A7 4-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of abdominal fullness. Blood examinations revealed anemia(hemoglobin 8.8 g/dL)and sever hypopro- teinemia(total protein 4.5 g/dL, albumin 1.1 g/dL). Computed tomography examination of abdomen revealed ascites and large tumor(12.5×10.5 cm)at the right side colon. By further examinations ascending colon cancer without distant metastasis was diagnosed, then we performed right hemicolectomy and primary intestinal anastomosis by open surgery. Ahuge type 1 tumor(18×12 cm)was observed in the excised specimen, which invaded to terminal ileum directly. The tumor was diagnosed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma without lymph node metastasis(pT3N0M0, fStage II ). Postoperative course was uneventful and serum protein concentration recovered gradually to normal range. Protein leakage from the tumor cannot be proved by this case, so we can't diagnose as protein-losing enteropathy, but we strongly doubt this etiology from postoperative course in this case.

  12. Losing and Saving and Losing Physics in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Texas has the second-largest population of the states, and played even a larger role in education reform movements of the past 15 years than its size would indicate. In the Fall of 2011, physicists across the country were surprised to learn that six university physics programs in Texas were threatened with closure because of small graduation numbers. Five of them ultimately closed. Many of the faculty at the institutions losing programs came together and formed a consortium that eventually made it possible to continue offering physics,by unconventional means, to their undergraduates. In the Spring of 2013 came an even larger change. Physics had been part of the recommended high school graduation plan in Texas. As part of a bill making sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements and accountability, the physics requirement was removed. Physics may partly be falling victim to the national focus on STEM, which suggests that the various disciplines of science are interchangeable and not individually important. None of the changes in Texas are hard to imagine coming to other states as well.

  13. Histologic morphometry confirms a prophylactic effect for hyperbaric oxygen in the prevention of delayed radiation enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier, J J; Davolt, D A; Court, W S; Onoda, J M; Alecu, R

    1998-01-01

    In a previous publication (Feldmeier et al., Radiother Oncol 1995; 35:138-144) we reported our success in preventing delayed radiation enteropathy in a murine model by the application of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2). In this study we introduce a histologic morphometric technique for assessing fibrosis in the submucosa of these same animal specimens and relate this assay to the previous results. The histologic morphometry, like the previous gross morphometry and compliance assays, demonstrates a significant protective effect for HBO2. The present assay is related to the previous assays in a statistically significant fashion. The predictive value for the histologic morphometric assay demonstrates a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 62.5%. The applicability of this assay to other organ systems and its potential superiority to the compliance assay are discussed.

  14. Bubble-fusion professor loses faculty post

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Purdue University in the US has announced that Rusi Taleyarkhan - who was found guilty of scientific misconduct by the university in July - will lose his title of Al Bement Jr Professor of Nuclear Engineering and will not be able to advise graduate students for at least three years. Purdue has also denied an appeal from the researcher about the misconduct verdict.

  15. Sample Menus to Eat Right and Lose Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight and Health Risk Control Your Weight Eat Right Be Physically Active Healthy Weight Tools BMI Calculator ... help make it easier for you to eat right and lose weight. The sample menus include ideas ...

  16. How to treat an extensive form of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia?

    PubMed Central

    Troskot, Rosana; Jurčić, Dragan; Bilić, Ante; Gomerčić Palčić, Marija; Težak, Stanko; Brajković, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old man with a rare disorder known as primary intestinal lymphangiectasia, which is characterized by dilated intestinal lymphatics that lead to the development of protein-losing enteropathy. The patient presented with a grand mal seizure caused by malabsorption-derived electrolytes and a protein disorder. Signs of the disease, including chronic diarrhea and peripheral edema, manifested 10 years ago, but a diagnosis was never made. The diagnosis was suspected because of the clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, imaging and endoscopic findings. Hyperemic and edematous mucosa of the small intestine corresponded to scattered white spots with dilated intestinal lymphatics and whitish villi in the histological specimen of the biopsied jejunal mucosa. Although numerous therapeutic strategies are available, only octreotide therapy proved to be an effective means of therapeutic resolution in this patient. Although the patient had a partial remission following the use of a slow release formula of octreotide, his prognosis, clinical course, and future treatment challenges are yet to be determined. PMID:26109821

  17. Vegetarian Diet: Will It Help Me Lose Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifestyle Weight loss If I switch to a vegetarian diet, will I lose weight? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. Not necessarily. A vegetarian diet is not inherently a weight-loss diet, but ...

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  19. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-07-21

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient.

  20. [Limb lymphedema as a first manifestation of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)].

    PubMed

    Boursier, V; Vignes, S

    2004-05-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease) is characterized by protein-losing enteropathy occurring more frequently in childhood. Chronic diarrhea and diffuse edema are the main clinical manifestations. Peripheral lymphedema may also be associated. Lymphedema is usually present at the time of diagnosis or appears later in the course of the disease. We report the observation of a 31-year-old man suffering from an upper, lower limb and genital lymphedema many years before diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia was established. Lower limb lymphoscintigraphy confirmed lymphedema and duodenal biopsies lymphangiectasia. Hypoproteinemia, lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia were also noted. Treatment of lymphedema included low stretch bandaging and elastic stocking. No dietary management with a low-fat diet was added. Search for primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with biological parameters would be useful when primary lymphedema is present. Especially since primary intestinal lymphangiectasia may be complicated by occurrence of B cell lymphoma.

  1. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia with generalized warts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Jae; Song, Hyun Joo; Boo, Sun-Jin; Na, Soo-Young; Kim, Heung Up; Hyun, Chang Lim

    2015-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy with lymphatic leakage into the small intestine. Dilated lymphatics in the small intestinal wall and mesentery are observed in this disease. Laboratory tests of PIL patients revealed hypoalbuminemia, lymphocytopenia, hypogammaglobulinemia and increased stool α-1 antitrypsin clearance. Cell-mediated immunodeficiency is also present in PIL patients because of loss of lymphocytes. As a result, the patients are vulnerable to chronic viral infection and lymphoma. However, cases of PIL with chronic viral infection, such as human papilloma virus-induced warts, are rarely reported. We report a rare case of PIL with generalized warts in a 36-year-old male patient. PIL was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and colonoscopic biopsy with histological tissue confirmation. Generalized warts were observed on the head, chest, abdomen, back, anus, and upper and lower extremities, including the hands and feet of the patient. PMID:26217101

  2. Chromosomal Gains at 9q Characterize Enteropathy-Type T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zettl, Andreas; Ott, German; Makulik, Angela; Katzenberger, Tiemo; Starostik, Petr; Eichler, Thorsten; Puppe, Bernhard; Bentz, Martin; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Chott, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Genetic alterations in enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) are unknown so far. In this series, 38 cases of ETL were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). CGH revealed chromosomal imbalances in 87% of cases analyzed, with recurrent gains of genetic material involving chromosomes 9q (in 58% of cases), 7q (24%), 5q (18%), and 1q (16%). Recurrent losses of genetic material occurred on chromosomes 8p and 13q (24% each), and 9p (18%). In this first systematic genetic study on ETL, chromosomal gains on 9q (minimal overlapping region 9q33-q34) were found to be highly characteristic of ETL. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on four cases of ETL, using a probe for 9q34, indicated frequent and multiple gains of chromosomal material at 9q34 (up to nine signals per case). Among 16 patients with ETL who survived initial disease presentation, patients with more than three chromosomal gains or losses (n = 11) followed a worse clinical course than those with three or less imbalances (n = 5). The observation of similar genetic alterations in ETL and in primary gastric (n = 4) and colonic (n = 1) T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, is suggestive of a genetic relationship of gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas at either localization. PMID:12414511

  3. Immune cell populations within the duodenal mucosa of dogs with enteropathies.

    PubMed

    German, A J; Hall, E J; Day, M J

    2001-01-01

    The mucosal immune system may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of small intestinal enteropathies. The aim of the current study was to assess mucosal immune cell populations in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), idiopathic antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD), and adverse reactions to food (FR). Endoscopic biopsies were performed of the duodenum of dogs with these conditions and from a group of dogs without enteric disease. Additional control samples were collected after death from other dogs that did not have evidence of enteric disease. Immunohistochemistry and computer-aided morphometry were used to assess the distribution of immune cell subsets in both lamina propria and intestinal epithelium. Compared with controls, dogs with ARD had increased numbers of lamina propria immunoglobulin (Ig) A- plasma cells and CD4+ cells. More marked alterations were noted in dogs with IBD, with significant increases in lamina propria IgG+ plasma cells, T cells (CD3+), CD4+ cells, macrophages, and neutrophils, but with reduced mast cell numbers. Increased intraepithelial CD3+ T cells were also present in the dogs with IBD, compared with controls. However, lamina propria and epithelial populations were unaltered in dogs with FR when compared with controls. The altered mucosal immune cell populations observed in dogs with ARD or IBD may reflect an underlying immunologic pathogenesis in these disorders.

  4. Assessment of Environmental Enteropathy in the MAL-ED Cohort Study: Theoretical and Analytic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L.; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A.; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C.; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  5. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia diagnosed by double-balloon enteroscopy and treated by medium-chain triglycerides: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disorder characterized by exudative enteropathy resulting from morphologic abnormalities of the intestinal lymphatics. Intestinal lymphangiectasia can be primary or secondary, so the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia must first exclude the possibility of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia. A double-balloon enteroscopy and biopsy, as well as the pathology can be used to confirm the diagnosis of intestinal lymphangiectasia. A polymeric diet containing medium-chain triglycerides and total parenteral nutrition may be a useful therapy. Case presentation A 17-year-old girl of Mongoloid ethnicity was admitted to our hospital with a history of diarrhea and edema. She was diagnosed with protein-losing enteropathy caused by intestinal lymphangiectasia. This was confirmed by a double-balloon enteroscopy and multi-dot biopsy. After treatment with total parenteral nutrition in hospital, which was followed by a low-fat and medium-chain triglyceride diet at home, she was totally relieved of her symptoms. Conclusion Intestinal lymphangiectasia can be diagnosed with a double-balloon enteroscopy and multi-dot biopsy, as well as the pathology of small intestinal tissue showing edema of the submucosa and lymphangiectasia. Because intestinal lymphangiectasia can be primary or secondary, the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia must first exclude the possibility of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia. A positive clinical response to the special diet therapy, namely a low-fat and medium-chain triglyceride diet, can further confirm the diagnosis of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia. PMID:23316917

  6. Mitochondrial enteropathy: the primary pathology may not be within the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P; Jones, S; Sviland, L; Andrews, R; Parsons, T; Turnbull, D; Bindoff, L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are an important cause of disease. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common in these patients, their pathogenesis remains uncertain.
AIM—To investigate the role of the mtDNA defect in the production of gastrointestinal dysfunction.
PATIENT—A 20 year old woman who presented at 15 years of age with recurrent vomiting and pseudo-obstruction, who did not respond to conservative management and ultimately had subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-en-y reconstruction. She subsequently presented with status epilepticus and was found to have a mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder due to a pathogenic mtDNA point mutation (A3243G).
METHODS—Resected bowel was studied using light and electron microscopy and mtDNA analysed from both mucosal and muscular layers using polymerase chain reaction generated RFLP analysis. 
RESULTS— Histological and electron microscopic studies revealed no morphological abnormalities in the resected stomach, and molecular genetic analysis failed to identify the genetic defect in either the mucosal or muscle layers.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that in some individuals with gastrointestinal symptoms associated with established mitochondrial DNA disease, the primary pathology of the mitochondrial enteropathy lies outside the gastrointestinal tract.


Keywords: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy; cyclical vomiting; pseudo-obstruction PMID:11115833

  7. HIV enteropathy and aging: gastrointestinal immunity, mucosal epithelial barrier, and microbial translocation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyin; Kotler, Donald P

    2014-07-01

    Despite decreases in morbidity and mortality as a result of antiretroviral therapy, gastrointestinal dysfunction remains common in HIV infection. Treated patients are at risk for complications of 'premature' aging, such as cardiovascular disease, osteopenia, neurocognitive decline, malignancies, and frailty. This review summarizes recent observations in this field. Mucosal CD4 lymphocytes, especially Th17 cells, are depleted in acute HIV and simian immune deficiency virus (SIV) infections, although other cell types also are affected. Reconstitution during therapy often is incomplete, especially in mucosa. Mucosal barrier function is affected by both HIV infection and aging and includes paracellular transport via tight junctions and uptake through areas of apoptosis; other factors may affect systemic antigen exposure. The resultant microbial translocation is associated with systemic immune activation in HIV and SIV infections. There is evidence of immune activation and microbial translocation in the elderly. The immune phenotypes of immunosenescence in HIV infection and aging appear similar. There are several targets for intervention; blockage of residual mucosal virus replication, preventing antigen uptake, modulating the microbiome, improving T cell recovery, combining therapies aimed at mucosal integrity, augmenting mucosal immunity, and managing traditional risk factors for premature aging in the general population. Aging may interact with HIV enteropathy to enhance microbial translocation and immune activation.

  8. Lose-Shift Responding in Humans Is Promoted by Increased Cognitive Load

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Victorita E.; Banks, Parker J.; Goodfellow, Kris; Gruber, Aaron J.

    2018-01-01

    The propensity of animals to shift choices immediately after unexpectedly poor reinforcement outcomes is a pervasive strategy across species and tasks. We report here on the memory supporting such lose-shift responding in humans, assessed using a binary choice task in which random responding is the optimal strategy. Participants exhibited little lose-shift responding when fully attending to the task, but this increased by 30%–40% in participants that performed with additional cognitive load that is known to tax executive systems. Lose-shift responding in the cognitively loaded adults persisted throughout the testing session, despite being a sub-optimal strategy, but was less likely as the time increased between reinforcement and the subsequent choice. Furthermore, children (5–9 years old) without load performed similarly to the cognitively loaded adults. This effect disappeared in older children aged 11–13 years old. These data provide evidence supporting our hypothesis that lose-shift responding is a default and reflexive strategy in the mammalian brain, likely mediated by a decaying memory trace, and is normally suppressed by executive systems. Reducing the efficacy of executive control by cognitive load (adults) or underdevelopment (children) increases its prevalence. It may therefore be an important component to consider when interpreting choice data, and may serve as an objective behavioral assay of executive function in humans that is easy to measure. PMID:29568264

  9. A Method for Predicting Protein Complexes from Dynamic Weighted Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhen; Sun, Xiaowu; Song, Wei; Du, Chao

    2018-06-01

    Predicting protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is of great significance to recognize the structure and function of cells. A protein may interact with different proteins under different time or conditions. Existing approaches only utilize static PPI network data that may lose much temporal biological information. First, this article proposed a novel method that combines gene expression data at different time points with traditional static PPI network to construct different dynamic subnetworks. Second, to further filter out the data noise, the semantic similarity based on gene ontology is regarded as the network weight together with the principal component analysis, which is introduced to deal with the weight computing by three traditional methods. Third, after building a dynamic PPI network, a predicting protein complexes algorithm based on "core-attachment" structural feature is applied to detect complexes from each dynamic subnetworks. Finally, it is revealed from the experimental results that our method proposed in this article performs well on detecting protein complexes from dynamic weighted PPI networks.

  10. Upregulation of toll-like receptors in chronic enteropathies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Burgener, I A; König, A; Allenspach, K; Sauter, S N; Boisclair, J; Doherr, M G; Jungi, T W

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is thought to result from a dysregulated interaction between the host immune system and commensal microflora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), but their role in enteropathies in dogs is unknown. That there is a dysregulation of TLRs recognizing bacterial MAMPs in dogs with IBD. Sixteen healthy beagles and 12 dogs with steroid-treated (ST) and 23 dogs with food-responsive (FR) diarrhea. Prospective, observational study. mRNA expression of canine TLR2, 4, and 9 was evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in duodenal and colonic biopsies obtained before and after standard therapy. Samples from control dogs were taken at necropsy, with additional biopsies of stomach, jejunum, ileum, and mesenteric lymph node in 6 dogs. There were significant differences (P< or = .017) in expression of TLR2, 4, and 9 between the 6 sampled locations in healthy control dogs (lymph node > small intestine > or = colon). Before therapy, ST expressed more mRNA than control dogs for all 3 receptors (P < .05). There were no significant differences between pretreatment and posttreatment values, even though 32/35 dogs improved clinically. No associations were found when comparing receptor mRNA expression with either histology or clinical activity scores. Bacteria-responsive TLR2, 4, and 9 are upregulated in duodenal and colonic mucosa in IBD. This might lead to increased inflammation through interaction with the commensal flora. The absence of significant changes after therapy despite clinical improvement might point toward the existence of a genetic predisposition to IBD as described in human IBD.

  11. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115... TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.808 Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? The value of trust fund investments made...

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor improves proliferation of endometrial epithelial cells by inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Whasun; Bae, Hyocheol; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family binds to two transmembrane receptors; neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (NTRK2) with high affinity and p75 with low affinity. Although BDNF-NTRK2 signaling in the central nervous system is known, signaling in the female reproductive system is unknown. Therefore, we determined effects of BDNF on porcine endometrial luminal epithelial (pLE) cells isolated from Day 12 of pregnancy, as well as expression of BDNF and NTRK2 in endometria of cyclic and pregnant pigs. BDNF-NTRK2 genes were expressed in uterine glandular (GE) and luminal (LE) epithelia during early pregnancy. In addition, their expression in uterine GE and LE decreased with increasing parity of sows. Recombinant BDNF increased proliferation in pLE cells in a dose-dependent, as well as expression of PCNA and Cyclin D1 in nuclei of pLE cells. BDNF also activated phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2, JNK, P38 proteins in pLE cells. In addition, cell death resulting from tunicamycin-induced ER stress was prevented when pLE cells were treated with the combination of tunicamycin and BDNF which also decreased cells in the Sub-G 1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response genes were mostly down-regulated to the basal levels as compared to non-treated pLE cells. Our finding suggests that BDNF acts via NTRK2 to induce development of pLE cells for maintenance of implantation and pregnancy by activating cell signaling via the PI3K and MAPK pathways and by inhibiting ER stress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery. PMID:24363538

  14. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia diagnosed by capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tak Geun; Chung, Joo Won; Kim, Hee Man; Han, Seok-Joo; Lee, Jin Sung; Park, Jung Yeob; Song, Si Young

    2011-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lymphatics and the development of protein-losing enteropathy. Patients with PIL develop hypoalbuminemia, hypocalcemia, lymphopenia and hypogammaglobulinemia, and present with bilateral lower limb edema, fatigue, abdominal pain and diarrhea. Endoscopy reveals diffusely elongated, circumferential and polypoid mucosae covered with whitish enlarged villi, all of which indicate intestinal lymphangiectasia. Diagnosis is confirmed by characteristic tissue pathology, which includes dilated intestinal lymphatics with diffusely swollen mucosa and enlarged villi. The prevalence of PIL has increased since the introduction of capsule endoscopy. The etiology and prevalence of PIL remain unknown. Some studies have reported that several genes and regulatory molecules for lymphangiogenesis are related to PIL. We report the case of a patient with PIL involving the entire small bowel that was confirmed by capsule endoscopy and double-balloon enteroscopy-guided tissue pathology who carried a deletion on chromosome 4q25. The relationship between this deletion on chromosome 4 and PIL remains to be investigated. PMID:22110841

  15. Acquired intestinal lymphangiectasia successfully treated with a low-fat and medium-chain triacylglycerol-enriched diet in a patient with liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Biselli, Maurizio; Andreone, Pietro; Gramenzi, Annagiulia; Cursaro, Carmela; Lorenzini, Stefania; Bonvicini, Fiorenza; Bernardi, Mauro

    2006-05-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is defined as a dilatation of small bowel lymphatic capillaries and a loss of lymph into the bowel lumen. Clinically it is characterized by hypoproteinaemia and oedema. We present here a case of protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia after liver transplantation in a 57-year-old man who was transplanted for hepatitis C virus. Four years after liver transplantation, the patient developed hypoalbuminaemia and ascites associated with recurrence of cirrhosis. The sudden fall in serum albumin led us to look for a cause of reduction other than or in addition to cirrhosis. Duodenal biopsies showed tall villi with dilated lymphatic vessels and widening of the villi caused by oedema, demonstrating intestinal lymphangiectasia. In this case a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triacylglycerols achieved an early clinical improvement with increased serum albumin levels and ascites disappearance. Intestinal lymphangiectasia should be suspected in liver-transplanted patients developing hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia after the recurrence of cirrhosis.

  16. Prescribing exercise to help your patients lose weight.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P; Higgins, Christopher L

    2016-02-01

    Exercise, in conjunction with diet, is critical to losing weight and maintaining health in obese patients. While it can be challenging for an obese person to transition to a healthy lifestyle, the physical and emotional benefits of a regular exercise program make it worth the effort. Copyright © 2016 Cleveland Clinic.

  17. Assessment of environmental enteropathy in the MAL-ED cohort study: theoretical and analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Predictors of trying to lose weight among overweight and obese Mexican-Americans: a signal detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Bersamin, Andrea; Hanni, Krista D; Winkleby, Marilyn A

    2009-01-01

    Signal detection analysis, a form of recursive partitioning, was used to identify combinations of sociodemographic and acculturation factors that predict trying to lose weight in a community-based sample of 957 overweight and obese Mexican-American adults (ages 18-69 years). Data were pooled from the 2004 and 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System conducted in a low-income, semi-rural community in California. Overall, 59 % of the population reported trying to lose weight. The proportion of adults who were trying to lose weight was highly variable across the seven mutually exclusive groups identified by signal detection (range 30-79 %). Significant predictors of trying to lose weight included BMI, gender, age and income. Women who were very overweight (BMI > 28.5 kg/m2) were most likely to be trying to lose weight (79 %), followed by very overweight higher-income men and moderately overweight (BMI = 25.0-28.5 kg/m2) higher-income women (72 % and 70 %, respectively). Moderately overweight men, aged 28-69 years, were the least likely to be trying to lose weight (30 %), followed by moderately overweight lower-income women (47 %) and very overweight lower-income men (49 %). The latter group is of particular concern since they have characteristics associated with medical complications of obesity (low education and poor access to medical care). Our findings highlight opportunities and challenges for public health professionals working with overweight Mexican-American adults - particularly lower-income adults who were born in Mexico - who are not trying to lose weight and are therefore at high risk for obesity-related co-morbidities.

  19. Urinary and faecal N-methylhistamine concentrations do not serve as markers for mast cell activation or clinical disease activity in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Anfinsen, Kristin P; Berghoff, Nora; Priestnall, Simon L; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M; Allenspach, Karin

    2014-12-21

    This study sought to correlate faecal and urinary N-methylhistamine (NMH) concentrations with resting versus degranulated duodenal mast cell numbers in dogs with chronic enteropathies (CE), and investigate correlations between intestinal mast cell activation and clinical severity of disease as assessed by canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI), and between urinary and faecal NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, and histopathological scores. Twenty-eight dogs with CE were included. Duodenal biopsies were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and by immunohistochemical labelling for tryptase. Duodenal biopsies were assigned a histopathological severity score, and duodenal mast cell numbers were counted in five high-power fields after metachromatic and immunohistochemical staining. Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. There was no correlation between the CCECAI and faecal or urinary NMH concentrations, mast cell numbers, or histopathological score - or between faecal or urinary NMH concentration and mast cell numbers. Post hoc analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in toluidine blue positive mast cells between two treatment groups (exclusion diet with/without metronidazole versus immunosuppression (IS)), with higher numbers among dogs not requiring IS. Faecal and urinary NMH concentrations and duodenal mast cell numbers were not useful indicators of severity of disease as assessed by the CCECAI or histological evaluation. The number of duodenal mast cells was higher in dogs that did not need IS, i.e. in dogs responding to an exclusion diet (with/without metronidazole), than in dogs requiring IS. Further studies comparing the role of mast cells in dogs with different forms of CE are needed.

  20. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  1. Efficacy of AST-120 in dogs with chronic idiopathic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, M; Wirtherle, N C; Beddies, G F; Kohn, B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic enteropathies (CIE) in dogs are complex diseases of unknown origin. AST-120 is a spherical carbon adsorbent preparation with a high adsorption ability for low molecular substances. Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of AST-120 in dogs with CIE. Ten client-owned dogs with mild (n = 7) to moderate (n = 3) CIE. Explorative, prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded pilot study. Dogs with chronic diarrhea and no or insufficient response to an elimination diet were included. The dogs received either AST-120 (n = 5) or placebo (n = 5) for a duration of 21 days. The canine inflammatory bowel disease activity index (CIBDAI) was used to assess disease severity at baseline and clinical outcome after 3 weeks of treatment. Furthermore, changes in body weight and the parameters stool consistency and frequency were compared within and between groups. The mean CIBDAI score decreased from 5.6 (SD 1.5) to 2.0 (SD 1.2) in the AST-120 group (P = .125) and from 4.8 (SD .8) to 3.6 (SD 2.3) in the placebo group (P = .688). Compared with baseline, posttreatment CIBDAI scores decreased more than 60% in 4/5 dogs treated with AST-120 and in 1/5 dogs treated with placebo (P = .206). Changes in CIBDAI scores, body weights, stool consistency, and frequency within and between groups did not achieve statistical significance after 3 weeks of treatment. No adverse effects of AST-120 were noted. This study investigated potential efficacy of AST-120 as an alternative therapy in dogs with mild-to-moderate CIE. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Improving Operational Wargaming: Its All Fun and Games Until Someone Loses a War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Improving Operational Wargaming: It’s All Fun and Games Until Someone Loses a War A...Improving Operational Wargaming: It’s All Fun and Games Until Someone Loses a War Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT...theory-including game element analysis and wargame pathologies-provides an excellent rubric for creating and evaluating wargames and wargaming

  3. Predictors of trying to lose weight among overweight and obese Mexican-Americans: a signal detection analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bersamin, Andrea; Hanni, Krista D; Winkleby, Marilyn A

    2017-01-01

    Objective Signal detection analysis, a form of recursive partitioning, was used to identify combinations of sociodemographic and acculturation factors that predict trying to lose weight in a community-based sample of 957 overweight and obese Mexican-American adults (ages 18–69 years). Design Data were pooled from the 2004 and 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System conducted in a low-income, semi-rural community in California. Results Overall, 59 % of the population reported trying to lose weight. The proportion of adults who were trying to lose weight was highly variable across the seven mutually exclusive groups identified by signal detection (range 30–79 %). Significant predictors of trying to lose weight included BMI, gender, age and income. Women who were very overweight (BMI > 28·5 kg/m2) were most likely to be trying to lose weight (79 %), followed by very overweight higher-income men and moderately overweight (BMI = 25·0–28·5 kg/m2) higher-income women (72 % and 70 %, respectively). Moderately overweight men, aged 28–69 years, were the least likely to be trying to lose weight (30 %), followed by moderately overweight lower-income women (47 %) and very overweight lower-income men (49 %). The latter group is of particular concern since they have characteristics associated with medical complications of obesity (low education and poor access to medical care). Conclusions Our findings highlight opportunities and challenges for public health professionals working with overweight Mexican-American adults – particularly lower-income adults who were born in Mexico – who are not trying to lose weight and are therefore at high risk for obesity-related co-morbidities. PMID:18339224

  4. Fecal Markers of Environmental Enteropathy and Subsequent Growth in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael B; Richardson, Barbra A; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Haque, Rashidul; John-Stewart, Grace C; Denno, Donna M; Petri, William A; Kosek, Margaret; Walson, Judd L

    2016-09-07

    Environmental enteropathy (EE), a subclinical intestinal disorder characterized by mucosal inflammation, reduced barrier integrity, and malabsorption, appears to be associated with increased risk of stunting in children in low- and middle-income countries. Fecal biomarkers indicative of EE (neopterin [NEO], myeloperoxidase [MPO], and alpha-1-antitrypsin [AAT]) have been negatively associated with 6-month linear growth. Associations between fecal markers (NEO, MPO, and AAT) and short-term linear growth were examined in a birth cohort of 246 children in Bangladesh. Marker concentrations were categorized in stool samples based on their distribution (< first quartile, interquartile range, > third quartile), and a 10-point composite EE score was calculated. Piecewise linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between markers measured quarterly (in months 3-21, 3-9, and 12-21) and 3-month change in length-for-age z-score (ΔLAZ). Children with high MPO levels at quarterly time points lost significantly more LAZ per 3-month period during the second year of life than those with low MPO (ΔLAZ = -0.100; 95% confidence interval = -0.167 to -0.032). AAT and NEO were not associated with growth; however, composite EE score was negatively associated with subsequent 3-month growth. In this cohort of children from an urban setting in Bangladesh, elevated MPO levels, but not NEO or AAT levels, were associated with decreases in short-term linear growth during the second year of life, supporting previous data suggesting the relevance of MPO as a marker of EE. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Three Drought-Responsive Members of the Nonspecific Lipid-Transfer Protein Gene Family in Lycopersicon pennellii Show Different Developmental Patterns of Expression1

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Marcela B.; Connell, Mary A. O'

    1998-01-01

    Genomic clones of two nonspecific lipid-transfer protein genes from a drought-tolerant wild species of tomato (Lycopersicon pennellii Corr.) were isolated using as a probe a drought- and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced cDNA clone (pLE16) from cultivated tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Both genes (LpLtp1 and LpLtp2) were sequenced and their corresponding mRNAs were characterized; they are both interrupted by a single intron at identical positions and predict basic proteins of 114 amino acid residues. Genomic Southern data indicated that these genes are members of a small gene family in Lycopersicon spp. The 3′-untranslated regions from LpLtp1 and LpLtp2, as well as a polymerase chain reaction-amplified 3′-untranslated region from pLE16 (cross-hybridizing to a third gene in L. pennellii, namely LpLtp3), were used as gene-specific probes to describe expression in L. pennellii through northern-blot analyses. All LpLtp genes were exclusively expressed in the aerial tissues of the plant and all were drought and ABA inducible. Each gene had a different pattern of expression in fruit, and LpLtp1 and LpLtp2, unlike LpLtp3, were both primarily developmentally regulated in leaf tissue. Putative ABA-responsive elements were found in the proximal promoter regions of LpLtp1 and LpLtp2. PMID:9536064

  6. Interplay between the Localization and Kinetics of Phosphorylation in Flagellar Pole Development of the Bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Tropini, Carolina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial cells maintain sophisticated levels of intracellular organization that allow for signal amplification, response to stimuli, cell division, and many other critical processes. The mechanisms underlying localization and their contribution to fitness have been difficult to uncover, due to the often challenging task of creating mutants with systematically perturbed localization but normal enzymatic activity, and the lack of quantitative models through which to interpret subtle phenotypic changes. Focusing on the model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, which generates two different types of daughter cells from an underlying asymmetric distribution of protein phosphorylation, we use mathematical modeling to investigate the contribution of the localization of histidine kinases to the establishment of cellular asymmetry and subsequent developmental outcomes. We use existing mutant phenotypes and fluorescence data to parameterize a reaction-diffusion model of the kinases PleC and DivJ and their cognate response regulator DivK. We then present a systematic computational analysis of the effects of changes in protein localization and abundance to determine whether PleC localization is required for correct developmental timing in Caulobacter. Our model predicts the developmental phenotypes of several localization mutants, and suggests that a novel strain with co-localization of PleC and DivJ could provide quantitative insight into the signaling threshold required for flagellar pole development. Our analysis indicates that normal development can be maintained through a wide range of localization phenotypes, and that developmental defects due to changes in PleC localization can be rescued by increased PleC expression. We also show that the system is remarkably robust to perturbation of the kinetic parameters, and while the localization of either PleC or DivJ is required for asymmetric development, the delocalization of one of these two components does not prevent

  7. Oxygen consumption along bed forms under losing and gaining streamflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai; Boano, Fulvio

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that bed forms are the most significant geomorphological structure that drives hyporheic exchange and biogeochemical processes in stream networks. Other studies also demonstrated that due to the hyporheic flow patterns within bed form, biogeochemical processes do not occur uniformly along and within the bed forms. The objective of this work was to systematically evaluate how losing or gaining flow conditions affect oxygen consumption by biofilm along sandy bed forms. We measured the effects of losing and gaining flow conditions on oxygen consumption by combining modeling and experiments in a novel laboratory flume system that enable the control of losing and gaining fluxes. Oxygen consumption was measured after growing a benthic biofilm fed with Sodium Benzoate (as a carbon source) and measuring the distribution of oxygen in the streambed with microelectrodes. The experimental results were analyzed using a novel code that calculates vertical profiles of reaction rates in the presence of hyporheic water fluxes. These experimental observations and modeling revealed that oxygen distribution varied along the bed forms. The zone of oxygen consumption (i.e. depth of penetration) was the largest at the upstream side of the bed form and the smallest in the lee side (at the lowest part of the bed form), regardless of the flow conditions. Also, the zone of oxygen consumption was the largest under losing conditions, the smallest under gaining conditions, and in-between under neutral conditions. The distribution of oxygen consumption rates determined with our new model will be also discussed. Our preliminary results enable us to show the importance of the coupling between flow conditions and oxygen consumption along bed forms and are expected to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling in streams.

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipoxygenase in dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Dumusc, S D; Ontsouka, E C; Schnyder, M; Hartnack, S; Albrecht, C; Bruckmaier, R M; Burgener, I A

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the major source of leukotrienes. Their role in IBD has been demonstrated in humans and animal models, but not in dogs with chronic enteropathies (CCE). COX-2 and 5-LO are upregulated in dogs with CCE. Fifteen healthy control dogs (HCD), 10 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 15 dogs with food-responsive diarrhea (FRD). Prospective study. mRNA expression of COX-2, 5-LO, IL-1b, IL-4, IL-6, TNF, IL-10 and TFG-β was evaluated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in duodenal and colonic biopsies before and after treatment. COX-2 expression in the colon was significantly higher in IBD and FRD before and after treatment (all P < .01). IL-1b was higher in FRD in the duodenum after treatment (P = .021). TGF-β expression was significantly higher in the duodenum of HCD compared to FRD/IBD before treatment (both P < .001) and IBD after treatment (P = .012). There were no significant differences among groups and within groups before and after treatment for IL-4, IL-6, TNF, and IL-10. There was a significant correlation between COX-2 and IL-1b in duodenum and colon before treatment in FRD and IBD, whereas 5-LO correlated better with IL-6 and TNF. IL-10 and TGF-β usually were correlated. COX-2 is upregulated in IBD and FRD, whereas IL-1b and TGF-β seem to be important pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, respectively. The use of dual COX/5-LO inhibitors could be an interesting alternative in the treatment of CCE. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Evaluation of Kentucky's "You Drink and Drive. You Lose" campaign.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-10-01

    Kentucky was selected within the Southeast Region of the United States by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to conduct a comprehensive impaired driving campaign entitled "You Drink & Drive. You Lose". The campaign was conducted aroun...

  10. Learning to Lose: Weight Loss Classes and Personal Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Adult learning takes place not only in educational organisations, but through participation in leisure and special interest groups. Commercially operated weight management organisations recruit large numbers of adults to their classes to learn how to eat healthily and lose weight. They publish readers' "real life" success stories in their…

  11. Losing ground--Swedish life expectancy in a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Drefahl, Sven; Ahlbom, Anders; Modig, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1970s, Sweden was the country where both women and men enjoyed the world's longest life expectancy. While life expectancy continues to be high and increasing, Sweden has been losing ground in relation to other leading countries. We look at life expectancy over the years 1970-2008 for men and women. To assess the relative contributions of age, causes of death, and smoking we decompose differences in life expectancy between Sweden and two leading countries, Japan and France. This study is the first to use this decomposition method to observe how smoking related deaths contribute to life expectancy differences between countries. Sweden has maintained very low mortality at young and working ages for both men and women compared to France and Japan. However, mortality at ages above 65 has become considerably higher in Sweden than in the other leading countries because the decrease has been faster in those countries. Different trends for circulatory diseases were the largest contributor to this development in both sexes but for women also cancer played a role. Mortality from neoplasms has been considerably low for Swedish men. Smoking attributable mortality plays a modest role for women, whereas it is substantially lower in Swedish men than in French and Japanese men. Sweden is losing ground in relation to other leading countries with respect to life expectancy because mortality at high ages improves more slowly than in the leading countries, especially due to trends in cardiovascular disease mortality. Trends in smoking rates may provide a partial explanation for the trends in women; however, it is not possible to isolate one single explanatory factor for why Sweden is losing ground.

  12. Differences in Game Statistics Between Winning and Losing Rugby Teams in the Six Nations Tournament

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Enrique; Villarejo, Diego; Palao, José M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyze the differences in rugby game statistics between winning and losing teams. The data from 58 games of round robin play from the Six Nations tournament from the 2003-2006 seasons were analyzed. The groups of variables studied were: number of points scored, way in which the points were scored; way teams obtained the ball and how the team used it; and technical and tactical aspects of the game. A univariate (t-test) and multivariate (discriminant) analysis of data was done. Winning teams had average values that were significantly higher in points scored, conversions, successful drops, mauls won, line breaks, possessions kicked, tackles completed, and turnovers won. Losing teams had significantly higher averages for the variables scrums lost and line-outs lost. The results showed that: a) in the phases of obtaining the ball and more specifically in scrummage and line-out, winning teams lose fewer balls than losing teams (winning teams have an efficacy of 90% in both actions); b) the winning team tends to play more with their feet when they obtain the ball, to utilize the maul as a way of attacking, and to break the defensive line more often than the losing team does; and c) On defence, winning teams recovered more balls and completed more tackles than losing teams, and the percentage of tackles completed by winning teams was 94%. The value presented could be used as a reference for practice and competition in peak performance teams. Key points This paper increases the knowledge about rugby match analysis. Give normative values to establish practice and match goals. Give applications ideas to connect research with coaches practice. PMID:24149592

  13. We're Losing Our Minds: Rethinking American Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.; Hersh, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    America is being held back by the quality and quantity of learning in college. This is a true educational emergency! Many college graduates cannot think critically, write effectively, solve problems, understand complex issues, or meet employers' expectations. We are losing our minds--and endangering our social, economic, and scientific leadership.…

  14. Do people with type 2 diabetes and their carers lose income? (T2ARDIS-4).

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeremy; Gear, Elena; Bottomley, Julia; Gillam, Stephen; Murphy, Moira; Williams, Rhys

    2003-06-01

    T(2)ARDIS is a study of the full costs of care for a sample of people with type 2 diabetes in the UK. This paper reports on individual earnings lost by patients (n=653) and carers (n=253) aged <65 years, based on 1998 values. Mean annual lost earnings are calculated on three different bases. Across the total survey population aged <65 years, mean lost earnings are estimated at pound 869 (S.D. pound 4109) per patient and pound 1300 (S.D. pound 4093) per carer. However, for the sub-set of respondents who actually lose earnings, the mean levels are pound 13841 (S.D. pound 9551) and pound 10960 (S.D. pound 6002), respectively. Patients and carers who lose earnings incur higher personal care-related expenditure than those who do not lose earnings (although for the patients this is not statistically significant). Patients who lose earnings also report poorer health-related quality of life and carers who lose earnings report higher levels of strain. Only one third of carers report receiving state benefits, and for both carers and patients the shortfall between reported benefits received and lost earnings is substantial. A strong association was found between patients' loss of earnings and the presence of diabetic complications (P<0.001), especially micro-vascular complications. Policy priorities should, therefore, include facilitating comprehensive access to state benefits (especially for carers) and a clear focus on reducing the incidence of diabetic complications.

