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Sample records for proteins primary radicals

  1. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  2. Primary radical yields in pulse irradiated alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielden, E. M.; Hart, E. J.

    1969-01-01

    Primary radical yields of hydrated electrons, H atoms, and OH radicals are determined by measuring hydrated electron formation following a 4 microsecond pulse of X rays. The pH dependence of free radical yields beyond pH 12 is determined by observation of the hydrated electrons.

  3. Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, R T; Fu, S; Stocker, R; Davies, M J

    1997-01-01

    Radical-mediated damage to proteins may be initiated by electron leakage, metal-ion-dependent reactions and autoxidation of lipids and sugars. The consequent protein oxidation is O2-dependent, and involves several propagating radicals, notably alkoxyl radicals. Its products include several categories of reactive species, and a range of stable products whose chemistry is currently being elucidated. Among the reactive products, protein hydroperoxides can generate further radical fluxes on reaction with transition-metal ions; protein-bound reductants (notably dopa) can reduce transition-metal ions and thereby facilitate their reaction with hydroperoxides; and aldehydes may participate in Schiff-base formation and other reactions. Cells can detoxify some of the reactive species, e.g. by reducing protein hydroperoxides to unreactive hydroxides. Oxidized proteins are often functionally inactive and their unfolding is associated with enhanced susceptibility to proteinases. Thus cells can generally remove oxidized proteins by proteolysis. However, certain oxidized proteins are poorly handled by cells, and together with possible alterations in the rate of production of oxidized proteins, this may contribute to the observed accumulation and damaging actions of oxidized proteins during aging and in pathologies such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. Protein oxidation may also sometimes play controlling roles in cellular remodelling and cell growth. Proteins are also key targets in defensive cytolysis and in inflammatory self-damage. The possibility of selective protection against protein oxidation (antioxidation) is raised. PMID:9164834

  4. Hydroxyl Radical Dosimetry for High Flux Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Applications Using a Simple Optical Detection Method.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-11-03

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) is a powerful benchtop tool used to probe protein structure, interactions, and conformational changes in solution. However, the reproducibility of all HRPF techniques is limited by the ability to deliver a defined concentration of hydroxyl radicals to the protein. This ability is impacted by both the amount of radical generated and the presence of radical scavengers in solution. In order to compare HRPF data from sample to sample, a hydroxyl radical dosimeter is needed that can measure the effective concentration of radical that is delivered to the protein, after accounting for both differences in hydroxyl radical generation and nonanalyte radical consumption. Here, we test three radical dosimeters (Alexa Fluor 488, terepthalic acid, and adenine) for their ability to quantitatively measure the effective radical dose under the high radical concentration conditions of FPOP. Adenine has a quantitative relationship between UV spectrophotometric response, effective hydroxyl radical dose delivered, and peptide and protein oxidation levels over the range of radical concentrations typically encountered in FPOP. The simplicity of an adenine-based dosimeter allows for convenient and flexible incorporation into FPOP applications, and the ability to accurately measure the delivered radical dose will enable reproducible and reliable FPOP across a variety of platforms and applications.

  5. Sulfite-radical anions in isolated soy proteins.

    PubMed

    Lei, Q; Boatright, W L

    2007-06-01

    Aqueous mixtures of manganese and sulfite, at levels found in isolated soy proteins (ISP) and defatted soy flakes, spontaneously react in the presence of oxygen to produce methanethiol from the 1-electron oxidation of methionine. The carbon and sulfur of methanethiol originate from the methyl-carbon and sulfur of methionine. Similar aqueous mixtures of sulfite, manganese, and oxygen also produce sufficient levels of free radicals to degrade fluorescein. The degradation of methionine by free radicals generated in the sulfite, manganese, and oxygen reaction mixture is inhibited by the free radical spin trapping agent 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Processing ISP with either L-cystine or potassium iodate reduces the free sulfite content of ISP and reduces the headspace methanethiol from aqueous ISP slurries to nondetectable levels. ISP processed without additives contained sufficient levels of free radicals to generate methanethiol from the oxidation of added methionine. There were no detectable levels of methanethiol produced when methionine was added to ISP processed with iodate.

