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Sample records for proteins inhibit hydrogen

  1. Tadalafil Integrates Nitric Oxide-Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling to Inhibit High Glucose-induced Matrix Protein Synthesis in Podocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hak Joo; Feliers, Denis; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Gorin, Yves; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-induced kidney cell injury involves an increase in matrix protein expression that is only partly alleviated by current treatment, prompting a search for new modalities. We have previously shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits high glucose-induced protein synthesis in kidney podocytes. We tested whether tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction, ameliorates high glucose stimulation of matrix proteins by generating H2S in podocytes. Tadalafil abrogated high glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis and matrix protein laminin γ1. Tadalafil inhibited high glucose-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 and laminin γ1 accumulation in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. Tadalafil increased AMPK phosphorylation by stimulating calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase β. Tadalafil rapidly increased the expression and activity of the H2S-generating enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by promoting its translation. dl-Propargylglycine, a CSE inhibitor, and siRNA against CSE inhibited tadalafil-induced AMPK phosphorylation and abrogated the tadalafil effect on high glucose stimulation of laminin γ1. In tadalafil-treated podocytes, we examined the interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO). Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, respectively, abolished tadalafil induction of H2S and AMPK phosphorylation. Tadalafil rapidly augmented inducible NOS (iNOS) expression by increasing its mRNA, and siRNA for iNOS and 1400W, an iNOS blocker, inhibited tadalafil stimulation of CSE expression and AMPK phosphorylation. We conclude that tadalafil amelioration of high glucose stimulation of synthesis of proteins including matrix proteins in podocytes requires integration of the NO-H2S-AMPK axis leading to the inhibition of high glucose-induced mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  3. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp. PMID:26686578

  4. Drug-protein hydrogen bonds govern the inhibition of the ATP hydrolysis of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chufan, Eduardo E; Kapoor, Khyati; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. This multidrug transporter utilizes energy from ATP hydrolysis for the efflux of a variety of hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Most of the substrates and modulators of P-gp stimulate its basal ATPase activity, although some inhibit it. The molecular mechanisms that are in play in either case are unknown. In this report, mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies of P-gp led to the identification of a pair of phenylalanine-tyrosine structural motifs in the transmembrane region that mediate the inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by certain drugs (zosuquidar, elacridar and tariquidar), with high affinity (IC50's ranging from 10 to 30nM). Upon mutation of any of these residues, drugs that inhibit the ATPase activity of P-gp switch to stimulation of the activity. Molecular modeling revealed that the phenylalanine residues F978 and F728 interact with tyrosine residues Y953 and Y310, respectively, in an edge-to-face conformation, which orients the tyrosines in such a way that they establish hydrogen-bond contacts with the inhibitor. Biochemical investigations along with transport studies in intact cells showed that the inhibitors bind at a high affinity site to produce inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and transport function. Upon mutation, they bind at lower affinity sites, stimulating ATP hydrolysis and only poorly inhibiting transport. These results also reveal that screening chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit the basal ATP hydrolysis can be a reliable tool to identify modulators with high affinity for P-gp.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits L-Type Calcium Currents Depending upon the Protein Sulfhydryl State in Rat Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Haojan; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that inhibits L-type calcium currents (I Ca, L). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. In particular, the targeting site in the L-type calcium channel where H2S functions remains unknown. The study was designed to investigate if the sulfhydryl group could be the possible targeting site in the L-type calcium channel in rat cardiomyocytes. Cardiac function was measured in isolated perfused rat hearts. The L-type calcium currents were recorded by using a whole cell voltage clamp technique on the isolated cardiomyocytes. The L-type calcium channel containing free sulfhydryl groups in H9C2 cells were measured by using Western blot. The results showed that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) produced a negative inotropic effect on cardiac function, which could be partly inhibited by the oxidant sulfhydryl modifier diamide (DM). H2S donor inhibited the peak amplitude of I Ca, L in a concentration-dependent manner. However, dithiothreitol (DTT), a reducing sulfhydryl modifier markedly reversed the H2S donor-induced inhibition of I Ca, L in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, in the presence of DM, H2S donor could not alter cardiac function and L type calcium currents. After the isolated rat heart or the cardiomyocytes were treated with DTT, NaHS could markedly alter cardiac function and L-type calcium currents in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, NaHS could decrease the functional free sulfhydryl group in the L-type Ca2+ channel, which could be reversed by thiol reductant, either DTT or reduced glutathione. Therefore, our results suggest that H2S might inhibit L-type calcium currents depending on the sulfhydryl group in rat cardiomyocytes. PMID:22590646

  6. Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis by up-regulation of Bcl-2 via NF-{kappa}B in H1299 human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Mi Ran; Nam, Hyo-Jung; Kim, So-Young; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-04-03

    Inhibitory heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Gi proteins) mediate a variety of signaling pathways by coupling receptors and effectors to regulate cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the role of Gi proteins in the modulation of hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gi proteins on hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms in H1299 human lung cancer cells. The stable expression of constitutively active alpha subunits of Gi1 (G{alpha}i1QL), Gi2, or Gi3 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The expression of G{alpha}i1QL up-regulated Bcl-2 expression, and the knockdown of Bcl-2 with siRNA abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of G{alpha}i1QL. G{alpha}i1 induced the transcription of Bcl-2 by activation of NF-{kappa}B, which resulted from an increase in NF-{kappa}B p50 protein. We conclude that G{alpha}i1 inhibits hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of H1299 lung cancer cells by up-regulating the transcription of Bcl-2 through a p50-mediated NF-{kappa}B activation.

  7. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  8. Protein hydrogen exchange: Testing current models

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J; Lim, Woon K; Bédard, Sabrina; Black, Ben E; Englander, S Walter

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the determinants of protein hydrogen exchange (HX), HX rates of most of the backbone amide hydrogens of Staphylococcal nuclease were measured by NMR methods. A modified analysis was used to improve accuracy for the faster hydrogens. HX rates of both near surface and well buried hydrogens are spread over more than 7 orders of magnitude. These results were compared with previous hypotheses for HX rate determination. Contrary to a common assumption, proximity to the surface of the native protein does not usually produce fast exchange. The slow HX rates for unprotected surface hydrogens are not well explained by local electrostatic field. The ability of buried hydrogens to exchange is not explained by a solvent penetration mechanism. The exchange rates of structurally protected hydrogens are not well predicted by algorithms that depend only on local interactions or only on transient unfolding reactions. These observations identify some of the present difficulties of HX rate prediction and suggest the need for returning to a detailed hydrogen by hydrogen analysis to examine the bases of structure-rate relationships, as described in the companion paper (Skinner et al., Protein Sci 2012;21:996–1005). PMID:22544567

  9. Hydrogen inhibition in steam gasification of annealed Saran char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Michael Gerard, Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Annealed Saran and coal chars were gasified in mixtures of H2O/H 2/Ar at 1123 K and varying pressures to varying extents of conversion, followed by transient kinetic desorption and TPD to 1773 K, in order to characterize hydrogen adsorbed onto char surfaces during gasification and to identify the mode(s) of hydrogen inhibition at varying extents of char conversion. Adsorbed hydrogen concentration on annealed Saran char was found to be independent of reactant gas composition and pressure, to increase from an initial surface concentration of 3 x 10-5 to 1.5 x 10 -3 0--3 mmolH2(STP)/m2 over the first 1% conversion, and to increase very gradually after this. Gasification rate declines significantly over the initial 1% carbon conversion and is inhibited mainly by dissociative hydrogen adsorption over this range. Linearized Langmiur-Hinshellwood type rate expressions based on the three primary modes of hydrogen inhibition have been developed for all gasification data above 1% char conversion. The expression which indicates reverse oxygen exchange or "associative" hydrogen adsorption fits the data well, while the expression for dissociative hydrogen adsorption does not. Calculation of the equilibrium constant for oxygen exchange (k1/k-1 = 0.029) indicates a low fractional coverage of adsorbed oxygen complexes (C(O)), while the equilibrium constant for "associative" hydrogen adsorption (k3/k-3 = 425 MPa-1) stipulates a high fractional coverage of "associatively" adsorbed hydrogen. Because no "associatively" bound hydrogen was detected and because low concentrations of surface oxides were found during gasification, it is concluded that reverse oxygen exchange is the primary mode of hydrogen inhibition past 1% char conversion for Saran char. Active site propagation along graphitic zig-zag edges is proposed as the main source of surface carbon consumption for steady-state char gasification in steam.

  10. [Hydrogen peroxide inhibits acetylcholinesterase of myometrium sarcolemma].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    The action of hydrogen peroxide on acetylcholinesterase enzymatic activity in myometrium sarcolemma fraction is investigated. Hydrogen peroxide (0.1-26 microM), depending on the concentration, suppressed the activity. Acetylcholinesterase proved to be highly sensitive to the action of H2O2, making Ki = 2.4 +/- 0.4 microM, nH = 0.65 +/- 0.08 (n = 4-5). It is established, that hydrogen peroxide in the range of 1.6 - 6.4 microM essentially reduce V(0,max) and K(M). In the presence of dithiothreitole (a reducer of SH-groups of the membrane surface) the investigated substance effect considerably decreased.

  11. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  12. T-2 mycotoxin inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.G.; Watts, M.R.; Canterbury, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of T-2 toxin on rat liver mitochondrial protein synthesis. Isolated rat liver mitochondria were supplemented with an S-100 supernatant from rat liver and an external ATP-generating system. An in-vitro assay employing cycloheximide, and inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis, and chloramphenicol, and inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis, to distinguish mitochondrial protein synthesis from the cytoplasmic process. Amino acid incorporation into mitochondria was dependent on the concentration of mitochondria and was inhibited by chloramphenicol. The rate of uptake of tritium leucine into mitochondrial protein was unaffected by the addition of T-2 toxin and was not a rate-limiting step in incorporation. However, 0.02 micrograms/ml of T-2 toxin decreased the rate of protein synthesis inhibition correlated with the amount of T-2 toxin taken up by the mitochondria. While T-2 toxin is known to inhibit eukaryotic protein synthesis, this is the first time T-2 was shown to inhibit mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  13. Phosphatidic acid inhibits blue light-induced stomatal opening via inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 [corrected].

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Stomata open in response to blue light under a background of red light. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) inhibits blue light-dependent stomatal opening, an effect essential for promoting stomatal closure in the daytime to prevent water loss. However, the mechanisms and molecular targets of this inhibition in the blue light signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we report that phosphatidic acid (PA), a phospholipid second messenger produced by ABA in guard cells, inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a positive regulator of blue light signaling, and PA plays a role in stimulating stomatal closure in Vicia faba. Biochemical analysis revealed that PA directly inhibited the phosphatase activity of the catalytic subunit of V. faba PP1 (PP1c) in vitro. PA inhibited blue light-dependent stomatal opening but did not affect red light- or fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening. PA also inhibited blue light-dependent H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. However, PA did not inhibit the autophosphorylation of phototropins, blue light receptors for stomatal opening. Furthermore, 1-butanol, a selective inhibitor of phospholipase D, which produces PA via hydrolysis of phospholipids, diminished the ABA-induced inhibition of blue light-dependent stomatal opening and H(+) pumping. We also show that hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, which are intermediates in ABA signaling, inhibited the blue light responses of stomata and that 1-butanol diminished these inhibitions. From these results, we conclude that PA inhibits blue light signaling in guard cells by PP1c inhibition, accelerating stomatal closure, and that PP1 is a cross talk point between blue light and ABA signaling pathways in guard cells.

  14. Hydrogen-water enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced inhibition of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Runtuwene, Joshua; Amitani, Haruka; Amitani, Marie; Asakawa, Akihiro; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Inui, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in cancer development. Hydrogen (H2) is a potent antioxidant and exhibits anti-inflammatory and potentially anticancer-like activities. This study aimed to investigate the role of H2 incombination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in cancer treatment both in vitro and in vivo using the colon 26 cell line. The survival rate was determined using the Kaplan-Meier survival test, and cell viability was assessed using cell viability imaging kit and the MTT assay, and activation of the cell apoptosis pathway (Phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (p-AMPK), Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and Caspase 3) were characterized by western blots. Hydrogen water administration improved the survival of mice with colon 26-induced cancer. Furthermore, hydrogen water enhanced cell apoptosis in cancer cells, resulting in a marked increase in the expression of p-AMPK, AIF and Caspase 3 in colon 26 cells. Hydrogen water also increased the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on colon 26 cells with spect to cell survival rate and anticancer functions. Additionally, high-content hydrogen water exhibited stronger antioxidative and anticancer activity than did the natural hydrogen water. In conclusion, high-content hydrogen water can inhibit colon cancer, particularly in combination with 5-fluorouracil. PMID:25870767

  15. Celecoxib transiently inhibits cellular protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pyrko, Peter; Kardosh, Adel; Schönthal, Axel H

    2008-01-15

    To uncover the full spectrum of its pharmacological activities, the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib is routinely being used at concentrations of up to 100 microM in cell culture. At these elevated concentrations, several COX-2-independent effects were identified, although many details of these events have remained unclear. Here, we report a COX-2-independent effect of celecoxib that might have profound consequences for the interpretation of previous results obtained at elevated concentrations of this drug in vitro. We found that celecoxib rapidly inhibits general protein translation at concentrations as low as 30 microM. This appears to be a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and entails the phosphorylation and inactivation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2alpha). These effects were not achieved by other coxibs (rofecoxib, valdecoxib) or traditional NSAIDs (indomethacin, flurbiprofen), but were mimicked by the COX-2-inactive celecoxib analog, 2,5-dimethyl-celecoxib (DMC), indicating COX-2 independence. Considering the obvious impact of blocked translation on cellular function, we provide evidence that this severe inhibition of protein synthesis might suffice to explain some of the previously reported COX-2-independent effects of celecoxib, such as the down-regulation of the essential cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D, which is a short-lived protein that rapidly disappears in response to the inhibition of protein synthesis. Taken together, our findings establish ER stress-induced inhibition of general translation as a critical outcome of celecoxib treatment in vitro, and suggest that this effect needs to be considered when interpreting observations from the use of this drug in cell culture. PMID:17920040

  16. Hydrogen peroxide generation from hydrated protein drink mixes.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2013-11-01

    Generation of oxygen radicals upon hydration of powdered protein products was examined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Among individual proteins powders examined oxidative bursts occurred almost immediately, and then rapidly declined in the 1st 5 min. Commercially available powdered protein drink mixes behaved differently, with an initial lag phase followed by a sustained increase in luminol-enhanced luminescence, lasting for an hour or beyond. The drink mix that produced the highest level of luminol-enhanced luminescence also contained 379 nM ascorbate radical when hydrated (28 nmole/g of powdered drink mix). The entire ascorbic acid content of this drink mix was oxidized to nondetectable levels (using HPLC-diode array detection) within 60 min of being hydrated. Treatment of the hydrated drink mixes with the enzyme catalase almost completely inhibited the luminol-enhanced luminescence from the hydrated drink mix demonstrating that hydrogen peroxide generated via a chemical reaction among the drink mixes' ingredients was a primary reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is the strongest oxidative capacity demonstrated in a food product as consumed (without any manipulation to increase ROS) and the 1st time that the ascrobate radical in a food product as been quantified. Generation of hydrogen peroxide in the hydrated drink mixes from metal catalyzed reactions involving oxygen and reducing equivalents from ascorbic acid is proposed.

  17. The hydrogen exchange core and protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R.; Woodward, C.

    1999-01-01

    A database of hydrogen-deuterium exchange results has been compiled for proteins for which there are published rates of out-exchange in the native state, protection against exchange during folding, and out-exchange in partially folded forms. The question of whether the slow exchange core is the folding core (Woodward C, 1993, Trends Biochem Sci 18:359-360) is reexamined in a detailed comparison of the specific amide protons (NHs) and the elements of secondary structure on which they are located. For each pulsed exchange or competition experiment, probe NHs are shown explicitly; the large number and broad distribution of probe NHs support the validity of comparing out-exchange with pulsed-exchange/competition experiments. There is a strong tendency for the same elements of secondary structure to carry NHs most protected in the native state, NHs first protected during folding, and NHs most protected in partially folded species. There is not a one-to-one correspondence of individual NHs. Proteins for which there are published data for native state out-exchange and theta values are also reviewed. The elements of secondary structure containing the slowest exchanging NHs in native proteins tend to contain side chains with high theta values or be connected to a turn/loop with high theta values. A definition for a protein core is proposed, and the implications for protein folding are discussed. Apparently, during folding and in the native state, nonlocal interactions between core sequences are favored more than other possible nonlocal interactions. Other studies of partially folded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (Barbar E, Barany G, Woodward C, 1995, Biochemistry 34:11423-11434; Barber E, Hare M, Daragan V, Barany G, Woodward C, 1998, Biochemistry 37:7822-7833), suggest that developing cores have site-specific energy barriers between microstates, one disordered, and the other(s) more ordered. PMID:10452602

  18. Simvastatin inhibits protein isoprenylation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephen M; Johnson, Kachael; Siefert, Matthew; Shank, Sam; Sironi, Luigi; Wolozin, Benjamin; Landreth, Gary E; Ziady, Assem G

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggests that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Statin action in patients with AD, as in those with heart disease, is likely to be at least partly independent of the effects of statins on cholesterol. Statins can alter cellular signaling and protein trafficking through inhibition of isoprenylation of Rho, Cdc42, and Rab family GTPases. The effects of statins on protein isoprenylation in vivo, particularly in the central nervous system, are poorly studied. We utilized two-dimensional gel electrophoresis approaches to directly monitor the levels of isoprenylated and non-isoprenylated forms of Rho and Rab family GTPases. We report that simvastatin significantly inhibits RhoA and Rab4, and Rab6 isoprenylation at doses as low as 50nM in vitro. We also provide the first in vivo evidence that statins inhibit the isoprenylation of RhoA in the brains of rats and RhoA, Cdc42, and H-Ras in the brains of mice treated with clinically relevant doses of simvastatin.

  19. Proline inhibits aggregation during protein refolding.

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, D.; Kumar, T. K.; Ganesh, G.; Jayaraman, G.; Yang, P. W.; Chang, M. M.; Trivedi, V. D.; Wang, S. L.; Hwang, K. C.; Chang, D. K.; Yu, C.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro refolding of hen egg-white lysozyme is studied in the presence of various osmolytes. Proline is found to prevent aggregation during protein refolding. However, other osmolytes used in this study fail to exhibit a similar property. Experimental evidence suggests that proline inhibits protein aggregation by binding to folding intermediate(s) and trapping the folding intermediate(s) into enzymatically inactive, "aggregation-insensitive" state(s). However, elimination of proline from the refolded protein mixture results in significant recovery of the bacteriolytic activity. At higher concentrations (>1.5 M), proline is shown to form loose, higher-order molecular aggregate(s). The supramolecular assembly of proline is found to possess an amphipathic character. Formation of higher-order aggregates is believed to be crucial for proline to function as a protein folding aid. In addition to its role in osmoregulation under water stress conditions, the results of this study hint at the possibility of proline behaving as a protein folding chaperone. PMID:10716186

  20. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N–H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N–H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion. PMID:26195754

  1. Protein Fibrillation Lag Times During Kinetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Rodrigo S.; López Medus, Máximo; Gómez, Gabriela E.; Couto, Paula M.; Labanda, María S.; Landolfo, Lucas; D’Alessio, Cecilia; Caramelo, Julio J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein aggregation is linked to more than 30 human pathologies, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Since small oligomers that form at the beginning of the fibrillation process probably are the most toxic elements, therapeutic strategies involving fibril fragmentation could be detrimental. An alternative approach, named kinetic inhibition, aims to prevent fibril formation by using small ligands that stabilize the parent protein. The factors that govern fibrillation lag times during kinetic inhibition are largely unknown, notwithstanding their importance for designing effective long-term therapies. Inhibitor-bound species are not likely to be incorporated into the core of mature fibrils, although their presence could alter the kinetics of the fibrillation process. For instance, inhibitor-bound species may act as capping elements that impair the nucleation process and/or fibril growth. Here, we address this issue by studying the effect of two natural inhibitors on the fibrillation behavior of lysozyme at neutral pH. We analyzed a set of 79 fibrillation curves obtained in lysozyme alone and a set of 37 obtained in the presence of inhibitors. We calculated the concentrations of the relevant species at the beginning of the curves using the inhibitor-binding constants measured under the same experimental conditions. We found that inhibitor-bound protein species do not affect fibrillation onset times, which are mainly determined by the concentration of unbound protein species present in equilibrium. In this system, knowledge of the fibrillation kinetics and inhibitor affinities suffices to predict the effect of kinetic inhibitors on fibrillation lag times. In addition, we developed a new methodology to better estimate fibrillation lag times from experimental curves. PMID:25099810

  2. Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production by the extreme thermophile, Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus.

    PubMed

    van Niel, Ed W J; Claassen, Pieternel A M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2003-02-01

    Substrate and product inhibition of hydrogen production during sucrose fermentation by the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was studied. The inhibition kinetics were analyzed with a noncompetitive, nonlinear inhibition model. Hydrogen was the most severe inhibitor when allowed to accumulate in the culture. Concentrations of 5-10 mM H(2) in the gas phase (identical with partial hydrogen pressure (pH(2)) of (1-2) x 10(4) Pa) initiated a metabolic shift to lactate formation. The extent of inhibition by hydrogen was dependent on the density of the culture. The highest tolerance for hydrogen was found at low volumetric hydrogen production rates, as occurred in cultures with low cell densities. Under those conditions the critical hydrogen concentration in the gas phase was 27.7 mM H(2) (identical with pH(2) of 5.6 x 10(4) Pa); above this value hydrogen production ceased completely. With an efficient removal of hydrogen sucrose fermentation was mainly inhibited by sodium acetate. The critical concentrations of sucrose and acetate, at which growth and hydrogen production was completely inhibited (at neutral pH and 70 degrees C), were 292 and 365 mM, respectively. Inorganic salts, such as sodium chloride, mimicked the effect of sodium acetate, implying that ionic strength was responsible for inhibition. Undissociated acetate did not contribute to inhibition of cultures at neutral or slightly acidic pH. Exposure of exponentially growing cultures to concentrations of sodium acetate or sodium chloride higher than ca. 175 mM caused cell lysis, probably due to activation of autolysins.

  3. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M.

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system. PMID:25699029

  4. Shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks in the methanogenesis-inhibited ruminal fermentation: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, Emilio M

    2015-01-01

    Maximizing the flow of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen away from CH4 and toward volatile fatty acids (VFA) would increase the efficiency of ruminant production and decrease its environmental impact. The objectives of this meta-analysis were: (i) To quantify shifts in metabolic hydrogen sinks when inhibiting ruminal methanogenesis in vitro; and (ii) To understand the variation in shifts of metabolic hydrogen sinks among experiments and between batch and continuous cultures systems when methanogenesis is inhibited. Batch (28 experiments, N = 193) and continuous (16 experiments, N = 79) culture databases of experiments with at least 50% inhibition in CH4 production were compiled. Inhibiting methanogenesis generally resulted in less fermentation and digestion in most batch culture, but not in most continuous culture, experiments. Inhibiting CH4 production in batch cultures resulted in redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward propionate and H2 but not butyrate. In continuous cultures, there was no overall metabolic hydrogen redirection toward propionate or butyrate, and H2 as a proportion of metabolic hydrogen spared from CH4 production was numerically smaller compared to batch cultures. Dihydrogen accumulation was affected by type of substrate and methanogenesis inhibitor, with highly fermentable substrates resulting in greater redirection of metabolic hydrogen toward H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and some oils causing small or no H2 accumulation. In both batch and continuous culture, there was a decrease in metabolic hydrogen recovered as the sum of propionate, butyrate, CH4 and H2 when inhibiting methanogenesis, and it is speculated that as CH4 production decreases metabolic hydrogen could be increasingly incorporated into formate, microbial biomass, and perhaps, reductive acetogenesis in continuous cultures. Energetic benefits of inhibiting methanogenesis depended on the inhibitor and its concentration and on the in vitro system.

  5. Inhibiting Protein Arginine Deiminases Has Antioxidant Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Witalison, Erin E.; Cui, Xiangli; Hofseth, Anne B.; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Causey, Corey P.; Thompson, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a dynamic, idiopathic, chronic inflammatory condition that carries a high colon cancer risk. We previously showed that Cl-amidine, a small-molecule inhibitor of the protein arginine deiminases, suppresses colitis in mice. Because colitis is defined as inflammation of the colon associated with infiltration of white blood cells that release free radicals and citrullination is an inflammation-dependent process, we asked whether Cl-amidine has antioxidant properties. Here we show that colitis induced with azoxymethane via intraperitoneal injection + 2% dextran sulfate sodium in the drinking water is suppressed by Cl-amidine (also given in the drinking water). Inducible nitric oxide synthase, an inflammatory marker, was also downregulated in macrophages by Cl-amidine. Because epithelial cell DNA damage associated with colitis is at least in part a result of an oxidative burst from overactive leukocytes, we tested the hypothesis that Cl-amidine can inhibit leukocyte activation, as well as subsequent target epithelial cell DNA damage in vitro and in vivo. Results are consistent with this hypothesis, and because DNA damage is a procancerous mechanism, our data predict that Cl-amidine will not only suppress colitis, but we hypothesize that it may prevent colon cancer associated with colitis. PMID:25635139

  6. Inhibition of Toxoplasma gondii protein synthesis by azithromycin.

    PubMed Central

    Blais, J; Garneau, V; Chamberland, S

    1993-01-01

    Azithromycin was shown to specifically inhibit the protein synthesis of Toxoplasma gondii in experimental systems by using free tachyzoites and T. gondii-infected mouse macrophages. RNA synthesis of the parasite was not affected by azithromycin. Inhibition of protein synthesis was also proportional to the relative anti-Toxoplasma activity of three macrolides. PMID:8215287

  7. Aedes aegypti D7 Saliva Protein Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Michael J.; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Troupin, Andrea; Watson, Alan M.; Klimstra, William B.; Fikrig, Erol; Colpitts, Tonya M.

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of several medically relevant arboviruses including dengue virus (DENV) types 1–4. Ae. aegypti transmits DENV by inoculating virus-infected saliva into host skin during probing and feeding. Ae. aegypti saliva contains over one hundred unique proteins and these proteins have diverse functions, including facilitating blood feeding. Previously, we showed that Ae. aegypti salivary gland extracts (SGEs) enhanced dissemination of DENV to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, HPLC-fractionation revealed that some SGE components inhibited infection. Here, we show that D7 proteins are enriched in HPLC fractions that are inhibitory to DENV infection, and that recombinant D7 protein can inhibit DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. Further, binding assays indicate that D7 protein can directly interact with DENV virions and recombinant DENV envelope protein. These data reveal a novel role for D7 proteins, which inhibits arbovirus transmission to vertebrates through a direct interaction with virions. PMID:27632170

  8. Aedes aegypti D7 Saliva Protein Inhibits Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Conway, Michael J; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Troupin, Andrea; Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B; Fikrig, Erol; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-09-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of several medically relevant arboviruses including dengue virus (DENV) types 1-4. Ae. aegypti transmits DENV by inoculating virus-infected saliva into host skin during probing and feeding. Ae. aegypti saliva contains over one hundred unique proteins and these proteins have diverse functions, including facilitating blood feeding. Previously, we showed that Ae. aegypti salivary gland extracts (SGEs) enhanced dissemination of DENV to draining lymph nodes. In contrast, HPLC-fractionation revealed that some SGE components inhibited infection. Here, we show that D7 proteins are enriched in HPLC fractions that are inhibitory to DENV infection, and that recombinant D7 protein can inhibit DENV infection in vitro and in vivo. Further, binding assays indicate that D7 protein can directly interact with DENV virions and recombinant DENV envelope protein. These data reveal a novel role for D7 proteins, which inhibits arbovirus transmission to vertebrates through a direct interaction with virions. PMID:27632170

  9. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the translational expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Teng, Huajian; Yang, Guangdong; Wu, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is under the influence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which regulates hypoxia responses. The regulation of HIF-1α accumulation by H2S has been shown, but the mechanisms for this effect are largely elusive and controversial. This study aimed at addressing the controversial mechanisms for and the functional importance of the interaction of H2S and HIF-1α protein. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH HIF-1α protein levels and HIF-1α transcriptional activity were detected by Western blotting and luciferase assay. The mechanisms for H2S-regulated HIF-1α protein levels were determined using short interfering RNA transfection, co-immunoprecipitation and 7-methyl-GTP sepharose 4B pull-down assay. Angiogenic activity was evaluated using tube formation assay in EA.hy926 cells. KEY RESULTS The accumulation of HIF-1α protein under hypoxia (1% O2) or hypoxia-mimetic conditions was reversed by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). This effect of NaHS was not altered after blocking the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway for HIF-1α degradation; however, blockade of protein translation with cycloheximide abolished the effect of NaHS on the half-life of HIF-1α protein. Knockdown of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) suppressed the effect of NaHS on HIF-1α protein accumulation under hypoxia. NaHS inhibited the expression of VEGF under hypoxia. It also decreased in vitro capillary tube formation and cell proliferation of EA.hy926 cells under hypoxia, but stimulated the tube formation under normoxia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H2S suppresses HIF-1α translation by enhancing eIF2α phosphorylation under hypoxia. The interaction of H2S and HIF-1α inhibits the angiogenic activity of vascular endothelial cells under hypoxia through the down-regulation of VEGF. PMID:22831549

  10. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Martin F; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay; Blasius, T Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-permeable molecules. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we develop two independent strategies to generate inhibitable motors, and characterize the resulting inhibition in single-molecule assays and in cells. We further apply these two strategies to create analogously inhibitable kinesin-3 motors. These inhibitable motors will be of great utility to study the functions of specific kinesins in a dynamic manner in cells and animals. Furthermore, these strategies can be used to generate inhibitable versions of any motor protein of interest. PMID:27045608

  11. Engineered kinesin motor proteins amenable to small-molecule inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Martin F.; Winding, Michael; Yue, Yang; Shastry, Shankar; Teloni, Federico; Reddy, Sanjay; Blasius, T. Lynne; Soppina, Pushpanjali; Hancock, William O.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Verhey, Kristen J.

    2016-01-01

    The human genome encodes 45 kinesin motor proteins that drive cell division, cell motility, intracellular trafficking and ciliary function. Determining the cellular function of each kinesin would benefit from specific small-molecule inhibitors. However, screens have yielded only a few specific inhibitors. Here we present a novel chemical-genetic approach to engineer kinesin motors that can carry out the function of the wild-type motor yet can also be efficiently inhibited by small, cell-permeable molecules. Using kinesin-1 as a prototype, we develop two independent strategies to generate inhibitable motors, and characterize the resulting inhibition in single-molecule assays and in cells. We further apply these two strategies to create analogously inhibitable kinesin-3 motors. These inhibitable motors will be of great utility to study the functions of specific kinesins in a dynamic manner in cells and animals. Furthermore, these strategies can be used to generate inhibitable versions of any motor protein of interest. PMID:27045608

  12. Potent protein glycation inhibition of plantagoside in Plantago major seeds.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Aradate, Tadashi; Kurosaka, Chihiro; Ubukata, Makoto; Kittaka, Shiho; Nakaminami, Yuri; Gamo, Kanae; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Plantagoside (5,7,4',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3'-O-glucoside) and its aglycone (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavanone), isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae), were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications.

  13. Dose-dependent inhibition of gastric injury by hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrogen has been reported to relieve damage in many disease models, and is a potential additive in drinking water to provide protective effects for patients as several clinical studies revealed. However, the absence of a dose–response relationship in the application of hydrogen is puzzling. We attempted to identify the dose–response relationship of hydrogen in alkaline electrolyzed drinking water through the aspirin induced gastric injury model. Methods In this study, hydrogen-rich alkaline water was obtained by adding H2 to electrolyzed water at one atmosphere pressure. After 2 weeks of drinking, we detected the gastric mucosal damage together with MPO, MDA and 8-OHdG in rat aspirin induced gastric injury model. Results Hydrogen-dose dependent inhibition was observed in stomach mucosal. Under pH 8.5, 0.07, 0.22 and 0.84 ppm hydrogen exhibited a high correlation with inhibitory effects showed by erosion area, MPO activity and MDA content in the stomach. Gastric histology also demonstrated the inhibition of damage by hydrogen-rich alkaline water. However, 8-OHdG level in serum did not have significant hydrogen-dose dependent effect. pH 9.5 showed higher but not significant inhibitory response compared with pH 8.5. Conclusions Hydrogen is effective in relieving the gastric injury induced by aspirin-HCl, and the inhibitory effect is dose-dependent. The reason behind this may be that hydrogen-rich water directly interacted with the target tissue, while the hydrogen concentration in blood was buffered by liver glycogen, evoking a suppressed dose–response effect. Drinking hydrogen-rich water may protect healthy individuals from gastric damage caused by oxidative stress. PMID:24589018

  14. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    PubMed Central

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-amide hydrogen bond is about twice that of the amide-hydroxyl. Additionally, the interaction of the hydroxyl group with water is seen most readily in its contributions to entropy and heat capacity changes. Surprisingly, the hydroxyl group shows weakly hydrophobic behavior in terms of these contributions. These results can be used to understand the effects of mutations on the stability of globular proteins. PMID:8819156

  15. Hydrogen peroxide: a key messenger that modulates protein phosphorylation through cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S G; Bae, Y S; Lee, S R; Kwon, J

    2000-10-10

    Ligand-receptor interactions can generate the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in cells, the implications of which are becoming appreciated. Fluctuations in H(2)O(2) levels can affect the intracellular activity of key signaling components including protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Rhee et al. discuss recent findings on the role of H(2)O(2) in signal transduction. Specifically, H(2)O(2) appears to oxidize active site cysteines in phosphatases, thereby inactivating them. H(2)O(2) also can activate protein kinases; however, although the mechanism of activation for some kinases appears to be similar to that of phosphatase inactivation (cysteine oxidation), it is unclear how H(2)O(2) promotes increased activation of other kinases. Thus, the higher levels of intracellular phosphoproteins observed in cells most likely occur because of the concomitant inhibition of protein phosphatases and activation of protein kinases.

  16. SUMO-mimicking peptides inhibiting protein SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Villhauer, Eric B; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Schindelin, Hermann; Yin, Jun

    2014-12-15

    The ubiquitin-like protein SUMO is transferred through a core E1-E2 cascade composed of the SUMO-activating enzyme (SAE) and Ubc9 to modify cellular proteins and transmit important biological signals. SAE primarily recognizes the C-terminal tail of SUMO and catalyzes ATP condensation with the SUMO C-terminal carboxylate to activate its transfer through the cascade. Here, we used phage display to show that a broad profile of SUMO C-terminal sequences could be activated by SAE. Based on this, we developed heptamer peptides that could 1) form thioester conjugates with SAE, 2) be transferred from SAE to Ubc9, and 3) be further transferred to the SUMOylation target protein RanGAP1. As these peptides recapitulate the action of SUMO in protein modification, we refer to them as "SUMO-mimicking peptides". We found that, once the peptides were conjugated to SAE and Ubc9, they blocked full-length SUMO from entering the cascade. These peptides can thus function as mechanism-based inhibitors of the protein SUMOylation reaction.

  17. Factors influencing the inhibition of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Brockhoff, Marielle; Hau, Jean-Christophe; Fontana, Patrizia; Zimmermann, Catherine; Pover, Alain De; Erdmann, Dirk; Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    The protein kinase field is a very active research area in the pharmaceutical industry and many activities are ongoing to identify inhibitors of these proteins. The design of new chemical entities with improved pharmacological properties requires a deeper understanding of the factors that modulate inhibitor-kinase interactions. In this report, we studied the effect of two of these factors--the magnesium ion cofactor and the protein substrate--on inhibitors of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor. Our results show that the concentration of magnesium ion influences the potency of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) competitive inhibitors, suggesting an explanation for the observation that such compounds retain their nanomolar potency in cells despite the presence of millimolar levels of ATP. We also showed that the peptidic substrate affects the potency of these inhibitors in a different manner, suggesting that the influence of this substrate on compound potency should be taken into consideration during drug discovery.

  18. Matrix Gla protein inhibition of tooth mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kaipatur, N R; Murshed, M; McKee, M D

    2008-09-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization is regulated by mineral ion availability, proteins, and other molecular determinants. To investigate protein regulation of mineralization in tooth dentin and cementum, and in alveolar bone, we expressed matrix Gla protein (MGP) ectopically in bones and teeth in mice, using an osteoblast/odontoblast-specific 2.3-kb Col1a1 promoter. Mandibles were analyzed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, light microscopy, histomorphometry, and transmission electron microscopy. While bone and tooth ECMs were established in the Col1a1-Mgp mice, extensive hypomineralization was observed, with values of unmineralized ECM from four- to eight-fold higher in dentin and alveolar bone when compared with that in wild-type tissues. Mineralization was virtually absent in tooth root dentin and cellular cementum, while crown dentin showed "breakthrough" areas of mineralization. Acellular cementum was lacking in Col1a1-Mgp teeth, and unmineralized osteodentin formed within the pulp. These results strengthen the view that bone and tooth mineralization is critically regulated by mineralization inhibitors. PMID:18719210

  19. Malaria circumsporozoite protein inhibits the respiratory burst in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Usynin, Ivan; Klotz, Christian; Frevert, Ute

    2007-11-01

    After transmission by infected mosquitoes, malaria sporozoites rapidly travel to the liver. To infect hepatocytes, sporozoites traverse Kupffer cells, but surprisingly, the parasites are not killed by these resident macrophages of the liver. Here we show that Plasmodium sporozoites and recombinant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) suppress the respiratory burst in Kupffer cells. Sporozoites and CSP increased the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosyl mono-phosphate (cAMP) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in Kupffer cells, but not in hepatocytes or liver endothelia. Preincubation with cAMP analogues or inhibition of phosphodiesterase also inhibited the respiratory burst. By contrast, adenylyl cyclase inhibition abrogated the suppressive effect of sporozoites. Selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors failed to reverse the CSP-mediated blockage and stimulation of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC), but not PKA inhibited the respiratory burst. Both blockage of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP-1) with receptor-associated protein and elimination of cell surface proteoglycans inhibited the cAMP increase in Kupffer cells. We propose that by binding of CSP to LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans, malaria sporozoites induce a cAMP/EPAC-dependent, but PKA-independent signal transduction pathway that suppresses defence mechanisms in Kupffer cells. This allows the sporozoites to safely pass through these professional phagocytes and to develop inside neighbouring hepatocytes.

  20. Mechanism of hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of sheep airway cilia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Salathé, M; Pratt, M M; Cartagena, N J; Soloni, F; Seybold, Z V; Wanner, A

    1992-06-01

    To study the effect of the inflammatory mediator hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on airway ciliary activity, we measured ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in cultured tracheal explants from sheep. Addition of H2O2 (10(-8) to 10(-4) M) produced a concentration-dependent mean (+/- SEM) decrease in CBF between 11.1 +/- 0.4% (P less than 0.01) and 100 +/- 0% (P less than 0.001); at each concentration, the maximal effect was reached by 20 to 25 min. Between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M H2O2, the decrease in CBF was reversible, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was not significantly increased, and major morphologic lesions were not seen. At higher concentrations of H2O2, incomplete recovery of CBF (10(-5) M) or irreversible ciliostasis (10(-4) M) developed, and a significant increase in LDH and morphologic lesions were present. Catalase (2,000 U/ml) and H-7 (10(-5) M), a protein kinase inhibitor, abolished cilioinhibition produced by H2O2 at 10(-6) M and lower concentrations but not at 10(-5) M and higher concentrations. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a protein kinase C activator, caused a dose-dependent (10(-11) to 10(-5) M), reversible decrease in CBF; this effect was abolished by H-7. We suggest that at nonlethal concentrations, H2O2 inhibits the beat frequency of airway epithelial cilia reversibly, through the activation of second messengers, including protein kinase C. This mechanism might contribute to the previously demonstrated impairment of mucociliary clearance in airway inflammation.

  1. Mildiomycin: a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Cosín, M; Carrasco, L

    1985-03-01

    Mildiomycin, a new nucleoside antibiotic, selectively inhibits protein synthesis in HeLa cells, and is less active in the inhibition of RNA or DNA synthesis. An increased inhibition of translation by mildiomycin is observed in cultured HeLa cells when they are permeabilized by encephalomyocarditis virus. This observation suggests that this antibiotic does not easily pass through the cell membrane, as occurs with other nucleoside and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The inhibition of translation is also observed in cell-free systems, such as endogenous protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate or the synthesis of polyphenylalanine directed by poly (U). Finally the mode of action of mildiomycin was investigated and the results suggest that the compound blocks the peptidyl-transferase center.

  2. Light and hydrogen peroxide inhibit C. elegans Feeding through gustatory receptor orthologs and pharyngeal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bhatla, Nikhil; Horvitz, H Robert

    2015-02-18

    While gustatory sensing of the five primary flavors (sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and savory) has been extensively studied, pathways that detect non-canonical taste stimuli remain relatively unexplored. In particular, while reactive oxygen species cause generalized damage to biological systems, no gustatory mechanism to prevent ingestion of such material has been identified in any organism. We observed that light inhibits C. elegans feeding and used light as a tool to uncover molecular and neural mechanisms for gustation. Light can generate hydrogen peroxide, and we discovered that hydrogen peroxide similarly inhibits feeding. The gustatory receptor family members LITE-1 and GUR-3 are required for the inhibition of feeding by light and hydrogen peroxide. The I2 pharyngeal neurons increase calcium in response to light and hydrogen peroxide, and these responses require GUR-3 and a conserved antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin PRDX-2. Our results demonstrate a gustatory mechanism that mediates the detection and blocks ingestion of a non-canonical taste stimulus, hydrogen peroxide.

  3. Potent protein glycation inhibition of plantagoside in Plantago major seeds.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Nobuyasu; Aradate, Tadashi; Kurosaka, Chihiro; Ubukata, Makoto; Kittaka, Shiho; Nakaminami, Yuri; Gamo, Kanae; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Plantagoside (5,7,4',5'-tetrahydroxyflavanone-3'-O-glucoside) and its aglycone (5,7,3',4',5'-pentahydroxyflavanone), isolated from a 50% ethanol extract of Plantago major seeds (Plantaginaceae), were established to be potent inhibitors of the Maillard reaction. These compounds also inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products in proteins in physiological conditions and inhibited protein cross-linking glycation. These results indicate that P. major seeds have potential therapeutic applications in the prevention of diabetic complications. PMID:24895551

  4. Hydrogen Tunneling Links Protein Dynamics to Enzyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Klinman, Judith P.; Kohen, Amnon

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between protein dynamics and function is a subject of considerable contemporary interest. Although protein motions are frequently observed during ligand binding and release steps, the contribution of protein motions to the catalysis of bond making/breaking processes is more difficult to probe and verify. Here, we show how the quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling associated with enzymatic C–H bond cleavage provides a unique window into the necessity of protein dynamics for achieving optimal catalysis. Experimental findings support a hierarchy of thermodynamically equilibrated motions that control the H-donor and -acceptor distance and active-site electrostatics, creating an ensemble of conformations suitable for H-tunneling. A possible extension of this view to methyl transfer and other catalyzed reactions is also presented. The impact of understanding these dynamics on the conceptual framework for enzyme activity, inhibitor/drug design, and biomimetic catalyst design is likely to be substantial. PMID:23746260

  5. Tetrathiomolybdate Inhibits Copper Trafficking Proteins Through Metal Cluster Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Hamsell M.; Xue, Yi; Robinson, Chandler D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Marvin, Rebecca G.; Kelly, Rebekah A.; Mondragón, Alfonso; Penner-Hahn, James E.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2010-05-06

    Tetrathiomolybdate (TM) is an orally active agent for treatment of disorders of copper metabolism. Here we describe how TM inhibits proteins that regulate copper physiology. Crystallographic results reveal that the surprising stability of the drug complex with the metallochaperone Atx1 arises from formation of a sulfur-bridged copper-molybdenum cluster reminiscent of those found in molybdenum and iron sulfur proteins. Spectroscopic studies indicate that this cluster is stable in solution and corresponds to physiological clusters isolated from TM-treated Wilson's disease animal models. Finally, mechanistic studies show that the drug-metallochaperone inhibits metal transfer functions between copper-trafficking proteins. The results are consistent with a model wherein TM can directly and reversibly down-regulate copper delivery to secreted metalloenzymes and suggest that proteins involved in metal regulation might be fruitful drug targets.

  6. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry of proteins at Langmuir monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Pirrone, Gregory F.; Vernon, Briana C.; Kent, Michael S.; Engen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) is valuable for providing conformational information for proteins/peptides that are very difficult to analyze with other methods such as peripheral membrane proteins and peptides that interact with membranes. We developed a new type of HX MS measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. A lipid monolayer was generated, a peptide or protein associated with it, and then the monolayer-associated peptide or protein was exposed to deuterium. The deuterated species was recovered from the monolayer, digested, and deuterium incorporation monitored by MS. Test peptides showed that deuterium recovery in an optimized protocol was equivalent to deuterium recovery in conventional solution HX MS. The reproducibility of the measurements was high despite the requirement of generating a new monolayer for each deuterium labeling time. We validated that known conformational changes in the presence of a monolayer/membrane could be observed with the peptide melittin and the myristoylated protein Arf-1. Results in an accompanying paper show that the method can reveal details of conformational changes in a protein (HIV-1 Nef) which adopts a different conformation depending on if it can insert into the lipid layer. Overall, the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provided new and meaningful conformational information for proteins that associate with lipid layers. The combination of HX MS results with neutron or X-ray reflection of the same proteins in Langmuir monolayers can be more informative than isolated use of either method. PMID:26134943

  7. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Proteins at Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Vernon, Briana C; Kent, Michael S; Engen, John R

    2015-07-21

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) mass spectrometry (MS) is valuable for providing conformational information for proteins/peptides that are very difficult to analyze with other methods such as peripheral membrane proteins and peptides that interact with membranes. We developed a new type of HX MS measurement that integrates Langmuir monolayers. A lipid monolayer was generated, a peptide or protein associated with it, and then the monolayer-associated peptide or protein was exposed to deuterium. The deuterated species was recovered from the monolayer, digested, and deuterium incorporation monitored by MS. Test peptides showed that deuterium recovery in an optimized protocol was equivalent to deuterium recovery in conventional solution HX MS. The reproducibility of the measurements was high, despite the requirement of generating a new monolayer for each deuterium labeling time. We validated that known conformational changes in the presence of a monolayer/membrane could be observed with the peptide melittin and the myristoylated protein Arf-1. Results in an accompanying paper show that the method can reveal details of conformational changes in a protein (HIV-1 Nef), which adopts a different conformation, depending on whether or not it is able to insert into the lipid layer. Overall, the HX MS Langmuir monolayer method provided new and meaningful conformational information for proteins that associate with lipid layers. The combination of HX MS results with neutron or X-ray reflection of the same proteins in Langmuir monolayers can be more informative than the isolated use of either method.

  8. Inhibition of proteolysis in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins.

    PubMed

    Zamora, R; Hidalgo, F J

    2001-12-01

    The proteolysis of bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified by reaction with the lipid peroxidation product 4,5(E)-epoxy-2(E)-heptenal was studied to better understand the loss of digestibility observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins. BSA was incubated for different periods of time with eight concentrations of the epoxyalkenal and, then, treated for 24 h with chymotrypsin, pancreatin, Pronase, or trypsin. The treatment of BSA with the aldehyde always decreased its proteolysis in relation to that of native BSA, and this inhibition of the proteolysis was related to the concentration of the epoxyalkenal and the reaction time. In fact, this inhibition was correlated with the damage suffered by the protein as a consequence of its reaction with the aldehyde: mainly the development of browning, the denaturation of the protein, and the formation of the oxidized lipid/amino acid reaction product epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine (p < or = 0.0011, 0.0045, and 0.0031, respectively). In addition, epsilon-N-pyrrolylnorleucine added at 0.1 or 1 mM inhibited the proteases assayed and suggested that the inhibition of the proteolysis observed in oxidized lipid-damaged proteins may be related to the formation and accumulation of pyrrolized amino acid residues. PMID:11743800

  9. Desferrioxamine Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Krzywanski, David M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Postlethwait, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissues are exposed to exogenous and endogenous nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), which is the terminal agent in protein tyrosine nitration. Besides iron chelation, the hydroxamic acid (HA) desferrioxamine (DFO) shows multiple functionalities including nitration inhibition. To investigate mechanisms whereby DFO affects 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, we utilized gas phase •NO2 exposures, to limit introduction of other reactive species, and a lung surface model wherein red cell membranes (RCM) were immobilized under a defined aqueous film. When RCM were exposed to •NO2 covered by +/− DFO: (i) DFO inhibited 3-NT formation more effectively than other HA and non-HA chelators; (ii) 3-NT inhibition occurred at very low [DFO] for prolonged times; and (iii) 3-NT formation was iron independent but inhibition required DFO present. DFO poorly reacted with •NO2 compared to ascorbate, assessed via •NO2 reactive absorption and aqueous phase oxidation rates, yet limited 3-NT formation at far lower concentrations. DFO also inhibited nitration under aqueous bulk phase conditions, and inhibited 3-NT generated by active myeloperoxidase “bound” to RCM. Per the above and kinetic analyses suggesting preferential DFO versus •NO2 reaction within membranes, we conclude that DFO inhibits 3-NT formation predominantly by facile repair of the tyrosyl radical intermediate, which prevents •NO2 addition, and thus nitration, and potentially influences biochemical functionalities. PMID:22705369

  10. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  11. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  12. Iridovirus CARD Protein Inhibits Apoptosis through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Pei-Wen; Shih, Chueh-Ju; Lin, Fu-Pang; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Grouper iridovirus (GIV) belongs to the genus Ranavirus of the family Iridoviridae; the genomes of such viruses contain an anti-apoptotic caspase recruitment domain (CARD) gene. The GIV-CARD gene encodes a protein of 91 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10,505 Daltons, and shows high similarity to other viral CARD genes and human ICEBERG. In this study, we used Northern blot to demonstrate that GIV-CARD transcription begins at 4 h post-infection; furthermore, we report that its transcription is completely inhibited by cycloheximide but not by aphidicolin, indicating that GIV-CARD is an early gene. GIV-CARD-EGFP and GIV-CARD-FLAG recombinant proteins were observed to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, but no obvious nuclear localization sequence was observed within GIV-CARD. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GIV-CARD in GK cells infected with GIV inhibited expression of GIV-CARD and five other viral genes during the early stages of infection, and also reduced GIV infection ability. Immunostaining was performed to show that apoptosis was effectively inhibited in cells expressing GIV-CARD. HeLa cells irradiated with UV or treated with anti-Fas antibody will undergo apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, respectively. However, over-expression of recombinant GIV-CARD protein in HeLa cells inhibited apoptosis induced by mitochondrial and death receptor signaling. Finally, we report that expression of GIV-CARD in HeLa cells significantly reduced the activities of caspase-8 and -9 following apoptosis triggered by anti-Fas antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GIV-CARD inhibits apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways.

  13. Iridovirus CARD Protein Inhibits Apoptosis through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Wen; Wu, Ming-Shan; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Pei-Wen; Shih, Chueh-Ju; Lin, Fu-Pang; Chang, Chi-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Grouper iridovirus (GIV) belongs to the genus Ranavirus of the family Iridoviridae; the genomes of such viruses contain an anti-apoptotic caspase recruitment domain (CARD) gene. The GIV-CARD gene encodes a protein of 91 amino acids with a molecular mass of 10,505 Daltons, and shows high similarity to other viral CARD genes and human ICEBERG. In this study, we used Northern blot to demonstrate that GIV-CARD transcription begins at 4 h post-infection; furthermore, we report that its transcription is completely inhibited by cycloheximide but not by aphidicolin, indicating that GIV-CARD is an early gene. GIV-CARD-EGFP and GIV-CARD-FLAG recombinant proteins were observed to translocate from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, but no obvious nuclear localization sequence was observed within GIV-CARD. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GIV-CARD in GK cells infected with GIV inhibited expression of GIV-CARD and five other viral genes during the early stages of infection, and also reduced GIV infection ability. Immunostaining was performed to show that apoptosis was effectively inhibited in cells expressing GIV-CARD. HeLa cells irradiated with UV or treated with anti-Fas antibody will undergo apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, respectively. However, over-expression of recombinant GIV-CARD protein in HeLa cells inhibited apoptosis induced by mitochondrial and death receptor signaling. Finally, we report that expression of GIV-CARD in HeLa cells significantly reduced the activities of caspase-8 and -9 following apoptosis triggered by anti-Fas antibody. Taken together, these results demonstrate that GIV-CARD inhibits apoptosis through both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:26047333

  14. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  15. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  16. Neutron protein crystallography: A complementary tool for locating hydrogens in proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, William B; Bodenheimer, Annette M; Meilleur, Flora

    2016-07-15

    Neutron protein crystallography is a powerful tool for investigating protein chemistry because it directly locates hydrogen atom positions in a protein structure. The visibility of hydrogen and deuterium atoms arises from the strong interaction of neutrons with the nuclei of these isotopes. Positions can be unambiguously assigned from diffraction at resolutions typical of protein crystals. Neutrons have the additional benefit to structural biology of not inducing radiation damage in protein crystals. The same crystal could be measured multiple times for parametric studies. Here, we review the basic principles of neutron protein crystallography. The information that can be gained from a neutron structure is presented in balance with practical considerations. Methods to produce isotopically-substituted proteins and to grow large crystals are provided in the context of neutron structures reported in the literature. Available instruments for data collection and software for data processing and structure refinement are described along with technique-specific strategies including joint X-ray/neutron structure refinement. Examples are given to illustrate, ultimately, the unique scientific value of neutron protein crystal structures.