  15. Mercury in the central European lake district - case study Plešné lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, Tomas; Rohovec, Jan; Novakova, Tereza; Matouskova, Sarka; Kopacek, Jiri; Kana, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    The central European lake district extends within the Bohemian forest and Bavarian forest Mountains. It includes 8 glacial lakes extending in altitudes from 935 to 1087 m a.s.l. All of them have been oligotrophic and forests of the lake catchments are dominated by Norway spruce (Picea abies). Plešné lake (PL) catchment is at 1087 m .a.s.l. and it covers area of 0.67 km2. In 2004, the forest at PL catchment was infested by the bark beetle (Ips typographus) and 88%-99% of trees had died by 2011. In contrast to relatively detailed research of North American and Scandinavian lake ecosystems the information concerning Hg contamination of central European lake ecosystems are rather scarce. The PL ecosystem can provide base for assessment of Hg contamination as well as for changes induced by the bark beetle infestation. In 2016, mean annual Hg concentration in bulk precipitation at Plešné lake reached 3.0 ng/L and bulk Hg deposition flux amounted at 4.6 µg/m2. The most important pathway of Hg deposition to the forest ecosystems has been litterfall. The highest Hg concentrations in litterfall material at PL were found in lichens 205 µg/kg, mixture of unidentifiable organic debris 159 µg/kg and bark 123 µg/kg. Litterfall spruce needles averaged at 56 µg/kg, only. Removal of spruce due to bark beetle infestation caused decrease of litterfall Hg fluxes. Recent litterfall fluxes in the unimpacted stands reached 55.8 µg/m2, while in the impacted dead stands they amounted 23.0 µg/m2, only. The qualitative composition of the litterfall in the infested stands was typical with absence of needles and prevalence of twigs and bark. To assess changes in Hg distribution within the soil profile due to forest dieback the soil data from year 1999 were compared with 2015 data. The mean Hg concentrations in the O horizons decreased from 424 to 311 µg/kg between years 1999 and 2015, and in A horizons the situation was reversed and an increase from 353 to 501 µg/kg occurred. The

  16. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation

    PubMed Central

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly. PMID:28232889

  17. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation.

    PubMed

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly.

  18. Nuclear receptor and target gene mRNA abundance in duodenum and colon of dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Greger, D L; Gropp, F; Morel, C; Sauter, S; Blum, J W

    2006-11-01

    Nuclear receptors (NR), such as constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR) and peroxisome proliferator-associated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARalpha, PPARgamma) are mediators of inflammation and may be involved in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and food responsive diarrhea (FRD) of dogs. The present study compared mRNA abundance of NR and NR target genes [multi drug-resistance gene-1 (MDR1), multiple drug-resistance-associated proteins (MRD2, MRD3), cytochrome P450 (CYP3A12), phenol-sulfating phenol sulfotransferase (SULT1A1) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST A3-3)] in biopsies obtained from duodenum and colon of dogs with IBD and FRD and healthy control dogs (CON; n=7 per group). Upon first presentation of dogs, mRNA levels of PPARalpha, PPARgamma, CAR, PXR and RXRalpha in duodenum as well as PPARgamma, CAR, PXR and RXRalpha in colon were not different among groups (P>0.10). Although mRNA abundance of PPARalpha in colon of dogs with FRD was similar in both IBD and CON (P>0.10), PPARalpha mRNA abundance was higher in IBD than CON (P<0.05). Levels of mRNA of MDR1 in duodenum were higher in FRD than IBD (P<0.05) or CON (P<0.001). Compared with CON, abundances of mRNA for MRP2, CYP3A12 and SULT1A1 were higher in both FRD and IBD than CON (P<0.05). Differences in mRNA levels of PPARalpha and MRP2 in colon and MDR1, MRP2, CYP3A12 and SULT1A1 in duodenum may be indicative for enteropathy in FRD and (or) IBD dogs relative to healthy dogs. More importantly, increased expression of MDR1 in FRD relative to IBD in duodenum may be a useful diagnostic marker to distinguish dogs with FRD from dogs with IBD.

  19. Living, loving and losing: implications for health and well-being.

    PubMed

    Downey, A M

    1983-01-01

    Living, loving and losing - we live, we love and we lose - this is an integral part of life's unending circle. Throughout the lifecycle, we are confronted continually with experiences of loss and separation. The loss of a loved one through separation, divorce, or death is one of the most difficult experiences to be dealt with in a lifetime. How do we cope with the "crisis of loss" in our lives? If education is supposed to prepare one for life, then Death Education is crucial in assisting individuals to cope with "myriad loss issues." This paper will explore the implications of loss for health and well-being, and briefly review some of the research findings regarding the negative impact of grief and bereavement upon health. The stages of the grief process will be cited, mentioning some of the barriers to grief resolution. Most importantly, the positive aspects of loss upon life and health will be elaborated.

  20. Persistent gut motor dysfunction in a murine model of T-cell-induced enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, T; Akiho, H; Khan, W I; Murao, H; Ogino, H; Kanayama, K; Nakamura, K; Takayanagi, R

    2010-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in remission often experience irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms. We investigated the mechanism for intestinal muscle hypercontractility seen in T-cell-induced enteropathy in recovery phase. BALB/c mice were treated with an anti-CD3 antibody (100 microg per mouse) and euthanized at varying days post-treatment to investigate the histological changes, longitudinal smooth muscle cell contraction, cytokines (Th1, Th2 cytokines, TNF-alpha) and serotonin (5-HT)-expressing enterochromaffin cell numbers in the small intestine. The role of 5-HT in anti-CD3 antibody-induced intestinal muscle function in recovery phase was assessed by inhibiting 5-HT synthesis using 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine (PCPA). Small intestinal tissue damage was observed from 24 h after the anti-CD3 antibody injection, but had resolved by day 5. Carbachol-induced smooth muscle cell contractility was significantly increased from 4 h after injection, and this muscle hypercontractility was evident in recovery phase (at day 7). Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13) were significantly increased from 4 h to day 7. 5-HT-expressing cells in the intestine were increased from day 1 to day 7. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor PCPA decreased the anti-CD3 antibody-induced muscle hypercontractility in recovery phase. Intestinal muscle hypercontractility in remission is maintained at the smooth muscle cell level. Th2 cytokines and 5-HT in the small intestine contribute to the maintenance of the altered muscle function in recovery phase.

  1. Predicting losing and gaining river reaches in lowland New Zealand based on a statistical methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Zammit, Christian; Dudley, Bruce

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of losing and gaining in rivers normally takes place in lowland where often there are various, sometimes conflicting uses for water resources, e.g., agriculture, industry, recreation, and maintenance of ecosystem function. To better support water allocation decisions, it is crucial to understand the location and seasonal dynamics of these losses and gains. We present a statistical methodology to predict losing and gaining river reaches in New Zealand based on 1) information surveys with surface water and groundwater experts from regional government, 2) A collection of river/watershed characteristics, including climate, soil and hydrogeologic information, and 3) the random forests technique. The surveys on losing and gaining reaches were conducted face-to-face at 16 New Zealand regional government authorities, and climate, soil, river geometry, and hydrogeologic data from various sources were collected and compiled to represent river/watershed characteristics. The random forests technique was used to build up the statistical relationship between river reach status (gain and loss) and river/watershed characteristics, and then to predict for river reaches at Strahler order one without prior losing and gaining information. Results show that the model has a classification error of around 10% for "gain" and "loss". The results will assist further research, and water allocation decisions in lowland New Zealand.

  2. A Comprehensive Review of Celiac Disease/Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathies.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Brian P; Williams, Emmanuelle; Clarke, Kofi

    2018-06-02

    Celiac disease is a complex immune-mediated gluten-sensitive enteropathy with protean clinical manifestations. It is manifest in genetically predisposed individuals who ingest gluten in varying amounts. In broad terms, it is thought to affect 1% of the population in the USA. More specifically, the prevalence increases drastically from 1:133 in patients not-at-risk, to 1:56 in symptomatic patients, to 1:39 in patients with a second-degree relative with the diagnosis, and to 1:22 in patients with a first-degree relative with the diagnosis. It may be associated with several immune-mediated phenomena, autoimmune diseases, and complicated by vitamin and other trace element deficiencies, bone disease, and malignancy. Our understanding of celiac disease has evolved rapidly over the past two decades. This has led to several lines of enquiry on the condition and potential treatment options. More recently, several entities including gluten intolerance, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and seronegative celiac disease have been described. These conditions are distinct from allergies or intolerance to wheat or wheat products. There are challenges in defining some of these entities since a large number of patients self-report these conditions. The absence of confirmatory diagnostic tests poses an added dilemma in distinguishing these entities. The differences in spectrum of symptoms and highlights of the variability between the pediatric and adult populations have been studied in some detail. The role of screening for celiac disease is examined in both the general population and "at risk" populations. Diagnostic strategies including the best available serologic testing, utility of HLA haplotypes DQ2 and DQ8 which are seen in over 90% of patients with celiac disease as compared with approximately 40% of the general population, and endoscopic evaluation are also reviewed. Comprehensive nutritional management after diagnosis is key to sustained health in patients with celiac disease

  3. The effects on employment and wages when working mothers lose Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Boushey, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the importance of health insurance in promoting employment and wage growth for prime-age mothers. Many mothers on welfare and other low-income mothers are eligible for Medicaid, but as they move up the job ladder, they lose eligibility. Losing work supports limits mothers' ability to stay employed: mothers who make this transition into employer-provided health insurance are nine times more likely to stay employed than mothers who leave Medicaid without this benefit. However, few mothers make the transition from Medicaid to employer-provided health insurance--not because they lack employment but because they do not find jobs that offer health insurance. Between the beginning of 2002 and the end of 2003, 37.2 percent of those on Medicaid left the program, but fewer than a quarter (23.4 percent) of those had employer-provided health insurance.

  4. Ileal polypoid lymphangiectasia bleeding diagnosed and treated by double balloon enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Seon; Lee, Beom Jae; Gu, Dae Hoe; Pyo, Jeung-Hui; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yun Ho; Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Bak, Young-Tae

    2013-12-07

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease characterized by focal or diffuse dilated enteric lymphatics with impaired lymph drainage. It causes protein-losing enteropathy and may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding. Commonly, lymphangiectasia presents as whitish spots or specks. To our knowledge, small bowel bleeding resulting from polypoid intestinal lymphangiectasia has not been reported. Here, we report a rare case of active bleeding from the small bowel caused by polypoid lymphangiectasia with a review of the relevant literature. An 80-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy could not identify the source of bleeding. Subsequent colonoscopy showed fresh bloody material gushing from the small bowel. An abdominal-pelvic contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan did not reveal any abnormal findings. Video capsule endoscopy showed evidence of active and recent bleeding in the ileum. To localize the bleeding site, we performed double balloon enteroscopy by the anal approach. A small, bleeding, polypoid lesion was found in the distal ileum and was successfully removed using endoscopic snare electrocautery. © 2013 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia treated with rapamycin in a child with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).

    PubMed

    Pollack, Sarah F; Geffrey, Alexandra L; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Shah, Uzma

    2015-09-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare protein-losing enteropathy characterized by a congenital malformation of the lymphatic vessels of the small intestine causing insufficient drainage and leakage of lymph fluid. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by benign hamartomas in multiple organ systems. While the lymphatic system has been implicated in TSC through lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and lymphedema, this paper reports the first case of PIL in TSC, a female patient with a TSC2 mutation. She developed persistent and significant abdominal distension with chronic diarrhea during her first year of life. Due to lack of treatment options and the involvement of the mTOR pathway in TSC, a trial of an mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, was initiated. This treatment was highly effective, with improvement in clinical symptoms of PIL as well as abnormal laboratory values including VEGF-C, which was elevated to over seven times the normal upper limit before treatment. This case suggests that PIL is a rare manifestation of TSC, warranting the use of mTOR inhibitors in future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. New concepts: development of a survivorship programme for patients with a functionally univentricular heart.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J; Dodds, Kathryn; Rychik, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Children with functionally univentricular hearts are now surviving into their third and fourth decades of life. Although survival alone is a remarkable achievement, a lot must still be done to improve the quality and duration of life after the Fontan operation. Challenges that may be faced by these patients include the impact of the Fontan operation on the liver and the density of bone, protein-losing enteropathy, and plastic bronchitis. Paediatric cardiologists are familiar with the haemodynamic issues inherent in Fontan physiology; however, training in cardiology is often not sufficient to give us a complete understanding of the pathophysiology of the complications or of the options for treatment. Collaboration with other subspecialists including gastroenterologists, endocrinologists, and pulmonologists is essential in order to provide the rigorous and nuanced care that our patients need and deserve. A clinic in which a patient can see multiple subspecialists, and in which the subspecialists, as a group, can discuss each patient, can provide a unique and valuable service for patients with a functionally univentricular heart.

  7. The Direct Effect of Flexible Walls on Fontan Connection Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, Mike; Fagan, Kiley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-11-01

    The current standard treatment for sufferers of congenital heart defects is the palliative Fontan procedure. The Fontan procedure results in an anastomosis of major veins directly to the branched pulmonary arteries bypassing the dysfunctional ventricle. This total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) extends life past birth, but Fontan patients still suffer long-term complications like decreased exercise capacity, protein-losing enteropathy, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). These complications have direct ties to fluid dynamics within the connection. Previous experimental and computation studies of Fontan connection fluid dynamics employed rigid vessel models. More recent studies utilize flexible models, but a direct comparison of the fundamental fluid dynamics between rigid and flexible vessels only exists for a computational model, without a direct experimental validation. Thus, this study was a direct comparison of fluid dynamics within a rigid and two compliant idealized TCPCs. 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were collected at the connection center plane. Results include power loss, hepatic flow distribution, fluid shear stress, and flow structure recognition. The effect of flexible walls on these values and clinical impact will be discussed.

  8. Molecular diversity of the faecal microbiota of Toy Poodles in Japan.

    PubMed

    Omatsu, Tsutomu; Omura, Miki; Katayama, Yukie; Kimura, Toru; Okumura, Maho; Okumura, Atsushi; Murata, Yoshiteru; Mizutani, Tetsuya

    2018-05-18

    The intestinal microbiota was revealed with the recent advances in molecular techniques, such as high-throughput sequencing analysis. As a result, the microbial changes are thought to influence the health of humans and animals and such changes are affected by several factors including diet, genetics, age, sex, and diseases. Similar studies are being conducted in dogs, and the knowledge of intestinal microbiota in dogs is expanding. Nonetheless, basic information on intestinal microbiota in dogs is less than that of humans. Our aim was to study toy poodles (n=21), a popular companion dog, in terms of basic characteristics of the faecal microbiota by 16S rRNA gene barcoding analysis. In the faecal microbiota, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Fusobacteria were the dominant phyla (over 93.4% of faecal microbiota) regardless of the attributes of the dogs. In family level, Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Lachnospiraceae were most prevalent. In case of a dog with protein-losing enteropathy, the diversity of faecal microbiota was different between before and after treatment. This study provides basic information for studying on faecal microbiota in toy poodles.

  9. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine–Tryptophan Ratio Are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret N.; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S.; Lee, Gwenyth O.; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K. Y.; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H.; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E.; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine–tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03–0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13–2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. PMID:27503512

  10. Who Gains, Who Loses from School Choice: A Research Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce

    Although the school-choice movement has spread quickly, little time has been taken to assess whether the claimed benefits of school choice have actually been realized. This policy brief summarizes empirical evidence to date and addresses the following questions: Who gains from school choice and who loses? Do innovative school organizations arise…

  11. Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) and IPEX-related disorders: an evolving web of heritable autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Verbsky, James W; Chatila, Talal A

    2013-12-01

    To summarize recent progress in our understanding of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) and IPEX-related disorders. A number of Mendelian disorders of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity have been noted to result from defects in T regulatory cell, development and function. The best characterized of these is IPEX, resulting from mutations affecting FOXP3. A number of other gene defects that affect T regulatory cell function also give rise to IPEX-related phenotypes, including loss-of-function mutations in CD25, STAT5b and ITCH. Recent progress includes the identification of gain-of-function mutations in STAT1 as a cause of an IPEX-like disease, emerging FOXP3 genotype/phenotype relationships in IPEX, and the elucidation of a role for the microbiota in the immune dysregulation associated with regulatory T cell deficiency. An expanding spectrum of genetic defects that compromise T regulatory cell function underlies human disorders of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. Collectively, these disorders offer novel insights into pathways of peripheral tolerance and their disruption in autoimmunity.

  12. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  13. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  14. Losing protein in the brain: the case of progranulin.

    PubMed

    Ghidoni, Roberta; Paterlini, Anna; Albertini, Valentina; Binetti, Giuliano; Benussi, Luisa

    2012-10-02

    It is well known that progranulin protein is involved in wound repair, inflammation, and tumor formation. The wedding between progranulin and brain was celebrated in 2006 with the involvement of progranulin gene (GRN) in Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), the most common form of early-onset dementia: up to date, 75 mutations have been detected in FTLD patients as well as in patients with widely variable clinical phenotypes. All pathogenic GRN mutations identified thus far cause the disease through a uniform mechanism, i.e. loss of functional progranulin or haploinsufficiency. Studies on GRN knockout mice suggest that progranulin-related neurodegenerative diseases may result from lifetime depletion of neurotrophic support together with cumulative damage in association with dysregulated inflammation, thus highlighting possible new molecular targets for GRN-related FTLD treatment. Recently, the dosage of plasma progranulin has been proposed as a useful tool for a quick and inexpensive large-scale screening of affected and unaffected carriers of GRN mutations. Before it is systematically translated into clinical practice and, more importantly, included into diagnostic criteria for dementias, further standardization of plasma progranulin test and harmonization of its use are required. Once a specific treatment becomes available for these pathologies, this test - being applicable on large scale - will represent an important step towards personalized healthcare. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Go for broke: The role of somatic states when asked to lose in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rebecca J; Rakow, Tim; Russo, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    The Somatic Marker Hypothesis (SMH) posits that somatic states develop and guide advantageous decision making by "marking" disadvantageous options (i.e., arousal increases when poor options are considered). This assumption was tested using the standard Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which participants win/lose money by selecting among four decks of cards, and an alternative version, identical in both structure and payoffs, but with the aim changed to lose as much money as possible. This "lose" version of the IGT reverses which decks are advantageous/disadvantageous; and so reverses which decks should be marked by somatic responses - which we assessed via skin conductance (SC). Participants learned to pick advantageously in the original (Win) IGT and in the (new) Lose IGT. Using multilevel regression, some variability in anticipatory SC across blocks was found but no consistent effect of anticipatory SC on disadvantageous deck selections. Thus, while we successfully developed a new way to test the central claims of the SMH, we did not find consistent support for the SMH. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. They Snooze, You Lose: The Educator's Guide to Successful Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmark, Lynell

    2011-01-01

    In today's increasingly visual world, the art of giving presentations is a much-needed talent. "They Snooze, You Lose", provides a comprehensive guide made especially for teachers and administrators who want to become presentation "stars" in their classrooms, at board meetings, or any time they are in front of an audience. This book describes how…

  17. Hiding the plot: parents' moral dilemmas and strategies when helping their overweight children lose weight.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Pernille; Grøn, Lone; Roessler, Kirsten Kaya

    2013-10-01

    In this study we investigated the moral dilemmas and strategies of a group of Danish parents who were trying to help their overweight children lose weight. Data were drawn from repeated semistructured interviews carried out over a period of 2 years with 12 families with overweight children. Using a narrative approach, we show the moral dilemmas parents found themselves in when trying to further the two seemingly incompatible goals of helping their children lose weight and simultaneously strengthening their self-worth. When the children were young, the parents tried to hide the fact that they needed to lose weight to protect them from feeling stigmatized. As the children grew older, the parents became more forthright about weight loss so the children would take on more responsibility. We suggest that for parents, weight loss is experienced as a risky undertaking because they perceive their children's self-worth as being in jeopardy during the process.

  18. Rethink outpatient surgery strategy? Study finds hospitals lose money on 56 procedures.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    A new study reveals hospitals are losing an average of $268 on each Medicare patient who has outpatient surgery. Losses depend on procedures, ownership structure, and how often the particular type of surgery is performed.

  19. Your money or your self-esteem: threatened egotism promotes costly entrapment in losing endeavors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqing; Baumeister, Roy F

    2006-07-01

    The present research explored egotism-maintaining favorable views of the self-as a motivation underlying entrapment in losing endeavors. Four studies suggested that threatened selfesteem would cause decision makers to invest and lose more money in a previously chosen course of action. Ego-threatened participants consistently lost more money than nonthreatened participants across diverse entrapping situations regardless of whether the outcome was ostensibly determined by luck (Experiments 1 and 4), ability (Experiment 2), or interpersonal competition (Experiment 3). Thus, pursuing favorable views of the self could be costly to decision makers' financial well-being and may produce self-defeating behaviors.

  20. Losing the Dark: Public Outreach about Light Pollution and Its Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, Carolyn; Petersen, Mark C.; Walker, Constance E.; Kardel, W. Scott; International Dark Sky Association Education Committee

    2015-01-01

    Losing the Dark is a PSA video available for public outreach through fulldome theaters as well as conventional venues (classroom, lecture hall, YouTube, Vimeo). It was created by Loch Ness Productions for the International Dark Sky Association. It explains problems caused by light pollution, which targets astronomy, health, and the environment. Losing the Dark also suggests ways people can implement "wise lighting" practices to help mitigate light pollution. The video is available free of charge for outreach professionals in planetarium facilities (both fulldome and classical), science centers, classroom, and other outreach venues, and has been translated into 13 languages. It is available via download, USB key (at cost), and through online venues. This paper summarizes the program's outreach to more than a thousand fulldome theaters, nearly 100,000 views via four sites on Youtube and Vimeo,a number of presentations at other museum and classroom facilities, and shares some preliminary metrics and commentary from users.

  1. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: construction and its plasma aspects.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis; Chowdhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density approximately 3-5x10(10) cm(-3) and temperature approximately 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  2. Health characteristics associated with gaining and losing private and public health insurance: a national study.

    PubMed

    Jerant, Anthony; Fiscella, Kevin; Franks, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Millions of Americans lack or lose health insurance annually, yet how health characteristics predict insurance acquisition and loss remains unclear. To examine associations of health characteristics with acquisition and loss of private and public health insurance. Prospective observational analysis of 2000 to 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data for persons aged 18 to 63 on entry, enrolled for 2 years. We modeled year 2 private and public insurance gain and loss. year 2 insurance status [none (reference), any private insurance, or public insurance] among those uninsured in year 1 (N=13,022), and retaining or losing coverage in year 2 among those privately or publicly insured in year 1 (N=47,239). age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, region, urbanity, health status, health conditions, year 1 health expenditures, year 1 and 2 employment status, and (in secondary analyses) skepticism toward medical care and insurance. In adjusted analyses, lower income and education were associated with not gaining and with losing private insurance. Poorer health status was associated with public insurance gain. Smoking and being overweight were associated with not gaining private insurance, and smoking with losing private coverage. Secondary analyses adjusting for medical skepticism yielded similar findings. Social disadvantage and poorer health status are associated with gaining public insurance, whereas social advantage, not smoking, and not being overweight are associated with gaining private insurance, even when adjusting for attitudes toward medical care. Private insurers seem to benefit from relatively low health risk selection.

  3. Differences in game-related statistics of basketball performance by game location for men's winning and losing teams.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miguel A; Lorenzo, Alberto; Barakat, Rubén; Ortega, Enrique; Palao, José M

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify game-related statistics that differentiate winning and losing teams according to game location. The sample included 306 games of the 2004-2005 regular season of the Spanish professional men's league (ACB League). The independent variables were game location (home or away) and game result (win or loss). The game-related statistics registered were free throws (successful and unsuccessful), 2- and 3-point field goals (successful and unsuccessful), offensive and defensive rebounds, blocks, assists, fouls, steals, and turnovers. Descriptive and inferential analyses were done (one-way analysis of variance and discriminate analysis). The multivariate analysis showed that winning teams differ from losing teams in defensive rebounds (SC = .42) and in assists (SC = .38). Similarly, winning teams differ from losing teams when they play at home in defensive rebounds (SC = .40) and in assists (SC = .41). On the other hand, winning teams differ from losing teams when they play away in defensive rebounds (SC = .44), assists (SC = .30), successful 2-point field goals (SC = .31), and unsuccessful 3-point field goals (SC = -.35). Defensive rebounds and assists were the only game-related statistics common to all three analyses.

  4. The Memory Trace Supporting Lose-Shift Responding Decays Rapidly after Reward Omission and Is Distinct from Other Learning Mechanisms in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Aaron J; Thapa, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    The propensity of animals to shift choices immediately after unexpectedly poor reinforcement outcomes is a pervasive strategy across species and tasks. We report here that the memory supporting such lose-shift responding in rats rapidly decays during the intertrial interval and persists throughout training and testing on a binary choice task, despite being a suboptimal strategy. Lose-shift responding is not positively correlated with the prevalence and temporal dependence of win-stay responding, and it is inconsistent with predictions of reinforcement learning on the task. These data provide further evidence that win-stay and lose-shift are mediated by dissociated neural mechanisms and indicate that lose-shift responding presents a potential confound for the study of choice in the many operant choice tasks with short intertrial intervals. We propose that this immediate lose-shift responding is an intrinsic feature of the brain's choice mechanisms that is engaged as a choice reflex and works in parallel with reinforcement learning and other control mechanisms to guide action selection.

  5. Chloride losing diarrhoea and metabolic alkalosis in an infant with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hochman, H I; Feins, N R; Rubin, R; Gould, J

    1976-01-01

    A case of hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis in an infant with chloride losing ileostomy drainage and cystic fibrosis is described. It is speculated that intestinal loss of chloride played a major role in the development of metabolic alkalosis. PMID:938082

  6. Assets and Depreciation: Or, Only an Accountant Would Claim Books Lose Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    Examines the purpose for using historical costs in library financial records. Discusses the difference between spending money and losing resources. Describes how financial record systems operate and the ways in which accounting treats classes of expenditures. Uses the example of a bookmobile. (AEF)

  7. Losing Thomas & Ella: A Father's Story (A Research Comic).

    PubMed

    Weaver-Hightower, Marcus B

    2017-09-01

    "Losing Thomas & Ella" presents a research comic about one father's perinatal loss of twins. The comic recounts Paul's experience of the hospital and the babies' deaths, and it details the complex grieving process afterward, including themes of anger, distance, relationship stress, self-blame, religious challenges, and resignation. A methodological appendix explains the process of constructing the comic and provides a rationale for the use of comics-based research for illness, death, and grief among practitioners, policy makers, and the bereaved.

  8. Time-gated detection of protein-protein interactions with transcriptional readout

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Mateo I; Coukos, Robert; von Zastrow, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional assays, such as yeast two-hybrid and TANGO, that convert transient protein-protein interactions (PPIs) into stable expression of transgenes are powerful tools for PPI discovery, screens, and analysis of cell populations. However, such assays often have high background and lose information about PPI dynamics. We have developed SPARK (Specific Protein Association tool giving transcriptional Readout with rapid Kinetics), in which proteolytic release of a membrane-tethered transcription factor (TF) requires both a PPI to deliver a protease proximal to its cleavage peptide and blue light to uncage the cleavage site. SPARK was used to detect 12 different PPIs in mammalian cells, with 5 min temporal resolution and signal ratios up to 37. By shifting the light window, we could reconstruct PPI time-courses. Combined with FACS, SPARK enabled 51 fold enrichment of PPI-positive over PPI-negative cells. Due to its high specificity and sensitivity, SPARK has the potential to advance PPI analysis and discovery. PMID:29189201

  9. HIV enteropathy: HAART reduces HIV-induced stem cell hyperproliferation and crypt hypertrophy to normal in jejunal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Batman, Philip A; Kapembwa, Moses S; Belmonte, Liliana; Tudor, Gregory; Kotler, Donald P; Potten, Christopher S; Booth, Catherine; Cahn, Pedro; Griffin, George E

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the structural and kinetic response of small intestinal crypt epithelial cells including stem cells to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Crypt size and proliferative activity of transit and stem cells in jejunal mucosa were quantified using morphometric techniques. Crypt length was measured by counting the number of enterocytes along one side of a number of crypts in each biopsy specimen and the mean crypt length was calculated. Proliferating crypt cells were identified with MIB-1 monoclonal antibody, and the percentage of crypt cells in proliferation was calculated at each cell position along the length of the crypt (proliferation index). Data were obtained from 9 HIV-positive test patients co-infected with microsporidia, 34 HIV-positive patients receiving HAART and 13 control cases. Crypt length was significantly greater in test patients than in controls, but crypt length in patients receiving HAART was normal. The proliferation index was greater in test subjects than in controls in stem and transit cell compartments, and was decreased in patients treated with HAART only in the stem cell region of the crypt. Villous atrophy in HIV enteropathy is attributed to crypt hypertrophy and encroachment of crypt cells onto villi. HAART restores normal crypt structure by inhibition of HIV-driven stem cell hyperproliferation at the crypt bases.

  10. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine-Tryptophan Ratio are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret N; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S; Lee, Gwenyth O; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K Y; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-10-05

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine-tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11-0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03-0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13-2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Nothing to lose: why early career scientists make ideal entrepreneurs.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N

    2014-12-01

    An entrepreneurial movement within science strives to invert the classical trajectory of academic research careers by positioning trainees at the apex of burgeoning industries. Young scientists today have nothing to lose and everything to gain by pursuing this 'third road', and academic institutes and established companies only stand to benefit from supporting this emerging movement of discovery research with economic purpose. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A dysbiosis index to assess microbial changes in fecal samples of dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathy.

    PubMed

    AlShawaqfeh, M K; Wajid, B; Minamoto, Y; Markel, M; Lidbury, J A; Steiner, J M; Serpedin, E; Suchodolski, J S

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies have identified various bacterial groups that are altered in dogs with chronic inflammatory enteropathies (CE) compared to healthy dogs. The study aim was to use quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to confirm these findings in a larger number of dogs, and to build a mathematical algorithm to report these microbiota changes as a dysbiosis index (DI). Fecal DNA from 95 healthy dogs and 106 dogs with histologically confirmed CE was analyzed. Samples were grouped into a training set and a validation set. Various mathematical models and combination of qPCR assays were evaluated to find a model with highest discriminatory power. The final qPCR panel consisted of eight bacterial groups: total bacteria, Faecalibacterium, Turicibacter, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus, Blautia, Fusobacterium and Clostridium hiranonis. The qPCR-based DI was built based on the nearest centroid classifier, and reports the degree of dysbiosis in a single numerical value that measures the closeness in the l2 - norm of the test sample to the mean prototype of each class. A negative DI indicates normobiosis, whereas a positive DI indicates dysbiosis. For a threshold of 0, the DI based on the combined dataset achieved 74% sensitivity and 95% specificity to separate healthy and CE dogs. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Changes in Cecal Microbiota and Mucosal Gene Expression Revealed New Aspects of Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Manuel; Blas, Enrique; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE) is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics), followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin) Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding. PMID:25147938

  14. Losing the Dark: A Planetarium PSA about Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Carolyn Collins; Walker, Constance

    2015-03-01

    Losing the Dark is a six-minute PSA video created for fulldome theaters by Loch Ness Productions, the International Dark Sky Association Education Committee headed by Dr. Constance Walker of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Dome3, Adler Planetarium, and Babak Tafreshi (The World at Night). It explains light pollution, its effects, and ways to implement ``wise lighting`` practices to mitigate light pollution. The show is also made in flat-screen HD format for classical planetariums, non-dome theaters, and for presentatons by IDA speakers.

  15. [Having and losing friends: necessary social-emotional competencies in adolescents].

    PubMed

    von Salisch, Maria; Lüpschen, Nadine; Kanevski, Rimma

    2013-01-01

    Supportive friendships are an invaluable resource for adolescents because of their various developmental tasks, but establishing and maintaining them requires particular interpersonal skills. In order to identify social-emotional competencies associated with having and losing friends, N = 206 early adolescents (12-14 years of age) were examined longitudinally right after the transition to secondary school in the beginning of grade 7 and again at the end of this school year. Adolescents who had at least one reciprocal friend at both times were compared to those who lost all their friends over the school year. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicate effects of time (and development) that underline an increase of self-disclosure, explanations and humor as well as a general decrease of openly aggressive behavior when angry at the friend. Interaction effects suggest that adolescents who lost their friend(s) intensified their use of physically and relationally aggressive behavior and of fantasies of revenge over time while continuously befriended adolescents decreased in their aggressive behavior when coping with anger in their friendships. Adolescents who had friends at both times were more willing to disclose private information whereas the self-disclosure of adolescents who lost their friends stagnated. These results are discussed in terms of deficient social-emotional competencies as the cause and the consequence of losing friends.

  16. 20 CFR 663.565 - May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under these conditions is liable to repay all adult and dislocated worker training funds it received... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility? 663.565 Section 663.565 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  17. 20 CFR 663.565 - May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under these conditions is liable to repay all adult and dislocated worker training funds it received... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May an eligible training provider lose its eligibility? 663.565 Section 663.565 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  18. The Attributional Responses of Young Female Athletes after Winning, Tying, and Losing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlan, Tara K.; Passer, Michael W.

    1980-01-01

    This study examined the attributions of female athletes for their personal and their team's performance after winning, tying, and losing a competitive soccer game. Players' attributions were made to the internal factors of ability and effort and to the external factors of opponent difficulty and luck. (Authors/CJ)

  19. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  20. Economic issues with follow-on protein products.

    PubMed

    Lanthier, Michael; Behrman, Rachel; Nardinelli, Clark

    2008-09-01

    The economic effects of the possible introduction of 'follow-on' protein products have been the subject of recent debate. Here, we aim to explore the economic issues surrounding this debate using three measures: total sales, product complexity and patent expiry. Our analysis shows that the sales of therapeutic protein products are concentrated in a relatively small number of branded products, which may be the most attractive targets for follow-on development. For the years 2013-2015, we estimate that products representing US$20 billion in annual sales--approximately half of all sales in 2006--can be expected to lose patent protection.

  1. ChiPPI: a novel method for mapping chimeric protein-protein interactions uncovers selection principles of protein fusion events in cancer.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Gorohovski, Alessandro; Tagore, Somnath; Sekar, Vaishnovi; Vazquez, Miguel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2017-07-07

    Fusion proteins, comprising peptides deriving from the translation of two parental genes, are produced in cancer by chromosomal aberrations. The expressed fusion protein incorporates domains of both parental proteins. Using a methodology that treats discrete protein domains as binding sites for specific domains of interacting proteins, we have cataloged the protein interaction networks for 11 528 cancer fusions (ChiTaRS-3.1). Here, we present our novel method, chimeric protein-protein interactions (ChiPPI) that uses the domain-domain co-occurrence scores in order to identify preserved interactors of chimeric proteins. Mapping the influence of fusion proteins on cell metabolism and pathways reveals that ChiPPI networks often lose tumor suppressor proteins and gain oncoproteins. Furthermore, fusions often induce novel connections between non-interactors skewing interaction networks and signaling pathways. We compared fusion protein PPI networks in leukemia/lymphoma, sarcoma and solid tumors finding distinct enrichment patterns for each disease type. While certain pathways are enriched in all three diseases (Wnt, Notch and TGF β), there are distinct patterns for leukemia (EGFR signaling, DNA replication and CCKR signaling), for sarcoma (p53 pathway and CCKR signaling) and solid tumors (FGFR and EGFR signaling). Thus, the ChiPPI method represents a comprehensive tool for studying the anomaly of skewed cellular networks produced by fusion proteins in cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. [Surgical treatment of rare combination of intestinal malrotation with secondary lymphangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Morozov, D A; Pimenova, E S; Tatochenko, V K; Bakradze, M D; Gadliya, D D; Morozova, O L; Talalaev, A G

    2015-01-01

    The rare combination of intestinal lymphangiectasia with malrotation of the duodenum in a child of three months of life is described. Basing on the literature review only 3 similar cases were described in the world practice. The boy with protein-losing enteropathy was examined at Moscow Scientific Centre of Children's Health. The child had vomiting, diarrhea, loss in body weight, hypoproteinemia, lymphopenia. The infectious nature of the disease was excluded. It had been suggested the Waldman desease (primary intestinal lymphangiectasia). The prognosis for such disease is unfavorable. An examination of the child was continued against the backdrop of ongoing symptomatic therapy. Complete physical examination included monitoring laboratory blood tests, X-ray examination with contrast, CT-scan, gastroduodenoscopy with biopsy of the mucosa of the small intestine. Malrotation duodenum with the recurrent mid-gut volvulus with the development of secondary intestinal lymphangiectasia was diagnosed. Modern methods of examination and multidisciplinary approach made it possible to diagnose the case. Operation to eliminate fixation duodenum resulted in the recovery of the patient. At the present time the child grows and develops according to age and does not require treatment. The prognosis for this disease is regarded as favorable.