  6. Molecular architectures and functions of radical enzymes and their (re)activating proteins.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naoki; Toraya, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    Certain proteins utilize the high reactivity of radicals for catalysing chemically challenging reactions. These proteins contain or form a radical and therefore named 'radical enzymes'. Radicals are introduced by enzymes themselves or by (re)activating proteins called (re)activases. The X-ray structures of radical enzymes and their (re)activases revealed some structural features of these molecular apparatuses which solved common enigmas of radical enzymes—i.e. how the enzymes form or introduce radicals at the active sites, how they use the high reactivity of radicals for catalysis, how they suppress undesired side reactions of highly reactive radicals and how they are (re)activated when inactivated by extinction of radicals. This review highlights molecular architectures of radical B12 enzymes, radical SAM enzymes, tyrosyl radical enzymes, glycyl radical enzymes and their (re)activating proteins that support their functions. For generalization, comparisons of the recently reported structures of radical enzymes with those of canonical radical enzymes are summarized here.

  7. Redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan-Guo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that transient production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signaling event triggered by the activation of various cell surface receptors. Major targets of H(2)O(2) include protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Oxidation of the active site Cys by H(2)O(2) abrogates PTP catalytic activity, thereby potentially furnishing a mechanism to ensure optimal tyrosine phosphorylation in response to a variety of physiological stimuli. Unfortunately, H(2)O(2) is poorly reactive in chemical terms and the second order rate constants for the H(2)O(2)-mediated PTP inactivation are ~10M(-1)s(-1), which is too slow to be compatible with the transient signaling events occurring at the physiological concentrations of H(2)O(2). We find that hydroxyl radical is produced from H(2)O(2) solutions in the absence of metal chelating agent by the Fenton reaction. We show that the hydroxyl radical is capable of inactivating the PTPs and the inactivation is active site directed, through oxidation of the catalytic Cys to sulfenic acid, which can be reduced by low molecular weight thiols. We also show that hydroxyl radical is a kinetically more efficient oxidant than H(2)O(2) for inactivating the PTPs. The second-order rate constants for the hydroxyl radical-mediated PTP inactivation are at least 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than those mediated by H(2)O(2) under the same conditions. Thus, hydroxyl radical generated in vivo may serve as a more physiologically relevant oxidizing agent for PTP inactivation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases.

  8. (Bi)sulfite Oxidation by Copper,Zinc-Superoxide Dismutase: Sulfite-Derived, Radical-Initiated Protein Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sulfur dioxide, formed during the combustion of fossil fuels, is a major air pollutant near large cities. Its two ionized forms in aqueous solution, sulfite and (bi)sulfite, are widely used as preservatives and antioxidants to prevent food and beverage spoilage. (Bi)sulfite can be oxidized by peroxidases to form the very reactive sulfur trioxide anion radical (•SO3−). This free radical further reacts with oxygen to form the peroxymonosulfate anion radical (−O3SOO•) and sulfate anion radical (SO4• −). Objective To explore the critical role of these radical intermediates in further oxidizing biomolecules, we examined the ability of copper,zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) to initiate this radical chain reaction, using human serum albumin (HSA) as a model target. Methods We used electron paramagnetic resonance, optical spectroscopy, oxygen uptake, and immuno-spin trapping to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. Results We found that when Cu,Zn-SOD reacted with (bi)sulfite, •SO3− was produced, with the concomitant reduction of SOD-Cu(II) to SOD-Cu(I). Further, we demonstrated that sulfite oxidation mediated by Cu,Zn-SOD induced the formation of radical-derived 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) spin-trapped HSA radicals. Conclusions The present study suggests that protein oxidative damage resulting from (bi)sulfite oxidation promoted by Cu,Zn-SOD could be involved in oxidative damage and tissue injury in (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions. PMID:20348042