  17. Poly(neutral red) based hydrogen peroxide biosensor for chromium determination by inhibition measurements.

    PubMed

    Attar, Aisha; Emilia Ghica, M; Amine, Aziz; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-08-30

    Amperometric hydrogen peroxide enzyme inhibition biosensors based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on electropolymerised neutral red (NR) or directly on the surface of carbon film electrodes (CFE) have been successfully applied to the determination of toxic Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Parameters influencing the performance of the biosensor including the enzyme immobilisation method, the amount of hydrogen peroxide, applied potential and electrolyte pH were optimised. The inhibition of horseradish peroxidase by the chromium species was studied under the optimised conditions. Results from the quantitative analysis of chromium ions are discussed in terms of detection limit, linear range and sensitivity. The HRP kinetic interactions reveal mixed binding of Cr(III) with I50=3.8μM and inhibition binding constant Ki=11.3μM at HRP/PNR/CFE biosensors and uncompetitive binding of Cr(VI) with I50=3.9μM and Ki=0.78μM at HRP/CFE biosensors in the presence of H2O2 substrate. Interferences from other heavy metal ions were studied and the inhibition show very good selectivity towards Cr(III) and Cr(VI).

  18. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits the vacuolar H+-ATPase in brain synaptic vesicles at micromolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Floor, E

    1998-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced from several sources in brain and may be involved in neurodegeneration and second messenger signaling. Little is known about the effects of H2O2 on transmitter storage in brain synaptic vesicles. Neurotransmitter uptake into synaptic vesicles is driven by an electrochemical proton gradient generated by the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) in the vesicle membrane. We report here that the VATPase in bovine brain synaptic vesicles is highly sensitive to inhibition by micromolar concentrations of H2O2. Glutamate uptake by the vesicles is also inhibited, very likely as a secondary consequence of ATPase inactivation. Dithiothreitol or reduced glutathione reverse H2O2-induced inhibition of the V-ATPase, and ATP or GTP partially protect the ATPase from inhibition by H2O2. These and other results suggest that the mechanism of inhibition of the V-ATPase by H2O2 involves oxidation of a reactive cysteine sulfhydryl group in the ATP binding site. Inhibition of V-ATPase activity would decrease the amount of transmitter stored in synaptic vesicles and thus down-regulate transmitter release during episodes of oxidative stress or in response to second messenger signaling.

  19. Inhibition of Snail1-DNA-PKcs protein-protein interface sensitizes cancer cells and inhibits tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ga-Young; Pyun, Bo-Jeong; Seo, Haeng Ran; Jin, Yeung Bae; Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study suggested that the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) interacts with Snail1, which affects genomic instability, sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents, and migration of tumor cells by reciprocal regulation between DNA-PKcs and Snail1. Here, we further investigate that a peptide containing 7-amino acid sequences (amino acids 15-21) of Snail1 (KPNYSEL, SP) inhibits the endogenous interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 through primary interaction with DNA-PKcs. SP restored the inhibited DNA-PKcs repair activity and downstream pathways. On the other hand, DNA-PKcs-mediated phosphorylation of Snail1 was inhibited by SP, which resulted in decreased Snail1 stability and Snail1 functions. However, these phenomena were only shown in p53 wild-type cells, not in p53-defective cells. From these results, it is suggested that interfering with the protein interaction between DNA-PKcs and Snail1 might be an effective strategy for sensitizing cancer cells and inhibiting tumor migration, especially in both Snail1-overexpressing and DNA-PKcs-overexpressing cancer cells with functional p53.

  20. Protein determinants of phage T4 lysis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Samir H; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Tran, Tram Anh T; Sacchettini, James C; Young, Ry

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies have established that lysis inhibition in bacteriophage T4 infections occurs when the RI antiholin inhibits the lethal hole-forming function of the T holin. The T-holin is composed of a single N-terminal transmembrane domain and a ∼20 kDa periplasmic domain. It accumulates harmlessly throughout the bacteriophage infection cycle until suddenly causing permeabilization of the inner membrane, thereby initiating lysis. The RI antiholin has a SAR domain that directs its secretion to the periplasm, where it can either be inactivated and degraded or be activated as a specific inhibitor of T. Previously, it was shown that the interaction of the soluble domains of these two proteins within the periplasm was necessary for lysis inhibition. We have purified and characterized the periplasmic domains of both T and RI. Both proteins were purified in a modified host that allows disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm, due to the functional requirement of conserved disulfide bonds. Analytical centrifugation and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that RI was monomeric and exhibited ∼80% alpha-helical content. In contrast, T exhibited a propensity to oligomerize and precipitate at high concentrations. Incubation of RI with T inhibits this aggregation and results in a complex of equimolar T and RI content. Although gel filtration analysis indicated a complex mass of 45 kDa, intermediate between the predicted 30 kDa heterodimer and 60 kDa heterotetramer, sedimentation velocity analysis indicated that the predominant species is the former. These results suggest that RI binding to T is necessary and sufficient for lysis inhibition. PMID:22389108

  1. Hydrogen bond rotations as a uniform structural tool for analyzing protein architecture.

    PubMed

    Penner, Robert C; Andersen, Ebbe S; Jensen, Jens L; Kantcheva, Adriana K; Bublitz, Maike; Nissen, Poul; Rasmussen, Anton M H; Svane, Katrine L; Hammer, Bjørk; Rezazadegan, Reza; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Nielsen, Jakob T; Andersen, Jørgen E

    2014-12-17

    Proteins fold into three-dimensional structures, which determine their diverse functions. The conformation of the backbone of each structure is locally at each C(α) effectively described by conformational angles resulting in Ramachandran plots. These, however, do not describe the conformations around hydrogen bonds, which can be non-local along the backbone and are of major importance for protein structure. Here, we introduce the spatial rotation between hydrogen bonded peptide planes as a new descriptor for protein structure locally around a hydrogen bond. Strikingly, this rotational descriptor sampled over high-quality structures from the protein data base (PDB) concentrates into 30 localized clusters, some of which correlate to the common secondary structures and others to more special motifs, yet generally providing a unifying systematic classification of local structure around protein hydrogen bonds. It further provides a uniform vocabulary for comparison of protein structure near hydrogen bonds even between bonds in different proteins without alignment.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide preconditioning protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats through inhibition of endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changyong; Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan; Lu, Huan; Deng, Jing; Yan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of myocardial damage. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signal molecule, has drawn considerable attention for its role in various pathophysiological processes. Multiple lines of evidence reveal the protective effects of H2S in various models of cardiac injury, however, the exact mechanism underlying this protective effect of H2S against myocardial I/R injury is not fully understood. The present study was designed to investigate whether H2S preconditioning attenuates myocardial I/R injury in rats and whether the observed protection is associated with reduced endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress. We found that H2S preconditioning significantly reduced myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function, and inhibited I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo. Furthermore, H2S preconditioning significantly attenuated I/R-induced ER/SR stress responses, including the increased expression of glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein, and activate transcription factor in myocardium. Additionally, we demonstrate that H2S preconditioning attenuates ER/SR stress and inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis in an in vitro model of hypoxia/reoxygenation in rat H9c2 cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, these results suggest that H2S-attenuated ER/SR stress plays an important role in its protective effects against I/R-induced myocardial injury. PMID:26339339

  3. Inhibition of protein synthesis may explain the bactericidal properties of hypochlorous acid produced by phagocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.M.; Davies, K.J.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors find that hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) inhibit protein synthesis in E. coli: HOCl is similarly ordered 10x more efficient than H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. This result may underlie the mechanism of bacterial killing by phagocytes, which use H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and myeloperoxidase (MPO) to oxidize Cl/sup -/ to HOCl. Protein synthesis (/sup 3/H-leu incorporation) was completely inhibited by 50..mu..M HOCl, whereas 50..mu..M H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ only gave similarly ordered 10% inhibition. Complete inhibition by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was only observed at concentrations < 0.5 mM. HOCl was also a more potent inhibitor of cell growth (cultured in M9 medium + glucose) than was H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. No growth occurred at 50..mu..M HOCl: in contrast 0.5 mM H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was required for similar results. During time-course experiments it was found that the inhibition of cell growth by both HOCl and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ reached a maximum within 30 min (at any concentration used). HOCl reacts avidly with amino groups to form N-chloroamines but H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is unreactive. Amino acids (ala, lys, met, trp) or taurine (all at 10 mM) prevented the effects of HOCl but did not affect H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ results. There was an excellent correlation between decreased protein synthesis and diminished cell growth. Inhibition of cell growth was not explained by proteolysis (release of acid-soluble counts), or by loss of membrane integrity. They propose that inhibition of protein synthesis may be a fundamental aspect of the bactericidal functions of phagocytes, and that the production of HOCl by MPO represents a quantitative advantage over H/sub 2/O/sub 2/.

  4. Inhibition of Type III Interferon Activity by Orthopoxvirus Immunomodulatory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The type III interferon (IFN) family elicits an antiviral response that is nearly identical to that evoked by IFN-α/β. However, these cytokines (known as IFN-λ1, 2, and 3) signal through a distinct receptor, and thus may be resistant to the evasion strategies used by some viruses to avoid the IFN-α/β response. Orthopoxviruses are highly resistant to IFN-α/β because they encode well-characterized immunomodulatory proteins that inhibit IFN activity. These include a secreted receptor (B18R) that neutralizes IFN-α/β, and a cytoplasmic protein (E3L) that blocks IFN-α/β effector functions in infected cells. We therefore determined the ability of these immunomodulators to abrogate the IFN-λ–induced antiviral response. We found that (i) vaccinia virus (VACV) replication is resistant to IFN-λ antiviral activity; (ii) neither VACV B18R nor the variola virus homolog B20R neutralizes IFN-λ; (iii) VACV E3L inhibits the IFN-λ–mediated antiviral response through a PKR-dependent pathway; (iv) VACV infection inhibits IFN-λR–mediated signal transduction and gene expression. These results demonstrate differential sensitivity of IFN-λ to multiple distinct evasion mechanisms employed by a single virus. PMID:20038204

  5. Diamidine Compounds for Selective Inhibition of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification critical for a variety of biological processes. Misregulation of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) has been linked to many pathological conditions. Most current PRMT inhibitors display limited specificity and selectivity, indiscriminately targeting many methyltransferase enzymes that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine as a cofactor. Here we report diamidine compounds for specific inhibition of PRMT1, the primary type I enzyme. Docking, molecular dynamics, and MM/PBSA analysis together with biochemical assays were conducted to understand the binding modes of these inhibitors and the molecular basis of selective inhibition for PRMT1. Our data suggest that 2,5-bis(4-amidinophenyl)furan (1, furamidine, DB75), one leading inhibitor, targets the enzyme active site and is primarily competitive with the substrate and noncompetitive toward the cofactor. Furthermore, cellular studies revealed that 1 is cell membrane permeable and effectively inhibits intracellular PRMT1 activity and blocks cell proliferation in leukemia cell lines with different genetic lesions. PMID:24564570

  6. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  7. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  8. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide generation from disposed gypsum drywall using chemical inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy; Bitton, Gabriel

    2011-07-15

    Disposal of gypsum drywall in landfills has been demonstrated to elevate hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in landfill gas, a problem with respect to odor, worker safety, and deleterious effect on gas-to-energy systems. Since H(2)S production in landfills results from biological activity, the concept of inhibiting H(2)S production through the application of chemical agents to drywall during disposal was studied. Three possible inhibition agents - sodium molybdate (Na(2)MoO(4)), ferric chloride (FeCl(3)), and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)) - were evaluated using flask and column experiments. All three agents inhibited H(2)S generation, with Na(2)MoO(4) reducing H(2)S generation by interrupting the biological sulfate reduction process and Ca(OH)(2) providing an unfavorable pH for biological growth. Although FeCl(3) was intended to provide an electron acceptor for a competing group of bacteria, the mechanism found responsible for inhibiting H(2)S production in the column experiment was a reduction in pH. Application of both Na(2)MoO(4) and FeCl(3) inhibited H(2)S generation over a long period (over 180 days), but the impact of Ca(OH)(2) decreased with time as the alkalinity it contributed was neutralized by the generated H(2)S. Practical application and potential environmental implications need additional exploration. PMID:21592650

  9. Nickel-hydrogen battery self-discharge mechanism and methods for its inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visintin, Arnaldo; Anani, Anaba; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Lim, Hong S.

    1992-01-01

    A review of our studies on the elucidation of the self-discharge mechanism of the Ni/H2 battery and methods to inhibit this phenomena is presented. The results show that (1) the rate of heat generation from nickel hydroxide powders and from electrodes increases with increase of hydrogen pressure, simultaneously, the open-circuit potential of the nickel hydroxide electrode is shifted in a negative direction more rapidly, indicating the transformation of NiOOH to Ni(OH)2; (2) heat generation rates measured in the microcalorimeter are considerably faster for electrolyte starved electrodes than for electrolyte-flooded electrodes; (3) there is a good correlation between the extent of self-discharge, as determined by heat generation in microcalorimetric measurement and capacity change; and (4) the self-discharge in Ni/H2 battery occurs via direct reduction of the active material by pressurized hydrogen. The addition of cadmium to the electrode reduces the self-discharge.

  10. Inhibition of the Hematopoietic Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Phenoxyacetic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Liu, Wallace H; Colayco, Sharon; Rascon, Justin; Vasile, Stefan; Gasior, Carlton; Critton, David A; Chan, Xochella; Dahl, Russell; Su, Ying; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas D Y; Mustelin, Tomas; Page, Rebecca; Tautz, Lutz

    2011-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have only recently become the focus of attention in the search for novel drug targets despite the fact that they play vital roles in numerous cellular processes and are implicated in many human diseases. The hematopoietic protein tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is often found dysregulated in preleukemic myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Physiological substrates of HePTP include the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK1/2 and p38. Specific modulators of HePTP catalytic activity will be useful for elucidating mechanisms of MAPK regulation in hematopietic cells, and may also provide treatments for hematopoietic malignancies such as AML. Here we report the discovery of phenoxyacetic acids as inhibitors of HePTP. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis and in silico docking studies reveal the molecular basis of HePTP inhibition by these compounds. We also show that these compounds are able to penetrate cell membranes and inhibit HePTP in human T lymphocytes.

  11. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  12. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Novel protein inhibits in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Burgess, S K; Carey, D M; Oxendine, S L

    1992-09-01

    Organic molecules both coexist and interact with inorganic crystal lattices in biomineralizing tissues. Mineral precipitation and crystal morphology are tightly regulated by the actions of these molecules. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies on water soluble extracts from the cuticle of Callinectes sapidus (Atlantic blue crab) reveal the presence, in unmineralized nascent premolt cuticle, of proteins which are absent in the mineralized postmolt cuticle. In the present studies, homogenates from both premolt and postmolt C. sapidus cuticles have been tested for their effect on the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate. The role of protein in this process was determined by heat pretreatment and trypsin pretreatment of the cuticle homogenates prior to the precipitation assay. The results from these experiments indicate that proteins, with molecular weights of approximately 75,000 and between 10,000 and 20,000, concentrated in the C. sapidus premolt cuticle, inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation in vitro. The inhibitory activity of these proteins appears to be a result of specific interactions since trypsin, myoglobin, and ovalbumin are not inhibitory. The presence of lower amounts of these inhibitory proteins in C. sapidus postmolt cuticle may be responsible for the subsequent mineralization of this tissue.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by regulating phenolic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Tao; Nie, Qixing; Zhang, Fengying; Zhu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    The effect of fumigation with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas on inhibiting enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices was investigated. Browning degree, changes in color, total phenol content, superoxide anion production rate (O2(-)), H2O2 content, antioxidant capacities (DPPH radical scavenging ability, ABTS radical scavenging activity and the reducing power) and activities of the phenol metabolism-associated enzymes including phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were evaluated. The results showed that treatment with 15 μl L(-1) H2S significantly inhibited the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices (P<0.05), reduced significantly O2(-) production rate and H2O2 content, and enhanced antioxidant capacities (P<0.05). PPO and POD activities in the fresh-cut lotus root slices were also significantly inhibited by treatment with H2S (P<0.05). This study suggested that treatment with exogenous H2S could inhibit the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by enhancing antioxidant capacities to alleviate the oxidative damage.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by regulating phenolic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Tao; Nie, Qixing; Zhang, Fengying; Zhu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    The effect of fumigation with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas on inhibiting enzymatic browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices was investigated. Browning degree, changes in color, total phenol content, superoxide anion production rate (O2(-)), H2O2 content, antioxidant capacities (DPPH radical scavenging ability, ABTS radical scavenging activity and the reducing power) and activities of the phenol metabolism-associated enzymes including phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) were evaluated. The results showed that treatment with 15 μl L(-1) H2S significantly inhibited the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices (P<0.05), reduced significantly O2(-) production rate and H2O2 content, and enhanced antioxidant capacities (P<0.05). PPO and POD activities in the fresh-cut lotus root slices were also significantly inhibited by treatment with H2S (P<0.05). This study suggested that treatment with exogenous H2S could inhibit the browning of fresh-cut lotus root slices by enhancing antioxidant capacities to alleviate the oxidative damage. PMID:25660900

  16. Kinetic evaluation of the inhibition of protein glycation during heating.

    PubMed

    Akıllıoğlu, H Gül; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of early stage of the Maillard reaction by a reversible bimolecular reaction mechanism and also to evaluate the compatibility of enzyme inhibition kinetics for calculating the inhibitory activity of protein anti-glycation agents. Model systems composed of ovalbumin, glucose, and anti-glycation agents (tannic acid or calcium ion) at different molar ratios were heated at 90 °C for different times in dry state or in solution. Heated samples were analysed for furosine, acid derivative of N-ε-fructoselysine (FL), to monitor the progression of the early glycation stage. Compared to a control, presence of calcium ions and tannic acid decreased FL formation significantly (p<0.05) during heating in dry state. Evaluation of the kinetic data revealed that calcium inhibited glycation of ovalbumin by a mixed non-competitive mechanism in both dry and in solution conditions; while the mode of inhibition by tannic acid was found to be purely non-competitive in the dry state.

  17. Kinetic evaluation of the inhibition of protein glycation during heating.

    PubMed

    Akıllıoğlu, H Gül; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of early stage of the Maillard reaction by a reversible bimolecular reaction mechanism and also to evaluate the compatibility of enzyme inhibition kinetics for calculating the inhibitory activity of protein anti-glycation agents. Model systems composed of ovalbumin, glucose, and anti-glycation agents (tannic acid or calcium ion) at different molar ratios were heated at 90 °C for different times in dry state or in solution. Heated samples were analysed for furosine, acid derivative of N-ε-fructoselysine (FL), to monitor the progression of the early glycation stage. Compared to a control, presence of calcium ions and tannic acid decreased FL formation significantly (p<0.05) during heating in dry state. Evaluation of the kinetic data revealed that calcium inhibited glycation of ovalbumin by a mixed non-competitive mechanism in both dry and in solution conditions; while the mode of inhibition by tannic acid was found to be purely non-competitive in the dry state. PMID:26593596

  18. Protein grafting of an HIV-1-inhibiting epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, Samuel K.; Kim, Peter S.

    2003-08-01

    Protein grafting, the transfer of a binding epitope of one ligand onto the surface of another protein, is a potentially powerful technique for presenting peptides in preformed and active three-dimensional conformations. Its utility, however, has been limited by low biological activity of the designed ligands and low tolerance of the protein scaffolds to surface substitutions. Here, we graft the complete binding epitope (19 nonconsecutive amino acids with a solvent-accessible surface area of >2,000 Å2) of an HIV-1 C-peptide, which is derived from the C-terminal region of HIV-1 gp41 and potently inhibits HIV-1 entry into cells, onto the surface of a GCN4 leucine zipper. The designed peptide, named C34coil, displays a potent antiviral activity approaching that of the native ligand. Moreover, whereas the linear C-peptide is unstructured and sensitive to degradation by proteases, C34coil is well structured, conformationally stable, and exhibits increased resistance to proteolytic degradation compared with the linear peptide. In addition to being a structured antiviral inhibitor, C34coil may also serve as the basis for the development of an alternative class of immunogens. This study demonstrates that "one-shot" protein grafting, without subsequent rounds of optimization, can be used to create ligands with structural conformations and improved biomedical properties.

  19. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  20. Inhibition of Protein-Protein Interactions and Signaling by Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the core of cell signaling pathways as well as many bacterial and viral infection processes. As such, they define critical targets for drug development against diseases such as cancer, arthritis, obesity, AIDS and many others. Until now, the clinical inhibition of protein-protein interactions and signaling has been accomplished with the use of antibodies or soluble versions of receptor molecules. Small molecule replacements of these therapeutic agents have been extremely difficult to develop; either the necessary potency has been hard to achieve or the expected biological effect has not been obtained. In this presentation, we show that a rigorous thermodynamic approach that combines differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a unique platform for the identification and optimization of small molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Recent advances in the development of cell entry inhibitors of HIV-1 using this approach will be discussed.

  1. Molecular hydrogen inhibits lipopolysaccharide-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages by targeting the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Jiang, Rui; Hao, Da-Peng; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome, an intracellular multi-protein complex controlling the maturation of cytokine interleukin-1β, plays an important role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cascades. Recently, the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) in macrophages stimulated with LPS has been suggested to act as a trigger during the process of NLRP3 inflammasome activation that can be blocked by some mitochondria-targeted antioxidants. Known as a ROS scavenger, molecular hydrogen (H2) has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit on LPS-induced inflammatory damage in many animal experiments. Due to the unique molecular structure, H2 can easily target the mitochondria, suggesting that H2 is a potential antagonist of mtROS-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Here we have showed that, in mouse macrophages, H2 exhibited substantial inhibitory activity against LPS-initiated NLRP3 inflammasome activation by scavenging mtROS. Moreover, the elimination of mtROS by H2 resultantly inhibited mtROS-mediated NLRP3 deubiquitination, a non-transcriptional priming signal of NLRP3 in response to the stimulation of LPS. Additionally, the removal of mtROS by H2 reduced the generation of oxidized mitochondrial DNA and consequently decreased its binding to NLRP3, thereby inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our findings have, for the first time, revealed the novel mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of molecular hydrogen on LPS-caused NLRP3 inflammasome activation, highlighting the promising application of this new antioxidant in the treatment of LPS-associated inflammatory pathological damage.

  2. Givinostat inhibition of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Gang; Xu, Ling; Wang, Ting; Wei, Jue; Meng, Wen-Ying; Wang, Na; Shi, Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effect of the histone deacetylase inhibitor givinostat on proteins related to regulation of hepatic stellate cell proliferation. METHODS: The cell counting kit-8 assay and flow cytometry were used to observe changes in proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle in hepatic stellate cells treated with givinostat. Western blot was used to observe expression changes in p21, p57, CDK4, CDK6, cyclinD1, caspase-3, and caspase-9 in hepatic stellate cells exposed to givinostat. The scratch assay was used to analyze the effect of givinostat on cell migration. Effects of givinostat on the reactive oxygen species profile, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in JS-1 cells were observed by laser confocal microscopy. RESULTS: Givinostat significantly inhibited JS-1 cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis, leading to cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases. Treatment with givinostat downregulated protein expression of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1, whereas expression of p21 and p57 was significantly increased. The givinostat-induced apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells was mainly mediated through p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Givinostat treatment increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. Acetylation of superoxide dismutase (acetyl K68) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (acetyl K310) was upregulated, while there was no change in protein expression. Moreover, the notable beneficial effect of givinostat on liver fibrosis was also confirmed in the mouse models. CONCLUSION: Givinostat has antifibrotic activities via regulating the acetylation of nuclear factor-κB and superoxide dismutase 2, thus inhibiting hepatic stellate cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. PMID:26217084

  3. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  4. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  5. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Joanna; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Agellon, Luis B.; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance. Conclusions We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function. PMID:27441395

  6. Neuroprotective effect of Citrus unshiu immature peel and nobiletin inhibiting hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Jung, Su Young; Lee, Gyeong Hwan; Cho, Jung Hee; Choi, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is common in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In a case study, nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peels could prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in donepezil-preadministered Alzheimer's disease patients. Objective: In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanism of nobiletin and Citrus unshiu immature peel (CUIP) water extract, which contains nobiletin as a major compound, on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal neuronal model. Materials and Methods: HT22 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of various concentrations of CUIP and nobiletin. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic protein levels were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with CUIP and nobiletin inhibited cell death due to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide-induced the expression of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) and p-p38 proteins in HT22 cells; however CUIP and nobiletin suppressed p-JNK and p-p38 without changing JNK or p38. Regarding apoptosis, caspase 3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Bax protein expression was determined. CUIP and nobiletin suppressed caspase 3 and Bax expression, but they induced Bcl-2 expression in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results show that CUIP and nobiletin can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HT22 neurons via mitogen-activated protein kinases and apoptotic pathways. PMID:26664016

  7. Selective inhibition of Biotin Protein Ligase from Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P.; Tieu, William; Yap, Min Y.; Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steven W.; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel; Morona, Renato; Turnidge, John D.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Booker, Grant W.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a well documented need to replenish the antibiotic pipeline with new agents to combat the rise of drug resistant bacteria. One strategy to combat resistance is to discover new chemical classes immune to current resistance mechanisms that inhibit essential metabolic enzymes. Many of the obvious drug targets that have no homologous isozyme in the human host have now been investigated. Bacterial drug targets that have a closely related human homologue represent a new frontier in antibiotic discovery. However, to avoid potential toxicity to the host, these inhibitors must have very high selectivity for the bacterial enzyme over the human homolog. We have demonstrated that the essential enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) from the clinically important pathogen Staphylococcus aureus could be selectively inhibited. Linking biotin to adenosine via a 1,2,3 triazole yielded the first BPL inhibitor selective for S. aureus BPL over the human equivalent. The synthesis of new biotin 1,2,3-triazole analogues using click chemistry yielded our most potent structure (Ki 90 nm) with a >1100-fold selectivity for the S. aureus BPL over the human homologue. X-ray crystallography confirmed the mechanism of inhibitor binding. Importantly, the inhibitor showed cytotoxicity against S. aureus but not cultured mammalian cells. The biotin 1,2,3-triazole provides a novel pharmacophore for future medicinal chemistry programs to develop this new antibiotic class. PMID:22437830

  8. Enhanced Bio-hydrogen Production from Protein Wastewater by Altering Protein Structure and Amino Acids Acidification Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Naidong; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Aihui; Feng, Leiyu

    2014-02-01

    Enhanced bio-hydrogen production from protein wastewater by altering protein structure and amino acids acidification type via pH control was investigated. The hydrogen production reached 205.2 mL/g-protein when protein wastewater was pretreated at pH 12 and then fermented at pH 10. The mechanism studies showed that pH 12 pretreatment significantly enhanced protein bio-hydrolysis during the subsequent fermentation stage as it caused the unfolding of protein, damaged the protein hydrogen bonding networks, and destroyed the disulfide bridges, which increased the susceptibility of protein to protease. Moreover, pH 10 fermentation produced more acetic but less propionic acid during the anaerobic fermentation of amino acids, which was consistent with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Further analyses of the critical enzymes, genes, and microorganisms indicated that the activity and abundance of hydrogen producing bacteria in the pH 10 fermentation reactor were greater than those in the control.

  9. Characterization of a Beta Vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein: a defense response gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall proteins that inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs). PGIPs are members of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family that play crucial roles in development, pathogen defense and recognition of beneficial microbes in pl...

  10. Selective and Reversible Inhibition of Active CO2 Transport by Hydrogen Sulfide in a Cyanobacterium 1

    PubMed Central

    Espie, George S.; Miller, Anthony G.; Canvin, David T.

    1989-01-01

    The active transport of CO2 in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus UTEX 625 was inhibited by H2S. Treatment of the cells with up to 150 micromolar H2S + HS− at pH 8.0 had little effect on Na+-dependent HCO3− transport or photosynthetic O2 evolution, but CO2 transport was inhibited by more than 90%. CO2 transport was restored when H2S was removed by flushing with N2. At constant total H2S + HS− concentrations, inhibition of CO2 transport increased as the ratio of H2S to HS− increased, suggesting a direct role for H2S in the inhibitory process. Hydrogen sulfide does not appear to serve as a substrate for transport. In the presence of H2S and Na+ -dependent HCO3− transport, the extracellular CO2 concentration rose considerably above its equilibrium level, but was maintained far below its equilibrium level in the absence of H2S. The inhibition of CO2 transport, therefore, revealed an ongoing leakage from the cells of CO2 which was derived from the intracellular dehydration of HCO3− which itself had been recently transported into the cells. Normally, leaked CO2 is efficiently transported back into the cell by the CO2 transport system, thus maintaining the extracellular CO2 concentration near zero. It is suggested that CO2 transport not only serves as a primary means of inorganic carbon acquisition for photosynthesis but also serves as a means of recovering CO2 lost from the cell. A schematic model describing the relationship between the CO2 and HCO3− transport systems is presented. Images Figure 7 PMID:16667030

  11. A probabilistic approach to the effect of water hydrogen bonds on the kinetics of protein folding and protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, E

    2010-02-26

    Previously, we presented a review of our kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding and for the protein thermal denaturation in a barrierless way. A protein was treated as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic, and neutral beads. As a crucial idea of the model, an overall potential around the cluster of native residues wherein a residue performs a chaotic motion was considered as the combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise, and confining potentials. The overall potential as a function of the distance from the cluster has a double well shape. This allowed one to develop kinetic models for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) and barrierless protein denaturation (BPD) by using the mean first passage time analysis. In the original models, however, hydrogen bonding effects were taken into account only indirectly which affected the accuracy of the models because hydrogen bonding does play a crucial role in the folding, stability, and denaturation of proteins. To improve the NMPF and BPD models and explicitly take into account the hydrogen bonding "water-water" and "water-protein residue", we have developed a probabilistic hydrogen bond (PHB) model for the effect of hydrogen bond networks of water molecules around two solute particles (immersed in water) on their interaction, and have then combined the PHB model with the NMPF and BPD models. In this paper, that can be regarded as sequel of our previous review, we analyze the modified NMPF and BPD models that explicitly take into account the effect of water-water hydrogen bonding on these processes. As expected, the application of the modified models to the folding/unfolding of two model proteins (one short, consisting of 124 residues and the other large, consisting of 2500 residues) demonstrate that the hydrogen bond networks play a very important role in the protein folding/unfolding phenomena.

  12. Parameter-Free Hydrogen-Bond Definition to Classify Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Hasti; Higham, Jonathan; Henchman, Richard H

    2016-08-25

    DSSP is the most commonly used method to assign protein secondary structure. It is based on a hydrogen-bond definition with an energy cutoff. To assess whether hydrogen bonds defined in a parameter-free way may give more generality while preserving accuracy, we examine a series of hydrogen-bond definitions to assign secondary structure for a series of proteins. Assignment by the strongest-acceptor bifurcated definition with provision for unassigned donor hydrogens, termed the SABLE method, is found to match DSSP with 95% agreement. The small disagreement mainly occurs for helices, turns, and bends. While there is no absolute way to assign protein secondary structure, avoiding molecule-specific cutoff parameters should be advantageous in generalizing structure-assignment methods to any hydrogen-bonded system. PMID:27067825

  13. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, George; Dudkin, Sergii; Borkin, Dmitry; Ni, Wendi; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-04-29

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes.

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate and penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose inhibit protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Andrea; Bécsi, Bálint; Kolozsvári, Bernadett; Komáromi, István; Kövér, Katalin E; Erdődi, Ferenc

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) and protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) are responsible for the dephosphorylation of the majority of phosphoserine/threonine residues in cells. In this study, we show that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG), polyphenolic constituents of green tea and tannins, inhibit the activity of the PP1 recombinant δ-isoform of the PP1 catalytic subunit and the native PP1 catalytic subunit (PP1c) with IC(50) values of 0.47-1.35 μm and 0.26-0.4 μm, respectively. EGCG and PGG inhibit PP2Ac less potently, with IC(50) values of 15 and 6.6 μm, respectively. The structure-inhibitory potency relationships of catechin derivatives suggests that the galloyl group may play a major role in phosphatase inhibition. The interaction of EGCG and PGG with PP1c was characterized by NMR and surface plasmon resonance-based binding techniques. Competitive binding assays and molecular modeling suggest that EGCG docks at the hydrophobic groove close to the catalytic center of PP1c, partially overlapping with the binding surface of microcystin-LR or okadaic acid. This hydrophobic interaction is further stabilized by hydrogen bonding via hydroxyl/oxo groups of EGCG to PP1c residues. Comparative docking shows that EGCG binds to PP2Ac in a similar manner, but in a distinct pose. Long-term treatment (24 h) with these compounds and other catechins suppresses the viability of HeLa cells with a relative effectiveness reminiscent of their in vitro PP1c-inhibitory potencies. The above data imply that the phosphatase-inhibitory features of these polyphenols may be implicated in the wide spectrum of their physiological influence.

  15. Hydrogen assisted cracking and inhibition of spring alloys in acidizing solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Coyle, W.R.; Chitwood, G.B.; Rice, P.W.; Walker, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Several experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the hydrogen assisted cracking resistance of high strength, corrosion resistant spring alloys to acidizing fluids. Two cobalt-based alloys, UNS R30035 and UNS R30003, and one nickel-based alloy, UNS N07750, were evaluated. The tests involved exposing stressed spring segments of all alloys and C-rings of R30035 to uninhibited 28% HCl, 28% HCl with two different inhibitors, and the NACE TM0177 solution. Failures of N07750 spring segments in the uninhibited acid parallel field performance of this alloy. There were no failures of the R30035 or R30003 spring segments in the environments tested. Springs made from N07750 are more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement than either R30035 or R30003. The C-ring tests of R30035 revealed the benefit of corrosion inhibition as a means of elevating the threshold cracking stress and increasing the time to failure in corrosive media. A strong beneficial effect of elevated-temperature thermal processing was observed for UNS R30035. High performance acidizing inhibitors are required in order to provide effective protection to high alloy spring materials.

  16. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  17. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  18. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E.; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  19. Improved hydrogen production in the microbial electrolysis cell by inhibiting methanogenesis using ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanping; Luo, Haiping; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Li, Jiayi; Fu, Shiyu

    2014-09-01

    Methanogenesis inhibition is essential for the improvement of hydrogen (H2) yield and energy recovery in the microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In this study, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was proposed as an efficient method for methanogenesis control in a single chamber MEC. With 30 cycles of operation with UV irradiation in the MEC, high H2 concentrations (>91%) were maintained, while without UV irradiation, CH4 concentrations increased significantly and reached up to 94%. In the MEC, H2 yields ranged from 2.87 ± 0.03 to 3.70 ± 0.11 mol H2/mol acetate with UV irradiation and from 3.78 ± 0.12 to 0.03 ± 0.004 mol H2/mol acetate without UV irradiation. Average energy efficiencies from the UV-irradiated MEC were 1.5 times of those without UV irradiation. Energy production from the MEC without UV irradiation was a negative energy yield process because of large amount of CH4 produced over time, which was mainly attributable to cathodic hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Our results clearly showed that UV irradiation could effectively inhibit methanogenesis and improve MEC performance to produce H2.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide can inhibit and enhance oxygenic photosynthesis in a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Haas, Sebastian; Yilmaz, Pelin; de Beer, Dirk; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-09-01

    We used microsensors to investigate the combinatory effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) and light on oxygenic photosynthesis in biofilms formed by a cyanobacterium from sulfidic springs. We found that photosynthesis was both positively and negatively affected by H2 S: (i) H2 S accelerated the recovery of photosynthesis after prolonged exposure to darkness and anoxia. We suggest that this is possibly due to regulatory effects of H2 S on photosystem I components and/or on the Calvin cycle. (ii) H2 S concentrations of up to 210 μM temporarily enhanced the photosynthetic rates at low irradiance. Modelling showed that this enhancement is plausibly based on changes in the light-harvesting efficiency. (iii) Above a certain light-dependent concentration threshold H2 S also acted as an inhibitor. Intriguingly, this inhibition was not instant but occurred only after a specific time interval that decreased with increasing light intensity. That photosynthesis is most sensitive to inhibition at high light intensities suggests that H2 S inactivates an intermediate of the oxygen evolving complex that accumulates with increasing light intensity. We discuss the implications of these three effects of H2 S in the context of cyanobacterial photosynthesis under conditions with diurnally fluctuating light and H2 S concentrations, such as those occurring in microbial mats and biofilms.

  1. Microsomal protein synthesis inhibition: an early manifestation of gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W.M.; Mela-Riker, L.M.; Houghton, D.C.; Gilbert, D.N.; Buss, W.C.

    1988-08-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics achieve bacterial killing by binding to bacterial ribosomes and inhibiting protein synthesis. To examine whether similar mechanisms could be present in renal tubular cells prior to the onset of overt proximal tubular necrosis due to these drugs, we isolated microsomes from Fischer rats given 20 mg/kg gentamicin every 12 h subcutaneously for 2 days and from vehicle-injected controls. Concomitant studies of renal structure, function, and mitochondrial respiration were carried out. (3H)leucine incorporation into renal microsomes of treated animals was reduced by 21.9% (P less than 0.01), whereas brain and liver microsomes from the same animals were unaffected. Gentamicin concentration in the renal microsomal preparation was 56 micrograms/ml, a value 7- to 10-fold above concentrations necessary to inhibit bacterial growth. Conventional renal function studies were normal (blood urea, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance). Treated animals showed only a mild reduction of inulin clearance, 0.71 compared with 0.93 ml.min-1.100 g-1 in controls (P less than 0.05), and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetylglucosaminidase of 20 compared with 14.8 units/l (P less than 0.05). Renal slice transport of p-aminohippuric acid, tetraethylammonium, and the fractional excretion of sodium were well preserved. There was no evidence, as seen by light microscopy, of proximal tubular necrosis. Mitochondrial cytochrome concentrations were normal and respiratory activities only slightly reduced. Processes similar to those responsible for bacterial killing could be involved in experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity before overt cellular necrosis.

  2. Inhibition of Heat Shock Protein 90 Prevents HIV Rebound*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pheroze; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV evades eradication because transcriptionally dormant proviral genomes persist in long-lived reservoirs of resting CD4+ T cells and myeloid cells, which are the source of viral rebound after cessation of antiretroviral therapy. Dormant HIV genomes readily produce infectious virus upon cellular activation because host transcription factors activated specifically by cell stress and heat shock mediate full-length HIV transcription. The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is overexpressed during heat shock and activates inducible cellular transcription factors. Here we show that heat shock accelerates HIV transcription through induction of Hsp90 activity, which activates essential HIV-specific cellular transcription factors (NF-κB, NFAT, and STAT5), and that inhibition of Hsp90 greatly reduces gene expression mediated by these factors. More importantly, we show that Hsp90 controls virus transcription in vivo by specific Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical development, tanespimycin (17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) and AUY922, which durably prevented viral rebound in HIV-infected humanized NOD scid IL-2Rγ−/− bone marrow-liver-thymus mice up to 11 weeks after treatment cessation. Despite the absence of rebound viremia, we were able to recover infectious HIV from PBMC with heat shock. Replication-competent virus was detected in spleen cells from these nonviremic Hsp90 inhibitor-treated mice, indicating the presence of a tissue reservoir of persistent infection. Our novel findings provide in vivo evidence that inhibition of Hsp90 activity prevents HIV gene expression in replication-competent cellular reservoirs that would typically cause rebound in plasma viremia after antiretroviral therapy cessation. Alternating or supplementing Hsp90 inhibitors with current antiretroviral therapy regimens could conceivably suppress rebound viremia from persistent HIV reservoirs. PMID:26957545

  3. BH3-only protein Bmf mediates apoptosis upon inhibition of CAP-dependent protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Grespi, Francesca; Soratroi, Claudia; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Sohm, Benedicte; Ploner, Christian; Geley, Stephan; Hengst, Ludger; Häcker, Georg; Villunger, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Tight transcriptional regulation, post-translational modifications and/or alternative splicing of BH3-only proteins fine-tune their pro-apoptotic function. Here, we characterize the gene locus of the BH3-only protein Bmf (Bcl-2 modifying factor) and describe the generation of two major isoforms from a common transcript where initiation of protein synthesis involves leucine-coding CUG. BmfCUG and the originally described isoform, Bmf short (BmfS), display comparable binding affinities to pro-survival Bcl-2 family members, localize preferentially to the outer mitochondrial membrane and induce rapid Bcl-2-blockable apoptosis. Notably, endogenous Bmf expression is induced upon forms of cell stress known to cause the repression of the CAP-dependent translation machinery such as serum-deprivation, hypoxia, inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway or mTOR, as well as direct pharmacological inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF-4E. Knock-down or deletion of Bmf reduces apoptosis under some of these conditions demonstrating that Bmf can act as a sentinel for the stress-impaired CAP-dependent protein translation machinery (150). PMID:20706276

  4. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates steroid-associated femoral head necrosis through inhibition of oxidative stress in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, SHENG-LI; JIAO, JIAN; YAN, HONG-WEI

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that hydrogen is a novel, selective antioxidant that exerts a protective effect against organ damage. The present study investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich saline on corticosteroid-induced necrosis of the femoral head in an animal model established using prednisolone. A total of 30 healthy, male, adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: Hydrogen-rich saline (treated with hydrogen-rich saline via intraperitoneal injection) and placebo (treated with normal saline). At the set time-points, the structure of the femoral head was examined using a microscope; the concentrations of glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxide (LPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thrombomodulin (TM) in the plasma were measured and the microvessel density was quantified. The results showed that hydrogen-rich saline significantly decreased the levels of VEGF, TM and LPO and increased the GSH level in steroid-associated necrosis of the femoral head in the rabbit model. A significant increase in the microvessel density was observed in the hydrogen-rich saline group. Histopathological staining confirmed the results of the biochemical analysis. The present study demonstrates that hydrogen treatment may alleviate steroid-associated osteonecrosis by inhibiting oxidative stress. Hydrogen-rich saline may provide an alternative treatment for steroid-associated necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26889236

  5. Pokeweed Antiviral Protein, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein: Activity, Inhibition and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Domashevskiy, Artem V.; Goss, Dixie J.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses employ an array of elaborate strategies to overcome plant defense mechanisms and must adapt to the requirements of the host translational systems. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) and is an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is thought to play an important role in the plant’s defense mechanism against foreign pathogens. This review focuses on the structure, function, and the relationship of PAP to other RIPs, discusses molecular aspects of PAP antiviral activity, the novel inhibition of this plant toxin by a virus counteraction—a peptide linked to the viral genome (VPg), and possible applications of RIP-conjugated immunotoxins in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25635465

  6. Pokeweed antiviral protein, a ribosome inactivating protein: activity, inhibition and prospects.

    PubMed

    Domashevskiy, Artem V; Goss, Dixie J

    2015-01-28

    Viruses employ an array of elaborate strategies to overcome plant defense mechanisms and must adapt to the requirements of the host translational systems. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) and is an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is thought to play an important role in the plant's defense mechanism against foreign pathogens. This review focuses on the structure, function, and the relationship of PAP to other RIPs, discusses molecular aspects of PAP antiviral activity, the novel inhibition of this plant toxin by a virus counteraction-a peptide linked to the viral genome (VPg), and possible applications of RIP-conjugated immunotoxins in cancer therapeutics.

  7. NifI inhibits nitrogenase by competing with Fe protein for binding to the MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Leigh, John A.

    2007-12-14

    Reduction of substrate by nitrogenase requires direct electron transfer from the Fe protein to the MoFe protein. Inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Methanococcus maripaludis occurs when the regulatory protein NifI{sub 1,2} binds the MoFe protein. This inhibition is relieved by 2-oxoglutarate. Here we present evidence that NifI{sub 1,2} binding prevents association of the two nitrogenase components. Increasing amounts of Fe protein competed with NifI{sub 1,2}, decreasing its inhibitory effect. NifI{sub 1,2} prevented the co-purification of MoFe protein with a mutant form of the Fe protein that forms a stable complex with the MoFe protein, and NifI{sub 1,2} was unable to bind to an AlF{sub 4}{sup -}-stabilized Fe protein:MoFe protein complex. NifI{sub 1,2} inhibited ATP- and MoFe protein-dependent oxidation of the Fe protein, and 2OG relieved this inhibition. These results support a model where NifI{sub 1,2} competes with the Fe protein for binding to MoFe protein and prevents electron transfer.

  8. Direct observation of hydrogen atom dynamics and interactions by ultrahigh resolution neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Julian C-H; Hanson, B Leif; Fisher, S Zoë; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y

    2012-09-18

    The 1.1 Å, ultrahigh resolution neutron structure of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanged crambin is reported. Two hundred ninety-nine out of 315, or 94.9%, of the hydrogen atom positions in the protein have been experimentally derived and resolved through nuclear density maps. A number of unconventional interactions are clearly defined, including a potential O─H…π interaction between a water molecule and the aromatic ring of residue Y44, as well as a number of potential C─H…O hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bonding networks that are ambiguous in the 0.85 Å ultrahigh resolution X-ray structure can be resolved by accurate orientation of water molecules. Furthermore, the high resolution of the reported structure has allowed for the anisotropic description of 36 deuterium atoms in the protein. The visibility of hydrogen and deuterium atoms in the nuclear density maps is discussed in relation to the resolution of the neutron data.

  9. Rheb Inhibits Protein Synthesis by Activating the PERK-eIF2α Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Richa; Shahani, Neelam; Gorgen, Lindsay; Ferretti, Max; Pryor, William; Chen, Po Yu; Swarnkar, Supriya; Worley, Paul F.; Karbstein, Katrin; Snyder, Solomon H.; Subramaniam, Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rheb, a ubiquitous small GTPase, is well known to bind and activate mTOR, which augments protein synthesis. Inhibition of protein synthesis is also physiologically regulated. Thus, with cell stress the unfolded protein response system leads to phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2α and arrest of protein synthesis. We now demonstrate a major role for Rheb in inhibiting protein synthesis through enhancing the phosphorylation of eIF2α by protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK). Interplay between the stimulatory and inhibitory roles of Rheb may enable cells to modulate protein synthesis in response to varying environmental stresses. PMID:25660019

  10. Macrocycles that inhibit the binding between heat shock protein 90 and TPR-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ardi, Veronica C; Alexander, Leslie D; Johnson, Victoria A; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2011-12-16

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) accounts for 1-2% of the total proteins in normal cells and functions as a molecular chaperone that folds, assembles, and stabilizes client proteins. Hsp90 is overexpressed (3- to 6-fold increase) in stressed cells, including cancer cells, and regulates over 200 client and co-chaperone proteins. Hsp90 client proteins are involved in a plethora of cellular signaling events including numerous growth and apoptotic pathways. Since pathway-specific inhibitors can be problematic in drug-resistant cancers, shutting down multiple pathways at once is a promising approach when developing new therapeutics. Hsp90's ability to modulate many growth and signaling pathways simultaneously makes this protein an attractive target in the field of cancer therapeutics. Herein we present evidence that a small molecule modulates Hsp90 via binding between the N and middle domain and allosterically inhibiting the binding interaction between Hsp90 and four C-terminal binding client proteins: IP6K2, FKBP38, FKBP52, and HOP. These last three clients contain a tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) region, which is known to interact with the MEEVD sequence on the C-terminus of Hsp90. Thus, this small molecule modulates the activity between co-chaperones that contain TPR motifs and Hsp90's MEEVD region. This mechanism of action is unique from that of all Hsp90 inhibitors currently in clinical trials where these molecules have no effect on proteins that bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90. Further, our small molecule induces a Caspase-3 dependent apoptotic event. Thus, we describe the mechanism of a novel scaffold that is a useful tool for studying cell-signaling events that result when blocking the MEEVD-TPR interaction between Hsp90 and co-chaperone proteins.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 mediates resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human hepatobiliary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ho-Bouldoires, Thanh Huong; Clapéron, Audrey; Mergey, Martine; Wendum, Dominique; Desbois-Mouthon, Christèle; Tahraoui, Sylvana; Fartoux, Laetitia; Chettouh, Hamza; Merabtene, Fatiha; Scatton, Olivier; Gaestel, Matthias; Praz, Françoise; Housset, Chantal; Fouassier, Laura

    2015-12-01

    The development and progression of liver cancer are characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-induced oxidative stress impairs cell proliferation and ultimately leads to cell death. Although liver cancer cells are especially resistant to oxidative stress, mechanisms of such resistance remain understudied. We identified the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2)/heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) signaling pathway mediating defenses against oxidative stress. In addition to MK2 and Hsp27 overexpression in primary liver tumors compared to adjacent nontumorous tissues, the MK2/Hsp27 pathway is activated by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in hepatobiliary cancer cells. MK2 inactivation or inhibition of MK2 or Hsp27 expression increases caspase-3 and PARP cleavage and DNA breaks and therefore cell death. Interestingly, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases antioxidant defenses such as heme oxygenase 1 through downregulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2. Moreover, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases both phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and expression of its ligand, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor. A new identified partner of MK2, the scaffold PDZ protein EBP50, could facilitate these effects through MK2/Hsp27 pathway regulation. These findings demonstrate that the MK2/Hsp27 pathway actively participates in resistance to oxidative stress and may contribute to liver cancer progression.

  12. Influenza B virus NS1 protein inhibits conjugation of the interferon (IFN)-induced ubiquitin-like ISG15 protein.

    PubMed

    Yuan, W; Krug, R M

    2001-02-01

    Of the several hundred proteins induced by interferon (IFN) alpha/beta, the ubiquitin-like ISG15 protein is one of the most predominant. We demonstrate the novel way in which the function of the ISG15 protein is inhibited by influenza B virus, which strongly induces the ISG15 protein: a specific region of the influenza B virus NS1 protein, which includes part of its effector domain, blocks the covalent linkage of ISG15 to its target proteins both in vitro and in infected cells. We identify UBE1L as the E1 enzyme that catalyzes the first activation step in the conjugation of ISG15, and show that the NS1B protein inhibits this activation step in vitro. Influenza A virus employs a different strategy: its NS1 protein does not bind the ISG15 protein, but little or no ISG15 protein is produced during infection. We discuss the likely basis for these different strategies.

  13. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  14. A C alpha-H...O hydrogen bond in a membrane protein is not stabilizing.

    PubMed

    Yohannan, Sarah; Faham, Salem; Yang, Duan; Grosfeld, David; Chamberlain, Aaron K; Bowie, James U

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogen bonds involving a carbon donor are very common in protein structures, and energy calculations suggest that Calpha-H...O hydrogen bonds could be about one-half the strength of traditional hydrogen bonds. It has therefore been proposed that these nontraditional hydrogen bonds could be a significant factor in stabilizing proteins, particularly membrane proteins as there is a low dielectric and no competition from water in the bilayer core. Nevertheless, this proposition has never been tested experimentally. Here, we report an experimental test of the significance of Calpha-H...O bonds for protein stability. Thr24 in bacteriorhodopsin, which makes an interhelical Calpha-H...O hydrogen bond to the Calpha of Ala51, was changed to Ala, Val, and Ser, and the thermodynamic stability of the mutants was measured. None of the mutants had significantly reduced stability. In fact, T24A was more stable than the wild-type protein by 0.6 kcal/mol. Crystal structures were determined for each of the mutants, and, while some structural changes were seen for T24S and T24V, T24A showed essentially no apparent structural alteration that could account for the increased stability. Thus, Thr24 appears to destabilize the protein rather than stabilize. Our results suggest that Calpha-H...O bonds are not a major contributor to protein stability.

  15. The activation sequence of cellular protein handling systems after proteasomal inhibition in dopaminergic cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunction of protein handling has been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases and inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) has been linked to the formation of protein aggregates and proteinopathies in such diseases. While proteasomal inhibition could trigger an array of downstream protein handling changes including up-regulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs), induction of molecular chaperones, activation of the ER stress/unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy and aggresome formation, little is known of the relationship of proteasomal inhibition to the sequence of activation of these diverse protein handling systems. In this study we utilized the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 and examined the activity of several major protein handling systems in the immortalized dopaminergic neuronal N27 cell line. In the early phase (up to 6 hours after proteasomal inhibition), MG132 induced time-dependent proteasomal inhibition which resulted in stimulation of the UPR, increased autophagic flux and stimulated heat shock protein response as determined by increased levels of phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)/GADD153, turnover of autophagy related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and increased levels of Hsp70 respectively. After prolonged proteasomal inhibition induced by MG132, we observed the formation of vimentin-caged aggresome-like inclusion bodies. A recovery study after MG132-induced proteasomal inhibition indicated that the autophagy-lysosomal pathway participated in the clearance of aggresomes. Our data characterizes the relationship between proteasome inhibition and activation of other protein handling systems. These data also indicated that the induction of alternate protein handling systems and their temporal relationships may be important factors that determine the extent of accumulation of misfolded proteins in cells as a result of

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase C by calphostin C is light-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, R.F.; Miller, F.D.; Merriman, R.L.; Howbert, J.J.; Heath, W.F.; Kobayashi, E.; Takahashi, I.; Tamaoki, T.; Nakano, H. )

    1991-04-15

    Calphostin C, a secondary metabolite of the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, inhibits protein kinase C by competing at the binding site for diacylglycerol and phorbol esters. Calphostin C is a polycyclic hydrocarbon with strong absorbance in the visible and ultraviolet ranges. In characterizing the activity of this compound, we unexpectedly found that the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate binding was dependent on exposure to light. Ordinary fluorescent light was sufficient for full activation. The inhibition of protein kinase C activity in cell-free systems and intact cells also required light. Light-dependent cytotoxicity was seen at concentrations about 5-fold higher than those inhibiting protein kinase C.