  3. An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutrosa subgutrosa) and a Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus).

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tiffany M; Wünschmann, Arno; Morningstar-Shaw, Brenda; Pantlin, Gayle C; Rasmussen, James M; Thompson, Rachel L

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis enteritis occurred in two juvenile goitered gazelles and an adult Malayan tapir over a period of 5 wk at the Minnesota Zoo. Diagnosis was made postmortem on one gazelle and one tapir, and a second gazelle was diagnosed via fecal culture. The death of the tapir was attributed to S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis septicemia, while salmonellosis was considered to be a contributing factor besides ostertagiasis for the death of one goitered gazelle and for the diarrhea of another goitered gazelle. A third gazelle became ill in the same time period, but Salmonella infection was not confirmed by culture. All exhibited the clinical signs of profuse, watery diarrhea. The gazelles developed a protein-losing enteropathy, and the tapir showed signs of sepsis and endotoxemia. Serotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the Salmonella isolates to be indistinguishable from each other. One year prior to this outbreak, Salmonella sp. was cultured from a Visayan warty pig (Sus cebifrons) housed in the same building as the tapir. After further investigation into the outbreak, spread of this pathogen was speculated to be associated with human movement across animal areas.

  4. Hypnotic induction in dentistry--coping with the fear of losing control (autonomy): a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Kleinhauz, M; Eli, I

    1991-07-01

    A common cause of stress among dental patients is the patient's fear of losing control in face of the "helplessness provoking" dental situation. Although hypno-relaxation and hypnosis serve as efficient tools to aid in the administration of dental treatment to such patients, some of them may view hypnosis as a further relinquishing of control to the hypnotist and thus resist hypnotic induction, despite their willingness to try to use hypnosis for therapeutic reasons. To avoid this resistance, a "self-control" induction method is suggested that enables the patient to remain in control throughout the process. This technique minimizes the threat of losing one's autonomy and thus enables treatment of these patients.

  5. FOC Imaging of the Dusty Envelopes of Mass-Losing Supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel

    1996-07-01

    Stars more massive than 10 M_odot are destined to explode as supernovae {SN}. Pre-SN mass loss can prolong core buildup, and the rate and duration of mass loss therefore largely determines a massive star's post-main sequence evolution and its position in the H-R diagram prior to SN detonation. The envelope ejected by a mass-losing supergiant also plays an important role in the formation and evolution of a SN remnant. We propose to investigate these processes with HST. We will use the FOC to image two massive stars that are in different stages of post-main sequence evolution: VY CMa, the prototype for a class of heavily mass-losing OH/IR supergiants, and HD 179821, a post-red supergiant that is likely in transition to the Wolf-Rayet phase. Both are known to possess compact reflection nebulae, but ground-based techniques are unable to separate the inner nebulosities from the PSF of the central stars. We will use the unparalleled resolution of the FOC to probe the structure of these nebulae at subarcsecond scales. These data will yield the mass loss histories of the central stars and will demonstrate the presence or absence of axisymmetric mass loss and circumstellar disks. In so doing, our HST/FOC program will define the role of mass loss in determining the fates of SN progenitors and SN remnants.

  6. Win-Stay, Lose-Sample: a simple sequential algorithm for approximating Bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Bonawitz, Elizabeth; Denison, Stephanie; Gopnik, Alison; Griffiths, Thomas L

    2014-11-01

    People can behave in a way that is consistent with Bayesian models of cognition, despite the fact that performing exact Bayesian inference is computationally challenging. What algorithms could people be using to make this possible? We show that a simple sequential algorithm "Win-Stay, Lose-Sample", inspired by the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift (WSLS) principle, can be used to approximate Bayesian inference. We investigate the behavior of adults and preschoolers on two causal learning tasks to test whether people might use a similar algorithm. These studies use a "mini-microgenetic method", investigating how people sequentially update their beliefs as they encounter new evidence. Experiment 1 investigates a deterministic causal learning scenario and Experiments 2 and 3 examine how people make inferences in a stochastic scenario. The behavior of adults and preschoolers in these experiments is consistent with our Bayesian version of the WSLS principle. This algorithm provides both a practical method for performing Bayesian inference and a new way to understand people's judgments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. IRS: where's the charity? Rural hospital manager may lose federal tax exemption.

    PubMed

    Hallam, K

    1998-06-08

    A rural hospital management company with ties to VHA may lose its federal tax exemption because, according to the Internal Revenue Service, there's nothing charitable about operating a hospital under contract. The case against the company is significant because it calls into question the tax exemptions of any not-for-profit corporation that manages or leases hospitals.

  8. Physical activity profiles of U.S. adults trying to lose weight: NHIS 1998.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Judy; Galuska, Deborah A; Serdula, Mary K; Kohl, Harold W

    2005-03-01

    Physical activity is an integral part of weight control programs, but recommended amounts vary. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence and characteristics of those who reported using exercise as a weight loss strategy (N=14,716), and to determine the prevalence of meeting various institutionally recommended levels of physical activity (N=8538) among that population. Data were obtained from the 1998 National Health Interview Survey, a face-to-face nationally representative household interview. Questions on leisure-time physical activity were analyzed using SUDAAN. Among those who reported trying to lose weight, 55% reported using exercise as a weight loss strategy alone, and of those, 58% reported eating fewer calories. The prevalence of using exercise as a weight loss strategy was directly associated with education and inversely associated with age and body mass index. Among those who reported using exercise as a weight loss strategy, 57% met the minimal 1998 National Institutes of Health recommendation of >or=150 min.wk; 46% met the lower end of the 2001 American College of Sports Medicine recommendation of 200 min.wk; and 30% met the upper end for 300 min.wk. Only 19% met the 2002 Institute of Medicine recommendation of 420 min.wk. Despite the importance of physical activity in a weight loss program, only about half of the persons trying to lose weight reported using exercise. Even among those, only slightly more than half met the minimal recommendations for physical activity. Efforts are needed to aid those trying to lose weight to incorporate appropriate levels of physical activity into their weight loss strategy.

  9. Do Black Women's Religious Beliefs About Body Image Influence Their Confidence in Their Ability to Lose Weight?

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexandria G; Berkley-Patton, Jannette; Bowe-Thompson, Carole; Ruhland-Petty, Therese; Berman, Marcie; Lister, Sheila; Christensen, Kelsey

    2017-10-19

    Black women are disproportionately burdened by obesity but maintain body satisfaction and strong religious commitment. Although faith-based weight-loss interventions have been effective at promoting weight loss among blacks, little is known about how body image and religious views contribute to weight-related beliefs among religious black women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether demographic and health history factors, religious involvement, and beliefs about body image could explain motivation and confidence to lose weight among a church-affiliated sample of black women. We recruited 240 church-affiliated black women aged 18 to 80 years (average age, 55 y; SD, 12.3) in 2014 from 6 black churches that participated in a larger study, Project FIT (Faith Influencing Transformation), a clustered, diabetes/heart disease/stroke intervention among black women and men. We used baseline data from Project FIT to conduct a cross-sectional study consisting of a survey. Variables approaching significance in preliminary correlation and χ 2 analyses were included in 2 multiple linear regression models examining motivation and confidence in ability to lose weight. In final regression models, body mass index was associated with motivation to lose weight (β = 0.283, P < .001), and beliefs about body image in relation to God predicted confidence to lose weight (β = 0.180, P = .01). Faith-based, weight-loss interventions targeting black women should emphasize physical well-being and highlight the health benefits of weight management rather than the benefits of altering physical appearance and should promote positive beliefs about body image, particularly relating to God.

  10. Interactions Between Suspended Kaolinite Deposition and Hyporheic Exchange Flux Under Losing and Gaining Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Aryeh; Packman, Aaron I.; Boano, Fulvio; Phillips, Colin B.; Arnon, Shai

    2018-05-01

    Fine particle deposition and streambed clogging affect many ecological and biogeochemical processes, but little is known about the effects of groundwater flow into and out of rivers on clogging. We evaluated the effects of losing and gaining flow on the deposition of suspended kaolinite clay particles in a sand streambed and the resulting changes in rates and patterns of hyporheic exchange flux (HEF). Observations of clay deposition from the water column, clay accumulation in the streambed sediments, and water exchange with the bed demonstrated that clay deposition in the bed substantially reduced both HEF and the size of the hyporheic zone. Clay deposition and HEF were strongly coupled, leading to rapid clogging in areas of water and clay influx into the bed. Local clogging diverted exchanged water laterally, producing clay deposit layers that reduced vertical hyporheic flow and favored horizontal flow. Under gaining conditions, HEF was spatially constrained by upwelling water, which focused clay deposition in a small region on the upstream side of each bed form. Because the area of inflow into the bed was smallest under gaining conditions, local clogging required less clay mass under gaining conditions than neutral or losing conditions. These results indicate that losing and gaining flow conditions need to be considered in assessments of hyporheic exchange, fine particle dynamics in streams, and streambed clogging and restoration.

  11. Projections for fast protein structure retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sourangshu; Bhattacharyya, Chiranjib; Chandra, Nagasuma R

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent times, there has been an exponential rise in the number of protein structures in databases e.g. PDB. So, design of fast algorithms capable of querying such databases is becoming an increasingly important research issue. This paper reports an algorithm, motivated from spectral graph matching techniques, for retrieving protein structures similar to a query structure from a large protein structure database. Each protein structure is specified by the 3D coordinates of residues of the protein. The algorithm is based on a novel characterization of the residues, called projections, leading to a similarity measure between the residues of the two proteins. This measure is exploited to efficiently compute the optimal equivalences. Results Experimental results show that, the current algorithm outperforms the state of the art on benchmark datasets in terms of speed without losing accuracy. Search results on SCOP 95% nonredundant database, for fold similarity with 5 proteins from different SCOP classes show that the current method performs competitively with the standard algorithm CE. The algorithm is also capable of detecting non-topological similarities between two proteins which is not possible with most of the state of the art tools like Dali. PMID:17254310

  12. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, healing effect of rebamipide in patients with low-dose aspirin and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced small bowel injury.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Sei; Katsuki, Shinichi; Fujita, Tomoki; Saitoh, Yusuke; Ohta, Hidetoshi; Nishikawa, Kouji; Sato, Yasushi; Sato, Yasuhiro; Ohira, Koji; Yamada, Masataka; Kato, Mototsugu

    2014-02-01

    It is not clear what kind of drug is appropriate to heal NSAID-induced enteropathy. Several reports showed the preventive effect of prostaglandin analogue or inducer using healthy subjects who took NSAIDs. However there was no report for healing effect and for patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing effect of rebamipide in patients with NSAIDs-induced enteropathy. In addition, we evaluated for nutritional parameter. This study was conducted as a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Study protocol was approved by each hospital's ethical committees. Patients with LDA and/or NSAID more than 3 months were enrolled. Patients with enteropathy were divided into the placebo and the rebamipide groups. Rebamipide 100 mg three times daily was administered during 4 weeks. Capsule endoscopies were performed at 0 and 4 week. The number of small intestinal ulcer and erosion were evaluated. Total protein was analyzed as nutritional parameter. Sixty one participants were completed this study. Change in number of small intestinal erosion in the rebamipide group was -2.5 ± 3.4, and 2.1 ± 3.9 in the placebo group (P < 0.0001). Change in number of small intestinal ulcer in the rebamipide group was -0.5 ± 1.6, and 0.1 ± 0.7 in the placebo group (P = 0.024). Change in serum total protein levels in the rebamipide group was 0.06 ± 0.36, and -0.27 ± 0.34 in the placebo group (P = 0.0005). Rebamipide has not only the healing effect for NSAIDs-induced enteropathy compared with placebo, but the improvement of nutritional condition. These results showed a tentative therapeutical strategy for chronic NSAIDs users.

  13. [What role for the family carers of elderly people losing their autonomy?].

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Blanche; Campéon, Arnaud

    2016-03-01

    The qualitative analysis of the role of family carers shows that supporting a family member losing their autonomy not only involves providing physical assistance and care but also, increasingly, adopting a role of coordinator. These activities can be a source of stress or they can be rewarding, depending on the shared history of the carer-patient relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. 41 CFR 301-51.103 - What is my liability if I lose a GTR?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... I lose a GTR? 301-51.103 Section 301-51.103 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 51-PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES Paying for Common Carrier Transportation...

  15. Personalized protein corona on nanoparticles and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Tabatabaei, Mateen; Farokhzad, Omid C; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2017-02-28

    It is now well understood that once in contact with biological fluids, nanoscale objects lose their original identity and acquire a new biological character, referred to as a protein corona. The protein corona changes many of the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, including size, surface charge, and aggregation state. These changes, in turn, affect the biological fate of nanoparticles, including their pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and therapeutic efficacy. It is progressively being accepted that even slight variations in the composition of a protein source (e.g., plasma and serum) can substantially change the composition of the corona formed on the surface of the exact same nanoparticles. Recently it has been shown that the protein corona is strongly affected by the patient's specific disease. Therefore, the same nanomaterial incubated with plasma proteins of patients with different pathologies adsorb protein coronas with different compositions, giving rise to the concept of personalized protein corona. Herein, we review this concept along with recent advances on the topic, with a particular focus on clinical relevance.

  16. 25 CFR 115.808 - Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Could trust fund investments made by OTFM lose money? 115.808 Section 115.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES TRUST FUNDS FOR TRIBES AND INDIVIDUAL INDIANS Tribal Accounts Investing and Managing Tribal Trust Funds § 115.808 Could trust fund investments mad...

  17. Benign summer light eruption and polymorphic light eruption: genetic and functional studies suggest that a revised nomenclature is required.

    PubMed

    Hawk, John

    2004-07-01

    New research indicates that polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is an autoimmune disease against an ultraviolet radiation-induced cutaneous antigen. PLE may even confer some protection against skin cancer later in life. This new information demands a reassessment of the precise nature and nomenclature of PLE. Benign summer light eruption (BSLE) (lucite estivale bénigne) is the name used in continental Europe, and particularly France, to describe a clinically short-lived, itchy, papular eruption particularly affecting young women after several hours of sunbathing at the beginning of summer or on sunny vacations. Clinically more prolonged forms of solar eruption, starting early in spring and persisting for long periods, have been known in France as polymorphic light eruption (PLE) (lucite polymorphe) ('European PLE'). Investigative studies, however, now suggest that BSLE and some cases of 'European PLE' are part of the same spectrum. In the Anglo-Saxon literature, they are lumped together as PLE ('Anglo-Saxon PLE'). The other cases of 'European PLE', which do not fall within the compass of 'Anglo-Saxon PLE', are, in the Anglo-Saxon literature, classified as either actinic prurigo (AP) (a genetically determined, prolonged, excoriated form of Anglo-Saxon PLE), or chronic actinic dermatitis (CAD) (a sunlight-induced eczema precisely resembling allergic contact dermatitis, apparently to an ultraviolet radiation-induced antigen). It is therefore proposed that: i. the European term BSLE be dropped and that these patients be reclassified within the spectrum of (Anglo-Saxon) PLE, ii. the European use of the term PLE ('European PLE') be discontinued, iii. those previously diagnosed as having 'European PLE' be reclassified as (Anglo-Saxon) PLE, AP or CAD, as appropriate. The benefits of such a change in nomenclature would be twofold, firstly a uniformity of terminology and secondly, and more importantly, terminology would then correlate better with our recently improved

  18. Trying to lose weight: diet strategies among Americans with overweight or obesity in 1996 and 2003.

    PubMed

    Andreyeva, Tatiana; Long, Michael W; Henderson, Kathryn E; Grode, Gabrielle M

    2010-04-01

    Health professionals recommend that individuals with overweight and obesity lose weight by reducing energy intake while maintaining a healthful diet. This study was designed to examine trends in weight loss attempts and strategies for adults with overweight or obesity among different sociodemographic groups. Data from the 1996 and 2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to estimate changes in weight loss attempts and strategies across population groups. Data were analyzed in 2009. Slightly more adults with overweight or obesity attempted weight loss in 2003 compared to 1996. There were substantial changes in the diet approaches reported: rates of those using energy restriction to lose weight doubled between 1996 and 2003, whereas low-fat dieting decreased by one third. Hispanic and less-educated adults did not shift away from low-fat diets. Attempted weight loss was associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption for most population groups. Increasingly more adults with overweight or obesity tried to lose weight through energy reduction, but some at-risk groups did not follow this beneficial trend between 1996 and 2003. Dietetics practitioners and public health campaigns should target such groups with concrete recommendations to reduce energy intake while maintaining a healthful diet, including adequate consumption of fruit and vegetables. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interaction of body mass index and attempt to lose weight in a national sample of US adults: association with reported food and nutrient intake, and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kant, A K

    2003-02-01

    This study examined the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and attempting to lose weight for reporting of: (1) macro- and micronutrient intake; (2) intake of low-nutrient-density foods; and (3) serum biomarkers of dietary exposure and cardiovascular disease risk. Dietary, anthropometric and biochemical data were from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), n=13 095. Multiple regression methods were used to examine the independent associations of BMI, trying to lose weight, or the interaction of BMI-trying to lose weight with reported intakes of energy, nutrients, percentage energy from low-nutrient-density foods (sweeteners, baked and dairy desserts, visible fats and salty snacks), and serum concentrations of vitamins, carotenoids and lipids. BMI was an independent positive predictor (P<0.05) of percentage of energy from fat, saturated fat, but a negative predictor of the ratio of reported energy intake to estimated expenditure for basal needs (EI/BEE), percentage of energy from carbohydrate and alcohol (men only), and serum concentrations of folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and most carotenoids in both men and women. Trying to lose weight was a negative predictor (P<0.05) of EI/BEE, intake of energy, and energy density, but not micronutrient intake. Higher mean serum ascorbate, vitamin E, lutein/zeaxanthin, and other carotenoids (men only) concentrations were associated with trying to lose weight (P<0.05) in both men and women. Few adverse BMI-trying to lose weight interaction effects were noted. There was little evidence of increased nutritional risk in those reportedly trying to lose weight irrespective of weight status.

  20. Winning or Losing against an Opposite-Sex Peer on a Gender-Based Competitive Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Stefanie; Thompson, J. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Explored the effects on college students' mood and body image of a negative versus positive outcome in an opposite-sex, competitive peer interaction. Used one gender-neutral and one gender stereotypical task. There were no gender differences in reactions to winning or losing gender-neutral competitions, except marginally for depression. The…

  1. Game-Related Statistics that Discriminated Winning, Drawing and Losing Teams from the Spanish Soccer League

    PubMed Central

    Lago-Peñas, Carlos; Lago-Ballesteros, Joaquín; Dellal, Alexandre; Gómez, Maite

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze men’s football competitions, trying to identify which game-related statistics allow to discriminate winning, drawing and losing teams. The sample used corresponded to 380 games from the 2008-2009 season of the Spanish Men’s Professional League. The game-related statistics gathered were: total shots, shots on goal, effectiveness, assists, crosses, offsides commited and received, corners, ball possession, crosses against, fouls committed and received, corners against, yellow and red cards, and venue. An univariate (t-test) and multivariate (discriminant) analysis of data was done. The results showed that winning teams had averages that were significantly higher for the following game statistics: total shots (p < 0.001), shots on goal (p < 0.01), effectiveness (p < 0.01), assists (p < 0.01), offsides committed (p < 0.01) and crosses against (p < 0.01). Losing teams had significantly higher averages in the variable crosses (p < 0.01), offsides received (p < 0. 01) and red cards (p < 0.01). Discriminant analysis allowed to conclude the following: the variables that discriminate between winning, drawing and losing teams were the total shots, shots on goal, crosses, crosses against, ball possession and venue. Coaches and players should be aware for these different profiles in order to increase knowledge about game cognitive and motor solicitation and, therefore, to evaluate specificity at the time of practice and game planning. Key points This paper increases the knowledge about soccer match analysis. Give normative values to establish practice and match objectives. Give applications ideas to connect research with coaches’ practice. PMID:24149698

  2. Underestimated Halogen Bonds Forming with Protein Backbone in Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Xu, Zhijian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2017-07-24

    Halogen bonds (XBs) are attracting increasing attention in biological systems. Protein Data Bank (PDB) archives experimentally determined XBs in biological macromolecules. However, no software for structure refinement in X-ray crystallography takes into account XBs, which might result in the weakening or even vanishing of experimentally determined XBs in PDB. In our previous study, we showed that side-chain XBs forming with protein side chains are underestimated in PDB on the basis of the phenomenon that the proportion of side-chain XBs to overall XBs decreases as structural resolution becomes lower and lower. However, whether the dominant backbone XBs forming with protein backbone are overlooked is still a mystery. Here, with the help of the ratio (R F ) of the observed XBs' frequency of occurrence to their frequency expected at random, we demonstrated that backbone XBs are largely overlooked in PDB, too. Furthermore, three cases were discovered possessing backbone XBs in high resolution structures while losing the XBs in low resolution structures. In the last two cases, even at 1.80 Å resolution, the backbone XBs were lost, manifesting the urgent need to consider XBs in the refinement process during X-ray crystallography study.

  3. Losing images in digital radiology: more than you think.

    PubMed

    Oglevee, Catherine; Pianykh, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    It is a common belief that the shift to digital imaging some 20 years ago helped medical image exchange and got rid of any potential image loss that was happening with printed image films. Unfortunately, this is not the case: despite the most recent advances in digital imaging, most hospitals still keep losing their imaging data, with these losses going completely unnoticed. As a result, not only does image loss affect the faith in digital imaging but it also affects patient diagnosis and daily quality of clinical work. This paper identifies the origins of invisible image losses, provides methods and procedures to detect image loss, and demonstrates modes of action that can be taken to stop the problem from happening.

  4. A strong TB programme embedded in a developing primary healthcare system is a lose-lose situation: insights from patient and community perspectives in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Neisha; James, Richard; Sreynimol, Um; Linda, Pen; Yoong, Joanne; Saly, Saint; Koeut, Pichenda; Eang, Mao Tan; Coker, Richard; Khan, Mishal S

    2017-10-01

    As exemplified by the situation in Cambodia, disease specific (vertical) health programmes are often favoured when the health system is fragile. The potential of such an approach to impede strengthening of primary healthcare services has been studied from a health systems perspective in terms of access and quality of care. In this bottom-up, qualitative study we investigate patient and community member experiences of health services when a strong tuberculosis (TB) programme is embedded into a relatively underutilized primary healthcare system. We conducted six gender-stratified community focus group discussions (n = 49) and seven mixed-gender focus group discussions with TB patients (n = 45) in three provinces located in urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Cambodia. Our analysis of health-seeking behaviour and experiences for TB and TB-like illness indicates that building a strong vertical TB control programme has had numerous benefits, including awareness of typical symptoms and need to seek care early; confidence in free TB services at public facilities; and willingness to complete treatment. However, there was a clear dichotomy in experiences and behaviour with respect to care-seeking for less severe illness at primary health services, which were generally avoided owing to access barriers and perceived poor quality. The tendency to delay seeking health care until the development of severe symptoms clearly indicative of TB is a major barrier to early diagnosis and treatment of TB. Our study indicates that an imbalance in the strength of vertical and primary health services could be a lose-lose situation as this impedes improvements in health system functioning and constrains progress of vertical disease control programmes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Lymphatic deletion of calcitonin receptor–like receptor exacerbates intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Reema B.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Blakeney, Elizabeth S.; Pawlak, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphatics play a critical role in maintaining gastrointestinal homeostasis and in the absorption of dietary lipids, yet their roles in intestinal inflammation remain elusive. Given the increasing prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease, we investigated whether lymphatic vessels contribute to, or may be causative of, disease progression. We generated a mouse model with temporal and spatial deletion of the key lymphangiogenic receptor for the adrenomedullin peptide, calcitonin receptor–like receptor (Calcrl), and found that the loss of lymphatic Calcrl was sufficient to induce intestinal lymphangiectasia, characterized by dilated lacteals and protein-losing enteropathy. Upon indomethacin challenge, Calcrlfl/fl/Prox1-CreERT2 mice demonstrated persistent inflammation and failure to recover and thrive. The epithelium and crypts of Calcrlfl/fl/Prox1-CreERT2 mice exhibited exacerbated hallmarks of disease progression, and the lacteals demonstrated an inability to absorb lipids. Furthermore, we identified Calcrl/adrenomedullin signaling as an essential upstream regulator of the Notch pathway, previously shown to be critical for intestinal lacteal maintenance and junctional integrity. In conclusion, lymphatic insufficiency and lymphangiectasia caused by loss of lymphatic Calcrl exacerbates intestinal recovery following mucosal injury and underscores the importance of lymphatic function in promoting recovery from intestinal inflammation. PMID:28352669

  6. The impact of winning and losing on family interactions: a biological approach to family therapy.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Leon; Sturman, Edward D

    2012-10-01

    To examine the connection between winning and losing and family functioning. We do this by hypothesizing a link between successful outcomes in individual competition and in functional family interaction. This enables us to show how therapeutic interventions can be directed toward the attachment system, by lowering anxiety and fostering mutual trust, and toward the social rank system, by promoting success and feelings of empowerment. A search of online databases was conducted with key search terms related to winning and losing, and their effects on attachment patterns and family interactions. Winning in agonistic encounters has been associated with lowered dysphoria, anxiety, and hostility. These affective states trigger positive patterns of family interaction through their effect on the social rank and attachment systems. Continued success promotes adaptive cycles of interaction, whereas inability to accept loss has the reverse effect. Early humans, who were more successful in competition, were better able to promote the survival and well-being of other family members, which would have accelerated our phylogenetic adaptation.

  7. Concerns about losing control when breaking bad news to terminally ill patients with cancer: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Friedrichsen, Maria; Milberg, Anna

    2006-06-01

    To study and explore problems perceived by physicians when breaking bad news to advanced cancer patients about discontinuing or not offering tumor-specific treatment due to incurable cancer. A qualitative phenomenographic interview study. The county of Ostergötland in Sweden. Thirty physicians with different demographic characteristics. According to the physicians' answers breaking bad news was perceived as involving a risk of losing control in different ways, regarding emotions, oneself, confidence, professionalism and patient trust. Four different main categories described as problems were identified; perceptions focusing on existential thoughts, relationships, knowledge, and perceptions related to time and environmental disturbances. Physicians perceived that breaking bad news to dying patients with cancer involved a risk of losing control. Existential thoughts and a lack of knowledge contribute to this risk. Theoretical education in existentiality/spirituality and clinical practice in a palliative context may help maintaining control.

  8. Using Peptide-Level Proteomics Data for Detecting Differentially Expressed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Tomi; Corthals, Garry L; Nevalainen, Olli S; Elo, Laura L

    2015-11-06

    The expression of proteins can be quantified in high-throughput means using different types of mass spectrometers. In recent years, there have emerged label-free methods for determining protein abundance. Although the expression is initially measured at the peptide level, a common approach is to combine the peptide-level measurements into protein-level values before differential expression analysis. However, this simple combination is prone to inconsistencies between peptides and may lose valuable information. To this end, we introduce here a method for detecting differentially expressed proteins by combining peptide-level expression-change statistics. Using controlled spike-in experiments, we show that the approach of averaging peptide-level expression changes yields more accurate lists of differentially expressed proteins than does the conventional protein-level approach. This is particularly true when there are only few replicate samples or the differences between the sample groups are small. The proposed technique is implemented in the Bioconductor package PECA, and it can be downloaded from http://www.bioconductor.org.

  9. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease).

    PubMed

    Vignes, Stéphane; Bellanger, Jérôme

    2008-02-22

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool alpha1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum) or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other inconsistently effective

  10. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (Waldmann's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Vignes, Stéphane; Bellanger, Jérôme

    2008-01-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is a rare disorder characterized by dilated intestinal lacteals resulting in lymph leakage into the small bowel lumen and responsible for protein-losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. PIL is generally diagnosed before 3 years of age but may be diagnosed in older patients. Prevalence is unknown. The main symptom is predominantly bilateral lower limb edema. Edema may be moderate to severe with anasarca and includes pleural effusion, pericarditis or chylous ascites. Fatigue, abdominal pain, weight loss, inability to gain weight, moderate diarrhea or fat-soluble vitamin deficiencies due to malabsorption may also be present. In some patients, limb lymphedema is associated with PIL and is difficult to distinguish lymphedema from edema. Exsudative enteropathy is confirmed by the elevated 24-h stool α1-antitrypsin clearance. Etiology remains unknown. Very rare familial cases of PIL have been reported. Diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic observation of intestinal lymphangiectasia with the corresponding histology of intestinal biopsy specimens. Videocapsule endoscopy may be useful when endoscopic findings are not contributive. Differential diagnosis includes constrictive pericarditis, intestinal lymphoma, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal tuberculosis, sarcoidosis or systemic sclerosis. Several B-cell lymphomas confined to the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, jejunum, midgut, ileum) or with extra-intestinal localizations were reported in PIL patients. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL medical management. The absence of fat in the diet prevents chyle engorgement of the intestinal lymphatic vessels thereby preventing their rupture with its ensuing lymph loss. Medium-chain triglycerides are absorbed directly into the portal venous circulation and avoid lacteal overloading. Other inconsistently effective

  11. Winning and losing: an evolutionary approach to mood disorders and their therapy.

    PubMed

    Sloman, Leon; Sturman, Edward D; Price, John S

    2011-06-01

    To advance a new evolutionary model that examines the effects of winning and losing on mood and physiological variables. Previous studies have focused on the involuntary defeat strategy in de-escalating conflict. Here, we propose that there also exists an involuntary winning strategy (IWS) that is triggered by success and characterized by euphoria and increased self-confidence. It motivates efforts to challenge, and promotes reconciliation. Previous studies are presented, including data on student athletes, demonstrating the impact of winning and losing on mood. Winning is consistently shown to be related to physiological changes such as increased testosterone and serotonin levels in primates. It reliably leads to mood changes that serve to motivate winners to continue their competitive efforts. When the IWS functions optimally, success leads to success in an adaptive cycle. Over time, the initial differences between the winners and losers of agonistic encounters become magnified in a process known as difference amplification. As a result of assortative mating, the children of people who have entered into an adaptive cycle will inherit traits from both parents that will, in turn, give them an increased competitive advantage. In this manner, difference amplification could have accelerated human evolution by natural selection. Vignettes of clinical interventions are also used to illustrate therapeutic strategies designed to disrupt maladaptive cycles and promote adaptive behaviour.

  12. Behavioural and neural modulation of win-stay but not lose-shift strategies as a function of outcome value in Rock, Paper, Scissors.

    PubMed

    Forder, Lewis; Dyson, Benjamin James

    2016-09-23

    Competitive environments in which individuals compete for mutually-exclusive outcomes require rational decision making in order to maximize gains but often result in poor quality heuristics. Reasons for the greater reliance on lose-shift relative to win-stay behaviour shown in previous studies were explored using the game of Rock, Paper, Scissors and by manipulating the value of winning and losing. Decision-making following a loss was characterized as relatively fast and relatively inflexible both in terms of the failure to modulate the magnitude of lose-shift strategy and the lack of significant neural modulation. In contrast, decision-making following a win was characterized as relatively slow and relatively flexible both in terms of a behavioural increase in the magnitude of win-stay strategy and a neural modulation of feedback-related negativity (FRN) and stimulus-preceding negativity (SPN) following outcome value modulation. The win-stay/lose-shift heuristic appears not to be a unified mechanism, with the former relying on System 2 processes and the latter relying on System 1 processes. Our ability to play rationally appears more likely when the outcome is positive and when the value of wins are low, highlighting how vulnerable we can be when trying to succeed during competition.

  13. ``Losing the Dark:'' A Planetarium PSA about Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Productions, L. N.; Walker, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    Losing the Dark is a PSA video being created for fulldome theaters by Loch Ness Productions under the direction of the International Dark Sky Association Education Committee headed by Dr. Constance Walker of the National Optical Astronomy Observatories. It explains the problems with light pollution, its effects on life, and three ways in which people can implement “wise lighting” practices to mitigate light pollution. The show is also being produced in a flat-screen HD format for use in classical planetarium and non-dome theaters, for presentations by IDA speakers when addressing planning boards, etc. and will be posted on the IDA and other web sites. The final length is six minutes for both versions. Funding has been provided by The International Planetarium Society and the International Dark-Sky Association.

  14. Communicative Acts in Coach-Athlete Interactions: When Losing Competitions and when Making Mistakes in Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagar, Sam S.; Jowett, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Athletes' perceptions of coaches' communicative acts of interaction in two key interpersonal situations were examined, and their impact on the athletes: (a) when athletes lose competitions; and, (b) when athletes make mistakes in training. Athletes (N = 324, M age = 20.11) completed an open-ended survey. Data were deductively and inductively…

  15. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" Public Service Advertising Campaign for Tweens to Save Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertrand, Jane T.; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national…

  16. The interaction of albumin and fatty-acid-binding protein with membranes: oleic acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Catalá, A

    1984-10-01

    Bovine serum albumin or fatty-acid-binding protein rapidly lose oleic acid when incubated in the presence of dimyristoyl lecithin liposomes. The phenomenon is dependent on vesicle concentration and no measurable quantities of protein are found associated with liposomes. Upon gel filtration on Sepharose CL-2B of incubated mixtures of microsomes containing [1-14C] oleic acid and albumin or fatty-acid-binding protein, association of fatty acid with the soluble proteins could be demonstrated. Both albumin and fatty-acid-binding protein stimulated the transfer of oleic acid from rat liver microsomes to egg lecithin liposomes. These results indicate that albumin is more effective in the binding of oleic acid than fatty-acid-binding protein, which allows a selective oleic acid dissociation during its interaction with membranes.

  17. 2007 Presidential Address: Fear of Losing Control--Power, Perfectionism, and the Psychology of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence and popular culture suggest that fear of losing control of oneself is common among North American women, yet there is little in the way of data or theory to show why so many women fear loss of control or how to help them to leave that fear behind. In this article a commonly accepted definition of self-regulation is examined…

  18. Mass-losing peculiar red giants - The comparison between theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mass loss from evolved red giants is considered. It seems that red giants on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) are losing between 0.0003 and 0.0006 solar mass/sq kpc yr in the solar neighborhood. If all the main sequence stars between 1 and 5 solar masses ultimately evolve into white dwarfs with masses of 0.7 solar mass, the predicted mass loss rate in the solar neighborhood from these stars is 0.0008 solar mass/sq kpc yr. Although there are still uncertainties, it appears that there is no strong disagreement between theory and observation.

  19. Children Who Lose Their Parents to HIV/AIDS: Agency Guidelines for Adoptive and Kinship Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merkel-Holguin, Lisa

    Across the United States and world, children who lose their parents to HIV/AIDS are one of the fasted emerging groups affected by this epidemic. Increasingly, child welfare and family service agencies are helping infected parents to secure legal and permanent care arrangements for their children. These guidelines address the issues of placing…

  20. Vaping to lose weight: Predictors of adult e-cigarette use for weight loss or control.

    PubMed

    Morean, Meghan E; Wedel, Amelia V

    2017-03-01

    Some traditional cigarette smokers are motivated to smoke to lose weight or control their weight. The current study evaluated whether a subset of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping to lose or control their weight and examined potential predictors of vaping for weight management. Adult e-cigarette users (n=459) who reported wanting to lose weight or maintain their weight completed an anonymous online survey. Participants reported on demographics, vaping frequency, e-cigarette nicotine content, cigarette smoking status, preferred e-cigarette/e-liquid flavors, current weight status (i.e., overweight, underweight), use of dieting strategies associated with anorexia and bulimia, lifetime history of binge eating, self-discipline, and impulse control. Binary logistic regression was used to examine whether vaping for weight loss/control was associated with the aforementioned variables. Participants who reported vaping for weight loss/control (13.5%) were more likely to vape frequently (adjOR=1.15; 95% CI [1.00, 1.31]); be overweight (adjOR=2.80; [1.33, 5.90]); restrict calories (adjOR=2.23; [1.13, 4.42]); have poor impulse control (adjOR=0.59; [0.41, 0.86]); and prefer coffee- (adjOR=2.92; [1.47, 5.80]) or vanilla-flavored e-liquid (adjOR=7.44; [1.56, 36.08]). A subset of adult e-cigarette users reported vaping for weight loss/control, raising concerns about expanded, scientifically unsubstantiated uses of e-cigarettes. Identifying where individuals obtain information about vaping for weight loss (e.g., e-cigarette ads, Internet) and whether weight-related motives promote e-cigarette initiation among e-cigarette naïve individuals is important to informing regulatory efforts. Further research also is needed to better understand the link between e-liquid flavors and weight loss motivations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Particle Tracking Model for Suspended Sediment Transport and Streambed Clogging Under Losing and Gaining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi-Ribero, A.; Fox, A.; Packman, A. I.; Escobar-Vargas, J.; Donado-Garzon, L. D.; Li, A.; Arnon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Exchange of mass, momentum and energy between surface water and groundwater is a driving factor for the biology, ecology and chemistry of rivers and water bodies in general. Nonetheless, this exchange is dominated by different factors like topography, bed morphology, and large-scale hydraulic gradient. In the particular case of fine sediments like clay, conservative tracer modeling is impossible because they are trapped in river beds for long periods, thus the normal advection dispersion approach leads to errors and results do not agree with reality. This study proposes a numerical particle tracking model that represents the behavior of kaolinite in a sand flume, and how its deposition varies according to different flow conditions, namely losing and gaining flow. Since fine particles do not behave like solutes, kaolinite dynamics are represented using settling velocity and a filtration coefficient allowing the particles to be trapped in the bed. This approach allows us to use measurable parameters directly related with the fine particle features as size and shape, and hydraulic parameters. Results are then compared with experimental results from lab experiments obtained in a recirculating flume, in order to assess the impact of losing and gaining conditions on sediment transport and deposition. Furthermore, our model is able to identify the zones where kaolinite deposition concentrates over the flume due to the bed geometry, and later relate these results with clogging of the bed and hence changes in the bed's hydraulic conductivity. Our results suggest that kaolinite deposition is higher under losing conditions since the vertical velocity of the flow is added to the deposition velocity of the particles modeled. Moreover, the zones where kaolinite concentrates varies under different flow conditions due to the difference in pressure and velocity in the river bed.