  9. Participation of oxygen-free radicals in the oxido-reduction of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Rojas, C; Guzman-Grenfell, A M; Hicks, J J

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have focused attention on the possible role of active oxygen species on protein damage and degradation. The reactions of free radicals on biomolecules are important in physiology and pathology. A number of systems that generate free radicals catalyze the oxidative modification of proteins in two species: protein peroxides, which can consume important antioxidants; and protein-bound reducing moieties, which can reduce transition metals, and may enhance their activity in radical reactions. Protein oxidation also contributes to the pool of damaged enzymes and accumulation of abnormal and damaged proteins, which increases during aging and in various pathological states, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, etc.

  10. Synthesis of unnatural amino acids from serine derivatives by beta-fragmentation of primary alkoxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Boto, Alicia; Gallardo, Juan A; Hernández, Dacil; Hernández, Rosendo

    2007-09-14

    The fragmentation of primary alkoxyl radicals has been scarcely used in synthesis since other competing processes (such as oxidation or hydrogen abstraction) usually predominate. However, when serine derivatives were used as substrates, the scission took place in excellent yields. Tandem scission-allylation, -alkylation, or -arylation reactions were subsequently developed. This one-pot methodology was applied to the synthesis of unnatural amino acids, which are useful synthetic blocks or amino acid surrogates in peptidomimetics.

  11. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  12. Radicality of initial surgery for primary malignant melanoma of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Todo, Yukiharu; Okamoto, Kazuhira; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Minobe, Shinichiro; Kato, Hidenori

    2016-04-01

    Radical surgery is considered not to improve the prognosis of primary malignant melanoma of the vagina (PMMV). This study was carried out to review the general consensus. A systematic review was performed on the basis of data from 10 patients in our cohort and 147 patients in the previous literature. The radicality of the initial surgery (RAINS) score was defined as the total number of points in terms of the resected organs. The target organs were the vagina, vulva, urethra, bladder, uterus, anus, rectum, pelvic lymph nodes, and inguinal lymph nodes. Overall survival (OS) according to the RAINS score was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Information on tumor stage, size, and depth of invasion was not obtained in 15, 47, and 43% of patients, respectively. The median follow-up period was 18 months. OS with a RAINS score of at least 7 was significantly longer than that with a RAINS score of up to 6 (median survival time, 41 vs. 19 months; log-rank test, P=0.037), despite the fact that the former group included significantly more patients with advanced-stage disease. A significant difference in OS was not found between patients with a RAINS score of at least 6 and up to 5. The therapeutic significance of radical surgery for PMMV has not been assessed appropriately in previous studies because of the lack of comparability among groups and differences in the definitions of surgical radicality. Patients with PMMV might benefit from initial surgery with appropriate surgical radicality, despite incomplete validation of the RAINS score.

  13. Protein, lipid, and DNA radicals to measure skin UVA damage and modulation by melanin.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Rogge, Fabrice; Lee, Martin

    2008-03-15

    Afro-Caribbeans have a lower incidence of skin cancer than Caucasians, but the effectiveness of melanin as a photoprotective pigment is debated. We investigated the UVA and solar irradiation of ex vivo human skin and DMPO using electron spin resonance spectroscopy, to determine whether pigmented skin is protected by melanin against free radical damage. Initial ascorbate radicals in Caucasian skin were superseded by lipid and/or protein radical adducts with isotropic (a(H)=1.8 mT) and anisotropic spectra comparable to spectra in irradiated pig fat (a(H)=1.9 mT) and BSA. DNA carbon-centered radical adducts (a(H)=2.3 mT) and a broad singlet were detected in genomic DNA/melanin but were not distinguishable in irradiated Caucasian skin. Protein and lipid radicals (n=6 in Caucasian skin) were minimal in Afro-Caribbean skin (n=4) and intermediate skin pigmentations were variable (n=3). In irradiated Afro-Caribbean skin a shoulder to the melanin radical (also in UVA-irradiated pigmented melanoma cells and genomic DNA/melanin and intrinsic to pheomelanin) was detected. In this sample group, protein (but not lipid) radical adducts decreased directly with pigmentation. ESR/spin trapping methodology has potential for screening skin susceptibility to aging and cancer-related radical damage and for measuring protection afforded by melanin, sunscreens, and antiaging creams.