  17. Primate lentiviruses are differentially inhibited by interferon-induced transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Le Duff, Yann; Wang, Yimeng; Pan, Qinghua; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Liang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins inhibit the entry of a large number of viruses. Not surprisingly, many viruses are refractory to this inhibition. In this study, we report that different strains of HIV and SIV are inhibited by human IFITM proteins to various degrees, with SIV of African green monkeys (SIVAGM) being mostly restricted by human IFITM2. Interestingly, SIVAGM is as much inhibited by human IFITM2 as by IFITM3 of its own host African green monkeys. Our data further demonstrate that the entry of SIVAGM is impaired by human IFITM2 and that this inhibition is overcome by the cholesterol-binding compound amphotericin B that also overcomes IFITM inhibition of influenza A viruses. These results suggest that IFITM proteins exploit similar mechanisms to inhibit the entry of both pH-independent primate lentiviruses and the pH-dependent influenza A viruses. PMID:25463599

  18. Structural Basis for the 14-3-3 Protein-dependent Inhibition of the Regulator of G Protein Signaling 3 (RGS3) Function*

    PubMed Central

    Rezabkova, Lenka; Man, Petr; Novak, Petr; Herman, Petr; Vecer, Jaroslav; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins function as GTPase-activating proteins for the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. The function of certain RGS proteins is negatively regulated by 14-3-3 proteins, a family of highly conserved regulatory molecules expressed in all eukaryotes. In this study, we provide a structural mechanism for 14-3-3-dependent inhibition of RGS3-Gα interaction. We have used small angle x-ray scattering, hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics, and Förster resonance energy transfer measurements to determine the low-resolution solution structure of the 14-3-3ζ·RGS3 complex. The structure shows the RGS domain of RGS3 bound to the 14-3-3ζ dimer in an as-yet-unrecognized manner interacting with less conserved regions on the outer surface of the 14-3-3 dimer outside its central channel. Our results suggest that the 14-3-3 protein binding affects the structure of the Gα interaction portion of RGS3 as well as sterically blocks the interaction between the RGS domain and the Gα subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:22027839

  19. Hydrogen bonding motifs of protein side chains: descriptions of binding of arginine and amide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, L.; Glusker, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    The modes of hydrogen bonding of arginine, asparagine, and glutamine side chains and of urea have been examined in small-molecule crystal structures in the Cambridge Structural Database and in crystal structures of protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes. Analysis of the hydrogen bonding patterns of each by graph-set theory shows three patterns of rings (R) with one or two hydrogen bond acceptors and two donors and with eight, nine, or six atoms in the ring, designated R2(2)(8), R2(2)(9), and R1(2)(6). These three patterns are found for arginine-like groups and for urea, whereas only the first two patterns R2(2)(8) and R2(2)(9) are found for asparagine- and glutamine-like groups. In each case, the entire system is planar within 0.7 A or less. On the other hand, in macromolecular crystal structures, the hydrogen bonding patterns in protein-nucleic acid complexes between the nucleic acid base and the protein are all R2(2)(9), whereas hydrogen bonding between Watson-Crick-like pairs of nucleic acid bases is R2(2)(8). These two hydrogen bonding arrangements [R2(2)(9)] and R2(2)(8)] are predetermined by the nature of the groups available for hydrogen bonding. The third motif identified, R1(2)(6), involves hydrogen bonds that are less linear than in the other two motifs and is found in proteins. PMID:7773178

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Formaldehyde-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in PC12 Cells by Upregulation of SIRT-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Chen, Li-Xun; Wang, Li; Xie, Ming; Wang, Chun-Yan; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known environmental pollutant, has been classified as a neurotoxic molecule. Our recent data demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gaseous transmitter, has a protective effect on the neurotoxicity of FA. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this protection remain largely unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in the neurotoxicity of FA. Silent mating type information regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT-1), a histone deacetylases, has various biological activities, including the extension of lifespan, the modulation of ER stress, and the neuroprotective action. Objective We hypothesize that the protection of H2S against FA-induced neurotoxicity involves in inhibiting ER stress by upregulation of SIRT-1. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of H2S on FA-induced ER stress in PC12 cells and the contribution of SIRT-1 to the protection of H2S against FA-induced injuries, including ER stress, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Principal Findings We found that exogenous application of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) significantly attenuated FA-induced ER stress responses, including the upregulated levels of glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein, and cleaved caspase-12 expression. We showed that NaHS upregulates the expression of SIRT-1 in PC12 cells. Moreover, the protective effects of H2S on FA-elicited ER stress, cytotoxicity and apoptosis were reversed by Sirtinol, a specific inhibitor of SIRT-1. Conclusion/Significance These data indicate that H2S exerts its protection against the neurotoxicity of FA through overcoming ER stress via upregulation of SIRT-1. Our findings provide novel insights into the protective mechanisms of H2S against FA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:24587076

  1. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis by Y Box-Binding Protein 1 Blocks Oncogenic Cell Transformation†

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andreas G.; Vogt, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    The multifunctional Y box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) is transcriptionally repressed by the oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (with P3K as an oncogenic homolog of the catalytic subunit) and, when reexpressed with the retroviral vector RCAS, interferes with P3K- and Akt-induced transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Retrovirally expressed YB-1 binds to the cap of mRNAs and inhibits cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. To determine the requirements for the inhibitory role of YB-1 in P3K-induced transformation, we conducted a mutational analysis, measuring YB-1-induced interference with transformation, subcellular localization, cap binding, mRNA binding, homodimerization, and inhibition of translation. The results show that (i) interference with transformation requires RNA binding and a C-terminal domain that is distinct from the cytoplasmic retention domain, (ii) interference with transformation is tightly correlated with inhibition of translation, and (iii) masking of mRNAs by YB-1 is not sufficient to block transformation or to inhibit translation. We identified a noncanonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal half of YB-1. A mutant lacking the NLS retains its ability to interfere with transformation, indicating that a nuclear function is not required. These results suggest that YB-1 interferes with P3K-induced transformation by a specific inhibition of translation through its RNA-binding domain and a region in the C-terminal domain. Potential functions of the C-terminal region are discussed. PMID:15743808

  2. The Therapeutic Potential of Cystathionine β-Synthetase/Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibition in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hellmich, Mark R.; Coletta, Ciro; Chao, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cancer represents a major socioeconomic problem; there is a significant need for novel therapeutic approaches targeting tumor-specific pathways. Recent Advances: In colorectal and ovarian cancers, an increase in the intratumor production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) plays an important role in promoting the cellular bioenergetics, proliferation, and migration of cancer cells. It also stimulates peritumor angiogenesis inhibition or genetic silencing of CBS exerts antitumor effects both in vitro and in vivo, and potentiates the antitumor efficacy of anticancer therapeutics. Critical Issues: Recently published studies are reviewed, implicating CBS overexpression and H2S overproduction in tumor cells as a tumor-growth promoting “bioenergetic fuel” and “survival factor,” followed by an overview of the experimental evidence demonstrating the anticancer effect of CBS inhibition. Next, the current state of the art of pharmacological CBS inhibitors is reviewed, with special reference to the complex pharmacological actions of aminooxyacetic acid. Finally, new experimental evidence is presented to reconcile a controversy in the literature regarding the effects of H2S donor on cancer cell proliferation and survival. Future Directions: From a basic science standpoint, future directions in the field include the delineation of the molecular mechanism of CBS up-regulation of cancer cells and the delineation of the interactions of H2S with other intracellular pathways of cancer cell metabolism and proliferation. From the translational science standpoint, future directions include the translation of the recently emerging roles of H2S in cancer into human diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 424–448. PMID:24730679

  3. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide restores normal breathing stability and improves autonomic control during experimental heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic imbalance and breathing instability are major contributors to the progression of heart failure (CHF). Potentiation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreflex has been shown to contribute to these effects. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently has been proposed to mediate CB hypoxic chemoreception. We hypothesized that H2S synthesis inhibition should decrease CB chemoreflex activation and improve breathing stability and autonomic function in CHF rats. Using the irreversible inhibitor of cystathione γ-lyase dl-propargylglycine (PAG), we tested the effects of H2S inhibition on resting breathing patterns, the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the hypoxic sensitivity of CB chemoreceptor afferents in rats with CHF. In addition, heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) were calculated as an index of autonomic function. CHF rats, compared with sham rats, exhibited increased breath interval variability and number of apneas, enhanced CB afferent discharge and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, decreased HRV, and increased low-frequency SBPV. Remarkably, PAG treatment reduced the apnea index by 90%, reduced breath interval variability by 40–60%, and reversed the enhanced hypoxic CB afferent and chemoreflex responses observed in CHF rats. Furthermore, PAG treatment partially reversed the alterations in HRV and SBPV in CHF rats. Our results show that PAG treatment restores breathing stability and cardiac autonomic function and reduces the enhanced ventilatory and CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia in CHF rats. These results support the idea that PAG treatment could potentially represent a novel pathway to control sympathetic outflow and breathing instability in CHF. PMID:23449938

  4. Hydrogen peroxide activates activator protein-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinases in pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Satoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Noriaki; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2006-10-01

    Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, where oxidative stress is thought to play a key role. Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) may act as a second messenger to mediate the actions of growth factors and cytokines. But the role of reactive oxygen species in the activation and regulation of cell functions in PSCs remains largely unknown. We here examined the effects of H(2)O(2) on the activation of signal transduction pathways and cell functions in PSCs. PSCs were isolated from the pancreas of male Wistar rats, and used in their culture-activated, myofibroblast-like phenotype unless otherwise stated. Activation of transcription factors was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase assay. Activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases was assessed by Western blotting using anti-phosphospecific antibodies. The effects of H(2)O(2) on proliferation, alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production were evaluated. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs in culture was also assessed. H(2)O(2) at non-cytotoxic concentrations (up to 100 microM) induced oxidative stress in PSCs. H(2)O(2) activated activator protein-1, but not nuclear factor kappaB. In addition, H(2)O(2) activated three classes of MAP kinases: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAP kinase. H(2)O(2) induced alpha(1)(I)procollagen gene expression but did not induce proliferation or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. H(2)O(2) did not initiate the transformation of freshly isolated PSCs to myofibroblast-like phenotype. Specific activation of these signal transduction pathways and collagen gene expression by H(2)O(2) may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis.

  5. Polarized cell motility induces hydrogen peroxide to inhibit cofilin via cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jenifer M; Gabrielsen, Mads; Chim, Ya Hua; Munro, June; McGhee, Ewan J; Sumpton, David; Eaton, Philip; Anderson, Kurt I; Yin, Huabing; Olson, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal cell motility is driven by polarized actin polymerization [1]. Signals at the leading edge recruit actin polymerization machinery to promote membrane protrusion, while matrix adhesion generates tractive force to propel forward movement. To work effectively, cell motility is regulated by a complex network of signaling events that affect protein activity and localization. H2O2 has an important role as a diffusible second messenger [2], and mediates its effects through oxidation of cysteine thiols. One cell activity influenced by H2O2 is motility [3]. However, a lack of sensitive and H2O2-specific probes for measurements in live cells has not allowed for direct observation of H2O2 accumulation in migrating cells or protrusions. In addition, the identities of proteins oxidized by H2O2 that contribute to actin dynamics and cell motility have not been characterized. We now show, as determined by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, that motile cells generate H2O2 at membranes and cell protrusions and that H2O2 inhibits cofilin activity through oxidation of cysteines 139 (C139) and 147 (C147). Molecular modeling suggests that C139 oxidation would sterically hinder actin association, while the increased negative charge of oxidized C147 would lead to electrostatic repulsion of the opposite negatively charged surface. Expression of oxidation-resistant cofilin impairs cell spreading, adhesion, and directional migration. These findings indicate that H2O2 production contributes to polarized cell motility through localized cofilin inhibition and that there are additional proteins oxidized during cell migration that might have similar roles.

  6. HAAD: A quick algorithm for accurate prediction of hydrogen atoms in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunqi; Roy, Ambrish; Zhang, Yang

    2009-08-20

    Hydrogen constitutes nearly half of all atoms in proteins and their positions are essential for analyzing hydrogen-bonding interactions and refining atomic-level structures. However, most protein structures determined by experiments or computer prediction lack hydrogen coordinates. We present a new algorithm, HAAD, to predict the positions of hydrogen atoms based on the positions of heavy atoms. The algorithm is built on the basic rules of orbital hybridization followed by the optimization of steric repulsion and electrostatic interactions. We tested the algorithm using three independent data sets: ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures, structures determined by neutron diffraction, and NOE proton-proton distances. Compared with the widely used programs CHARMM and REDUCE, HAAD has a significantly higher accuracy, with the average RMSD of the predicted hydrogen atoms to the X-ray and neutron diffraction structures decreased by 26% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, hydrogen atoms placed by HAAD have more matches with the NOE restraints and fewer clashes with heavy atoms. The average CPU cost by HAAD is 18 and 8 times lower than that of CHARMM and REDUCE, respectively. The significant advantage of HAAD in both the accuracy and the speed of the hydrogen additions should make HAAD a useful tool for the detailed study of protein structure and function. Both an executable and the source code of HAAD are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/HAAD.

  7. Inhibition of α-helix-mediated protein-protein interactions using designed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzarito, Valeria; Long, Kérya; Murphy, Natasha S.; Wilson, Andrew J.

    2013-03-01

    Inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represents a significant challenge because it is unclear how they can be effectively and selectively targeted using small molecules. Achieving this goal is critical given the defining role of these interactions in biological processes. A rational approach to inhibitor design based on the secondary structure at the interface is the focus of much research, and different classes of designed ligands have emerged, some of which effectively and selectively disrupt targeted PPIs. This Review discusses the relevance of PPIs and, in particular, the importance of α-helix-mediated PPIs to chemical biology and drug discovery with a focus on designing inhibitors, including constrained peptides, foldamers and proteomimetic-derived ligands. In doing so, key challenges and major advances in developing generic approaches for the elaboration of PPI inhibitors are highlighted. The challenges faced in developing such ligands as drug leads -- and how criteria applied to these may differ from conventional small-molecule drugs -- are summarized.

  8. Differences in folate-protein interactions result in differing inhibition of native rat liver and recombinant glycine N-methyltransferase by 5-methyltetrahydrofolate

    SciTech Connect

    Luka, Zigmund; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Newcomer, Marcia E; Wagner, Conrad

    2012-06-27

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a key regulatory enzyme in methyl group metabolism. In mammalian liver it reduces S-adenosylmethionine levels by using it to methylate glycine, producing N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and S-adenosylhomocysteine. GNMT is inhibited by binding two molecules of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (mono- or polyglutamate forms) per tetramer of the active enzyme. Inhibition is sensitive to the status of the N-terminal valine of GNMT and to polyglutamation of the folate inhibitor. It is inhibited by pentaglutamate form more efficiently compared to monoglutamate form. The native rat liver GNMT contains an acetylated N-terminal valine and is inhibited much more efficiently compared to the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli where the N-terminus is not acetylated. In this work we used a protein crystallography approach to evaluate the structural basis for these differences. We show that in the folate-GNMT complexes with the native enzyme, two folate molecules establish three and four hydrogen bonds with the protein. In the folate-recombinant GNMT complex only one hydrogen bond is established. This difference results in more effective inhibition by folate of the native liver GNMT activity compared to the recombinant enzyme.

  9. Differences in folate-protein interactions result in differing inhibition of native rat liver and recombinant glycine N-methyltransferase by 5-methyltetrahydrofolate

    PubMed Central

    Luka, Zigmund; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V.; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Wagner, Conrad

    2011-01-01

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a key regulatory enzyme in methyl group metabolism. In mammalian liver it reduces S-adenosylmethionine levels by using it to methylate glycine, producing N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and S-adenosylhomocysteine. GNMT is inhibited by binding two molecules of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (mono- or polyglutamate forms) per tetramer of the active enzyme. Inhibition is sensitive to the status of the N-terminal valine of GNMT and to polyglutamation of the folate inhibitor. It is inhibited by pentaglutamate form more efficiently compared to monoglutamate form. The native rat liver GNMT contains an acetylated N-terminal valine and is inhibited much more efficiently compared to the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli where the N-terminus is not acetylated. In this work we used a protein crystallography approach to evaluate the structural basis for these differences. We show that in the folate-GNMT complexes with the native enzyme, two folate molecules establish three and four hydrogen bonds with the protein. In the folate-recombinant GNMT complex only one hydrogen bond is established. This difference results in more effective inhibition by folate of the native liver GNMT activity compared to the recombinant enzyme. PMID:22037183

  10. Aluminum inhibits root growth and induces hydrogen peroxide accumulation in Plantago algarbiensis and P. almogravensis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Martins, Neusa; Gonçalves, Sandra; Romano, Anabela

    2013-12-01

    We have evaluated the impact of aluminum (Al) on germination, relative root growth, Al accumulation in roots tips, H2O2 levels, plasma membrane integrity, pigment levels, protein content, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in seedlings of the endangered Portuguese species Plantago algarbiensis and Plantago almogravensis. We found that up to 400 μM Al had no impact on the germination percentage in either species but inhibited root growth in a concentration-dependent manner (more severely in P. algarbiensis). Al accumulation in the root tips of both species was concentration dependent up to 200 μM but declined thereafter despite the absence of membrane damage. We observed a concentration-dependent induction of SOD activity but no change in CAT activity resulting in the accumulation of H2O2 (a known growth inhibitor), although its impact in P. almogravensis may be partially ameliorated by the accumulation of carotenoid pigments. Our data suggest an association between Al uptake, H2O2 production, and the inhibition of root growth during early seedling development in P. algarbiensis and P. almogravensis, although the latter is more tolerant towards higher concentrations of the metal. PMID:23702818

  11. Assessment of redox changes to hydrogen peroxide-sensitive proteins during EGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, Sarah L; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in growth factor signaling where it can oxidize and modify the function of redox-sensitive proteins. While selective thiol oxidation has been measured, there has been no global assessment of protein oxidation following growth factor activation. Significant changes to the abundant and widely distributed redox sensitive thiol proteins were observed in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide, but no changes were observed following treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF). This included members of the peroxiredoxin family, which were also monitored in the presence of the thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin to limit their capacity to recycle to the reduced form. We conclude that widespread thiol oxidation does not occur in cells during EGF signaling, and that hydrogen peroxide must act in a highly localized or selective manner.

  12. The effect of hydrogen ion on the steady-state multiplicity of substrate-inhibited enzymatic reactions. II. Transient behavior.

    PubMed

    Elnashaie, S S; Elrifaie, M A; Ibrahim, G; Badra, G

    1983-12-01

    In this paper we concentrate our attention on the stability and transient behavior of the isothermal system (CSTR) with a substrate-inhibited enzyme reaction producing hydrogen ions. Our investigation covers the region of multiple steady states uncovered previously (1) (ordinary hysteresis and isola). We investigate the local stability characteristics of the different steady states, the effect of the initial condition on the transient behavior and the response of the system to feed disturbances of various magnitudes and durations.

  13. Hydrogen bonds of sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Guo, Jing; Yu, Yue; An, Qingda; Wang, Liyan; Li, Shenglin; Huang, Xuelin; Mu, Siyang; Qi, Shanwei

    2016-05-20

    Sodium alginate/Antarctic krill protein composite material (SA/AKP) was successfully obtained by blending method. The hydrogen bonds of SA/AKP composite material were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen spectrum (HNMR). Experiment manifested the existence of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds in SA/AKP system; strength of intermolecular hydrogen bond enhanced with the increase of AKP in the composite material and the interaction strength of hydrogen bonding followed the order: OH…Ether O>OH…π>OH…N. The percentage of intermolecular hydrogen bond decreased with increase of pH. At the same time, the effect of hydrogen bonds on properties of the composite material was discussed. The increase of intermolecular hydrogen bonding led to the decrease of crystallinity, increase of apparent viscosity and surface tension, as well as obvious decrease of heat resistance of SA/AKP composite material. SA/AKP fiber SEM images and energy spectrum showed that crystallized salt was separated from the fiber, which possibly led to the fibrillation of the composite fibers.

  14. Arginine Inhibits Adsorption of Proteins on Polystyrene Surface

    PubMed Central

    Shikiya, Yui; Tomita, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles) as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg), lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins. PMID:23967100

  15. Bivalent inhibitors for disrupting protein surface-substrate interactions and for dual inhibition of protein prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shinnosuke; Kato, Nobuo; Harada, Kazuo; Ohkanda, Junko

    2011-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight compounds that disrupt protein−protein interactions (PPIs) have tremendous potential applications as clinical agents and as chemical probes for investigating intracellular PPI networks. However, disrupting PPIs is extremely difficult due to the large, flat interfaces of many proteins, which often lack structurally defined cavities to which drug-like molecules could bind in a thermodynamically favorable manner. Here, we describe a series of bivalent compounds that anchor to the enzyme active site to deliver a minimally sized surface-binding module to the targeted surface involved in transient PPI with a substrate. These compounds are capable of significantly inhibiting enzymatic reactions involving protein surface−substrate interaction in the single-digit nanomole range. Inhibitors of farnesyltransferase (FTase), which possesses a negatively charged local area on its α-subunit, were designed by attaching a module derived from a branched monoamine-containing gallate to a conventional active-site-directed CVIM tetrapeptide using an alkyl spacer. A significant improvement in inhibitory activity (>200-fold) against farnesylation of the K-Ras4B peptide was observed when the gallate module was attached to the CVIM tetrapeptide. Furthermore, the bivalent compounds had submicromolar inhibitory activity against geranylgeranylation of the K-Ras4B peptide catalyzed by GGTase I, which has an α-subunit identical to that of FTase. The anchoring strategy we describe would be useful for designing a new class of PPI inhibitors as well as dual enzyme inhibitors targeting common surface structures.

  16. A Link between Protein Structure and Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnson, Brian J.; Colby, Thomas D.; Chin, Jodie K.; Goldstein, Barry M.; Klinman, Judith P.

    1997-11-01

    We present evidence that the size of an active site side chain may modulate the degree of hydrogen tunneling in an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Primary and secondary kH/kT and kD/kT kinetic isotope effects have been measured for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol catalyzed by horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 25 degrees C. As reported in earlier studies, the relationship between secondary kH/kT and kD/kT isotope effects provides a sensitive probe for deviations from classical behavior. In the present work, catalytic efficiency and the extent of hydrogen tunneling have been correlated for the alcohol dehydrogenase-catalyzed hydride transfer among a group of site-directed mutants at position 203. Val-203 interacts with the opposite face of the cofactor NAD+ from the alcohol substrate. The reduction in size of this residue is correlated with diminished tunneling and a two orders of magnitude decrease in catalytic efficiency. Comparison of the x-ray crystal structures of a ternary complex of a high-tunneling (Phe-93 --> Trp) and a low-tunneling (Val-203 --> Ala) mutant provides a structural basis for the observed effects, demonstrating an increase in the hydrogen transfer distance for the low-tunneling mutant. The Val-203 --> Ala ternary complex crystal structure also shows a hyperclosed interdomain geometry relative to the wild-type and the Phe-93 --> Trp mutant ternary complex structures. This demonstrates a flexibility in interdomain movement that could potentially narrow the distance between the donor and acceptor carbons in the native enzyme and may enhance the role of tunneling in the hydride transfer reaction.

  17. Modifications of boronic ester pro-chelators triggered by hydrogen peroxide tune reactivity to inhibit metal-promoted oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Kwon, Ashley M; Vangeloff, Abbey D; Franz, Katherine J

    2007-11-21

    Several new analogs of salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH) and salicylaldehyde benzoyl hydrazone (SBH) that contain an aryl boronic ester (BSIH, BSBH) or acid (BASIH) in place of an aryl hydroxide have been synthesized and characterized as masked metal ion chelators. These pro-chelators show negligible interaction with iron(III), although the boronic acid versions exhibit some interaction with copper(II), zinc(II) and nickel(II). Hydrogen peroxide oxidizes the aryl boronate to phenol, thus converting the pro-chelators to tridentate ligands with high affinity metal binding properties. An X-ray crystal structure of a bis-ligated iron(III) complex, [Fe(SBH(m-OMe)(3))(2)]NO(3), confirms the meridonal binding mode of these ligands. Modifications of the aroyl ring of the chelators tune their iron affinity, whereas modifications on the boron-containing ring of the pro-chelators attenuate their reaction rates with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the methoxy derivative pro-chelator (p-OMe)BASIH reacts with hydrogen peroxide nearly 5 times faster than the chloro derivative (m-Cl)BASIH. Both the rate of pro-chelator to chelator conversion as well as the metal binding affinity of the chelator influence the overall ability of these molecules to inhibit hydroxyl radical formation catalyzed by iron or copper in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid. This pro-chelator strategy has the potential to improve the efficacy of medicinal chelators for inhibiting metal-promoted oxidative stress. PMID:17992288

  18. Hydrogen exchange of disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    A truly disordered protein lacks a stable fold and its backbone amide protons exchange with solvent at rates predicted from studies of unstructured peptides. We have measured the exchange rates of two model disordered proteins, FlgM and α-synuclein, in buffer and in Escherichia coli using the NMR experiment, SOLEXSY. The rates are similar in buffer and cells and are close to the rates predicted from data on small, unstructured peptides. This result indicates that true disorder can persist inside the crowded cellular interior and that weak interactions between proteins and macromolecules in cells do not necessarily affect intrinsic rates of exchange.

  19. Selenium inhibits root elongation by repressing the generation of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Mo, Hai-Zhen; Zheng, Mei-Yu; Xian, Ming; Qi, Zhong-Qiang; Li, You-Qin; Hu, Liang-Bin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been becoming an emerging pollutant causing severe phytotoxicity, which the biochemical mechanism is rarely known. Although hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been suggested as an important exogenous regulator modulating plant physiological adaptions in response to heavy metal stress, whether and how the endogenous H2S regulates Se-induce phytotoxicity remains unclear. In this work, a self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in situ in the roots of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced root growth stunt was closely correlated with the inhibition of endogenous H2S generation in root tips. Se(IV) stress dampened the expression of most LCD and DCD homologues in the roots of B. rapa. By using various specific fluorescent probes for bio-imaging root tips in situ, we found that the increase in endogenous H2S by the application of H2S donor NaHS could significantly alleviate Se(IV)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation, oxidative impairment, and cell death in root tips, which further resulted in the recovery of root growth under Se(IV) stress. However, dampening the endogenous H2S could block the alleviated effect of NaHS on Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity. Finally, the increase in endogenous H2S resulted in the enhancement of glutathione (GSH) in Se(IV)-treated roots, which may share the similar molecular mechanism for the dominant role of H2S in removing ROS by activating GSH biosynthesis in mammals. Altogether, these data provide the first direct evidences confirming the pivotal role of endogenous H2S in modulating Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity in roots.

  20. Selenium Inhibits Root Elongation by Repressing the Generation of Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mei-Yu; Xian, Ming; Qi, Zhong-Qiang; Li, You-Qin; Hu, Liang-Bin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been becoming an emerging pollutant causing severe phytotoxicity, which the biochemical mechanism is rarely known. Although hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been suggested as an important exogenous regulator modulating plant physiological adaptions in response to heavy metal stress, whether and how the endogenous H2S regulates Se-induce phytotoxicity remains unclear. In this work, a self-developed specific fluorescent probe (WSP-1) was applied to track endogenous H2S in situ in the roots of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced root growth stunt was closely correlated with the inhibition of endogenous H2S generation in root tips. Se(IV) stress dampened the expression of most LCD and DCD homologues in the roots of B. rapa. By using various specific fluorescent probes for bio-imaging root tips in situ, we found that the increase in endogenous H2S by the application of H2S donor NaHS could significantly alleviate Se(IV)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation, oxidative impairment, and cell death in root tips, which further resulted in the recovery of root growth under Se(IV) stress. However, dampening the endogenous H2S could block the alleviated effect of NaHS on Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity. Finally, the increase in endogenous H2S resulted in the enhancement of glutathione (GSH) in Se(IV)-treated roots, which may share the similar molecular mechanism for the dominant role of H2S in removing ROS by activating GSH biosynthesis in mammals. Altogether, these data provide the first direct evidences confirming the pivotal role of endogenous H2S in modulating Se(IV)-induced phytotoxicity in roots. PMID:25333279

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Transforming Growth Factor-β1-Induced EMT via Wnt/Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has anti-fibrotic potential in lung, kidney and other organs. The exogenous H2S is released from sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and can influence the renal fibrosis by blocking the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts. But whether H2S affects renal epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Our study is aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of H2S on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) and the associated mechanisms. The induced EMT is assessed by Western blotting analysis on the expressions of α-SMA, E-cadherin and fibronectin. HK-2 cells were treated with NaHS before incubating with TGF-β1 to investigate its effect on EMT and the related molecular mechanism. Results demonstrated that NaHS decreased the expression of α-SMA and fibronectin, and increased the expression of E-cadherin. NaHS reduced the expression of TGF-β receptor type I (TβR I) and TGF-β receptor type II (TβR II). In addition, NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced increase of β-catenin expression and ERK phosphorylation. Moreover, it inhibited the TGF-β1-induced nuclear translocation of ββ-catenin. These effects of NaHS on fibronectin, E-cadherin and TβR I were abolished by the ERK inhibitor U0126 or β-catenin inhibitor XAV939, or β-catenin siRNA interference. We get the conclusion that NaHS attenuated TGF-β1-induced EMT in HK-2 cells through both ERK-dependent and β-catenin-dependent pathways. PMID:26760502

  2. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  3. Mapping Protein-Ligand Interactions with Proteolytic Fragmentation, Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Elyssia S; Hudgens, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    Biological processes are the result of noncovalent, protein-ligand interactions, where the ligands range from small organic and inorganic molecules to lipids, nucleic acids, peptides, and proteins. Amide groups within proteins constantly exchange protons with water. When immersed in heavy water (D2O), mass spectrometry (MS) can measure the change of mass associated with the hydrogen to deuterium exchange (HDX). Protein-ligand interactions modify the hydrogen exchange rates of amide protons, and the measurement of the amide exchange rates can provide rich information regarding the dynamical structure of the protein-ligand complex. This chapter describes a protocol for conducting bottom-up, continuous uptake, proteolytic fragmentation HDX-MS experiments that can help identify and map the interacting peptides of a protein-ligand interface. This tutorial outlines the fundamental theory governing hydrogen exchange; provides practical information regarding the preparation of protein samples and solutions; and describes the exchange reaction, reaction quenching, enzymatic digestion, chromatographic separation, and peptide analysis by MS. Tables list representative combinations of fluidic components used by HDX-MS researchers and summarize the available HDX-MS analysis software packages. Additionally, two HDX-MS case studies are used to illustrate protein-ligand interactions involving: (1) a continuous sequence of interacting residues and (2) a set of discontinuously numbered residues, residing spatially near each other.

  4. Inhibition of protein import into mitochondria by amphiphilic cations: potential targets and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, P F; Glaser, E

    1998-11-01

    In this paper we describe for the first time the inhibitory effect of three amphiphilic cations, trifluoperazine, propranolol and dibucaine on mitochondrial protein import. The amphiphilic cations did not affect binding of mitochondrial precursor proteins to mitochondria. Import into mitoplasts was affected in a similar manner to intact mitochondria, indicating that the protein import machinery of the inner membrane of mitochondria was responsible for the observed effect. At concentrations which completely inhibited protein import, the amphiphilic cations did not affect the membrane potential (DeltaPsi) across the inner membrane. The inhibitory potency of amphiphilic cations reflects their lipid/water partition coefficient and relatively high concentrations of the drugs were required for complete inhibition, hence we propose that the mechanism of protein import inhibition by amphiphilic cations is due to membrane perturbing effects. We discuss the implications of our findings in view of the possible connection between various inner mitochondrial membrane channels and the protein import pore.

  5. Protein Disulfide Isomerase Interacts with Tau Protein and Inhibits Its Fibrillization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tau protein is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as tauopathies including Alzheimer disease, and Tau fibrillization is thought to be related to neuronal toxicity. Physiological inhibitors of Tau fibrillization hold promise for developing new strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease. Because protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is both an enzyme and a chaperone, and implicated in neuroprotection against Alzheimer disease, we want to know whether PDI can prevent Tau fibrillization. In this study, we have investigated the interaction between PDI and Tau protein and the effect of PDI on Tau fibrillization. Methodology/Principal Findings As evidenced by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, human PDI interacts and co-locates with some endogenous human Tau on the endoplasmic reticulum of undifferentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The results from isothermal titration calorimetry show that one full-length human PDI binds to one full-length human Tau (or human Tau fragment Tau244–372) monomer with moderate, micromolar affinity at physiological pH and near physiological ionic strength. As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays, Sarkosyl-insoluble SDS-PAGE, and transmission electron microscopy, full-length human PDI remarkably inhibits both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244–372 fibrillization in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we find that two molecules of the a-domain of human PDI interact with one Tau244–372 molecule with sub-micromolar affinity, and inhibit both steps of nucleation and elongation of Tau244–372 fibrillization more strongly than full-length human PDI. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate for the first time that human PDI binds to Tau protein mainly through its thioredoxin-like catalytic domain a, forming a 1∶1 complex and preventing Tau misfolding. Our findings suggest that PDI could act as a physiological inhibitor of Tau fibrillization, and

  6. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  7. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  8. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  9. Protein-based nanobiosensor for direct detection of hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, Meisam; Amoabediny, Ghasem; Yazdian, Fatemeh; Habibi-Rezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    The chemically modified cytochrome c from equine heart, EC (232-700-9), was immobilized onto gold nanoparticles in order to develop a specific biosensing system for monitoring hydrogen sulfide down to the micromolar level, by means of a localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. The sensing mechanism is based on the cytochrome-c conformational changes in the presence of H2S which alter the dielectric properties of the gold nanoparticles and the surface plasmon resonance peak undergoes a redshift. According to the experiments, it is revealed that H2S can be detected at a concentration of 4.0 μ \\text{M} (1.3 \\text{ppb}) by the fabricated biosensor. This simple, quantitative and sensitive sensing platform provides a rapid and convenient detection for H2S at concentrations far below the hazardous limit.

  10. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  11. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  12. Understanding the role of hydrogen bonds in water dynamics and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Valentino; Iskrov, Svilen; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of cold and pressure denaturation of proteins are a matter of debate, but it is commonly accepted that water plays a fundamental role in the process. It has been proposed that the denaturation process is related to an increase of hydrogen bonds among hydration water molecules. Other theories suggest that the causes of denaturation are the density fluctuations of surface water, or the destabilization of hydrophobic contacts as a consequence of water molecule inclusions inside the protein, especially at high pressures. We review some theories that have been proposed to give insight into this problem, and we describe a coarse-grained model of water that compares well with experiments for proteins' hydration water. We introduce its extension for a homopolymer in contact with the water monolayer and study it by Monte Carlo simulations in an attempt to understand how the interplay of water cooperativity and interfacial hydrogen bonds affects protein stability. PMID:23277668

  13. IFITM Proteins Inhibit Entry Driven by the MERS-Coronavirus Spike Protein: Evidence for Cholesterol-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Winkler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM) proteins 1, 2 and 3 inhibit the host cell entry of several enveloped viruses, potentially by promoting the accumulation of cholesterol in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 is essential for control of influenza virus infection in mice and humans. In contrast, the role of IFITM proteins in coronavirus infection is less well defined. Employing a retroviral vector system for analysis of coronavirus entry, we investigated the susceptibility of human-adapted and emerging coronaviruses to inhibition by IFITM proteins. We found that entry of the recently emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is sensitive to inhibition by IFITM proteins. In 293T cells, IFITM-mediated inhibition of cellular entry of the emerging MERS- and SARS-CoV was less efficient than blockade of entry of the globally circulating human coronaviruses 229E and NL63. Similar differences were not observed in A549 cells, suggesting that cellular context and/or IFITM expression levels can impact inhibition efficiency. The differential IFITM-sensitivity of coronaviruses observed in 293T cells afforded the opportunity to investigate whether efficiency of entry inhibition by IFITMs and endosomal cholesterol accumulation correlate. No such correlation was observed. Furthermore, entry mediated by the influenza virus hemagglutinin was robustly inhibited by IFITM3 but was insensitive to accumulation of endosomal cholesterol, indicating that modulation of cholesterol synthesis/transport did not account for the antiviral activity of IFITM3. Collectively, these results show that the emerging MERS-CoV is a target of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins and demonstrate that mechanisms other than accumulation of endosomal cholesterol can contribute to viral entry inhibition by IFITMs. PMID:25256397

  14. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion.

  15. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion. PMID:24747813

  16. Statistical analysis of protein structures suggests that buried ionizable residues in proteins are hydrogen bonded or form salt bridges.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jeffrey; Makhatadze, George I

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that nonpolar residues are largely buried in the interior of proteins, whereas polar and ionizable residues tend to be more localized on the protein surface where they are solvent exposed. Such a distribution of residues between surface and interior is well understood from a thermodynamic point: nonpolar side chains are excluded from the contact with the solvent water, whereas polar and ionizable groups have favorable interactions with the water and thus are preferred at the protein surface. However, there is an increasing amount of information suggesting that polar and ionizable residues do occur in the protein core, including at positions that have no known functional importance. This is inconsistent with the observations that dehydration of polar and in particular ionizable groups is very energetically unfavorable. To resolve this, we performed a detailed analysis of the distribution of fractional burial of polar and ionizable residues using a large set of ˜2600 nonhomologous protein structures. We show that when ionizable residues are fully buried, the vast majority of them form hydrogen bonds and/or salt bridges with other polar/ionizable groups. This observation resolves an apparent contradiction: the energetic penalty of dehydration of polar/ionizable groups is paid off by favorable energy of hydrogen bonding and/or salt bridge formation in the protein interior. Our conclusion agrees well with the previous findings based on the continuum models for electrostatic interactions in proteins.

  17. Control of Carbon and Electron Flow in Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentations: Utilization of Carbon Monoxide to Inhibit Hydrogen Production and to Enhance Butanol Yields.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Bellows, P; Datta, R; Zeikus, J G

    1984-10-01

    Extracts prepared from non-solvent-producing cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum contained methyl viologen-linked hydrogenase activity (20 U/mg of protein at 37 degrees C) but did not display carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity. CO addition readily inhibited the hydrogenase activity of cell extracts or of viable metabolizing cells. Increasing the partial pressure of CO (2 to 10%) in unshaken anaerobic culture tube headspaces significantly inhibited (90% inhibition at 10% CO) both growth and hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum. Growth was not sensitive to low partial pressures of CO (i.e., up to 15%) in pH-controlled fermentors (pH 4.5) that were continuously gassed and mixed. CO addition dramatically altered the glucose fermentation balance of C. acetobutylicum by diverting carbon and electrons away from H(2), CO(2), acetate, and butyrate production and towards production of ethanol and butanol. The butanol concentration was increased from 65 to 106 mM and the butanol productivity (i.e., the ratio of butanol produced/total acids and solvents produced) was increased by 31% when glucose fermentations maintained at pH 4.5 were continuously gassed with 85% N(2)-15% CO versus N(2) alone. The results are discussed in terms of metabolic regulation of C. acetobutylicum saccharide fermentations to achieve maximal butanol or solvent yield.

  18. Control of Carbon and Electron Flow in Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentations: Utilization of Carbon Monoxide to Inhibit Hydrogen Production and to Enhance Butanol Yields

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hong; Bellows, Para; Datta, Rathin; Zeikus, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts prepared from non-solvent-producing cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum contained methyl viologen-linked hydrogenase activity (20 U/mg of protein at 37°C) but did not display carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity. CO addition readily inhibited the hydrogenase activity of cell extracts or of viable metabolizing cells. Increasing the partial pressure of CO (2 to 10%) in unshaken anaerobic culture tube headspaces significantly inhibited (90% inhibition at 10% CO) both growth and hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum. Growth was not sensitive to low partial pressures of CO (i.e., up to 15%) in pH-controlled fermentors (pH 4.5) that were continuously gassed and mixed. CO addition dramatically altered the glucose fermentation balance of C. acetobutylicum by diverting carbon and electrons away from H2, CO2, acetate, and butyrate production and towards production of ethanol and butanol. The butanol concentration was increased from 65 to 106 mM and the butanol productivity (i.e., the ratio of butanol produced/total acids and solvents produced) was increased by 31% when glucose fermentations maintained at pH 4.5 were continuously gassed with 85% N2-15% CO versus N2 alone. The results are discussed in terms of metabolic regulation of C. acetobutylicum saccharide fermentations to achieve maximal butanol or solvent yield. PMID:16346643

  19. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells involved in the modulation of calcium sensing receptor in high homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Wang, Xiyao; Liang, Xiaohui; Wu, Jichao; Dong, Shiyun; Li, Hongzhu; Jin, Meili; Sun, Dianjun; Zhang, Weihua; Zhong, Xin

    2016-09-10

    Hyperhomocysteinemia induces the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits the phenotype switch of VSMCs and calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulated the production of endogenous H2S. However, whether CaSR inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs by regulating the endogenous cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE, a major enzyme that produces H2S) pathway in high homocysteine (HHcy) has not been previously investigated. The intracellular calcium concentration, the concentration of H2S, the cell viability, the proliferation and the expression of proteins of cultured VSMCs from rat thoracic aortas were measured, respectively. The results showed that the [Ca(2+)]i and the expression of p-CaMK and CSE increased upon treatment with CaSR agonist. In HHcy, the H2S concentration decrease, the proliferation and migration rate increased, the expression of Cyclin D1, PCNA, Osteopontin and p-Erk1/2 increased while the α-SM actin, P21(Cip/WAK-1) and Calponin decreased. The CaSR agonist or exogenous H2S significantly reversed the changes of VSMCs caused by HHcy. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CaSR regulate the endogenous CSE/H2S is related to the PLC-IP3 receptor and CaM signal pathways which inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs, and the latter is involved in the Erk1/2 dependent signal pathway in high homocysteine. PMID:27502588

  20. Intracellular coagulation inhibits the extraction of proteins from Prochloron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fall, R.; Lewin, R. A.; Fall, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Protein extraction from the prokaryotic alga Prochloron LP (isolated from the ascidian host Lissoclinum patella) was complicated by an irreversible loss of cell fragility in the isolated algae. Accompanying this phenomenon, which is termed intracellular coagulation, was a redistribution of thylakoids around the cell periphery, a loss of photosynthetic O2 production, and a drastic decrease in the extractability of cell proteins. Procedures are described for the successful preparation and transport of cell extracts yielding the enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase as well as other soluble proteins.

  1. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process.

  2. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process. PMID:26254676

  3. Analysis of creatine kinase activity with evaluation of protein expression under the effect of heat and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Rakhmetov, A D; Pil, Lee Sang; Ostapchenko, L I; Zoon, Chae Ho

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation has detrimental effects on the brain functioning, which involves inhibition of the crucial enzyme, brain type creatine kinase (CKBB), responsible for the CK/phosphocreatine shuttle system. Here we demonstrate a susceptibility of CKBB to several ordinary stressors. In our study enzymatic activity of purified recombinant brain-type creatine kinase was evaluated. We assayed 30 nMconcentration of CKBB under normal and stress conditions. In the direction of phosphocreatine formation hydrogen peroxide and heat treatments altered CKBB activity down to 26 and 14%, respectively. Also, examination of immunoblotted membrane patterns by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and western blot analysis showed a decrease in expression levels of intrinsic CKBB enzyme in HeLa andA549 cells. Hence, our results clearly show that cytosolic CKBB is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and heat induced inactivation. Therefore, due to its susceptibility, this enzyme may be defined as a potential target in brain damage.

  4. Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Host Cell Entry of Ebolaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Karsten, Christina B; Gnirß, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Markus; Lu, Kai; Takada, Ayato; Winkler, Michael; Simmons, Graham; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly pathogenic in humans and nonhuman primates and pose a severe threat to public health. The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins can restrict entry of ebolaviruses, influenza A viruses, and other enveloped viruses. However, the breadth and mechanism of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Here, we employed ebolavirus glycoprotein-pseudotyped vectors and ebolavirus-like particles to address this question. We show that IFITM proteins inhibit the cellular entry of diverse ebolaviruses and demonstrate that type I interferon induces IFITM protein expression in macrophages, major viral targets. Moreover, we show that IFITM proteins block entry of influenza A viruses and ebolaviruses by different mechanisms and provide evidence that antibodies and IFITM proteins can synergistically inhibit cellular entry of ebolaviruses. These results provide insights into the role of IFITM proteins in infection by ebolaviruses and suggest a mechanism by which antibodies, though poorly neutralizing in vitro, might contribute to viral control in vivo.

  5. Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Host Cell Entry of Ebolaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Karsten, Christina B; Gnirß, Kerstin; Hoffmann, Markus; Lu, Kai; Takada, Ayato; Winkler, Michael; Simmons, Graham; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly pathogenic in humans and nonhuman primates and pose a severe threat to public health. The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins can restrict entry of ebolaviruses, influenza A viruses, and other enveloped viruses. However, the breadth and mechanism of the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Here, we employed ebolavirus glycoprotein-pseudotyped vectors and ebolavirus-like particles to address this question. We show that IFITM proteins inhibit the cellular entry of diverse ebolaviruses and demonstrate that type I interferon induces IFITM protein expression in macrophages, major viral targets. Moreover, we show that IFITM proteins block entry of influenza A viruses and ebolaviruses by different mechanisms and provide evidence that antibodies and IFITM proteins can synergistically inhibit cellular entry of ebolaviruses. These results provide insights into the role of IFITM proteins in infection by ebolaviruses and suggest a mechanism by which antibodies, though poorly neutralizing in vitro, might contribute to viral control in vivo. PMID:26034199

  6. Pyridalyl inhibits cellular protein synthesis in insect, but not mammalian, cell lines.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Koko; Hirakura, Setsuko; Kobayashi, Jun; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Saito, Shigeru; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2008-09-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism of action and selectivity of the insecticidal activity of pyridalyl, the cytotoxicity of pyridalyl against various insect and mammalian cell lines was characterized by measuring the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis. When the effect of pyridalyl on the cellular protein synthesis in Sf9 cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of [(3)H]leucine, rapid and significant inhibition of protein synthesis was observed. However, pyridalyl did not inhibit protein synthesis in a cell-free protein synthesis system, indicating that pyridalyl does not directly inhibit protein synthesis. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed against any of the mammalian cell lines tested. In the case of insect cell lines, remarkable differences in the cytotoxicity of pyridalyl were observed: the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 mM) was found against Sf9 cells derived from Spodoptera frugiperda, whereas no obvious cytotoxicity was observed against BmN4 cells derived from Bombyx mori. Measurements of the insecticidal activity of pyridalyl against Spodoptera litura and B. mori revealed a correlation between the cytotoxicity against cultured cell lines and the insecticidal activity. From these observations, it was concluded that the selective inhibition of cellular protein synthesis by pyridalyl might contribute significantly to the insecticidal activity and the selectivity of this compound. PMID:18454491

  7. Inhibited flammability and surface inactivation of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Mateum, Philip Edward R.; Orille, Ross William M.; Ramos, Rafael Julius U.; Monasterial, Jonathan Lee C.; Ramos, Henry J.; Bo-ot, Luis Ma. T.

    2007-06-01

    Changes on the properties of wood irradiated by low energy hydrogen ion showers (LEHIS) were examined. The experimental facility employed was an in-house constructed, compact gas discharge ion source with beam energies maintained approximately in the 1 keV range fixed at 1 mA discharge current, 3 mTorr gas filling pressure. Wood specimens used were of species endemic in the Philippines namely Shorea sp., Shorea polysperma and Cocos nucifera. Results showed the processed samples manifested characteristics of inhibited flammability, and became relatively hydrophobic after the treatment. In the fire resistance test, it was also observed during initial flaming that the processed surfaces accumulated less soot attesting to a much lower smoldering rate, i.e. lesser combustibility. To assess the increase in fire endurance time for the processed wood against the control substrates, a non-directional, two-tailed t-test was utilized. Significant at the 0.05 level, the t-statistic measured 9.164 as opposed to only 4.303 in its corresponding critical value at two degrees of freedom. Hence, the treatment appeared to show strong statistical evidence of being effective in enhancing fire resistance. The processed specimens also exhibited moisture absorptive inhibition time of more than 10 min versus an average absorption period of just 8 s for the unprocessed samples. Spectroscopy using a cast steel mass analyzer indicated a predominance of H+ with faint signals of H2+in the ion showers. It is hypothesized that the monatomic ion plays an essential participatory role in the surface modification process. Data from an earlier work using Narra wood (Pterocarpus indicus) [G.Q. Blantocas, H.J. Ramos, M. Wada, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 45 (2006) 8498] was extended in the current study to substantiate this hypothesis. The data is now presented as current density ratio H+ /H2+versus the change rate constant K of the wetting model equation. It is shown that wood affinity to water decreased as the

  8. Frequent side chain methyl carbon-oxygen hydrogen bonding in proteins revealed by computational and stereochemical analysis of neutron structures.

    PubMed

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Horowitz, Scott; Brooks, Charles L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2015-03-01

    The propensity of backbone Cα atoms to engage in carbon-oxygen (CH · · · O) hydrogen bonding is well-appreciated in protein structure, but side chain CH · · · O hydrogen bonding remains largely uncharacterized. The extent to which side chain methyl groups in proteins participate in CH · · · O hydrogen bonding is examined through a survey of neutron crystal structures, quantum chemistry calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations. Using these approaches, methyl groups were observed to form stabilizing CH · · · O hydrogen bonds within protein structure that are maintained through protein dynamics and participate in correlated motion. Collectively, these findings illustrate that side chain methyl CH · · · O hydrogen bonding contributes to the energetics of protein structure and folding.

  9. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  10. G protein γ subunit 7 induces autophagy and inhibits cell division

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juanjuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Li, Zhiyuan; Yang, Xingxing; Wang, Wenchao; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    GNG7 (G protein γ subunit 7), a subunit of heterotrimeric G protein, is ubiquitously expressed in multiple tissues but is down-regulated in various cancers. Its expression could reduce tumor volume in mice but the mechanism was not clear. Here we show that GNG7 overexpression inhibits cell proliferation and increases cell death. GNG7 level is cell cycle-dependent and it regulates actin cytoskeleton and cell division. In addition, GNG7 is an autophagy inducer, which is the first reported Gγ protein involved in autophagy. GNG7 knockdown reduces Rapamycin and starvation-induced autophagy. Further analysis reveals that GNG7 inhibits MTOR in cells, a central regulator for autophagy and cell proliferation. In conclusion, GNG7 inhibits MTOR pathway to induce autophagy and cell death, inhibits cell division by regulating actin cytoskeleton. These combined effects lead to the antitumor capacity of GNG7. PMID:27056891

  11. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  12. Apoptosis induced by the nuclear death domain protein p84N5 is inhibited by association with Rb protein.

    PubMed

    Doostzadeh-Cizeron, J; Evans, R; Yin, S; Goodrich, D W

    1999-10-01

    Rb protein inhibits both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Interaction of specific cellular proteins, including E2F1, with Rb C-terminal domains mediates cell cycle regulation. In contrast, the nuclear N5 protein associates with an Rb N-terminal domain with unknown function. The N5 protein contains a region of sequence similarity to the death domain of proteins involved in apoptotic signaling. We demonstrate here that forced N5 expression potently induces apoptosis in several tumor cell lines. Mutation of conserved residues within the death domain homology compromise N5-induced apoptosis, suggesting that it is required for normal function. Endogenous N5 protein is specifically altered in apoptotic cells treated with ionizing radiation. Furthermore, dominant interfering death domain mutants compromise cellular responses to ionizing radiation. Finally, physical association with Rb protein inhibits N5-induced apoptosis. We propose that N5 protein plays a role in the regulation of apoptosis and that Rb directly coordinates cell proliferation and apoptosis by binding specific proteins involved in each process through distinct protein binding domains. PMID:10512864

  13. Bacterial Protein Synthesis as a Target for Antibiotic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis occurs on macromolecular machines, called ribosomes. Bacterial ribosomes and the translational machinery represent one of the major targets for antibiotics in the cell. Therefore, structural and biochemical investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics provide not only insight into the mechanism of action and resistance of antibiotics, but also insight into the fundamental process of protein synthesis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of protein synthesis, particularly with respect to X-ray and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosome complexes, and highlights the different steps of translation that are targeted by the diverse array of known antibiotics. Such findings will be important for the ongoing development of novel and improved antimicrobial agents to combat the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27481773

  14. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  15. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  16. "Chameleonic" backbone hydrogen bonds in protein binding and as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, C A; Accordino, S R; Gerbino, D C; Appignanesi, G A

    2015-10-01

    We carry out a time-averaged contact matrix study to reveal the existence of protein backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs) whose net persistence in time differs markedly form their corresponding PDB-reported state. We term such interactions as "chameleonic" BHBs, CBHBs, precisely to account for their tendency to change the structural prescription of the PDB for the opposite bonding propensity in solution. We also find a significant enrichment of protein binding sites in CBHBs, relate them to local water exposure and analyze their behavior as ligand/drug targets. Thus, the dynamic analysis of hydrogen bond propensity might lay the foundations for new tools of interest in protein binding-site prediction and in lead optimization for drug design. PMID:26486885

  17. Cadmium inhibits the protein degradation of Sml1 by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Sml1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, In-Joon; Kang, Hyun-Jun; Chang, Miwha; Choi, Il-Dong; Kang, Chang-Min; Yun, Cheol-Won

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd inhibits Sml1-p formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd affects cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cd inhibits Sml1 ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal, and the mechanism of cadmium toxicity in living organisms has been well studied. Here, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to examine the detailed molecular mechanism of cell growth defects caused by cadmium. Using a plate assay of a yeast deletion mutant collection, we found that deletion of SML1, which encodes an inhibitor of Rnr1, resulted in cadmium resistance. Sml1 protein levels increased when cells were treated with cadmium, even though the mRNA levels of SML1 remained unchanged. Using northern and western blot analyses, we found that cadmium inhibited Sml1 degradation by inhibiting Sml1 phosphorylation. Sml1 protein levels increased when cells were treated with cadmium due to disruption of the dependent protein degradation pathway. Furthermore, cadmium promoted cell cycle progression into the G2 phase. The same result was obtained using cells in which SML1 was overexpressed. Deletion of SML1 delayed cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with Sml1 accumulation and with growth defects caused by cadmium stress. Interestingly, although cadmium treatment led to increase Sml1 levels, intracellular dNTP levels also increased because of Rnr3 upregulation due to cadmium stress. Taken together, these results suggest that cadmium specifically affects the phosphorylation of Sml1 and that Sml1 accumulates in cells.

  18. Inhibition of Nonenzymatic Protein Glycation by Pomegranate and Other Fruit Juices

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ∼90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation. PMID:24433074

  19. Inhibition of nonenzymatic protein glycation by pomegranate and other fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ~90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation.