  2. Reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuefeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Li; Wang, Lijuan; Pan, Jie

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional fluid model is built up to numerically investigate the reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma. The calculation results indicate that the electron collisions with CH4 are the key pathways to produce the neutral particles CH2 and CH as well as the charged particles e and CH3+. CH3, H2, H, C2H2, and C2H4 primarily result from the reactions between the neutral particles and CH4. The charge transfer reactions are the significant pathways to produce CH4+, C2H2+, and C2H4+. As to the neutral species CH and H and the charged species CH3+, the reactions between themselves and CH4 contribute to substantial losses of these particles. The ways responsible for losing CH3, H2, C2H2, and C2H4 are CH3 + H → CH4, H2 + CH → CH2 + H, CH4+ + C2H2 → C2H2+ + CH4, and CH4+ + C2H4 → C2H4+ + CH4, respectively. Both electrons and C2H4+ are consumed by the dissociative electron-ion recombination reactions. The essential reaction pathways of losing CH4+ and C2H2+ are the charge transfer reactions.

  3. Honeybee society destruction by losing control of self-reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peipei; Su, Beibei; He, Da-Ren

    2004-03-01

    Recently the mechanism of the damage caused by invasion of Apis mellifera capensis honeybee into the normal A. M. Scutellata colonies became interesting for scientists due to the fact that the mechanism may resemble those of cancer vicious hyperplasia, spreading of some epidemic, and turbulence of society induced by some bad society groups. For the mechanism, we suggest a new guess, which means that the losing control of self-reproduction disturbs and throws information structure of the society into confuse. We also simulate the damage process with a cellular automata based on the idea. The simulation shows that the process is equivalent to a non-equilibrium percolation phase transition. This discussion remind us that the management and monitor on the information network between society members may be a more effective way for avoiding the overflow of the destructor sub-colonies.

  4. Direct Biomarkers of Microbial Translocation Correlate with Immune Activation in Adult Zambians with Environmental Enteropathy and Hepatosplenic Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kaonga, Patrick; Kaimoyo, Evans; Besa, Ellen; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Sinkala, Edford; Kelly, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Microbial translocation is a poorly understood consequence of several disorders such as environmental enteropathy (EE) and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis (HSS). Herein, we compared biomarkers of microbial origin and immune activation in adults with these disorders and in healthy controls. A cross-sectional study was conducted in participants with EE recruited from Misisi compound, Lusaka, Zambia; HSS patients and healthy controls from the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka. Plasma lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) was measured by limulus amoebocyte lysate assay, plasma 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene copy number was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, Toll-like receptor ligand (TLRL) activity by QUANTI-Blue detection medium, and cytokines from cell culture supernatant by Cytometric Bead Array. In univariate analysis LPS, 16S rRNA gene copy number, and TLR activity were all high and correlated with each other and with cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, and IL-4 secreted by the RAW-Blue cells. After controlling for baseline characteristic, biomarkers of microbial translocation in blood were predictors of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 activation in cell culture supernatant from EE participants and HSS patients but not in healthy controls. TLR activity showed the strongest correlation with TNF-α. These data provide correlative evidence that microbial translocation contributes to systemic cytokine activation in two disorders common in the tropics, with total TLR ligand estimation showing the strongest correlation with TNF-α (r = 0.66, P < 0.001). PMID:29140241

  5. Silk micrococoons for protein stabilisation and molecular encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanovich, Ulyana; Ruggeri, Francesco S.; de Genst, Erwin; Adamcik, Jozef; Barros, Teresa P.; Porter, David; Müller, Thomas; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Naturally spun silks generate fibres with unique properties, including strength, elasticity and biocompatibility. Here we describe a microfluidics-based strategy to spin liquid native silk, obtained directly from the silk gland of Bombyx mori silkworms, into micron-scale capsules with controllable geometry and variable levels of intermolecular β-sheet content in their protein shells. We demonstrate that such micrococoons can store internally the otherwise highly unstable liquid native silk for several months and without apparent effect on its functionality. We further demonstrate that these native silk micrococoons enable the effective encapsulation, storage and release of other aggregation-prone proteins, such as functional antibodies. These results show that native silk micrococoons are capable of preserving the full activity of sensitive cargo proteins that can aggregate and lose function under conditions of bulk storage, and thus represent an attractive class of materials for the storage and release of active biomolecules.

  6. I feel good whether my friends win or my foes lose: brain mechanisms underlying feeling similarity.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana

    2014-07-01

    People say they enjoy both seeing a preferred social group succeed and seeing an adversary social group fail. At the same time, they state they dislike seeing a preferred social group fail and seeing an adversary social group succeed. The current magnetic resonance imaging study investigated whether-and if so, how-such similarities in reported feeling states are reflected in neural activities. American football fans anticipated success and failure situations for their favorite or their adversary teams. The data support the idea that feeling similarities and divergences expressed in verbal reports carry with them significant neural similarities and differences, respectively. Desired (favorite team likely to win and adversary team likely to lose) rather than undesired (favorite team likely to lose and adversary team likely to win) outcomes were associated with heightened activity in the supramarginal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, insula, and cerebellum. Precuneus activity additionally distinguished anticipated desirable outcomes for favorite versus adversary teams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. From fan to fat? Vicarious losing increases unhealthy eating, but self-affirmation is an effective remedy.

    PubMed

    Cornil, Yann; Chandon, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    Using archival and experimental data, we showed that vicarious defeats experienced by fans when their favorite football team loses lead them to consume less healthy food. On the Mondays following a Sunday National Football League (NFL) game, saturated-fat and food-calorie intake increase significantly in cities with losing teams, decrease in cities with winning teams, and remain at their usual levels in comparable cities without an NFL team or with an NFL team that did not play. These effects are greater in cities with the most committed fans, when the opponents are more evenly matched, and when the defeats are narrow. We found similar results when measuring the actual or intended food consumption of French soccer fans who had previously been asked to write about or watch highlights from victories or defeats of soccer teams. However, these unhealthy consequences of vicarious defeats disappear when supporters spontaneously self-affirm or are given the opportunity to do so.

  8. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Aaron; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Rocklin, Gabriel J; Hicks, Derrick R; Vergara, Renan; Murapa, Patience; Bernard, Steffen M; Zhang, Lu; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Bahl, Christopher D; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Goreshnik, Inna; Fuller, James T; Koday, Merika T; Jenkins, Cody M; Colvin, Tom; Carter, Lauren; Bohn, Alan; Bryan, Cassie M; Fernández-Velasco, D Alejandro; Stewart, Lance; Dong, Min; Huang, Xuhui; Jin, Rongsheng; Wilson, Ian A; Fuller, Deborah H; Baker, David

    2017-10-05

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37-43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing.

  9. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Aaron; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Hicks, Derrick R.; Vergara, Renan; Murapa, Patience; Bernard, Steffen M.; Zhang, Lu; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Bahl, Christopher D.; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Goreshnik, Inna; Fuller, James T.; Koday, Merika T.; Jenkins, Cody M.; Colvin, Tom; Carter, Lauren; Bohn, Alan; Bryan, Cassie M.; Fernández-Velasco, D. Alejandro; Stewart, Lance; Dong, Min; Huang, Xuhui; Jin, Rongsheng; Wilson, Ian A.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Baker, David

    2017-10-01

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37-43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing.

  10. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Aaron; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Hicks, Derrick R.; Vergara, Renan; Murapa, Patience; Bernard, Steffen M.; Zhang, Lu; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Bahl, Christopher D.; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Goreshnik, Inna; Fuller, James T.; Koday, Merika T.; Jenkins, Cody M.; Colvin, Tom; Carter, Lauren; Bohn, Alan; Bryan, Cassie M.; Fernández-Velasco, D. Alejandro; Stewart, Lance; Dong, Min; Huang, Xuhui; Jin, Rongsheng; Wilson, Ian A.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Baker, David

    2018-01-01

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37–43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing. PMID:28953867

  11. Fighting for and losing or gaining control in life.

    PubMed

    Theorell, T

    1997-01-01

    In JP Henry's work, fighting for and losing control were important concepts in the interpretation of energy mobilization in psychosocial conditions. Attachment and support were important protective and salutogenic factors. These concepts have been applied in a series of epidemiological and psychophysiological real life studies. Job conditions which force the worker to mobilize energy and concomitantly inhibit anabolism could be identified at least partly by means of the demand-control-support model originally proposed by Karasek. The most adverse conditions at work arise when psychological demands are high and at the same time the decision latitude is low. This combination is associated with changes in the regulation of endocrine parameters as well as with increased morbidity--heart disease, functional gastrointestinal symptoms and musculoskeletal disorders. Examples of studies of physiological correlates of psychosocial processes leading to fight for control are also described from outside work activities.

  12. Uncoupling of intestinal mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and inhibition of cyclooxygenase are required for the development of NSAID-enteropathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, S; Sigthorsson, G; Simpson, R J; Watts, J; Jacob, M; Tavares, I A; Rafi, S; Roseth, A; Foster, R; Price, A B; Wrigglesworth, J M; Bjarnason, I

    2000-05-01

    The pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastrointestinal damage is believed to involve a nonprostaglandin dependent effect as well as prostaglandin dependent effects. One suggestion is that the nonprostaglandin mechanism involves uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. To assess the role of uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the pathogenesis of small intestinal damage in the rat. We compared key pathophysiologic events in the small bowel following (i) dinitrophenol, an uncoupling agent (ii) parenteral aspirin, to inhibit cyclooxygenase without causing a 'topical' effect and (iii) the two together, using (iv) indomethacin as a positive control. Dinitrophenol altered intestinal mitochondrial morphology, increased intestinal permeability and caused inflammation without affecting gastric permeability or intestinal prostanoid levels. Parenteral aspirin decreased mucosal prostanoids without affecting intestinal mitochondria in vivo, gastric or intestinal permeability. Aspirin caused no inflammation or ulcers. When dinitrophenol and aspirin were given together the changes in intestinal mitochondrial morphology, permeability, inflammation and prostanoid levels and the macro- and microscopic appearances of intestinal ulcers were similar to indomethacin. These studies allow dissociation of the contribution and consequences of uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cyclooxygenase inhibition in the pathophysiology of NSAID enteropathy. While uncoupling of enterocyte mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation leads to increased intestinal permeability and low grade inflammation, concurrent decreases in mucosal prostanoids appear to be important in the development of ulcers.

  13. Winning and Losing: Effects on Impulsive Action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of wins and losses on impulsive action in gambling (Experiments 1–3) and nongambling tasks (Experiments 4–5). In each experiment, subjects performed a simple task in which they had to win points. On each trial, they had to choose between a gamble and a nongamble. The gamble was always associated with a higher amount but a lower probability of winning than the nongamble. After subjects indicated their choice (i.e., gamble or not), feedback was presented. They had to press a key to start the next trial. Experiments 1–3 showed that, compared to the nongambling baseline, subjects were faster to initiate the next trial after a gambled loss, indicating that losses can induce impulsive actions. In Experiments 4 and 5, subjects alternated between the gambling task and a neutral decision-making task in which they could not win or lose points. Subjects were faster in the neutral decision-making task if they had just lost in the gambling task, suggesting that losses have a general effect on action. Our results challenge the dominant idea that humans become more cautious after suboptimal outcomes. Instead, they indicate that losses in the context of potential rewards are emotional events that increase impulsivity. PMID:27808548

  14. Linking the proteins--elucidation of proteome-scale networks using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Delphine; Gonnet, Florence; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; de la Fuente, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Proteomes are intricate. Typically, thousands of proteins interact through physical association and post-translational modifications (PTMs) to give rise to the emergent functions of cells. Understanding these functions requires one to study proteomes as "systems" rather than collections of individual protein molecules. The abstraction of the interacting proteome to "protein networks" has recently gained much attention, as networks are effective representations, that lose specific molecular details, but provide the ability to see the proteome as a whole. Mostly two aspects of the proteome have been represented by network models: proteome-wide physical protein-protein-binding interactions organized into Protein Interaction Networks (PINs), and proteome-wide PTM relations organized into Protein Signaling Networks (PSNs). Mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have been shown to be essential to reveal both of these aspects on a proteome-wide scale. Techniques such as affinity purification followed by MS have been used to elucidate protein-protein interactions, and MS-based quantitative phosphoproteomics is critical to understand the structure and dynamics of signaling through the proteome. We here review the current state-of-the-art MS-based analytical pipelines for the purpose to characterize proteome-scale networks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In It Together: Mother Talk of Weight Concerns Moderates Negative Outcomes of Encouragement to Lose Weight on Daughter Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Erin E.; Gondoli, Dawn M.; Corning, Alexandra F.; Morrissey, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    Mothers’ influence on their daughters is important for understanding girls’ disordered eating and body dissatisfaction. Direct maternal encouragement of daughters to lose weight is linked to daughters’ development of bulimic symptoms, and additional findings indicate that daughters whose mothers merely talk about dieting and body dissatisfaction are more likely to be diagnosed with an eating disorder. The current study extends such research by examining the interactive contributions of maternal encouragement to lose weight and maternal dieting discussions to the prediction of early adolescent daughters’ body dissatisfaction and disordered eating over the middle school period. Participants were 89 adolescent girls who were in the 6th grade at Time 1. Regression analyses were conducted to examine interactive effects of mother encouragement to diet and talk of weight concerns on daughter body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, and dieting behavior. Results suggest an interactive effect in which mothers’ dieting talk may act as a buffer against the negative effects of direct encouragement to lose weight. PMID:26551484

  16. Low-energy charge transfer excitations in NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. I.; Pustovarov, V. A.; Churmanov, V. N.; Ivanov, V. Yu; Yermakov, A. Ye; Uimin, M. A.; Gruzdev, N. B.; Sokolov, P. S.; Baranov, A. N.; Moskvin, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    Comparative analysis of photoluminescence (PL) and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of NiO poly- and nanocrystals in the spectral range 2-5.5 eV reveals two PLE bands peaked near 3.7 and 4.6 eV with a dramatic rise in the low-temperature PLE spectral weight of the 3.7 eV PLE band in the nanocrystalline NiO as compared with its polycrystalline counterpart. In frames of a cluster model approach we assign the 3.7 eV PLE band to the low-energy bulk-forbidden p-d (t1g(π)-eg) charge transfer (CT) transition which becomes the allowed one in the nanocrystalline state while the 4.6 eV PLE band is related to a bulk allowed d-d (eg-eg) CT transition scarcely susceptible to the nanocrystallization. The PLE spectroscopy of the nanocrystalline materials appears to be a novel informative technique for inspection of different CT transitions.

  17. Frequency-Locked Detector Threshold Setting Criteria Based on Mean-Time-To-Lose-Lock (MTLL) for GPS Receivers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Na; Qin, Honglei; Sun, Kewen; Ji, Yuanfa

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-locked detector (FLD) has been widely utilized in tracking loops of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to indicate their locking status. The relation between FLD and lock status has been seldom discussed. The traditional PLL experience is not suitable for FLL. In this paper, the threshold setting criteria for frequency-locked detector in the GPS receiver has been proposed by analyzing statistical characteristic of FLD output. The approximate probability distribution of frequency-locked detector is theoretically derived by using a statistical approach, which reveals the relationship between probabilities of frequency-locked detector and the carrier-to-noise ratio (C/N0) of the received GPS signal. The relationship among mean-time-to-lose-lock (MTLL), detection threshold and lock probability related to C/N0 can be further discovered by utilizing this probability. Therefore, a theoretical basis for threshold setting criteria in frequency locked loops for GPS receivers is provided based on mean-time-to-lose-lock analysis. PMID:29207546

  18. Frequency-Locked Detector Threshold Setting Criteria Based on Mean-Time-To-Lose-Lock (MTLL) for GPS Receivers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian; Yuan, Heliang; Zhao, Na; Qin, Honglei; Sun, Kewen; Ji, Yuanfa

    2017-12-04

    Frequency-locked detector (FLD) has been widely utilized in tracking loops of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to indicate their locking status. The relation between FLD and lock status has been seldom discussed. The traditional PLL experience is not suitable for FLL. In this paper, the threshold setting criteria for frequency-locked detector in the GPS receiver has been proposed by analyzing statistical characteristic of FLD output. The approximate probability distribution of frequency-locked detector is theoretically derived by using a statistical approach, which reveals the relationship between probabilities of frequency-locked detector and the carrier-to-noise ratio ( C / N ₀) of the received GPS signal. The relationship among mean-time-to-lose-lock (MTLL), detection threshold and lock probability related to C / N ₀ can be further discovered by utilizing this probability. Therefore, a theoretical basis for threshold setting criteria in frequency locked loops for GPS receivers is provided based on mean-time-to-lose-lock analysis.

  19. Plectin controls biliary tree architecture and stability in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Jirouskova, Marketa; Nepomucka, Katerina; Oyman-Eyrilmez, Gizem; Kalendova, Alzbeta; Havelkova, Helena; Sarnova, Lenka; Chalupsky, Karel; Schuster, Bjoern; Benada, Oldrich; Miksatkova, Petra; Kuchar, Martin; Fabian, Ondrej; Sedlacek, Radislav; Wiche, Gerhard; Gregor, Martin

    2018-05-01

    Plectin, a highly versatile cytolinker protein, controls intermediate filament cytoarchitecture and cellular stress response. In the present study, we investigate the role of plectin in the liver under basal conditions and in experimental cholestasis. We generated liver-specific plectin knockout (Ple Δalb ) mice and analyzed them using two cholestatic liver injury models: bile duct ligation (BDL) and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) feeding. Primary hepatocytes and a cholangiocyte cell line were used to address the impact of plectin on keratin filament organization and stability in vitro. Plectin deficiency in hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells led to aberrant keratin filament network organization, biliary tree malformations, and collapse of bile ducts and ductules. Further, plectin ablation significantly aggravated biliary damage upon cholestatic challenge. Coincidently, we observed a significant expansion of A6-positive progenitor cells in Ple Δalb livers. After BDL, plectin-deficient bile ducts were prominently dilated with more frequent ruptures corresponding to an increased number of bile infarcts. In addition, more abundant keratin aggregates indicated less stable keratin filaments in Ple Δalb hepatocytes. A transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed a compromised tight junction formation in plectin-deficient biliary epithelial cells. In addition, protein profiling showed increased expression of the adherens junction protein E-Cadherin, and inefficient upregulation of the desmosomal protein desmoplakin in response to BDL. In vitro analyses revealed a higher susceptibility of plectin-deficient keratin networks to stress-induced collapse, paralleled by elevated activation of p38 MAP kinase. Our study shows that by maintaining proper keratin network cytoarchitecture and biliary epithelial stability, plectin plays a critical role in protecting the liver from stress elicited by cholestasis. Plectin is a cytolinker protein capable of

  20. Biophysical analysis of the effect of chemical modification by 4-oxononenal on the structure, stability, and function of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dinen D.; Singh, Surinder M.; Dzieciatkowska, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) is a molecular chaperone important for the folding of numerous proteins, which include millions of immunoglobulins in human body. It also plays a key role in the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the endoplasmic reticulum. Free radical generation is a common phenomenon that occurs in cells under healthy as well as under stress conditions such as ageing, inflammation, alcohol consumption, and smoking. These free radicals attack the cell membranes and generate highly reactive lipid peroxidation products such as 4-oxononenal (4-ONE). BiP is a key protein that is modified by 4-ONE. In this study, we probed how such chemical modification affects the biophysical properties of BiP. Upon modification, BiP shows significant tertiary structural changes with no changes in its secondary structure. The protein loses its thermodynamic stability, particularly, that of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) where ATP binds. In terms of function, the modified BiP completely loses its ATPase activity with decreased ATP binding affinity. However, modified BiP retains its immunoglobulin binding function and its chaperone activity of suppressing non-specific protein aggregation. These results indicate that 4-ONE modification can significantly affect the structure-function of key proteins such as BiP involved in cellular pathways, and provide a molecular basis for how chemical modifications can result in the failure of quality control mechanisms inside the cell. PMID:28886061

  1. Patient-reported outcomes and associations with pleural effusion in outpatients with heart failure: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gundersen, Guri H; Norekvål, Tone M; Graven, Torbjørn; Haug, Hilde H; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens O; Gustad, Lise T; Dalen, Håvard

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to study whether patient-reported outcomes, measured by quality of life (QoL) and functional class, are sensitive to pleural effusion (PLE) in patients with heart failure (HF), and to study changes in QoL and functional class during follow-up of PLE. Methods A cohort of 62 patients from an outpatient HF clinic was included. The amount of PLE was quantified using a pocket-sized ultrasound imaging device. Self-reports of QoL and functional class were collected using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. Results At baseline, 26 (42%) patients had PLE of which 19 (31%) patients had moderate to severe amounts of PLE. Patients with no to mild PLE had a lower MLHFQ score (mean 42, SD 21) compared with patients with a moderate to severe amount of PLE (mean 55, SD 24), p=0.03. For 28 patients (45%) with follow-up data, we observed a linear improvement of the MLHFQ-score (3.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1) with each centimetre reduction of PLE. Correspondingly, patient-reported NYHA-class followed the same pattern as the MLHFQ-score. Conclusions Our study indicates that patient-reported outcome measures as MLHFQ may be sensitive tools to identify patients with HF at highest risk of symptomatic PLE and that treatment targeting reduction of PLE during follow-up is essential to improvement of QoL and functional capacity of outpatients with HF. Trial registration number NCT01794715; Results PMID:28320791

  2. Randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled intra-individual trial on topical treatment with a 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ analogue in polymorphic light eruption.

    PubMed

    Gruber-Wackernagel, A; Bambach, I; Legat, F J; Hofer, A; Byrne, S N; Quehenberger, F; Wolf, P

    2011-07-01

    Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is a very frequent photodermatosis whose pathogenesis may involve resistance to ultraviolet (UV)-induced immune suppression. Similar to UV radiation, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃) and its analogues such as calcipotriol have been shown to exhibit immunosuppressive properties. We performed a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled intraindividual half-body trial (NCT00871052) to investigate the preventive effect of a calcipotriol-containing cream in PLE. Thirteen patients with PLE (10 women, three men; mean age 37 years) pretreated their skin on two symmetrically located test fields with calcipotriol or placebo cream twice daily for 7 days before the start of photoprovocation testing with solar-simulated UV radiation. We established a specific PLE test score [AA + SI + 0·4 P (range 0-12), where AA is affected area score (range 0-4), SI is skin infiltration score (range 0-4) and P is pruritus score on a visual analogue scale (range 0-10)] to quantify PLE severity. Photoprovocation led to PLE lesions in 12/13 (92%) patients. As shown by the PLE test score, compared with placebo calcipotrial pretreatment significantly reduced PLE symptoms in average by 32% (95% confidence interval 21-44%; P = 0·0022, exact Wilcoxon signed-rank test) throughout the observation period starting at 48 h until 144 h after the first photoprovocation exposure. At 48, 72 and 144 h calcipotriol pretreatment resulted in a lower PLE test score in 7 (58%), 9 (75%) and 10 (83%) of the 12 cases, respectively. Considering all time points together, calcipotriol diminished the PLE test score in all 12 photoprovocable patients (P = 0·0005; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). These results suggest a potential therapeutic benefit of topical 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ analogues as prophylactic treatment in patients with PLE. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  3. Update on celiac disease – etiology, differential diagnosis, drug targets, and management advances

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Samantha A; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by exposure to wheat gluten and similar proteins found in rye and barley that affects genetically susceptible persons. This immune-mediated enteropathy is characterized by villous atrophy, intraepithelial lymphocytosis, and crypt hyperplasia. Once thought a disease that largely presented with malnourished children, the wide spectrum of disease activity is now better recognized and this has resulted in a shift in the presenting symptoms of most patients with CD. New advances in testing, both serologic and endoscopic, have dramatically increased the detection and diagnosis of CD. While the gluten-free diet is still the only treatment for CD, recent investigations have explored alternative approaches, including the use of altered nonimmunogenic wheat variants, enzymatic degradation of gluten, tissue transglutaminase inhibitors, induction of tolerance, and peptides to restore integrity to intestinal tight junctions. PMID:22235174

  4. Nanostructured Mineral Coatings Stabilize Proteins for Therapeutic Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohua; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Khalil, Andrew S; Hess, Dalton; Umhoefer, Jennifer M; Markel, Mark D; Murphy, William L

    2017-09-01

    Proteins tend to lose their biological activity due to their fragile structural conformation during formulation, storage, and delivery. Thus, the inability to stabilize proteins in controlled-release systems represents a major obstacle in drug delivery. Here, a bone mineral inspired protein stabilization strategy is presented, which uses nanostructured mineral coatings on medical devices. Proteins bound within the nanostructured coatings demonstrate enhanced stability against extreme external stressors, including organic solvents, proteases, and ethylene oxide gas sterilization. The protein stabilization effect is attributed to the maintenance of protein conformational structure, which is closely related to the nanoscale feature sizes of the mineral coatings. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) released from a nanostructured mineral coating maintains its biological activity for weeks during release, while it maintains activity for less than 7 d during release from commonly used polymeric microspheres. Delivery of the growth factors bFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor using a mineral coated surgical suture significantly improves functional Achilles tendon healing in a rabbit model, resulting in increased vascularization, more mature collagen fiber organization, and a two fold improvement in mechanical properties. The findings of this study demonstrate that biomimetic interactions between proteins and nanostructured minerals provide a new, broadly applicable mechanism to stabilize proteins in the context of drug delivery and regenerative medicine. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Protein and cell micropatterning and its integration with micro/nanoparticles assembly.

    PubMed

    Yap, F L; Zhang, Y

    2007-01-15

    Micropatterning of proteins and cells has become very popular over the past decade due to its importance in the development of biosensors, microarrays, tissue engineering and cellular studies. This article reviews the techniques developed for protein and cell micropatterning and its biomedical applications. The prospect of integrating micro and nanoparticles with protein and cell micropatterning is discussed. The micro/nanoparticles are assembled into patterns and form the substrate for proteins and cell attachment. The assembled particles create a micro or nanotopography, depending on the size of the particles employed. The nonplanar structure can increase the surface area for biomolecules attachment and therefore enhance the sensitivity for detection in biosensors. Furthermore, a nanostructured substrate can influence the conformation and functionality of protein attached to it, while cellular response in terms of morphology, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, etc. can be affected by a surface expressing micro or nanoscale structures. Proteins and cells tend to lose their normal functions upon attachment to substrate. By recognizing the types of topography that are favourable for preserving proteins and cell behaviour, and integrating it with micropattering will lead to the development of functional protein and cell patterns.

  6. Engineering the entropy-driven free-energy landscape of a dynamic nanoporous protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Robert; Suzuki, Yuta; Paesani, Francesco; Tezcan, F Akif

    2018-04-30

    De novo design and construction of stimuli-responsive protein assemblies that predictably switch between discrete conformational states remains an essential but highly challenging goal in biomolecular design. We previously reported synthetic, two-dimensional protein lattices self-assembled via disulfide bonding interactions, which endows them with a unique capacity to undergo coherent conformational changes without losing crystalline order. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to map the free-energy landscape of these lattices, validated this landscape through extensive structural characterization by electron microscopy and established that it is predominantly governed by solvent reorganization entropy. Subsequent redesign of the protein surface with conditionally repulsive electrostatic interactions enabled us to predictably perturb the free-energy landscape and obtain a new protein lattice whose conformational dynamics can be chemically and mechanically toggled between three different states with varying porosities and molecular densities.

  7. Elastin: a representative ideal protein elastomer.

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D W; Hugel, T; Seitz, M; Gaub, H E; Sheiba, L; Dea, J; Xu, J; Parker, T

    2002-01-01

    During the last half century, identification of an ideal (predominantly entropic) protein elastomer was generally thought to require that the ideal protein elastomer be a random chain network. Here, we report two new sets of data and review previous data. The first set of new data utilizes atomic force microscopy to report single-chain force-extension curves for (GVGVP)(251) and (GVGIP)(260), and provides evidence for single-chain ideal elasticity. The second class of new data provides a direct contrast between low-frequency sound absorption (0.1-10 kHz) exhibited by random-chain network elastomers and by elastin protein-based polymers. Earlier composition, dielectric relaxation (1-1000 MHz), thermoelasticity, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations and thermodynamic and statistical mechanical analyses are presented, that combine with the new data to contrast with random-chain network rubbers and to detail the presence of regular non-random structural elements of the elastin-based systems that lose entropic elastomeric force upon thermal denaturation. The data and analyses affirm an earlier contrary argument that components of elastin, the elastic protein of the mammalian elastic fibre, and purified elastin fibre itself contain dynamic, non-random, regularly repeating structures that exhibit dominantly entropic elasticity by means of a damping of internal chain dynamics on extension. PMID:11911774

  8. Two fundamental questions about protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Penny, David; Zhong, Bojian

    2015-12-01

    Two basic questions are considered that approach protein evolution from different directions; the problems arising from using Markov models for the deeper divergences, and then the origin of proteins themselves. The real problem for the first question (going backwards in time) is that at deeper phylogenies the Markov models of sequence evolution must lose information exponentially at deeper divergences, and several testable methods are suggested that should help resolve these deeper divergences. For the second question (coming forwards in time) a problem is that most models for the origin of protein synthesis do not give a role for the very earliest stages of the process. From our knowledge of the importance of replication accuracy in limiting the length of a coding molecule, a testable hypothesis is proposed. The length of the code, the code itself, and tRNAs would all have prior roles in increasing the accuracy of RNA replication; thus proteins would have been formed only after the tRNAs and the length of the triplet code are already formed. Both questions lead to testable predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Heart transplantation for adults with congenital heart disease: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hikaru; Ichikawa, Hajime; Ueno, Takayoshi; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-06-01

    Increased survival rates after corrective or palliative surgery for complex congenital heart disease (CHD) in infancy and childhood are now being coupled with increased numbers of patients who survive to adulthood with various residual lesions or sequelae. These patients are likely to deteriorate in cardiac function or end-organ function, eventually requiring lifesaving treatment including heart transplantation. Although early and late outcomes of heart transplantation have been improving for adult survivors of CHD, outcomes and pretransplant management could still be improved. Survivors of Fontan procedures are a vulnerable cohort, particularly when single ventricle physiology fails, mostly with protein-losing enteropathy and hepatic dysfunction. Therefore, we reviewed single-institution and larger database analyses of adults who underwent heart transplantation for CHD, to enable risk stratification by identifying the indications and outcomes. As the results, despite relatively high early mortality, long-term results were encouraging after heart transplantation. However, further investigations are needed to improve the indication criteria for complex CHD, especially for failed Fontan. In addition, the current system of status criteria and donor heart allocation system in heart transplantation should be arranged as suitable for adults with complex CHD. Furthermore, there is a strong need to develop ventricular assist devices as a bridge to transplantation or destination therapy, especially where right-sided circulatory support is needed.

  10. Mass-losing M supergiants in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.; Kleinmann, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    A list of the 21 mass-losing red supergiants (20 M type, one G type; L greater than 100,000 solar luminosities) within 2.5 kpc of the sun is compiled. These supergiants are highly evolved descendants of main-sequence stars with initial masses larger than 20 solar masses. The surface density is between about 1 and 2/sq kpc. As found previously, these stars are much less concentrated toward the Galactic center than W-R stars, which are also highly evolved massive stars. Although with considerable uncertainty, it is estimated that the mass return by the M supergiants is somewhere between 0.00001 and 0.00003 solar mass/sq kpc yr. In the hemisphere facing the Galactic center there is much less mass loss from M supergiants than from W-R stars, but, in the anticenter direction, the M supergiants return more mass than do the W-R stars. The duration of the M supergiant phase appears to be between 200,000 and 400,000 yr. During this phase, a star of initially at least 20 solar masses returns perhaps 3-10 solar masses into the interstellar medium.

  11. A Longitudinal Study of Body Image and Strategies to Lose Weight and Increase Muscles among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, M. P.; Ricciardelli, L. A.

    2005-01-01

    A longitudinal study was used to examine age differences in the role of body mass index (BMI) and sociocultural pressures in predicting changes in body image and strategies to both lose weight and increase muscles among 443 children aged between 8 and 12 years (207 boys, 236 girls) over a 16-month period. The strongest predictors of body image and…

  12. [Efficacy of double balloon enteroscopy for patients with intestinal lymphangiectasia, case report of primary intestinal lymphangiectasia].

    PubMed

    Yakami, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Kenji; Kameda, Natsuhiko; Machida, Hirohisa; Okazaki, Hirotoshi; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Oshitani, Nobuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2008-11-01

    A 31-year-old man has visited our hospital, complaining diarrhea and leg edema. Blood test showed hypoalbuminea, but we couldn't find the reason by several examinations. Therefore, we performed double balloon enteroscopy, and intestinal lymphangiectasia was diagnosed histologically by biopsy. It's useful and effective to perform double balloon enteroscopy and histological examination for the unknown origin case of protein loosing enteropathy.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes and associations with pleural effusion in outpatients with heart failure: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Guri H; Norekvål, Tone M; Graven, Torbjørn; Haug, Hilde H; Skjetne, Kyrre; Kleinau, Jens O; Gustad, Lise T; Dalen, Håvard

    2017-03-20

    We aimed to study whether patient-reported outcomes, measured by quality of life (QoL) and functional class, are sensitive to pleural effusion (PLE) in patients with heart failure (HF), and to study changes in QoL and functional class during follow-up of PLE. A cohort of 62 patients from an outpatient HF clinic was included. The amount of PLE was quantified using a pocket-sized ultrasound imaging device. Self-reports of QoL and functional class were collected using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification. At baseline, 26 (42%) patients had PLE of which 19 (31%) patients had moderate to severe amounts of PLE. Patients with no to mild PLE had a lower MLHFQ score (mean 42, SD 21) compared with patients with a moderate to severe amount of PLE (mean 55, SD 24), p=0.03. For 28 patients (45%) with follow-up data, we observed a linear improvement of the MLHFQ-score (3.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.1) with each centimetre reduction of PLE. Correspondingly, patient-reported NYHA-class followed the same pattern as the MLHFQ-score. Our study indicates that patient-reported outcome measures as MLHFQ may be sensitive tools to identify patients with HF at highest risk of symptomatic PLE and that treatment targeting reduction of PLE during follow-up is essential to improvement of QoL and functional capacity of outpatients with HF. NCT01794715; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Single-Molecule and Superresolution Imaging in Live Bacteria Cells

    PubMed Central

    Biteen, Julie S.; Moerner, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Single-molecule imaging enables biophysical measurements devoid of ensemble averaging, gives enhanced spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit, and permits superresolution reconstructions. Here, single-molecule and superresolution imaging are applied to the study of proteins in live Caulobacter crescentus cells to illustrate the power of these methods in bacterial imaging. Based on these techniques, the diffusion coefficient and dynamics of the histidine protein kinase PleC, the localization behavior of the polar protein PopZ, and the treadmilling behavior and protein superstructure of the structural protein MreB are investigated with sub-40-nm spatial resolution, all in live cells. PMID:20300204

  15. Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage II Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage II Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage III Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma

  16. A strategy of win-stay, lose-shift that outperforms tit-for-tat in the Prisoner's Dilemma game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Martin; Sigmund, Karl

    1993-07-01

    THE Prisoner's Dilemma is the leading metaphor for the evolution of cooperative behaviour in populations of selfish agents, especially since the well-known computer tournaments of Axelrod1 and their application to biological communities2,3. In Axelrod's simulations, the simple strategy tit-for-tat did outstandingly well and subsequently became the major paradigm for reciprocal altruism4 12. Here we present extended evolutionary simulations of heterogeneous ensembles of probabilistic strategies including mutation and selection, and report the unexpected success of another protagonist: Pavlov. This strategy is as simple as tit-for-tat and embodies the fundamental behavioural mechanism win-stay, lose-shift, which seems to be a widespread rule13. Pavlov's success is based on two important advantages over tit-for-tat: it can correct occasional mistakes and exploit unconditional cooperators. This second feature prevents Pavlov populations from being undermined by unconditional cooperators, which in turn invite defectors. Pavlov seems to be more robust than tit-for-tat, suggesting that cooperative behaviour in natural situations may often be based on win-stay, lose-shift.

  17. The loss of a shared lifetime: a qualitative study exploring spouses' experiences of losing couplehood with their partner with dementia living in institutional care.