  14. Artifacts Generated During Azoalkane Peroxy Radical Oxidative Stress Testing of Pharmaceuticals Containing Primary and Secondary Amines.

    PubMed

    Nefliu, Marcela; Zelesky, Todd; Jansen, Patrick; Sluggett, Gregory W; Foti, Christopher; Baertschi, Steven W; Harmon, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    We report artifactual degradation of pharmaceutical compounds containing primary and secondary amines during peroxy radical-mediated oxidative stress carried out using azoalkane initiators. Two degradation products were detected when model drug compounds dissolved in methanol/water were heated to 40°C with radical initiators such as 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN). The primary artifact was identified as an α-aminonitrile generated from the reaction of the amine group of the model drug with formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide, generated as byproducts of the stress reaction. A minor artifact was generated from the reaction between the amine group and isocyanic acid, also a byproduct of the stress reaction. We report the effects of pH, initiator/drug molar ratio, and type of azoalkane initiator on the formation of these artifacts. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used for structure elucidation, whereas mechanistic studies, including stable isotope labeling experiments, cyanide analysis, and experiments exploring the effects of butylated hydroxyanisole addition, were employed to support the degradation pathways.

  15. Self Sacrifice in Radical S-adenosylmethionine Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Squire J.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Grove, Tyler L.

    2007-01-01

    The radical SAM superfamily of metalloproteins catalyze the reductive cleavage of S-adenosyl-l-methionine to generate a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical (5′-dA•) intermediate that is obligate for turnover. The 5′-dA• acts as a potent oxidant, initiating turnover by abstracting a hydrogen atom from an appropriate substrate. A special class of these enzymes use this strategy to functionalize unactivated C–H bonds by insertion of sulfur atoms. This review will describe the characterization of three members of this class—biotin synthase, lipoyl synthase, and MiaB protein—each of which has been shown to cannibalize itself during turnover. PMID:17936058

  16. Unusually high reactivity of apolipoprotein B-100 among proteins to radical reactions induced in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Narita, S; Yamada, Y; Tanaka, K; Kojo, S

    2000-01-17

    Relative reactivities of proteins to radical reactions caused in human plasma were studied for the first time utilizing an immunoblotting assay. When radical reactions were caused by Cu(2+), apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB) underwent extensive fragmentation concurrently with the decrease in alpha-tocopherol, while human serum albumin (HSA) and transferrin (TF) were not decreased at all. When radical reactions were initiated by Cu(2+) with hydrogen peroxide or 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride (AAPH), alpha-tocopherol and apoB were also decreased steadily but HSA and TF were not decreased. These observations indicate that apoB is extremely reactive, even comparable to alpha-tocopherol, towards radical reactions. These results also suggest that the radical reaction of apoB is a possible process in vivo and it is involved in atherogenesis along with low density lipoprotein lipid peroxidation, which has been studied extensively.

  17. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  18. Concerning the production of free radicals in proteins by ultraviolet light.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Androes, G. M.; Gloria, H. R.; Reinisch, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The response to UV light of several solid proteins and model compounds has been studied in vacuum and at low temperature, using electron paramagnetic resonance techniques. The results indicate that the details of amino acid composition and sequence, and the tertiary structure of a protein are important in determining both the rate of, and the mechanism for, the production of free radicals, and in determining the conditions under which sulfur-type radicals can be produced. The results presented are related to enzyme inactivation and to the UV stability of proteins generally.