  20. Inhibition of thermal induced protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Rauf, Abdul; Ben Hadda, Taibi

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the in vitro inhibition of protein denaturation of extract/fractions of Withania somnifera and isolated withanolides including 20β hydroxy-1-oxo(22R)-witha-2,5,24 trienolide (1), (20R,22R-14α,20α)-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,5,16,24 tetraenolide (2). The results showed that the extract/fractions of the plant evoked profound inhibitory effect on thermal-induced protein denaturation. The chloroform fraction caused the most dominant attenuation of 68% at 500 μg/mL. The bioactivity-guided isolation from chloroform fraction led to the isolation of compounds 1 and 2 that showed profound protein inhibition with 78.05% and 80.43% effect at 500 μg/mL and thus strongly complimented the activity of extract/fractions. In conclusion, extract/fractions of W. somnifera possessed strong inhibition of protein denaturation that can be attributed to these isolated withanolides.

  1. Thromboxane Receptor Activates the AMP-Activated Protein Kinase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells via Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Dong, Yunzhou; Xu, Jian; Xie, Zhonglin; Wu, Yong; Song, Ping; Guzman, Melissa; Wu, Jiliang; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 receptor (TPr) stimulation induces cellular hypertrophy in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs); however, regulation of VSMC hypertrophy remains poorly understood. Here we show that TPr stimulation activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), which in turn limits TPr-induced protein synthesis in VSMCs. Exposure of cultured VSMCs to either TPr agonists, IBOP and U46619, or exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) caused time- and dose-dependent AMPK activation, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of both AMPK-Thr172 and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase–Ser79, a downstream enzyme of AMPK, whereas SQ29548, a selective TPr antagonist, significantly attenuated TPr-enhanced AMPK activation. In parallel, both IBOP and U46619 significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of catalase (an H2O2 scavenger) abolished, whereas superoxide dismutase (which catalyzes H2O2 formation) enhanced, IBOP-induced AMPK activation, suggesting that TPr-activated AMPK was mediated by H2O2. Consistently, exposure of VSMCs to either TPr agonists or exogenous H2O2 dose-dependently increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 (at serines 428 and 307), an AMPK kinase, as well as coimmunoprecipitation of AMPK with LKB1. In addition, direct mutagenesis of either Ser428 or Ser307 of LKB1 into alanine, like the kinase-dead LKB1 mutant, abolished both TPr-stimulated AMPK activation and coimmunoprecipitation. Finally, genetic inhibition of AMPK significantly accentuated IBOP-enhanced protein synthesis, whereas adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active AMPK abolished IBOP-enhance protein synthesis in VSMCs. We conclude that TPr stimulation triggers reactive oxygen species–mediated LKB1-dependent AMPK activation, which in return inhibits cellular protein synthesis in VSMCs. PMID:18063812

  2. Hydrogen Bond Dynamic Propensity Studies for Protein Binding and Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamic propensity of the backbone hydrogen bonds of the protein MDM2 (the natural regulator of the tumor suppressor p53) in order to determine its binding properties. This approach is fostered by the observation that certain backbone hydrogen bonds at the p53-binding site exhibit a dynamical propensity in simulations that differs markedly form their state-value (that is, formed/not formed) in the PDB structure of the apo protein. To this end, we conduct a series of hydrogen bond propensity calculations in different contexts: 1) computational alanine-scanning studies of the MDM2-p53 interface; 2) the formation of the complex of MDM2 with the disruptive small molecule Nutlin-3a (dissecting the contribution of the different molecular fragments) and 3) the binding of a series of small molecules (drugs) with different affinities for MDM2. Thus, the relevance of the hydrogen bond propensity analysis for protein binding studies and as a useful tool to complement existing methods for drug design and optimization will be made evident. PMID:27792778

  3. S-Propargyl-Cysteine, a Novel Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Inhibits Inflammatory Hepcidin and Relieves Anemia of Inflammation by Inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minjun; Tang, Wenbo; Xin, Hong; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is clinically prevalent and greatly threatens public health. Traditional remedies have raised controversy during clinical practice, calling for alternative therapies. We have recently found that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits inflammatory hepcidin, the critical mediator of AI. However, due to the chemical property of H2S, there remains an urgent need for a stable H2S donor in AI treatment. Here we reported that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), a novel water-soluble H2S donor, suppressed hepatic hepcidin and corrected hypoferremia induced by lipopolysaccharide. The effects of SPRC were reversed by inhibition of cystathionine γ-lyase, one of the major endogenous H2S synthases. Moreover, SPRC reduced serum hepcidin, improved transferrin saturation, and maintained erythrocyte membrane integrity in a chronic mouse AI model. Consistently, splenomegaly was ameliorated and splenic iron accumulation relieved. Mechanism study indicated that serum IL-6 content and hepatic Il-6 mRNA were decreased by SPRC, in parallel with reduced hepatic JAK2/STAT3 activation. On the whole, our data reveal the inhibition of inflammatory hepcidin by SPRC, and suggest SPRC as a potential remedy against AI. PMID:27649298

  4. S-Propargyl-Cysteine, a Novel Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Inhibits Inflammatory Hepcidin and Relieves Anemia of Inflammation by Inhibiting IL-6/STAT3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is clinically prevalent and greatly threatens public health. Traditional remedies have raised controversy during clinical practice, calling for alternative therapies. We have recently found that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits inflammatory hepcidin, the critical mediator of AI. However, due to the chemical property of H2S, there remains an urgent need for a stable H2S donor in AI treatment. Here we reported that S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), a novel water-soluble H2S donor, suppressed hepatic hepcidin and corrected hypoferremia induced by lipopolysaccharide. The effects of SPRC were reversed by inhibition of cystathionine γ-lyase, one of the major endogenous H2S synthases. Moreover, SPRC reduced serum hepcidin, improved transferrin saturation, and maintained erythrocyte membrane integrity in a chronic mouse AI model. Consistently, splenomegaly was ameliorated and splenic iron accumulation relieved. Mechanism study indicated that serum IL-6 content and hepatic Il-6 mRNA were decreased by SPRC, in parallel with reduced hepatic JAK2/STAT3 activation. On the whole, our data reveal the inhibition of inflammatory hepcidin by SPRC, and suggest SPRC as a potential remedy against AI. PMID:27649298

  5. Soy protein diet inhibits zymosan induced monocyte migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Atherosclerosis has been recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Recently, we showed reduced atherosclerotic lesions in a hyperlipidemic mouse model fed isoflavone-free soy protein diet (SPI) compared to casein (CAS)-fed mice, despite unchanged serum lipid levels. However, the molecular mechan...

  6. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Blocks Consolidation of an Acrobatic Motor Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Dichgans, Johannes; Schulz, Jorg B.; Luft, Andreas R.; Buitrago, Manuel M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether motor skill learning depends on de novo protein synthesis, adult rats were trained in an acrobatic locomotor task (accelerating rotarod) for 7 d. Animals were systemically injected with cycloheximide (CHX, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h before sessions 1 and 2 or sessions 2 and 3. Control rats received vehicle injections before…

  7. Conformational analysis of g protein-coupled receptor signaling by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Su Youn; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-01-01

    Conformational change and protein-protein interactions are two major mechanisms of membrane protein signal transduction, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon agonist binding, GPCRs change conformation, resulting in interaction with downstream signaling molecules such as G proteins. To understand the precise signaling mechanism, studies have investigated the structural mechanism of GPCR signaling using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or electron paramagnetic resonance. In addition to these techniques, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently been used in GPCR studies. HDX-MS measures the rate at which peptide amide hydrogens exchange with deuterium in the solvent. Exposed or flexible regions have higher exchange rates and excluded or ordered regions have lower exchange rates. Therefore, HDX-MS is a useful tool for studying protein-protein interfaces and conformational changes after protein activation or protein-protein interactions. Although HDX-MS does not give high-resolution structures, it analyzes protein conformations that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography or NMR. Furthermore, conformational information from HDX-MS can help in the crystallization of X-ray crystallography by suggesting highly flexible regions. Interactions between GPCRs and downstream signaling molecules are not easily analyzed by X-ray crystallography or NMR because of the large size of the GPCR-signaling molecule complexes, hydrophobicity, and flexibility of GPCRs. HDX-MS could be useful for analyzing the conformational mechanism of GPCR signaling. In this chapter, we discuss details of HDX-MS for analyzing GPCRs using the β2AR-G protein complex as a model system.

  8. Ajoene, a garlic compound, inhibits protein prenylation and arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Yokoyama, Kohei; Sadilek, Martin; Paoletti, Rodolfo; Apitz-Castro, Rafael; Gelb, Michael H; Corsini, Alberto

    2003-03-01

    (1) Ajoene is a garlic compound with anti-platelet properties and, in addition, was shown to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis by affecting 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and late enzymatic steps of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. (2) MVA constitutes the precursor not only of cholesterol, but also of a number of non-sterol isoprenoids, such as farnesyl and geranylgeranyl groups. Covalent attachment of these MVA-derived isoprenoid groups (prenylation) is a required function of several proteins that regulate cell proliferation. We investigated the effect of ajoene on rat aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation as related to protein prenylation. (3) Cell counting, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle analysis showed that ajoene (1-50 micro M) interfered with the progression of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and inhibited rat SMC proliferation. (4) Similar to the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin, ajoene inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis. However, in contrast to simvastatin, the antiproliferative effect of ajoene was not prevented by the addition of MVA, farnesol (FOH), and geranylgeraniol (GGOH). Labelling of smooth muscle cell cellular proteins with [3H]-FOH and [3H]-GGOH was significantly inhibited by ajoene. (5) In vitro assays for protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (PGGTase-I) confirmed that ajoene inhibits protein prenylation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry analyses also demonstrated that ajoene causes a covalent modification of the cysteine SH group of a peptide substrate for protein PGGTase-I. (6) Altogether, our results provide evidence that ajoene interferes with the protein prenylation reaction, an effect that may contribute to its inhibition of SMC proliferation.

  9. Ajoene, a garlic compound, inhibits protein prenylation and arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Nicola; Yokoyama, Kohei; Sadilek, Martin; Paoletti, Rodolfo; Apitz-Castro, Rafael; Gelb, Michael H; Corsini, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Ajoene is a garlic compound with anti-platelet properties and, in addition, was shown to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis by affecting 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and late enzymatic steps of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. MVA constitutes the precursor not only of cholesterol, but also of a number of non-sterol isoprenoids, such as farnesyl and geranylgeranyl groups. Covalent attachment of these MVA-derived isoprenoid groups (prenylation) is a required function of several proteins that regulate cell proliferation. We investigated the effect of ajoene on rat aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation as related to protein prenylation. Cell counting, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle analysis showed that ajoene (1–50 μM) interfered with the progression of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and inhibited rat SMC proliferation. Similar to the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin, ajoene inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis. However, in contrast to simvastatin, the antiproliferative effect of ajoene was not prevented by the addition of MVA, farnesol (FOH), and geranylgeraniol (GGOH). Labelling of smooth muscle cell cellular proteins with [3H]-FOH and [3H]-GGOH was significantly inhibited by ajoene. In vitro assays for protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (PGGTase-I) confirmed that ajoene inhibits protein prenylation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry analyses also demonstrated that ajoene causes a covalent modification of the cysteine SH group of a peptide substrate for protein PGGTase-I. Altogether, our results provide evidence that ajoene interferes with the protein prenylation reaction, an effect that may contribute to its inhibition of SMC proliferation. PMID:12642382

  10. Controlling hydrogen scrambling in multiply charged protein ions during collisional activation: implications for top-down hydrogen/deuterium exchange MS utilizing collisional activation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Abzalimov, Rinat R; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2010-02-01

    Hydrogen exchange in solution combined with ion fragmentation in the gas phase followed by MS detection emerged in recent years as a powerful tool to study higher order protein structure and dynamics. However, a certain type of ion chemistry in the gas phase, namely, internal rearrangement of labile hydrogen atoms (the so-called hydrogen scrambling), is often cited as a factor limiting the utility of this experimental technique. Although several studies have been carried out to elucidate the roles played by various factors in the occurrence and the extent of hydrogen scrambling, there is still no consensus as to what experimental protocol should be followed to avoid or minimize it. In this study we employ fragmentation of mass-selected subpopulations of protein ions to assess the extent of internal proton mobility prior to dissociation. A unique advantage of tandem MS is that it not only provides a means to map the deuterium content of protein ions whose overall levels of isotope incorporation can be precisely defined by controlling the mass selection window, but also correlates this spatial isotope distribution with such global characteristic as the protein ion charge state. Hydrogen scrambling does not occur when the charge state of the precursor protein ions selected for fragmentation is high. Fragment ions derived from both N- and C-terminal parts of the protein are equally unaffected by scrambling. However, spatial distribution of deuterium atoms obtained by fragmenting low-charge-density protein ions is consistent with a very high degree of scrambling prior to the dissociation events. The extent of hydrogen scrambling is also high when multistage fragmentation is used to probe deuterium incorporation locally. Taken together, the experimental results provide a coherent picture of intramolecular processes occurring prior to the dissociation event and provide guidance for the design of experiments whose outcome is unaffected by hydrogen scrambling.

  11. Interleukin-6 inhibits adrenal androgen release from bovine adrenal zona reticularis cells by inhibiting the expression of steroidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    McIlmoil, S; Call, G B; Barney, M; Strickland, J; Judd, A M

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is secreted by adrenocortical cells and modifies cortisol secretion. In this study, the effects of IL-6 on adrenal androgen release were investigated. The zona reticularis (ZR) was generally isolated from bovine adrenal glands by dissection. In select experiments, the intact adrenal cortex (ie, all 3 adrenocortical zones) was dissected from the adrenal glands. For androgen release experiments, ZR and intact adrenocortical cubes were dispersed into isolated cells, the cells cultured and exposed to IL-6 and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and androgen release determined by radioimmunoassay. Basal and ACTH-stimulated androgen release from the ZR was inhibited by IL-6 in a concentration-dependent (10-1000 pg/mL) and time-dependent (4-24 h) manner (P < 0.01 by 1-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni test). In contrast, IL-6 increased basal and ACTH-stimulated androgen release from mixed adrenocortical cells (P < 0.01). The mechanism of IL-6 inhibition of androgen release was investigated by exposing ZR strips to IL-6 and measuring the expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein of steroidogenic factors. Basal and ACTH-stimulated expression of the mRNA and protein for steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme, 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, steroid 17-α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase/17,20 desmolase, and the nuclear factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), that stimulates steroidogenesis, were decreased by IL-6 (P < 0.01). In contrast IL-6 increased the mRNA and protein for dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (DAX-1), a nuclear factor that inhibits steroidogenesis (P < 0.01). In summary, IL-6 decreased androgen release and the expression of steroidogenic factors in the ZR, and this decrease may be mediated in part through increasing DAX-1 and decreasing SF-1. PMID:26218834

  12. The inhibition of protein prenyltransferases by oxygenated metabolites of limonene and perillyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Gelb, M H; Tamanoi, F; Yokoyama, K; Ghomashchi, F; Esson, K; Gould, M N

    1995-05-01

    The monoterpenes limonene and perillyl alcohol are effective therapeutic agents against advanced rat mammary cancer. Limonene is currently undergoing clinical testing in cancer patients. These monoterpenes and their oxygenated metabolites have been previously shown to inhibit protein prenylation in cultured cells. Since farnesylation of ras protein is critical for its ability to cause oncogenic transformation, inhibition of protein prenylation may be the basis of the anti-tumor effects of limonene and perillyl alcohol. In this study we test the ability of limonene and its oxygenated analogs to inhibit protein prenylation enzymes in vitro. Limonene and perillyl alcohol and their major in vivo metabolite, perillic acid, are weak inhibitors of both mammalian and yeast protein farnesyl transferase (PFT) and protein geranylgeranyl transferase (PGGT). In contrast, a minor metabolite of both limonene and perillyl alcohol, perillic acid methyl ester, is a potent inhibitor of both enzymes. Perillic acid methyl ester is a competitive inhibitor of yeast PFT with respect to farnesyl pyrophosphate. These studies suggest that if the inhibition of protein prenylation is a mechanism for limonene's and perillyl alcohol's anti-cancer activities, these monoterpenes may be prodrugs that are converted into pharmacologically-active substances by metabolic modification.

  13. Influence of heterocyclic anils on corrosion inhibition and hydrogen permeation through mild steel in acid chloride environments

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A. Khan, M.A.W.; Ajmal, M.; Muralidharan, S.; Iyer, S.V.

    1997-06-01

    The heterocyclic anils 2-salicylideneaminobenzothiazole (SABT), 2-salicylideneamino-6-methoxybenzothiazole (SAMEOBT) were investigated to evaluate their efficiency as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel (MS) in 1 M hydrochloric acid at concentrations from 100 ppm to 500 ppm and temperatures from 35 C to 60 C. SACLBT performed best, giving an inhibition efficiency as high as 98% even at a very low concentration and higher temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization studies showed inhibition was under cathodic control. These compounds reduced hydrogen permeation through MS in 1 M HCl solution. Adsorption on the MS surface followed Temkin`s adsorption isotherms. Surface analysis of the MS surface exposed with SACLBT proved adsorption of this compound on the surface occurred through interaction of lone pairs of nitrogen, sulfur, and chlorine atoms with the metal surface.

  14. Hydrogen Inhibition of Nitrogen Reduction by Nitrogenase in Isolated Soybean Nodule Bacteroids 1

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Madeline E.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1989-01-01

    Dihydrogen, a by-product of biological nitrogen fixation, is a competitive inhibitor of N2 reduction by nitrogenase. To evaluate the significance of H2 inhibition in vivo, we have measured the apparent inhibition constant for H2 inhibition of N2 reduction in Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. The rate of N2 reduction was measured as ammonia production by bacteroids incubated in a buffer containing 200 micromolar leghemoglobin and 10 millimolar succinate under 0.02 atmosphere O2 and various concentrations of N2 and H2. The apparent inhibition constant for H2 under these conditions was determined to be approximately 0.03 atmosphere. This relatively low value strengthens the proposal that H2 inhibition of N2 reduction may be a significant factor in lowering the efficiency of nitrogen fixation in legume nodules. PMID:16667084

  15. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION FOR THE DIGESTION OF PROTEINS BY PEPSIN.

    PubMed

    Northrop, J H

    1920-11-20

    The experiments described above show that the rate of digestion and the conductivity of protein solutions are very closely parallel. If the isoelectric point of a protein is at a lower hydrogen ion concentration than that of another, the conductivity and also the rate of digestion of the first protein extends further to the alkaline side. The optimum hydrogen ion concentration for the rate of digestion and the degree of ionization (conductivity) of gelatin solutions is the same, and the curves for the ionization and rate of digestion as plotted against the pH are nearly parallel throughout. The addition of a salt with the same anion as the acid to a solution of protein already containing the optimum amount of the acid has the same depressing effect on the digestion as has the addition of the equivalent amount of acid. These facts are in quantitative agreement with the hypothesis that the determining factor in the digestion of proteins by pepsin is the amount of ionized protein present in the solution. It was shown in a previous paper that this would also account for the peculiar relation between the rate of digestion and the concentration of protein. The amount of ionized protein in the solution depends on the amount of salt formed between the protein (a weak base) and the acid. This quantity, in turn, according to the hydrolysis theory of the salts of weak bases and strong acids, is a function of the hydrogen ion concentration, up to the point at which all the protein is combined with the acid as a salt. This point is the optimum hydrogen ion concentration for digestion, since the solution now contains the maximum concentration of protein ions. The hydrogen ion concentration in this range therefore is merely a convenient indicator of the amount of ionized protein present in the solution and takes no active part in the hydrolysis. After sufficient acid has been added to combine with all the protein, i.e. at pH of about 2.0, the further addition of acid serves to

  16. Prion protein inhibits microtubule assembly by inducing tubulin oligomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Nieznanski, Krzysztof . E-mail: k.nieznanski@nencki.gov.pl; Podlubnaya, Zoya A.; Nieznanska, Hanna

    2006-10-13

    A growing body of evidence points to an association of prion protein (PrP) with microtubular cytoskeleton. Recently, direct binding of PrP to tubulin has also been found. In this work, using standard light scattering measurements, sedimentation experiments, and electron microscopy, we show for First time the effect of a direct interaction between these proteins on tubulin polymerization. We demonstrate that full-length recombinant PrP induces a rapid increase in the turbidity of tubulin diluted below the critical concentration for microtubule assembly. This effect requires magnesium ions and is weakened by NaCl. Moreover, the PrP-induced light scattering structures of tubulin are cold-stable. In preparations of diluted tubulin incubated with PrP, electron microscopy revealed the presence of {approx}50 nm disc-shaped structures not reported so far. These unique tubulin oligomers may form large aggregates. The effect of PrP is more pronounced under the conditions promoting microtubule formation. In these tubulin samples, PrP induces formation of the above oligomers associated with short protofilaments and sheets of protofilaments into aggregates. Noticeably, this is accompanied by a significant reduction of the number and length of microtubules. Hence, we postulate that prion protein may act as an inhibitor of microtubule assembly by inducing formation of stable tubulin oligomers.

  17. Downregulation of amyloid precursor protein inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein expressed in several cell types. In the nervous system, APP is expressed by glial and neuronal cells, and several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a role in normal and pathological phenomena. To address the question of the actual function of APP in normal developing neurons, we undertook a study aimed at blocking APP expression using antisense oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide internalization was achieved by linking them to a vector peptide that translocates through biological membranes. This original technique, which is very efficient and gives direct access to the cell cytosol and nucleus, allowed us to work with extracellular oligonucleotide concentrations between 40 and 200 nM. Internalization of antisense oligonucleotides overlapping the origin of translation resulted in a marked but transient decrease in APP neosynthesis that was not observed with the vector peptide alone, or with sense oligonucleotides. Although transient, the decrease in APP neosynthesis was sufficient to provoke a distinct decrease in axon and dendrite outgrowth by embryonic cortical neurons developing in vitro. The latter decrease was not accompanied by changes in the spreading of the cell bodies. A single exposure to coupled antisense oligonucleotides at the onset of the culture was sufficient to produce significant morphological effects 6, 18, and 24 h later, but by 42 h, there were no remaining significant morphologic changes. This report thus demonstrates that amyloid precursor protein plays an important function in the morphological differentiation of cortical neurons in primary culture. PMID:7876315

  18. Hydrogen Sulfide Prolongs Postharvest Storage of Fresh-Cut Pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) by Alleviation of Oxidative Damage and Inhibition of Fungal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuai-Ping; Wu, Jun; Li, Yan-Hong; Zheng, Ji-Lian; Han, Yi; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has proved to be a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants and animals. Here, we investigated the role of H2S in the decay of fresh-cut pears (Pyrus pyrifolia). H2S gas released by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) prolonged the shelf life of fresh-cut pear slices in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, H2S maintained higher levels of reducing sugar and soluble protein in pear slices. H2S significantly reduced the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide radicals (•O2−) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Further investigation showed that H2S fumigation up-regulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD), while it down-regulated those of lipoxygenase (LOX), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO). Furthermore, H2S fumigation effectively inhibited the growth of two fungal pathogens of pear, Aspergillus niger and Penicillium expansum, suggesting that H2S can be developed as an effective fungicide for postharvest storage. The present study implies that H2S is involved in prolonging postharvest storage of pears by acting as an antioxidant and fungicide. PMID:24454881

  19. In vitro expression of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein genes: autogenous inhibition of translation.

    PubMed Central

    Yates, J L; Arfsten, A E; Nomura, M

    1980-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L1 (0.5 micro M) was found to inhibit the synthesis of both proteins of the L11 operon, L11 and L1, but not the synthesis of other proteins directed by lambda rifd 18 DNA. Similarly, S4 (1 micro M) selectively inhibited the synthesis of three proteins of the alpha operon, S13, S11, and S4, directed by lambda spcI DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment obtained from this DNA. S8 (3.6 micro M) also showed preferential inhibitory effects on the synthesis of some proteins encoded in the spc operon, L24 and L5 (and probably S14 and S8), directed by lambda spcl DNA or a restriction enzyme fragment carrying the genes for these proteins. The inhibitory effect of L1 was observed only with L1 and not with other proteins examined, including S4 and S8. Similarly, the effect of S4 was not observed with L1 or S8, and that of S8 was not seen with L1 or S4. Inhibition was shown to take place at the level of translation rather than transcription. Thus, at least some ribosomal proteins (L1 S4, and S8) have the ability to cause selective translational inhibition of the synthesis of certain ribosomal proteins whose genes are in the same operon as their own. These results support the hypothesis that certain free ribosomal proteins not assembled into ribosomes act as "autogenous" feedback inhibitors to regulate the synthesis of ribosomal proteins. Images PMID:6445562

  20. Effect of hydrogen bond networks on the nucleation mechanism of protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djikaev, Y. S.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2009-12-01

    We have recently developed a kinetic model for the nucleation mechanism of protein folding (NMPF) in terms of ternary nucleation by using the first passage time analysis. A protein was considered as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic, hydrophilic (some of which are negatively or positively ionizable), and neutral beads. The main idea of the NMPF model consisted of averaging the dihedral potential in which a selected residue is involved over all possible configurations of all neighboring residues along the protein chain. The combination of the average dihedral, effective pairwise (due to Lennard-Jones-type and electrostatic interactions), and confining (due to the polymer connectivity constraint) potentials gives rise to an overall potential around the cluster that, as a function of the distance from the cluster center, has a double-well shape. This allows one to evaluate the protein folding time. In the original NMPF model hydrogen bonding was not taken into account explicitly. To improve the NMPF model and make it more realistic, in this paper we modify our (previously developed) probabilistic hydrogen bond model and combine it with the former. Thus, a contribution due to the disruption of hydrogen bond networks around the interacting particles (cluster of native residues and residue in the protein unfolded part) appears in the overall potential field around a cluster. The modified model is applied to the folding of the same model proteins that were examined in the original model: a short protein consisting of 124 residues (roughly mimicking bovine pancreatic ribonuclease) and a long one consisting of 2500 residues (as a representative of large proteins with superlong polypeptide chains), at pH=8.3 , 7.3, and 6.3. The hydrogen bond contribution now plays a dominant role in the total potential field around the cluster (except for very short distances thereto where the repulsive energy tends to infinity). It is by an order of magnitude stronger for

  1. Growth-inhibiting extracellular matrix proteins also inhibit electrical activity by reducing calcium and increasing potassium conductances.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; De-Miguel, F F

    2009-01-23

    Inhibitionof neurite sprouting and electrical activity by extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins was studied during neurite regeneration by using anterior pagoda (AP) neurons of the leech. Adult isolated neurons were plated in culture inside ganglion capsules, which among many ECM proteins, contain a group of inhibitory peanut lectin- (PNA) binding glycoproteins. These proteins inhibit neurite production and contribute to the formation of a bipolar outgrowth pattern by AP neurons. Addition of PNA lectin to the culture medium to block the inhibitory effects of ECM glycoproteins induced an increase of neurite sprouting, the loss of the bipolar pattern, and also an increase in the amplitude and duration of action potentials evoked by intracellular current injection. PNA lectin had independent effects on neurite sprouting and electrical activity, since there was no correlation between the total neurite length and the amplitude of the action potentials. Moreover, action potentials were increased by the presence of PNA lectin even in neurons that did not grow. The changes induced by PNA lectin on the active conductances underlying the action potentials were estimated by quantitative model simulations. We predict that the increases in the amplitude and duration of the action potential induced by PNA lectin were due to an increase in a calcium conductance and a reduction in the delayed rectifier potassium conductance. Our results suggest that inhibitory ECM glycoproteins may use independent signaling pathways to inhibit neurite sprouting and electrical activity. These proteins affect the action potential by changing the proportion of inward and outward active conductances. PMID:18976697

  2. Protein turnover and cellular autophagy in growing and growth-inhibited 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, T.; Pfeifer, U. )

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between growth, protein degradation, and cellular autophagy was tested in growing and in growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers. For the biochemical evaluation of DNA and protein metabolism, growth-inhibited 3T3 cell monolayers with high cell density and growing 3T3 cell monolayers with low cell density were labeled simultaneously with ({sup 14}C)thymidine and ({sup 3}H)leucine. The evaluation of the DNA turnover and additional ({sup 3}H)thymidine autoradiography showed that 24 to 5% of 3T3 cells continue to replicate even in the growth-inhibited state, where no accumulation of protein and DNA can be observed. Cell loss, therefore, has to be assumed to compensate for the ongoing cell proliferation. When the data of protein turnover were corrected for cell loss, it was found that the rate constant of protein synthesis in nongrowing monolayers was reduced to half the value found in growing monolayers. Simultaneously, the rate constant of protein degradation in nongrowing monolayers was increased to about 1.5-fold the value of growing monolayers. These data are in agreement with the assumption that cellular autophagy represents a major pathway of regulating protein degradation in 3T3 cells and that the regulation of autophagic protein degradation is of relevance for the transition from a growing to a nongrowing state.

  3. Antiviral Protein of Momordica charantia L. Inhibits Different Subtypes of Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Leelamanit, Wichet

    2013-01-01

    The new antiviral activity of the protein extracted from Momordica charantia was determined with different subtypes of influenza A. The protein was purified from the seed of M. charantia using an anion exchanger and a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system. At the concentration of 1.401 mg/mL, the protein did not exhibit cytotoxicity in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK) but inhibited 1 × 105 FFU influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus at 56.50%, 65.72%, and 100% inhibition by the protein treated before the virus (pretreated), the protein treated alongside with the virus (simultaneously treated), and the protein treated after the virus (posttreated) during incubation, respectively. Using 5, 25, and 100 TCID50 of influenza A/New Caledonia/20/99 H1N1, A/Fujian/411/01 H3N2 and A/Thailand/1(KAN-1)/2004 H5N1, the IC50 was calculated to be 100, 150, and 200; 75, 175, and 300; and 40, 75, and 200 μg/mL, respectively. Our present finding indicated that the plant protein inhibited not only H1N1 and H3N2 but also H5N1 subtype. As a result of the broad spectrum of its antiviral activity, this edible plant can be developed as an effective therapeutic agent against various and even new emerging subtypes of influenza A. PMID:23935676

  4. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kalunke, Raviraj M.; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25852708

  5. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens.

  6. Elongation factor 2 kinase promotes cell survival by inhibiting protein synthesis without inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Claire E.J.; Wang, Xuemin; Xie, Jianling; Pickford, Jo; Barron, John; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Versele, Matthias; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) inhibits the elongation stage of protein synthesis by phosphorylating its only known substrate, eEF2. eEF2K is tightly regulated by nutrient-sensitive signalling pathways. For example, it is inhibited by signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). It is therefore activated under conditions of nutrient deficiency. Here we show that inhibiting eEF2K or knocking down its expression renders cancer cells sensitive to death under nutrient-starved conditions, and that this is rescued by compounds that block protein synthesis. This implies that eEF2K protects nutrient-deprived cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. Cells in which signalling through mTORC1 is highly active are very sensitive to nutrient withdrawal. Inhibiting mTORC1 protects them. Our data reveal that eEF2K makes a substantial contribution to the cytoprotective effect of mTORC1 inhibition. eEF2K is also reported to promote another potentially cytoprotective process, autophagy. We have used several approaches to test whether inhibition or loss of eEF2K affects autophagy under a variety of conditions. We find no evidence that eEF2K is involved in the activation of autophagy in the cell types we have studied. We conclude that eEF2K protects cancer cells against nutrient starvation by inhibiting protein synthesis rather than by activating autophagy. PMID:26795954

  7. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  8. Cancer Differentiating Agent Hexamethylene Bisacetamide Inhibits BET Bromodomain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lisa M; Green, Lydia C; Muralidharan, Somsundar Veppil; Demir, Dağsu; Welin, Martin; Bhadury, Joydeep; Logan, Derek T; Walse, Björn; Nilsson, Jonas A

    2016-04-15

    Agents that trigger cell differentiation are highly efficacious in treating certain cancers, but such approaches are not generally effective in most malignancies. Compounds such as DMSO and hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) have been used to induce differentiation in experimental systems, but their mechanisms of action and potential range of uses on that basis have not been developed. Here, we show that HMBA, a compound first tested in the oncology clinic over 25 years ago, acts as a selective bromodomain inhibitor. Biochemical and structural studies revealed an affinity of HMBA for the second bromodomain of BET proteins. Accordingly, both HMBA and the prototype BET inhibitor JQ1 induced differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells. As expected of a BET inhibitor, HMBA displaced BET proteins from chromatin, caused massive transcriptional changes, and triggered cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in Myc-induced B-cell lymphoma cells. Furthermore, HMBA exerted anticancer effects in vivo in mouse models of Myc-driven B-cell lymphoma. This study illuminates the function of an early anticancer agent and suggests an intersection with ongoing clinical trials of BET inhibitor, with several implications for predicting patient selection and response rates to this therapy and starting points for generating BD2-selective BET inhibitors. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2376-83. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26941288

  9. Reduced Protein Synthesis Fidelity Inhibits Flagellar Biosynthesis and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongqiang; Evans, Christopher R.; Ling, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate translation of the genetic information from DNA to protein is maintained by multiple quality control steps from bacteria to mammals. Genetic and environmental alterations have been shown to compromise translational quality control and reduce fidelity during protein synthesis. The physiological impact of increased translational errors is not fully understood. While generally considered harmful, translational errors have recently been shown to benefit cells under certain stress conditions. In this work, we describe a novel regulatory pathway in which reduced translational fidelity downregulates expression of flagellar genes and suppresses bacterial motility. Electron microscopy imaging shows that the error-prone Escherichia coli strain lacks mature flagella. Further genetic analyses reveal that translational errors upregulate expression of a small RNA DsrA through enhancing its transcription, and deleting DsrA from the error-prone strain restores motility. DsrA regulates expression of H-NS and RpoS, both of which regulate flagellar genes. We demonstrate that an increased level of DsrA in the error-prone strain suppresses motility through the H-NS pathway. Our work suggests that bacteria are capable of switching on and off the flagellar system by altering translational fidelity, which may serve as a previously unknown mechanism to improve fitness in response to environmental cues. PMID:27468805

  10. Short Hydrogen Bonds and Proton Delocalization in Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP).

    PubMed

    Oltrogge, Luke M; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-06-24

    Short hydrogen bonds and specifically low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) have been the focus of much attention and controversy for their possible role in enzymatic catalysis. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) mutant S65T, H148D has been found to form a very short hydrogen bond between Asp148 and the chromophore resulting in significant spectral perturbations. Leveraging the unique autocatalytically formed chromophore and its sensitivity to this interaction we explore the consequences of proton affinity matching across this putative LBHB. Through the use of noncanonical amino acids introduced through nonsense suppression or global incorporation, we systematically modify the acidity of the GFP chromophore with halogen substituents. X-ray crystal structures indicated that the length of the interaction with Asp148 is unchanged at ∼2.45 Å while the absorbance spectra demonstrate an unprecedented degree of color tuning with increasing acidity. We utilized spectral isotope effects, isotope fractionation factors, and a simple 1D model of the hydrogen bond coordinate in order to gain insight into the potential energy surface and particularly the role that proton delocalization may play in this putative short hydrogen bond. The data and model suggest that even with the short donor-acceptor distance (∼2.45 Å) and near perfect affinity matching there is not a LBHB, that is, the barrier to proton transfer exceeds the H zero-point energy. PMID:27162964

  11. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits lactase but is alleviated by salivary proline-rich proteins.

    PubMed

    Naz, Shahina; Siddiqi, Rahmanullah; Dew, Tristan P; Williamson, Gary

    2011-03-23

    Lactase phlorizin hydrolase is a small intestinal brush border enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the milk sugar, lactose, and also many flavonoid glucosides. We demonstrate that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal flavonoid from green tea, inhibits in vitro hydrolysis of lactose by intestinal lactase. We then tested the hypothesis that salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) could modulate this inhibition and stabilize EGCG. Inhibition by EGCG of digestive enzymes (α-amylase>chymotrypsin>trypsin>lactase≫pepsin) was alleviated ∼2-6-fold by PRPs. Furthermore, PRPs appeared stable to proteolysis and also stabilized EGCG under digestive conditions in vitro. This is the first report on EGCG inhibition of lactase, and it quantifies the protective role of PRPs against EGCG inhibition of digestive enzymes.

  12. Codon-specific and general inhibition of protein synthesis by the tRNA-sequestering minigenes.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Olivares, Luis; Zamora-Romo, Efraín; Guarneros, Gabriel; Hernandez-Sanchez, Javier

    2006-07-01

    The expression of minigenes in bacteria inhibits protein synthesis and cell growth. Presumably, the translating ribosomes, harboring the peptides as peptidyl-tRNAs, pause at the last sense codon of the minigene directed mRNAs. Eventually, the peptidyl-tRNAs drop off and, under limiting activity of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, accumulate in the cells reducing the concentration of specific aminoacylable tRNA. Therefore, the extent of inhibition is associated with the rate of starvation for a specific tRNA. Here, we used minigenes harboring various last sense codons that sequester specific tRNAs with different efficiency, to inhibit the translation of reporter genes containing, or not, these codons. A prompt inhibition of the protein synthesis directed by genes containing the codons starved for their cognate tRNA (hungry codons) was observed. However, a non-specific in vitro inhibition of protein synthesis, irrespective of the codon composition of the gene, was also evident. The degree of inhibition correlated directly with the number of hungry codons in the gene. Furthermore, a tRNA(Arg4)-sequestering minigene promoted the production of an incomplete beta-galactosidase polypeptide interrupted, during bacterial polypeptide chain elongation at sites where AGA codons were inserted in the lacZ gene suggesting ribosome pausing at the hungry codons.

  13. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  14. Properties of a hydrogen-inhibited mutant of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed Central

    Odom, J M; Wall, J D

    1987-01-01

    A mutant of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 has been obtained which is incapable of sulfate respiration with molecular hydrogen but which grows normally on lactate plus sulfate under argon. Growth characteristics of the mutant suggest that the defect is involved in electron transfer to sulfate or nitrate but not thiosulfate. PMID:3818548

  15. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheeswari, S.; Sriram, R.; Brindha, P.; Kurian, Gino A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model. Materials and Methods: The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH), sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques. Results: The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4. Conclusion: Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O3 2-and SO4 2- moiety produced by the test compounds. PMID:26200543

  16. Hydrogen bonding-assisted thermal conduction in β-sheet crystals of spider silk protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Teli; Ban, Heng; Liu, Ling

    2014-06-01

    Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that β-sheet, an essential component of spider silk protein, has a thermal conductivity 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of some other protein structures reported in the literature. In contrast to several other nanostructured materials of similar bundled/layered structures (e.g. few-layer graphene and bundled carbon nanotubes), the β-sheet is found to uniquely feature enhanced thermal conductivity with an increased number of constituting units, i.e. β-strands. Phonon analysis identifies inter-β-strand hydrogen bonding as the main contributor to the intriguing phenomenon, which prominently influences the state of phonons in both low- and high-frequency regimes. A thermal resistance model further verifies the critical role of hydrogen bonding in thermal conduction through β-sheet structures.Using atomistic simulations, we demonstrate that β-sheet, an essential component of spider silk protein, has a thermal conductivity 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that of some other protein structures reported in the literature. In contrast to several other nanostructured materials of similar bundled/layered structures (e.g. few-layer graphene and bundled carbon nanotubes), the β-sheet is found to uniquely feature enhanced thermal conductivity with an increased number of constituting units, i.e. β-strands. Phonon analysis identifies inter-β-strand hydrogen bonding as the main contributor to the intriguing phenomenon, which prominently influences the state of phonons in both low- and high-frequency regimes. A thermal resistance model further verifies the critical role of hydrogen bonding in thermal conduction through β-sheet structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Structure of the β-sheets, computational model, determination of area and temperature gradient, and additional phonon DOS results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01195c

  17. The role of hydrogen bond networks in the barrierless thermal denaturation of a native protein.

    PubMed

    Djikaev, Y S; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2009-07-28

    Using the mean first passage time analysis, we have recently developed a kinetic model for the thermal unfolding of a native protein in a barrierless way. A protein was considered as a random heteropolymer consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic beads with all the bonds and bond angles equal and constant. As a crucial idea of the model the overall potential around a folded part (cluster) of the protein in which a protein residue performs a chaotic motion was considered to be a combination of three potentials: effective pairwise, average dihedral, and confining. However, the hydrogen bonding of water molecules was not taken into account explicitly. In this paper we improve that model by combining it with a probabilistic approach to water hydrogen bonding. Thus, an additional contribution due to the disruption of hydrogen bond networks around the interacting particles (a cluster of native residues and a residue in the protein unfolded part) appears in the overall potential field around a cluster. The overall potential as a function of the distance from the cluster center has a double well shape. This allows one to determine the rates with which the cluster emits and absorbs residues by using the mean first passage time analysis. Due to a sufficiently large temperature increase or decrease, the emission rate becomes larger than the absorption rate in the whole range of cluster sizes. This leads to the unfolding of the protein in a barrierless way reminiscent of spinodal decomposition. Knowing the cluster emission and absorption rates as functions of temperature and cluster size, one can find the threshold temperatures of cold and hot barrierless denaturation as well as the corresponding unfolding times. The extended model is then applied to the unfolding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease, consisting of 124 residues whereof 43 are hydrophobic (neutral beads are considered to be hydrophobic as well) and 81 hydrophilic.

  18. Momilactione B inhibits protein kinase A signaling and reduces tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2 expression in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Boram; Jun, Hee-jin; Seo, Woo-Duck; Kim, Dong-Woo; Cho, Kang-Jin; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-05-01

    Momilactone B (MB) is a terpenoid phytoalexin present in rice bran that exhibits several biological activities. MB reduced the melanin content in B16 melanocytes melanin content and inhibited tyrosinase activities. Using transcriptome analysis, the genes involved in protein kinase A (PKA) signaling were found to be markedly altered. B16 cells stimulated with MB had decreased concentrations of cAMP protein kinase A activity, and cAMP-response element-binding protein which is a key transcription factor for microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression. Accordingly, the expression of MITF and its target genes, which are essential for melanogenesis, were reduced. MB thus exhibits anti-melanogenic effects by repressing tyrosinase enzyme activity and inhibiting the PKA signaling pathway which, in turn, decreases melanogenic gene expression.

  19. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    PubMed

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function.

  20. Multiple mechanisms for CRISPR-Cas inhibition by anti-CRISPR proteins.

    PubMed

    Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Garcia, Bianca; Strum, Scott; Du, Mingjian; Rollins, MaryClare F; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Wiedenheft, Blake; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2015-10-01

    The battle for survival between bacteria and the viruses that infect them (phages) has led to the evolution of many bacterial defence systems and phage-encoded antagonists of these systems. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR-associated (cas) genes comprise an adaptive immune system that is one of the most widespread means by which bacteria defend themselves against phages. We identified the first examples of proteins produced by phages that inhibit a CRISPR-Cas system. Here we performed biochemical and in vivo investigations of three of these anti-CRISPR proteins, and show that each inhibits CRISPR-Cas activity through a distinct mechanism. Two block the DNA-binding activity of the CRISPR-Cas complex, yet do this by interacting with different protein subunits, and using steric or non-steric modes of inhibition. The third anti-CRISPR protein operates by binding to the Cas3 helicase-nuclease and preventing its recruitment to the DNA-bound CRISPR-Cas complex. In vivo, this anti-CRISPR can convert the CRISPR-Cas system into a transcriptional repressor, providing the first example-to our knowledge-of modulation of CRISPR-Cas activity by a protein interactor. The diverse sequences and mechanisms of action of these anti-CRISPR proteins imply an independent evolution, and foreshadow the existence of other means by which proteins may alter CRISPR-Cas function. PMID:26416740

  1. Catalase, but not MnSOD, inhibits glucose deprivation-activated ASK1-MEK-MAPK signal transduction pathway and prevents relocalization of Daxx: hydrogen peroxide as a major second messenger of metabolic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae J; Lee, Yong J

    2003-10-01

    Overexpression of catalase, but not manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), inhibited glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation in human prostate adenocarcinoma DU-145 cells. Suppression of JNK1 activation by catalase overexpression resulted from inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) activation by preventing dissociation of thioredoxin (TRX) from ASK1. Overexpression of catalase also inhibited relocalization of Daxx from the nucleus to the cytoplasm as well as association of Daxx with ASK1 during glucose deprivation. Taken together, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) rather than superoxide anion (O(2) (*-)) acts as a second messenger of metabolic oxidative stress to activate the ASK1-MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway.

  2. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  3. Combining size-exclusion chromatography with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange to study protein conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Alexey A; Helmy, Roy

    2016-01-29

    Methods for protein characterization are being actively developed based on the growing importance of protein therapies and applications. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the use of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) in combination with differential hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) to compare protein global conformational changes at different solution conditions. Using chaotropic mobile phase additive, differential HDX was used to detect a number of solvent accessible labile protons of protein on-column at pH and temperature conditions which provided unrestricted intrinsic H/D exchange (all-or-nothing approach). Varying SEC on-column conditions allowed for protein conformational changes to be observed. Temperature and pressure were independently studied with regards to their effect on the proteins' (insulin, cytochrome C, ubiquitin, and myoglobin) conformational changes in the solution. The obtained ΔHDX profiles revealed protein conformational changes in solution under varied conditions manifested as the difference in the number of protons exchanged to deuterons, or vice-versa. The approach described in this manuscript could prove useful for protein batch-to-batch comparisons, for optimization of chemical reactions with enzyme as catalyst or for protein chemical modification reactions. PMID:26763301

  4. Strategies for inhibiting function of HIV-1 accessory proteins: a necessary route to AIDS therapy?

    PubMed

    Richter, S N; Frasson, I; Palù, G

    2009-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) genome encodes three major structural proteins common to all retroviruses (Gag, Pol and Env), two regulatory proteins (Tat and Rev) that are essential for viral replication, and four accessory proteins (Nef, Vif, Vpu, Vpr). While accessory proteins were initially reported to be unnecessary for viral growth, their importance as virulence factors is now being more and more appreciated: they can dramatically alter the course and severity of viral infection, replication and disease progression. None of the HIV accessory proteins display enzymatic activity: they rather act altering cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions with a number of host cell factors. All currently approved anti-HIV drugs target pol and env encoded proteins. Therefore, widening the molecular targets of HIV therapy by additionally targeting accessory proteins may expand treatment options, resulting in high impact effective new therapy. In this review we present the state of the art of compounds that target HIV accessory proteins. Most of the research has focused on the inhibition of specific accessory proteins/host cell partner interactions. Promising compounds have been found within different classes of molecules: small natural and synthetic molecules, peptides and proteins, oligonucleotides, in particular those used as RNA interference (RNAi) tools. With the assortment of compounds available, especially against Nef and Vif functions, the demonstration of the clinical efficacy of the new anti-HIV-1 drugs targeting accessory proteins is next challenge.

  5. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C

    2016-04-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  6. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  7. Curcumin/turmeric solubilized in sodium hydroxide inhibits HNE protein modification--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2007-03-21

    Free radical mediated lipid peroxidation has been implicated in multiple diseases. A major oxidation by-product of this deleterious process is 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). HNE is cytotoxic, mutagenic and genotoxic and is involved in disease pathogenesis. Curcumin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (occurring as the yellow pigment found in the rhizomes of the perennial herb Curcuma longa known as turmeric), has emerged as the newest "nutraceutical" agent that has been shown to be efficacious against colon cancer and other disorders, including correcting cystic fibrosis defects. Since curcumin has been reported to have anti-oxidant properties we hypothesized that it will inhibit HNE-modification of a protein substrate. Using an ELISA that employed HNE-modification of solid phase antigen following immobilization, we found that the curcumin solubilized in dilute alkali (5mM sodium hydroxide, pH 11) inhibited HNE-protein modification by 65%. Turmeric also inhibited HNE-protein modification similarly (65%) but at a much lower alkali level (130muM sodium hydroxide, pH 7.6). Alkali by itself (5mM sodium hydroxide, pH 11) was found to enhance HNE modification by as much as 267%. Curcumin/turmeric has to inhibit this alkali enhanced HNE-modification prior to inhibiting the normal HNE protein modification induced by HNE. Thus, inhibition of HNE-modification could be a mechanism by which curcumin exerts its antioxidant effects. The pH at which the inhibition of HNE modification of substrate was observed was close to the physiological pH, making this formulation of curcumin potentially useful practically.

  8. Resveratrol inhibits the hydrogen dioxide-induced apoptosis via Sirt 1 activation in osteoblast cells.

    PubMed

    He, Na; Zhu, Xuewei; He, Wei; Zhao, Shiwei; Zhao, Weiyan; Zhu, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Sirt 1 plays a critical role in stress responses. We determined the deregulation of Sirt 1 activity, p53 acetylation, Bcl-2 expression, and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in mouse osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells which were exposed to H2O2. And then we investigated the protective role of Sirt 1 activator, Resveratrol (RSV), against the H2O2-induced apoptosis. Results demonstrated that Sirt 1 and Bcl-2 were inhibited, whereas p53 acetylation, Bax, and caspase 9 were promoted by H2O2, as was aggravated by the Sirt 1 inhibitor, EX-527. Instead, RSV inhibited the H2O2-induced both p53 acetylation and the caspase 9 activation, whereas ameliorated the H2O2-induced Bcl-2 inhibition and apoptosis. In conclusion, Sirt 1 was downregulated during the H2O2-induced apoptosis in MC3T3-E1 cells. And the chemical activation of Sirt 1 inhibited the H2O2-induced apoptosis via the downregulation of p53 acetylation. Our results suggest that Sirt 1 upregulation appears to be an important strategy to inhibit the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

  9. Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B inhibits apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages through protein S cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Yueh-Ying; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Kuo, Chih-Feng; Han, Chia-Li; Wang, Shuying; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages plays an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Previous study indicated that streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SPE B) reduces phagocytic activity in group A streptococcus (GAS) infection. Here, we demonstrate that SPE B causes an inhibitory effect on protein S-mediated phagocytosis. In the presence of SPE B, serum- and purified protein S-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells were significantly inhibited. The binding abilities of protein S to apoptotic cells were decreased by treatment with SPE B. Bacterial culture supernatants from GAS NZ131 strain also caused a reduction of protein S binding to apoptotic cells, but speB mutant strain did not. SPE B directly cleaved protein S in vitro and in vivo, whereas a lower level of cleavage occurred in mice infected with a speB isogenic mutant strain. SPE B-mediated initial cleavage of protein S caused a disruption of phagocytosis, and also resulted in a loss of binding ability of protein S-associated C4b-binding protein to apoptotic cells. Taken together, these results suggest a novel pathogenic role of SPE B that initiates protein S degradation followed by the inhibition of apoptotic cell clearance by macrophages. PMID:27181595

  10. Growth inhibition and differences in protein profiles in azadirachtin-treated Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Lai, Duo; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-04-01

    Azadirachtin A is a very effective biopesticide widely used in insect pest control. It has strong antifeeding and growth inhibitory activity against most insects, however, its mode of action is still unclear. Proteomic experiments using 2DE indicate significant effects of Azadirachtin A on the amount of proteins related to growth inhibition in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Twenty-one spots with different intensity in azadirachtin-treated larvae were identified. These proteins are involved in cytoskeletal organization, transcription and translation, hormonal regulation, and energy metabolism. Protein network analysis reveals heat shock protein 23 to be a potential target of azadirachtin. These results provide new insights into understanding the mechanism of growth inhibition in insects in response to azadirachtin. PMID:24458307

  11. Analysis of phosphorylated proteins and inhibition of kinase activity during Giardia intestinalis excystation.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Magda E; Wasserman, Moisés

    2010-03-01

    The parasite Giardia intestinalis undergoes a differentiation process that allows it to infect its mammal host. That process is excystation. We examined the importance of protein phosphorylation during the passage from cyst to trophozoite. Cysts obtained from patients with giardiasis were excysted in vitro and the soluble cytoplasmic proteins were analyzed during the three phases of the process, using a specific staining for phosphoproteins. We found two phosphorylated proteins and identified them with MALDI-TOF as 14-3-3 and Hsp70. Modifications were detected in both proteins, which could indicate a role in differentiation of the parasite. In addition, the inhibition of serine-threonine kinases during excystation specifically affected the cytokinesis of the excyzoite, thus inhibiting the completion of trophozoite formation.

  12. Probing Yeast Polarity with Acute, Reversible, Optogenetic Inhibition of Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Jost, Anna Payne-Tobin; Weiner, Orion D

    2015-10-16

    We recently developed a technique for rapidly and reversibly inhibiting protein function through light-inducible sequestration of proteins away from their normal sites of action. Here, we adapt this method for inducible inactivation of Bem1, a scaffold protein involved in budding yeast polarity. We find that acute inhibition of Bem1 produces profound defects in cell polarization and cell viability that are not observed in bem1Δ. By disrupting Bem1 activity at specific points in the cell cycle, we demonstrate that Bem1 is essential for the establishment of polarity and bud emergence but is dispensable for the growth of an emerged bud. By taking advantage of the reversibility of Bem1 inactivation, we show that pole size scales with cell size, and that this scaling is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. Our experiments reveal how rapid reversible inactivation of protein function complements traditional genetic approaches. This strategy should be widely applicable to other biological contexts.

  13. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1-3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  14. Water vapor inhibits hydrogen sulfide detection in pulsed fluorescence sulfur monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluhme, Anders B.; Ingemar, Jonas L.; Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2016-06-01

    The Thermo Scientific 450 Hydrogen Sulfide-Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). Sulfur dioxide is measured by pulsed fluorescence, while H2S is converted to SO2 with a molybdenum catalyst prior to detection. The 450 is widely used to measure ambient concentrations, e.g., for emissions monitoring and pollution control. An air stream with a constant H2S concentration was generated and the output of the analyzer recorded as a function of relative humidity (RH). The analyzer underreported H2S as soon as the relative humidity was increased. The fraction of undetected H2S increased from 8.3 at 5.3 % RH (294 K) to over 34 % at RH > 80 %. Hydrogen sulfide mole fractions of 573, 1142, and 5145 ppb were tested. The findings indicate that previous results obtained with instruments using similar catalysts should be re-evaluated to correct for interference from water vapor. It is suspected that water decreases the efficiency of the converter unit and thereby reduces the measured H2S concentration.