    PubMed

    Førsund, Linn Hege; Skovdahl, Kirsti; Kiik, Riina; Ytrehus, Siri

    2015-01-01

    To explore and describe spouses' experiences of losing couplehood with their dementia-afflicted partner living in institutional care. Despite the losses and experiences of discontinuity due to the cognitive decline caused by dementia, the feelings of belonging and reciprocity in close relationships are still crucial to many couples. However, these experiences of spouses with partners living in institutional care are not well documented and are thus the focus of this study. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to capture the relational processes described by the spouses. Conversational interviews were conducted with n = 10 spouses of dementia-afflicted persons living in institutional care. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. The spouses' experiences of losing couplehood were primarily connected to separation from the partner and the sense of being alone. They were also related to the loss of the shared past and future. However, these experiences did not seem to be constant; short glimpses of connectedness, reciprocity and interdependence contributed to a feeling of couplehood, although these were only momentary. The spouses' experiences of losing couplehood were dynamic and were related to the couple's entire life. The spouses wavered between senses of loss and belonging to couplehood, depending on the conditions characterising the moment. Healthcare personnel must recognise the severity of some spouses' experiences of losing couplehood and be aware of how these experiences can fluctuate and be situation dependent. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Effects of Consecutive Basketball Games on the Game-Related Statistics that Discriminate Winner and Losing Teams

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Sergio J.; García, Javier; Feu, Sebastian; Lorenzo, Alberto; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the game-related statistics that discriminated basketball winning and losing teams in each of the three consecutive games played in a condensed tournament format. The data were obtained from the Spanish Basketball Federation and included game-related statistics from the Under-20 league (2005-2006 and 2006-2007 seasons). A total of 223 games were analyzed with the following game-related statistics: two and three-point field goal (made and missed), free-throws (made and missed), offensive and defensive rebounds, assists, steals, turnovers, blocks (made and received), fouls committed, ball possessions and offensive rating. Results showed that winning teams in this competition had better values in all game-related statistics, with the exception of three point field goals made, free-throws missed and turnovers (p ≥ 0.05). The main effect of game number was only identified in turnovers, with a statistical significant decrease between the second and third game. No interaction was found in the analysed variables. A discriminant analysis allowed identifying the two-point field goals made, the defensive rebounds and the assists as discriminators between winning and losing teams in all three games. Additionally to these, only the three-point field goals made contributed to discriminate teams in game three, suggesting a moderate effect of fatigue. Coaches may benefit from being aware of this variation in game determinant related statistics and, also, from using offensive and defensive strategies in the third game, allowing to explore or hide the three point field-goals performance. Key points Overall team performances along the three consecutive games were very similar, not confirming an accumulated fatigue effect. The results from the three-point field goals in the third game suggested that winning teams were able to shoot better from longer distances and this could be the result of exhibiting higher conditioning status and

  19. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  20. The helical MreB cytoskeleton in Escherichia coli MC1000/pLE7 is an artifact of the N-Terminal yellow fluorescent protein tag.

    PubMed

    Swulius, Matthew T; Jensen, Grant J

    2012-12-01

    Based on fluorescence microscopy, the actin homolog MreB has been thought to form extended helices surrounding the cytoplasm of rod-shaped bacterial cells. The presence of these and other putative helices has come to dominate models of bacterial cell shape regulation, chromosome segregation, polarity, and motility. Here we use electron cryotomography to show that MreB does in fact form extended helices and filaments in Escherichia coli when yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is fused to its N terminus but native (untagged) MreB expressed to the same levels does not. In contrast, mCherry fused to an internal loop (MreB-RFP(SW)) does not induce helices. The helices are therefore an artifact of the placement of the fluorescent protein tag. YFP-MreB helices were also clearly distinguishable from the punctate, "patchy" localization patterns of MreB-RFP(SW), even by standard light microscopy. The many interpretations in the literature of such punctate patterns as helices should therefore be reconsidered.

  1. Student pharmacists' preparedness to evaluate primary literature pre- and post-Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences.

    PubMed

    Momary, Kathryn M; Lundquist, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of formal primary literature evaluation (PLE) during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) on student pharmacists' preparedness and knowledge related to literature evaluation. A perception of preparedness survey and knowledge assessment was given to student pharmacists pre- and post-APPEs. Student pharmacists were also asked to characterize their opportunities for formal PLE during APPEs. Literature evaluation experiences, knowledge base and preparedness data were compared between student pharmacists who completed two or more PLE on APPE and those who did not. A total of 211 student pharmacists completed 529 formal PLE during their APPE experiences. Quiz grades and average perception of preparedness increased significantly from pre- to post-APPE regardless of whether student pharmacists had the opportunity for formal PLE on APPE. Student pharmacists who completed two or more PLE on APPE stated they felt more confident in evaluating primary literature after APPE, had greater post-APPE preparedness scores and a trend towards higher post-APPE quiz scores. APPEs provide an important opportunity for student pharmacists to improve their PLE knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein aggregation due to nsSNP resulting in P56S VABP protein is associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vinay Kumar, Chundi; Kumar, K M; Swetha, Rayapadi; Ramaiah, Sudha; Anbarasu, Anand

    2014-08-07

    Mutations in the gene encoding vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAPB) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. The VAPB gene is mapped to chromosome number 20 and can be found at cytogenetic location 20q13.33 of the chromosome. VAPB is seen to play a significant role in the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is a process that suppresses the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Earlier studies have reported two points; which we have analyzed in our study. Firstly, the mutation P56S in the VAPB is seen to increase the stability of the protein and secondly, the mutation P56S in VAPB is seen to interrupt the functioning of the gene and loses its ability to be involved in the activation of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway which leads to ALS. With correlation on the previous research studies on the stability of this protein, we carried out Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. We analyzed the SNP results of 17 nsSNPs obtained from dbSNP using SIFT, polyphen, I-Mutant, SNP&GO, PhDSNP and Mutpred to predict the role of nsSNPs in VAPB. MD simulation is carried out and plots for RMSD, RMSF, Rg, SASA, H-bond and PCA are obtained to check and prove the stability of the wild type and the mutant protein structure. The protein is checked for its aggregation and the results obtained show changes in the protein structure that might result in the loss of function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimated Effects of Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Protein Intake and the Risk of Protein Deficiency by Country and Region

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel; Myers, Samuel S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Crops grown under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) contain less protein. Crops particularly affected include rice and wheat, which are primary sources of dietary protein for many countries. Objectives: We aimed to estimate global and country-specific risks of protein deficiency attributable to anthropogenic CO2 emissions by 2050. Methods: To model per capita protein intake in countries around the world under eCO2, we first established the effect size of eCO2 on the protein concentration of edible portions of crops by performing a meta-analysis of published literature. We then estimated per-country protein intake under current and anticipated future eCO2 using global food balance sheets (FBS). We modeled protein intake distributions within countries using Gini coefficients, and we estimated those at risk of deficiency from estimated average protein requirements (EAR) weighted by population age structure. Results: Under eCO2, rice, wheat, barley, and potato protein contents decreased by 7.6%, 7.8%, 14.1%, and 6.4%, respectively. Consequently, 18 countries may lose >5% of their dietary protein, including India (5.3%). By 2050, assuming today’s diets and levels of income inequality, an additional 1.6% or 148.4 million of the world’s population may be placed at risk of protein deficiency because of eCO2. In India, an additional 53 million people may become at risk. Conclusions: Anthropogenic CO2 emissions threaten the adequacy of protein intake worldwide. Elevated atmospheric CO2 may widen the disparity in protein intake within countries, with plant-based diets being the most vulnerable. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP41 PMID:28885977

  4. Weight loss expectations and body dissatisfaction in young women attempting to lose weight.

    PubMed

    Siervo, M; Montagnese, C; Muscariello, E; Evans, E; Stephan, B C M; Nasti, G; Papa, A; Iannetti, E; Colantuoni, A

    2014-04-01

    Unrealistic weight loss expectations (WLEs) and greater body dissatisfaction may be associated with the poor long-term outcomes of dietary and lifestyle weight loss treatments. We evaluated the association between body size, WLEs and body dissatisfaction in young women attempting to lose weight. Forty-four young healthy women [age range 18-35 years, body mass index (BMI) range 23-40 kg/m2] were recruited. Women were classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) and non-obese (BMI <30.0 kg/m2). The Body Dissatisfaction scale of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and the Body Image Assessment for Obesity silhouette charts were used to assess body dissatisfaction. WLEs were categorised according to personal (ideal, happiness, satisfaction, weight history), lifestyle (fitness) and social (career, family acceptance, peer acceptance, mass media, social pressure) factors. Individual WLEs were compared with recommended clinical targets (5%, 10% and 20%) for weight loss. Body dissatisfaction was lower in non-obese subjects and was directly associated with BMI (P < 0.05). WLEs were directly associated with BMI and the obese group reported greater expectations. Five non-obese subjects (23%) desired to lose more than 20% of their body weight, whereas the proportion was significantly higher in the obese group (17 subjects; 74%). Subjects derived the greatest WLEs from mass media, whereas they perceived that family and friends were supportive of a lesser degree of weight loss. We observed a mismatch between clinical and personal expectations, and social pressure and interpersonal relationships appear to have a prominent role with respect to influencing the association. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  5. A novel model for NSAID induced gastroenteropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devendra Pratap; Borse, Swapnil P; Nivsarkar, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Progress in management of Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastrointestinal toxicity requires the availability of appropriate experimental animal models that are as close to humans as feasible. Our objective was to develop a rat model for NSAID-induced gastroenteropathy and also to simulate the common clinical scenario of co-administration of NSAID and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to explore if PPI contribute to exacerbation of NSAID-enteropathy. Rats were treated twice daily with pantoprazole sodium (PTZ; 10mg/kg peroral) or vehicle for a total of 10days. In some experiments, Diclofenac sodium (DCF; 9mg/kg) or vehicle was administered orally twice daily for the final 5days of PTZ/vehicle administration. After the last dose on 9th day, rats in all the groups were fasted but water was provided ad libitum. 12h after the last dose on 10th day, rats in all the groups were euthanized and their gastrointestinal tracts were assessed for haemorrhagic lesions, lipid peroxidation, intestinal permeability and gastrointestinal luminal pH alterations. Changes in haemoglobin, haematocrit and serum levels of albumin, total protein, ALT and bilirubin were calculated. The macroscopic and histological evidence suggested that administration of DCF resulted in significant gastroenteropathic damage and co-administration of PTZ resulted in significant exacerbation of NSAID enteropathy, while attenuation of NSAID induced gastropathy was observed. Our results were further supported by the significant decrease in haemoglobin and haematocrit levels and serum levels of albumin and total proteins, an increase in oxidative stress and intestinal permeability with the use of DCF either alone or in combination with PTZ. This model was developed to simulate the human clinical situation during NSAID therapy and indeed the present DCF regimen caused both gastric and small bowel alterations, such as multiple erosive lesions, together with a decrease in haemoglobin, haematocrit

  6. Losing the Quality Battle in Australian Education for Librarianship: A Decade on. (An Update on the Original Article by Ross Harvey, "Losing the Quality Battle in Australian Education for Librarianship". "The Australian Library Journal", 50 No. 1, 2001: 15-22.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Ross

    2011-01-01

    The Editor of "ALJ" has invited me to comment on my 2001 article "Losing the quality battle in Australian education for librarianship" (Harvey 2001). The article was prompted by a period I spent as a visiting professor in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA (the University of California Los Angeles) and was written while I was there.…

  7. Genetically divergent strains of feline immunodeficiency virus from the domestic cat (Felis catus) and the African lion (Panthera leo) share usage of CD134 and CXCR4 as entry receptors.

    PubMed

    McEwan, William A; McMonagle, Elizabeth L; Logan, Nicola; Serra, Rodrigo C; Kat, Pieter; Vandewoude, Sue; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2008-11-01

    The env open reading frames of African lion (Panthera leo) lentivirus (feline immunodeficiency virus [FIV(Ple)]) subtypes B and E from geographically distinct regions of Africa suggest two distinct ancestries, with FIV(Ple)-E sharing a common ancestor with the domestic cat (Felis catus) lentivirus (FIV(Fca)). Here we demonstrate that FIV(Ple)-E and FIV(Fca) share the use of CD134 (OX40) and CXCR4 as a primary receptor and coreceptor, respectively, and that both lion CD134 and CXCR4 are functional receptors for FIV(Ple)-E. The shared usage of CD134 and CXCR4 by FIV(Fca) and FIV(Ple)-E may have implications for in vivo cell tropism and the pathogenicity of the E subtype among free-ranging lion populations.

  8. Losing Chlordimeform Use in Cotton Production. Its Effects on the Economy and Pest Resistance. Agricultural Economic Report Number 587.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osteen, Craig; Suguiyama, Luis

    This report examines the economic implications of losing chlordimeform use on cotton and considers chlordimeform's role in managing the resistance of bollworms and tobacco budworms to synthetic pyrethroids. It estimates changes in prices, production, acreage, consumer expenditures, aggregate producer returns, regional crop effects, and returns to…

  9. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B.; Mylon, Steven E.; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing.Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the

  10. Validation of a preclinical model of diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic neoplasia in Yucatan miniature pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jennifer; Tinkey, Peggy T.; Avritscher, Rony; Van Pelt, Carolyn; Eskandari, Ghazaleh; George, Suraj Konnath; Xiao, Lianchun; Cressman, Erik; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Rashid, Asif; Kaseb, Ahmed O.; Amin, Hesham M.; Uthamanthil, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to reduce time to tumor onset in a diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) swine model via partial liver embolization (PLE) and to characterize the model for use in translational research. Methods Eight Yucatan miniature pigs were injected intraperitoneally with either saline (n=2) or DEN (n=6) solution weekly for 12 weeks. Three of the DEN-treated pigs underwent PLE. Animals underwent periodic radiological evaluation, liver biopsy, and blood sampling, and full necropsy was performed at study termination (~29 months). Results All DEN-treated pigs developed hepatic adenoma and HCC. PLE accelerated the time to adenoma development but not to HCC development. Biomarker analysis results showed that IGF1 levels decreased in all DEN-treated pigs, as functional liver capacity decreased with progression of HCC. VEGF and IL-6 levels were positively correlated with disease progression. Immunohistochemical probing of HCC tissues demonstrated the expression of several important survival-promoting proteins. Conclusion To our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate accelerated development of hepatic neoplasia in Yucatan miniature pigs. Our HCC swine model closely mimics the human condition (i.e., progressive disease stages and expression of relevant molecular markers) and is a viable translational model. PMID:27305144

  11. Associations of Trying to Lose Weight, Weight Control Behaviors, and Current Cigarette Use among US High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jonetta L.; Eaton, Danice K.; Pederson, Linda L.; Lowry, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Approximately one-quarter of high school students currently use cigarettes. Previous research has suggested some youth use smoking as a method for losing weight. The purpose of this study was to describe the association of current cigarette use with specific healthy and unhealthy weight control practices among 9th-12th grade students…

  12. 25 CFR 115.430 - Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reach the age of 18? 115.430 Section 115.430 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18? Your account will no longer be supervised when you reach the age of 18 unless statutory language or a tribal resolution specifies...

  13. 25 CFR 115.430 - Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reach the age of 18? 115.430 Section 115.430 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Will your account lose its supervised status when you reach the age of 18? Your account will no longer be supervised when you reach the age of 18 unless statutory language or a tribal resolution specifies...

  14. Fecal S100A12 concentration predicts a lack of response to treatment in dogs affected with chronic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Volkmann, Maria; Otoni, Cristiane C; Grützner, Niels; Kohn, Barbara; Jergens, Albert E; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-09-01

    S100A12 is a potential biomarker of gastrointestinal inflammation in dogs and fecal S100A12 concentrations are correlated with disease severity and outcome. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether there was any association between pre-treatment fecal S100A12 concentrations in dogs affected with chronic enteropathy (CE) and the response to treatment. Dogs affected with CE were recruited into the study and were classified as antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD; n = 9), food-responsive diarrhea (FRD; n = 30) or idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; n = 25). They were also grouped based on their response to treatment as complete remission (n = 35), partial response (n = 25) or no response (n = 4). Fecal S100A12 concentrations, measured by ELISA, were elevated in dogs affected with IBD compared with those from dogs affected with FRD (P = 0.010) or ARD (P = 0.025). Dogs with IBD that did not respond to treatment (n = 4) had significantly greater fecal S100A12 concentrations than dogs in complete remission (P = 0.009). Measurement of fecal S100A12 at the time of diagnosis discriminated between dogs with IBD that were refractory to therapy (≥2700 ng/g fecal S100A12) from those with at least a partial response (<2700 ng/g fecal S100A12), with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 76%. These preliminary results suggest that testing of fecal S100A12 may be useful for predicting the lack of response to treatment in dogs affected with CE. The utility of serial fecal S100A12 measurements for monitoring dogs undergoing treatment for CE warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Plagiochin E, a botanic-derived phenolic compound, reverses fungal resistance to fluconazole relating to the efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Guo, X-L; Leng, P; Yang, Y; Yu, L-G; Lou, H-X

    2008-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of plagiochin E (PLE), a botanic-derived phenolic natural product, on reversal of fungal resistance to fluconazole (FLC) in vitro and the related mechanism. A synergistic action of PLE and FLC was observed in the FLC-resistant Candida albicans strains and was evaluated using the fractional inhibited concentration index. The effect of PLE on FLC intracellular uptake was investigated in FLC-resistant C. albicans cells by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and the effect on efflux drug pump was assessed by measuring the efflux of Rhodamine 123 (Rh123). PLE significantly inhibited the efflux, but not the absorption, of Rh123 in FLC-resistant strains in phosphate-buffered saline with 5% glucose. Overexpression of the multidrug-resistance gene CDR1 in FLC-resistant C. albicans isolates was detected, and the introduction of PLE to the cells showed a significant reduction of the CDR1 expression in those FLC-resistant isolates. These findings indicate that PLE could reverse the fungal resistant to FLC by inhibiting the efflux of FLC from C. albicans, and this effect may be related to the efflux pump. These results indicate that the combination of PLE and FLC may provide an approach for the clinical therapy of fungus infection induced by FLC-resistant strains.

  16. The Effect of Suspended Sediment Transport and Deposition on Streambed Clogging Under Losing and Gaining Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A.; Packman, A. I.; Preziosi-Ribero, A.; Li, A.; Arnon, S.

    2017-12-01

    Sediment transport and deposition in streams can affect streambed hydraulic characteristics due to clogging, reduce water fluxes through the hyporheic zone, and thus expected to affect biogeochemical processes. Processes affecting deposition of suspended particles were systematically studied under various overlying velocities but without taking into account the interactions with groundwater. This is despite the fact that the interaction with groundwater were shown to play an important role in deposition patterns of fine sediments in field studies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of losing and gaining fluxes on suspended sediment depositional patterns and on hyporheic exchange fluxes. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory flume system (640 cm long and 30 cm wide) that has a capacity to enforce losing or gaining flow conditions. The flume was packed with homogenous sand, while suspended sediment deposition was evaluated by adding kaolinite particles to the water and following the deposition rate by particle disappearance from the bulk water. Consecutive additions of kaolinite were done, while hyporheic exchange fluxes were evaluated by conducting NaCl tracer experiments between each kaolinite additions. Furthermore, dye injections were used to visualize the flow patterns in the streambed using time-lapse photography through the transparent sidewalls of the flume. Hyporheic exchange and particle tracking simulations were done to assess the results of particle deposition and feedbacks between hyporheic flow, particle transport, and streambed clogging. Experimental results showed that the deposition of clay decreases with increasing amount of clay concentration in the sediment. Hyporheic exchange flux decreases linearly with increasing amount of clay added to the system and the region of active hyporheic exchange was confined to the upper part of the sediment. Understanding the particle deposition mechanisms under losing and gaining flow

  17. Losing track of time through delayed body representations.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Thomas H; Steixner, Agnes; Boettger, Joachim; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    The ability to keep track of time is perceived as crucial in most human societies. However, to lose track of time may also serve an important social role, associated with recreational purpose. To this end a number of social technologies are employed, some of which may relate to a manipulation of time perception through a modulation of body representation. Here, we investigated an influence of real-time or delayed videos of own-body representations on time perception in an experimental setup with virtual mirrors. Seventy participants were asked to either stay in the installation until they thought that a defined time (90 s) had passed, or they were encouraged to stay in the installation as long as they wanted and after exiting were asked to estimate the duration of their stay. Results show that a modulation of body representation by time-delayed representations of the mirror-video displays influenced time perception. Furthermore, these time-delayed conditions were associated with a greater sense of arousal and intoxication. We suggest that feeding in references to the immediate past into working memory could be the underlying mental mechanism mediating the observed modulation of time perception. We argue that such an influence on time perception would probably not only be achieved visually, but might also work with acoustic references to the immediate past (e.g., with music).

  18. Heavy inertial particles in turbulent flows gain energy slowly but lose it rapidly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Gupta, Anupam; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the time irreversibility of the dynamics of heavy inertial particles in three-dimensional, statistically homogeneous, and isotropic turbulent flows. We show that the probability density function (PDF) of the increment, W (τ ) , of a particle's energy over a time scale τ is non-Gaussian, and skewed toward negative values. This implies that, on average, particles gain energy over a period of time that is longer than the duration over which they lose energy. We call this slow gain and fast loss. We find that the third moment of W (τ ) scales as τ3 for small values of τ . We show that the PDF of power-input p is negatively skewed too; we use this skewness Ir as a measure of the time irreversibility and we demonstrate that it increases sharply with the Stokes number St for small St; this increase slows down at St≃1 . Furthermore, we obtain the PDFs of t+ and t-, the times over which p has, respectively, positive or negative signs, i.e., the particle gains or loses energy. We obtain from these PDFs a direct and natural quantification of the slow gain and fast loss of the energy of the particles, because these PDFs possess exponential tails from which we infer the characteristic loss and gain times tloss and tgain, respectively, and we obtain tloss

  19. Heavy inertial particles in turbulent flows gain energy slowly but lose it rapidly.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Gupta, Anupam; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the time irreversibility of the dynamics of heavy inertial particles in three-dimensional, statistically homogeneous, and isotropic turbulent flows. We show that the probability density function (PDF) of the increment, W(τ), of a particle's energy over a time scale τ is non-Gaussian, and skewed toward negative values. This implies that, on average, particles gain energy over a period of time that is longer than the duration over which they lose energy. We call this slow gain and fast loss. We find that the third moment of W(τ) scales as τ^{3} for small values of τ. We show that the PDF of power-input p is negatively skewed too; we use this skewness Ir as a measure of the time irreversibility and we demonstrate that it increases sharply with the Stokes number St for small St; this increase slows down at St≃1. Furthermore, we obtain the PDFs of t^{+} and t^{-}, the times over which p has, respectively, positive or negative signs, i.e., the particle gains or loses energy. We obtain from these PDFs a direct and natural quantification of the slow gain and fast loss of the energy of the particles, because these PDFs possess exponential tails from which we infer the characteristic loss and gain times t_{loss} and t_{gain}, respectively, and we obtain t_{loss}

  20. Chlorogenic acid stability in pressurized liquid extraction conditions.

    PubMed

    Wianowska, Dorota; Typek, Rafał; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L

    2015-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CQAs) are phenolic compounds naturally occurring in all higher plants. They are potentially useful in pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, food additives, and cosmetics due to their recently suggested biomedical activity. Hence, research interest in CQA properties, their isomers, and natural occurrence has been growing. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) is regarded as an effective and quick sample preparation method in plant analysis. The short time of PLE decreases the risk of chemical degradation of extracted compounds, thus increasing the attractiveness of its application. However, PLE applied for plant sample preparation is not free from limitations. We found that trans-5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (trans-5-CQA), the main CQA isomer, isomerizes to 3- and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acids and undergoes transesterification, hydrolysis, and reaction with water even in rapid PLE. Moreover, the number and concentration of trans-5-CQA derivatives formed in PLE strongly depends on extractant composition, its pH, and extraction time and temperature. It was not possible to find the PLE conditions in which the transformation process of trans-5-CQA would be eliminated.

  1. Using Heat as a Tracer to Estimate Streambed Water Exchanges beneath the Losing Disconnected Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yung-Chia; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Hsu, Shao-Yu; Liao, Lin-Yan

    2017-04-01

    Streambed water exchanges is the movement of water from a river into the beneath sediments and then back into the river. This interaction between river and streambed is considered as a fundamental role in the functioning of riparian ecosystems. Chichiawan Watershed located in central Taiwan is the only habitat for the endangered species of formosan land-locked salmon and such dynamics of downwelling/upwelling flow within the streambed can affect the survival of salmon. In order to investigate the interaction between river and streambed, heat is used as an environmental tracer to determine the water exchanges within the streambed and estimate the hydraulic conductivity of sediments. The detailed hydrographs, thermographs, and vertical temperature profiles obtained along the Yusheng Creek, a tributary at the upstream of Chichiawan Creek, were presented and used to estimate the streambed water exchanges. Results showed that the Yusheng Creek along the monitoring section is a losing stream and its downwelling flux increases from up- to down-stream. Partial monitoring sections changed from perennial to intermittence when the consecutive dry days over a period of time increase significantly and an unsaturated zone between the creek and the groundwater existed. According to the measured temperature and water level data, the numerical model of VS2DH was used to quantify the vertical fluxes and hydraulic conductivities of streamed. The potential mechanisms causing the creek transited from perennial to intermittence and becoming a losing disconnected system need further study.

  2. The Experience of Receiving and Then Losing a Scholarship: A Tracer Study of Secondary School Scholarship Recipients in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Cathy; Chapman, David W.; Okurut, Charles Opolot

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings of a tracer that investigated differences in the profile and subsequent experiences of scholarship recipients in Uganda who were able to complete the lower secondary school cycle (O level) without interruption (N = 174) and those that dropped out before completing their O-level cycle (N = 51), thereby losing their…

  3. Prevention of polymorphic light eruption by oral administration of a nutritional supplement containing lycopene, β-carotene, and Lactobacillus johnsonii: results from a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Le Floc'h, Caroline; Cheniti, Ahsène; Piccardi, Nathalie; Krutmann, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is the most common photodermatosis. Little is known about the efficacy of systemic photoprotection provided by nutritional supplements in PLE patients. The purpose of this study was to assess efficacy of nutritional supplement containing lycopene, β-carotene, and Lactobacillus johnsonii to diminish skin lesions induced by 'photoprovocation' testing in PLE patients. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study, 60 PLE patients were supplemented with the nutritional supplement or placebo. For inducing skin lesions, patient skin was exposed to single daily doses of 100 J/cm2 ultraviolet A1 (UVA1) for two consecutive days. Skin lesions were evaluated using a PLE score. Skin biopsies were taken before and after supplementation from unexposed and exposed skin, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mRNA expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Prior to supplementation, skin lesions were induced in all patients with comparable PLE scores. After 12 weeks, intake of the supplement significantly reduced the PLE score after one exposure as compared with patients taking placebo (P<0.001). After two exposures, these differences were no longer significant. At a molecular level, the development of skin lesions was associated with an increased expression of ICAM-1 mRNA, which was significantly reduced after supplementation (P=0.022), but not with placebo. The nutritional supplement provides protection against the development of UVA-induced PLE lesions at clinical and molecular levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Multifunctional clickable and protein-repellent magnetic silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Estupiñán, Diego; Bannwarth, Markus B; Mylon, Steven E; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-02-07

    Silica nanoparticles are versatile materials whose physicochemical surface properties can be precisely adjusted. Because it is possible to combine several functionalities in a single carrier, silica-based materials are excellent candidates for biomedical applications. However, the functionality of the nanoparticles can get lost upon exposure to biological media due to uncontrolled biomolecule adsorption. Therefore, it is important to develop strategies that reduce non-specific protein-particle interactions without losing the introduced surface functionality. Herein, organosilane chemistry is employed to produce magnetic silica nanoparticles bearing differing amounts of amino and alkene functional groups on their surface as orthogonally addressable chemical functionalities. Simultaneously, a short-chain zwitterion is added to decrease the non-specific adsorption of biomolecules on the nanoparticles surface. The multifunctional particles display reduced protein adsorption after incubation in undiluted fetal bovine serum as well as in single protein solutions (serum albumin and lysozyme). Besides, the particles retain their capacity to selectively react with biomolecules. Thus, they can be covalently bio-functionalized with an antibody by means of orthogonal click reactions. These features make the described multifunctional silica nanoparticles a promising system for the study of surface interactions with biomolecules, targeting, and bio-sensing.

  5. The Complete Set of Genes Encoding Major Intrinsic Proteins in Arabidopsis Provides a Framework for a New Nomenclature for Major Intrinsic Proteins in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, Urban; Karlsson, Maria; Johansson, Ingela; Gustavsson, Sofia; Sjövall, Sara; Fraysse, Laure; Weig, Alfons R.; Kjellbom, Per

    2001-01-01

    Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs) facilitate the passive transport of small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs constitute a very old family of proteins and different forms have been found in all kinds of living organisms, including bacteria, fungi, animals, and plants. In the genomic sequence of Arabidopsis, we have identified 35 different MIP-encoding genes. Based on sequence similarity, these 35 proteins are divided into four different subfamilies: plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, tonoplast intrinsic proteins, NOD26-like intrinsic proteins also called NOD26-like MIPs, and the recently discovered small basic intrinsic proteins. In Arabidopsis, there are 13 plasma membrane intrinsic proteins, 10 tonoplast intrinsic proteins, nine NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, and three small basic intrinsic proteins. The gene structure in general is conserved within each subfamily, although there is a tendency to lose introns. Based on phylogenetic comparisons of maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis MIPs (AtMIPs), it is argued that the general intron patterns in the subfamilies were formed before the split of monocotyledons and dicotyledons. Although the gene structure is unique for each subfamily, there is a common pattern in how transmembrane helices are encoded on the exons in three of the subfamilies. The nomenclature for plant MIPs varies widely between different species but also between subfamilies in the same species. Based on the phylogeny of all AtMIPs, a new and more consistent nomenclature is proposed. The complete set of AtMIPs, together with the new nomenclature, will facilitate the isolation, classification, and labeling of plant MIPs from other species. PMID:11500536

  6. Solitons and protein folding: An In Silico experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, N.; Dai, J.; Sieradzan, A.; Niemi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Protein folding [1] is the process of formation of a functional 3D structure from a random coil — the shape in which amino-acid chains leave the ribosome. Anfinsen's dogma states that the native 3D shape of a protein is completely determined by protein's amino acid sequence. Despite the progress in understanding the process rate and the success in folding prediction for some small proteins, with presently available physics-based methods it is not yet possible to reliably deduce the shape of a biologically active protein from its amino acid sequence. The protein-folding problem endures as one of the most important unresolved problems in science; it addresses the origin of life itself. Furthermore, a wrong fold is a common cause for a protein to lose its function or even endanger the living organism. Soliton solutions of a generalized discrete non-linear Schrödinger equation (GDNLSE) obtained from the energy function in terms of bond and torsion angles κ and τ provide a constructive theoretical framework for describing protein folds and folding patterns [2]. Here we study the dynamics of this process by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. The soliton manifestation is the pattern helix-loop-helix in the secondary structure of the protein, which explains the importance of understanding loop formation in helical proteins. We performed in silico experiments for unfolding one subunit of the core structure of gp41 from the HIV envelope glycoprotein (PDB ID: 1AIK [3]) by molecular-dynamics simulations with the MD package GROMACS. We analyzed 80 ns trajectories, obtained with one united-atom and two different all-atom force fields, to justify the side-chain orientation quantification scheme adopted in the studies and to eliminate force-field based artifacts. Our results are compatible with the soliton model of protein folding and provide first insight into soliton-formation dynamics.

  7. Unusual biophysics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-05-01

    Research of a past decade and a half leaves no doubt that complete understanding of protein functionality requires close consideration of the fact that many functional proteins do not have well-folded structures. These intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and proteins with intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are highly abundant in nature and play a number of crucial roles in a living cell. Their functions, which are typically associated with a wide range of intermolecular interactions where IDPs possess remarkable binding promiscuity, complement functional repertoire of ordered proteins. All this requires a close attention to the peculiarities of biophysics of these proteins. In this review, some key biophysical features of IDPs are covered. In addition to the peculiar sequence characteristics of IDPs these biophysical features include sequential, structural, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity of IDPs; their rough and relatively flat energy landscapes; their ability to undergo both induced folding and induced unfolding; the ability to interact specifically with structurally unrelated partners; the ability to gain different structures at binding to different partners; and the ability to keep essential amount of disorder even in the bound form. IDPs are also characterized by the "turned-out" response to the changes in their environment, where they gain some structure under conditions resulting in denaturation or even unfolding of ordered proteins. It is proposed that the heterogeneous spatiotemporal structure of IDPs/IDPRs can be described as a set of foldons, inducible foldons, semi-foldons, non-foldons, and unfoldons. They may lose their function when folded, and activation of some IDPs is associated with the awaking of the dormant disorder. It is possible that IDPs represent the "edge of chaos" systems which operate in a region between order and complete randomness or chaos, where the complexity is maximal. This article is part of a Special Issue

  8. Liver Transplant: Nutrition

    MedlinePlus

    ... transplant and liver disease patients. Pre-Transplant Protein Malnutrition -- Many patients with end stage liver disease do ... to lose weight sensibly and slowly, without causing malnutrition (especially protein malnutrition). Losing excess weight decreases the ...

  9. Hereditary polymorphic light eruption of American Indians: occurrence in non-Indians with polymorphic light eruption.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, R M; Johnson, J A

    1996-04-01

    Hereditary polymorphic light eruption (HPLE) occurs unique ly in the American Indian and Inuit and exhibits autosomal dominant transmission. Because the cutaneous expression of HPLE resembles that of polymorphic light eruption (PLE) and because many non-Indians in the United States have American Indian heritage, some instances of PLE may actually be HPLE. Our purpose was to determine whether non-Indian patients with PLE have characteristics suggestive of HPLE. We surveyed in Nebraska 25 European-Caucasian and 36 African-American patients with PLE for American Indian heritage and photosensitive relatives. Nonphotosensitive subjects (52 Caucasians and 40 African Americans) were surveyed for American Indian heritage. American Indian heritage occurred in 11 Caucasian patients (44%); of those, seven (64%) had photosensitive relatives. Likewise, 29 African Americans (81%) had American Indian heritage; 19 (66%) of those had photosensitive relatives. American Indian heritage occurred in 10 Caucasian control subjects (19%) and in 34 African-American control subjects (85%). If American Indian heritage and a family history of photosensitivity are definitive for HPLE, seven (28%) of our Caucasian patients and 19 (53%) of our African-American patients have HPLE rather than PLE. We urge physicians who suspect PLE in non-Indians to ask about American Indian heritage and photosensitive relatives and to screen their present patients with PLE for such characteristics.

  10. Is the Fungus Magnaporthe Losing DNA Methylation?

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Van Vu, Ba; Kadotani, Naoki; Tanaka, Masaki; Murata, Toshiki; Shiina, Kohta; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio; Nakayashiki, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    The long terminal repeat retrotransposon, Magnaporthe gypsy-like element (MAGGY), has been shown to be targeted for cytosine methylation in a subset of Magnaporthe oryzae field isolates. Analysis of the F1 progeny from a genetic cross between methylation-proficient (Br48) and methylation-deficient (GFSI1-7-2) isolates revealed that methylation of the MAGGY element was governed by a single dominant gene. Positional cloning followed by gene disruption and complementation experiments revealed that the responsible gene was the DNA methyltransferase, MoDMT1, an ortholog of Neurospora crassa Dim-2. A survey of MAGGY methylation in 60 Magnaporthe field isolates revealed that 42 isolates from rice, common millet, wheat, finger millet, and buffelgrass were methylation proficient while 18 isolates from foxtail millet, green bristlegrass, Japanese panicgrass, torpedo grass, Guinea grass, and crabgrass were methylation deficient. Phenotypic analyses showed that MoDMT1 plays no major role in development and pathogenicity of the fungus. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that the average copy number of genomic MAGGY elements was not significantly different between methylation-deficient and -proficient field isolates even though the levels of MAGGY transcript were generally higher in the former group. MoDMT1 gene sequences in the methylation-deficient isolates suggested that at least three independent mutations were responsible for the loss of MoDMT1 function. Overall, our data suggest that MoDMT1 is not essential for the natural life cycle of the fungus and raise the possibility that the genus Magnaporthe may be losing the mechanism of DNA methylation on the evolutionary time scale. PMID:23979580

  11. Metabolic phenotyping of an adoptive transfer mouse model of experimental colitis and impact of dietary fish oil intake.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Lichti, Pia; Bosco, Nabil; Brahmbhatt, Viral; Oliveira, Manuel; Haller, Dirk; Benyacoub, Jalil

    2015-04-03

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are acute and chronic disabling inflammatory disorders with multiple complex etiologies that are not well-defined. Chronic intestinal inflammation has been linked to an energy-deficient state of gut epithelium with alterations in oxidative metabolism. Plasma-, urine-, stool-, and liver-specific metabonomic analyses are reported in a naïve T cell adoptive transfer (AT) experimental model of colitis, which evaluated the impact of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched diet. Metabolic profiles of AT animals and their controls under chow diet or fish oil supplementation were compared to describe the (i) consequences of inflammatory processes and (ii) the differential impact of n-3 fatty acids. Inflammation was associated with higher glycoprotein levels (related to acute-phase response) and remodeling of PUFAs. Low triglyceride levels and enhanced PUFA levels in the liver suggest activation of lipolytic pathways that could lead to the observed increase of phospholipids in the liver (including plasmalogens and sphingomyelins). In parallel, the increase in stool excretion of most amino acids may indicate a protein-losing enteropathy. Fecal content of glutamine was lower in AT mice, a feature exacerbated under fish oil intervention that may reflect a functional relationship between intestinal inflammatory status and glutamine metabolism. The decrease in Krebs cycle intermediates in urine (succinate, α-ketoglutarate) also suggests a reduction in the glutaminolytic pathway at a systemic level. Our data indicate that inflammatory status is related to this overall loss of energy homeostasis.

  12. Nanoformulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor with Target Receptor-Triggered-Release in the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhang; Fay, James M; Poon, Chi-Duen; Vinod, Natasha; Zhao, Yuling; Bullock, Kristin; Qin, Si; Manickam, Devika S; Yi, Xiang; Banks, William A; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2018-02-07

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is identified as a potent neuroprotective and neuroregenerative agent for many neurological diseases. Regrettably, its delivery to the brain is hampered by poor serum stability and rapid brain clearance. Here, a novel nanoformulation is reported composed of a bio-compatible polymer, poly(ethylene glycol)- b -poly(L-glutamic acid) (PEG-PLE), that hosts the BDNF molecule in a nanoscale complex, termed here Nano-BDNF. Upon simple mixture, Nano-BDNF spontaneously forms uniform spherical particles with a core-shell structure. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that binding between BDNF and PEG-PLE is mediated through electrostatic coupling as well as transient hydrogen bonding. The formation of Nano-BDNF complex stabilizes BDNF and protects it from nonspecific binding with common proteins in the body fluid, while allowing it to associate with its receptors. Following intranasal administration, the nanoformulation improves BDNF delivery throughout the brain and displays a more preferable regional distribution pattern than the native protein. Furthermore, intranasally delivered Nano-BDNF results in superior neuroprotective effects in the mouse brain with lipopolysaccharides-induced inflammation, indicating promise for further evaluation of this agent for the therapy of neurologic diseases.