  19. Beta-carotene encapsulated in food protein nanoparticles reduces peroxyl radical oxidation in Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-carotene (BC) was encapsulated by sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and soybean protein isolate (SPI) by the homogenization-evaporation method forming nanoparticles of 78, 90 and 370 nm diameter. Indices of the chemical antioxidant assays, the reducing power, DPPH radical scave...

  20. Pulsed electron beam water radiolysis for submicrosecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2009-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on submicrosecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for submicrosecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and beta-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one submicrosecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a time scale shorter than that of large scale protein motions.

  1. Pulsed Electron Beam Water Radiolysis for Sub-Microsecond Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on sub-microsecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for sub-microsecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one sub-microsecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a timescale shorter than that of large scale protein motions. PMID:19265387

  2. Molecularly imprinted protein recognition thin films constructed by controlled/living radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shogo; Ooya, Tooru; Kitayama, Yukiya; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrated the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with binding affinity toward a target protein, ribonuclease A (RNase) by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of acrylic acid, acrylamide, and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of RNase. The binding activity of the MIPs was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the MIP thin layers prepared on the gold-coated sensor chips. The MIPs prepared by ATRP (MIP-ATRP) had a binding affinity toward RNase with larger binding amount compared to MIPs prepared by conventional free radical polymerization methods (MIP-RP). Moreover, protein selectivity was evaluated using reference proteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, and α-lactalbumin) and was confirmed in MIP-ATRP of optimum film thickness determined experimentally to be 15-30 nm; however, protein selectivity was not achieved in all MIP-RP. We have shown that ATRP is powerful technique for preparing protein recognition materials by molecular imprinting.

  3. Dosimetry Determines the Initial OH Radical Concentration in Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins (FPOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ben; Zhang, Hao; Giblin, Daryl; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2015-05-01

    Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) employs laser photolysis of hydrogen peroxide to give OH radicals that label amino acid side-chains of proteins on the microsecond time scale. A method for quantitation of hydroxyl radicals after laser photolysis is of importance to FPOP because it establishes a means to adjust the yield of •OH, offers the opportunity of tunable modifications, and provides a basis for kinetic measurements. The initial concentration of OH radicals has yet to be measured experimentally. We report here an approach using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine quantitatively the initial •OH concentration (we found ~0.95 mM from 15 mM H2O2) from laser photolysis and to investigate the quenching efficiencies for various •OH scavengers.

  4. Ultrafast primary processes of the stable neutral organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid solution.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Christoph; Wezisla, Boris; Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-05-28

    Femtosecond spectroscopy with hyperspectral white-light detection was used to elucidate the ultrafast primary processes of the thermodynamically stable organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid acetonitrile solution at room temperature. The radical was excited with optical pulses having a duration of 39 fs and a center wavelength of 800 nm thereby accessing its energetically lowest electronically excited state (D1). The apparent spectrotemporal response is understood in terms of an ultrafast primary D1-to-D0 internal conversion that generates the electronic ground state of the radical in a highly vibrationally excited fashion within a few hundred femtoseconds. The replenished electronic ground state subsequently undergoes vibrational cooling on a time scale of a few picoseconds. The instantaneous absorption spectra of the radical derived from the femtosecond pump-probe data are analyzed within the Sulzer-Wieland formalism for calculating the electronic spectra of "hot" polyatomic molecules. The pump-probe spectra together with transient anisotropy data in the region of the D0 → D1 ground-state bleach gives evidence for an additional transient absorption that arises from a dark excited state, which gains oscillator strength with increasing vibrational excitation of the radical by virtue of vibronic coupling.