  15. Seminal plasma proteins inhibit in vitro- and cooling-induced capacitation in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vadnais, Melissa L; Roberts, Kenneth P

    2010-01-01

    Dilute boar seminal plasma (SP) has been shown to inhibit in vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes in boar spermatozoa, as assessed by the ability of the spermatozoa to undergo an ionophore-induced acrosome reaction. We hypothesised that the protein component of SP is responsible for this effect. To test this hypothesis, varying concentrations of total SP protein or SP proteins fractionated by heparin binding were assayed for their ability to inhibit in vitro capacitation, as well as cooling- and cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes. In vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes were prevented by 10% whole SP, as well as by total proteins extracted from SP at concentrations greater than 500 microg mL(-1). No amount of SP protein was able to prevent cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes. Total SP proteins were fractionated based on their heparin-binding properties and the heparin-binding fraction was shown to possess capacitation inhibitory activity at concentrations as low as 250 microg mL(-1). The proteins in the heparin-binding fraction were subjected to mass spectrometry and identified. The predominant proteins were three members of the spermadhesin families, namely AQN-3, AQN-1 and AWN, and SP protein pB1. We conclude that one or more of these heparin-binding SP proteins is able to inhibit in vitro capacitation and cooling-induced capacitation-like changes, but not cryopreservation-induced capacitation-like changes, in boar spermatozoa. PMID:20591323

  16. Results of a screening programme to identify plants or plant extracts that inhibit ruminal protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Selje, N; Hoffmann, E M; Muetzel, S; Ningrat, R; Wallace, R J; Becker, K

    2007-07-01

    One aim of the EC Framework V project, 'Rumen-up' (QLK5-CT-2001-00 992), was to find plants or plant extracts that would inhibit the nutritionally wasteful degradation of protein in the rumen. A total of 500 samples were screened in vitro using 14C-labelled casein in a 30-min incubation with ruminal digesta. Eight were selected for further investigation using a batch fermentation system and soya protein and bovine serum albumin as proteolysis substrates; proteolysis was monitored over 12 h by the disappearance of soluble protein and the production of branched SCFA and NH3. Freeze-dried, ground foliage of Peltiphyllum peltatum, Helianthemum canum, Arbutus unedo, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi and Knautia arvensis inhibited proteolysis (P < 0.05), while Daucus carota, Clematis vitalba and Erica arborea had little effect. Inhibition by the first four samples appeared to be caused by the formation of insoluble tannin-protein complexes. The samples were rich in phenolics and inhibition was reversed by polyethyleneglycol. In contrast, K. arvensis contained low concentrations of phenolics and no tannins, had no effect in the 30-min assay, yet inhibited the degradation rate of soluble protein (by 14 %, P < 0.0001) and the production of branched SCFA (by 17 %, P < 0.05) without precipitating protein in the 12-h batch fermentation. The effects showed some resemblance to those obtained in parallel incubations containing 3 mum-monensin, suggesting that K. arvensis may be a plant-derived feed additive that can suppress growth and activity of key proteolytic ruminal micro-organisms in a manner similar to that already well known for monensin. PMID:17445338

  17. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C; van Alphen, Lieke B; Patry, Robert T; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-12-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  18. The Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein ZAP Inhibits LINE and Alu Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, John B; Moran, John V

    2015-05-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome. To investigate the interplay between the L1 retrotransposition machinery and the host cell, we used co-immunoprecipitation in conjunction with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the L1 first open reading frame-encoded protein, ORF1p. We identified 39 ORF1p-interacting candidate proteins including the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP or ZC3HAV1). Here we show that the interaction between ZAP and ORF1p requires RNA and that ZAP overexpression in HeLa cells inhibits the retrotransposition of engineered human L1 and Alu elements, an engineered mouse L1, and an engineered zebrafish LINE-2 element. Consistently, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous ZAP in HeLa cells led to a ~2-fold increase in human L1 retrotransposition. Fluorescence microscopy in cultured human cells demonstrated that ZAP co-localizes with L1 RNA, ORF1p, and stress granule associated proteins in cytoplasmic foci. Finally, molecular genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that ZAP reduces the accumulation of full-length L1 RNA and the L1-encoded proteins, yielding mechanistic insight about how ZAP may inhibit L1 retrotransposition. Together, these data suggest that ZAP inhibits the retrotransposition of LINE and Alu elements.

  19. The Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein ZAP Inhibits LINE and Alu Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, John B; Moran, John V

    2015-05-01

    Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) is the only active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome. To investigate the interplay between the L1 retrotransposition machinery and the host cell, we used co-immunoprecipitation in conjunction with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the L1 first open reading frame-encoded protein, ORF1p. We identified 39 ORF1p-interacting candidate proteins including the zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP or ZC3HAV1). Here we show that the interaction between ZAP and ORF1p requires RNA and that ZAP overexpression in HeLa cells inhibits the retrotransposition of engineered human L1 and Alu elements, an engineered mouse L1, and an engineered zebrafish LINE-2 element. Consistently, siRNA-mediated depletion of endogenous ZAP in HeLa cells led to a ~2-fold increase in human L1 retrotransposition. Fluorescence microscopy in cultured human cells demonstrated that ZAP co-localizes with L1 RNA, ORF1p, and stress granule associated proteins in cytoplasmic foci. Finally, molecular genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that ZAP reduces the accumulation of full-length L1 RNA and the L1-encoded proteins, yielding mechanistic insight about how ZAP may inhibit L1 retrotransposition. Together, these data suggest that ZAP inhibits the retrotransposition of LINE and Alu elements. PMID:25951186

  20. Inhibition of Heterotrimeric G Protein Signaling by a Small Molecule Acting on Gα Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli; Damian, Marjorie; Gespach, Christian; Ferrandis, Eric; Lavergne, Olivier; De Wever, Olivier; Banères, Jean-Louis; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prévost, Grégoire Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous activation of many distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and heterotrimeric G proteins play a major role in various pathological conditions. Pan-inhibition of GPCR signaling by small molecules thus represents a novel strategy to treat various diseases. To better understand such therapeutic approach, we have characterized the biomolecular target of BIM-46187, a small molecule pan-inhibitor of GPCR signaling. Combining bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques in living cells as well as in reconstituted receptor-G protein complexes, we observed that, by direct binding to the Gα subunit, BIM-46187 prevents the conformational changes of the receptor-G protein complex associated with GPCR activation. Such a binding prevents the proper interaction of receptors with the G protein heterotrimer and inhibits the agonist-promoted GDP/GTP exchange. These observations bring further evidence that inhibiting G protein activation through direct binding to the Gα subunit is feasible and should constitute a new strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19648112

  1. A Flagellar Glycan-Specific Protein Encoded by Campylobacter Phages Inhibits Host Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Sacher, Jessica C.; van Alphen, Lieke B.; Patry, Robert T.; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    We previously characterized a carbohydrate binding protein, Gp047, derived from lytic Campylobacter phage NCTC 12673, as a promising diagnostic tool for the identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. We also demonstrated that this protein binds specifically to acetamidino-modified pseudaminic acid residues on host flagella, but the role of this protein in the phage lifecycle remains unknown. Here, we report that Gp047 is capable of inhibiting C. jejuni growth both on solid and liquid media, an activity, which we found to be bacteriostatic. The Gp047 domain responsible for bacterial growth inhibition is localized to the C-terminal quarter of the protein, and this activity is both contact- and dose-dependent. Gp047 gene homologues are present in all Campylobacter phages sequenced to date, and the resulting protein is not part of the phage particle. Therefore, these results suggest that either phages of this pathogen have evolved an effector protein capable of host-specific growth inhibition, or that Campylobacter cells have developed a mechanism of regulating their growth upon sensing an impending phage threat. PMID:26694450

  2. Hydrogens detected by subatomic resolution protein crystallography in a [NiFe] hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideaki; Nishikawa, Koji; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-04-23

    The enzyme hydrogenase reversibly converts dihydrogen to protons and electrons at a metal catalyst. The location of the abundant hydrogens is of key importance for understanding structure and function of the protein. However, in protein X-ray crystallography the detection of hydrogen atoms is one of the major problems, since they display only weak contributions to diffraction and the quality of the single crystals is often insufficient to obtain sub-ångström resolution. Here we report the crystal structure of a standard [NiFe] hydrogenase (∼91.3 kDa molecular mass) at 0.89 Å resolution. The strictly anoxically isolated hydrogenase has been obtained in a specific spectroscopic state, the active reduced Ni-R (subform Ni-R1) state. The high resolution, proper refinement strategy and careful modelling allow the positioning of a large part of the hydrogen atoms in the structure. This has led to the direct detection of the products of the heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen into a hydride (H(-)) bridging the Ni and Fe and a proton (H(+)) attached to the sulphur of a cysteine ligand. The Ni-H(-) and Fe-H(-) bond lengths are 1.58 Å and 1.78Å, respectively. Furthermore, we can assign the Fe-CO and Fe-CN(-) ligands at the active site, and can obtain the hydrogen-bond networks and the preferred proton transfer pathway in the hydrogenase. Our results demonstrate the precise comprehensive information available from ultra-high-resolution structures of proteins as an alternative to neutron diffraction and other methods such as NMR structural analysis. PMID:25624102

  3. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  4. Inhibition of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) using whey proteins

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The antiviral activity of native and esterified whey proteins fractions (α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and lactoferrin) was studied to inhibit tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) on infected tomato plants. Whey proteins fractions and their esterified derivatives were sprayed into TYLCV-infected plants. Samples were collected from infected leaves before treatment, 7 and 15 days after treatment for DNA and molecular hybridization analysis. The most evident inhibition of virus replication was observed after 7 and 15 days using α-lactoferrin and α-lactalbumin, respectively. Native and esterified lactoferrin showed complete inhibition after 7 days. On the other hand, native β-lactoglobulin showed inhibition after 7 and 15 days whereas esterified β-lactoglobulin was comparatively more effective after 7 days. The relative amount of viral DNA was less affected by the esterified α-lactalbumin whereas native α-lactalbumin inhibited virus replication completely after 15 days. These results indicate that native or modified whey proteins fractions can be used for controlling the TYLCV-infected plants. PMID:20128897

  5. Inhibition of protein-protein interactions with low molecular weight compounds

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marilyn M.; Weber, David J.; Shapiro, Paul S.; Coop, Andrew; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of issues associated with the design and development of low molecular weight inhibitors of protein-protein interactions is presented. Areas discussed include information on the nature of protein-protein interfaces, methods to characterize those interfaces and methods by which that information is applied towards ligand identification and design. Specific examples of the strategy for the identification of inhibitors of protein-protein interactions involving the proteins p56lck kinase, ERK2 and the calcium-binding protein S100B are presented. Physical characterization of the inhibitors identified in those studies shows them to have drug-like and lead-like properties, indicating their potential to be developed into therapeutic agents. PMID:21927717

  6. Surface plasmon resonance assay of inhibition by pharmaceuticals for thyroxine hormone binging to transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Keigo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay to estimate the competitive inhibition by pharmaceuticals for thyroxine (T4) binding to thyroid hormone transport proteins, transthyretin (TTR) and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG). In this SPR assay, the competitive inhibition of pharmaceuticals for introducing T4 into immobilized TTR or TBG on the sensor chip can be estimated using a running buffer containing pharmaceuticals. The SPR assay showed reproducible immobilization of TTR and TBG, and the kinetic binding parameters of T4 to TTR or TBG were estimated. The equilibrium dissociation constants of TTR or TBG measured by SPR did not clearly differ from data reported for other binding assays. To estimate the competitive inhibition of tetraiodothyroacetic acid, diclofenac, genistein, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, and furosemide, reported to be competitive or noncompetitive pharmaceuticals for T4 binding to TTR or TBG, their 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) (or 80% inhibition concentration, IC80) were calculated from the change of T4 responses in sensorgrams obtained with various concentrations of the pharmaceuticals. Our SPR method should be a useful tool for predicting the potential of thyroid toxicity of pharmaceuticals by evaluating the competitive inhibition of T4 binding to thyroid hormone binding proteins, TTR and TBG.

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Selectively Inhibits γ-Secretase Activity and Decreases Mitochondrial Aβ Production in Neurons from APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Li; Qiao, Pei-Feng; Yan, Ning; Gao, Dan; Liu, Meng-Jie; Yan, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now considered to be a gasotransmitter and may be involved in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A majority of APP is associated with mitochondria and is a substrate for the mitochondrial γ-secretase. The mitochondria-associated APP metabolism where APP intracellular domains (AICD) and Aβ are generated locally and may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. Here, we aimed to investigate the ability of H2S to mediate APP processing in mitochondria and assessed the possible mechanisms underlying H2S-mediated AD development. We treated neurons from APP/PS1 transgenic mice with a range of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) concentrations. NaHS attenuated APP processing and decreased Aβ production in mitochondria. Meanwhile, NaHS did not changed BACE-1 and ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10) protein levels, but NaHS (30 μM) significantly increased the levels of presenilin 1(PS1), PEN-2, and NCT, as well as improved the γ-secretase activity, while NaHS (50 μM) exhibits the opposing effects. Furthermore, the intracellular ATP and the COX IV activity of APP/PS1 neurons were increased after 30 μM NaHS treatment, while the ROS level was decreased and the MMP was stabilized. The effect of NaHS differs from DAPT (a non-selective γ-secretase inhibitor), and it selectively inhibited γ-secretase in vitro, without interacting with Notch and modulating its cleavage. The results indicated that NaHS decreases Aβ accumulation in mitochondria by selectively inhibiting γ-secretase. Thus, we provide a mechanistic view of NaHS is a potential anti-AD drug candidate and it may decrease Aβ deposition in mitochondria by selectively inhibiting γ-secretase activity and therefore protecting the mitochondrial function during AD conditions.

  8. Protein Abundance Changes and Ubiquitylation Targets Identified after Inhibition of the Proteasome with Syringolin A*

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Dudler, Robert; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2014-01-01

    As proteins are the main effectors inside cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partly achieved by specific protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS). In plants, an exceptionally high number of proteins are involved in Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system-mediated protein degradation and it is known to regulate most, if not all, important cellular processes. Here, we investigated the response to the inhibition of the proteasome at the protein level treating leaves with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) in a daytime specific manner and found 109 accumulated and 140 decreased proteins. The patterns of protein level changes indicate that the accumulating proteins cause proteotoxic stress that triggers various responses. Comparing protein level changes in SylA treated with those in a transgenic line over-expressing a mutated ubiquitin unable to form polyubiquitylated proteins produced little overlap pointing to different response pathways. To distinguish between direct and indirect targets of the UPS we also enriched and identified ubiquitylated proteins after inhibition of the proteasome, revealing a total of 1791 ubiquitylated proteins in leaves and roots and 1209 that were uniquely identified in our study. The comparison of the ubiquitylated proteins with those changing in abundance after SylA-mediated inhibition of the proteasome confirmed the complexity of the response and revealed that some proteins are regulated both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. For the ubiquitylated proteins that accumulate in the cytoplasm but are targeted to the plastid or the mitochondrion, we often found peptides in their target sequences, demonstrating that the UPS is involved in controlling organellar protein levels. Attempts to identify the sites of ubiquitylation revealed that the specific properties of this post-translational modification can lead to incorrect peptide spectrum assignments in complex peptide mixtures

  9. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  10. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  11. Inhibition of protein carbamylation in urea solution using ammonium-containing buffers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Urea solution is one of the most commonly employed protein denaturants for protease digestion in proteomic studies. However, it has long been recognized that urea solution can cause carbamylation at the N termini of proteins/peptides and at the side chain amino groups of lysine and arginine residues. Protein/peptide carbamylation blocks protease digestion and affects protein identification and quantification in mass spectrometry analysis by blocking peptide amino groups from isotopic/isobaric labeling and changing peptide charge states, retention times, and masses. In addition, protein carbamylation during sample preparation makes it difficult to study in vivo protein carbamylation. In this study, we compared the peptide carbamylation in urea solutions of different buffers and found that ammonium-containing buffers were the most effective buffers to inhibit protein carbamylation in urea solution. The possible mechanism of carbamylation inhibition by ammonium-containing buffers is discussed, and a revised procedure for the protease digestion of proteins in urea and ammonium-containing buffers was developed to facilitate its application in proteomic research.

  12. MECHANISM OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE INHIBITION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS (HAEC) EXPOSED TO ZN2+

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to Zn2+ inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity and leads to activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in ...

  13. Seleninate in Place of Phosphate: Irreversible Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Mohannad; Liu, Sijiu; Zhou, Bo; Walls, Chad D.; Wu, Li; Knapp, Spencer; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-02-16

    A homotyrosine based seleninic acid irreversibly inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases by forming a covalent selenosulfide linkage with the active site cysteine sulfhydryl specifically. The details of the event are revealed by model synthetic studies and by kinetic, mass spectrometric, and crystallographic characterization.

  14. LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION, FERTILITY INHIBITION, AND EPITOPE MAPS USING ANTIBODIES TO THE SPERM PROTEIN SP22. GR Klinefelter1, JE Welch*1, HDM Moore*2, K Bobseine*1, J Suarez*1 ,N Roberts*1 ,R Zucker *1 1U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, RTP, NC and 2University of Sheffield...

  15. Ozone inhibits endothelial cell cyclooxygenase activity through formation of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Eling, T.E.; Friedman, M.

    1987-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a 2H exposure of cultured pulmonary endothelial cells to ozone (0.0-1.0 ppm) in-vitro resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of endothelial prostacyclin production (90% decrease at the 1.0 ppm level). Ozone-exposed endothelial cells, incubated with 20 uM arachidonate, also demonstrated a significant inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. To further examine the mechanisms of the inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis, bovine pulmonary endothelial cells were exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2H. A significant decrease in prostacyclin synthesis was found within 5 min of exposure (77 +/- 36% of air-exposed control values, p less than 0.05). Endothelial prostacyclin synthesis returned to baseline levels by 12H after ozone exposure, a time point which was similar to the recovery time of unexposed endothelium treated with 0.5 uM acetylsalicylic acid. Incubation of endothelial cells, previously exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2 hours, with 4 uM PGH2 resulted in restoration of essentially normal prostacyclin synthesis. When endothelial cells were co-incubated with catalase (5 U/ml) during ozone exposure, no inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis was observed. Co-incubation with either heat-inactivated catalase or superoxide dismutase (10 U/ml) did not affect the ozone-induced inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. These data suggest that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is a major toxic species produced in endothelial cells during ozone exposure and responsible for the inhibition of endothelial cyclooxygenase activity.

  16. Phosphorylation of synaptosomal cytoplasmic proteins: Inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase c) by bay k 8644.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Lovenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    The phosphorylation of specific substrates of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) was examined in striatal synaptosomal cytoplasm. The phosphoprotein substrata were termed group C phosphoprotems and were divided into two subgroups: group C(1) phosphoproteins (P83, P45A, P21 and P18) were found in both cytoplasm and synaptosomal membranes and, although stimulated by phosphatidylserine, only required exogamous calcium for their labeling; group C(2) phosphoproteins (P120, P96, P21.5, P18.5 and P16) were found predominantly in the cytoplasm and were absolutely dependent upon exogenous calcium and phosphatidylserme for their labeling. Several criteria were used to identify these proteins as specific protein kinase C substrates: (a) their phosphorylation was stimulated to a greater extent by Ca(2+) /phosphatidylserine/diolein than by Ca(2+) alone or Cal(2+) /calmodulin (group C(1)) or was completely dependent upon Ca(2+) /phosphatdylserine/diolein (group C(2)); (b) supermaximal concentrations of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor were without effect; (c) their phosphorylation was stimulated by oleic acid, which selectively activates protein kinase C in the absence of Ca(2+); (d) NaCl, which inhibited cAMP- and Ca(2+)/calmodulindependent phosphorylation, slightly increased phosphorylation of group C(1) and slightly decreased phosphorylation of group C(2) phosphoproteins. Maximal phosphorylation of P96 and other group C phosphoproteins occurred within 60 s and was followed by a slow decay rate while substrata of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase were maximally labeled within 20-30 s and rapidly dephosphorylated. The phosphorylation of all group C phosphoproteins was inhibited by the calcium channel agomst BAY K 8644, however, group C(2) phosphoproteins were considerably more sensitive. The IC(50) for inhibition of P96 labeling was 19 ?M. but for P83 was 190 ?M. Group B phosphoproteins were also slightly inhibited, and the

  17. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  18. Generic inhibition of amyloidogenic proteins by two naphthoquinone-tryptophan hybrid molecules.

    PubMed

    Scherzer-Attali, Roni; Shaltiel-Karyo, Ronit; Adalist, Yonatan H; Segal, Daniel; Gazit, Ehud

    2012-08-01

    Amyloid formation is associated with several human diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and so forth, no disease modifying therapeutics are available for them. Because of the structural similarities between the amyloid species characterizing these diseases, (despite the lack of amino acid homology) it is believed that there might be a common mechanism of toxicity for these conditions. Thus, inhibition of amyloid formation could be a promising disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for them. Aromatic residues have been identified as crucial in formation and stabilization of amyloid structures. This finding was corroborated by high-resolution structural studies, theoretical analysis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Amongst the aromatic entities, tryptophan was found to possess the most amyloidogenic potential. We therefore postulate that targeting aromatic recognition interfaces by tryptophan could be a useful approach for inhibiting the formation of amyloids. Quinones are known as inhibitors of cellular metabolic pathways, to have anti- cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial properties and were shown to inhibit aggregation of several amyloidogenic proteins in vitro. We have previously described two quinone-tryptophan hybrids which are capable of inhibiting amyloid-beta, the protein associated with AD pathology, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we tested their generic properties and their ability to inhibit other amyloidogenic proteins including α-synuclein, islet amyloid polypeptide, lysozyme, calcitonin, and insulin. Both compounds showed efficient inhibition of all five proteins examined both by ThT fluorescence analysis and by electron microscope imaging. If verified in vivo, these small molecules could serve as leads for developing generic anti-amyloid drugs.

  19. The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor stimulates hydrogen fermentation by inhibiting methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-BER) is useful for dark hydrogen fermentation. The effect of the electrochemical reaction on microorganisms in the Ml-BER was investigated using glucose as the substrate and compared with organisms in a membraneless non-bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-NBER) and bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) with a proton exchange membrane. The potentials on the working electrode of the Ml-BER and BER with membrane were regulated to -0.9 V (versus Ag/AgCl) to avoid water electrolysis with a carbon electrode. The Ml-BER showed suppressed methane production (19.8 ± 9.1 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and increased hydrogen production (12.6 ± 3.1 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.2 ± 0.1, and the major intermediate was butyrate (24.9 ± 2.4 mM), suggesting efficient hydrogen fermentation. In contrast, the Ml-NBER showed high methane production (239.3 ± 17.9 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and low hydrogen production (0.2 ± 0.0 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.3 ± 0.1. In the cathodic chamber of the BER with membrane, methane production was high (276.3 ± 20.4 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) (pHout, 7.2 ± 0.1). In the anodic chamber of the BER with membrane (anode-BER), gas production was low because of high lactate production (43.6 ± 1.7 mM) at pHout 5.0 ± 0.1. Methanogenic archaea were not detected in the Ml-BER and anode-BER. However, Methanosarcina sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were found in Ml-NBER. Prokaryotic copy numbers in the Ml-BER and Ml-NBER were similar, as were the bacterial community structures. Thus, the electrochemical reaction in the Ml-BER affected hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens, but not the bacterial community. PMID:23053110

  20. A coarse-grained α-carbon protein model with anisotropic hydrogen-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Eng-Hui; Fawzi, Nicolas Lux; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We develop a sequence based α-carbon model to incorporate a mean field estimate of the orientation dependence of the polypeptide chain that gives rise to specific hydrogen bond pairing to stabilize α-helices and β-sheets. We illustrate the success of the new protein model in capturing thermodynamic measures and folding mechanism of proteins L and G. Compared to our previous coarse-grained model, the new model shows greater folding cooperativity and improvements in designability of protein sequences, as well as predicting correct trends for kinetic rates and mechanism for proteins L and G. We believe the model is broadly applicable to other protein folding and protein–protein co-assembly processes, and does not require experimental input beyond the topology description of the native state. Even without tertiary topology information, it can also serve as a mid-resolution protein model for more exhaustive conformational search strategies that can bridge back down to atomic descriptions of the polypeptide chain. PMID:17879350

  1. Start2Fold: a database of hydrogen/deuterium exchange data on protein folding and stability

    PubMed Central

    Pancsa, Rita; Varadi, Mihaly; Tompa, Peter; Vranken, Wim F.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins fulfil a wide range of tasks in cells; understanding how they fold into complex three-dimensional (3D) structures and how these structures remain stable while retaining sufficient dynamics for functionality is essential for the interpretation of overall protein behaviour. Since the 1950's, solvent exchange-based methods have been the most powerful experimental means to obtain information on the folding and stability of proteins. Considerable expertise and care were required to obtain the resulting datasets, which, despite their importance and intrinsic value, have never been collected, curated and classified. Start2Fold is an openly accessible database (http://start2fold.eu) of carefully curated hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) data extracted from the literature that is open for new submissions from the community. The database entries contain (i) information on the proteins investigated and the underlying experimental procedures and (ii) the classification of the residues based on their exchange protection levels, also allowing for the instant visualization of the relevant residue groups on the 3D structures of the corresponding proteins. By providing a clear hierarchical framework for the easy sharing, comparison and (re-)interpretation of HDX data, Start2Fold intends to promote a better understanding of how the protein sequence encodes folding and structure as well as the development of new computational methods predicting protein folding and stability. PMID:26582925

  2. Identification of a 2-cys peroxiredoxin as a tetramethyl benzidine-hydrogen peroxide stained protein from the thylakoids of the extreme halophyte Arthrocnemum macrostachyum L.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrea; Antonacci, Alessia; Marsano, Francesco; Redondo-Gomez, Susana; Figueroa Clemente, Enrique Manuel; Andreucci, Flora; Barbato, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Tetramethylbenzidine-H(2)O(2) staining of SDS-polyacrylamide gel is a widely used method for the specific detection of proteins with heme-dependent peroxidase activity. When this method was used with thylakoids from the halophytic plant Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, besides the cytochrome f and cytochrome b6 proteins usually found in higher plants and cyanobacteria, at least four additional bands were detected. One of them, a 46-kDa protein, was shown to be an extrinsic protein, and identified by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting as a 2-cys peroxiredoxin. Peroxidase activity was insensitive to oxidizing agents such as trans-4,4-diydroxy-1,2-dithiane or hydrogen peroxide, but was inhibited by treatment of thylakoids with reducing agents such as dithiothreitol or mercaptoethanol. By immunoblotting, it was shown that loss of peroxidase activity was paralleled by disappearance of the 46-kDa band, which was converted to a 23-kDa immunoreactive form. A dimer/monomer relationship between the two proteins is suggested, with the dimeric form likely being a heme-binding protein. This possibility was further supported by anionic exchange chromatography and de novo sequencing of tryptic fragments of the protein and sequence comparison, as most of the residues previously implicated in heme binding in 2-cys peroxiredoxin from Rattus norvegicus were conserved in A. macrostachyum. The amount of this protein was modulated by environmental conditions, and increased when salt concentration in the growth medium was higher or lower than the optimal one. PMID:22683464

  3. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  4. Aluminium and hydrogen ions inhibit a mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    The tension-dependent activity of mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in excised plasmalemmal patches from onion bulb scale epidermis is modulated by pH in the physiologically meaningful range between 4.5 and 7.2. It is rapidly lowered by lowering pH and rapidly raised by raising pH. Channel activity is effectively inhibited by low levels of aluminium ions and activity can be partially restored by washing for a few minutes. We suggest that under normal conditions the sensitivity of the mechanosensory channels to pH of the wall free space plays important roles in regulation of plant activities such as growth. We further suggest that, when levels of acid and aluminium ions in the soil solution are high, they might inhibit similar sensory channels in cells of the root tip, thus contributing critically to the acid soil syndrome.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Improves Vascular Calcification in Rats by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Teng, Xu; Li, Hui; Xue, Hong-Mei; Guo, Qi; Xiao, Lin; Wu, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the vitamin D3 plus nicotine (VDN) model of rats was used to prove that H2S alleviates vascular calcification (VC) and phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Besides, H2S can also inhibit endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) of calcified aortic tissues. The effect of H2S on alleviating VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC can be blocked by TM, while PBA also alleviated VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC that was similar to the effect of H2S. These results suggest that H2S may alleviate rat aorta VC by inhibiting ERS, providing new target and perspective for prevention and treatment of VC. PMID:27022436

  6. Hydrogen-ion binding by tobacco-mosaic-virus protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Durham, A C; Vogel, D; de Marcillac, G D

    1977-09-15

    Hydrogen ion titration curves of tobacco mosaic virus protein have been measured in various conditions of protein concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and rate of pH change. The polymers present at each stage are deduced from turbidity and sedimentation data, plus published information. A simple semi-quantitative analysis of the curves is given, and the pK values of the two abnormal carboxylates in single helix are estimated as 6.4 and about 7.0. Disks, and some faster-forming unknown polymers in the same size range, have been abnormal carboxylate with pK 6.9. These results are most easily interpreted in terms of electrostatic interactions between carboxylates, probably at the axial ends of the protein subunits.

  7. A phage protein that inhibits the bacterial ATPase required for type IV pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Chung, In-Young; Jang, Hye-Jeong; Bae, Hee-Won; Cho, You-Hee

    2014-08-01

    Type IV pili (TFPs) are required for bacterial twitching motility and for phage infection in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we describe a phage-encoded protein, D3112 protein gp05 (hereafter referred to as Tip, representing twitching inhibitory protein), whose expression is necessary and sufficient to mediate the inhibition of twitching motility. Tip interacts with and blocks the activity of bacterial-encoded PilB, the TFP assembly/extension ATPase, at an internal 40-aa region unique to PilB. Tip expression results in the loss of surface piliation. Based on these observations and the fact that many P. aeruginosa phages require TFPs for infection, Tip-mediated twitching inhibition may represent a generalized strategy for superinfection exclusion. Moreover, because TFPs are required for full virulence, PilB may be an attractive target for the development of novel antiinfectives. PMID:25049409

  8. Gentamicin inhibits HSP70-assisted protein folding by interfering with substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Soh; Nakano, Shunsuke; Owari, Kensuke; Fuziwara, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Nobuaki; Otaka, Michiro; Tamaki, Kumiko; Watanabe, Sumio; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Wakui, Hideki; Sawada, Ken-Ichi; Kubota, Hiroshi; Itoh, Hideaki

    2010-02-19

    We previously reported that gentamicin (GM) specifically binds to heat-shock protein with subunit molecular masses of 70 kDa (HSP70). In the present study, we have investigated the effects of GM binding on HSP70-assisted protein folding in vitro. The C-terminal, and not the N-terminal of HSP70 was found to bind to GM. GM significantly suppressed refolding of firefly luciferase in the presence of HSP70 and HSP40, although the ATPase activity of HSP70 was unaffected by GM. A surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that GM specifically interferes with the binding of HSP70 to a model peptide that mimics the exposed hydrophobic surface of the folding intermediates. These results indicated that GM inhibits the chaperone activity of HSP70 and may suppress protein folding via inhibition of HSP70 in vivo.

  9. Antisense inhibition of the photosystem I antenna protein Lhca4 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Goodman, H M; Jansson, S

    1997-01-01

    The function of Lhca4, a gene encoding the photosystem 1 type IV chlorophyll a/b-binding protein complex in Arabidopsis, was investigated using antisense technology. Lhca4 protein was reduced in a number of mutant lines and abolished in one. The inhibition of protein was not correlated with the inhibition of mRNA. No depletion of Lhca1 was observed, but the low-temperature fluorescence emission spectrum was drastically altered in the mutants. The emission maximum was blue-shifted by 6 nm, showing that chlorophyll molecules bound to Lhca4 are responsible for most of the long-wavelength fluorescence emission. Some mutants also showed an unexplainable delay in flowering time and an increase in seed weight. PMID:9414561

  10. Inhibition of angiogenesis by a synthetic fusion protein VTF derived from vasostatin and tumstatin.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quliang; Sun, Cihuang; Luo, Jinxian; Zhang, Tianyuan; Wang, Lijing

    2014-10-01

    The inhibition of angiogenesis represents a potential strategy for antitumor therapy. A novel synthetic fusion protein VTF, composed of bioactive fragments from two different angiogenesis inhibitors, vasostatin and tumstatin with a (Gly-Ser-Gly)2 bridge, was generated using the pET-15b expression vector. The fusion protein VTF showed significantly enhanced efficacy in inhibiting human endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation and neovascularization on chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Moreover, VTF suppressed the growth of B16 melanoma and the formation of tumor blood vessels potently in vivo. These results indicated that the fusion protein containing the bioactive fragments of multiple angiogenesis inhibitors might be a promising therapeutic agent for tumor treatment. PMID:24942148

  11. Biomass hydrolysis inhibition at high hydrogen partial pressure in solid-state anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Cazier, E A; Trably, E; Steyer, J P; Escudie, R

    2015-08-01

    In solid-state anaerobic digestion, so-called ss-AD, biogas production is inhibited at high total solids contents. Such inhibition is likely caused by a slow diffusion of dissolved reaction intermediates that locally accumulate. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 and CO2 partial pressure on ss-AD. Partial pressure of H2 and/or CO2 was artificially fixed, from 0 to 1 557mbars for H2 and from 0 to 427mbars for CO2. High partial pressure of H2 showed a significant effect on methanogenesis, while CO2 had no impact. At high [Formula: see text] , the overall substrate degradation decreased with no accumulation of metabolites from acidogenic bacteria, indicating that the hydrolytic activity was specifically impacted. Interestingly, such inhibition did not occur when CO2 was added with H2. This result suggests that CO2 gas transfer is probably a key factor in ss-AD from biomass.

  12. Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor protein (RhoGDI) inhibits exocytosis in mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mariot, P; O'Sullivan, A J; Brown, A M; Tatham, P E

    1996-01-01

    Introducing non-hydrolysable analogues of GTP into the cytosolic compartment of mast cells results in exocytotic secretion through the activation of GTP binding proteins. The identity and mechanism of action of these proteins are not established. We have investigated the effects of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) on exocytosis induced by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) in rat mast cells, introducing the protein into cells by means of a patch pipette and recording the progress of exocytosis by monitoring cell capacitance. To allow time for the protein to enter the cells and find its correct location, stimulation was provided 5-10 min after patch rupture by photolysing caged GTP-gamma-S included in the pipette solution. When bovine RhoGDI was introduced into mast cells, exocytosis was inhibited at concentrations of 200-400 nM for native protein and 800 nM to 8 microM for the recombinant form. Protein denatured by heat or N-ethylmaleimide treatment did not inhibit. In permeabilized cells, recombinant RhoGDI increased the rate at which cells lose their ability to respond to GTP-gamma-S. These data demonstrate that one or more small GTP binding proteins of the Rho family has a central role in the exocytotic mechanism in mast cells. Images PMID:8978674

  13. UCH-L1 Inhibition Decreases the Microtubule-Binding Function of Tau Protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Han, Yun; Yu, Quntao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Shaohui; Liao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is critical for protein degradation and free ubiquitin recycling. In Alzheimer's disease brains, UCH-L1 is negatively related to neurofibrillary tangles whose major component is hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the direct action of UCH-L1 on tau has not been reported. In the current study, mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were treated by the different concentrations of UCH-L1 inhibitor LDN (2.5, 5 and 10 μM) to inhibit the hydrolase activity of UCH-L1. In addition, we also used UCH-L1 siRNA to treat the HEK293/tau441 cells to decrease the expression of UCH-L1. After LDN and UCH-L1 siRNA treatment, we used immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and tau-microtubule binding assay to measure the microtubule-binding ability and post-translational modifications of tau protein. All the results presented that both inhibition of the activity and expression of UCH-L1 induced the decreased microtubule-binding ability and increased phosphorylation of tau protein. Abnormal aggregation and ubiquitination of tau protein was also observed after UCH-L1 inhibition. The above results suggested that aggregation of tau protein might be devoted to the abnormal post-translational modifications of tau protein. Our study first indicates that dysfunction of UCH-L1 most likely affected normal biological function of tau protein through decreasing degradation of ubiquitinated and hyperphosphorylated tau. PMID:26444754

  14. Proteins in the Cocoon of Silkworm Inhibit the Growth of Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Youshan; Liu, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Silk cocoons are composed of fiber proteins (fibroins) and adhesive glue proteins (sericins), which provide a physical barrier to protect the inside pupa. Moreover, other proteins were identified in the cocoon silk, many of which are immune related proteins. In this study, we extracted proteins from the silkworm cocoon by Tris-HCl buffer (pH7.5), and found that they had a strong inhibitory activity against fungal proteases and they had higher abundance in the outer cocoon layers than in the inner cocoon layers. Moreover, we found that extracted cocoon proteins can inhibit the germination of Beauveria bassiana spores. Consistent with the distribution of protease inhibitors, we found that proteins from the outer cocoon layers showed better inhibitory effects against B. bassiana spores than proteins from the inner layers. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to reveal the extracted components in the scaffold silk, the outermost cocoon layer. A total of 129 proteins were identified, 30 of which were annotated as protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors accounted for 89.1% in abundance among extracted proteins. These protease inhibitors have many intramolecular disulfide bonds to maintain their stable structure, and remained active after being boiled. This study added a new understanding to the antimicrobial function of the cocoon. PMID:27032085

  15. Proteins in the Cocoon of Silkworm Inhibit the Growth of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaomeng; Dong, Zhaoming; Zhang, Yan; Li, Youshan; Liu, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Silk cocoons are composed of fiber proteins (fibroins) and adhesive glue proteins (sericins), which provide a physical barrier to protect the inside pupa. Moreover, other proteins were identified in the cocoon silk, many of which are immune related proteins. In this study, we extracted proteins from the silkworm cocoon by Tris-HCl buffer (pH7.5), and found that they had a strong inhibitory activity against fungal proteases and they had higher abundance in the outer cocoon layers than in the inner cocoon layers. Moreover, we found that extracted cocoon proteins can inhibit the germination of Beauveria bassiana spores. Consistent with the distribution of protease inhibitors, we found that proteins from the outer cocoon layers showed better inhibitory effects against B. bassiana spores than proteins from the inner layers. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to reveal the extracted components in the scaffold silk, the outermost cocoon layer. A total of 129 proteins were identified, 30 of which were annotated as protease inhibitors. Protease inhibitors accounted for 89.1% in abundance among extracted proteins. These protease inhibitors have many intramolecular disulfide bonds to maintain their stable structure, and remained active after being boiled. This study added a new understanding to the antimicrobial function of the cocoon. PMID:27032085

  16. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-01-01

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%–99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy. PMID:26114473

  17. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  18. Activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 is inhibited by the influenza A virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Talon, J; Horvath, C M; Polley, R; Basler, C F; Muster, T; Palese, P; García-Sastre, A

    2000-09-01

    We present a novel mechanism by which viruses may inhibit the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) cascade. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein NS1 of influenza virus is shown to prevent the potent antiviral interferon response by inhibiting the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a key regulator of IFN-alpha/beta gene expression. IRF-3 activation and, as a consequence, IFN-beta mRNA induction are inhibited in wild-type (PR8) influenza virus-infected cells but not in cells infected with an isogenic virus lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1 virus). Furthermore, NS1 is shown to be a general inhibitor of the interferon signaling pathway. Inhibition of IRF-3 activation can be achieved by the expression of wild-type NS1 in trans, not only in delNS1 virus-infected cells but also in cells infected with a heterologous RNA virus (Newcastle disease virus). We propose that inhibition of IRF-3 activation by a dsRNA binding protein significantly contributes to the virulence of influenza A viruses and possibly to that of other viruses.

  19. ITRACONAZOLE INHIBITS ENTEROVIRUS REPLICATION BY TARGETING THE OXYSTEROL-BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Jeroen R.P.M.; van der Linden, Lonneke; Albulescu, Lucian; Bigay, Joëlle; Arita, Minetaro; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Lanke, Kjerstin H.W.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Ulferts, Rachel; Drin, Guillaume; Schlinck, Nina; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Sever, Navdar; Head, Sarah A.; Liu, Jun O.; Beachy, Philip A.; De Matteis, Maria A.; Shair, Matthew D.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Itraconazole (ITZ) is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anti-cancer activity. In this study, we identified ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus). We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4). Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e. shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as novel molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs. PMID:25640182

  20. Regulatory elements and structural features of Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene for fungal and pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are involved in plant defense. PGIPs are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that are known to inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs) during the infection process. Several sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes (BvPGIP) were clon...

  1. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; De la Parra, Columba; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J; Wade, Paul A; Saxton, Arnold M; Donnell, Robert M; Pestell, Richard G; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie; Wimalasena, Jay

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  2. Protein kinase B/Akt1 inhibits autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wonseok; Ju, Ji-hyun; Lee, Kyung-min; Nam, KeeSoo; Oh, Sunhwa; Shin, Incheol

    2013-02-01

    Autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a selective intracellular degradative process involving the cell's own lysosomal apparatus. An essential component in cell development, homeostasis, repair and resistance to stress, autophagy may result in either cell death or survival. The targeted region of the cell is sequestered within a membrane structure, the autophagosome, for regulation of the catabolic process. A key factor in both autophagosome formation and autophagosome maturation is a protein encoded by the ultraviolet irradiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG). Conversely, the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt), which regulates survival in various cancers, inhibits autophagy through mTOR activation. We found that Akt1 may also directly inhibit autophagy by down-regulating UVRAG both in a 293T transient transfection system and breast cancer cells stably expressing Akt1. The UVRAG with mutations at putative Akt1-phosphorylation sites were still inhibited by Akt1, and dominant-negative Akt1 also inhibited UVRAG expression, suggesting that Akt1 down-regulates UVRAG by a kinase activity-independent mechanism. We showed that Akt1 overexpression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells down-regulated UVRAG transcription. Cells over-expressing Akt1 were more resistant than control cells to ultraviolet light-induced autophagy and exhibited the associated reduction in cell viability. Levels of the autophagosome indicator protein LC3B-II and mRFP-GFP-LC3 were reduced in cells that over-expressing Akt1. Inhibiting Akt1 by siRNA or reintroducing UVRAG gene rescued the level of LC3B-II in UV-irradiation. Altogether, these data suggest that Akt1 may inhibit autophagy by decreasing UVRAG expression, which also sensitizes cancer cells to UV irradiation.

  3. A pro-chelator triggered by hydrogen peroxide inhibits iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Franz, Katherine J

    2006-09-27

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a new pro-chelating agent, isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide (BSIH), are presented. BSIH only weakly interacts with iron unless hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present to remove the boronic ester protecting group to reveal a phenol that is a key metal-binding group of tridentate salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). BSIH prevents deoxyribose degradation caused by hydroxyl radicals that are generated from H2O2 and redox-active iron by sequestering Fe3+ and preventing iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation. The rate-determining step for iron sequestration is conversion of BSIH to SIH, followed by rapid Fe3+ complexation. The pro-chelate approach of BSIH represents a promising strategy for chelating a specific pool of detrimental metal ions without disturbing healthy metal ion distribution.

  4. A pro-chelator triggered by hydrogen peroxide inhibits iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Charkoudian, Louise K; Pham, David M; Franz, Katherine J

    2006-09-27

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a new pro-chelating agent, isonicotinic acid [2-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-[1,3,2]dioxaborolan-2-yl)-benzylidene]-hydrazide (BSIH), are presented. BSIH only weakly interacts with iron unless hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is present to remove the boronic ester protecting group to reveal a phenol that is a key metal-binding group of tridentate salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). BSIH prevents deoxyribose degradation caused by hydroxyl radicals that are generated from H2O2 and redox-active iron by sequestering Fe3+ and preventing iron-promoted hydroxyl radical formation. The rate-determining step for iron sequestration is conversion of BSIH to SIH, followed by rapid Fe3+ complexation. The pro-chelate approach of BSIH represents a promising strategy for chelating a specific pool of detrimental metal ions without disturbing healthy metal ion distribution. PMID:16984186

  5. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Induced by Hydrogen Sulfide in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a potential gaseous messenger molecule, has been suggested to play important roles in a wide range of physiological processes in plants. The aim of present study was to investigate which set of proteins is involved in H2S-regulated metabolism or signaling pathways. Spinacia oleracea seedlings were treated with 100 µM NaHS, a donor of H2S. Changes in protein expression profiles were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. Over 1000 protein spots were reproducibly resolved, of which the abundance of 92 spots was changed by at least 2-fold (sixty-five were up-regulated, whereas 27 were down-regulated). These proteins were functionally divided into 9 groups, including energy production and photosynthesis, cell rescue, development and cell defense, substance metabolism, protein synthesis and folding, cellular signal transduction. Further, we found that these proteins were mainly localized in cell wall, plasma membrane, chloroplast, mitochondria, nucleus, peroxisome and cytosol. Our results demonstrate that H2S is involved in various cellular and physiological activities and has a distinct influence on photosynthesis, cell defense and cellular signal transduction in S. oleracea leaves. These findings provide new insights into proteomic responses in plants under physiological levels of H2S. PMID:25181351

  6. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins induced by hydrogen sulfide in Spinacia oleracea leaves.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a potential gaseous messenger molecule, has been suggested to play important roles in a wide range of physiological processes in plants. The aim of present study was to investigate which set of proteins is involved in H2S-regulated metabolism or signaling pathways. Spinacia oleracea seedlings were treated with 100 µM NaHS, a donor of H2S. Changes in protein expression profiles were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. Over 1000 protein spots were reproducibly resolved, of which the abundance of 92 spots was changed by at least 2-fold (sixty-five were up-regulated, whereas 27 were down-regulated). These proteins were functionally divided into 9 groups, including energy production and photosynthesis, cell rescue, development and cell defense, substance metabolism, protein synthesis and folding, cellular signal transduction. Further, we found that these proteins were mainly localized in cell wall, plasma membrane, chloroplast, mitochondria, nucleus, peroxisome and cytosol. Our results demonstrate that H2S is involved in various cellular and physiological activities and has a distinct influence on photosynthesis, cell defense and cellular signal transduction in S. oleracea leaves. These findings provide new insights into proteomic responses in plants under physiological levels of H2S.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Influenza Inhibition by Surfactant Protein D Revealed by Large-scale Molecular Dynamics Simulation†

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Boon Chong; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Cafarella, Tanya R.; White, Mitchell R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; Allen, Kimberly; Crouch, Erika C.; Calin, Oliviana; Seeberger, Peter H.; Schulten, Klaus; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D), a mammalian C-type lectin, is the primary innate inhibitor of influenza A virus (IAV) in the lung. SP-D interactions with highly branched viral N-linked glycans on hemagglutinin (HA), an abundant IAV envelope protein and critical virulence factor, promote viral aggregation and neutralization through as yet unknown molecular mechanisms. Two truncated human SP-D forms, wild-type (WT) and double mutant D325A+R343V, representing neck and carbohydrate recognition domains are compared in this study. Whereas both WT and D325A+R343V bind to isolated glycosylated HA, WT does not inhibit IAV in neutralization assays; in contrast, D325A+R343V neutralization compares well with full-length native SP-D. To elucidate the mechanism for these biochemical observations, we have solved crystal structures of D325A+R343V in the presence and absence of a viral nonamannoside (Man9). Based on the D325A+R343V/Man9 structure and other crystallographic data, models of complexes between HA and WT or D325A+R343V were produced and subjected to molecular dynamics. Simulations reveal that whereas WT and D325A+R343V both block the sialic acid receptor site of HA, the D325A+R343V complex is more stable, with stronger binding due to additional hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with HA residues. Furthermore, the blocking mechanism of HA differs for WT and D325A+R343V due to alternate glycan binding modes. The combined results suggest a mechanism through which the mode of SP-D/HA interaction could significantly influence viral aggregation and neutralization. These studies provide the first atomic-level molecular view of an innate host defense lectin inhibiting its viral glycoprotein target. PMID:24224757

  8. Methoxychlor inhibits brain mitochondrial respiration and increases hydrogen peroxide production and CREB phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Rosemary A; Kristián, Tibor; Gupta, Rupesh K; Flaws, Jodi A; Fiskum, Gary

    2005-12-01

    The organochlorine insecticide methoxychlor (mxc) is an established reproductive toxicant that affects other systems including the central nervous system (CNS), possibly by mechanisms involving oxidative stress. This study tested the hypothesis that mxc inhibits brain mitochondrial respiration, resulting in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxygen electrode measurements of mitochondrial respiration and Amplex Red measurements of H(2)O(2) production were performed with rat brain mitochondria exposed in vitro to mxc (0-10 microg/ml) and with brain mitochondria from mice chronically exposed in vivo to mxc (0-64 mg/kg/day) for 20 days by intraperitoneal injection. In vitro mxc exposure inhibited ADP-dependent respiration (state 3) using both complex I- and II-supported substrates. Similarly, state 3 respiration was inhibited following in vivo mxc exposure using complex I substrates. H(2)O(2) production was stimulated after in vitro mxc treatment in the presence of complex I substrates, but not in mitochondria isolated from in vivo mxc-treated mice. Because previous studies demonstrated a relationship between oxidative stress and CREB phosphorylation, we also tested the hypothesis that mxc elevates phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) in mitochondria. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurements demonstrated that pCREB immunoreactivity was elevated by in vitro mxc exposure in the presence or absence of respiratory substrates, indicating that stimulation of H(2)O(2) production is not necessary for this effect. These multiple effects of mxc on mitochondria may play an important role in its toxicity, particularly in the CNS.

  9. Inhibition of Astrocytic Glutamine Synthetase by Lead is Associated with a Slowed Clearance of Hydrogen Peroxide by the Glutathione System

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stephen R.; Lee, Alan; Bishop, Glenda M.; Czerwinska, Hania; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Lead intoxication in humans is characterized by cognitive impairments, particularly in the domain of memory, where evidence indicates that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be impacted. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that lead decreases the expression and activity of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes, yet the basis of this effect is uncertain. To investigate the mechanism responsible, the present study exposed primary astrocyte cultures to a range of concentrations of lead acetate (0–330 μM) for up to 24 h. GS activity was significantly reduced in cells following 24 h incubation with 100 or 330 μM lead acetate. However, no reduction in GS activity was detected when astrocytic lysates were co-incubated with lead acetate, suggesting that the mechanism is not due to a direct interaction and involves intact cells. Since GS is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, the capacity of lead to inhibit the clearance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. It was found that exposure to lead significantly diminished the capacity of astrocytes to degrade H2O2, and that this was due to a reduction in the effectiveness of the glutathione system, rather than to catalase. These results suggest that the inhibition of GS activity in lead poisoning is a consequence of slowed H2O2 clearance, and supports the glutathione pathway as a primary therapeutic target. PMID:26696846

  10. An exogenous hydrogen sulphide donor, NaHS, inhibits the apoptosis signaling pathway to exert cardio-protective effects in a rat hemorrhagic shock model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanjie; Dai, Xiongwei; Zhu, Danxia; Xu, Xiaoli; Gao, Cao; Wu, Changping

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to be interwined in multiple systems, specifically in the cardiovascular system. However, the mechanisms underlying remain controversial. In the present study, we assessed the cardio-protective effects of H2S in the rat hemorrhagic shock model. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by drawing blood from the femoral artery to maintain the mean arterial pressure at 35-40 mmHg for 1.5 h. The rats were assigned to four groups and the H2S donor, NaHS (28 μmol/kg, i.p.), was injected before the resuscitation in certain groups. After resuscitation the animals were observed and then killed to harvest the hearts. The morphological investigation and ultrastructural analyses were done and apoptotic cells were detected. The levels of relevant proteins were examined using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses. Resuscitated hemorrhagic shock induced heart injury and significantly increased the levels of serum myocardial enzymes, creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. Furthermore, it caused marked increase of apoptotic cells in heart tissue. Moreover, the expression of death receptor Fas and Fas-ligand, as well as the expression of apoptosis-relevant proteins active-caspase 3 and active-caspase 8 were markedly increased. Administration of NaHS significantly ameliorated hemorrhagic shock caused hemodynamic deterioration, decreased myocardial enzymes elevation, protected myocardial ultrastructure, and inhibited the expression of apoptosis-relevant proteins. It suggested that H2S might exert its cardio-protective roles via both the extrinsic Fas/FasL/caspase-8/caspase-3 pathway and the intrinsic mitochondria-involved pathways. PMID:26261501

  11. Efflux by small multidrug resistance proteins is inhibited by membrane-interactive helix-stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Stone, Tracy A; Poulsen, Bradley E; Deber, Charles M

    2015-01-16

    Bacterial cell membranes contain several protein pumps that resist the toxic effects of drugs by efficiently extruding them. One family of these pumps, the small multidrug resistance proteins (SMRs), consists of proteins of about 110 residues that need to oligomerize to form a structural pathway for substrate extrusion. As such, SMR oligomerization sites should constitute viable targets for efflux inhibition, by disrupting protein-protein interactions between helical segments. To explore this proposition, we are using Hsmr, an SMR from Halobacter salinarum that dimerizes to extrude toxicants. Our previous work established that (i) Hsmr dimerization is mediated by a helix-helix interface in Hsmr transmembrane (TM) helix 4 (residues (90)GLALIVAGV(98)); and (ii) a peptide comprised of the full TM4(85-105) sequence inhibits Hsmr-mediated ethidium bromide efflux from bacterial cells. Here we define the minimal linear sequence for inhibitor activity (determined as TM4(88-100), and then "staple" this sequence via Grubbs metathesis to produce peptides typified by acetyl-A-(Sar)3-(88)VVGLXLIZXGVVV(100)-KKK-NH2 (X = 2-(4'-pentenyl)alanine at positions 92 and 96; Z = Val, Gly, or Asn at position 95)). The Asn(95) peptide displayed specific efflux inhibition and resensitization of Hsmr-expressing cells to ethidium bromide; and was non-hemolytic to human red blood cells. Stapling essentially prevented peptide degradation in blood plasma and liver homogenates versus an unstapled counterpart. The overall results confirm that the stapled analog of TM4(88-100) retains the structural complementarity required to disrupt the Hsmr TM4-TM4 locus in Hsmr, and portend the general validity of stapled peptides as therapeutics for the disruption of functional protein-protein interactions in membranes.