  13. [Exudative enteropathy in congenital lymphedema-lymphangiectasia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heruth, M; Müller, P; Liebscher, L; Kurze, G; Richter, T

    2006-01-01

    Congenital peripheral elephantiasiformic alterations are very rare in paediatric patients. In a patient with lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome we demonstrate over a 8-year follow-up that not only cosmetic and social indications for surgical treatments but also internal care become important during the course. We report on a boy with congenital lymphedemas of the extremities and the genital region, which were several times surgically treated. The patient became symptomatic firstly with tetanic cramps caused by malabsorption syndrome due to intestinal lymphangiectasia at the age of 6 years. Synopsis of clinical and laboratory findings and the patient's course are pointing to a mild Hennekam syndrome with still unknown aetiology. The boy developed adequately with permanent oral substitution of electrolytes and vitamins, protein-rich diet, supplementation of medium-chain fatty acids and compressing bandages. Infusions of human albumin to correct persistent hypalbuminemia as well as cytostatic treatment with cyclophosphamide as a formal trial were ineffective and are not advisable, therefore.

  14. Lactulose:Mannitol Diagnostic Test by HPLC and LC-MSMS Platforms: Considerations for Field Studies of Intestinal Barrier Function and Environmental Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gwenyth O.; Kosek, Peter; Lima, Aldo A.M.; Singh, Ravinder; Yori, Pablo P.; Olortegui, Maribel P.; Lamsam, Jesse L.; Oliveira, Domingos B.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Kosek, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The lactulose:mannitol (L:M) diagnostic test is frequently used in field studies of environmental enteropathy (EE); however, heterogeneity in test administration and disaccharide measurement has limited the comparison of results between studies and populations. We aim to assess the agreement between L:M measurement between high-performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPLC-PAD) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS) platforms. Methods: The L:M test was administered in a cohort of Peruvian infants considered at risk for EE. A total of 100 samples were tested for lactulose and mannitol at 3 independent laboratories: 1 running an HPLC-PAD platform and 2 running LC-MSMS platforms. Agreement between the platforms was estimated. Results: The Spearman correlation between the 2 LC-MSMS platforms was high (ρ ≥ 0.89) for mannitol, lactulose, and the L:M ratio. The correlation between the HPLC-PAD platform and LC-MSMS platform was ρ = 0.95 for mannitol, ρ = 0.70 for lactulose, and ρ = 0.43 for the L:M ratio. In addition, the HPLC-PAD platform overestimated the lowest disaccharide concentrations to the greatest degree. Conclusions: Given the large analyte concentration range, the improved accuracy of LC-MSMS has important consequences for the assessment of lactulose and mannitol following oral administration in populations at risk for EE. We recommend that researchers wishing to implement a dual-sugar test as part of a study of EE use an LC-MSMS platform to optimize the accuracy of results and increase comparability between studies. PMID:24941958

  15. Microbiota fingerprints lose individually identifying features over time.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, David; Leung, Marcus H Y; Lee, Patrick K H

    2017-01-09

    Humans host individually unique skin microbiota, suggesting that microbiota traces transferred from skin to surfaces could serve as forensic markers analogous to fingerprints. While it is known that individuals leave identifiable microbiota traces on surfaces, it is not clear for how long these traces persist. Moreover, as skin and surface microbiota change with time, even persistent traces may lose their forensic potential as they would cease to resemble the microbiota of the person who left them. We followed skin and surface microbiota within households for four seasons to determine whether accurate microbiota-based matching of individuals to their households could be achieved across long time delays. While household surface microbiota traces could be matched to the correct occupant or occupants with 67% accuracy, accuracy decreased substantially when skin and surface samples were collected in different seasons, and particularly when surface samples were collected long after skin samples. Most OTUs persisted on skin or surfaces for less than one season, indicating that OTU loss was the major cause of decreased matching accuracy. OTUs that were more useful for individual identification persisted for less time and were less likely to be deposited from skin to surface, suggesting a trade-off between the longevity and identifying value of microbiota traces. While microbiota traces have potential forensic value, unlike fingerprints they are not static and may degrade in a way that preferentially erases features useful in identifying individuals.

  16. Live-cell topology assessment of URG7, MRP6{sub 102} and SP-C using glycosylatable green fluorescent protein in mammalian cells

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Lee, Hunsang; Lara, Patricia; Ostuni, Angela

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Glycosylatable GFP (gGFP) is developed for the use in mammalian cells. • gGFP selectively loses its fluorescence upon N-linked glycosylation in the ER lumen. • Differential fluorescence/glycosylation pattern probes membrane protein topology. • Membrane topology of URG7, MRP6{sub 102}, and SP-C was determined by gGFP tagging in vivo. - Abstract: Experimental tools to determine membrane topology of a protein are rather limited in higher eukaryotic organisms. Here, we report the use of glycosylatable GFP (gGFP) as a sensitive and versatile membrane topology reporter in mammalian cells. gGFP selectively loses its fluorescence upon N-linked glycosylation in the ER lumen.more » Thus, positive fluorescence signal assigns location of gGFP to the cytosol whereas no fluorescence signal and a glycosylated status of gGFP map the location of gGFP to the ER lumen. By using mammalian gGFP, the membrane topology of disease-associated membrane proteins, URG7, MRP6{sub 102}, SP-C(Val) and SP-C(Leu) was confirmed. URG7 is partially targeted to the ER, and inserted in C{sub in} form. MRP6{sub 102} and SP-C(Leu/Val) are inserted into the membrane in C{sub out} form. A minor population of untargeted SP-C is removed by proteasome dependent quality control system.« less

  17. The prevalence of antinuclear antibodies in patients with apparent polymorphic light eruption.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G M; Hawk, J L

    1991-11-01

    Polymorphic light eruption (PLE) is a very common photosensitive disorder, the most important differential diagnosis of which is lupus erythematosus (LE). One-hundred and forty-two patients with PLE were screened for circulating antinuclear (ANA), Ro and La antibodies over a 2-year period. Results were negative in 66 patients. Sixty-two patients had low-titre ANA of various patterns, ranging from trace to 1/80 without evidence of LE although one later developed subacute cutaneous LE. Fourteen had more significant findings, six with ANA ranging from 1/160 to 1/1280 but no anti-Ro antibodies, four with ANA ranging from 1/160 to 1/1280 and also with anti-Ro antibodies and four patients with anti-Ro antibodies but low-titre ANA, one of whom later developed discoid LE. Three of these 14 patients fulfilled the American Rheumatism Association criteria for the diagnosis of systemic LE, but it was not certain in any of the patients whether the PLE-like rash represented cutaneous LE or coincidental PLE. However the overall 10% incidence of definite or possible LE in patients with suspected PLE suggests that all PLE patients should be screened for LE.

  18. Application of Integral Pumping Tests to estimate the influence of losing streams on groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschik, S.; Musolff, A.; Reinstorf, F.; Strauch, G.; Schirmer, M.

    2009-05-01

    Urban streams receive effluents of wastewater treatment plants and untreated wastewater during combined sewer overflow events. In the case of losing streams substances, which originate from wastewater, can reach the groundwater and deteriorate its quality. The estimation of mass flow rates Mex from losing streams to the groundwater is important to support groundwater management strategies, but is a challenging task. Variable inflow of wastewater with time-dependent concentrations of wastewater constituents causes a variable water composition in urban streams. Heterogeneities in the structure of the streambed and the connected aquifer lead, in combination with this variable water composition, to heterogeneous concentration patterns of wastewater constituents in the vicinity of urban streams. Groundwater investigation methods based on conventional point sampling may yield unreliable results under these conditions. Integral Pumping Tests (IPT) can overcome the problem of heterogeneous concentrations in an aquifer by increasing the sampled volume. Long-time pumping (several days) and simultaneous sampling yields reliable average concentrations Cav and mass flow rates Mcp for virtual control planes perpendicular to the natural flow direction. We applied the IPT method in order to estimate Mex of a stream section in Leipzig (Germany). The investigated stream is strongly influenced by combined sewer overflow events. Four pumping wells were installed up- and downstream of the stream section and operated for a period of five days. The study was focused on four inorganic (potassium, chloride, nitrate and sulfate) and two organic (caffeine and technical-nonylphenol) wastewater constituents with different transport properties. The obtained concentration-time series were used in combination with a numerical flow model to estimate Mcp of the respective wells. The difference of the Mcp's between up- and downstream wells yields Mex of wastewater constituents that increase

  19. Loss of Proliferation and Antigen Presentation Activity following Internalization of Polydispersed Carbon Nanotubes by Primary Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells. PMID:22384094

  20. Game Related Statistics Which Discriminate Between Winning and Losing Under-16 Male Basketball Games

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alberto; Gómez, Miguel Ángel; Ortega, Enrique; Ibáñez, Sergio José; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the game-related statistics which discriminate between winning and losing teams in under-16 years old male basketball games. The sample gathered all 122 games in the 2004 and 2005 Under-16 European Championships. The game-related statistics analysed were the free-throws (both successful and unsuccessful), 2- and 3-points field-goals (both successful and unsuccessful) offensive and defensive rebounds, blocks, assists, fouls, turnovers and steals. The winning teams exhibited lower ball possessions per game and better offensive and defensive efficacy coefficients than the losing teams. Results from discriminant analysis were statistically significant and allowed to emphasize several structure coefficients (SC). In close games (final score differences below 9 points), the discriminant variables were the turnovers (SC = -0.47) and the assists (SC = 0.33). In balanced games (final score differences between 10 and 29 points), the variables that discriminated between the groups were the successful 2-point field-goals (SC = -0.34) and defensive rebounds (SC = -0. 36); and in unbalanced games (final score differences above 30 points) the variables that best discriminated both groups were the successful 2-point field-goals (SC = 0.37). These results allowed understanding that these players' specific characteristics result in a different game-related statistical profile and helped to point out the importance of the perceptive and decision making process in practice and in competition. Key points The players' game-related statistical profile varied according to game type, game outcome and in formative categories in basketball. The results of this work help to point out the different player's performance described in U-16 men's basketball teams compared with senior and professional men's basketball teams. The results obtained enhance the importance of the perceptive and decision making process in practice and in competition. PMID

  1. Comparative Analysis of Wolbachia Genomes Reveals Streamlining and Divergence of Minimalist Two-Component Systems

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Steen; Serbus, Laura Renee

    2015-01-01

    Two-component regulatory systems are commonly used by bacteria to coordinate intracellular responses with environmental cues. These systems are composed of functional protein pairs consisting of a sensor histidine kinase and cognate response regulator. In contrast to the well-studied Caulobacter crescentus system, which carries dozens of these pairs, the streamlined bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis encodes only two pairs: CckA/CtrA and PleC/PleD. Here, we used bioinformatic tools to compare characterized two-component system relays from C. crescentus, the related Anaplasmataceae species Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and 12 sequenced Wolbachia strains. We found the core protein pairs and a subset of interacting partners to be highly conserved within Wolbachia and these other Anaplasmataceae. Genes involved in two-component signaling were positioned differently within the various Wolbachia genomes, whereas the local context of each gene was conserved. Unlike Anaplasma and Ehrlichia, Wolbachia two-component genes were more consistently found clustered with metabolic genes. The domain architecture and key functional residues standard for two-component system proteins were well-conserved in Wolbachia, although residues that specify cognate pairing diverged substantially from other Anaplasmataceae. These findings indicate that Wolbachia two-component signaling pairs share considerable functional overlap with other α-proteobacterial systems, whereas their divergence suggests the potential for regulatory differences and cross-talk. PMID:25809075

  2. Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does It Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderhag, Per; Wickman, Per-Olof; Bergqvist, Kerstin; Jakobson, Britt; Hamza, Karim Mikael; Säljö, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review research on how students' interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on…

  3. Iatrogenic Cushing's Disease in a Boy after Misdiagnosis of Salt-Losing Virilizing Adrenal Hyperplasia: Impaired Metyrapone Response with Failure of Catch-Up Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendilaharzu, Hernan; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A boy misdiagnosed as having the sodium-losing form of virilizing adrenal hyperplasia was treated with large doses of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids from the newborn period until he was more than 4 years of age. (Author)

  4. Plasma endotoxin core antibody concentration and linear growth are unrelated in rural Malawian children aged 2-5 years

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Environmental enteropathy is subclinical inflammation of the upper gastrointestinal tract associated with reduced linear growth in developing countries. Usually investigators have used biopsy or a dual sugar absorption test to assess environmental enteropathy. Such tests are time and resource intens...

  5. Indicator 1.07. Number and geographic distribution of forest-associated species at risk of losing genetic variation and locally adapted genotypes

    Treesearch

    C. H. Flather; M. S Knowles; C. H. Sieg

    2011-01-01

    This indicator provides information on the number and distribution of forest-associated species at risk of losing genetic variation across their geographic range. Comparing a species' current geographic distribution with its historic distribution is the basis for identifying those species whose range has contracted significantly. Human activities are accelerating...

  6. Regional, but not total, body composition changes in overweight and obese adults consuming a higher protein, energy-restricted diet are sex specific.

    PubMed

    Tang, Minghua; Leidy, Heather J; Campbell, Wayne W

    2013-08-01

    Secondary analyses of data from 2 studies were used to assess the effects of protein intake and sex on diet-induced changes in body composition. The primary hypothesis was that the changes of body composition via energy restriction (ie, lean body mass [LBM], fat mass [FM], and bone) would be sex and diet specific. For 12 weeks, 43 male (study 1) and 45 female (study 2) overweight and obese adults consumed an energy-deficit diet (750 kcal/d less than energy needs) containing either 0.8 (normal protein [NP], 21 men and 23 women) or 1.4 g protein∙kg(-1)∙d(-1) (high protein [HP], 22 men and 22 women). Body composition measurements were performed at preintervention and postintervention. Over time, all research participants lost weight, LBM, and FM. Independent of protein intake, the men lost more LBM in the trunk (-0.9 vs -0.5 kg) and less in the legs (-1.5 vs -1.1 kg) compared with the women (P < .05). Independent of sex, the HP group lost less LBM in the trunk and legs than the NP group. These sex and protein intake responses resulted in the NP men losing the most LBM in the legs and the NP women losing the most LBM in the trunk. Over time, men lost more FM (-5.0 vs -3.9 kg) from the trunk and less from legs (-1.7 vs -2.1 kg) than women (P < .05), which resulted in a greater decrease of the android-to-gynoid fat ratio for the men. Protein intake did not influence these sex-specific responses or have any independent effects on changes in FM. In addition, protein intake did not influence bone mineral density responses over time; bone mineral density was reduced in women, but not in men. These findings indicate that higher protein intake during weight loss promotes the retention of LBM in both the trunk and legs despite the sex-specific changes in these body regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Few adults with functional limitations advised to exercise more or lose weight in NHANES 2011-14 seek health professional assistance: An opportunity for physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Kinslow, Brian; De Heer, Hendrik D; Warren, Meghan

    2018-03-02

    Functional limitations are associated with decreased physical activity and increased body mass index. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of functional limitations among adults who reported receiving health professional advice to exercise more or lose weight, and to assess involvement of health professionals, including physical therapists, in weight loss efforts with these individuals. A cross-sectional analysis of U.S. adults from the 2011 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5,480). Participant demographics, health history, and functional limitations were assessed via self-report and examination. Frequency distributions were calculated using SAS® analytical software, accounting for the complex survey design. Population estimates were calculated using the American Community Survey. 31.0% of individuals (n = 1,696), representing a population estimate of 35 million adults, advised to exercise more or lose weight by a health professional reported one or more functional limitation. Of the 31%, 57.6% attempted weight loss, and 40.1% used exercise for weight loss. Few sought health professional assistance. Physical therapists were not mentioned. Few individuals with functional limitations advised to lose weight or increase exercise seek health professional assistance for weight loss. Physical therapists have an opportunity to assist those with functional limitations with exercise prescription.

  8. Selective removal of arsenate from drinking water using a polymeric ligand exchanger.

    PubMed

    An, Byungryul; Steinwinder, Thomas R; Zhao, Dongye

    2005-12-01

    The new maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 microg/L for arsenic in the US drinking water will take effect on January 22, 2006. The compliance cost is estimated to be approximately dollar 600 million per year using current treatment technologies. This research aims to develop an innovative ion exchange process that may help water utilities comply with the new MCL in a more cost-effective manner. A polymeric ligand exchanger (PLE) was prepared by loading Cu2+ to a commercially available chelating ion exchange resin. Results from batch and column experiments indicated that the PLE offered unusually high selectivity for arsenate over other ubiquitous anions such as sulfate, bicarbonate and chloride. The average binary arsenate/sulfate separation factor for the PLE was determined to be 12, which were over two orders of magnitude greater than that (0.1-0.2) for commercial strong-base anion (SBA) exchangers. Because of the enhanced arsenate selectivity, the PLE was able to treat approximately 10 times more bed volumes (BVs) of water than commonly used SBA resins. The PLE can operate optimally in the neutral pH range (6.0-8.0). The exhausted PLE can be regenerated highly efficiently. More than 95% arsenate capacity can be recovered using approximately 22 BVs of 4% (w/w) NaCl at pH 9.1, and the regenerated PLE can be reused without any capacity drop. Upon treatment using FeCl3, the spent brine was recovered and reused for regeneration, which may cut down the regenerant need and reduces the volume of process waste residuals. The PLE can be used as a highly selective and reusable sorbent for removal of arsenate from drinking water.

  9. Early diagnosis of salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a newborn boy.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, I. A.; Winter, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Assays of serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentration may be relied upon to establish a diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia within a few hours of birth. In a male infant the concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone was increased in cord serum and remained elevated until glucocorticoid therapy was started on the 5th day of life. Plasma renin activity was increased only slightly in the first few days, but a striking increase on day 5, along with a gradual increase in the serum potassium concentration, confirmed that the infant had the salt-losing form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. It was not possible to demonstrate an increased concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, in amniotic fluid obtained at 30 weeks' gestation, presumably because of interference in this assay by cross-reacting steroids. Studies of the mother's serum concentration of 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol during delivery did not disclose any deviation from normal. PMID:890632

  10. Nociceptive DRG neurons express muscle lim protein upon axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Levin, Evgeny; Andreadaki, Anastasia; Gobrecht, Philipp; Bosse, Frank; Fischer, Dietmar

    2017-04-04

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has long been regarded as a cytosolic and nuclear muscular protein. Here, we show that MLP is also expressed in a subpopulation of adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons in response to axonal injury, while the protein was not detectable in naïve cells. Detailed immunohistochemical analysis of L4/L5 DRG revealed ~3% of MLP-positive neurons 2 days after complete sciatic nerve crush and maximum ~10% after 4-14 days. Similarly, in mixed cultures from cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacral DRG ~6% of neurons were MLP-positive after 2 days and maximal 17% after 3 days. In both, histological sections and cell cultures, the protein was detected in the cytosol and axons of small diameter cells, while the nucleus remained devoid. Moreover, the vast majority could not be assigned to any of the well characterized canonical DRG subpopulations at 7 days after nerve injury. However, further analysis in cell culture revealed that the largest population of MLP expressing cells originated from non-peptidergic IB4-positive nociceptive neurons, which lose their ability to bind the lectin upon axotomy. Thus, MLP is mostly expressed in a subset of axotomized nociceptive neurons and can be used as a novel marker for this population of cells.

  11. Systems Mechanobiology: Tension-Inhibited Protein Turnover Is Sufficient to Physically Control Gene Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Dingal, P.C. Dave P.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease. PMID:25468352

  12. Technical and Tactical Aspects that Differentiate Winning and Losing Performances in Elite Male Karate Fighters.

    PubMed

    Vidranski, Tihomir; Sertić, Hrvoje; Jukić, Josefina

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify the fighters' technical and tactical activity indicators in order to determine indicator significance regarding situational efficiency and designation between winning and losing performances in a karate match. We scientifically observed a sample of 274 male contesters of 137 karate matches during the 2008 World Karate Championship in Tokyo. Each individual competitor was observed in maximum of three matches. The matches were recorded using a DVD camera in order to collect data for further analysis, and the sample was further described using 48 technical and tactical indicators of situational efficiency and match outcome variables. The obtained results indicate that a karate match is composed of 91% of non-scoring techniques and 9% of scoring techniques in the total technique frequency. On this basis a significant difference in the situational efficiency between the match winners and the losing contesters has been discovered. Those two groups of fighters exhibit a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) in 11 out of 21 observed variables of situational efficiency in the table of derived situational indicators. A prevalence of non-scoring techniques suggests that energy demand and technical and tactical requirements of a karate match are in the largest extent defined by non-scoring techniques. Therefore, it would be a grave mistake to disregard non-scoring karate techniques in any future situational efficiency studies. It has been discovered that the winners differ from the defeated contesters by a higher level of situational efficiency in their executed techniques, which incorporate versatility, biomechanical and structural complexity, topological diversity and a specific tactical concept of technique use in the attack phase.

  13. Protein Structural Perturbation and Aggregation on Homogeneous Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Ananthakrishnan; Belfort, Georges

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that globular proteins, such as hen egg lysozyme in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature, lose native structural stability and activity when adsorbed onto well-defined homogeneous solid surfaces. This structural loss is evident by α-helix to turns/random during the first 30 min and followed by a slow α-helix to β-sheet transition. Increase in intramolecular and intermolecular β-sheet content suggests conformational rearrangement and aggregation between different protein molecules, respectively. Amide I band attenuated total reflection/Fourier transformed infrared (ATR/FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the secondary structure content of lysozyme adsorbed on six different self-assembled alkanethiol monolayer surfaces with –CH3, –OPh, –CF3, –CN, –OCH3, and –OH exposed functional end groups. Activity measurements of adsorbed lysozyme were in good agreement with the structural perturbations. Both surface chemistry (type of functional groups, wettability) and adsorbate concentration (i.e., lateral interactions) are responsible for the observed structural changes during adsorption. A kinetic model is proposed to describe secondary structural changes that occur in two dynamic phases. The results presented in this article demonstrate the utility of the ATR/FTIR spectroscopic technique for in situ characterization of protein secondary structures during adsorption on flat surfaces. PMID:15542559

  14. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohamad Ali; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  15. Development of fish protein powder as an ingredient for food applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Shaviklo, Amir Reza

    2015-02-01

    The increasing awareness that dried fish protein can be applied for food fortification and production of value added/functional foods has encouraged the food industry to examine different methods for developing fish protein ingredient from different raw materials. Fish protein powder (FPP) is a dried and stable fish product, intended for human consumption, in which the protein is more concentrated than in the original fish flesh. Quality and acceptability of FPP depend on several factors. The fat content of the FPP is a critical issue because when it is oxidized a strong and often rancid flavour is produced. Protein content of FPP depends on the raw materials, amount of additives and moisture content, but it contains at least 65 % proteins. FPP is used in the food industry for developing re-structured and ready-to-eat food products. The FPP maintains its properties for 6 months at 5 °C but loses them rapidly at 30 °C. Deterioration of the FPP during storage is prevented by lowering the moisture content of the product and eliminating of oxygen from the package. The FPP can be applied as a functional ingredient for developing formulated ready-to-eat products. This article reviews methods for extracting fish proteins, drying methods, characteristics and applications of FPP and factors affecting FPP quality.

  16. GFP tagging of sieve element occlusion (SEO) proteins results in green fluorescent forisomes.

    PubMed

    Pélissier, Hélène C; Peters, Winfried S; Collier, Ray; van Bel, Aart J E; Knoblauch, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Forisomes are Ca(2+)-driven, ATP-independent contractile protein bodies that reversibly occlude sieve elements in faboid legumes. They apparently consist of at least three proteins; potential candidates have been described previously as 'FOR' proteins. We isolated three genes from Medicago truncatula that correspond to the putative forisome proteins and expressed their green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion products in Vicia faba and Glycine max using the composite plant methodology. In both species, expression of any of the constructs resulted in homogenously fluorescent forisomes that formed sieve tube plugs upon stimulation; no GFP fluorescence occurred elsewhere. Isolated fluorescent forisomes reacted to Ca(2+) and chelators by contraction and expansion, respectively, and did not lose fluorescence in the process. Wild-type forisomes showed no affinity for free GFP in vitro. The three proteins shared numerous conserved motifs between themselves and with hypothetical proteins derived from the genomes of M. truncatula, Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. However, they showed neither significant similarities to proteins of known function nor canonical metal-binding motifs. We conclude that 'FOR'-like proteins are components of forisomes that are encoded by a well-defined gene family with relatives in taxa that lack forisomes. Since the mnemonic FOR is already registered and in use for unrelated genes, we suggest the acronym SEO (sieve element occlusion) for this family. The absence of binding sites for divalent cations suggests that the Ca(2+) binding responsible for forisome contraction is achieved either by as yet unidentified additional proteins, or by SEO proteins through a novel, uncharacterized mechanism.

  17. GFP Tagging of Sieve Element Occlusion (SEO) Proteins Results in Green Fluorescent Forisomes

    PubMed Central

    Pélissier, Hélène C.; Peters, Winfried S.; Collier, Ray; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Knoblauch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Forisomes are Ca2+-driven, ATP-independent contractile protein bodies that reversibly occlude sieve elements in faboid legumes. They apparently consist of at least three proteins; potential candidates have been described previously as ‘FOR’ proteins. We isolated three genes from Medicago truncatula that correspond to the putative forisome proteins and expressed their green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion products in Vicia faba and Glycine max using the composite plant methodology. In both species, expression of any of the constructs resulted in homogenously fluorescent forisomes that formed sieve tube plugs upon stimulation; no GFP fluorescence occurred elsewhere. Isolated fluorescent forisomes reacted to Ca2+ and chelators by contraction and expansion, respectively, and did not lose fluorescence in the process. Wild-type forisomes showed no affinity for free GFP in vitro. The three proteins shared numerous conserved motifs between themselves and with hypothetical proteins derived from the genomes of M. truncatula, Vitis vinifera and Arabidopsis thaliana. However, they showed neither significant similarities to proteins of known function nor canonical metal-binding motifs. We conclude that ‘FOR’-like proteins are components of forisomes that are encoded by a well-defined gene family with relatives in taxa that lack forisomes. Since the mnemonic FOR is already registered and in use for unrelated genes, we suggest the acronym SEO (sieve element occlusion) for this family. The absence of binding sites for divalent cations suggests that the Ca2+ binding responsible for forisome contraction is achieved either by as yet unidentified additional proteins, or by SEO proteins through a novel, uncharacterized mechanism. PMID:18784195

  18. Photoluminescence-excitation spectroscopy as a highly sensitive probe for carrier transport processes affected by surface damages in AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Hideo; Yamamoto, Yoshitsugu; Kamo, Yoshitaka; Kunii, Tetsuo; Oku, Tomoki; Shirahama, Takeo; Tanaka, Hiroyasu; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate that photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) spectroscopy can probe with high sensitivity the effects of plasma-induced surface damages on photogenerated-carrier-transport processes in AlxGa1-xN/GaN heterostructures, on the basis of systematic optical and structural characterization results for the as-grown reference sample and the plasma-exposed sample. It is found from the structural characterizations with atomic force microscopy that the plasma exposure remarkably modifies the atomic step boundaries and the pits on the AlxGa1-xN surface, which leads to a remarkable difference between the PLE spectra of the bound exciton photoluminescence from the underlying GaN layer in the two samples. The PLE spectrum of the reference sample shows a step rising from the AlxGa1-xN fundamental transition energy toward the high energy side, whereas the rising step disappears in the PLE spectrum of the plasma-exposed sample. In contrast, the reflectance characteristics are the same in the two samples; i.e., the excitonic transition itself is not influenced by the plasma exposure. The present findings indicate that the PLE spectral profile is sensitive to the change in efficiency of the photogenerated carrier injection from the AlxGa1-xN layer to the GaN layer. Thus, it is concluded that the PLE characterization is effective to probe the photogenerated-carrier transport in heterostructures.

  19. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. PMID:28280516

  20. Addiction, cigarette smoking, and voluntary control of action: Do cigarette smokers lose their free will?

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Roy F

    2017-06-01

    Opinions differ widely as to whether addicts lose the ability to control their behavior and employ free will. This article reviews empirical findings regarding multiple questions relevant to the issue of free will among addicted smokers: Is smoking voluntary behavior? Can people quit smoking? Why don't people quit smoking? Why do smokers relapse when they try to quit? Do addicted smokers suffer from irresistible cravings? Are there some people who cannot quit? Are there conditions that make resistance impossible? Why would they smoke knowing it can kill them? The evidence reviewed here seems most consistent with the view that smokers retain control over their actions but cannot easily stop having frequent desires to smoke.

  1. Identification of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities within the intestinal mucosa of dogs with chronic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Hanifeh, Mohsen; Rajamäki, Minna Marjaana; Syrjä, Pernilla; Mäkitalo, Laura; Kilpinen, Susanne; Spillmann, Thomas

    2018-03-12

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 are zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases involved in the breakdown and reconstitution of extracellular matrix under both physiological and pathological conditions. Mucosal MMP-2 and -9 activities have been reported to be upregulated in the intestine of humans with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and in animal models of IBD. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of canine chronic enteropathies (CE) is unknown. This study investigated mucosal pro- and active MMP-2 and -9 activities in dogs with CE and healthy dogs using gelatin zymography, and also to determine the association of their activities in dogs with CE with the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI), histopathologic findings, the clinical outcome, and hypoalbuminemia. Intestinal mucosal samples from duodenum, ileum, colon, and cecum were collected from 40 dogs with CE and 18 healthy Beagle dogs. In dogs with CE, the number of samples positive for mucosal pro- and active MMP-2 was significantly higher in the duodenum (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively), ileum (P = 0.002 and P = 0.018, respectively), and colon (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.002, respectively), compared with healthy controls. Mucosal pro-MMP-9-positive samples in the duodenum and colon were significantly more frequent in dogs with CE than in healthy dogs (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Despite the presence of mucosal samples positive for active MMP-9 in the intestinal segments of dogs with CE, the difference compared to healthy controls did not reach statistical significance. None of the intestinal mucosal samples in healthy dogs showed gelatinolytic activity corresponding to the control bands of active MMP-2 and -9. Mucosal active MMP-9 activities displayed a significant positive association with the severity of neutrophil infiltration in the duodenum (P = 00.040), eosinophils in the cecum (P = 00.037), and the CIBDAI score for ileum samples

  2. The Intricate Relationship between Psychotic-Like Experiences and Associated Subclinical Symptoms in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Unterrassner, Lui; Wyss, Thomas A; Wotruba, Diana; Haker, Helene; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between subclinical psychotic, negative, and affective symptoms has gained increased attention regarding the etiology of psychosis spectrum and other mental disorders. Importantly, research has tended to not differentiate between different subtypes of psychotic-like experiences (PLE) although they may not have the same significance for mental health. In order to gain information on the subclinical interplay between specific PLE and other symptoms as well as the significance of PLE for mental health, we investigated their specific associations in 206 healthy individuals (20-60 years, 73 females) using correlational and linear regression analyses. PLE were assessed with the Magical Ideation Questionnaire, the revised Exceptional Experiences Questionnaire, and subscales of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). The revised Symptom Checklist 90, the SPQ, and the Physical Anhedonia Scale were used to measure subclinical negative symptoms, affective symptoms, and other symptoms such as, emotional instability. As hypothesized, we found that (1) most affective symptoms and all other subclinical symptoms correlated positively with all PLE, whereas we found only partial associations between negative symptoms and PLE. Notably, (2) magical ideation and paranormal beliefs correlated negatively with physical anhedonia. In the regression analyses we found (3) similar patterns of specific positive associations between PLE and other subclinical symptoms: Suspiciousness was a specific predictor of negative-like symptoms, whereas ideas of reference, unusual perceptual experiences, and dissociative anomalous perceptions specifically predicted anxiety symptoms. Interestingly, (4) ideas of reference negatively predicted physical anhedonia. Similarly, paranormal beliefs were negatively associated with constricted affect. Moreover, odd beliefs were a negative predictor of depression, emotional instability, and unspecific symptoms. Our findings indicated that

  3. The Intricate Relationship between Psychotic-Like Experiences and Associated Subclinical Symptoms in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Unterrassner, Lui; Wyss, Thomas A.; Wotruba, Diana; Haker, Helene; Rössler, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between subclinical psychotic, negative, and affective symptoms has gained increased attention regarding the etiology of psychosis spectrum and other mental disorders. Importantly, research has tended to not differentiate between different subtypes of psychotic-like experiences (PLE) although they may not have the same significance for mental health. In order to gain information on the subclinical interplay between specific PLE and other symptoms as well as the significance of PLE for mental health, we investigated their specific associations in 206 healthy individuals (20–60 years, 73 females) using correlational and linear regression analyses. PLE were assessed with the Magical Ideation Questionnaire, the revised Exceptional Experiences Questionnaire, and subscales of the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ). The revised Symptom Checklist 90, the SPQ, and the Physical Anhedonia Scale were used to measure subclinical negative symptoms, affective symptoms, and other symptoms such as, emotional instability. As hypothesized, we found that (1) most affective symptoms and all other subclinical symptoms correlated positively with all PLE, whereas we found only partial associations between negative symptoms and PLE. Notably, (2) magical ideation and paranormal beliefs correlated negatively with physical anhedonia. In the regression analyses we found (3) similar patterns of specific positive associations between PLE and other subclinical symptoms: Suspiciousness was a specific predictor of negative-like symptoms, whereas ideas of reference, unusual perceptual experiences, and dissociative anomalous perceptions specifically predicted anxiety symptoms. Interestingly, (4) ideas of reference negatively predicted physical anhedonia. Similarly, paranormal beliefs were negatively associated with constricted affect. Moreover, odd beliefs were a negative predictor of depression, emotional instability, and unspecific symptoms. Our findings indicated that

  4. Domain atrophy creates rare cases of functional partial protein domains.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Ananth; Bateman, Alex

    2015-04-30

    Protein domains display a range of structural diversity, with numerous additions and deletions of secondary structural elements between related domains. We have observed a small number of cases of surprising large-scale deletions of core elements of structural domains. We propose a new concept called domain atrophy, where protein domains lose a significant number of core structural elements. Here, we implement a new pipeline to systematically identify new cases of domain atrophy across all known protein sequences. The output of this pipeline was carefully checked by hand, which filtered out partial domain instances that were unlikely to represent true domain atrophy due to misannotations or un-annotated sequence fragments. We identify 75 cases of domain atrophy, of which eight cases are found in a three-dimensional protein structure and 67 cases have been inferred based on mapping to a known homologous structure. Domains with structural variations include ancient folds such as the TIM-barrel and Rossmann folds. Most of these domains are observed to show structural loss that does not affect their functional sites. Our analysis has significantly increased the known cases of domain atrophy. We discuss specific instances of domain atrophy and see that there has often been a compensatory mechanism that helps to maintain the stability of the partial domain. Our study indicates that although domain atrophy is an extremely rare phenomenon, protein domains under certain circumstances can tolerate extreme mutations giving rise to partial, but functional, domains.

  5. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Design Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Results Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. Conclusions These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. PMID:27459152

  6. Mutation of EpCAM leads to intestinal barrier and ion transport dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kozan, Philip A; McGeough, Matthew D; Peña, Carla A; Mueller, James L; Barrett, Kim E; Marchelletta, Ronald R; Sivagnanam, Mamata

    2015-05-01

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a devastating diarrheal disease seen in infancy that is typically associated with villous changes and the appearance of epithelial tufts. We previously found mutations in epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to be causative in CTE. We developed a knock-down cell model of CTE through transfection of an EpCAM shRNA construct into T84 colonic epithelial cells to elucidate the in vitro role of EpCAM in barrier function and ion transport. Cells with EpCAM deficiency exhibited decreased electrical resistance, increased permeability, and decreased ion transport. Based on mutations in CTE patients, an in vivo mouse model was developed, with tamoxifen-inducible deletion of exon 4 in Epcam resulting in mutant protein with decreased expression. Tamoxifen treatment of Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice resulted in pathological features of villous atrophy and epithelial tufts, similar to those in human CTE patients, within 4 days post induction. Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice also showed decreased expression of tight junctional proteins, increased permeability, and decreased ion transport in the intestines. Taken together, these findings reveal mechanisms that may underlie disease in CTE. Knock-down EpCAM cell model of congenital tufting enteropathy was developed. In vivo inducible mouse model was developed resulting in mutant EpCAM protein. Cells with EpCAM deficiency demonstrated barrier and ion transport dysfunction. Tamoxifen-treated Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice demonstrated pathological features. Epcam (Δ4/Δ4) mice showed improper barrier function and ion transport.

  7. Evolutionary distance from human homologs reflects allergenicity of animal food proteins.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, John A; Breiteneder, Heimo; Mills, E N Clare

    2007-12-01

    In silico analysis of allergens can identify putative relationships among protein sequence, structure, and allergenic properties. Such systematic analysis reveals that most plant food allergens belong to a restricted number of protein superfamilies, with pollen allergens behaving similarly. We have investigated the structural relationships of animal food allergens and their evolutionary relatedness to human homologs to define how closely a protein must resemble a human counterpart to lose its allergenic potential. Profile-based sequence homology methods were used to classify animal food allergens into Pfam families, and in silico analyses of their evolutionary and structural relationships were performed. Animal food allergens could be classified into 3 main families--tropomyosins, EF-hand proteins, and caseins--along with 14 minor families each composed of 1 to 3 allergens. The evolutionary relationships of each of these allergen superfamilies showed that in general, proteins with a sequence identity to a human homolog above approximately 62% were rarely allergenic. Single substitutions in otherwise highly conserved regions containing IgE epitopes in EF-hand parvalbumins may modulate allergenicity. These data support the premise that certain protein structures are more allergenic than others. Contrasting with plant food allergens, animal allergens, such as the highly conserved tropomyosins, challenge the capability of the human immune system to discriminate between foreign and self-proteins. Such immune responses run close to becoming autoimmune responses. Exploiting the closeness between animal allergens and their human homologs in the development of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy will need to consider the potential for developing unanticipated autoimmune responses.

  8. Effects of dietary protein intake on body composition changes after weight loss in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Eun; O’Connor, Lauren E.; Sands, Laura P.; Slebodnik, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The impact of dietary protein on body composition changes after older adults purposefully lose weight requires systematic evaluation. Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the effects of protein intake (<25% vs ≥25% of energy intake or 1.0 g/kg/d) on energy restriction–induced changes in body mass, lean mass, and fat mass in adults older than 50 years. Data Sources: PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched using the keywords “dietary proteins,” “body composition,” “skeletal muscle,” and “muscle strength.” Study Selection: Two researchers independently screened 1542 abstracts. Data Extraction: Information was extracted from 24 articles. Data Synthesis: Twenty randomized control trials met the inclusion criteria. Conclusion: Older adults retained more lean mass and lost more fat mass during weight loss when consuming higher protein diets. PMID:26883880

  9. Clinical Research Priorities in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotts, Timothy; Khairy, Paul; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; John, Anitha S.; Valente, Anne Marie; Zaidi, Ali N.; Cook, Stephen C.; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Ting, Jennifer Grando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J.; Verstappen, Amy; Kay, Joseph; Earing, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Kogon, Brian; Broberg, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) clinicians are hampered by the paucity of data to inform clinical decision-making. The objective of this study was to identify priorities for clinical research in ACHD. Methods A list of 45 research questions was developed by the Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC), compiled into a survey, and administered to ACHD providers. Patient input was sought via the Adult Congenital Heart Association at community meetings and online forums. The 25 top questions were sent to ACHD providers worldwide via an online survey. Each question was ranked based on perceived priority and weighted based on time spent in ACHD care. The top 10 topics identified are presented and discussed. Results The final online survey yielded 139 responses. Top priority questions related to tetralogy of Fallot (timing of pulmonary valve replacement and criteria for primary prevention ICDs), patients with systemic right ventricles (determining the optimal echocardiographic techniques for measuring right ventricular function, and indications for tricuspid valve replacement and primary prevention ICDs), and single ventricle/Fontan patients (role of pulmonary vasodilators, optimal anticoagulation, medical therapy for preservation of ventricular function, treatment for protein losing enteropathy). In addition, establishing criteria to refer ACHD patients for cardiac transplantation was deemed a priority. Conclusions The ACHD field is in need of prospective research to address fundamental clinical questions. It is hoped that this methodical consultation process will inform researchers and funding organizations about clinical research topics deemed to be of high priority. PMID:24411207

  10. Clinical research priorities in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cotts, Timothy; Khairy, Paul; Opotowsky, Alexander R; John, Anitha S; Valente, Anne Marie; Zaidi, Ali N; Cook, Stephen C; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Ting, Jennifer Grando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J; Verstappen, Amy; Kay, Joseph; Earing, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Kogon, Brian; Broberg, Craig S

    2014-02-15

    Adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) clinicians are hampered by the paucity of data to inform clinical decision-making. The objective of this study was to identify priorities for clinical research in ACHD. A list of 45 research questions was developed by the Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC), compiled into a survey, and administered to ACHD providers. Patient input was sought via the Adult Congenital Heart Association at community meetings and online forums. The 25 top questions were sent to ACHD providers worldwide via an online survey. Each question was ranked based on perceived priority and weighted based on time spent in ACHD care. The top 10 topics identified are presented and discussed. The final online survey yielded 139 responses. Top priority questions related to tetralogy of Fallot (timing of pulmonary valve replacement and criteria for primary prevention ICDs), patients with systemic right ventricles (determining the optimal echocardiographic techniques for measuring right ventricular function, and indications for tricuspid valve replacement and primary prevention ICDs), and single ventricle/Fontan patients (role of pulmonary vasodilators, optimal anticoagulation, medical therapy for preservation of ventricular function, treatment for protein losing enteropathy). In addition, establishing criteria to refer ACHD patients for cardiac transplantation was deemed a priority. The ACHD field is in need of prospective research to address fundamental clinical questions. It is hoped that this methodical consultation process will inform researchers and funding organizations about clinical research topics deemed to be of high priority. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intestinal lymphangiectasis and lipidosis in rats following subchronic exposure to indole-3-carbinol via oral gavage.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Michael C; Crabbs, Torrie A; Wyde, Michael E; Painter, J Todd; Hill, Georgette D; Malarkey, David E; Lieuallen, Warren G; Nyska, Abraham

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the toxicity and carcinogenic potential of indole-3-carbinol (I3C), the National Toxicology Program has conducted 13-week subchronic studies in Fisher 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice, and chronic 2-year bioassays in Sprague-Dawley rats and B6C3F1 mice. While the chronic study results are not yet available, subchronic study results and short-term special evaluations of interim sacrifices in the 2-year rat bioassay are presented. F344 rats were orally gavaged ≤300 mg I3C/kg body weight 5 days a week for 13 weeks. Rats treated with ≥150 mg/kg demonstrated a dose-related dilation of lymphatics (lymphangiectasis) of the duodenum, jejunum, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Material within dilated lacteals stained positively for Oil Red O and Sudan Black, consistent with lipid. Electron microscopic evaluation confirmed extracellular lipid accumulation within the villar lamina propria, lacteals, and within villar macrophages. Analyses of hepatic and pulmonary CYP1A enzymes demonstrated dose-dependent I3C induction of CYP1A1 and 1A2. B6C3F1 mice orally gavaged ≤250 mg I3C/kg body weight did not demonstrate histopathological changes; however, hepatic CYP induction was similar to that in rats. The histopathologic changes of intestinal lymphangiectasis and lipidosis in this study share similarities with intestinal lymphangiectasia as observed in humans and dogs. However, the resultant clinical spectrum of protein-losing enteropathy was not present.

  12. Current Role of Blood and Urine Biomarkers in the Clinical Care of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Rajpal, Saurabh; Alshawabkeh, Laith; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing number of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). While several biomarkers have been validated and integrated into general cardiology clinical practice, these tests are often applied to adults with CHD in the absence of disease-specific validation. Although these patients are often grouped into a single population, there is heterogeneous pathophysiology, variable disease chronicity, extensive multisystem involvement, and a low event rate relative to acquired heart disease. These stand as challenges to systematic investigation and clinical application of biomarkers for adults with CHD. This paper reviews recent studies investigating the use of biomarkers in this population, with emphasis on biomarkers applied in clinical adult CHD care. A handful of biomarkers have been integrated into adult CHD practice, such as iron studies in cyanotic heart disease and stool alpha-1 antitrypsin for diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy in the Fontan circulation. Use of kidney and liver tests has been studied in prognostication of adult CHD patients. A few other biomarkers like natriuretic peptides and troponins seem likely to provide useful information in other ACHD situations based on limited disease-specific data and extrapolation from acquired heart disease. More research is needed to support the robust validity of most existing clinical biomarkers in adult congenital cardiology practice. Until data from larger, prospectively enrolled cohorts are available, clinical use of biomarkers in these patients will require careful interpretation with attention to underlying pathophysiology, as well as detailed understanding of potential pitfalls of specific assays and clinical contexts.

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Protein Misfolding Mechanisms in Neurological Diseases: A Historical Overview.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Felix; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Evans, Alan C

    2018-01-01

    Protein misfolding refers to a process where proteins become structurally abnormal and lose their specific 3-dimensional spatial configuration. The histopathological presence of misfolded protein (MP) aggregates has been associated as the primary evidence of multiple neurological diseases, including Prion diseases, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. However, the exact mechanisms of MP aggregation and propagation, as well as their impact in the long-term patient's clinical condition are still not well understood. With this aim, a variety of mathematical models has been proposed for a better insight into the kinetic rate laws that govern the microscopic processes of protein aggregation. Complementary, another class of large-scale models rely on modern molecular imaging techniques for describing the phenomenological effects of MP propagation over the whole brain. Unfortunately, those neuroimaging-based studies do not take full advantage of the tremendous capabilities offered by the chemical kinetics modeling approach. Actually, it has been barely acknowledged that the vast majority of large-scale models have foundations on previous mathematical approaches that describe the chemical kinetics of protein replication and propagation. The purpose of the current manuscript is to present a historical review about the development of mathematical models for describing both microscopic processes that occur during the MP aggregation and large-scale events that characterize the progression of neurodegenerative MP-mediated diseases.

  14. Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-specific Ubiquitin Ligase MID1 Is a Sequence-dependent Regulator of Translation Efficiency Controlling 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent Protein Kinase-1 (PDPK-1)*

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Orgillés, Beatriz; Rutschow, Désirée; Zeller, Raphael; Karagiannidis, Antonios I.; Köhler, Andrea; Chen, Changwei; Wilson, Timothy; Krause, Sven; Roepcke, Stefan; Lilley, David; Schneider, Rainer; Schweiger, Susann

    2011-01-01

    We have shown previously that the ubiquitin ligase MID1, mutations of which cause the midline malformation Opitz BBB/G syndrome (OS), serves as scaffold for a microtubule-associated protein complex that regulates protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Here, we show that the MID1 protein complex associates with mRNAs via a purine-rich sequence motif called MIDAS (MID1 association sequence) and thereby increases stability and translational efficiency of these mRNAs. Strikingly, inclusion of multiple copies of the MIDAS motif into mammalian mRNAs increases production of the encoded proteins up to 20-fold. Mutated MID1, as found in OS patients, loses its influence on MIDAS-containing mRNAs, suggesting that the malformations in OS patients could be caused by failures in the regulation of cytoskeleton-bound protein translation. This is supported by the observation that the majority of mRNAs that carry MIDAS motifs is involved in developmental processes and/or energy homeostasis. Further analysis of one of the proteins encoded by a MIDAS-containing mRNA, namely PDPK-1 (3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1), which is an important regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin/PP2A signaling, showed that PDPK-1 protein synthesis is significantly reduced in cells from an OS patient compared with an age-matched control and can be rescued by functional MID1. Together, our data uncover a novel messenger ribonucleoprotein complex that regulates microtubule-associated protein translation. They suggest a novel mechanism underlying OS and point at an enormous potential of the MIDAS motif to increase the efficiency of biotechnological protein production in mammalian cells. PMID:21930711

  15. Evaluation of the "Lose Your Excuse" public service advertising campaign for tweens to save energy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Jane T; Goldman, Patty; Zhivan, Natalia; Agyeman, Yaw; Barber, Erin

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluates the 2008-2009 "Lose your Excuse" public service advertising (PSA) campaign on energy efficiency targeting 8- to 12-year-olds, intended to increase knowledge, foster proactive attitudes, and change energy usage behaviors. Baseline and two follow-up surveys were conducted with online samples representative of the national population of households with kids with online access. Almost half (47%) of the tweens recognized at least one ad from the campaign. Ad recognition was positively associated with knowledge, proactive attitudes, and energy-saving behavior. Propensity score analysis confirmed a small but measurable and statistically significant effect on energy-saving behavior. The discussion section compares these results to public health campaigns in terms of ghost awareness, reach, and effect size.

  16. Linking social and spatial networks to viral community phylogenetics reveals subtype-specific transmission dynamics in African lions.

    PubMed

    Fountain-Jones, Nicholas M; Packer, Craig; Troyer, Jennifer L; VanderWaal, Kimberly; Robinson, Stacie; Jacquot, Maude; Craft, Meggan E

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneity within pathogen species can have important consequences for how pathogens transmit across landscapes; however, discerning different transmission routes is challenging. Here, we apply both phylodynamic and phylogenetic community ecology techniques to examine the consequences of pathogen heterogeneity on transmission by assessing subtype-specific transmission pathways in a social carnivore. We use comprehensive social and spatial network data to examine transmission pathways for three subtypes of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV Ple ) in African lions (Panthera leo) at multiple scales in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. We used FIV Ple molecular data to examine the role of social organization and lion density in shaping transmission pathways and tested to what extent vertical (i.e., father- and/or mother-offspring relationships) or horizontal (between unrelated individuals) transmission underpinned these patterns for each subtype. Using the same data, we constructed subtype-specific FIV Ple co-occurrence networks and assessed what combination of social networks, spatial networks or co-infection best structured the FIV Ple network. While social organization (i.e., pride) was an important component of FIV Ple transmission pathways at all scales, we find that FIV Ple subtypes exhibited different transmission pathways at within- and between-pride scales. A combination of social and spatial networks, coupled with consideration of subtype co-infection, was likely to be important for FIV Ple transmission for the two major subtypes, but the relative contribution of each factor was strongly subtype-specific. Our study provides evidence that pathogen heterogeneity is important in understanding pathogen transmission, which could have consequences for how endemic pathogens are managed. Furthermore, we demonstrate that community phylogenetic ecology coupled with phylodynamic techniques can reveal insights into the differential evolutionary pressures acting

  17. Physically Active Rats Lose More Weight during Calorie Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Smyers, Mark E.; Bachir, Kailey Z.; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.; Novak, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. PMID:25449411

  18. Breakdown in the temporal and spatial organization of spontaneous brain activity during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Huang, Zirui; Chen, Yali; Zhang, Jun; Ghinda, Diana; Nikolova, Yuliya; Wu, Jinsong; Xu, Jianghui; Bai, Wenjie; Mao, Ying; Yang, Zhong; Duncan, Niall; Qin, Pengmin; Wang, Hao; Chen, Bing; Weng, Xuchu; Northoff, Georg

    2018-05-01

    Which temporal features that can characterize different brain states (i.e., consciousness or unconsciousness) is a fundamental question in the neuroscience of consciousness. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), we investigated the spatial patterns of two temporal features: the long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs), measured by power-law exponent (PLE), and temporal variability, measured by standard deviation (SD) during wakefulness and anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. We found that both PLE and SD showed global reductions across the whole brain during anesthetic state comparing to wakefulness. Importantly, the relationship between PLE and SD was altered in anesthetic state, in terms of a spatial "decoupling." This decoupling was mainly driven by a spatial pattern alteration of the PLE, rather than the SD, in the anesthetic state. Our results suggest differential physiological grounds of PLE and SD and highlight the functional importance of the topographical organization of LRTCs in maintaining an optimal spatiotemporal configuration of the neural dynamics during normal level of consciousness. The central role of the spatial distribution of LRTCs, reflecting temporo-spatial nestedness, may support the recently introduced temporo-spatial theory of consciousness (TTC). © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pressurized liquid extraction of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) with bioethanol: an efficient and sustainable approach.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajin; Guo, Zheng; Glasius, Marianne; Kristensen, Kasper; Xiao, Langtao; Xu, Xuebing

    2011-08-26

    To develop an efficient green extraction approach for recovery of bioactive compounds from natural plants, we examined the potential of pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) with bioethanol/water as solvents. The advantages of PLE over other extraction approaches, in addition to reduced time/solvent cost, the extract of PLE showed a distinct constituent profile from that of Soxhlet extraction, with significantly improved recovery of diarylheptanoids, etc. Among the pure solvents tested for PLE, bioethanol yield the highest efficiency for recovering most constituents of gingerol-related compounds; while for a broad concentration spectrum of ethanol aqueous solutions, 70% ethanol gave the best performance in terms of yield of total extract, complete constituent profile and recovery of most gingerol-related components. PLE with 70% bioethanol operated at 1500 psi and 100 °C for 20 min (static extraction time: 5 min) is recommended as optimized extraction conditions, achieving 106.8%, 109.3% and 108.0% yield of [6]-, [8]- and [10]-gingerol relative to the yield of corresponding constituent obtained by 8h Soxhlet extraction (absolute ethanol as extraction solvent). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein Polymerization into Fibrils from the Viewpoint of Nucleation Theory.

    PubMed

    Kashchiev, Dimo

    2015-11-17

    The assembly of various proteins into fibrillar aggregates is an important phenomenon with wide implications ranging from human disease to nanoscience. Using general kinetic results of nucleation theory, we analyze the polymerization of protein into linear or helical fibrils in the framework of the Oosawa-Kasai (OK) model. We show that while within the original OK model of linear polymerization the process does not involve nucleation, within a modified OK model it is nucleation-mediated. Expressions are derived for the size of the fibril nucleus, the work for fibril formation, the nucleation barrier, the equilibrium and stationary fibril size distributions, and the stationary fibril nucleation rate. Under otherwise equal conditions, this rate decreases considerably when the short (subnucleus) fibrils lose monomers much more frequently than the long (supernucleus) fibrils, a feature that should be born in mind when designing a strategy for stymying or stimulating fibril nucleation. The obtained dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of monomeric protein is convenient for experimental verification and for use in rate equations accounting for nucleation-mediated fibril formation. The analysis and the results obtained for linear fibrils are fully applicable to helical fibrils whose formation is describable by a simplified OK model. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Engaging students in learning: findings from a study of project-led education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sandra; Mesquita, Diana; Assunção Flores, Maria; Lima, Rui M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a three-year study of project-based learning implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme, at the University of Minho, Portugal. This particular model was inspired on project-led education (PLE), following Powell and Weenk's [2003. Project-Led Engineering Education. Utrecht: Lemma] work. It aims to analyse students' perceptions of PLE as a learning device and its implications for faculty and students' role in teaching and learning. Data collection took place in two phases through individual surveys and focus groups to students. Findings suggest the importance of PLE as a device to enhance meaningful learning and provide evidence from students that it helps to increase their engagement in learning. Implications of PLE for faculty and students role in teaching and learning will be discussed in the paper.

  2. What effect do attempts to lose weight have on the observed relationship between nutrition behaviors and body mass index among adolescents?

    PubMed

    Utter, Jennifer; Scragg, Robert; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Schaaf, David

    2007-09-19

    Little research has given consideration to how people's weight control behaviors may moderate the relationships between nutrition and body mass index (BMI) in large cross-sectional studies. The objective of the current study is to determine how attempts to lose weight confound the relationships between nutrition behaviors and BMI among a population of predominately overweight adolescents. Data were drawn from the baseline measurements of the Pacific OPIC (Obesity Prevention In Communities). Participants included approximately 3500 high school students in New Zealand. Students in the sample primarily identified as a Pacific Island ethnicity (57%) and the mean age for participants was 14.8 years. Participants completed a questionnaire about nutrition and physical activity patterns and were weighed and measured for height. In our sample, 57% of students were overweight/obese, with the highest prevalence among Pacific Island students (71%). Approximately 50% of students were currently trying to lose weight, and this was more common among females, Pacific Island students and overweight/obese students. Examination of the nutritional correlates of BMI in the total population found inverse relationships between BMI and consumption of high-fat/high-sugar foods and positive relationships between BMI and eating 5 or more fruits and vegetables a day (all significant after controlling for age, sex, and ethnicity). For example, students who drank the most soft drinks or ate fruit and vegetables infrequently had the lowest mean BMI. Students' attempts to change their weight significantly moderated the relationships between most nutritional behaviors and BMI. In most cases, among students not trying to change their weight, expected relationships were observed; among students trying to lose weight, unexpected or no relationships were observed. Our findings suggest that among this population of predominately overweight students, solely relying on cross-sectional findings between

  3. An activity transition from NADH dehydrogenase to NADH oxidase during protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Huston, Scott; Collins, John; Sun, Fangfang; Zhang, Ting; Vaden, Timothy D; Zhang, Y-H Percival; Fu, Jinglin

    2018-05-01

    A decrease in the specific activity of an enzyme is commonly observed when the enzyme is inappropriately handled or is stored over an extended period. Here, we reported a functional transition of an FMN-bound diaphorase (FMN-DI) that happened during the long-term storage process. It was found that FMN-DI did not simply lose its β-nicotinamide adenine diphosphate (NADH) dehydrogenase activity after a long-time storage, but obtained a new enzyme activity of NADH oxidase. Further mechanistic studies suggested that the alteration of the binding strength of an FMN cofactor with a DI protein could be responsible for this functional switch of the enzyme. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. An observational estimate of the probability of encounters between mass-losing evolved stars and molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel H.; Myers, P. C.

    1994-02-01

    One hypothesis for the elevated abundance of Al-26 present during the formation of the solar system is that an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star expired within the molecular cloud (MC) containing the protosolar nebula. To test this hypothesis for star-forming clouds at the present epoch, we compared nearly complete lists of rapidly mass-losing AGB stars and MCs in the solar neighborhood and identified those stars which are most likely to encounter a nearby cloud. Roughly 10 stars satisfy our selection criteria. We estimated probabilities of encounter for these stars from the position of each star relative to cloud CO emission and the likely star-cloud distance along the line of sight. Typical encounter probabilities are approximately 1%. The number of potential encounters and the probability for each star-cloud pair to result in an encounter suggests that within 1 kpc of the Sun, there is a approximately 1% chance that a given cloud will be visited by a mass-losing AGB star over the next million years. The estimate is dominated by the possibility of encounters involving the stars IRC +60041 and S Cep. Over a MC lifetime, the probability for AGB encounter may be as high as approximately 70%. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of AL-26 enrichment of processed and unprocessed meteoritic inclusions. If the Al-26 in either type of inclusion arose from AGB-MC interaction, the low probability estimated here seems to require that AGB-MC encounters trigger multiple star formation and/or that the production rate of AGB stars was higher during the epoch of solar system formation than at present. Various lines of evidence suggest only the more massive (5-8 solar mass) AGB stars can produce significant AL-26 enrichment of star-forming clouds.

  5. Protective role of salt in catalysis and maintaining structure of halophilic proteins against denaturation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, Sunil K

    2014-01-01

    Search for new industrial enzymes having novel properties continues to be a desirable pursuit in enzyme research. The halophilic organisms inhabiting under saline/ hypersaline conditions are considered as promising source of useful enzymes. Their enzymes are structurally adapted to perform efficient catalysis under saline environment wherein n0n-halophilic enzymes often lose their structure and activity. Haloenzymes have been documented to be polyextremophilic and withstand high temperature, pH, organic solvents, and chaotropic agents. However, this stability is modulated by salt. Although vast amount of information have been generated on salt mediated protection and structure function relationship in halophilic proteins, their clear understanding and correct perspective still remain incoherent. Furthermore, understanding their protein architecture may give better clue for engineering stable enzymes which can withstand harsh industrial conditions. The article encompasses the current level of understanding about haloadaptations and analyzes structural basis of their enzyme stability against classical denaturants.

  6. High Molecular Weight Proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi Reduce Cross-Reaction with Leishmania spp. in Serological Diagnosis Tests

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Landín, Alejandra Yunuen; Martínez, Ignacio; Schabib, Muslim; Espinoza, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Because of its distribution throughout Latin America, sometimes it can overlap with other parasitic diseases, such as leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania spp. This might represent a problem when performing serological diagnosis, because both parasites share antigens, resulting in cross-reactions. In the present work we evaluated Mexican sera samples: 83.8% of chagasic patients recognized at least one antigen of high molecular weight (>95 kDa) when evaluated by Western blot. Proteins of 130 kDa and 160 kDa are predominantly being recognized by asymptomatic chagasic patients. When the proteins were extracted using Triton X-100 detergent, a larger number of specific T. cruzi proteins were obtained. This protein fraction can be used to increase specificity to 100% in Western blot assays without losing sensitivity of the test. High molecular weight proteins of T. cruzi include glycoproteins with a great amount of αMan (α-mannose), αGlc (α-glucose), GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine), and αGal (α-galactose) content and these structures play an essential role in antigens recognition by antibodies present in patients' sera. PMID:25136581

  7. Improving flavour and quality of tomatoes by expression of synthetic gene encoding sweet protein monellin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chinreddy Subramanyam; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Kaul, Tanushri; Islam, Tahmina; Reddy, Malireddy K

    2015-05-01

    Monellin a sweet-tasting protein exists naturally as a heterodimer of two non-covalently linked subunits chain A and B, which loses its sweetness on denaturation. In this study, we validated the expression of a synthetic monellin gene encoding a single polypeptide chain covalently linking the two subunits under T7 and fruit-ripening-specific promoters in Escherichia coli and tomato fruits, respectively. Purified recombinant monellin protein retained its sweet flavour at 70 °C and pH 2. We developed 15 transgenic T0 tomato plants overexpressing monellin, which were devoid of any growth penalty or phenotypic abnormalities during greenhouse conditions. T-DNA integration and fruit-specific heterologous expression of monellin had occurred in these transgenic tomato lines. ELISA revealed that expression of monellin was 4.5% of the total soluble fruit protein. Functional analyses of transgenic tomatoes of T2-5 and T2-14 lines revealed distinctly strong sweetness compared with wild type. Monellin a potential non-carbohydrate sweetener, if expressed in high amounts in fruits and vegetables, would enhance their flavour and quality.

  8. Simultaneous determination of nine saponins from Panax notoginseng using HPLC and pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Wan, J B; Lai, C M; Li, S P; Lee, M Y; Kong, L Y; Wang, Y T

    2006-04-11

    A HPLC and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) method was developed for simultaneous determination of nine saponins, including notoginsenoside R1, ginsenoside Rg1, Re, Rf, Rb1, Rc, Rb2, Rb3 and Rd in Panax notoginseng. The analysis was performed on C18 column with water-acetonitrile gradient elution and the investigated saponins were authenticated by comparing retention time and mass spectra with their reference compounds. Several methods including PLE, ultrasonication, soxhlet extraction and immersion were used for sample preparation and their extraction efficiency was compared. The results showed that PLE has the highest extraction efficiency and repeatability, which would be valuable on standardization of sample preparation for quality control of Chinese medicines. The developed HPLC and PLE is an effective approach for simultaneously quantitative determination of sapoinins in P. notoginseng, which could be used for quality control of P. notoginseng and its preparations.

  9. Production of okara and soy protein concentrates using membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, K H; Govindaraju, K; Singh, Vasudeva; Subramanian, R

    2011-01-01

    potential of membrane technology has not been exploited for the recovery of okara protein. Our study showed that protein content of okara extract could be improved from approximately 68% to approximately 81% without losing any true proteins in the process.

  10. Physically active rats lose more weight during calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    Smyers, Mark E; Bachir, Kailey Z; Britton, Steven L; Koch, Lauren G; Novak, Colleen M

    2015-02-01

    Daily physical activity shows substantial inter-individual variation, and low physical activity is associated with obesity and weight gain. Elevated physical activity is also associated with high intrinsic aerobic capacity, which confers considerable metabolic health benefits. Rats artificially selected for high intrinsic aerobic capacity (high-capacity runners, HCR) are more physically active than their low-capacity counterparts (low-capacity runners, LCR). To test the hypothesis that physical activity counters metabolic thriftiness, we measured physical activity and weight loss during three weeks of 50% calorie restriction (CR) in the HCR and LCR rat lines. At baseline, HCR ate more and were more active than LCR; this was seen in male rats, where LCR are considerably heavier than HCR, as well as in a set of female rats where body weight did not differ between the lines, demonstrating that this effect is consistent across sex and not secondary to body weight. We show for the first time that HCR lose more weight than LCR relative to baseline. Physical activity levels declined throughout CR, and this was more pronounced in HCR than in LCR, yet some aspects of activity remained elevated in HCR relative to LCR even during CR. This is consistent with the idea that low physical activity contributes to metabolic thriftiness during food restriction, allowing LCR to defend body mass, particularly lean mass. This has implications for physical activity during diet-induced weight loss, the genetic underpinnings of individual differences in weight loss during a diet, and the potential evolutionary opposition between metabolic thriftiness and aerobic capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between executive function, attachment style, and psychotic like experiences in typically developing youth.

    PubMed

    Blair, Melanie A; Nitzburg, George; DeRosse, Pamela; Karlsgodt, Katherine H

    2018-03-03

    Psychotic like experiences (PLE's) are common in the general population, particularly during adolescence, which has generated interest in how PLE's emerge, and the extent to which they reflect either risk for, or resilience to, psychosis. The "attachment-developmental-cognitive" (ADC) model is one effort to model the effect of risk factors on PLEs. The ADC model proposes attachment insecurity as an early environmental insult that can contribute to altered neurodevelopment, increasing the likelihood of PLE's and psychosis. In particular, early-life attachment disruptions may negatively impact numerous aspects of executive function (EF), including behavioral inhibition and emotion regulation. Yet despite the relationship of disrupted attachment to EF impairments, no studies have examined how these factors may combine to contribute to PLE's in adolescents. Here, we examined the relative contributions of daily-life EF and attachment difficulties (avoidance and anxiety) to PLEs in typically developing youth (N=52; ages 10-21). We found that EF deficits and high attachment insecurity both accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in PLE's, and interacted to predict PLE manifestation. Specifically, positive PLEs were predicted by greater trouble monitoring behavioral impact, less difficulty completing tasks, greater difficulty regulating emotional reactions, greater difficulty controlling impulses and higher attachment anxiety. Negative PLEs were predicted by greater difficulty in alternating attention, transitioning across situations, and regulating emotional reactions as well as higher attachment anxiety. These results are consistent with the ADC model, providing evidence that early-life attachment disruptions may impact behavioral regulation and emotional control, which together may contribute to PLEs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Assessing the impact of feline immunodeficiency virus and bovine tuberculosis co-infection in African lions.

    PubMed

    Maas, M; Keet, D F; Rutten, V P M G; Heesterbeek, J A P; Nielen, M

    2012-10-22

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a disease that was introduced relatively recently into the Kruger National Park (KNP) lion population. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV(ple)) is thought to have been endemic in lions for a much longer time. In humans, co-infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus increases disease burden. If BTB were to reach high levels of prevalence in lions, and if similar worsening effects would exist between FIV(ple) and BTB as for their human equivalents, this could pose a lion conservation problem. We collected data on lions in KNP from 1993 to 2008 for spatio-temporal analysis of both FIV(ple) and BTB, and to assess whether a similar relationship between the two diseases exists in lions. We found that BTB prevalence in the south was higher than in the north (72 versus 19% over the total study period) and increased over time in the northern part of the KNP (0-41%). No significant spatio-temporal differences were seen for FIV(ple) in the study period, in agreement with the presumed endemic state of the infection. Both infections affected haematology and blood chemistry values, FIV(ple) in a more pronounced way than BTB. The effect of co-infection on these values, however, was always less than additive. Though a large proportion (31%) of the lions was co-infected with FIV(ple) and M. bovis, there was no evidence for a synergistic relation as in their human counterparts. Whether this results from different immunopathogeneses remains to be determined.

  13. Sequential high pressure extractions applied to recover piceatannol and scirpusin B from passion fruit bagasse.

    PubMed

    Viganó, Juliane; Aguiar, Ana C; Moraes, Damila R; Jara, José L P; Eberlin, Marcos N; Cazarin, Cinthia B B; Maróstica, Mário R; Martínez, Julian

    2016-07-01

    Passion fruit seeds are currently discarded on the pulp processing but are known for their high piceatannol and scirpusin B contents. Using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), these highly valuable phenolic compounds were efficiently extracted from defatted passion fruit bagasse (DPFB). PLE was performed using mixtures of ethanol and water (50 to 100% ethanol, w/w) as solvent, temperatures from 50 to 70°C and pressure at 10MPa. The extraction methods were compared in terms of the global yield, total phenolic content (TPC), piceatannol content and the antioxidant capacity of the extracts. The DPFB extracts were also compared with those from non-defatted passion fruit bagasse (nDPFB). Identification and quantification of piceatannol were performed using UHPLC-MS/MS. The results showed that high TPC and piceatannol content were achieved for the extracts obtained from DPFB through PLE at 70°C and using 50 and 75% ethanol as the solvent. The best PLE conditions for TPC (70°C, 75% ethanol) resulted in 55.237mgGAE/g dried and defatted bagasse, whereas PLE at 70°C and 50% ethanol achieved 18.590mg of piceatannol/g dried and defatted bagasse, and such yields were significantly higher than those obtained using conventional extraction techniques. The antioxidant capacity assays showed high correlation with the TPC (r>0.886) and piceatannol (r>0.772). The passion fruit bagasse has therefore proved to be a rich source of piceatannol and PLE showed high efficiency to recover phenolic compounds from defatted passion fruit bagasse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of food intakes for women adopting the high protein Dukan diet.

    PubMed

    Wyka, Joanna; Malczyk, Ewa; Misiarz, Marta; Zołoteńka-Synowiec, Marzena; Całyniuk, Beata; Baczyńska, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are metabolic disorders affecting both adults and children. Effective treatment of these conditions is focused on decreasing the body mass, through individually tailored and well balanced diets, along with increasing physical activity. Obese persons often, however, choose high protein diets for losing weight. Recently in Poland, the high-protein Dukan-diet has become very popular. To assess dietary consumption in women adopting the Dukan-diet, including intakes of protein, fat, carbohydrate as well as vitamins and minerals. Subjects were 51 women aged 19-64 years on the Dukan-diet, who were surveyed by individually conducted interview. Women were asked to provide typical menus from each phase of their diets. Quantitative dietary intake assessment was achieved by an officially used 'Photograph album of foodstuffs and dishes' as custom-designed by the National Food and Nutrition Institute (IZZ) in Warsaw. Protein intakes in all subjects were excessive, especially those of animal origin when compared to recommended nutritional standards. In contrast, dietary carbohydrate intakes were low due to poor consumption of fruit and vegetables. Mineral and vitamin intakes revealed high potassium, iron and vitamins A, D and B2, but low vitamin C and folates. Women's average weight reduction after 8-10 weeks of dieting was approximately 15 kilograms. Many nutritional abnormalities were found in women on the high protein Dukan-diet. Adopting this diet in the long-term may pose health threats through acquiring kidney and liver disease, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease.

  15. [Genome loses all 5-methylcytosine a life span. How is this connected with accumulation of mutations during aging?].

    PubMed

    Mazin, A L

    1993-01-01

    The 5-methylcytosine (5mC) content in liver DNA has been determined for rats of different age. The rate of the 5mC loss from DNA is maximal in pre- and neonatal rats, 1.28% of reduction of the 5mC content per day, then it decreases to 0.33% and becomes minimal and constant in adult rats, 0.028% per day. During pregnancy and the first 15 days of postnatal development rat genome loses 49% of all 5mC. Within the next 45 days 15% of 5mC disappears, and during maximal rat life span, about four years, 39% of the genomic 5mC may be lost. Thus, it has been found for the first time that the animal genome loses practically all 5mC residues during the life span. Analysis of the literature data shows that for embryos the rate of the 5mC loss from DNA proves to be higher than that for adult animals by 96 times for mice, 69-for rats and 28-for cows. The rate of embryonal DNA hypomethylation may be inversely proportional to the pregnancy duration of species. In adult animals the rate inversely correlates with their maximal life span and accounts for the 5mC loss from DNA of a mouse by 0.028%, of a rat by 0.024%, of a hamster by 0.007%, of a cow by 0.004% and of a human being by 0.0005% per day. During the entire ontogenesis, the genome of a mouse loses 93% of all 5mC residues, that of a rat-101% and of a cow-88%. The age-dependent loss of 5mC from DNA is also typical for cell lines aging in vitro. It is constant, as a rule, and correlates with the number of cell population doublings (PD). The removal of all 5mC from DNA corresponds to 70-130 PD for human, 40-60 PD-for hamster and 6 PD- for mouse cells. In immortal lines the level of DNA methylation is stable or grows with age. A possible mechanism of an age-related 5mC loss from DNA is discussed. DNA hypomethylation may result from 5mC deamination directly at the moment of replicative DNA methylation and subsequent reparation of the G.T mispairs which leads to accumulation of the 5mC-->T+C substitutions in the genome with each

  16. Powerful Learning Environments: The Critical Link between School and Classroom Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnan, Christine; Schnepel, Katherine C.; Anderson, Lorin W.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated classrooms within four Accelerated Schools Project (ASP) schools, operationalizing the ASP principles, values, and concepts of a "powerful learning environment" (PLE), examining how similarly PLE was implemented in different classrooms and schools, and analyzing the relation between degree of implementation and differences in…

  17. Judgments of Nonverbal Behaviour by Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Can They Detect Signs of Winning and Losing from Brief Video Clips?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Christian; Furley, Philip; Mulhall, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Typically developing children are able to judge who is winning or losing from very short clips of video footage of behaviour between active match play across a number of sports. Inferences from "thin slices" (short video clips) allow participants to make complex judgments about the meaning of posture, gesture and body language. This…

  18. Sub-isotypic differences in the immunoglobulin G response to Lawsonia intracellularis in vaccinated, seropositive, and equine proliferative enteropathy-affected horses.