  12. Efflux by Small Multidrug Resistance Proteins Is Inhibited by Membrane-interactive Helix-stapled Peptides*

    PubMed Central

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Stone, Tracy A.; Poulsen, Bradley E.; Deber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cell membranes contain several protein pumps that resist the toxic effects of drugs by efficiently extruding them. One family of these pumps, the small multidrug resistance proteins (SMRs), consists of proteins of about 110 residues that need to oligomerize to form a structural pathway for substrate extrusion. As such, SMR oligomerization sites should constitute viable targets for efflux inhibition, by disrupting protein-protein interactions between helical segments. To explore this proposition, we are using Hsmr, an SMR from Halobacter salinarum that dimerizes to extrude toxicants. Our previous work established that (i) Hsmr dimerization is mediated by a helix-helix interface in Hsmr transmembrane (TM) helix 4 (residues 90GLALIVAGV98); and (ii) a peptide comprised of the full TM4(85–105) sequence inhibits Hsmr-mediated ethidium bromide efflux from bacterial cells. Here we define the minimal linear sequence for inhibitor activity (determined as TM4(88–100), and then “staple” this sequence via Grubbs metathesis to produce peptides typified by acetyl-A-(Sar)3-88VVGLXLIZXGVVV100-KKK-NH2 (X = 2-(4′-pentenyl)alanine at positions 92 and 96; Z = Val, Gly, or Asn at position 95)). The Asn95 peptide displayed specific efflux inhibition and resensitization of Hsmr-expressing cells to ethidium bromide; and was non-hemolytic to human red blood cells. Stapling essentially prevented peptide degradation in blood plasma and liver homogenates versus an unstapled counterpart. The overall results confirm that the stapled analog of TM4(88–100) retains the structural complementarity required to disrupt the Hsmr TM4-TM4 locus in Hsmr, and portend the general validity of stapled peptides as therapeutics for the disruption of functional protein-protein interactions in membranes. PMID:25425644

  13. Inhibition of p53 DNA binding by human papillomavirus E6 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, M S; Laimins, L A

    1994-01-01

    Transformation by the human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene products, E6 and E7, involves their interaction with cellular proteins p53 and Rb. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, we found that HPV E6 bound human p53 and that the relative efficiency of binding varied such that the GST-HPV type 16 E6 (16E6) protein bound p53 with highest affinity, followed by GST-31E6, GST-18E6, and GST-11E6. The GST-E6 fusion proteins were sufficient for binding p53 purified from a baculovirus expression system as well as in vitro translation sources, while no association was observed with GST-18E7 or a GST-16E6 mutant bearing a five-amino-acid deletion in E6. When the site-specific DNA binding activity of p53 was examined in the presence of GST-E6 proteins, an inhibition of DNA binding was observed. The degree of inhibition correlated with the relative affinity of different E6 proteins for p53; thus, GST-16E6 was the most potent inhibitor of p53 DNA binding activity, and GST-11E6 was the least effective. Prevention of p53 DNA binding is likely to play a role in the abrogation of the transcriptional activity of p53 by HPV E6 and provides a further mechanism for E6 disruption of p53 growth suppressor function in addition to its role in directing specific degradation of p53 through the ubiquitin-mediated pathway. The variation in inhibition of DNA binding seen with the various E6 proteins may thus contribute to the differences in oncogenic potential seen among the HPV types. Images PMID:8207801

  14. Protein Synthesis Inhibition Activity by Strawberry Tissue Protein Extracts during Plant Life Cycle and under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Mercatelli, Daniele; Mancuso, Rossella; Baruzzi, Gianluca; Faedi, Walther; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), enzymes that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating rRNA and many other polynucleotidic substrates. Although RIPs show antiviral, antifungal, and insecticidal activities, their biological and physiological roles are not completely understood. Additionally, it has been described that RIP expression is augmented under stressful conditions. In this study, we evaluated protein synthesis inhibition activity in partially purified basic proteins (hereafter referred to as RIP activity) from tissue extracts of Fragaria × ananassa (strawberry) cultivars with low (Dora) and high (Record) tolerance to root pathogens and fructification stress. Association between the presence of RIP activity and the crop management (organic or integrated soil), growth stage (quiescence, flowering, and fructification), and exogenous stress (drought) were investigated. RIP activity was found in every tissue tested (roots, rhizomes, leaves, buds, flowers, and fruits) and under each tested condition. However, significant differences in RIP distribution were observed depending on the soil and growth stage, and an increase in RIP activity was found in the leaves of drought-stressed plants. These results suggest that RIP expression and activity could represent a response mechanism against biotic and abiotic stresses and could be a useful tool in selecting stress-resistant strawberry genotypes. PMID:23892598

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  16. The bacterial virulence factor NleA inhibits cellular protein secretion by disrupting mammalian COPII function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinoh; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Fromme, J Chris; Frey, Elizabeth A; Lario, Paula I; Metalnikov, Pavel; Rizg, Keyrillos; Thomas, Nikhil A; Lee, Sau Fung; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Hardwidge, Philip R; Pawson, Tony; Strynadka, Natalie C; Finlay, B Brett; Schekman, Randy; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2007-09-13

    Enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC) maintain an extracellular lifestyle and use a type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into the host cytosol. These effectors manipulate host pathways to favor bacterial replication and survival. NleA is an EHEC/EPEC- and related species-specific translocated effector protein that is essential for bacterial virulence. However, the mechanism by which NleA impacts virulence remains undetermined. Here we demonstrate that NleA compromises the Sec23/24 complex, a component of the mammalian COPII protein coat that shapes intracellular protein transport vesicles, by directly binding Sec24. Expression of an NleA-GFP fusion protein reduces the efficiency of cellular secretion by 50%, and secretion is inhibited in EPEC-infected cells. Direct biochemical experiments show that NleA inhibits COPII-dependent protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Collectively, these findings indicate that disruption of COPII function in host cells contributes to the virulence of EPEC and EHEC.

  17. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Erica M.; Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann; Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  18. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  19. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.

  20. Hybrid Fluorinated and Hydrogenated Double-Chain Surfactants for Handling Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Fréderic; Breyton, Cécile; Guillet, Pierre; Ebel, Christine; Durand, Grégory

    2016-01-15

    Two hybrid fluorinated double-chain surfactants with a diglucosylated polar head were synthesized. The apolar domain consists of a perfluorohexyl main chain and a butyl hydrogenated branch as a side chain. They were found to self-assemble into small micelles at low critical micellar concentrations, demonstrating that the short branch increases the overall hydrophobicity while keeping the length of the apolar domain short. They were both able to keep the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin stable, one of them for at least 3 months.

  1. Inhibition of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) by turnip mosaic virus genome-linked protein (VPg).

    PubMed

    Domashevskiy, Artem V; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Goss, Dixie J

    2012-08-24

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) and an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is also a cap-binding protein and is a potent antiviral agent against many plant, animal, and human viruses. To elucidate the mechanism of RNA depurination, and to understand how PAP recognizes and targets various RNAs, the interactions between PAP and turnip mosaic virus genome-linked protein (VPg) were investigated. VPg can function as a cap analog in cap-independent translation and potentially target PAP to uncapped IRES-containing RNA. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy and HPLC techniques were used to quantitatively describe PAP depurination activity and PAP-VPg interactions. PAP binds to VPg with high affinity (29.5 nm); the reaction is enthalpically driven and entropically favored. Further, VPg is a potent inhibitor of PAP depurination of RNA in wheat germ lysate and competes with structured RNA derived from tobacco etch virus for PAP binding. VPg may confer an evolutionary advantage by suppressing one of the plant defense mechanisms and also suggests the possible use of this protein against the cytotoxic activity of ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  2. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  3. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  4. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  5. Protein kinase C regulates tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition in the hippocampus and thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Damian P; Smart, Trevor G

    2013-01-01

    Tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) provides a key mode of regulation for synaptic GABAARs underlying phasic inhibition; however, less attention has been focused on the plasticity of tonic inhibition and whether this can also be modulated by receptor phosphorylation. To address this issue, we used whole-cell patch clamp recording in acute murine brain slices at both room and physiological temperatures to examine the effects of PKC-mediated phosphorylation on tonic inhibition. Recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells in the hippocampus and dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons in the thalamus demonstrated that PKC activation caused downregulation of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of PKC resulted in an increase in tonic GABAAR activity. These findings were corroborated by experiments on human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing recombinant α4β2δ GABAARs, which represent a key extrasynaptic GABAAR isoform in the hippocampus and thalamus. Using bath application of low GABA concentrations to mimic activation by ambient neurotransmitter, we demonstrated a similar inhibition of receptor function following PKC activation at physiological temperature. Live cell imaging revealed that this was correlated with a loss of cell surface GABAARs. The inhibitory effects of PKC activation on α4β2δ GABAAR activity appeared to be mediated by direct phosphorylation at a previously identified site on the β2 subunit, serine 410. These results indicate that PKC-mediated phosphorylation can be an important physiological regulator of tonic GABAAR-mediated inhibition. PMID:24102973

  6. Interaction of brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (BIG) 1 and kinesin motor protein KIF21A

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyan; Meza-Carmen, Victor; Puxeddu, Ermanno; Wang, Guanghui; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2008-01-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (BIG) 1 activates human ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 and 3 by accelerating the replacement of ARF-bound GDP with GTP to initiate recruitment of coat proteins for membrane vesicle formation. Liquid chromatography MS/MS analysis of peptides from proteins that co-precipitated with BIG1 antibodies identified “kinesin family member 21A” (KIF21A), a plus-end-directed motor protein that moves cargo on microtubules away from the microtubule-organizing center. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation (IP) of endogenous proteins and microscopically apparent overlap of immunoreactive BIG1 with overexpressed GFP-KIF21A in the perinuclear region were consistent with an interaction of KIF21A–BIG1. Overexpression of full-length KIF21A and BIG1 and their fragments in HEK293 cells followed by reciprocal IP revealed that the C-terminal tail of KIF21A, with seven WD-40 repeats, may interact with structure in the C-terminal region of BIG1. Interfering with cyclic activation and inactivation of ARF1 by overexpressing constitutively active ARF1(Q71L) or dominant inactive ARF1(T31N) altered the distribution of BIG1 as well as its interaction with KIF21A. A requirement for ARF1 was confirmed by its selective depletion with siRNA. Unlike disruption of microtubules with nocodazole, selective inhibition of transport by depletion of KIF21A with specific siRNA altered BIG1 distribution without changing that of intrinsic Golgi membrane proteins. These newly recognized interactions of BIG1 and KIF21A should enable us to understand better the mechanisms through which, acting together, they may integrate local events in membrane trafficking with longer-range transport processes and to relate those processes to the diverse signaling and scaffold functions of BIG1. PMID:19020088

  7. Modulation of diamide toxicity in thermotolerant cells by inhibition of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Freeman, M L; Meredith, M J

    1989-08-15

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed in vitro to various concentrations of diamide for 1 h at 37 degrees C. This treatment resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity. Cells were also heated at 43 degrees C for 15 min, incubated at 37 degrees C for 3 h, and then exposed to various concentrations of diamide. This heat shock has been shown previously to trigger the synthesis of heat shock proteins and the development of thermotolerance. Further, under these experimental conditions both were inhibited if protein synthesis was inhibited by exposure to cycloheximide (M. L. Freeman et al., Radiat. Res., 112: 195-203, 1987). Diamide toxicity was diminished in cells made thermotolerant by the 43 degrees C/15-min heat shock. For example, at the highest dose used, 0.8 mM, survival increased from 0.93% to 6.1%. However, diamide toxicity was unaffected if the cells were exposed to diamide 3 h after a 43 degrees C/60 min heat shock. This latter heat shock produced significant inhibition of protein synthesis whereas the 15-min heat shock did not (M. L. Freeman et al., Cancer Res., 48: 7033-7037, 1988). Further, a 43 degrees C/15-min heat shock did not confer protection against diamide toxicity if the cells were simultaneously exposed to cycloheximide. Exposure to 0.8 mM diamide was shown to oxidize specific cellular proteins as measured by 2-dimensional thiol blotting. However, the degree of protein thiol modification was not affected by a prior heat shock. Nor did the heat shock increase the intracellular concentration of glutathione or the activity of glutathione reductase. The diamide treatment caused specific, as opposed to general, protein thiol oxidation and heat shock did not prevent this. It is hypothesized that it was the oxidation of protein thiols which led to cellular toxicity. Protein synthesis, triggered by heat shock, protected cells from the diamide toxicity without preventing protein thiol modification. These results suggest that the proteins

  8. The Human Antimicrobial Protein Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein (BPI) Inhibits the Infectivity of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pinkenburg, Olaf; Meyer, Torben; Bannert, Norbert; Norley, Steven; Bolte, Kathrin; Czudai-Matwich, Volker; Herold, Susanne; Gessner, André; Schnare, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their well-known antibacterial activity some antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) display also antiviral effects. A 27 aa peptide from the N-terminal part of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) previously shown to harbour antibacterial activity inhibits the infectivity of multiple Influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1) the causing agent of the Influenza pneumonia. In contrast, the homologous murine BPI-peptide did not show activity against Influenza A virus. In addition human BPI-peptide inhibits the activation of immune cells mediated by Influenza A virus. By changing the human BPI-peptide to the sequence of the mouse homologous peptide the antiviral activity was completely abolished. Furthermore, the human BPI-peptide also inhibited the pathogenicity of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus but failed to interfere with HIV and measles virus. Electron microscopy indicate that the human BPI-peptide interferes with the virus envelope and at high concentrations was able to destroy the particles completely. PMID:27273104

  9. The potent antiplasmodial calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine inhibits plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Cavagnino, Andrea; Rossi, Franca; Rizzi, Menico

    2011-12-01

    Due to their critical involvement in the execution of the malaria parasite developmental pattern both in the mosquito vector and in the human host, Plasmodium calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are considered promising candidates for the development of new tools to block malaria transmission. We report here that the phenothiazine trifluoperazine non-competitively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum CDPK4 in the micromolar range while other calmodulin antagonists only marginally affect the enzyme activity, and we propose the inhibition mechanism. Our results demonstrate that selective enzyme inhibition is achievable by targeting its calmodulin-like domain. This observation could be exploited for the discovery of innovative phenothiazine-based CDPK inhibitors of potential medical interest.

  10. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B by lignans from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Senugmi; Na, Min Kyun; Jang, Jun Pil; Kim, Kyung Ah; Kim, Bo Yeon; Sung, Nak Ju; Oh, Won Keun; Ahn, Jong Seog

    2006-08-01

    Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been proposed as one of the drug targets for treating type 2 diabetes and obesity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of the semen of Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae) afforded PTP1B inhibitory compounds, meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (1) and otobaphenol (2). Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited PTP1B with IC(50) values of 19.6 +/- 0.3 and 48.9 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively, in the manner of non-competitive inhibitors. Treatment with compound 1 on 32D cells overexpressing the insulin receptor (IR) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of IR. These results indicate that compound 1 can act as an enhancing agent in intracellular insulin signaling, possibly through the inhibition of PTP1B activity.

  11. Xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone from Humulus lupulus L., inhibits cholesteryl ester transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Takazumi, Koji; Segawa, Shuichi; Okada, Yukio; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-10-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels are correlated with a low risk of atherosclerosis. The inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which catalyses cholesterol transfer between lipoproteins, leads to an increase in HDL-cholesterol and is expected to be the next anti-atherogenic target. This study revealed that xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone, showed the highest inhibition against CETP from screening of natural products in various plants. We investigated the inhibitory activity of some chalcones and flavanones. Naringenin chalcone showed weak CETP inhibition compared with xanthohumol. In addition, isoxanthohumol and naringenin drastically decreased the inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the prenyl group and chalcone structure of xanthohumol were responsible for the CETP inhibitory activity. PMID:25005963

  12. A human serum mannose-binding protein inhibits in vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) of CD4+ H9 lymphoblasts is inhibited by a mannose-binding protein (MBP) purified from human serum. In addition, MBP is able to selectively bind to HIV- infected H9 cells and HIV-infected cells from the monocyte cell line U937. These results indicate MBP most likely recognizes high mannose glycans known to be present on gp120 in the domain that is recognized by CD4 and thereby inhibits viral entry to susceptible cells. In support of this contention, recombinant gp120 binds directly to MBP; the binding is saturable, mannan inhibitable, removed by N-glycanase treatment, and dependent on divalent cations. PMID:2909656

  13. Inhibition of ice recrystallization and cryoprotective activity of wheat proteins in liver and pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chow-Shi-Yée, Mélanie; Briard, Jennie G; Grondin, Mélanie; Averill-Bates, Diana A; Ben, Robert N; Ouellet, François

    2016-05-01

    Efficient cryopreservation of cells at ultralow temperatures requires the use of substances that help maintain viability and metabolic functions post-thaw. We are developing new technology where plant proteins are used to substitute the commonly-used, but relatively toxic chemical dimethyl sulfoxide. Recombinant forms of four structurally diverse wheat proteins, TaIRI-2 (ice recrystallization inhibition), TaBAS1 (2-Cys peroxiredoxin), WCS120 (dehydrin), and TaENO (enolase) can efficiently cryopreserve hepatocytes and insulin-secreting INS832/13 cells. This study shows that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are internalized during the freeze-thaw process, while TaBAS1 and WCS120 remain at the extracellular level. Possible antifreeze activity of the four proteins was assessed. The "splat cooling" method for quantifying ice recrystallization inhibition activity (a property that characterizes antifreeze proteins) revealed that TaIRI-2 and TaENO are more potent than TaBAS1 and WCS120. Because of their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization, the wheat recombinant proteins TaIRI-2 and TaENO are promising candidates and could prove useful to improve cryopreservation protocols for hepatocytes and insulin-secreting cells, and possibly other cell types. TaENO does not have typical ice-binding domains, and the TargetFreeze tool did not predict an antifreeze capacity, suggesting the existence of nontypical antifreeze domains. The fact that TaBAS1 is an efficient cryoprotectant but does not show antifreeze activity indicates a different mechanism of action. The cryoprotective properties conferred by WCS120 depend on biochemical properties that remain to be determined. Overall, our results show that the proteins' efficiencies vary between cell types, and confirm that a combination of different protection mechanisms is needed to successfully cryopreserve mammalian cells.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide preconditioning protects rat liver against ischemia/reperfusion injury by activating Akt-GSK-3β signaling and inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingqing; Fu, Hailong; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Fengying; Zou, Zui; Liu, Meng; Wang, Quanxing; Miao, Mingyong; Shi, Xueyin

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third most common endogenously produced gaseous signaling molecule, but its impact on hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, especially on mitochondrial function, remains unclear. In this study, rats were randomized into Sham, I/R, ischemia preconditioning (IPC) or sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) preconditioning groups. To establish a model of segmental (70%) warm hepatic ischemia, the hepatic artery, left portal vein and median liver lobes were occluded for 60 min and then unclamped to allow reperfusion. Preconditioning with 12.5, 25 or 50 μmol/kg NaHS prior to the I/R insult significantly increased serum H2S levels, and, similar to IPC, NaHS preconditioning decreased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in the plasma and prevented hepatocytes from undergoing I/R-induced necrosis. Moreover, a sub-toxic dose of NaHS (25 μmol/kg) did not disrupt the systemic hemodynamics but dramatically inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening and thus prevented mitochondrial-related cell death and apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that NaHS preconditioning markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (p-GSK-3β) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and decreased the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3/9 levels. Therefore, NaHS administration prior to hepatic I/R ameliorates mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through the inhibition of MPTP opening and the activation of Akt-GSK-3β signaling. Furthermore, this study provides experimental evidence for the clinical use of H2S to reduce liver damage after perioperative I/R injury. PMID:24058562

  15. Hydrogen Sulfide Preconditioning Protects Rat Liver against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury by Activating Akt-GSK-3β Signaling and Inhibiting Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Xu, Fengying; Zou, Zui; Liu, Meng; Wang, Quanxing; Miao, Mingyong; Shi, Xueyin

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third most common endogenously produced gaseous signaling molecule, but its impact on hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, especially on mitochondrial function, remains unclear. In this study, rats were randomized into Sham, I/R, ischemia preconditioning (IPC) or sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor) preconditioning groups. To establish a model of segmental (70%) warm hepatic ischemia, the hepatic artery, left portal vein and median liver lobes were occluded for 60 min and then unclamped to allow reperfusion. Preconditioning with 12.5, 25 or 50 μmol/kg NaHS prior to the I/R insult significantly increased serum H2S levels, and, similar to IPC, NaHS preconditioning decreased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in the plasma and prevented hepatocytes from undergoing I/R-induced necrosis. Moreover, a sub-toxic dose of NaHS (25 μmol/kg) did not disrupt the systemic hemodynamics but dramatically inhibited mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening and thus prevented mitochondrial-related cell death and apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that NaHS preconditioning markedly increased the expression of phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt), phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (p-GSK-3β) and B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and decreased the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3/9 levels. Therefore, NaHS administration prior to hepatic I/R ameliorates mitochondrial and hepatocellular damage through the inhibition of MPTP opening and the activation of Akt-GSK-3β signaling. Furthermore, this study provides experimental evidence for the clinical use of H2S to reduce liver damage after perioperative I/R injury. PMID:24058562

  16. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I.; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Parra, Columba de la; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J.; Wade, Paul A.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Donnell, Robert M.; Pestell, Richard G.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  17. Polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein without and with hydrogen ion binding.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, R A; Lauffer, M A

    1983-05-01

    When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein is polymerized at pH values above 7 in unbuffered solutions, either by raising temperature at constant ionic strength or by increasing ionic strength at constant temperature, a 20 S component is formed having bound only the very small amount of H+ ion supplied by the unpolymerized protein. When hydrogen ion is added by titration during polymerization so as to keep pH constant, as would occur automatically if a buffer were present, a 20 S component is formed with one H+ ion bound each for half of the subunits. Thus, a 20 S form with and a 20 S form without bound H+ ion exist. Furthermore, the 20 S form without bound H+ ion binds H+ ion when supplied by titration to produce a 20 S form with the same amount of bound H+ ion as when H+ ion is supplied during the polymerization.

  18. Inhibition of chikungunya virus by picolinate that targets viral capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajesh; Fatma, Benazir; Saha, Amrita; Bajpai, Sailesh; Sistla, Srinivas; Dash, Paban Kumar; Parida, Manmohan; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-11-01

    The protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of the transmembrane glycoprotein E2 with the hydrophobic pocket on the surface of capsid protein (CP) plays a critical role in alphavirus life cycle. Dioxane based derivatives targeting PPIs have been reported to possess antiviral activity against Sindbis Virus (SINV), the prototype alphavirus. In this study, the binding of picolinic acid (PCA) to the conserved hydrophobic pocket of capsid protein was analyzed by molecular docking, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding constant KD obtained for PCA was 2.1×10(-7)M. Additionally, PCA significantly inhibited CHIKV replication in infected Vero cells, decreasing viral mRNA and viral load as assessed by qRT-PCR and plaque reduction assay, respectively. This study is suggestive of the potential of pyridine ring compounds as antivirals against alphaviruses and may serve as the basis for the development of PCA based drugs against alphaviral diseases.

  19. Inhibition of chikungunya virus by picolinate that targets viral capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajesh; Fatma, Benazir; Saha, Amrita; Bajpai, Sailesh; Sistla, Srinivas; Dash, Paban Kumar; Parida, Manmohan; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-11-01

    The protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of the transmembrane glycoprotein E2 with the hydrophobic pocket on the surface of capsid protein (CP) plays a critical role in alphavirus life cycle. Dioxane based derivatives targeting PPIs have been reported to possess antiviral activity against Sindbis Virus (SINV), the prototype alphavirus. In this study, the binding of picolinic acid (PCA) to the conserved hydrophobic pocket of capsid protein was analyzed by molecular docking, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The binding constant KD obtained for PCA was 2.1×10(-7)M. Additionally, PCA significantly inhibited CHIKV replication in infected Vero cells, decreasing viral mRNA and viral load as assessed by qRT-PCR and plaque reduction assay, respectively. This study is suggestive of the potential of pyridine ring compounds as antivirals against alphaviruses and may serve as the basis for the development of PCA based drugs against alphaviral diseases. PMID:27614702

  20. Inhibition by ajoene of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Villar, R; Alvariño, M T; Flores, R

    1997-02-01

    The effects of ajoene (a potent antithrombotic agent obtained from garlic) on the tyrosine phosphorylation status of human platelet proteins were investigated by immunoblotting-based experiments using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Incubation of platelets with ajoene enhanced the phosphorylation of at least four proteins (estimated MWs 76, 80, 84 and 120 kDa), both in resting platelets and in platelets subsequently stimulated with thrombin (0.1 U/ml). This effect was both dose- and incubation-time-dependent. High concentrations of ajoene (50 microM) or long periods of incubation (10 min) led to nonselective 'hyperphosphorylation' of numerous proteins. The effects of ajoene on protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in platelet lysates were also investigated, PTP activity was inhibited when platelets were incubated with ajoene before lysis, but not when ajoene was added to lysates of platelets which had not been pre-exposed to ajoene.

  1. Ethionine-dependent inhibition of acute-phase plasma protein synthesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kasperczyk, H.; Koj, A.

    1983-01-01

    Ethionine administered intraperitoneally to rats suffering from turpentine-induced inflammation preferentially reduced incorporation of 14C-leucine into fibrinogen, haptoglobin and other acute-phase proteins. The inhibitory effect was observed both in vivo and in liver slices obtained from ethionine-treated donors, while addition of ethionine to liver slices in vitro led to general reduction of synthesis of all liver and plasma proteins, including albumin. For comparison, the effects of galactosamine and actinomycin D on plasma protein synthesis in injured rats were also examined. It has been concluded that ethionine acts in the early phases of the acute-phase response, probably by inhibition of trauma-induced transcription of liver mRNA specific for acute-phase proteins. PMID:6882676

  2. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins. PMID:27166805

  3. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  4. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC. PMID:23924858

  5. Inhibition of CDC25B Phosphatase Through Disruption of Protein–Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators and represent very attractive but challenging targets for anticancer drug discovery. Here, we explored whether fragment-based screening represents a valid approach to identify inhibitors of CDC25B. This resulted in identification of 2-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzonitrile, which directly binds to the catalytic domain of CDC25B. Interestingly, NMR data and the crystal structure demonstrate that this compound binds to the pocket distant from the active site and adjacent to the protein–protein interaction interface with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate. Furthermore, we developed a more potent analogue that disrupts CDC25B interaction with CDK2/Cyclin A and inhibits dephosphorylation of CDK2. Based on these studies, we provide a proof of concept that targeting CDC25 phosphatases by inhibiting their protein–protein interactions with CDK2/Cyclin A substrate represents a novel, viable opportunity to target this important class of enzymes. PMID:25423142

  6. Knockdown of Pokemon protein expression inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation by suppression of AKT activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaosan; Dai, Yichen; Chen, Zhangxin; Xie, Junpei; Zeng, Wei; Lin, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of Pokemon, which is an erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor protein, occurs in different cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Pokemon is also reported to have an oncogenic activity in various human cancers. This study investigated the effect of Pokemon knockdown on the regulation of HCC growth. POK shRNA suppressed the expression of Pokemon protein in HepG2 cells compared to the negative control vector-transfected HCC cells. Pokemon knockdown also reduced HCC cell viability and enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells. AKT activation and the expression of various cell cycle-related genes were inhibited following Pokemon knockdown. These data demonstrate that Pokemon may play a role in HCC progression, suggesting that inhibition of Pokemon expression using Pokemon shRNA should be further evaluated as a novel target for the control of HCC.

  7. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed Central

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-01-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8580316

  8. Sub-MIC Tylosin Inhibits Streptococcus suis Biofilm Formation and Results in Differential Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yanbei; Zhao, Yulin; Zhao, Honghai; Bai, Jingwen; Chen, Jianqing; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Chang; Li, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S.suis) is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections that are difficult to treat. In this study, the effect of tylosin on biofilm formation of S. suis was investigated. 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 1/4 MIC of tylosin were shown to inhibit S. suis biofilm formation in vitro. By using the iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment and with no treatment. A total of 1501 proteins were identified by iTRAQ. Ninety-six differentially expressed proteins were identified (Ratio > ±1.5, p < 0.05). Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase) and surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins) were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth with sub-MIC tylosin treatment. Thus, our data revealed the rough regulation of biofilm formation that may provide a foundation for future research into mechanisms and targets. PMID:27065957

  9. Sub-MIC Tylosin Inhibits Streptococcus suis Biofilm Formation and Results in Differential Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Yang, Yanbei; Zhao, Yulin; Zhao, Honghai; Bai, Jingwen; Chen, Jianqing; Zhou, Yonghui; Wang, Chang; Li, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S.suis) is an important zoonotic pathogen that causes severe diseases in humans and pigs. Biofilms of S. suis can induce persistent infections that are difficult to treat. In this study, the effect of tylosin on biofilm formation of S. suis was investigated. 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 1/4 MIC of tylosin were shown to inhibit S. suis biofilm formation in vitro. By using the iTRAQ strategy, we compared the protein expression profiles of S. suis grown with sub-MIC tylosin treatment and with no treatment. A total of 1501 proteins were identified by iTRAQ. Ninety-six differentially expressed proteins were identified (Ratio > ±1.5, p < 0.05). Several metabolism proteins (such as phosphoglycerate kinase) and surface proteins (such as ABC transporter proteins) were found to be involved in biofilm formation. Our results indicated that S. suis metabolic regulation, cell surface proteins, and virulence proteins appear to be of importance in biofilm growth with sub-MIC tylosin treatment. Thus, our data revealed the rough regulation of biofilm formation that may provide a foundation for future research into mechanisms and targets. PMID:27065957

  10. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  11. Synthetic copolymer 1 inhibits human T-cell lines specific for myelin basic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Teitelbaum, D; Milo, R; Arnon, R; Sela, M

    1992-01-01

    Copolymer 1 (Cop 1) is a synthetic basic random copolymer of amino acids that has been shown to be effective in suppression of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and has been proposed as a candidate drug for multiple sclerosis. Cop 1 is immunologically cross reactive with myelin basic protein (BP) and was shown to inhibit murine BP-specific T-cell lines of various H-2 restrictions. In the present study these findings were extended to include human T-cell lines. Cop 1 competitively inhibited the proliferative responses and interleukin 2 secretion of six BP-specific T-cell lines and 13 clones with several DR restrictions and epitope specificities. Conversely, BP inhibited--albeit to a lesser extent--the response of all the Cop 1-specific T-cell lines and clones, irrespective of their DR restrictions. Another random copolymer of tyrosine, glutamic acid, and alanine, denoted TGA, had no effect on these lines. Neither Cop 1 nor BP inhibited the response of lines and clones specific for purified protein derivative. Cop 1 and BP exerted their cross-inhibitory effects only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. These results suggest that Cop 1 can compete with BP for the binding to human major histocompatibility complex molecules. In view of recent studies implicating BP reactivity in multiple sclerosis, these findings suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial effect of Cop 1 in this disease. Images PMID:1370347

  12. Spironolactone blocks Epstein-Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-03-29

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses.

  13. Spironolactone blocks Epstein–Barr virus production by inhibiting EBV SM protein function

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Clinically available drugs active against Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and other human herpesviruses are limited to those targeting viral DNA replication. To identify compounds directed against other steps in the viral life cycle, we searched for drugs active against the EBV SM protein, which is essential for infectious virus production. SM has a highly gene-specific mode of action and preferentially enhances expression of several late lytic cycle EBV genes. Here we demonstrate that spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist approved for clinical use, inhibits SM function and infectious EBV production. Expression of EBV viral capsid antigen is highly SM dependent, and spironolactone inhibits viral capsid antigen synthesis and capsid formation, blocking EBV virion production at a step subsequent to viral DNA replication. In addition, spironolactone inhibits expression of other SM-dependent genes necessary for infectious virion formation. We further demonstrate that molecules structurally related to spironolactone with similar antimineralocorticoid blocking activity do not inhibit EBV production. These findings pave the way for development of antiherpesvirus drugs with new mechanisms of action directed against SM and homologous essential proteins in other herpesviruses. PMID:26976570

  14. KSHV latent protein LANA2 inhibits sumo2 modification of p53.

    PubMed

    Laura, Marcos-Villar; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F; Ferreirós, Alba; Baz-Martínez, Maite; Lang, Valerie; Vidal, Anxo; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a crucial antiviral role and targeting of p53 by viral proteins is a common mechanism involved in virus oncogenesis. The activity of p53 is tightly regulated at the post-translational levels through a myriad of modifications. Among them, modification of p53 by SUMO has been associated with the onset of cellular senescence. Kaposi´s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses several proteins targeting p53, including the latent protein LANA2 that regulates polyubiquitylation and phosphorylation of p53. Here we show that LANA2 also inhibits the modification of p53 by SUMO2. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2, as well as the p53-LANA2 interaction, both require the SUMOylation of the viral protein and its interaction with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins in a non-covalent manner. Finally, we show that the control of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2 correlates with its ability to inhibit SUMO2- and type I interferon-induced senescence. These results highlight the importance of p53 SUMOylation in the control of virus infection and suggest that viral oncoproteins could contribute to viral infection and cell transformation by abrogating p53 SUMOylation.

  15. Mutant Cockayne syndrome group B protein inhibits repair of DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Saijo, Masafumi; Bay, Mui N; Lan, Li; Kuraoka, Isao; Brooks, Philip J; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko; Yasui, Akira; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2011-01-01

    Two UV-sensitive syndrome patients who have mild photosensitivity without detectable somatic abnormalities lack detectable Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein because of a homozygous null mutation in the CSB gene. In contrast, mutant CSB proteins are produced in CS-B patients with the severe somatic abnormalities of Cockayne syndrome and photosensitivity. It is known that the piggyBac transposable element derived 3 is integrated within the CSB intron 5, and that CSB-piggyBac transposable element derived 3 fusion (CPFP) mRNA is produced by alternative splicing. We found that CPFP or truncated CSB protein derived from CPFP mRNA was stably produced in CS-B patients, and that wild-type CSB, CPFP, and truncated CSB protein interacted with DNA topoisomerase I. We also found that CPFP inhibited repair of a camptothecin-induced topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex. The inhibition was suppressed by the presence of wild-type CSB, consistent with the autosomal recessive inheritance of Cockayne syndrome. These results suggested that reduced repair of a DNA topoisomerase I-DNA covalent complex because of truncated CSB proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of CS-B. PMID:21143350

  16. Antibacterial activity and inhibition of protein synthesis in Escherichia coli by antisense DNA analogs.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M A; Summerton, J; Foster, E; Cunningham, K; Stirchak, E; Weller, D; Schaup, H W

    1991-01-01

    Protein synthesis, which takes place within ribosomes, is essential for the survival of any living organism. Ribosomes are composed of both proteins and RNA. Specific interaction between the 3' end CCUCC sequence of prokaryotic 16S rRNA and a partially complementary sequence preceding the initiating codon of mRNA is believed to be a prerequisite for initiation of protein synthesis. Here we report the use of short (three to six nucleotides) synthetic DNA analogs complementary to this sequence to block protein synthesis in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. In the DNA analogs the normal phosphodiester bond in the antisense DNA was replaced by methylcarbamate internucleoside linkages to enhance transport across plasma membranes. Of the analogs tested, those with the sequence AGG and GGA inhibit protein synthesis and colony formation by E. coli strains lacking an outer cell wall. Polyethylene glycol 1000 (PEG 1000) was attached to the 5' end of some of the test methylcarbamate DNAs to enhance solubility. Analogs of AGG and GGAG with PEG 1000 attached inhibited colony formation in normal E. coli. These analogs may be useful food additives to control bacterial spoilage and biomedically as antibiotics. PMID:1821653

  17. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats.

    PubMed

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  18. KSHV latent protein LANA2 inhibits sumo2 modification of p53

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Marcos-Villar; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F; Ferreirós, Alba; Baz-Martínez, Maite; Lang, Valerie; Vidal, Anxo; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Collado, Manuel; Rivas, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays a crucial antiviral role and targeting of p53 by viral proteins is a common mechanism involved in virus oncogenesis. The activity of p53 is tightly regulated at the post-translational levels through a myriad of modifications. Among them, modification of p53 by SUMO has been associated with the onset of cellular senescence. Kaposi´s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) expresses several proteins targeting p53, including the latent protein LANA2 that regulates polyubiquitylation and phosphorylation of p53. Here we show that LANA2 also inhibits the modification of p53 by SUMO2. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2, as well as the p53-LANA2 interaction, both require the SUMOylation of the viral protein and its interaction with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins in a non-covalent manner. Finally, we show that the control of p53-SUMO2 conjugation by LANA2 correlates with its ability to inhibit SUMO2- and type I interferon-induced senescence. These results highlight the importance of p53 SUMOylation in the control of virus infection and suggest that viral oncoproteins could contribute to viral infection and cell transformation by abrogating p53 SUMOylation. PMID:25607652

  19. Protein Synthesis Inhibition in the Peri-Infarct Cortex Slows Motor Recovery in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schubring-Giese, Maximilian; Leemburg, Susan; Luft, Andreas Rüdiger; Hosp, Jonas Aurel

    2016-01-01

    Neuroplasticity and reorganization of brain motor networks are thought to enable recovery of motor function after ischemic stroke. Especially in the cortex surrounding the ischemic scar (i.e., peri-infarct cortex), evidence for lasting reorganization has been found at the level of neurons and networks. This reorganization depends on expression of specific genes and subsequent protein synthesis. To test the functional relevance of the peri-infarct cortex for recovery we assessed the effect of protein synthesis inhibition within this region after experimental stroke. Long-Evans rats were trained to perform a skilled-reaching task (SRT) until they reached plateau performance. A photothrombotic stroke was induced in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the trained paw. The SRT was re-trained after stroke while the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) or saline were injected into the peri-infarct cortex through implanted cannulas. ANI injections reduced protein synthesis within the peri-infarct cortex by 69% and significantly impaired recovery of reaching performance through re-training. Improvement of motor performance within a single training session remained intact, while improvement between training sessions was impaired. ANI injections did not affect infarct size. Thus, protein synthesis inhibition within the peri-infarct cortex impairs recovery of motor deficits after ischemic stroke by interfering with consolidation of motor memory between training sessions but not short-term improvements within one session. PMID:27314672

  20. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  1. Affinity capture of biotinylated proteins at acidic conditions to facilitate hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry analysis of multimeric protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Koefoed, Klaus; Nygaard, Frank; Sen, Jette Wagtberg

    2013-08-01

    Characterization of conformational and dynamic changes associated with protein interactions can be done by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) by comparing the deuterium uptake in the bound and unbound state of the proteins. Investigation of local hydrogen/deuterium exchange in heteromultimeric protein complexes poses a challenge for the method due to the increased complexity of the mixture of peptides originating from all interaction partners in the complex. Previously, interference of peptides from one interaction partner has been removed by immobilizing the intact protein on beads prior to the HDX-MS experiment. However, when studying protein complexes of more than two proteins, immobilization can possibly introduce steric limitations to the interactions. Here, we present a method based on the high affinity biotin-streptavidin interaction that allows selective capture of biotinylated proteins even under the extreme conditions for hydrogen/deuterium exchange quenching i.e. pH 2.5 and 0 °C. This biotin-streptavidin capture strategy allows hydrogen/deuterium exchange to occur in proteins in solution and enables characterization of specific proteins in heteromultimeric protein complexes without interference of peptides originating from other interaction partners in the complex. The biotin-streptavidin strategy has been successfully implemented in a model system with two recombinant monoclonal antibodies that target nonoverlapping epitopes on the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We present a workflow for biotinylation and characterization of recombinant antibodies and demonstrate affinity capture of biotinylated antibodies under hydrogen/deuterium exchange quench conditions by the biotin-streptavidin strategy.

  2. Inhibition of transketolase by oxythiamine altered dynamics of protein signals in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiarui; Zhang, Xuemei; Ma, Danjun; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Yingchun; Go, Vay Liang; Wang, Qi; Yen, Yun; Recker, Robert; Xiao, Gary Guishan

    2013-01-01

    Oxythiamine (OT), an analogue of anti-metabolite, can suppress the nonoxidative synthesis of ribose and induce cell apoptosis by causing a G1 phase arrest in vitro and in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear yet. In the present study, a quantitative proteomic analysis using the modified SILAC method (mSILAC) was performed to determine the effect of metabolic inhibition on dynamic changes of protein expression in MIA PaCa-2 cancer cells treated with OT at various doses (0 μM, 5 μM, 50 μM and 500 μM) and time points (0 h, 12 h and 48 h). A total of 52 differential proteins in MIA PaCa-2 cells treated with OT were identified, including 14 phosphorylated proteins. Based on the dynamic expression pattern, these proteins were categorized in three clusters, straight down-regulation (cluster 1, 37% of total proteins), upright "V" shape expression pattern (cluster 2, 47.8% total), and downright "V" shape pattern (cluster 3, 15.2% total). Among them, Annexin A1 expression was significantly down-regulated by OT treatment in time-dependent manner, while no change of this protein was observed in OT dose-dependent fashion. Pathway analysis suggested that inhibition of transketolase resulted in changes of multiple cellular signaling pathways associated with cell apoptosis. The temporal expression patterns of proteins revealed that OT altered dynamics of protein expression in time-dependent fashion by suppressing phosphor kinase expression, resulting in cancer cell apoptosis. Results from this study suggest that interference of single metabolic enzyme activity altered multiple cellular signaling pathways. PMID:23890079

  3. Inhibition of bromodomain proteins for the treatment of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Trabucco, Sally E.; Gerstein, Rachel M.; Evens, Andrew M.; Bradner, James E.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 50% of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) enter long-term remission after standard chemotherapy. DLBCL patients who do not respond to chemotherapy have few treatment options. There remains a critical need to identify effective and targeted therapeutics for DLBCL. Experimental Design Recent studies have highlighted the incidence of increased c-MYC protein in DLBCL and the correlation between high levels of c-MYC protein and poor survival prognosis of DLBCL patients, suggesting that c-MYC is a compelling target for DLBCL therapy. The small molecule JQ1 suppresses c-MYC expression through inhibition of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family of bromodomain proteins. We investigated whether JQ1 can inhibit proliferation of DLBCL cells in culture and xenograft models in vivo. Results We show that JQ1 at nanomolar concentrations efficiently inhibited proliferation of human DLBCL cells in a dose-dependent manner regardless of their molecular subtypes, suggesting a broad effect of JQ1 in DLBCL. The initial G1 arrest induced by JQ1 treatment in DLBCL cells was followed by either apoptosis or senescence. The expression of c-MYC was suppressed as a result of JQ1 treatment from the natural, chromosomally-translocated or amplified loci. Furthermore, JQ1 treatment significantly suppressed growth of DLBCL cells engrafted in mice and improved survival of engrafted mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that inhibition of the BET family of bromodomain proteins by JQ1 has potential clinical utility in the treatment of DLBCL. PMID:25009295

  4. Pranlukast inhibits renal epithelial cyst progression via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-02-01

    Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) antagonists were found to inhibit chloride secretion in human airway epithelial cells. Since chloride secretion in renal epithelial cells, which shares common mechanisms with airway epithelial cells, plays important roles in renal cyst progression in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), this study was aimed to investigate effects of drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst progression and its underlying mechanisms. Effects of CysLT1 receptor antagonists on renal cyst growth and formation were determined using Madine Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cyst models. Mechanisms of actions of CysLT1 receptor antagonists were determined using short-circuit current measurement, assays of cell viability and cell proliferation, and immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins. Of the three drugs acting as CysLT1 receptor antagonists (montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast) tested, pranlukast was the most promising drug that inhibited MDCK cyst growth and formation without affecting cell viability. Its effect was independent of the inhibition of CysLT1 receptors. Instead, it reduced cAMP-activated chloride secretion and proliferation of MDCK cells in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner and had no effect on CFTR protein expression. Interestingly, pranlukast enhanced AMPK activation via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase beta (CaMKKβ) with consequent activation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. These results indicate that pranlukast retards renal epithelial cyst progression by inhibiting cAMP-activated chloride secretion and cell proliferation via CaMKKβ-AMPK-mTOR pathway. Therefore, pranlukast represents a class of known drugs that may have potential utility in PKD treatment. PMID:24360935

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Alleviates Myocardial Collagen Remodeling in Association with Inhibition of TGF-β/Smad Signaling Pathway in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Jin, Hongfang; Sun, Lujing; Chen, Siyao; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Jia; Li, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Manman; Sun, Yan; Tang, Chaoshu; Zhao, Bin; Du, Junbao

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to explore the role and possible mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the regulation of myocardial collagen remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We treated nine-week-old male SHRs and age- and sex-matched Wistar–Kyoto rats (WKYs) with NaHS (90 μmol/kg−1·day−1) for 9 wks. At 18 wks, plasma H2S, tail arterial pressure, morphology of the heart, myocardial ultrastructure and collagen volume fraction (CVF), myocardial expressions of collagen I and III protein and procollagen I and III mRNA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), TGF-β type I receptor (TβR-I), type II receptor (TβR-II), p-Smad2 and 3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP)-1 proteins were determined. TGF-β1-stimulated cultured cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) were used to further study the mechanisms. The results showed that compared with WKYs, SHRs showed a reduced plasma H2S, elevated tail artery pressure and increased myocardial collagen, TGF-β1, TβR-II, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 expressions. However, NaHS markedly decreased tail artery pressure and inhibited myocardial collagen, TGF-β1, TβR-II, p-Smad2 and p-Smad3 protein expressions, but H2S had no effect on the expressions of MMP-13 and TIMP-1. Hydralazine reduced blood pressure but had no effect on myocardial collagen, MMP-13 and TIMP-1 expressions and TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. H2S prevented activation of the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and abnormal collagen synthesis in CFs. In conclusion, the results suggested that H2S could prevent myocardial collagen remodeling in SHR. The mechanism might be associated with inhibition of collagen synthesis via TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway. PMID:25222913

  6. Comprehensive analysis of hydrogen bonds in regulatory protein DNA-complexes: in search of common principles.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Gutfreund, Y; Schueler, O; Margalit, H

    1995-10-20

    A systematic analysis of hydrogen bonds between regulatory proteins and their DNA targets is presented, based on 28 crystallographically solved complexes. All possible hydrogen bonds were screened and classified into different types: those that involve the amino acid side-chains and DNA base edges and those that involve the backbone atoms of the molecules. For each interaction type, all bonds were characterized and a statistical analysis was performed to reveal significant amino acid-base interdependence. The interactions between the amino acid side-chains and DNA backbone constitute about half of the interactions, but did not show any amino acid-base correlation. Interactions via the protein backbone were also observed, predominantly with the DNA backbone. As expected, the most significant pairing preference was demonstrated for interactions between the amino acid side-chains and the DNA base edges. The statistically significant relationships could mostly be explained by the chemical nature of the participants. However, correlations that could not be trivially predicted from the hydrogen bonding potential of the residues were also identified, like the preference of lysine for guanine over adenine, or the preference of glutamic acid for cystosine over adenine. While Lys x G interactions were very frequent and spread over various families, the Glu x C interactions were found mainly in the basic helix-loop-helix family. Further examination of the side-chain-base edge contacts at the atomic level revealed a trend of the amino acids to contact the DNA by their donor atoms, preferably at position W2 in the major groove. In most cases it seems that the interactions are not guided simply by the presence of a required atom in a specific position in the groove, but that the identity of the base possessing this atom is crucial. This may have important implications in molecular design experiments.

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Renal Oxidative Stress and Kidney Injury in Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Liu, Jia; Huang, Yaqian; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Wang, Suxia; Ren, Yali; Li, Xiaohui; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The study was designed to investigate if H2S could inhibit high-salt diet-induced renal excessive oxidative stress and kidney injury in Dahl rats. Methods. Male salt-sensitive Dahl and SD rats were used. Blood pressure (BP), serum creatinine, urea, creatinine clearance rate, and 24-hour urine protein were measured. Renal ultra- and microstructures were observed. Collagen-I and -III contents the oxidants and antioxidants levels in renal tissue were detected. Keap1/Nrf2 association and Keap1 s-sulfhydration were detected. Results. After 8 weeks of high-salt diet, BP was significantly increased, renal function and structure were impaired, and collagen deposition was abundant in renal tissues with increased renal MPO activity, H2O2, MDA, GSSG, and •OH contents, reduced renal T-AOC and GSH contents, CAT, GSH-PX and SOD activity, and SOD expressions in Dahl rats. Furthermore, endogenous H2S in renal tissues was decreased in Dahl rats. H2S donor, however, decreased BP, improved renal function and structure, and inhibited collagen excessive deposition in kidney, in association with increased antioxidative activity and reduced oxidative stress in renal tissues. H2S activated Nrf2 by inducing Keap1 s-sulfhydration and subsequent Keap1/Nrf2 disassociation. Conclusions. H2S protected against high-salt diet-induced renal injury associated with enhanced antioxidant capacity and inhibited renal oxidative stress. PMID:26823949

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits High-Salt Diet-Induced Renal Oxidative Stress and Kidney Injury in Dahl Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pan; Shen, Zhizhou; Liu, Jia; Huang, Yaqian; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Wang, Suxia; Ren, Yali; Li, Xiaohui; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The study was designed to investigate if H2S could inhibit high-salt diet-induced renal excessive oxidative stress and kidney injury in Dahl rats. METHODS. Male salt-sensitive Dahl and SD rats were used. Blood pressure (BP), serum creatinine, urea, creatinine clearance rate, and 24-hour urine protein were measured. Renal ultra- and microstructures were observed. Collagen-I and -III contents the oxidants and antioxidants levels in renal tissue were detected. Keap1/Nrf2 association and Keap1 s-sulfhydration were detected. RESULTS. After 8 weeks of high-salt diet, BP was significantly increased, renal function and structure were impaired, and collagen deposition was abundant in renal tissues with increased renal MPO activity, H2O2, MDA, GSSG, and (•)OH contents, reduced renal T-AOC and GSH contents, CAT, GSH-PX and SOD activity, and SOD expressions in Dahl rats. Furthermore, endogenous H2S in renal tissues was decreased in Dahl rats. H2S donor, however, decreased BP, improved renal function and structure, and inhibited collagen excessive deposition in kidney, in association with increased antioxidative activity and reduced oxidative stress in renal tissues. H2S activated Nrf2 by inducing Keap1 s-sulfhydration and subsequent Keap1/Nrf2 disassociation. CONCLUSIONS. H2S protected against high-salt diet-induced renal injury associated with enhanced antioxidant capacity and inhibited renal oxidative stress. PMID:26823949

  9. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  10. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  11. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  12. A novel role of cytosolic protein synthesis inhibition in aminoglycoside ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Francis, Shimon P; Katz, Joshua; Fanning, Kathryn D; Harris, Kimberly A; Nicholas, Brian D; Lacy, Michael; Pagana, James; Agris, Paul F; Shin, Jung-Bum

    2013-02-13

    Ototoxicity is a main dose-limiting factor in the clinical application of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Despite longstanding research efforts, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying aminoglycoside ototoxicity remains limited. Here we report the discovery of a novel stress pathway that contributes to aminoglycoside-induced hair cell degeneration. Modifying the previously developed bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging method, we used click chemistry to study the role of protein synthesis activity in aminoglycoside-induced hair cell stress. We demonstrate that aminoglycosides inhibit protein synthesis in hair cells and activate a signaling pathway similar to ribotoxic stress response, contributing to hair cell degeneration. The ability of a particular aminoglycoside to inhibit protein synthesis and to activate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway correlated well with its ototoxic potential. Finally, we report that a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug known to inhibit ribotoxic stress response also prevents JNK activation and improves hair cell survival, opening up novel strategies to prevent and treat aminoglycoside ototoxicity. PMID:23407963

  13. Inhibition of Tafel Kinetics for Electrolytic Hydrogen Evolution on Isolated Micron Scale Electrocatalysts on Semiconductor Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Coridan, Robert H; Schichtl, Zebulon G; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2016-09-21

    Semiconductor-liquid junctions are ubiquitous in photoelectrochemical approaches to artificial photosynthesis. By analogy with the antennae and reaction centers in natural photosynthetic complexes, separating the light-absorbing semiconductor and electrocatalysts can improve catalytic efficiency. A catalytic layer can also impair the photovoltage-generating energetics of the electrode without appropriate microscopic organization of catalytically active area on the surface. Here, we have developed a method using high-speed X-ray phase contrast imaging to study in situ electrolytic bubble growth on semiconductor electrodes fabricated with isolated, micron-scale platinum electrocatalysts. X-rays are a nonperturbative probe by which gas evolution dynamics can be studied under conditions relevant to solar fuels applications. The self-limited growth of a bubble residing on the isolated electrocatalyst was measured by tracking the evolution of the gas-liquid boundary. Contrary to observations on macroscopic electrodes, bubble evolution on isolated, microscopic Pt pads on Si electrodes was insensitive to increasing overpotential. The persistence of the bubble causes mass transport limitations and inhibits the expected Tafel-like kinetics. The observed scaling of catalytic current densities with pad size implies that electrolysis is occurring predominantly on the perimeter of the active area. PMID:27575549

  14. The cytochrome bd oxidase of Escherichia coli prevents respiratory inhibition by endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Sergey; Imlay, Karin R C; Imlay, James A

    2016-07-01

    When sulfur compounds are scarce or difficult to process, Escherichia coli adapts by inducing the high-level expression of sulfur-compound importers. If cystine then becomes available, the cystine is rapidly overimported and reduced, leading to a burgeoning pool of intracellular cysteine. Most of the excess cysteine is exported, but some is adventitiously degraded, with the consequent release of sulfide. Sulfide is a potent ligand of copper and heme moieties, raising the prospect that it interferes with enzymes. We observed that when cystine was provided and sulfide levels rose, E. coli became strictly dependent upon cytochrome bd oxidase for continued respiration. Inspection revealed that low-micromolar levels of sulfide inhibited the proton-pumping cytochrome bo oxidase that is regarded as the primary respiratory oxidase. In the absence of the back-up cytochrome bd oxidase, growth failed. Exogenous sulfide elicited the same effect. The potency of sulfide was enhanced when oxygen concentrations were low. Natural oxic-anoxic interfaces are often sulfidic, including the intestinal environment where E. coli dwells. We propose that the sulfide resistance of the cytochrome bd oxidase is a key trait that permits respiration in such habitats.