    PubMed

    Page, Allen E; Stills, Harold F; Horohov, David W

    2014-12-15

    In the horse, Lawsonia intracellularis infection results in equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). While upwards of 100% of weanlings on an endemic farm may seroconvert, only a small percentage (approximately 5%) will develop clinical disease. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms likely play a role in resistance to L. intracellularis and the absence of a L. intracellularis-specific IFN-γ response has been associated with the development of EPE. The goal of this study was to determine whether protection from clinical EPE is associated with the induction of a systemic IgG sub-isotypic response consistent with a Th1-type cytokine response. To describe their L. intracellularis/EPE status, horses enrolled in this study were placed into one of three categories: seropositive-only, vaccinated, and presumptive clinical EPE. An existing ELISA method was modified to detect L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a), IgG(b), and IgG(t) antibodies using the mouse anti-equine hybridomas CVS-48, CVS-39, and CVS-40, respectively. Additionally, the existing ELISA method was used to quantify total IgG antibodies specific for L. intracellularis for comparison between the groups. Total L. intracellularis-specific IgG was found to be significantly higher (p<0.05) in presumptive clinical EPE cases (n=21) when compared with seropositive (exposed but unaffected) (n=36) and vaccinated horses (n=27). Further, a similar pattern for IgG(a) was seen in that the presumptive clinical EPE horses had significantly more L. intracellularis-specific IgG(a) (p<0.05) than the seropositive or vaccinated horses. With IgG(b), however, the vaccinated horses had significantly more IgG(b) (p<0.05) than the presumptive clinical or seropositive horses. No L. intracellularis-specific IgG(t) was detected in samples from any of the groups. While the results presented here with respect to IgG(a) response in the presumptive clinical EPE group were expected, a higher concentration of IgG(a) was anticipated in the seropositive

  19. Protective role of salt in catalysis and maintaining structure of halophilic proteins against denaturation

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    Search for new industrial enzymes having novel properties continues to be a desirable pursuit in enzyme research. The halophilic organisms inhabiting under saline/ hypersaline conditions are considered as promising source of useful enzymes. Their enzymes are structurally adapted to perform efficient catalysis under saline environment wherein n0n-halophilic enzymes often lose their structure and activity. Haloenzymes have been documented to be polyextremophilic and withstand high temperature, pH, organic solvents, and chaotropic agents. However, this stability is modulated by salt. Although vast amount of information have been generated on salt mediated protection and structure function relationship in halophilic proteins, their clear understanding and correct perspective still remain incoherent. Furthermore, understanding their protein architecture may give better clue for engineering stable enzymes which can withstand harsh industrial conditions. The article encompasses the current level of understanding about haloadaptations and analyzes structural basis of their enzyme stability against classical denaturants. PMID:24782853

  20. A Scalable Approach for Protein False Discovery Rate Estimation in Large Proteomic Data Sets

    PubMed Central

    Savitski, Mikhail M.; Wilhelm, Mathias; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Bantscheff, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Calculating the number of confidently identified proteins and estimating false discovery rate (FDR) is a challenge when analyzing very large proteomic data sets such as entire human proteomes. Biological and technical heterogeneity in proteomic experiments further add to the challenge and there are strong differences in opinion regarding the conceptual validity of a protein FDR and no consensus regarding the methodology for protein FDR determination. There are also limitations inherent to the widely used classic target–decoy strategy that particularly show when analyzing very large data sets and that lead to a strong over-representation of decoy identifications. In this study, we investigated the merits of the classic, as well as a novel target–decoy-based protein FDR estimation approach, taking advantage of a heterogeneous data collection comprised of ∼19,000 LC-MS/MS runs deposited in ProteomicsDB (https://www.proteomicsdb.org). The “picked” protein FDR approach treats target and decoy sequences of the same protein as a pair rather than as individual entities and chooses either the target or the decoy sequence depending on which receives the highest score. We investigated the performance of this approach in combination with q-value based peptide scoring to normalize sample-, instrument-, and search engine-specific differences. The “picked” target–decoy strategy performed best when protein scoring was based on the best peptide q-value for each protein yielding a stable number of true positive protein identifications over a wide range of q-value thresholds. We show that this simple and unbiased strategy eliminates a conceptual issue in the commonly used “classic” protein FDR approach that causes overprediction of false-positive protein identification in large data sets. The approach scales from small to very large data sets without losing performance, consistently increases the number of true-positive protein identifications and is readily

  1. High-temperature protein G is essential for activity of the Escherichia coli clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G; Kiro, Ruth; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2011-12-13

    Prokaryotic DNA arrays arranged as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), along with their associated proteins, provide prokaryotes with adaptive immunity by RNA-mediated targeting of alien DNA or RNA matching the sequences between the repeats. Here, we present a thorough screening system for the identification of bacterial proteins participating in immunity conferred by the Escherichia coli CRISPR system. We describe the identification of one such protein, high-temperature protein G (HtpG), a homolog of the eukaryotic chaperone heat-shock protein 90. We demonstrate that in the absence of htpG, the E. coli CRISPR system loses its suicidal activity against λ prophage and its ability to provide immunity from lysogenization. Transcomplementation of htpG restores CRISPR activity. We further show that inactivity of the CRISPR system attributable to htpG deficiency can be suppressed by expression of Cas3, a protein that is essential for its activity. Accordingly, we also find that the steady-state level of overexpressed Cas3 is significantly enhanced following HtpG expression. We conclude that HtpG is a newly identified positive modulator of the CRISPR system that is essential for maintaining functional levels of Cas3.

  2. High-temperature protein G is essential for activity of the Escherichia coli clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system

    PubMed Central

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G.; Kiro, Ruth; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2011-01-01

    Prokaryotic DNA arrays arranged as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), along with their associated proteins, provide prokaryotes with adaptive immunity by RNA-mediated targeting of alien DNA or RNA matching the sequences between the repeats. Here, we present a thorough screening system for the identification of bacterial proteins participating in immunity conferred by the Escherichia coli CRISPR system. We describe the identification of one such protein, high-temperature protein G (HtpG), a homolog of the eukaryotic chaperone heat-shock protein 90. We demonstrate that in the absence of htpG, the E. coli CRISPR system loses its suicidal activity against λ prophage and its ability to provide immunity from lysogenization. Transcomplementation of htpG restores CRISPR activity. We further show that inactivity of the CRISPR system attributable to htpG deficiency can be suppressed by expression of Cas3, a protein that is essential for its activity. Accordingly, we also find that the steady-state level of overexpressed Cas3 is significantly enhanced following HtpG expression. We conclude that HtpG is a newly identified positive modulator of the CRISPR system that is essential for maintaining functional levels of Cas3. PMID:22114197

  3. Integrated Hydrogeological Investigation on the Vulnerability of a Pumping Station at a Losing Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngueleu Kamangou, Stephane; Vogt, Tobias; Cirpka, Olaf

    2010-05-01

    River restoration usually includes alteration of the river channel morphology. Thereby the interaction between river and groundwater can be modified. For the design of a river restoration project - especially in the vicinity of a groundwater pumping well for drinking water production - this impact must be predicted. But a good prediction requires a proper understanding of the existing situation. Numerical models help to improve the strategy of a successful river restoration project. The main objective of this study was to investigate the vulnerability of a pumping station located at losing river in northeast Switzerland. Besides the effect that river restoration could create, a particular attention was placed on the effect of a beaver dam in a side channel close to the pumping station. Analysis of field measurements coupled with numerical modeling of the pumping station area improved the understanding of the interactions in the river corridor between the river, side channels and the alluvial aquifer.

  4. Micromixer-based time-resolved NMR: applications to ubiquitin protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Masaya; Jayawickrama, Dimuthu A; Wolters, Andrew M; Manz, Andreas; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2003-02-15

    Time-resolved NMR spectroscopy is used to studychanges in protein conformation based on the elapsed time after a change in the solvent composition of a protein solution. The use of a micromixer and a continuous-flow method is described where the contents of two capillary flows are mixed rapidly, and then the NMR spectra of the combined flow are recorded at precise time points. The distance after mixing the two fluids and flow rates define the solvent-protein interaction time; this method allows the measurement of NMR spectra at precise mixing time points independent of spectral acquisition time. Integration of a micromixer and a microcoil NMR probe enables low-microliter volumes to be used without losing significant sensitivity in the NMR measurement. Ubiquitin, the model compound, changes its conformation from native to A-state at low pH and in 40% or higher methanol/water solvents. Proton NMR resonances of the His-68 and the Tyr-59 of ubiquitin are used to probe the conformational changes. Mixing ubiquitin and methanol solutions under low pH at microliter per minute flow rates yields both native and A-states. As the flow rate decreases, yielding longer reaction times, the population of the A-state increases. The micromixer-NMR system can probe reaction kinetics on a time scale of seconds.

  5. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Congdon, Thomas R; Notman, Rebecca; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-09-12

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications-from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action.

  6. Influence of Block Copolymerization on the Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins are produced by many cold-acclimatized species to enable them to survive subzero temperatures. These proteins have multiple macroscopic effects on ice crystal growth which makes them appealing for low-temperature applications—from cellular cryopreservation to food storage. Poly(vinyl alcohol) has remarkable ice recrystallization inhibition activity, but its mode of action is uncertain as is the extent at which it can be incorporated into other high-order structures. Here the synthesis and characterization of well-defined block copolymers containing poly(vinyl alcohol) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) by RAFT/MADIX polymerization is reported, as new antifreeze protein mimetics. The effect of adding a large second hydrophilic block is studied across a range of compositions, and it is found to be a passive component in ice recrystallization inhibition assays, enabling retention of all activity. In the extreme case, a block copolymer with only 10% poly(vinyl alcohol) was found to retain all activity, where statistical copolymers of PVA lose all activity with very minor changes to composition. These findings present a new method to increase the complexity of antifreeze protein mimetic materials, while retaining activity, and also to help understand the underlying mechanisms of action. PMID:27476873

  7. Can SNOMED CT be squeezed without losing its shape?

    PubMed

    López-García, Pablo; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-09-21

    In biomedical applications where the size and complexity of SNOMED CT become problematic, using a smaller subset that can act as a reasonable substitute is usually preferred. In a special class of use cases-like ontology-based quality assurance, or when performing scaling experiments for real-time performance-it is essential that modules show a similar shape than SNOMED CT in terms of concept distribution per sub-hierarchy. Exactly how to extract such balanced modules remains unclear, as most previous work on ontology modularization has focused on other problems. In this study, we investigate to what extent extracting balanced modules that preserve the original shape of SNOMED CT is possible, by presenting and evaluating an iterative algorithm. We used a graph-traversal modularization approach based on an input signature. To conform to our definition of a balanced module, we implemented an iterative algorithm that carefully bootstraped and dynamically adjusted the signature at each step. We measured the error for each sub-hierarchy and defined convergence as a residual sum of squares <1. Using 2000 concepts as an initial signature, our algorithm converged after seven iterations and extracted a module 4.7 % the size of SNOMED CT. Seven sub-hierarhies were either over or under-represented within a range of 1-8 %. Our study shows that balanced modules from large terminologies can be extracted using ontology graph-traversal modularization techniques under certain conditions: that the process is repeated a number of times, the input signature is dynamically adjusted in each iteration, and a moderate under/over-representation of some hierarchies is tolerated. In the case of SNOMED CT, our results conclusively show that it can be squeezed to less than 5 % of its size without any sub-hierarchy losing its shape more than 8 %, which is likely sufficient in most use cases.

  8. Anti-Ma-associated encephalitis due to dysgerminoma in a woman with Swyer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Al-Thubaiti, Ibtisam; Al-Hayek, Kefah; Binfalah, Mohammed

    2013-04-09

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE)/diencephalitis associated with anti-Ma2 antibodies was linked to testicular cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer (non-SCLC).(1,2) We report a case of anti-Ma-associated PLE/diencephalitis due to dysgerminoma in a woman with gonadal dysgenesis, or Swyer syndrome.

  9. Anti-snake venom activities of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) against Russell's viper venom: characterization of piperine as active principle.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, P A; Nipate, S S; Sonpetkar, J M; Salvi, N C; Waghmare, A B; Chaudhari, P D

    2013-05-20

    Piper longum L. fruits have been traditionally used against snakebites in north-eastern and southern region of India. To examine the ability of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L., Piperaceae (PLE) and piperine, one of the main active principles of Piper longum, to inhibit the Russell's viper (Doboia russelii, Viperidae) snake venom activities. Anti-snake venom activities of ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) and piperine against Russell's viper venom was studied in embryonated fertile chicken eggs, mice and rats by using various models as follows: inhibition of venom lethal action, inhibition of venom haemorrhagic action (in vitro), inhibition of venom haemorrhagic action (in vivo), inhibition of venom necrotizing action, inhibition of venom defibrinogenating action, inhibition of venom induced paw edema, inhibition of venom induced mast cell degranulation, creatine kinase assay and assay for catalase activity. PLE was found to inhibit the venom induced haemorrhage in embryonated fertile chicken eggs. Administration of PLE and piperine significantly (p<0.01) inhibited venom induced lethality, haemorrhage, necrosis, defibrinogenation and inflammatory paw edema in mice in a dose dependent manner. PLE and piperine also significantly (p<0.01) reduced venom induced mast cell degranulation in rats. Venom induced decrease in catalase enzyme levels in mice kidney tissue and increase in creatine kinase enzyme levels in mice serum were significantly (p<0.01) reversed by administration of both PLE and piperine. PLE possesses good anti-snake venom properties and piperine is one of the compounds responsible for the effective venom neutralizing ability of the plant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The nucleotide-free state of heterotrimeric G proteins α-subunit adopts a highly stable conformation.

    PubMed

    Andhirka, Sai Krishna; Vignesh, Ravichandran; Aradhyam, Gopala Krishna

    2017-08-01

    Deciphering the mechanism of activation of heterotrimeric G proteins by their cognate receptors continues to be an intriguing area of research. The recently solved crystal structure of the ternary complex captured the receptor-bound α-subunit in an open conformation, without bound nucleotide has improved our understanding of the activation process. Despite these advancements, the mechanism by which the receptor causes GDP release from the α-subunit remains elusive. To elucidate the mechanism of activation, we studied guanine nucleotide-induced structural stability of the α-subunit (in response to thermal/chaotrope-mediated stress). Inherent stabilities of the inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) forms contribute antagonistically to the difference in conformational stability whereas the GDP-bound protein is able to switch to a stable intermediate state, GTP-bound protein loses this ability. Partial perturbation of the protein fold reveals the underlying influence of the bound nucleotide providing an insight into the mechanism of activation. An extra stable, pretransition intermediate, 'empty pocket' state (conformationally active-state like) in the unfolding pathway of GDP-bound protein mimics a gating system - the activation process having to overcome this stable intermediate state. We demonstrate that a relatively more complex conformational fold of the GDP-bound protein is at the core of the gating system. We report capturing this threshold, 'metastable empty pocket' conformation (the gate) of α-subunit of G protein and hypothesize that the receptor activates the G protein by enabling it to achieve this structure through mild structural perturbation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Triathletes Lose Their Advantageous Pain Modulation under Acute Psychosocial Stress.

    PubMed

    Geva, Nirit; Pruessner, Jens; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    Triathletes, who constantly engage in intensely stressful sport, were recently found to exhibit greater pain tolerance and more efficient pain inhibition capabilities than nonathletes. However, pain inhibition correlated negatively with retrospective reports of mental stress during training and competition. The aim of the current study was to test pain inhibition capabilities of triathletes under acute, controlled psychological stress manipulation. Participants were 25 triathletes and ironman triathletes who underwent the measurement of pain threshold, pain intolerance, tonic suprathreshold pain, and conditioned pain modulation before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST). Perceived ratings of stress and anxiety, autonomic variables, and salivary cortisol levels were obtained as indices of stress. The MIST induced a significant stress reaction manifested in the subjective and objective indices. Overall, a significant reduction in pain threshold and in conditioned pain modulation efficacy was observed after the MIST, which reached the baseline levels observed previously in nonathletes. Paradoxically, the magnitude of this stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH) correlated negatively with the magnitude of the stress response; low-stress responders exhibited greater SIH than high-stress responders. The results suggest that under acute psychological stress, triathletes not only react with SIH and a reduction in pain modulation but also lose their advantageous pain modulation over nonathletes. The stronger the stress response recorded, the weaker the SIH. It appears that triathletes are not resilient to stress, responding with an increase in the sensitivity to pain as well as a decrease in pain inhibition. The possible effects of athletes' baseline pain profile and stress reactivity on SIH are discussed.

  12. SAS-1 Is a C2 Domain Protein Critical for Centriole Integrity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R.; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome. PMID:25412110

  13. The Moderating Effect of Instructional Conceptions on the Effect of Powerful Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarfo, Frederick Kwaku; Elen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at experimentally investigating the moderating role of instructional conceptions on the effectiveness of powerful learning environments (PLE) designed in line with the four-component instructional design model (4C/ID-model). The study also investigated the influence of learning in a 4C/ID PLE on students' instructional…

  14. Learning in Online Continuing Professional Development: An Institutionalist View on the Personal Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark William; Prescott, Denise; Lyon, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The nature of institutions is an important question for the Personal Learning Environment (PLE). Whilst the PLE has tended to focus on what is considered to be "non-institutional" technology like social software, most online tools today have a corporate/institutional foundation. How should educators position themselves with learners who…

  15. Constant Change: The Ever-Evolving Personal Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres Kompen, Ricardo; Monguet, Josep Ma.; Brigos, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    There are several definitions for the term "personal learning environment" (PLE); in this article, PLE refers to a group of web technologies, with various degrees of integration and interaction, that helps users and learners manage the flow of information that relates to the learning process, the creation of knowledge, and the…

  16. Strategy Approach for eLearning 2.0 Deployment in Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casquero, Oskar; Portillo, Javier; Ovelar, Ramon; Romo, Jesus; Benito, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The institutionally powered Personal Learning Environment (iPLE) constitutes our vision of how Web 2.0 technologies, people arrangement and data sharing could be applied for delivering open, flexible, distributed and learner-centred learning environments to university members. Based on the iPLE, this paper explores a strategy approach that…

  17. Factors Associated With Weight Change in Online Weight Management Communities: A Case Study in the LoseIt Reddit Community

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Antonio; Couto Silva, Ana Paula; Meira Jr, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that of the 72% of American Internet users who have looked for health information online, 22% have searched for help to lose or control weight. This demand for information has given rise to many online weight management communities, where users support one another throughout their weight loss process. Whether and how user engagement in online communities relates to weight change is not totally understood. Objective We investigated the activity behavior and analyze the semantic content of the messages of active users in LoseIt (r/loseit), a weight management community of the online social network Reddit. We then explored whether these features are associated with weight loss in this online social network. Methods A data collection tool was used to collect English posts, comments, and other public metadata of active users (ie, users with at least one post or comment) on LoseIt from August 2010 to November 2014. Analyses of frequency and intensity of user interaction in the community were performed together with a semantic analysis of the messages, done by a latent Dirichlet allocation method. The association between weight loss and online user activity patterns, the semantics of the messages, and real-world variables was found by a linear regression model using 30-day weight change as the dependent variable. Results We collected posts and comments of 107,886 unique users. Among these, 101,003 (93.62%) wrote at least one comment and 38,981 (36.13%) wrote at least one post. Median percentage of days online was 3.81 (IQR 9.51). The 10 most-discussed semantic topics on posts were related to healthy food, clothing, calorie counting, workouts, looks, habits, support, and unhealthy food. In the subset of 754 users who had gender, age, and 30-day weight change data available, women were predominant and 92.9% (701/754) lost weight. Female gender, body mass index (BMI) at baseline, high levels of online activity, the number of upvotes

  18. Optimizing pressurized liquid extraction of microbial lipids using the response surface method.

    PubMed

    Cescut, J; Severac, E; Molina-Jouve, C; Uribelarrea, J-L

    2011-01-21

    Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for the determination of optimum extraction parameters to reach maximum lipid extraction yield with yeast. Total lipids were extracted from oleaginous yeast (Rhodotorula glutinis) using pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). The effects of extraction parameters on lipid extraction yield were studied by employing a second-order central composite design. The optimal condition was obtained as three cycles of 15 min at 100°C with a ratio of 144 g of hydromatrix per 100 g of dry cell weight. Different analysis methods were used to compare the optimized PLE method with two conventional methods (Soxhlet and modification of Bligh and Dyer methods) under efficiency, selectivity and reproducibility criteria thanks to gravimetric analysis, GC with flame ionization detector, High Performance Liquid Chromatography linked to Evaporative Light Scattering Detector (HPLC-ELSD) and thin-layer chromatographic analysis. For each sample, the lipid extraction yield with optimized PLE was higher than those obtained with referenced methods (Soxhlet and Bligh and Dyer methods with, respectively, a recovery of 78% and 85% compared to PLE method). Moreover, the use of PLE led to major advantages such as an analysis time reduction by a factor of 10 and solvent quantity reduction by 70%, compared with traditional extraction methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of pressurized liquid extraction by response surface methodology of Goji berry (Lycium barbarum L.) phenolic bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Tripodo, Giusy; Ibáñez, Elena; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Fanali, Chiara

    2018-01-03

    Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) has been used for the first time in this work to extract phenolic compounds from Goji berries according to a multilevel factorial design using response surface methodology. The global yield (% w/dw, weight/dry-weight), total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid (TF) and antioxidant activity (determined via ABTS assay, expressed as TEAC value) were used as response variables to study the effects of temperature (50-180°C) and green solvent composition (mixtures of ethanol/water). Phenolic compounds characterization was performed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). The optimum PLE conditions predicted by the model were as follows: 180°C and 86% ethanol in water with a good desirability value of 0.815. The predicted conditions were confirmed experimentally and once the experimental design was validated for commercial fruit samples, the PLE extraction of phenolic compounds from three different varieties of fruit samples (Selvatico mongolo, Bigol, and Polonia) was performed. Nine phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in these extracts, including phenolic acids and their derivatives, and flavonols. The optimized PLE conditions were compared to a conventional solid-liquid extraction, demonstrating that PLE is a useful alternative to extract phenolic compounds from Goji berry. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of the Mass-losing Supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel H.; Weintraub, David A.

    1998-04-01

    The highly luminous M supergiant VY CMa is a massive star that appears to be in its final death throes, losing mass at high rate en route to exploding as a supernova. Subarcsecond-resolution optical images of VY CMa, obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope, vividly demonstrate that mass loss from VY CMa is highly anisotropic. In the FOC images, the optical ``star'' VY CMa constitutes the bright, well-resolved core of an elongated reflection nebula. The imaged nebula is ~3" (~4500 AU) in extent and is clumpy and highly asymmetric. The images indicate that the bright core, which lies near one edge of the nebula, is pure scattered starlight. We conclude that at optical wavelengths VY CMa is obscured from view along our line of sight by its own dusty envelope. The presence of the extended reflection nebula then suggests that this envelope is highly flattened and/or that the star is surrounded by a massive circumstellar disk. Such axisymmetric circumstellar density structure should have profound effects on post-red supergiant mass loss from VY CMa and, ultimately, on the shaping of the remnant of the supernova that will terminate its post-main-sequence evolution.

  1. Protein tyrosine adduct in humans self-poisoned by chlorpyrifos

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, Bin, E-mail: binli@unmc.edu; Eyer, Peter, E-mail: peter.eyer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de; Eddleston, Michael, E-mail: M.Eddleston@ed.ac.uk

    2013-06-15

    Studies of human cases of self-inflicted poisoning suggest that chlorpyrifos oxon reacts not only with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase but also with other blood proteins. A favored candidate is albumin because in vitro and animal studies have identified tyrosine 411 of albumin as a site covalently modified by organophosphorus poisons. Our goal was to test this proposal in humans by determining whether plasma from humans poisoned by chlorpyrifos has adducts on tyrosine. Plasma samples from 5 self-poisoned humans were drawn at various time intervals after ingestion of chlorpyrifos for a total of 34 samples. All 34 samples were analyzed for plasmamore » levels of chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) as a function of time post-ingestion. Eleven samples were analyzed for the presence of diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine by mass spectrometry. Six samples yielded diethoxyphosphorylated tyrosine in pronase digests. Blood collected as late as 5 days after chlorpyrifos ingestion was positive for CPO-tyrosine, consistent with the 20-day half-life of albumin. High plasma CPO levels did not predict detectable levels of CPO-tyrosine. CPO-tyrosine was identified in pralidoxime treated patients as well as in patients not treated with pralidoxime, indicating that pralidoxime does not reverse CPO binding to tyrosine in humans. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase was a more sensitive biomarker of exposure than adducts on tyrosine. In conclusion, chlorpyrifos oxon makes a stable covalent adduct on the tyrosine residue of blood proteins in humans who ingested chlorpyrifos. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos-poisoned patients have adducts on protein tyrosine. • Diethoxyphosphate-tyrosine does not lose an alkyl group. • Proteins in addition to AChE and BChE are modified by organophosphates.« less

  2. Losing jobs and lighting up: Employment experiences and smoking in the Great Recession

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Shelley D.; Perreira, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession produced the highest rates of unemployment observed in decades, in part due to particularly high rates of people losing work involuntarily. The impact of these job losses on health is unknown, due to the length of time required for most disease development, concerns about reverse causation, and limited data that covers this time period. We examine associations between job loss, employment status and smoking, the leading preventable cause of death, among 13,571 individuals participating in the 2001-2011 waves of the U.S.-based Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Results indicate that recent involuntary job loss is associated with an average 1.1 percentage point increase in smoking probability. This risk is strongest when people have returned to work, and appears reversed when they leave the labor market altogether. Although some job loss is associated with changes in household income and psychological distress levels, we find no evidence that these changes explain smoking behavior modifications. Smoking prevention programs and policies targeted at displaced workers or the newly employed may alleviate some negative health effects produced by joblessness during the Great Recession. PMID:26079992

  3. Prefrontal neurons represent winning and losing during competitive video shooting games between monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Masataka

    2012-05-30

    Humans and animals must work to support their survival and reproductive needs. Because resources are limited in the natural environment, competition is inevitable, and competing successfully is vitally important. However, the neuronal mechanisms of competitive behavior are poorly studied. We examined whether neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) showed response sensitivity related to a competitive game. In this study, monkeys played a video shooting game, either competing with another monkey or the computer, or playing alone without a rival. Monkeys performed more quickly and more accurately in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games, indicating that they were more motivated in the competitive than in the noncompetitive games. LPFC neurons showed differential activity between the competitive and noncompetitive games showing winning- and losing-related activity. Furthermore, activities of prefrontal neurons differed depending on whether the competition was between monkeys or between the monkey and the computer. These results indicate that LPFC neurons may play an important role in monitoring the outcome of competition and enabling animals to adapt their behavior to increase their chances of obtaining a reward in a socially interactive environment.

  4. Maternal protein reserves and their influence on lactational performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Pine, A P; Jessop, N S; Oldham, J D

    1994-01-01

    To determine the contribution of tissue protein reserves to lactational performance, multiparous female Sprague-Dawley rats were mated, caged individually and offered a diet high in protein (215 g crude protein (N x 6.25; CP)/kg dry matter (DM); H) ad lib. until day 12 of gestation. Subsequently half the rats continued to receive diet H while the remainder were offered a diet low in protein (65 g CP/kg DM; L) until parturition. This treatment aimed to produce a difference in carcass protein at parturition. On day 1 of lactation females were allocated to either diet H or a low-protein diet (90 g CP/kg DM; L2) offered until day 13 of lactation, giving four lactation treatment groups HH, HL2, LH and LL2. Groups of females were slaughtered on days 2 and 12 of gestation and days 1 and 13 of lactation and carcass and major organs were analysed. Weight gain of standardized litters was used as an indicator of lactational performance. Maternal carcass protein contents at parturition were 43.5 (SE 1.2) and 38.7 (SE 0.8) g (P < 0.01) for diets H and L respectively. During lactation there was little change in carcass protein content of HH rats while LH rats appeared to replenish their depleted reserves. Food intake or lactational performance did not differ between these two groups. HL2 and LL2 rats lost carcass protein with HL2 rats losing more than LL2 rats (P < 0.05). Intake and lactational performance were reduced compared with that on diet H (P < 0.05) but for the first 6 d of lactation were both greater (P < 0.05) for diet HL2 than for diet LL2. All four groups showed a considerable loss of body fat during lactation which was not affected by diet. The ability of HL2 rats to catabolize more protein and consume more food allowed them to sustain a greater lactational performance. Previous maternal protein depletion had no influence on lactational performance as long as an adequate supply of dietary protein was provided.

  5. Psychotic-like experiences and happiness in the English general population.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Ai

    2017-11-01

    Psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) have been associated with a variety of adverse outcomes but how they affect happiness in individuals with PLE is unknown. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess the association between PLEs and happiness, and the factors that may influence this association. Nationally representative data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey including adults aged ≥ 16 years was analyzed. The Psychosis Screening Questionnaire was used to assess past 12-month PLE. Individuals who endorsed at least one of the following were considered to have any PLE: thought control, paranoia, strange experiences, auditory hallucinations. Happiness (3-point scale) was assessed with a validated question with higher scores indicating lower levels of happiness. The association between PLE and happiness was assessed by multivariable ordinal logistic regression. Mediation analysis was also performed. Among the 7363 individuals included in the analysis, the prevalence of any PLE increased with decreasing levels of happiness [very happy (2.3%), fairly happy (5.4%), not too happy (14.9%)]. This was also shown in the multivariable analysis adjusted for sociodemographic factors and stressful life events (from very happy to not too happy: OR = 2.41; 95%CI = 1.86-3.12). Mediation analysis showed that anxiety disorders explained the largest proportion of the association (38.8%) followed by depressive episode (28.5%), insomnia (21.9%), disability (16.5%), pain (12.5%), social support (10.0%), and physical health conditions (6.0%). The cross-sectional design limits causal inference. Interventions to identify and address conditions that may have a negative impact on happiness in individuals with PLE may be important to improve their well-being. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A protocol for pressurized liquid extraction and processing methods to isolate modern and ancient bone cholesterol for compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Laffey, Ann O; Krigbaum, John; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2017-02-15

    Bone lipid compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and bone collagen and apatite stable isotope ratio analysis are important sources of ecological and paleodietary information. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) is quicker and utilizes less solvent than traditional methods of lipid extraction such as soxhlet and ultrasonication. This study facilitates dietary analysis by optimizing and testing a standardized methodology for PLE of bone cholesterol. Modern and archaeological bones were extracted by PLE using varied temperatures, solvent solutions, and sample weights. The efficiency of PLE was assessed via quantification of cholesterol yields. Stable isotopic ratio integrity was evaluated by comparing isotopic signatures (δ 13 C and δ 18 O values) of cholesterol derived from whole bone, bone collagen and bone apatite. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS) were conducted on purified collagen and lipid extracts to assess isotopic responses to PLE. Lipid yield was optimized at two PLE extraction cycles of 75 °C using dichloromethane/methanol (2:1 v/v) as a solvent with 0.25-0.75 g bone sample. Following lipid extraction, saponification combined with the derivatization of the neutral fraction using trimethylsilylation yielded nearly twice the cholesterol of non-saponified or non-derivatized samples. It was also found that lipids extracted from purified bone collagen and apatite could be used for cholesterol CSIA. There was no difference in the bulk δ 13 C values of collagen extracted from bone with or without lipid. However, there was a significant depletion in 18 O of bone apatite due to lipid presence or processing. These results should assist sample selection and provide an effective, alternative extraction method for bone cholesterol that may be used for isotopic and paleodietary analysis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Production of high titre antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice immunized with ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. (Piperaceae) and piperine.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, P A; Nipate, S S; Sonpetkar, J M; Salvi, N C; Waghmare, A B; Chaudhari, P D

    2014-01-15

    Piper longum L. fruits have been traditionally used against snakebites in north-eastern and southern region of India. The aim of the study was to assess the production of antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice after prophylactic immunization with ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum L. and piperine. The mice sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against Russell's viper venom by in vitro lethality neutralization assay and in vivo lethality neutralization assay. Polyvalent anti-snake venom serum (antivenom) manufactured by Haffkine Bio-Pharmaceutical Corporation Ltd. was used as standard. Further confirmation of presence of antibodies against the venom in sera of mice immunized with PLE and piperine was done using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double immunodiffusion test. Treatment with PLE-treated mice serum and piperine-treated mice serum was found to inhibit the lethal action of venom both in the in vitro lethality neutralization assay and in vivo lethality neutralization assay. ELISA testing indicated that there were significantly high (p<0.01) levels of cross reactions between the PLE and piperine treated mice serum and the venom antigens. In double immunodiffusion test, a white band was observed between the two wells of antigen and antibodies for both the PLE-treated and piperine-treated mice serum. Thus it can be concluded that immunization with ethanolic extract of fruits of Piper longum and piperine produced a high titre antibody response against Russell's viper venom in mice. The antibodies against PLE and piperine could be useful in antivenom therapy of Russell's viper bites. PLE and piperine may also have a potential interest in view of the development of antivenom formulations used as antidote against snake bites. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Losing a loved one to homicide: prevalence and mental health correlates in a national sample of young adults.

    PubMed

    Zinzow, Heidi M; Rheingold, Alyssa A; Hawkins, Alesia O; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2009-02-01

    The present study examined the prevalence, demographic distribution, and mental health correlates of losing a loved one to homicide. A national sample of 1,753 young adults completed structured telephone interviews measuring violence exposure, mental health diagnoses, and loss of a family member or close friend to a drunk driving accident (vehicular homicide) or murder (criminal homicide). The prevalence of homicide survivorship was 15%. African Americans were more highly represented among criminal homicide survivors. Logistic regression analyses found that homicide survivors were at risk for past year posttraumatic stress disorder (OR = 1.88), major depressive episode (OR = 1.64), and drug abuse/dependence (OR = 1.77). These findings highlight the significant mental health needs of homicide survivors.

  9. Losing a Loved One to Homicide: Prevalence and Mental Health Correlates in a National Sample of Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zinzow, Heidi; Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Hawkins, Alesia; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the prevalence, demographic distribution, and mental health correlates of losing a loved one to homicide. A national sample of 1753 young adults completed structured telephone interviews measuring violence exposure, mental health diagnoses, and loss of a family member or close friend to a drunk driving accident (vehicular homicide) or murder (criminal homicide). The prevalence of homicide survivorship was 15.2%. African Americans were more highly represented among criminal homicide survivors. Logistic regression analyses found that homicide survivors were at risk for past year posttraumatic stress disorder (OR = 1.88), major depressive episode (OR = 1.64), and drug abuse/dependence (OR = 1.77). These findings highlight the significant mental health needs of homicide survivors. PMID:19230006

  10. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12–14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE) scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the Child Behavior Checklist for assessment of the child’s internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Results confirmed that severity of PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychological distress and with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Maternal authoritativeness and warmth functioned as protective factors and had moderating effects on the relation between PLE exposure and mental health symptoms. In contrast, maternal authoritarianism exacerbated the relation between PLE exposure and children’s externalizing symptoms. Fathers’ parenting style and warmth had no significant relationship with children’s mental health outcomes. These findings have important clinical and practical implications for parental guidance and support during periods of war and armed conflict. PMID:28878705

  11. Optimization of pressurized liquid extraction of inositols from pine nuts (Pinus pinea L.).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Aceituno, L; Rodríguez-Sánchez, S; Sanz, J; Sanz, M L; Ramos, L

    2014-06-15

    Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) has been used for the first time to extract bioactive inositols from pine nuts. The influence of extraction time, temperature and cycles of extraction in the yield and composition of the extract was studied. A quadratic lineal model using multiple linear regression in the stepwise mode was used to evaluate possible trends in the process. Under optimised PLE conditions (50°C, 18 min, 3 cycles of 1.5 mL water each one) at 10 MPa, a noticeable reduction in extraction time and solvent volume, compared with solid-liquid extraction (SLE; room temperature, 2h, 2 cycles of 5 mL water each one) was achieved; 5.7 mg/g inositols were extracted by PLE, whereas yields of only 3.7 mg/g were obtained by SLE. Subsequent incubation of PLE extracts with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (37°C, 5h) allowed the removal of other co-extracted low molecular weight carbohydrates which may interfere in the bioactivity of inositols. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Are extraction methods in quantitative assays of pharmacopoeia monographs exhaustive? A comparison with pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Basalo, Carlos; Mohn, Tobias; Hamburger, Matthias

    2006-10-01

    The extraction methods in selected monographs of the European and the Swiss Pharmacopoeia were compared to pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) with respect to the yield of constituents to be dosed in the quantitative assay for the respective herbal drugs. The study included five drugs, Belladonnae folium, Colae semen, Boldo folium, Tanaceti herba and Agni casti fructus. They were selected to cover different classes of compounds to be analyzed and different extraction methods to be used according to the monographs. Extraction protocols for PLE were optimized by varying the solvents and number of extraction cycles. In PLE, yields > 97 % of extractable analytes were typically achieved with two extraction cycles. For alkaloid-containing drugs, the addition of ammonia prior to extraction significantly increased the yield and reduced the number of extraction cycles required for exhaustive extraction. PLE was in all cases superior to the extraction protocol of the pharmacopoeia monographs (taken as 100 %), with differences ranging from 108 % in case of parthenolide in Tanaceti herba to 343 % in case of alkaloids in Boldo folium.

  13. Children Affected by War and Armed Conflict: Parental Protective Factors and Resistance to Mental Health Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the role of parenting styles and parental warmth in moderating relations between exposure to political life events and mental health symptoms among 277 Israeli adolescents aged 12-14 and their parents, who had been exposed to protracted periods of war, missile bombardments, and terrorism. Adolescents completed the Political Life Events (PLE) scale, Brief Symptom Inventory and questionnaires regarding parenting style and parental warmth. The primary caregiver completed the Child Behavior Checklist for assessment of the child's internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Results confirmed that severity of PLE exposure was positively correlated with psychological distress and with internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Maternal authoritativeness and warmth functioned as protective factors and had moderating effects on the relation between PLE exposure and mental health symptoms. In contrast, maternal authoritarianism exacerbated the relation between PLE exposure and children's externalizing symptoms. Fathers' parenting style and warmth had no significant relationship with children's mental health outcomes. These findings have important clinical and practical implications for parental guidance and support during periods of war and armed conflict.

  14. People trying to lose weight dislike calorie counting apps and want motivational support to help them achieve their goals.

    PubMed

    Solbrig, Linda; Jones, Ray; Kavanagh, David; May, Jon; Parkin, Tracey; Andrade, Jackie

    2017-03-01

    Two thirds of UK adults are overweight or obese and at increased risk of chronic conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and certain cancers. Basic public health support for weight loss comprises information about healthy eating and lifestyle, but internet and mobile applications (apps) create possibilities for providing long-term motivational support. To explore among people currently trying to lose weight, or maintaining weight loss, (i) problems, experiences and wishes in regards to weight management and weight loss support including e-health support; (ii) reactions to Functional Imagery Training (FIT) as a possible intervention. Six focus groups ( N  = 24 in total) were recruited from a public pool of people who had expressed an interest in helping with research. The topics considered were barriers to weight loss, desired support for weight loss and acceptability of FIT including the FIT app. The focus group discussions were transcribed and thematically analysed. All groups spontaneously raised the issue of waning motivation and expressed the desire for motivational app support for losing weight and increasing physical activity. They disliked calorie counting apps and those that required lots of user input. All groups wanted behavioural elements such as setting and reviewing goals to be included, with the ability to personalise the app by adding picture reminders and choosing times for goal reminders. Participants were positive about FIT and FIT support materials. There is a mismatch between the help provided via public health information campaigns and commercially available weight-loss self-help (lifestyle information, self-monitoring), and the help that individuals actually desire (motivational and autonomous e-support), posing an opportunity to develop more effective electronic, theory-driven, motivational, self-help interventions.

  15. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

    Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Study participants inclu