  15. Zinc finger protein 131 inhibits estrogen signaling by suppressing estrogen receptor {alpha} homo-dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Yohan; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The binding affinity of ZNF131 to ER{alpha} increases upon E2 stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits ER{alpha}-dimerization and E2-induced breast cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor. -- Abstract: Steroid hormone estrogen elicits various physiological functions, many of which are mediated through two structurally and functionally distinct estrogen receptors, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}. The functional role of zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131) is poorly understood, but it is assumed to possess transcriptional regulation activity due to the presence of a DNA binding motif. A few recent reports, including ours, revealed that ZNF131 acts as a negative regulator of ER{alpha} and that SUMO modification potentiates the negative effect of ZNF131 on estrogen signaling. However, its molecular mechanism for ER{alpha} inhibition has not been elucidated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that ZNF131 directly interacts with ER{alpha}, which consequently inhibits ER{alpha}-mediated trans-activation by suppressing its homo-dimerization. Moreover, we show that the C-terminal region of ZNF131 containing the SUMOylation site is necessary for its inhibition of estrogen signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that ZNF131 inhibits estrogen signaling by acting as an ER{alpha}-co-repressor.

  16. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  17. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide–protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide–protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, nonbinding control peptides, and statistical analysis of replicate data. We show that HDX-MS can identify regions in the two epigenetic regulator proteins KDM4C and KDM1A that are perturbed through weak interactions with PD-identified peptides. Two peptides cause reduced HDX on opposite sides of the active site of KDM4C, indicating distinct binding modes. In contrast, the perturbation site of another PD-selected peptide inhibiting the function of KDM1A maps to a GST-tag. Our results demonstrate that HDX-MS can validate and map weak peptide–protein interactions and pave the way for understanding and optimizing the binding of peptide scaffolds identified through PD and similar ligand discovery approaches. PMID:25325890

  18. Waste activated sludge fermentation for hydrogen production enhanced by anaerobic process improvement and acetobacteria inhibition: the role of fermentation pH.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuxiao; Chen, Yinguang; Zhang, Dong; Zhu, Xiaoyu

    2010-05-01

    In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., controlling the fermentation pH at constant pH 10, for significantly increasing hydrogen yield from waste activated sludge (WAS) via the improvement of anaerobic process (sludge solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidification) and inhibition of hydrogen consumption by acetobacteria was reported. Without addition of pure hydrogen producer and nutrient source, the effect of different constant pH in the range of pH 4-11 on hydrogen production from WAS was compared with that of different initial pH. The maximal hydrogen yield was observed respectively at constant pH 10 and initial pH 10, but the former was 47.8% higher than the latter (26.9 versus 18.2 mL per gram volatile suspended solids) and much greater than that reported in literature. Then, the mechanisms for constant pH 10 resulting in remarkably higher hydrogen production than initial pH 10 were investigated. It was observed that constant pH 10 fermentation showed much higher solubilization of sludge main particulate organic matters, hydrolysis of solubilized organic materials and acidification of hydrolyzed products, which were of benefit to the hydrogen production. Also, there was more acetic but less propionic acid in the constant pH 10 test, which was in correspondence with the theory of fermentation type affecting hydrogen production. Moreover, in the reactor of initial pH 10 the produced hydrogen was readily converted to acetic acid, but no obvious hydrogen consumption was observed in constant pH 10 reactor. Further investigation of microorganisms with enzymes analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that the activity and growth of acetobacteria in the reactor of constant pH 10 was much lower than those in initial pH 10 reactor.

  19. Mitochondrial protein import: modification of sulfhydryl groups of the inner mitochondrial membrane import machinery in Solanum tuberosum inhibits protein import.

    PubMed

    von Stedingk, E M; Pavlov, P F; Grinkevich, V A; Glaser, E

    1997-12-01

    Protein import into mitochondria involves several components of the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes as well as molecular chaperones located inside mitochondria. Here, we have investigated the effect of sulfhydryl group reagents on import of the in vitro transcribed/translated precursor of the F1 beta subunit of the ATP synthase (pF1 beta) into Solanum tuberosum mitochondria. We have used a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT), a membrane-permeant alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a non-permeant alkylating agent, 3-(N-maleimidopropionyl)biocytin (MPB), an SH-group specific agent and cross-linker 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) as well as an oxidizing cross-linker, copper sulfate. DTT stimulated the mitochondrial protein import, whereas NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. Inhibition by Cu2+ could be reversed by addition of DTT. The efficiency of inhibition was higher in energized mitochondrial than in non-energized. We have dissected the effect of the SH-group reagents on binding, unfolding and transport of the precursor into mitochondria. Our results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of NEM, DTNB and Cu2+ on the efficiency of import was not due to the interaction of the SH-group reagents with import receptors. Modification of pF1 beta with NEM prior to the import resulted in stimulation of import, whereas DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ inhibited import of the NEM-modified pF1 beta into intact mitochondria. Import of pF1 beta through a receptor-independent bypass-route as well as import into mitoplasts were sensitive to DTT, NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ in a similar manner as import into mitochondria. As MPB does not cross the inner membrane, these results indicated that redox and conformational status of SH groups located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane were essential for protein import.

  20. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibition (2P2I)-Oriented Chemical Library Accelerates Hit Discovery.

    PubMed

    Milhas, Sabine; Raux, Brigitt; Betzi, Stéphane; Derviaux, Carine; Roche, Philippe; Restouin, Audrey; Basse, Marie-Jeanne; Rebuffet, Etienne; Lugari, Adrien; Badol, Marion; Kashyap, Rudra; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Eydoux, Cécilia; Hamon, Véronique; Gourdel, Marie-Edith; Combes, Sébastien; Zimmermann, Pascale; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Roux, Thomas; Rogers, Catherine; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan; Trinquet, Eric; Collette, Yves; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Morelli, Xavier

    2016-08-19

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) represent an enormous source of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. We and others have recently pinpointed key rules that will help in identifying the next generation of innovative drugs to tackle this challenging class of targets within the next decade. We used these rules to design an oriented chemical library corresponding to a set of diverse "PPI-like" modulators with cores identified as privileged structures in therapeutics. In this work, we purchased the resulting 1664 structurally diverse compounds and evaluated them on a series of representative protein-protein interfaces with distinct "druggability" potential using homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) technology. For certain PPI classes, analysis of the hit rates revealed up to 100 enrichment factors compared with nonoriented chemical libraries. This observation correlates with the predicted "druggability" of the targets. A specific focus on selectivity profiles, the three-dimensional (3D) molecular modes of action resolved by X-ray crystallography, and the biological activities of identified hits targeting the well-defined "druggable" bromodomains of the bromo and extraterminal (BET) family are presented as a proof-of-concept. Overall, our present study illustrates the potency of machine learning-based oriented chemical libraries to accelerate the identification of hits targeting PPIs. A generalization of this method to a larger set of compounds will accelerate the discovery of original and potent probes for this challenging class of targets. PMID:27219844

  1. Bifunctional Ligands for Inhibition of Tight-Binding Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Taavi; Enkvist, Erki; Viira, Birgit; Manoharan, Ganesh Babu; Raidaru, Gerda; Pflug, Alexander; Alam, Kazi Asraful; Zaccolo, Manuela; Engh, Richard Alan; Uri, Asko

    2016-08-17

    The acknowledged potential of small-molecule therapeutics targeting disease-related protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has promoted active research in this field. The strategy of using small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) to fight strong (tight-binding) PPIs tends to fall short due to the flat and wide interfaces of PPIs. Here we propose a biligand approach for disruption of strong PPIs. The potential of this approach was realized for disruption of the tight-binding (KD = 100 pM) tetrameric holoenzyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Supported by X-ray analysis of cocrystals, bifunctional inhibitors (ARC-inhibitors) were constructed that simultaneously associated with both the ATP-pocket and the PPI interface area of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc). Bifunctional inhibitor ARC-1411, possessing a KD value of 3 pM toward PKAc, induced the dissociation of the PKA holoenzyme with a low-nanomolar IC50, whereas the ATP-competitive inhibitor H89 bound to the PKA holoenzyme without disruption of the protein tetramer. PMID:27389935

  2. Rgg protein structure-function and inhibition by cyclic peptide compounds.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Federle, Michael J; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2015-04-21

    Peptide pheromone cell-cell signaling (quorum sensing) regulates the expression of diverse developmental phenotypes (including virulence) in Firmicutes, which includes common human pathogens, e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Cytoplasmic transcription factors known as "Rgg proteins" are peptide pheromone receptors ubiquitous in Firmicutes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of a Streptococcus Rgg protein alone and in complex with a tight-binding signaling antagonist, the cyclic undecapeptide cyclosporin A. To our knowledge, these represent the first Rgg protein X-ray crystal structures. Based on the results of extensive structure-function analysis, we reveal the peptide pheromone-binding site and the mechanism by which cyclosporin A inhibits activation of the peptide pheromone receptor. Guided by the Rgg-cyclosporin A complex structure, we predicted that the nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog valspodar would inhibit Rgg activation. Indeed, we found that, like cyclosporin A, valspodar inhibits peptide pheromone activation of conserved Rgg proteins in medically relevant Streptococcus species. Finally, the crystal structures presented here revealed that the Rgg protein DNA-binding domains are covalently linked across their dimerization interface by a disulfide bond formed by a highly conserved cysteine. The DNA-binding domain dimerization interface observed in our structures is essentially identical to the interfaces previously described for other members of the XRE DNA-binding domain family, but the presence of an intermolecular disulfide bond buried in this interface appears to be unique. We hypothesize that this disulfide bond may, under the right conditions, affect Rgg monomer-dimer equilibrium, stabilize Rgg conformation, or serve as a redox-sensitive switch.

  3. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors. PMID:22791606

  4. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors.

  5. Tacaribe virus Z protein interacts with the L polymerase protein to inhibit viral RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jácamo, Rodrigo; López, Nora; Wilda, Maximiliano; Franze-Fernández, María T

    2003-10-01

    Tacaribe virus (TV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TV genome encodes four proteins, the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a small RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetic system, we recently demonstrated that TV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and full-cycle RNA replication mediated by TV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (N. López, R. Jácamo, and M. T. Franze-Fernández, J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). In the present study we investigated whether Z might interact with either of the proteins, N and L, required for RNA synthesis. To that end, we used coimmunoprecipitation with monospecific antibodies against the viral proteins and coimmunoprecipitation with serum against glutathione S-transferase (GST) and binding to glutathione-Sepharose beads when Z was expressed as a fusion protein with GST. We demonstrated that Z interacted with L but not with N and that Z inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L. We also evaluated the contribution of different Z regions to its binding ability and functional activity. We found that integrity of the RING structure is essential for Z binding to L and for Z inhibitory activity. Mutants with deletions at the N and C termini of Z showed that amino acids within the C-terminal region and immediately adjacent to the RING domain N terminus contribute to efficient Z-L interaction and are required for inhibitory activity. The data presented here provide the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L, suggesting that Z interferes with viral RNA synthesis by direct interaction with L. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed a previously unreported interaction between N and L.

  6. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three genes encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins from Capsicum annuum, and their relation to increased resistance to two fungal pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are plant cell wall glycoproteins that can inhibit fungal endopolygalacturonases (PGs). Inhibiting by PGIPs directly reduces potential PG activity in specific plant pathogenic fungi, reducing their aggressiveness. Here, we isolated and functionally chara...

  7. Deciphering the protein translation inhibition and coping mechanism of trichothecene toxin in resistant fungi.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Indu; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-09-01

    In modern times for combating the deleterious soil microbes for improved sustainable agricultural practices, there is a need to have a proper understanding of the plant-microbe interactions present in the rhizospheric microbiome of the plant roots. In the present study, the interactions of trichodermin with petidyltransferase centre of ribosomal complex was studied by molecular dynamics and in silico interaction methods to demonstrate its mechanism of action and to decipher the possible reason how it may inhibit protein synthesis at the ribosomal complex. Further we have illustrated how trichodermin resistance protein (60S ribosomal protein L3) helps to overcome the deleterious effects of trichothecene compounds like trichodermin. Normal mode analysis of trichodermin resistance protein and 25S rRNA that constitutes the petidyltransferase centre showed that the W-finger region of the protein moved towards 25S rRNA. Further analysis of molecular dynamics simulation time frames showed that several intermediate states of large motions of the protein molecules towards the 25S rRNA which finally blocks the binding pocket of the trichodermin. It indicated that this protein not only changes the local environment and conformation of the petidyltransferase centre but also restrain trichodermin from binding to the 25S rRNA at the petidyltransferase centre. PMID:27495375

  8. Polymer-drug conjugates for intracellar molecule-targeted photoinduced inactivation of protein and growth inhibition of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Huanxiang; Zhu, Chunlei; Yang, Qiong; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2012-10-01

    For most molecule-targeted anticancer systems, intracellular protein targets are very difficult to be accessed by antibodies, and also most efforts are made to inhibit protein activity temporarily rather than inactivate them permanently. In this work we firstly designed and synthesized multifunctional polymer-drug conjugates (polythiophene-tamoxifen) for intracellular molecule-targeted binding and inactivation of protein (estrogen receptor α, ERα) for growth inhibition of MCF-7 cancer cells. Small molecule drug was conjugated to polymer side chain for intracellular signal protein targeting, and simultaneously the fluorescent characteristic of polymer for tracing the cellular uptake and localization of polythiophene-drug conjugates by cell imaging. Under light irradiation, the conjugated polymer can sensitize oxygen to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that specifically inactivate the targeted protein, and thus inhibit the growth of tumor cells. The conjugates showed selective growth inhibition of ERα positive cancer cells, which exhibits low side effect for our intracellular molecule-targeted therapy system.

  9. mTOR inhibition activates overall protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system as well as by autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinghui; Zhai, Bo; Gygi, Steven P; Goldberg, Alfred Lewis

    2015-12-29

    Growth factors and nutrients enhance protein synthesis and suppress overall protein degradation by activating the protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Conversely, nutrient or serum deprivation inhibits mTOR and stimulates protein breakdown by inducing autophagy, which provides the starved cells with amino acids for protein synthesis and energy production. However, it is unclear whether proteolysis by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which catalyzes most protein degradation in mammalian cells, also increases when mTOR activity decreases. Here we show that inhibiting mTOR with rapamycin or Torin1 rapidly increases the degradation of long-lived cell proteins, but not short-lived ones, by stimulating proteolysis by proteasomes, in addition to autophagy. This enhanced proteasomal degradation required protein ubiquitination, and within 30 min after mTOR inhibition, the cellular content of K48-linked ubiquitinated proteins increased without any change in proteasome content or activity. This rapid increase in UPS-mediated proteolysis continued for many hours and resulted primarily from inhibition of mTORC1 (not mTORC2), but did not require new protein synthesis or key mTOR targets: S6Ks, 4E-BPs, or Ulks. These findings do not support the recent report that mTORC1 inhibition reduces proteolysis by suppressing proteasome expression [Zhang Y, et al. (2014) Nature 513(7518):440-443]. Several growth-related proteins were identified that were ubiquitinated and degraded more rapidly after mTOR inhibition, including HMG-CoA synthase, whose enhanced degradation probably limits cholesterol biosynthesis upon insulin deficiency. Thus, mTOR inhibition coordinately activates the UPS and autophagy, which provide essential amino acids and, together with the enhanced ubiquitination of anabolic proteins, help slow growth. PMID:26669439

  10. Inhibition and Dispersal of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Combination Treatment with Escapin Intermediate Products and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Ariel J; Ahmed, Marwa N A; Wang, Shu-Lin; Damera, Krishna; Wang, Binghe; Tai, Phang C; Gilbert, Eric S; Derby, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Escapin is an l-amino acid oxidase that acts on lysine to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ammonia, and equilibrium mixtures of several organic acids collectively called escapin intermediate products (EIP). Previous work showed that the combination of synthetic EIP and H2O2 functions synergistically as an antimicrobial toward diverse planktonic bacteria. We initiated the present study to investigate how the combination of EIP and H2O2 affected bacterial biofilms, using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a model. Specifically, we examined concentrations of EIP and H2O2 that inhibited biofilm formation or fostered disruption of established biofilms. High-throughput assays of biofilm formation using microtiter plates and crystal violet staining showed a significant effect from pairing EIP and H2O2, resulting in inhibition of biofilm formation relative to biofilm formation in untreated controls or with EIP or H2O2 alone. Similarly, flow cell analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the EIP and H2O2 combination reduced the biomass of established biofilms relative to that of the controls. Area layer analysis of biofilms posttreatment indicated that disruption of biomass occurs down to the substratum. Only nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of EIP and H2O2 were required to impact biofilm formation or disruption, and these concentrations are significantly lower than those causing bactericidal effects on planktonic bacteria. Micromolar concentrations of EIP and H2O2 combined enhanced P. aeruginosa swimming motility compared to the effect of either EIP or H2O2 alone. Collectively, our results suggest that the combination of EIP and H2O2 may affect biofilms by interfering with bacterial attachment and destabilizing the biofilm matrix. PMID:27401562

  11. Specific inhibition of sensitized protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) with a biarsenical probe

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Oliver B.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key regulator of the insulin-receptor and leptin-receptor signaling pathways, and it has therefore emerged as a critical anti-type-II-diabetes and anti-obesity drug target. Toward the goal of generating a covalent modulator of PTP1B activity that can be used for investigating its roles in cell signaling and disease progression, we report that the biarsenical probe FlAsH-EDT2 can be used to inhibit PTP1B variants that contain cysteine point mutations in a key catalytic loop of the enzyme. The site-specific cysteine mutations have little effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme in the absence of FlAsH-EDT2. Upon addition of FlAsH-EDT2, however, the activity of the engineered PTP1B is strongly inhibited, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that the cysteine-rich PTP1B variants can be targeted with the biarsenical probe in either whole-cell lysates or intact cells. Together, our data provide an example of a biarsenical probe controlling the activity of a protein that does not contain the canonical tetra-cysteine biarsenical-labeling sequence CCXXCC. The targeting of “incomplete” cysteine-rich motifs could provide a general means for controlling protein activity by targeting biarsenical compounds to catalytically important loops in conserved protein domains. PMID:22263876

  12. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins. PMID:14514663

  13. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  14. 15-Deoxyspergualin inhibits eukaryotic protein synthesis through eIF2α phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ramya, T. N. C.; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2006-01-01

    DSG (15-deoxyspergualin), an immunosuppressant with tumoricidal properties, binds potently to the regulatory C-terminal ‘EEVD’ motif of Hsps (heat-shock proteins). In the present study we demonstrate that DSG inhibits eukaryotic protein synthesis by sequestering Hsp70 which is required for maintaining HRI (haem-regulated inhibitor), a kinase of the eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α), inactive. DSG stalled initiation of protein synthesis through phosphorylation of HRI and eIF2α. Addition of a recombinant eIF2α (S51A) protein, which lacks the phosphorylation site, lowered the inhibitory potential of DSG in reticulocyte lysate. The inhibitory effect of DSG was also attenuated in HRI knockdown cells. Moreover, exogenous addition of Hsp70 or the peptide ‘EEVD’ reversed the inhibitory effect of DSG. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of DSG in different mammalian cancer cells was found to negatively correlate with the amount of Hsp70 expressed in the cells, emphasizing the link with Hsp70 in DSG inhibition of eukaryotic translation. PMID:16952278

  15. Interbacterial signaling via Burkholderia contact-dependent growth inhibition system proteins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Erin C; Perault, Andrew I; Marlatt, Sara A; Cotter, Peggy A

    2016-07-19

    In prokaryotes and eukaryotes, cell-cell communication and recognition of self are critical to coordinate multicellular functions. Although kin and kind discrimination are increasingly appreciated to shape naturally occurring microbe populations, the underlying mechanisms that govern these interbacterial interactions are insufficiently understood. Here, we identify a mechanism of interbacterial signal transduction that is mediated by contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) system proteins. CDI systems have been characterized by their ability to deliver a polymorphic protein toxin into the cytoplasm of a neighboring bacterium, resulting in growth inhibition or death unless the recipient bacterium produces a corresponding immunity protein. Using the model organism Burkholderia thailandensis, we show that delivery of a catalytically active CDI system toxin to immune (self) bacteria results in gene expression and phenotypic changes within the recipient cells. Termed contact-dependent signaling (CDS), this response promotes biofilm formation and other community-associated behaviors. Engineered strains that are isogenic with B. thailandensis, except the DNA region encoding the toxin and immunity proteins, did not display CDS, whereas a strain of Burkholderia dolosa producing a nearly identical toxin-immunity pair induced signaling in B. thailandensis Our data indicate that bcpAIOB loci confer dual benefits; they direct antagonism toward non-self bacteria and promote cooperation between self bacteria, with self being defined by the bcpAIOB allele and not by genealogic relatedness. PMID:27335458

  16. Mutant p53 proteins counteract autophagic mechanism sensitizing cancer cells to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Oppici, Elisa; Dando, Ilaria; Butturini, Elena; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar; Mariotto, Sofia; Cellini, Barbara; Blandino, Giovanni; Palmieri, Marta; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in TP53 gene play a pivotal role in tumorigenesis and cancer development. Here, we report that gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins inhibit the autophagic pathway favoring antiapoptotic effects as well as proliferation of pancreas and breast cancer cells. We found that mutant p53 significantly counteracts the formation of autophagic vesicles and their fusion with lysosomes throughout the repression of some key autophagy-related proteins and enzymes as BECN1 (and P-BECN1), DRAM1, ATG12, SESN1/2 and P-AMPK with the concomitant stimulation of mTOR signaling. As a paradigm of this mechanism, we show that atg12 gene repression was mediated by the recruitment of the p50 NF-κB/mutant p53 protein complex onto the atg12 promoter. Either mutant p53 or p50 NF-κB depletion downregulates atg12 gene expression. We further correlated the low expression levels of autophagic genes (atg12, becn1, sesn1, and dram1) with a reduced relapse free survival (RFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) of breast cancer patients carrying TP53 gene mutations conferring a prognostic value to this mutant p53-and autophagy-related signature. Interestingly, the mutant p53-driven mTOR stimulation sensitized cancer cells to the treatment with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. All these results reveal a novel mechanism through which mutant p53 proteins promote cancer cell proliferation with the concomitant inhibition of autophagy.

  17. The inhibition of ice nucleators by insect antifreeze proteins is enhanced by glycerol and citrate.

    PubMed

    Duman, J G

    2002-02-01

    Antifreeze proteins depress the freezing point of water while not affecting the melting point, producing a characteristic difference in freezing and melting points termed thermal hysteresis. Larvae of the beetle Dendroides canadensis accumulate potent antifreeze proteins (DAFPs) in their hemolymph and gut, but to achieve high levels of thermal hysteresis requires enhancers, such as glycerol. DAFPs have previously been shown to inhibit the activity of bacterial and hemolymph protein ice nucleators, however, the effect was not large and therefore the effectiveness of the DAFPs in promoting supercooling of the larvae in winter was doubtful. However, this study demonstrates that DAFPs, in combination with the thermal hysteresis enhancers glycerol (1 M) or citrate (0.5 M), eliminated the activity of hemolymph protein ice nucleators and Pseudomonas syringae ice-nucleating active bacteria, and lowered the supercooling points (nucleation temperatures) of aqueous solutions containing these ice nucleators to those of water or buffer alone. This shows that the DAFPs, along with glycerol, play a critical role in promoting hemolymph supercooling in overwintering D. canadensis. Also, DAFPs in combination with enhancers may be useful in applications which require inhibition of ice nucleators. PMID:11916110

  18. Ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide inhibits cholestasis- and hypoxia-induced apoptosis by upregulating antiapoptosis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sellinger, Myra; Xu, Weihong; Pathil, Anita; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    An increase of toxic bile acids such as glycochenodeoxycholic acid occurs during warm ischemia reperfusion causing cholestasis and damage in hepatocytes and intrahepatic biliary epithelial cells. We aim to test antiapoptosis effects of ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide under cholestatic induction by glycochenodeoxycholic acid treatment of mouse hepatocytes and hypoxia induction by cobalt chloride treatment of intrahepatic biliary epithelial cancer Mz-ChA-1cell line. Such treatments caused marked increases in apoptosis as evidenced by activation of caspase 3, caspase 8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Co-treatment with ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide significantly inhibited these increases. Interestingly, ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide was able to increase expression of antiapoptotic cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein in both cell types. Ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide also prevented the decreases of myeloid cell leukemia sequence-1 protein in both experimental systems, and this protection was due to ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide’s ability to inhibit ubiquitination-mediated degradation of myeloid cell leukemia sequence-1, and to increase the phosphorylation of GSK-3β. In addition, ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide was able to prevent the decreased expression of another antiapoptotic cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 in cobalt chloride-treated Mz-ChA-1 cells. Hence, ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide mediated cytoprotection against apoptosis during toxic bile-acid and ischemic stresses by a mechanism involving accumulation of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein, myeloid cell leukemia sequence-1 and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 proteins. Ursodeoxycholyl lysophosphatidylethanolamide may thus be used as an agent to prevent hepatic ischemia reperfusion. PMID:25125499

  19. Anthocyanidins inhibit activator protein 1 activity and cell transformation: structure-activity relationship and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, De-Xing; Kai, Keiko; Li, Jian-Jian; Lin, Shigang; Terahara, Norihiko; Wakamatsu, Mika; Fujii, Makoto; Young, Mattew R; Colburn, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Anthocyanins are the chemical components that give the intense color to many fruits and vegetables, such as blueberries, red cabbages and purple sweet potatoes. Extensive studies have indicated that anthocyanins have strong antioxidant activities. To investigate the mechanism of anthocyanidins as an anticancer food source, six kinds of anthocyanidins representing the aglycons of most anthocyanins, were used to examine their effects on tumor promotion in mouse JB6 cells, a validated model for screening cancer chemopreventive agents and elucidating the molecular mechanisms. Of the six anthocyanins tested, only those with an ortho-dihydroxyphenyl structure on the B-ring suppressed 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced cell transformation and activator protein-1 transactivation, suggesting that the ortho-dihydroxyphenyl may contribute to the inhibitory action. Delphinidin, but not peonidin, blocked the phosphorylation of protein kinases in the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway at early times and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway at later times. p38 kinase was not inhibited by delphinidin. Furthermore, two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) specific inhibitors (SP600125 for JNK and UO126 for ERK) could specifically block the activation of JNK and ERK and cell transformation. Those results demonstrate that anthocyanidins contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by blocking activation of the MAPK pathway. These findings provide the first molecular basis for the anticarcinogenic action of anthocyanidins.

  20. Inhibiting cortical protein kinase A in spinal cord injured rats enhances efficacy of rehabilitative training.

    PubMed

    Wei, David; Hurd, Caitlin; Galleguillos, Danny; Singh, Jyoti; Fenrich, Keith K; Webber, Christine A; Sipione, Simonetta; Fouad, Karim

    2016-09-01

    Elevated levels of the second messenger molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are often associated with neuron sprouting and neurite extension (i.e., neuroplasticity). Phosphokinase A (PKA) is a prominent downstream target of cAMP that has been associated with neurite outgrowth. We hypothesized that rehabilitative motor training following spinal cord injuries promotes neuroplasticity via PKA activation. However, in two independent experiments, inhibition of cortical PKA using Rp-cAMPS throughout rehabilitative training robustly increased functional recovery and collateral sprouting of injured corticospinal tract axons, an indicator of neuroplasticity. Consistent with these in vivo findings, using cultured STHdh neurons, we found that Rp-cAMPS had no effect on the phosphorylation of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein), a prominent downstream target of PKA, even with the concomitant application of the adenylate cyclase agonist forskolin to increase cAMP levels. Conversely, when cAMP levels were increased using the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX, Rp-cAMPS potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that an alternate cAMP dependent pathway was involved in increasing CREB phosphorylation and neuroplasticity. This idea was supported by an in vitro neurite outgrowth assay, where inhibiting PKA did enhance neurite outgrowth. However, when PKA inhibition was combined with inhibition of EPAC2 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP), another downstream target of cAMP in neurons, neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced. In conclusion, blocking PKA in cortical neurons of spinal cord injured rats increases neurite outgrowth of the lesioned corticospinal tract fibres and the efficacy of rehabilitative training, likely via EPAC. PMID:27401133

  1. Characterization of the inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein chaperone activities by methylated oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Sergiy V; Boudier, Christian; Gottikh, Marina; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Mély, Yves

    2012-02-01

    Since currently available therapies against HIV/AIDS still show important drawbacks, the development of novel anti-HIV treatments is a key issue. We recently characterized methylated oligoribonucleotides (mONs) that extensively inhibit HIV-1 replication in primary T cells at nanomolar concentrations. The mONs were shown to target both HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and the nucleocapsid protein (NC), which is an essential partner of RT during viral DNA synthesis. To further understand the mechanism of such mONs, we studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence-based techniques their NC binding properties and ability to inhibit the nucleic acid chaperone properties of NC. Notably, we investigated the ability of mONs to inhibit the NC-induced destabilization of the HIV-1 cTAR (complementary DNA sequence to TAR [transactivation response element]) stem-loop and the NC-promoted cTAR annealing to its complementary sequence, required at the early stage of HIV-1 viral DNA synthesis. Moreover, we compared the activity of the mONs to that of a number of modified and nonmodified oligonucleotides. Results show that the mONs inhibit NC by a competitive mechanism whereby the mONs tightly bind the NC peptide, mainly through nonelectrostatic interactions with the hydrophobic platform at the top of the NC zinc fingers. Taken together, these results favor the notion that the mONs impair the process of the RT-directed viral DNA synthesis by sequestering NC molecules, thus preventing the chaperoning of viral DNA synthesis by NC. These findings contribute to the understanding of the molecular basis for NC inhibition by mONs, which could be used for the rational design of antiretroviral compounds targeting HIV-1 NC protein.

  2. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  3. Amide hydrogen exchange and internal dynamics in the chemotactic protein CheY from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, E; Bruix, M; López-Hernández, E; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1997-08-22

    The backbone internal dynamics of the wild-type 129 amino acid alpha/beta parallel protein CheY and its double mutant F14N/P110G are analysed here by the hydrogen-exchange method. The F14N mutation is known to stabilise the protein and to accelerate refolding while P110G is destabilising and accelerates unfolding. We first assigned and characterised the double mutant by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to try and discover any possible conformational change induced by the two mutations. The main difference between the two proteins is a favourable N-capping interaction of the newly introduced Asn14 side-chain at the beginning of the first alpha-helix (alpha-helix A). Second, we have measured the exchange rates in the wild-type and mutant CheY. In the first case the observed protection factors are slightly dispersed around an average value. According to their distribution in the structure, protein stability is highest on one face of the central beta-sheet, in the surroundings of the main hydrophobic core formed by side-chains of residues in beta-strands I, II and III and helices A and E. The mutations in the double mutant protein affect two distinct subdomains differently (from beta-strand I to III and from alpha-helix C to the end). In the second subdomain the number of protected protons is reduced with respect to those in the wild-type. This differential behaviour can be explained by a selective decrease in stability of the second folding subdomain produced by the P110G mutation and the opposite effect in the first subdomain, produced by the F14N mutation. alpha-Helix A, which is involved together with beta-strands I and III in the folding nucleus of CheY, shows the largest protection factors in both proteins.

  4. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  5. Negative Regulation of NADPH Oxidase 4 by Hydrogen Peroxide-inducible Clone 5 (Hic-5) Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Leena P.; Zhou, Yong; Estrada, Aida V.; Ding, Qiang; Cheng, Guangjie; Collawn, James F.; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone 5 (Hic-5) is a focal adhesion adaptor protein induced by the profibrotic cytokine TGF-β1. We have demonstrated previously that TGF-β1 induces myofibroblast differentiation and lung fibrosis by activation of the reactive oxygen species-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4). Here we investigated a potential role for Hic-5 in regulating Nox4, myofibroblast differentiation, and senescence. In normal human diploid fibroblasts, TGF-β1 induces Hic-5 expression in a delayed manner relative to the induction of Nox4 and myofibroblast differentiation. Hic-5 silencing induced constitutive Nox4 expression and enhanced TGF-β1-inducible Nox4 levels. The induction of constitutive Nox4 protein in Hic-5-silenced cells was independent of transcription and translation and controlled by the ubiquitin-proteasomal system. Hic-5 associates with the ubiquitin ligase Cbl-c and the ubiquitin-binding protein heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). The interaction of these proteins is required for the ubiquitination of Nox4 and for maintaining low basal levels of this reactive oxygen species-generating enzyme. Our model suggests that TGF-β1-induced Hic-5 functions as a negative feedback mechanism to limit myofibroblast differentiation and senescence by promoting the ubiquitin-proteasomal system-mediated degradation of Nox4. Together, these studies indicate that endogenous Hic-5 suppresses senescence and profibrotic activities of myofibroblasts by down-regulating Nox4 protein expression. Additionally, these are the first studies, to our knowledge, to demonstrate posttranslational regulation of Nox4. PMID:24831009

  6. Mesenchyme-specific overexpression of nucleolar protein 66 in mice inhibits skeletal growth and bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qin; Zhang, Liping; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Krahe, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies showed that nucleolar protein 66 (NO66), the Jumonji C-domain-containing histone demethylase for methylated histone H3K4 and H3K36 (H3K36me), negatively regulates osteoblast differentiation in vitro by inhibiting the activity of transcription factor osterix (Osx). However, whether NO66 affects mammalian skeletogenesis in vivo is not yet known. Here, we generated transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing a flag-tagged NO66 transgene driven by the Prx1 (paired related homeobox 1) promoter. We found that NO66 overexpression in Prx1-expressing mesenchymal cells inhibited skeletal growth and bone formation. The inhibitory phenotype was associated with >50% decreases in chondrocyte/osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, we found that in bones of NO66-TG mice, expression of Igf1, Igf1 receptor (Igf1r), runt-related transcription factor 2, and Osx was significantly down-regulated (P < 0.05). Consistent with these results, we observed >50% reduction in levels of phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) and H3K36me3 in bones of NO66-TG mice, suggesting an inverse correlation between NO66 histone demethylase and the activity of IGF1R/Akt signaling. This correlation was further confirmed by in vitro assays of C2C12 cells with NO66 overexpression. We propose that the decrease in the IGF1R/Akt signaling pathway in mice with mesenchymal overexpression of NO66 may contribute in part to the inhibition of skeletal growth and bone formation.—Chen, Q., Zhang, L., de Crombrugghe, B., Krahe, R. Mesenchyme-specific overexpression of nucleolar protein 66 in mice inhibits skeletal growth and bone formation. PMID:25746793

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced severe acute pancreatitis by inhibiting ROS and NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce (•)OH and ONOO(-) selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically.

  8. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Acute Renal Injury in Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis by Inhibiting ROS and NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qiao; Liao, Kang-Shu; Zhao, Kai-Liang; Zuo, Teng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Yu, Jia; Guo, Wen-Yi; He, Xiao-Bo; Abliz, Ablikim; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2), a new antioxidant, was reported to reduce •OH and ONOO− selectively and inhibit certain proinflammatory mediators to product, without disturbing metabolic redox reactions or ROS involved in cell signaling. We herein aim to explore its protective effects on acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanisms. Rats were injected with hydrogen-rich saline (HRS group) or normal saline (SO and SAP group) through tail intravenously (6 mL/kg) and compensated subcutaneously (20 mL/kg) after successful modeling. Results showed that hydrogen-rich saline attenuated the following: (1) serum Cr and BUN, (2) pancreatic and renal pathological injuries, (3) renal MDA, (4) renal MPO, (5) serum IL-1β, IL-6, and renal TNF-α, HMGB1, and (6) tyrosine nitration, IκB degradation, and NF-κB activation in renal tissues. In addition, it increased the level of IL-10 and SOD activity in renal tissues. These results proved that hydrogen-rich saline attenuates acute renal injury in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis, presumably because of its detoxification activity against excessive ROS, and inhibits the activation of NF-κB by affecting IκB nitration and degradation. Our findings highlight the potential value of hydrogen-rich saline as a new therapeutic method on acute renal injury in severe acute pancreatitis clinically. PMID:25878401

  9. Structural basis for the inhibition of mammalian and insect alpha-amylases by plant protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Payan, Françoise

    2004-02-12

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitous proteins which play an important role in the carbohydrate metabolism of microorganisms, animals and plants. Living organisms use protein inhibitors as a major tool to regulate the glycolytic activity of alpha-amylases. Most of the inhibitors for which three-dimensional (3-D) structures are available are directed against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases, interacting with the active sites in a substrate-like manner. In this review, we discuss the detailed inhibitory mechanism of these enzymes in light of the recent determination of the 3-D structures of pig pancreatic, human pancreatic, and yellow mealworm alpha-amylases in complex with plant protein inhibitors. In most cases, the mechanism of inhibition occurs through the direct blockage of the active center at several subsites of the enzyme. Inhibitors exhibiting "dual" activity against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases establish contacts of the same type in alternative ways.

  10. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  11. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  12. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler׳s murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions.

  13. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    PubMed

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  14. Lucanthone and Its Derivative Hycanthone Inhibit Apurinic Endonuclease-1 (APE1) by Direct Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Mamta D.; Agarwal, Rakhi; Pena, Louis A.; Cunha, Luis; Mezei, Mihaly; Shen, Min; Wilson, David M.; Liu, Yuan; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Wilson, Samuel H.; Waring, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC50 values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 µM and 80 nM, respectively. The KD values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e.g., TRIS and DMSO

  15. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  16. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting the expression of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi-Hua; Lin, Xiao-Long; Yuan, Cong; He, Jun; Tan, Tian-Ping; Wu, Shao-Jian; Yu, Shan; Chen, Li; Liu, Jun; Tian, Wei; Chen, Yu-Dan; Fu, Hong-Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, which can give rise to severe cardiotoxicity, limiting its clinical use. Preliminary evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may exert protective effects on DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether peroxiredoxin III is involved in the cardioprotection of H2S against DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity. The results demonstrated that DOX not only markedly induced injuries, including cytotoxicity and apoptosis, it also increased the expression levels of peroxiredoxin III. Notably, pretreatment with sodium hydrosulfide significantly attenuated the DOX‑induced decrease in cell viability and increase in apoptosis, and also reversed the increased expression levels of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. In addition, pretreatment of the H9c2 cells with N‑acetyl‑L‑cysteine, a scavenger of reactive oxygen species, prior to exposure to DOX markedly decreased the expression levels of peroxiredoxin III. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that exogenous H2S attenuates DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity by inhibiting the expression of peroxiredoxin III in H9c2 cells. In the present study, the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiomyocytes was assessed using an methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and Hoechst staining. The levels of Prx III and cystathionine-γ-lyase were examined by western blotting.

  17. Oxidized S100A4 inhibits the activation of protein phosphatase 5 through S100A1 in MKN‑45 gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2014-12-01

    S100 proteins bind to numerous target proteins, as well as other S100 proteins and activate signaling cascades. S100 proteins can be modified by various post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, methylation and acetylation. In addition, oxidation is important for modulating their activities. Previous studies have shown that S100A1 interacts with S100A4 in vitro and in vivo. Due to this potential cross‑talk among the S100 proteins, the aim of the present study was to examine whether S100A4 modulates the activity of S100A1. S100A4 was readily oxidized and formed disulfide-linked dimers and oligomers. Although non-oxidized S100A4 bound to protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), the Cu-oxidized S100A4 failed to bind PP5. Instead, the Cu-oxidized S100A4 directly interacted with S100A1 and prevented PP5 activation. Hydrogen peroxide induced S100A4 oxidation in MKN-45 gastric adenocarcinoma cells and decreased S100A1‑PP5 interaction, resulted in the inhibition of PP5 activation by S100A1. These data indicate that oxidized S100A4 regulates PP5 activity in a unique manner under oxidative stress conditions. PMID:25269953

  18. 2-Octynoic Acid Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection through Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darong; Xue, Binbin; Wang, Xiaohong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Nianli; Gao, Yimin; Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen

    2013-01-01

    Many chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients with current therapy do not clear the virus. It is necessary to find novel treatments. The effect of 2-octynoic acid (2-OA) on HCV infection in human hepatocytes was examined. The mechanism of 2-OA antiviral activity was explored. Our data showed that 2-OA abrogated lipid accumulation in HCV replicon cells and virus-infected hepatocytes. It suppressed HCV RNA replication and infectious virus production with no cytotoxicity to the host cells. 2-OA did not affect hepatitis B virus replication in HepG2.2.15 cells derived from HepG2 cells transfected with full genome of HBV. Further study demonstrated that 2-OA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase in viral-infected cells. Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited AMPK activity and reversed the reduction of intracellular lipid accumulation and the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Knockdown of AMPK expression by RNA interference abolished the activation of AMPK by 2-OA and blocked 2-OA antiviral activity. Interestingly, 2-OA induced interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and inhibited microRNA-122 (miR-122) expression in virus-infected hepatocytes. MiR-122 overexpression reversed the antiviral effect of 2-OA. Furthermore, knockdown of AMPK expression reversed both the induction of ISGs and suppression of miR-122 by 2-OA, implying that activated AMPK induces the intracellular innate response through the induction of ISGs and inhibiting miR-122 expression. 2-OA inhibits HCV infection through regulation of innate immune response by activated AMPK. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which active AMPK inhibits HCV infection. 2-OA and its derivatives hold promise for novel drug development for chronic hepatitis C. PMID:23741428

  19. Depletion of OLFM4 gene inhibits cell growth and increases sensitization to hydrogen peroxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced-apoptosis in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene is a secreted glycoprotein more commonly known as the anti-apoptotic molecule GW112. OLFM4 is found to be frequently up-regulated in many types of human tumors including gastric cancer and it was believed to play significant role in the progression of gastric cancer. Although the function of OLFM4 has been indicated in many studies, recent evidence strongly suggests a cell or tissue type-dependent role of OLFM4 in cell growth and apoptosis. The aim of this study is to examine the role of gastric cancer-specific expression of OLFM4 in cell growth and apoptosis resistance. Methods OLFM4 expression was eliminated by RNA interference in SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells. Cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle and apoptosis were characterized in vitro. Tumorigenicity was analyzed in vivo. The apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF α) were assessed in the presence or absence of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk. Results The elimination of OLFM4 protein by RNA interference in SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells significantly inhibits tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo by induction of cell G1 arrest (all P < 0.01). OLFM4 knockdown did not trigger obvious cell apoptosis but increased H2O2 or TNF α-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activity (all P < 0.01). Treatment of Z-VAD-fmk attenuated caspase-3 activity and significantly reversed the H2O2 or TNF α-induced apoptosis in OLFM4 knockdown cells (all P < 0.01). Conclusion Our study suggests that depletion of OLFM4 significantly inhibits tumorigenicity of the gastric cancer SGC-7901 and MKN45 cells. Blocking OLFM4 expression can sensitize gastric cancer cells to H2O2 or TNF α treatment by increasing caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. A combination strategy based on OLFM4 inhibition and anticancer drugs treatment may provide therapeutic potential in gastric cancer intervention. PMID:22471589

  20. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Inhibition of Vasomotor Activity: Evaluation of Single and Combined Treatments With Vitamin A and Insulin in Streptozotocin-Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zobali, Fulya; Besler, Tanju; Ari, Nuray

    2002-01-01

    A positive correlation has been established between increased oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases in diabetes mellitus. We evaluated the effects of single or combined treatments with vitamin A (retinol acetate, 30 mg/kg/day, for 12-weeks) and insulin (8-10 IU/rat/day for the final 6-week) on vasomotor activity, oxidative stress and retinol metabolism in 12-week streptozotocin diabetic rats. The vasomotor activity was determined by measuring in vitro responsiveness of aorta rings to phenylephrine (PE) and acetylcholine (ACh) in the absence or in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Preincubation with H2O2 (10 μM) produced a significant decrease in PE (1 mM)-induced contraction in untreated-diabetic but not in control rats. Single treatment with insulin counteracted this effect of H2O2 and also reversed the increased contractile response of diabetic aorta to PE, while vitamin A was found to be ineffective. H2O2 (10 μM) also inhibited ACh (1 mM)-stimulated endothelium- dependent relaxation two fold more in diabetic than in control aorta. In the prevention of H2O2-induced inhibition of vascular relaxation to ACh, vitamin A alone was markedly effective while insulin alone was not. The combination of vitamin A plus insulin removed the inhibitory action of H2O2 in diabetic aorta. Diabetic animals displayed an increased level of aorta thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in association with decreased levels of plasma retinol and retinol-binding protein (RBP). Single treatment with insulin, in spite of allowing recovery of normal growth rate and improved glucose and retinol metabolism in diabetic rats, was unable to control TBARS production to the same extent as vitamin A alone. Our findings suggest that the maintenance of ACh-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant tone in normal physiological levels depends largely on the prevention and/or inhibition of peroxidative stress, which is achieved by combined treatment with vitamin A plus insulin

  1. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  2. Rgg protein structure–function and inhibition by cyclic peptide compounds

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Vijay; Aggarwal, Chaitanya; Federle, Michael J.; Neiditch, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide pheromone cell–cell signaling (quorum sensing) regulates the expression of diverse developmental phenotypes (including virulence) in Firmicutes, which includes common human pathogens, e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Cytoplasmic transcription factors known as “Rgg proteins” are peptide pheromone receptors ubiquitous in Firmicutes. Here we present X-ray crystal structures of a Streptococcus Rgg protein alone and in complex with a tight-binding signaling antagonist, the cyclic undecapeptide cyclosporin A. To our knowledge, these represent the first Rgg protein X-ray crystal structures. Based on the results of extensive structure–function analysis, we reveal the peptide pheromone-binding site and the mechanism by which cyclosporin A inhibits activation of the peptide pheromone receptor. Guided by the Rgg–cyclosporin A complex structure, we predicted that the nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog valspodar would inhibit Rgg activation. Indeed, we found that, like cyclosporin A, valspodar inhibits peptide pheromone activation of conserved Rgg proteins in medically relevant Streptococcus species. Finally, the crystal structures presented here revealed that the Rgg protein DNA-binding domains are covalently linked across their dimerization interface by a disulfide bond formed by a highly conserved cysteine. The DNA-binding domain dimerization interface observed in our structures is essentially identical to the interfaces previously described for other members of the XRE DNA-binding domain family, but the presence of an intermolecular disulfide bond buried in this interface appears to be unique. We hypothesize that this disulfide bond may, under the right conditions, affect Rgg monomer–dimer equilibrium, stabilize Rgg conformation, or serve as a redox-sensitive switch. PMID:25847993

  3. Resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest: effects of cardiopulmonary bypass and sodium–hydrogen exchange inhibition on myocardial and neurological recovery☆

    PubMed Central

    Liakopoulos, Oliver J.; Hristov, Nikola; Buckberg, Gerald D.; Triana, Jonathan; Trummer, Georg; Allen, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine if cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), together with inhibition of the sodium–hydrogen exchanger (NHE), limits myocardial and neurological injury and improves recovery after prolonged (unwitnessed) cardiac arrest (CA), as NHE inhibition improved recovery after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Methods: Twenty-seven pigs (31–39 kg) underwent 15 min of prolonged (no-flow) CA followed by 10 min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation-advanced life support (CPR-ALS). Subjects with restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) during CPR-ALS received either no drug (n = 6) or an inhibitor of the NHE (HOE-642; n = 5). In the 16 unsuccessfully resuscitated animals, peripheral normothermic CPB was instituted, and either no drug (n = 9) or similar HOE-642 (n = 7) therapy started. Hemodynamic data, a species-specific neurological deficit score (0 = normal to 500 = brain death), and mortality were recorded at 24 h, and biochemical variables of organ injury measured. Results: CPR-ALS restored ROSC in 41% (11/27) of animals, but was unsuccessful in 59% (16/27) that required CPB. Without CPB, HOE-642 increased cardiac index and decreased vascular resistance; with CPB, HOE-642 caused higher pump flows (3.4 ± 0.6 l min−1 m−2 vs 2.5 ± 0.7 l min−1 m−2; p ≪ 0.001) and higher post-arrest cardiac index; but animals required more vasopressors (p = 0.019) from drug-induced vasodilation. No differences between biochemical markers of oxidative and organ injury and overall 24-h mortality (20%) were found between groups. Neurological score was improved at 24 h compared with 4 h only after HOE-642 treatment with (150 ± 34 vs 220 ± 43; p = 0.003) or without CPB (162 ± 39 vs 238 ± 48; p ≤ 0.001), but failed to reach statistical difference with respect to the untreated group. Conclusions: CPB is an effective resuscitative tool to treat prolonged CA but there is limited improvement of neurological function

  4. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits the Development of Atherosclerosis with Suppressing CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Duojiao; Zhang, Alian; Gu, Ting; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Changqian

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, as a novel gaseous mediator, has been suggested to play a key role in atherogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms by which H2S affects atherosclerosis remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential role of H2S in atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism with respect to chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CX3CL1) and chemokine receptors (CCR2, CCR5, and CX3CR1) in macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages were pre-incubated with saline or NaHS (50 µM, 100 µM, 200 µM), an H2S donor, and then stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was found that NaHS dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ or LPS-induced CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression, as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in macrophages. Overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme that catalyzes H2S biosynthesis resulted in a significant reduction in CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in stimulated macrophages. The inhibitory effect of H2S on CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression was mediated by modulation of proliferators-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, male apoE−/− mice were fed a high-fat diet and then randomly given NaHS (1 mg/kg, i.p., daily) or DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 10 mg/kg, i.p., daily). NaHS significantly inhibited aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and impeded aortic plaque development. NaHS had a better anti-atherogenic benefit when it was applied at the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, inhibition of H2S formation by PAG increased aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and exacerbated the extent of atherosclerosis. In addition, H2S had minimal effect on the expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCR2 and CCR5 in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these data indicate that H2S hampers the progression of atherosclerosis in fat-fed apoE−/− mice and downregulates CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression on macrophages and in lesion

  5. Measuring the hydrogen/deuterium exchange of proteins at high spatial resolution by mass spectrometry: overcoming gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium scrambling.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-10-21

    Proteins are dynamic molecules that exhibit conformational flexibility to function properly. Well-known examples of this are allosteric regulation of protein activity and ligand-induced conformational changes in protein receptors. Detailed knowledge of the conformational properties of proteins is therefore pertinent to both basic and applied research, including drug development, since the majority of drugs target protein receptors and a growing number of drugs introduced to the market are therapeutic peptides or proteins. X-ray crystallography provides a static picture at atomic resolution of the lowest-energy structure of the native ensemble. There is a growing need for sensitive analytical tools to explore all of the significant molecular structures in the conformational landscape of proteins. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) has recently emerged as a powerful method for characterizing protein conformational dynamics. The basis of this method is the fact that backbone amides in stable hydrogen-bonded structures (e.g., α-helices and β-sheets) are protected against exchange with the aqueous solvent. All protein structures are dynamic, however, and eventually all of the protecting hydrogen bonds will transiently break as the protein--according to thermodynamic principles--cycles through partially unfolded states that correspond to excited free energy levels. As a result, all of the backbone amides will eventually become temporarily solvent-exposed and exchange-competent over time. Consequently, a folded protein in D2O will gradually incorporate deuterium into its backbone amides, and the kinetics of the process can be readily monitored by mass spectrometry. The deuterium uptake kinetics for the intact protein (global exchange kinetics) represents the sum of the exchange kinetics for the individual backbone amides. Local exchange kinetics is typically achieved by using pepsin digestion under quench conditions (i.e., under cold

  6. Inhibition of the p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction by cyclometallated iridium(III) compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Juan; He, Bingyong; Miles, Jennifer A.; Wang, Wanhe; Mao, Zhifeng; Che, Weng Ian; Lu, Jin-Jian; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wilson, Andrew J.; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 transcription factor by mutation or other mechanisms is a frequent event in tumorigenesis. One of the major endogenous negative regulators of p53 in humans is hDM2, a ubiquitin E3 ligase that binds to p53 causing proteasomal p53 degradation. In this work, a library of organometallic iridium(III) compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to disrupt the p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction. The novel cyclometallated iridium(III) compound 1 [Ir(eppy)2(dcphen)](PF6) (where eppy = 2-(4-ethylphenyl)pyridine and dcphen = 4, 7-dichloro-1, 10-phenanthroline) blocked the interaction of p53/hDM2 in human amelanotic melanoma cells. Finally, 1 exhibited anti-proliferative activity and induced apoptosis in cancer cell lines consistent with inhibition of the p53/hDM2 interaction. Compound 1 represents the first reported organometallic p53/hDM2 protein-protein interaction inhibitor. PMID:26883110

  7. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  8. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  9. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 V protein inhibits and antagonizes tetherin.

    PubMed

    Ohta, K; Goto, H; Yumine, N; Nishio, M

    2016-03-01

    Tetherin (BST-2/CD317/HM1.24) is an antiviral membrane protein that prevents the release of enveloped viruses from the cell surface. We found that the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV-2), but not that of V protein-deficient recombinant hPIV-2, was inhibited by tetherin. V protein immunoprecipitates with tetherin, and this interaction requires its C-terminal Trp residues. The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol attachment signal of tetherin, but not its cytoplasmic tail, was necessary for its binding with V. The distribution of the V protein clearly changed when co-expressed with tetherin in plasmid-transfected cells. hPIV-2 infection of HeLa cells reduced cell surface tetherin without affecting total cellular tetherin. This reduction also occurred in HeLa cells constitutively expressing V, whereas mutated V protein did not affect the cell surface tetherin. Our results suggest that hPIV-2 V protein antagonizes tetherin by binding it and reducing its presence at the cell surface.

  10. Synthesis and cleavage processing of oncornavirus proteins during interferon inhibition of virus particle release.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S Z; Strand, M; Billiau, A

    1977-01-01

    The effect of interferon on the rate of synthesis and the cleavage processing of viral proteins in mouse cells, chronically infected with Rauscher murine leukemia virus, has been studied by immunoprecipitation of newly synthesized viral proteins from virus-infected cells pulse-labeled with [35S]methionine. Immuno-precipitated, labeled polypeptides were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and then examined by autoradiography. Cleavage processing was studied in the same manner with cells that had been pulse-labeled and then incubated with non-radioactive media for a sufficient time to allow normal cleavage processing to occur. At a concentration that strongly inhibited the release of virus particles, interferon had no effect on the synthesis of proteins carrying antigenic determinants of the major core protein p30 or of the envelope glycoprotein gp69/71. Nor did it affect the post-translational cleavage processing of the precursors to these proteins. Similarly, interferon did not affect labeling or chasing of precursor protein carrying the p15 determinants; labeling of p15 itself could not be studied because it does not contain methionine. PMID:70406

  11. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  12. Systems mechanobiology: tension-inhibited protein turnover is sufficient to physically control gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Dingal, P C Dave P; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-12-01

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease. PMID:25468352

  13. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Alexey M. Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F. Yakovleva, Anastasia A. Zefirov, Andrei L.

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  14. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Parvez; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Zaman, Masihuz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and Aβ-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demonstrated that vitamin k3 significantly inhibits fibril formation as well as the inhibitory effect is dose dependent manner. Our experimental studies inferred that vitamin k3 exert its neuro protective effect against amyloid induced cytotoxicity through concerted pathway, modifying the aggregation formation towards formation of nontoxic aggregates. Molecular docking demonstrated that vitamin k3 mediated inhibition of HEWL and Aβ-42 fibrillogenesis may be initiated by interacting with proteolytic resistant and aggregation prone regions respectively. This work would provide an insight into the mechanism of protein aggregation inhibition by vitamin k3; pave the way for discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effect against amyloid formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27230476

  15. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of Gas Hydrates by α-Helical Antifreeze Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Davies, Peter L; Walker, Virginia K

    2015-10-20

    Kinetic hydrate inhibitors (KHIs) are used commercially to inhibit gas hydrate formation and growth in pipelines. However, improvement of these polymers has been constrained by the lack of verified molecular models. Since antifreeze proteins (AFPs) act as KHIs, we have used their solved x-ray crystallographic structures in molecular modeling to explore gas hydrate inhibition. The internal clathrate water network of the fish AFP Maxi, which extends to the protein's outer surface, is remarkably similar to the {100} planes of structure type II (sII) gas hydrate. The crystal structure of this water web has facilitated the construction of in silico models for Maxi and type I AFP binding to sII hydrates. Here, we have substantiated our models with experimental evidence of Maxi binding to the tetrahydrofuran sII model hydrate. Both in silico and experimental evidence support the absorbance-inhibition mechanism proposed for KHI binding to gas hydrates. Based on the Maxi crystal structure we suggest that the inhibitor adsorbs to the gas hydrate lattice through the same anchored clathrate water mechanism used to bind ice. These results will facilitate the rational design of a next generation of effective green KHIs for the petroleum industry to ensure safe and efficient hydrocarbon flow. PMID:26488661

  16. Mode of Action of Primaquine: Preferential Inhibition of Protein Biosynthesis in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Olenick, John G.; Hahn, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of a strain of Bacillus megaterium was prevented by a minimal inhibitory concentration of primaquine of 52 μg/ml or 2 × 10−4m. When exponentially growing cultures received the drug at 6 × 10−4m, the rate of growth was drastically reduced and no further growth occurred after 15 min of exposure. At this concentration, primaquine was bactericidal, causing a 50% reduction in the viable population after one doubling time of 45 min. Supplying primaquine to cultures 30 min after adding radioactive-labeled phenylalanine, thymidine, uracil, or diaminopimelic acid produced an immediate and complete inhibition of protein biosynthesis but no inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid biosynthesis for at least 15 min, and caused the formation of ribonucleic acid and cell wall polymer to proceed linearly at rates similar to those established prior to the addition of drug. This pattern of inhibition of macromolecular biosyntheses suggests that the major in vivo action of primaquine in B. megaterium is to block protein synthesis. PMID:4625625

  17. A glucocorticoid-induced leucine-zipper protein, GILZ, inhibits adipogenesis of mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xingming; Shi, Weibin; Li, Qingnan; Song, Buer; Wan, Mei; Bai, Shuting; Cao, Xu

    2003-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell lineages, including adipocytes and osteoblasts. The induction of adipocyte differentiation by glucocorticoids (GCs) not only causes the accumulation of fat cells in bone marrow, but also depletes the supply of osteoblasts for new bone formation, thus leading to osteoporosis. We have shown that a GC-induced leucine-zipper protein (GILZ) antagonizes adipocyte differentiation. GILZ binds to a tandem repeat of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) binding sites in the promoter of the gene encoding peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ2 (PPAR-γ2), and inhibits its transcription as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor. We have also shown that ectopic expression of GILZ blocks GC-induced adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, adipogenic marker genes (for example, those encoding PPAR-γ2, C/EBP-α, lipoprotein lipase and adipsin) are also inhibited by GILZ. Our results reveal a novel GC antagonistic mechanism that has potential therapeutic applications for the inhibition of GC-induced adipocyte differentiation. PMID:12671681

  18. Effects of protein-ligand interactions on hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics: canonical and noncanonical scenarios.

    PubMed

    Sowole, Modupeola A; Konermann, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) methods are widely used for monitoring protein-ligand interactions. This approach relies on the fact that ligand binding can modulate the extent of protein structural fluctuations that transiently disrupt hydrogen bonds and expose backbone amides to the solvent. It is commonly observed that ligand binding causes a reduction of HDX rates. This reduction can be restricted to elements adjacent to the binding site, but other regions can be affected as well. Qualitatively, ligand-induced HDX protection can be rationalized on the basis of two-state models that equate structural dynamics with global unfolding/refolding. Unfortunately, such models tend to be unrealistic because the dynamics of native proteins are dominated by subglobal transitions and local fluctuations. Ligand binding lowers the ground-state free energy. It is not obvious why this should necessarily be accompanied by a depletion of excited-state occupancies, which would be required for a reduction of HDX rates. Here, we propose a framework that implies that ligand binding can either slow or accelerate amide deuteration throughout the protein. These scenarios are referred to as "type 1" and "type 2", respectively. Evidence for type 1 binding is abundant in the literature, whereas the viability of type 2 interactions is less clear. Using HDX mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that the oxygenation of hemoglobin (Hb) provides a dramatic example of a type 2 scenario. The observed behavior is consistent with cooperative T → R switching, where part of the intrinsic O2 binding energy is reinvested for destabilization of the ground state. This destabilization increases the Boltzmann occupancy of unfolded conformers, thereby enhancing HDX rates. Surprisingly, O2 binding to myoglobin (Mb) also induces elevated HDX rates. These Mb data reveal that type 2 behavior is not limited to cooperative multisubunit systems. Although enhanced protection from deuteration is widely

  19. Characterizing alpha helical properties of Ebola viral proteins as potential targets for inhibition of alpha-helix mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2014-01-01

    Ebola, considered till recently as a rare and endemic disease, has dramatically transformed into a potentially global humanitarian crisis. The genome of Ebola, a member of the Filoviridae family, encodes seven proteins. Based on the recently implemented software (PAGAL) for analyzing the hydrophobicity and amphipathicity properties of alpha helices (AH) in proteins, we characterize the helices in the Ebola proteome. We demonstrate that AHs with characteristically unique features are involved in critical interactions with the host proteins. For example, the Ebola virus membrane fusion subunit, GP2, from the envelope glycoprotein ectodomain has an AH with a large hydrophobic moment. The neutralizing antibody (KZ52) derived from a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak recognizes a protein epitope on this AH, emphasizing the critical nature of this secondary structure in the virulence of the Ebola virus. Our method ensures a comprehensive list of such `hotspots'. These helices probably are or can be the target of molecules designed to inhibit AH mediated protein-protein interactions. Further, by comparing the AHs in proteins of the related Marburg viruses, we are able to elicit subtle changes in the proteins that might render them ineffective to previously successful drugs. Such differences are difficult to identify by a simple sequence or structural alignment. Thus, analyzing AHs in the small Ebola proteome can aid rational design aimed at countering the `largest Ebola epidemic, affecting multiple countries in West Africa' ( http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/index.html). PMID:25717367

  20. Pharmacological LRRK2 kinase inhibition induces LRRK2 protein destabilization and proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lobbestael, E.; Civiero, L.; De Wit, T.; Taymans, J.-M.; Greggio, E.; Baekelandt, V.

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) kinase activity is increased in several pathogenic mutations, including the most common mutation, G2019S, and is known to play a role in Parkinson’s disease (PD) pathobiology. This has stimulated the development of potent, selective LRRK2 kinase inhibitors as one of the most prevailing disease-modifying therapeutic PD strategies. Although several lines of evidence support beneficial effects of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, many questions need to be answered before clinical applications can be envisaged. Using six different LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, we show that LRRK2 kinase inhibition induces LRRK2 dephosphorylation and can reduce LRRK2 protein levels of overexpressed wild type and G2019S, but not A2016T or K1906M, LRRK2 as well as endogenous LRRK2 in mouse brain, lung and kidney. The inhibitor-induced reduction in LRRK2 levels could be reversed by proteasomal inhibition, but not by lysosomal inhibition, while mRNA levels remained unaffected. In addition, using LRRK2 S910A and S935A phosphorylation mutants, we show that dephosphorylation of these sites is not required for LRRK2 degradation. Increasing our insight in the molecular and cellular consequences of LRRK2 kinase inhibition will be crucial in the further development of LRRK2-based PD therapies. PMID:27658356

  1. Protein kinase Cα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizong; Wang, Nan; Li, Man; Gong, Huiqin; Liao, Xinghua; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Tongcun

    2015-09-01

    Myocardin plays a key role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the upstream signals that control the stability and transactivity of myocardin remain to be fully understood. The expression of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) also induces cardiac hypertrophy. An essential downstream molecule of PKCα, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, was reported to negatively regulate the activities of myocardin. But, the effect of cooperation between PKCα and myocardin and the potential molecular mechanism by which PKCα regulates myocardin-mediated cardiac hypertrophy are unclear. In this study, a luciferase assay was performed using H9C2 cells transfected with expression plasmids for PKCα and myocardin. Surprisingly, the results showed that PKCα inhibited the transcriptional activity of myocardin. PKCα inhibited myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by the decrease in cell surface area and fetal gene expression, in cardiomyocyte cells overexpressing PKCα and myocardin. The potential mechanism underlying the inhibition effect of PKCα on the function of myocardin is further explored. PKCα directly promoted the basal phosphorylation of endogenous myocardin at serine and threonine residues. In myocardin-overexpressing cardiomyocyte cells, PKCα induced the excessive phosphorylation of myocardin, resulting in the degradation of myocardin and a transcriptional suppression of hypertrophic genes. These results demonstrated that PKCα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation. PMID:26206583

  2. Protein kinase G inhibits flow-induced Ca2+ entry into collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wong, Wei-Yan; Sun, Lei; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2012-07-01

    The renal cortical collecting duct (CCD) contributes to the maintenance of K(+) homeostasis by modulating renal K(+) secretion. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) mediates flow-induced K(+) secretion in the CCD, but the mechanisms regulating flow-induced Ca(2+) entry into renal epithelial cells are not well understood. Here, we found that atrial natriuretic peptide, nitric oxide, and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) act through protein kinase G (PKG) to inhibit flow-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) in M1-CCD cells. Coimmunoprecipitation, double immunostaining, and functional studies identified heteromeric TRPV4-P2 channels as the mediators of flow-induced Ca(2+) entry into M1-CCD cells and HEK293 cells that were coexpressed with both TRPV4 and TRPP2. In these HEK293 cells, introducing point mutations at two putative PKG phosphorylation sites on TRPP2 abolished the ability of cGMP to inhibit flow-induced Ca(2+) entry. In addition, treating M1-CCD cells with fusion peptides that compete with the endogenous PKG phosphorylation sites on TRPP2 also abolished the cGMP-mediated inhibition of the flow-induced Ca(2+) entry. Taken together, these data suggest that heteromeric TRPV4-P2 channels mediate the flow-induced entry of Ca(2+) into collecting duct cells. Furthermore, substances such as atrial natriuretic peptide and nitric oxide, which increase cGMP, abrogate flow-induced Ca(2+) entry through PKG-mediated inhibition of these channels. PMID:22518003

  3. Implication of unfolded protein response in resveratrol-induced inhibition of K562 cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bao-Qin; Gao, Yan-Yan; Niu, Xiao-Fang; Xie, Ji-Sheng; Meng, Xin; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RES), a natural plant polyphenol, is an effective inducer of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a variety of carcinoma cell types. In addition, RES has been reported to inhibit tumorigenesis in several animal models suggesting that it functions as a chemopreventive and anti-tumor agent in vivo. The chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties associated with resveratrol offer promise for the design of new chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms by which RES mediates its effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we showed that RES caused cell cycle arrest and proliferation inhibition via induction of unfolded protein response (UPR) in human leukemia K562 cell line. Treatment of K562 cells with RES induced a number of signature UPR markers, including transcriptional induction of GRP78 and CHOP, phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2{alpha} (eIF2{alpha}), ER stress-specific XBP-1 splicing, suggesting the induction of UPR by RES. RES inhibited proliferation of K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that K562 cells were arrested in G1 phase upon RES treatment. Salubrinal, an eIF2{alpha} inhibitor, or overexpression of dominant negative mutants of PERK or eIF2{alpha}, effectively restored RES-induced cell cycle arrest, underscoring the important role of PERK/eIF2{alpha} branch of UPR in RES-induced inhibition of cell proliferation.

  4. A cationic tetrapyrrole inhibits toxic activities of the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Massignan, Tania; Cimini, Sara; Stincardini, Claudia; Cerovic, Milica; Vanni, Ilaria; Elezgarai, Saioa R.; Moreno, Jorge; Stravalaci, Matteo; Negro, Alessandro; Sangiovanni, Valeria; Restelli, Elena; Riccardi, Geraldina; Gobbi, Marco; Castilla, Joaquín; Borsello, Tiziana; Nonno, Romolo; Biasini, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into PrPSc, a self-replicating isoform (prion) that accumulates in the central nervous system of affected individuals. The structure of PrPSc is poorly defined, and likely to be heterogeneous, as suggested by the existence of different prion strains. The latter represents a relevant problem for therapy in prion diseases, as some potent anti-prion compounds have shown strain-specificity. Designing therapeutics that target PrPC may provide an opportunity to overcome these problems. PrPC ligands may theoretically inhibit the replication of multiple prion strains, by acting on the common substrate of any prion replication reaction. Here, we characterized the properties of a cationic tetrapyrrole [Fe(III)-TMPyP], which was previously shown to bind PrPC, and inhibit the replication of a mouse prion strain. We report that the compound is active against multiple prion strains in vitro and in cells. Interestingly, we also find that Fe(III)-TMPyP inhibits several PrPC-related toxic activities, including the channel-forming ability of a PrP mutant, and the PrPC-dependent synaptotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers, which are associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. These results demonstrate that molecules binding to PrPC may produce a dual effect of blocking prion replication and inhibiting PrPC-mediated toxicity. PMID:26976106

  5. Molecular mechanism of transcription inhibition by phage T7 gp2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Sheppard, Carol; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Severinov, Konstantin

    2011-11-11

    Escherichia coli T7 bacteriophage gp2 protein is a potent inhibitor of host RNA polymerase (RNAP). gp2 inhibits formation of open promoter complex by binding to the β' jaw, an RNAP domain that interacts with downstream promoter DNA. Here, we used an engineered promoter with an optimized sequence to obtain and characterize a specific promoter complex containing RNAP and gp2. In this complex, localized melting of promoter DNA is initiated but does not propagate to include the point of the transcription start. As a result, the complex is transcriptionally inactive. Using a highly sensitive RNAP beacon assay, we performed quantitative real-time measurements of specific binding of the RNAP-gp2 complex to promoter DNA and various promoter fragments. In this way, the effect of gp2 on RNAP interaction with promoters was dissected. As expected, gp2 greatly decreased RNAP affinity to downstream promoter duplex. However, gp2 also inhibited RNAP binding to promoter fragments that lacked downstream promoter DNA that interacts with the β' jaw. The inhibition was caused by gp2-mediated decrease of the RNAP binding affinity to template and non-template strand segments of the transcription bubble downstream of the -10 promoter element. The inhibition of RNAP interactions with single-stranded segments of the transcription bubble by gp2 is a novel effect, which may occur via allosteric mechanism that is set in motion by the gp2 binding to the β' jaw.

  6. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N(2) bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N(2) bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N(2) sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, "semi-unfolded" ↔ "native" ↔ "globally unfolded" → "aggregated". This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  7. Protein structural dynamics at the gas/water interface examined by hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yiming; Konermann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Gas/water interfaces (such as air bubbles or foam) are detrimental to the stability of proteins, often causing aggregation. This represents a potential problem for industrial processes, for example, the production and handling of protein drugs. Proteins possess surfactant-like properties, resulting in a high affinity for gas/water interfaces. The tendency of previously buried nonpolar residues to maximize contact with the gas phase can cause significant structural distortion. Most earlier studies in this area employed spectroscopic tools that could only provide limited information. Here we use hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry (MS) for probing the conformational dynamics of the model protein myoglobin (Mb) in the presence of N2 bubbles. HDX/MS relies on the principle that unfolded and/or highly dynamic regions undergo faster deuteration than tightly folded segments. In bubble-free solution Mb displays EX2 behavior, reflecting the occurrence of short-lived excursions to partially unfolded conformers. A dramatically different behavior is seen in the presence of N2 bubbles; EX2 dynamics still take place, but in addition the protein shows EX1 behavior. The latter results from interconversion of the native state with conformers that are globally unfolded and long-lived. These unfolded species likely correspond to Mb that is adsorbed to the surface of gas bubbles. N2 sparging also induces aggregation. To explain the observed behavior we propose a simple model, that is, “semi-unfolded” ↔ “native” ↔ “globally unfolded” → “aggregated”. This model quantitatively reproduces the experimentally observed kinetics. To the best of our knowledge, the current study marks the first exploration of surface denaturation phenomena by HDX/MS. PMID:25761782

  8. Structural Implications of Hydrogen-Bond Energetics in Membrane Proteins Revealed by High-Pressure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Arvi; Kangur, Liina; Olsen, John D.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2012-01-01

    The light-harvesting 1 (LH1) integral membrane complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides provides a convenient model system in which to examine the poorly understood role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) as stabilizing factors in membrane protein complexes. We used noncovalently bound arrays of bacteriochlorophyll chromophores within native and genetically modified variants of LH1 complexes to monitor local changes in the chromophore binding sites induced by externally applied hydrostatic pressure. Whereas membrane-bound complexes demonstrated very high resilience to pressures reaching 2.1 GPa, characteristic discontinuous shifts and broadenings of the absorption spectra were observed around 1 GPa for detergent-solubilized proteins, in similarity to those observed when specific (α or β) H-bonds between the chromophores and the surrounding protein were selectively removed by mutagenesis. These pressure effects, which were reversible upon decompression, allowed us to estimate the rupture energies of H-bonds to the chromophores in LH1 complexes. A quasi-independent, additive role of H-bonds in the α- and β-sublattices in reinforcing the wild-type LH1 complex was established. A comparison of a reaction-center-deficient LH1 complex with complexes containing reaction centers also demonstrated a stabilizing effect of the reaction center. This study thus provides important insights into the design principles of natural photosynthetic complexes. PMID:23283234

  9. Electrochemical reduction of disulfide-containing proteins for hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mysling, Simon; Salbo, Rune; Ploug, Michael; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of disulfide bond-containing proteins by hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) requires reduction of the disulfide bonds under acidic and cold conditions, where the amide hydrogen exchange reaction is quenched (pH 2.5, 0 °C). The reduction typically requires a high concentration (>200 mM) of the chemical reducing agent Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) as its reduction rate constant is decreased at low pH and temperature. Serious adverse effects on chromatographic and mass spectrometric performances have been reported when using high concentrations of TCEP. In the present study, we explore the feasibility of using electrochemical reduction as a substitute for TCEP in HDX-MS analyses. Our results demonstrate that efficient disulfide bond reduction is readily achieved by implementing an electrochemical cell into the HDX-MS workflow. We also identify some challenges in using electrochemical reduction in HDX-MS analyses and provide possible conditions to attenuate these limitations. For example, high salt concentrations hamper disulfide bond reduction, necessitating additional dilution of the sample with aqueous acidic solution at quench conditions. PMID:24251601

  10. Intrathecal Infusion of Hydrogen-Rich Normal Saline Attenuates Neuropathic Pain via Inhibition of Activation of Spinal Astrocytes and Microglia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuejun; Xiang, Zhenghua; Yang, Liqun; Huang, Shengdong; Lu, Zhijie; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are key molecules that mediate neuropathic pain. Although hydrogen is an established antioxidant, its effect on chronic pain has not been characterized. This study was to investigate the efficacy and mechanisms of hydrogen-rich normal saline induced analgesia. Methodology/Principal findings In a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by L5 spinal nerve ligation (L5 SNL), intrathecal injection of hydrogen-rich normal saline relieved L5 SNL-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Importantly, repeated administration of hydrogen-rich normal saline did not lead to tolerance. Preemptive treatment with hydrogen-rich normal saline prevented development of neuropathic pain behavior. Immunofluorochrome analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich normal saline treatment significantly attenuated L5 SNL-induced increase of 8-hydroxyguanosine immunoreactive cells in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. Western blot analysis of SDS/PAGE-fractionated tyrosine-nitrated proteins showed that L5 SNL led to increased expression of tyrosine-nitrated Mn-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in the spinal cord, and hydrogen-rich normal saline administration reversed the tyrosine-nitrated MnSOD overexpression. We also showed that the analgesic effect of hydrogen-rich normal saline was associated with decreased activation of astrocytes and microglia, attenuated expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the spinal cord. Conclusion/Significance Intrathecal injection of hydrogen-rich normal saline produced analgesic effect in neuropathic rat. Hydrogen-rich normal saline-induced analgesia in neuropathic rats is mediated by reducing the activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia, which is induced by overproduction of hydroxyl and peroxynitrite. PMID:24857932

  11. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation rescues native folding in loss of function protein misfolding diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Song, Wensi; Brancati, Giovanna; Segatori, Laura

    2011-12-16

    Lysosomal storage disorders are often caused by mutations that destabilize native folding and impair trafficking of secretory proteins. We demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) prevents native folding of mutated lysosomal enzymes in patient-derived fibroblasts from two clinically distinct lysosomal storage disorders, namely Gaucher and Tay-Sachs disease. Prolonging ER retention via ERAD inhibition enhanced folding, trafficking, and activity of these unstable enzyme variants. Furthermore, combining ERAD inhibition with enhancement of the cellular folding capacity via proteostasis modulation resulted in synergistic rescue of mutated enzymes. ERAD inhibition was achieved by cell treatment with small molecules that interfere with recognition (kifunensine) or retrotranslocation (eeyarestatin I) of misfolded substrates. These different mechanisms of ERAD inhibition were shown to enhance ER retention of mutated proteins but were associated with dramatically different levels of ER stress, unfolded protein response activation, and unfolded protein response-induced apoptosis. PMID:22006919

  12. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  13. De novo design of protein homo-oligomers with modular hydrogen-bond network-mediated specificity.

    PubMed

    Boyken, Scott E; Chen, Zibo; Groves, Benjamin; Langan, Robert A; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Ford, Alex; Gilmore, Jason M; Xu, Chunfu; DiMaio, Frank; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Sankaran, Banumathi; Seelig, Georg; Zwart, Peter H; Baker, David

    2016-05-01

    In nature, structural specificity in DNA and proteins is encoded differently: In DNA, specificity arises from modular hydrogen bonds in the core of the double helix, whereas in proteins, specificity arises largely from buried hydrophobic packing complemented by irregular peripheral polar interactions. Here, we describe a general approach for designing a wide range of protein homo-oligomers with specificity determined by modular arrays of central hydrogen-bond networks. We use the approach to design dimers, trimers, and tetramers consisting of two concentric rings of helices, including previously not seen triangular, square, and supercoiled topologies. X-ray crystallography confirms that the structures overall, and the hydrogen-bond networks in particular, are nearly identical to the design models, and the networks confer interaction specificity in vivo. The ability to design extensive hydrogen-bond networks with atomic accuracy enables the programming of protein interaction specificity for a broad range of synthetic biology applications; more generally, our results demonstrate that, even with the tremendous diversity observed in nature, there are fundamentally new modes of interaction to be discovered in proteins. PMID:27151862

  14. De novo design of protein homo-oligomers with modular hydrogen-bond network-mediated specificity.

    PubMed

    Boyken, Scott E; Chen, Zibo; Groves, Benjamin; Langan, Robert A; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Ford, Alex; Gilmore, Jason M; Xu, Chunfu; DiMaio, Frank; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Sankaran, Banumathi; Seelig, Georg; Zwart, Peter H; Baker, David

    2016-05-01

    In nature, structural specificity in DNA and proteins is encoded differently: In DNA, specificity arises from modular hydrogen bonds in the core of the double helix, whereas in proteins, specificity arises largely from buried hydrophobic packing complemented by irregular peripheral polar interactions. Here, we describe a general approach for designing a wide range of protein homo-oligomers with specificity determined by modular arrays of central hydrogen-bond networks. We use the approach to design dimers, trimers, and tetramers consisting of two concentric rings of helices, including previously not seen triangular, square, and supercoiled topologies. X-ray crystallography confirms that the structures overall, and the hydrogen-bond networks in particular, are nearly identical to the design models, and the networks confer interaction specificity in vivo. The ability to design extensive hydrogen-bond networks with atomic accuracy enables the programming of protein interaction specificity for a broad range of synthetic biology applications; more generally, our results demonstrate that, even with the tremendous diversity observed in nature, there are fundamentally new modes of interaction to be discovered in proteins.

  15. The case for inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arabacilar, Pelin; Marber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This minireview discusses the evidence that the inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPKs) maybe of therapeutic value in heart failure. Most previous experimental studies, as well as past and ongoing clinical trials, have focussed on the role of p38 MAPKs in myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndromes. There is now growing evidence that these kinases are activated within the myocardium of the failing human heart and in the heart and blood vessels of animal models of heart failure. Furthermore, from a philosophical viewpoint the chronic activation of the adaptive stress pathways that lead to the activation of p38 MAPKs in heart failure is analogous to the chronic activation of the sympathetic, renin-aldosterone-angiotensin and neprilysin systems. These have provided some of the most effective therapies for heart failure. This minireview questions whether similar and synergistic advantages would follow the inhibition of p38 MAPKs.

  16. Zinc pyrithione inhibits yeast growth through copper influx and inactivation of iron-sulfur proteins.

    PubMed

    Reeder, Nancy L; Kaplan, Jerry; Xu, Jun; Youngquist, R Scott; Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ping; Juhlin, Kenton D; Schwartz, James R; Grant, Raymond A; Fieno, Angela; Nemeth, Suzanne; Reichling, Tim; Tiesman, Jay P; Mills, Tim; Steinke, Mark; Wang, Shuo L; Saunders, Charles W

    2011-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZPT) is an antimicrobial material with widespread use in antidandruff shampoos and antifouling paints. Despite decades of commercial use, there is little understanding of its antimicrobial mechanism of action. We used a combination of genome-wide approaches (yeast deletion mutants and microarrays) and traditional methods (gene constructs and atomic emission) to characterize the activity of ZPT against a model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ZPT acts through an increase in cellular copper levels that leads to loss of activity of iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins. ZPT was also found to mediate growth inhibition through an increase in copper in the scalp fungus Malassezia globosa. A model is presented in which pyrithione acts as a copper ionophore, enabling copper to enter cells and distribute across intracellular membranes. This is the first report of a metal-ligand complex that inhibits fungal growth by increasing the cellular level of a different metal. PMID:21947398

  17. Human MxA protein inhibits the replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Pang, Daxin; Wang, Tiedong; Yang, Xin; Wu, Rong; Ren, Linzhu; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) has a spherical enveloped particle with a single stranded RNA genome, the virus belonging to a pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae is the causative agent of an acute contagious disease classical swine fever (CSF). The interferon-induced MxA protein has been widely shown to inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses as members of the Bunyaviridae family and others. Interestingly, it has been reported that expression of MxA in infected cells was blocked by CSFV and whether MxA has an inhibitory effect against CSFV remains unknown to date until present. Here, we report that CSFV replicated poorly in cells stably transfected with human MxA. The proliferation of progeny virus in both PK-15 cell lines and swine fetal fibroblasts (PEF) continuously expressing MxA was shown significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay and real-time PCR.

  18. Distinct modes of inhibition by sclerostin on bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Krause, Carola; Korchynskyi, Olexandr; de Rooij, Karien; Weidauer, Stella E; de Gorter, David J J; van Bezooijen, Rutger L; Hatsell, Sarah; Economides, Aris N; Mueller, Thomas D; Löwik, Clemens W G M; ten Dijke, Peter

    2010-12-31

    Sclerostin is expressed by osteocytes and has catabolic effects on bone. It has been shown to antagonize bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and/or Wnt activity, although at present the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Consistent with previous findings, Sclerostin opposed direct Wnt3a-induced but not direct BMP7-induced responses when both ligand and antagonist were provided exogenously to cells. However, we found that when both proteins are expressed in the same cell, sclerostin can antagonize BMP signaling directly by inhibiting BMP7 secretion. Sclerostin interacts with both the BMP7 mature domain and pro-domain, leading to intracellular retention and proteasomal degradation of BMP7. Analysis of sclerostin knock-out mice revealed an inhibitory action of sclerostin on Wnt signaling in both osteoblasts and osteocytes in cortical and cancellous bones. BMP7 signaling was predominantly inhibited by sclerostin in osteocytes of the calcaneus and the cortical bone of the tibia. Our results suggest that sclerostin exerts its potent bone catabolic effects by antagonizing Wnt signaling in a paracrine and autocrine manner and antagonizing BMP signaling selectively in the osteocytes that synthesize simultaneously both sclerostin and BMP7 proteins.

  19. N-(3-oxo-acyl) homoserine lactone inhibits tumor growth independent of Bcl-2 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guoping; Neely, Aaron M.; Schwarzer, Christian; Lu, Huayi; Whitt, Aaron G.; Stivers, Nicole S.; Burlison, Joseph A.; White, Carl; Machen, Terry E.; Li, Chi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-homoserine lactone (C12) as a quorum-sensing molecule for bacterial communication. C12 has also been reported to induce apoptosis in various types of tumor cells. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of C12-triggerred tumor cell apoptosis is still unclear. In addition, it is completely unknown whether C12 possesses any potential therapeutic effects in vivo. Our data indicate that, unlike most apoptotic inducers, C12 evokes a novel form of apoptosis in tumor cells through inducing mitochondrial membrane permeabilization independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Importantly, C12 inhibits tumor growth in animals regardless of either pro- or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Furthermore, opposite to conventional chemotherapeutics, C12 requires paraoxonase 2 (PON2) to exert its cytotoxicity on tumor cells in vitro and its inhibitory effects on tumor growth in vivo. Overall, our results demonstrate that C12 inhibits tumor growth independent of both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, and through inducing unique apoptotic signaling mediated by PON2 in tumor cells. PMID:26758417

  20. Cross-inhibition of pathogenic agents and the host proteins they exploit

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermintz, Leeor; Leonardi, William; Tran, Sharon H.; Zozaya, Josue; Mathew-Joseph, Alyssa; Liem, Spencer; Levitin, Anastasia; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The major limitations of pathogen-directed therapies are the emergence of drug-resistance and their narrow spectrum of coverage. A recently applied approach directs therapies against host proteins exploited by pathogens in order to circumvent these limitations. However, host-oriented drugs leave the pathogens unaffected and may result in continued pathogen dissemination. In this study we aimed to discover drugs that could simultaneously cross-inhibit pathogenic agents, as well as the host proteins that mediate their lethality. We observed that many pathogenic and host-assisting proteins belong to the same functional class. In doing so we targeted a protease component of anthrax toxin as well as host proteases exploited by this toxin. We identified two approved drugs, ascorbic acid 6-palmitate and salmon sperm protamine, that effectively inhibited anthrax cytotoxic protease and demonstrated that they also block proteolytic activities of host furin, cathepsin B, and caspases that mediate toxin’s lethality in cells. We demonstrated that these drugs are broad-spectrum and reduce cellular sensitivity to other bacterial toxins that require the same host proteases. This approach should be generally applicable to the discovery of simultaneous pathogen and host-targeting inhibitors of many additional pathogenic agents. PMID:27703274

  1. Identification of a new Sprouty protein responsible for the inhibition of the Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus reproduction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shengkai; Cheng, Tingcai; Jiang, Liang; Lin, Ping; Yang, Qiong; Xiao, Yang; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Xia, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    The rat sarcoma-extracellular signal regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases pathway, one of the most ancient signaling pathways, is crucial for the defense against Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection. Sprouty (Spry) proteins can inhibit the activity of this pathway by receptor tyrosine kinases. We cloned and identified a new B. mori gene with a Spry domain similar to the Spry proteins of other organisms, such as fruitfly, mouse, human, chicken, Xenopus and zebrafish, and named it BmSpry. The gene expression analysis showed that BmSpry was transcribed in all of the examined tissues and in all developmental stages from embryo to adult. BmSpry also induced expression of BmNPV in the cells. Our results indicated: (1) the knock-down of BmSpry led to increased BmNPV replication and silkworm larvae mortality; (2) over-expression of BmSpry led to reduced BmNPV replication; and (3) BmSpry regulated the activation of ERK and inhibited BmNPV replication. These results showed that BmSpry plays a crucial role in the antiviral defense of the silkworm both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Spore germination of Trichoderma atroviride is inhibited by its LysM protein TAL6.

    PubMed

    Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Zach, Simone; Frischmann, Alexa; Spadiut, Oliver; Dietzsch, Christian; Herwig, Christoph; Ruth, Claudia; Rodler, Agnes; Jungbauer, Alois; Kubicek, Christian P

    2013-03-01

    LysM motifs are carbohydrate-binding modules found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They have general N-acetylglucosamine binding properties and therefore bind to chitin and related carbohydrates. In plants, plasma-membrane-bound proteins containing LysM motifs are involved in plant defence responses, but also in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Filamentous fungi secrete LysM proteins that contain several LysM motifs but no enzymatic modules. In plant pathogenic fungi, for LysM proteins roles in dampening of plant defence responses and protection from plant chitinases were shown. In this study, the carbohydrate-binding specificities and biological function of the LysM protein TAL6 from the plant-beneficial fungus Trichoderma atroviride were investigated. TAL6 contains seven LysM motifs and the sequences of its LysM motifs are very different from other fungal LysM proteins investigated so far. The results showed that TAL6 bound to some forms of polymeric chitin, but not to chito-oligosaccharides. Further, no binding to fungal cell wall preparations was detected. Despite these rather weak carbohydrate-binding properties, a strong inhibitory effect of TAL6 on spore germination was found. TAL6 was shown to specifically inhibit germination of Trichoderma spp., but interestingly not of other fungi. Thus, this protein is involved in self-signalling processes during fungal growth rather than fungal-plant interactions. These data expand the functional repertoire of fungal LysM proteins beyond effectors in plant defence responses and show that fungal LysM proteins are also involved in the self-regulation of fungal growth and development.

  3. Insulin attenuates atrophy of unweighted soleus muscle by amplified inhibition of protein degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Satarug, S.; Aannestad, A.; Munoz, K. A.; Henriksen, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    Unweighting atrophy of immature soleus muscle occurs rapidly over the first several days, followed by slower atrophy coinciding with increased sensitivity to insulin of in vitro protein metabolism. This study determined whether this increased sensitivity might account for the diminution of atrophy after 3 days of tall-cast hindlimb suspension. The physiological significance of the increased response to insulin in unweighted muscle was evaluated by analyzing in vivo protein metabolism for day 3 (48 to 72 hours) and day 4 (72 to 96 hours) of unweighting in diabetic animals either injected with insulin or not treated. Soleus from nontreated diabetic animals showed a similar loss of protein during day 3 (-16.2%) and day 4 (-14.5%) of unweighting, whereas muscle from insulin-treated animals showed rapid atrophy (-14.5%) during day 3 only, declining to just -3.1% the next day. Since fractional protein synthesis was similar for both day 3 (8.6%/d) and day 4 (7.0%/d) of unweighting in insulin-treated animals, the reduction in protein loss must be accounted for by a slowing of protein degradation due to circulating insulin. Intramuscular (IM) injection of insulin (600 nmol/L) stimulated in situ protein synthesis similarly in 4-day unweighted (+56%) and weight-bearing (+90%) soleus, even though unweighted muscle showed a greater in situ response of 2-deoxy-[3H]glucose uptake to IM injection of either insulin (133 nmol/L) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (200 nmol/L) than control muscle. These findings suggest that unweighted muscle is selectively more responsive in vivo to insulin, and that the slower atrophy after 3 days of unweighting was due to an increased effect of insulin on inhibiting protein degradation.

  4. The matricellular protein CCN1 suppresses hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting compensatory proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-C; Kim, K-H; Lau, L F

    2016-03-10

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is on the rise in the United States. Previous studies showed that the matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61) is induced during hepatic injuries and functions to restrict and resolve liver fibrosis. Here, we show that CCN1 suppresses hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting carcinogen-induced compensatory hepatocyte proliferation, thus limiting the expansion of damaged and potentially oncogenic hepatocytes. Consistent with tumor suppression, CCN1 expression is downregulated in human HCC. Ccn1(ΔHep) mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Ccn1 suffer increased HCC tumor multiplicity induced by the hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Knockin mice (Ccn1(dm/dm)) that express an integrin α6β1-binding defective CCN1 phenocopied Ccn1(ΔHep) mice, indicating that CCN1 acts through its α6β1 binding sites in this context. CCN1 effectively inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent hepatocyte proliferation through integrin α6-mediated accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby triggering p53 activation and cell cycle block. Consequently, Ccn1(dm/dm) mice exhibit diminished p53 activation and elevated compensatory hepatocyte proliferation, resulting in increased HCC. Furthermore, we show that a single dose of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib delivered prior to DEN-induced injury was sufficient to block compensatory proliferation and annihilate development of HCC nodules observed 8 months later, suggesting potential chemoprevention by targeting CCN1-inhibitable EGFR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation. Together, these results show that CCN1 is an injury response protein that functions not only to restrict fibrosis in the liver, but also to suppress hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting EGFR-dependent hepatocyte compensatory proliferation.

  5. The expression of N-terminal deletion DNA pilot proteins inhibits the early stages of phiX174 replication.

    PubMed

    Ruboyianes, Mark V; Chen, Min; Dubrava, Mathew S; Cherwa, James E; Fane, Bentley A

    2009-10-01

    The phiX174 DNA pilot protein H contains four predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domains. The region of the gene encoding these structures was cloned, expressed in vivo, and found to strongly inhibit wild-type replication. DNA and protein synthesis was investigated in the absence of de novo H protein synthesis and in wild-type-infected cells expressing the inhibitory proteins (DeltaH). The expression of the DeltaH proteins interfered with early stages of DNA replication, which did not require de novo H protein synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory proteins interfere with the wild-type H protein that enters the cell with the penetrating DNA. As transcription and protein synthesis are dependent on DNA replication in positive single-stranded DNA life cycles, viral protein synthesis was also reduced. However, unlike DNA synthesis, efficient viral protein synthesis required de novo H protein synthesis, a novel function for this protein. A single amino acid change in the C terminus of protein H was both necessary and sufficient to confer resistance to the inhibitory DeltaH proteins, restoring both DNA and protein synthesis to wild-type levels. DeltaH proteins derived from the resistant mutant did not inhibit wild-type or resistant mutant replication. The inhibitory effects of the DeltaH proteins were lessened by the coexpression of the internal scaffolding protein, which may suppress H-H protein interactions. While coexpression relieved the block in DNA biosynthesis, viral protein synthesis remained suppressed. These data indicate that protein H's role in DNA replication and stimulating viral protein synthesis can be uncoupled. PMID:19640994

  6. Coupling of protein motions and hydrogen transfer during catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase

    PubMed Central

    Swanwick, Richard S.; Maglia, Giovanni; Tey, Lai-hock; Allemann, Rudolf K.

    2005-01-01

    The enzyme DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) catalyses hydride transfer from NADPH to, and protonation of, dihydrofolate. The physical basis of the hydride transfer step catalysed by DHFR from Escherichia coli has been studied through the measurement of the temperature dependence of the reaction rates and the kinetic isotope effects. Single turnover experiments at pH 7.0 revealed a strong dependence of the reaction rates on temperature. The observed relatively large difference in the activation energies for hydrogen and deuterium transfer led to a temperature dependence of the primary kinetic isotope effects from 3.0±0.2 at 5 °C to 2.2±0.2 at 40 °C and an inverse ratio of the pre-exponential factors of 0.108±0.04. These results are consistent with theoretical models for hydrogen transfer that include contributions from quantum mechanical tunnelling coupled with protein motions that actively modulate the tunnelling distance. Previous work had suggested a coupling of a remote residue, Gly121, with the kinetic events at the active site. However, pre-steady-state experiments at pH 7.0 with the mutant G121V-DHFR, in which Gly121 was replaced with valine, revealed that the chemical mechanism of DHFR catalysis was robust to this replacement. The reduced catalytic efficiency of G121V-DHFR was mainly a consequence of the significantly reduced pre-exponential factors, indicating the requirement for significant molecular reorganization during G121V-DHFR catalysis. In contrast, steady-state measurements at pH 9.5, where hydride transfer is rate limiting, revealed temperature-independent kinetic isotope effects between 15 and 35 °C and a ratio of the pre-exponential factors above the semi-classical limit, suggesting a rigid active site configuration from which hydrogen tunnelling occurs. The mechanism by which hydrogen tunnelling in DHFR is coupled with the environment appears therefore to be sensitive to pH. PMID:16241906

  7. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3.

  8. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. PMID:26392314

  9. Inhibition of mRNA export and dimerization of interferon regulatory factor 3 by Theiler's virus leader protein.

    PubMed

    Ricour, Céline; Delhaye, Sophie; Hato, Stanleyson V; Olenyik, Tamara D; Michel, Bénédicte; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Gustin, Kurt E; Michiels, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV or Theiler's virus) is a neurotropic picornavirus that can persist lifelong in the central nervous system of infected mice, causing a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease. The leader (L) protein of the virus is an important determinant of viral persistence and has been shown to inhibit transcription of type I interferon (IFN) genes and to cause nucleocytoplasmic redistribution of host proteins. In this study, it was shown that expression of the L protein shuts off synthesis of the reporter proteins green fluorescent protein and firefly luciferase, suggesting that it induces a global shut-off of host protein expression. The L protein did not inhibit transcription or translation of the reporter genes, but blocked cellular mRNA export from the nucleus. This activity correlated with the phosphorylation of nucleoporin 98 (Nup98), an essential component of the nuclear pore complex. In contrast, the data confirmed that the L protein inhibited IFN expression at the transcriptional level, and showed that transcription of other chemokine or cytokine genes was affected by the L protein. This transcriptional inhibition correlated with inhibition of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) dimerization. Whether inhibition of IRF-3 dimerization and dysfunction of the nuclear pore complex are related phenomena remains an open question. In vivo, IFN antagonism appears to be an important role of the L protein early in infection, as a virus bearing a mutation in the zinc finger of the L protein replicated as efficiently as the wild-type virus in type I IFN receptor-deficient mice, but had impaired fitness in IFN-competent mice.

  10. Role of Bulk Water Environment in Regulation of Functional Hydrogen-Bond Network in Photoactive Yellow Protein.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Koichi; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2015-12-24

    Photoactive yellow protein is a soluble photoreceptor protein involved in signal transduction for phototaxis. A hydrogen-bond between the chromophore, p-coumaric acid (pCA), and a nearby carboxyl group of Glu46 at the active site is known to play a crucial role in the formation of the signaling state in the photoactivation. Since the hydrogen-bond at the active site as well as the extensive conformational changes of the protein in the formation of the signaling state are considered to be controlled by water molecules, we theoretically examined influence of bulk water environment on the functionally important hydrogen-bond by means of molecular simulations. Theoretical analysis of potential energy profiles of the proton transfer between pCA and Glu46 with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations revealed critical effect of electrostatic screening of bulk water on the electronic character of the hydrogen-bond. Moreover, QM/MM free energy geometry optimizations identified the water-penetrating state where Glu46 forming a putative low-barrier hydrogen-bond with pCA is hydrated by water molecules penetrating from bulk environment in addition to the water-excluded state which corresponds to X-ray crystallographic structures. The present results suggest that the water-penetrating state is a precursory conformational substate that leads to efficient formation of the signaling state.

  11. Natural product (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer cell growth by targeting RNA-binding protein Musashi-1.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lan; Appelman, Carl; Smith, Amber R; Yu, Jia; Larsen, Sarah; Marquez, Rebecca T; Liu, Hao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Gao, Philip; Roy, Anuradha; Anbanandam, Asokan; Gowthaman, Ragul; Karanicolas, John; De Guzman, Roberto N; Rogers, Steven; Aubé, Jeffrey; Ji, Min; Cohen, Robert S; Neufeld, Kristi L; Xu, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Musashi-1 (MSI1) is an RNA-binding protein that acts as a translation activator or repressor of target mRNAs. The best-characterized MSI1 target is Numb mRNA, whose encoded protein negatively regulates Notch signaling. Additional MSI1 targets include the mRNAs for the tumor suppressor protein APC that regulates Wnt signaling and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21(WAF-1). We hypothesized that increased expression of NUMB, P21 and APC, through inhibition of MSI1 RNA-binding activity might be an effective way to simultaneously downregulate Wnt and Notch signaling, thus blocking the growth of a broad range of cancer cells. We used a fluorescence polarization assay to screen for small molecules that disrupt the binding of MSI1 to its consensus RNA binding site. One of the top hits was (-)-gossypol (Ki = 476 ± 273 nM), a natural product from cottonseed, known to have potent anti-tumor activity and which has recently completed Phase IIb clinical trials for prostate cancer. Surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance studies demonstrate a direct interaction of (-)-gossypol with the RNA binding pocket of MSI1. We further showed that (-)-gossypol reduces Notch/Wnt signaling in several colon cancer cell lines having high levels of MSI1, with reduced SURVIVIN expression and increased apoptosis/autophagy. Finally, we showed that orally administered (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our study identifies (-)-gossypol as a potential small molecule inhibitor of MSI1-RNA interaction, and suggests that inhibition of MSI1's RNA binding activity may be an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  12. Rational design of allosteric-inhibition sites in classical protein tyrosine phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Chio, Cynthia M.; Yu, Xiaoling; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), which catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphotyrosine in protein substrates, are critical regulators of metazoan cell signaling and have emerged as potential drug targets for a range of human diseases. Strategies for chemically targeting the function of individual PTPs selectively could serve to elucidate the signaling roles of these enzymes and would potentially expedite validation of the therapeutic promise of PTP inhibitors. Here we report a novel strategy for the design of non-natural allosteric-inhibition sites in PTPs; these sites, which can be introduced into target PTPs through protein engineering, serve to sensitize target PTPs to potent and selective inhibition by a biarsenical small molecule. Building on the recent discovery of a naturally occurring cryptic allosteric site in wild-type Src-homology-2 domain containing PTP (Shp2) that can be targeted by biarsenical compounds, we hypothesized that Shp2’s unusual sensitivity to biarsenicals could be strengthened through rational design and that the Shp2-specific site could serve as a blueprint for the introduction of non-natural inhibitor sensitivity in other PTPs. Indeed, we show here that the strategic introduction of a cysteine residue at a position removed from the Shp2 active site can serve to increase the potency and selectivity of the interaction between Shp2’s allosteric site and the biarsenical inhibitor. Moreover, we find that “Shp2-like” allosteric sites can be installed de novo in PTP enzymes that do not possess naturally occurring sensitivity to biarsenical compounds. Using primary-sequence alignments to guide our enzyme engineering, we have successfully introduced allosteric-inhibition sites in four classical PTPs—PTP1B, PTPH-1, FAP-1, and HePTP—from four different PTP subfamilies, suggesting that our sensitization approach can likely be applied widely across the classical PTP family to generate biarsenical-responsive PTPs. PMID:25828055

  13. Matrix Gla protein inhibits ectopic calcification by a direct interaction with hydroxyapatite crystals.

    PubMed

    O'Young, Jason; Liao, Yinyin; Xiao, Yizhi; Jalkanen, Jari; Lajoie, Gilles; Karttunen, Mikko; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2011-11-16

    Mice lacking the gene encoding matrix gla protein (MGP) exhibit massive mineral deposition in blood vessels and die soon after birth. We hypothesize that MGP prevents arterial calcification by adsorbing to growing hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals. To test this, we have used a combined experimental-computational approach. We synthesized peptides covering the entire sequence of human MGP, which contains three sites of serine phosphorylation and five sites of γ-carboxylation, and studied their effects on HA crystal growth using a constant-composition autotitration assay. In parallel studies, the interactions of these sequences with the {100} and {001} faces of HA were analyzed using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. YGlapS (amino acids 1-14 of human MGP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56) adsorbed rapidly to the {100} and {001} faces and strongly inhibited HA growth (IC(50) = 2.96 μg/mL and 4.96 μg/mL, respectively). QR-Gla (MGP29-42) adsorbed more slowly and was a moderate growth inhibitor, while the remaining three (nonpost-translationally modified) peptides had little or no effect in either analysis. Substitution of gla with glutamic acid reduced the adsorption and inhibition activities of SK-Gla and (to a lesser extent) QR-Gla but not YGlapS; substitution of phosphoserine with serine reduced the inhibitory potency of YGlapS. These studies suggest that MGP prevents arterial calcification by a direct interaction with HA crystals that involves both phosphate groups and gla residues of the protein. The strong correlation between simulated adsorption and measured growth inhibition indicates that MD provides a powerful tool to predict the effects of proteins and peptides on crystal formation.

  14. Soluble Prion Protein Binds Isolated Low Molecular Weight Amyloid-β Oligomers Causing Cytotoxicity Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas L; Choi, Jin-Kyu; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K

    2015-12-16

    A growing number of observations indicate that soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers play a major role in Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies strongly suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of these oligomers are mediated by cellular, membrane-anchored prion protein and that Aβ neurotoxicity can be inhibited by soluble recombinant prion protein (rPrP) and its fragments. However, the mechanism by which rPrP interacts with Aβ oligomers and prevents their toxicity is largely unknown, and studies in this regard are hindered by the large structural heterogeneity of Aβ oligomers. To overcome this difficulty, here we used photoinduced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) to isolate well-defined oligomers of Aβ42 and characterize these species with regard to their cytotoxicity and interaction with rPrP, as well the mechanism by which rPrP inhibits Aβ42 cytotoxicity. Our data shows that the addition of rPrP to the assembling Aβ42 results in a shift in oligomer size distribution, decreasing the population of toxic tetramers and higher order oligomers and increasing the population of nontoxic (and possibly neuroprotective) monomers. Isolated oligomeric species of Aβ42 are cytotoxic to primary neurons and cause permeation of model lipid bilayers. These toxic effects, which are oligomer size-dependent, can be inhibited by the addition of rPrP, and our data suggest potential mechanisms of this inhibitory action. This insight should help in current efforts to develop PrP-based therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26466138

  15. Silencing of GRA10 protein expression inhibits Toxoplasma gondii intracellular growth and development.

    PubMed

    Witola, William H; Bauman, Bretta; McHugh, Mark; Matthews, Kwame

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii dense granule proteins (GRAs) are secreted abundantly in both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages of the parasite and are known to localize to various compartments of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that interfaces with the host cell milieu. Thus, GRAs may play significant roles in the biogenesis of the PV that is important for survival of intracellular T. gondii. GRA10 is a dense granule protein whose role in T. gondii has not yet been characterized. Therefore, in this study, we endeavored to determine the role of GRA10 in the growth and survival of intracellular T. gondii by using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) antisense knockdown approach to disrupt the translation of GRA10 mRNA in the parasites. We expressed and purified a truncated recombinant GRA10 protein to generate anti-GRA10 polyclonal antibodies that we used to characterize GRA10 in T. gondii. We found that GRA10 is a soluble, dense granule-associated protein that is secreted into the parasite cytosol and the parasitophorous vacuole milieu. Using in vitro cultures, we found that knockdown of GRA10 results in severe inhibition of T. gondii growth in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells. Together, our findings define GRA10 as a dense granule protein that plays a significant role in the growth and propagation of intracellular T. gondii in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells.

  16. Silencing of GRA10 protein expression inhibits Toxoplasma gondii intracellular growth and development.

    PubMed

    Witola, William H; Bauman, Bretta; McHugh, Mark; Matthews, Kwame

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii dense granule proteins (GRAs) are secreted abundantly in both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages of the parasite and are known to localize to various compartments of the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that interfaces with the host cell milieu. Thus, GRAs may play significant roles in the biogenesis of the PV that is important for survival of intracellular T. gondii. GRA10 is a dense granule protein whose role in T. gondii has not yet been characterized. Therefore, in this study, we endeavored to determine the role of GRA10 in the growth and survival of intracellular T. gondii by using phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) antisense knockdown approach to disrupt the translation of GRA10 mRNA in the parasites. We expressed and purified a truncated recombinant GRA10 protein to generate anti-GRA10 polyclonal antibodies that we used to characterize GRA10 in T. gondii. We found that GRA10 is a soluble, dense granule-associated protein that is secreted into the parasite cytosol and the parasitophorous vacuole milieu. Using in vitro cultures, we found that knockdown of GRA10 results in severe inhibition of T. gondii growth in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells. Together, our findings define GRA10 as a dense granule protein that plays a significant role in the growth and propagation of intracellular T. gondii in human fibroblasts and in ovine monocytic cells. PMID:24832208