  5. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  6. Aliphatic peptidyl hydroperoxides as a source of secondary oxidation in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Jessica; Liu, Mian; Live, David; Sharp, Joshua S

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a technique for studying protein structure and binding that entails oxidizing a protein system of interest with diffusing hydroxyl radicals, and then measuring the amount of oxidation of each amino acid. One important issue in hydroxyl radical footprinting is limiting amino acid oxidation by secondary oxidants to prevent uncontrolled oxidation, which can cause amino acids to appear more solvent accessible than they really are. Previous work suggested that hydrogen peroxide was the major secondary oxidant of concern in hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments; however, even after elimination of all hydrogen peroxide, some secondary oxidation was still detected. Evidence is presented for the formation of peptidyl hydroperoxides as the most abundant product upon oxidation of aliphatic amino acids. Both reverse phase liquid chromatography and catalase treatment were shown to be ineffective at eliminating peptidyl hydroperoxides. The ability of these peptidyl hydroperoxides to directly oxidize methionine is demonstrated, suggesting the value of methionine amide as an in situ protectant. Hydroxyl radical footprinting protocols require the use of an organic sulfide or similar peroxide scavenger in addition to removal of hydrogen peroxide to successfully eradicate all secondary oxidizing species and prevent uncontrolled oxidation of sulfur-containing residues.

  7. The nitroxide TEMPO is an efficient scavenger of protein radicals: cellular and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Lam, Magdalena; Shinde, Sujata S; Anderson, Robert F; Davies, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    Protein oxidation occurs during multiple human pathologies, and protein radicals are known to induce damage to other cell components. Such damage may be modulated by agents that scavenge protein radicals. In this study, the potential protective reactions of the nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl radical) against Tyr- and Trp-derived radicals (TyrO./TrpN.) have been investigated. Pretreatment of macrophage cells with TEMPO provided protection against photo-oxidation-induced loss of cell viability and Tyr oxidation, with the nitroxide more effective than the hydroxylamine or parent amine. Pulse radiolysis was employed to determine rate constants, k, for the reaction of TEMPO with TyrO. and TrpN. generated on N-Ac-Tyr-amide and N-Ac-Trp-amide, with values of k~10(8) and 7×10(6)M(-1)s(-1), respectively, determined. Analogous studies with lysozyme, chymotrypsin, and pepsin yielded k for TEMPO reacting with TrpN. ranging from 1.5×10(7) (lysozyme) to 1.1×10(8) (pepsin)M(-1)s(-1). Pepsin-derived TyrO. reacted with TEMPO with k~4×10(7)M(-1)s(-1); analogous reactions for lysozyme and chymotrypsin TyrO. were much slower. These data indicate that TEMPO can inhibit secondary reactions of both TyrO. and TrpN., though this is protein dependent. Such protein radical scavenging may contribute to the positive biological effects of nitroxides.

  8. Efficient DNP NMR of Membrane Proteins: Sample Preparation Protocols, Sensitivity, and Radical Location

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu Y.; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~4 fold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105–160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  9. RNAi Screen for NRF2 Inducers Identifies Targets That Rescue Primary Lung Epithelial Cells from Cigarette Smoke Induced Radical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Frances-Rose; Schubert, Steffen; Hannus, Michael; Sönnichsen, Birte; Ittrich, Carina; Kreideweiss, Stefan; Rippmann, Jörg F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a highly prevalent condition characterized by inflammation and progressive obstruction of the airways. At present, there is no treatment that suppresses the chronic inflammation of the disease, and COPD patients often succumb to the condition. Excessive oxidative stress caused by smoke inhalation is a major driving force of the disease. The transcription factor NRF2 is a critical player in the battle against oxidative stress and its function is impaired in COPD. Increasing NRF2 activity may therefore be a viable therapeutic option for COPD treatment. We show that down regulation of KEAP1, a NRF2 inhibitor, protects primary human lung epithelial cells from cigarette-smoke-extract (CSE) induced cell death in an established in vitro model of radical stress. To identify new potential drug targets with a similar effect, we performed a siRNA screen of the ‘druggable’ genome using a NRF2 transcriptional reporter cell line. This screen identified multiple genes that when down regulated increased NRF2 transcriptional activity and provided a survival benefit in the in vitro model. Our results suggest that inhibiting components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system will have the strongest effects on NRF2 transcriptional activity by increasing NRF2 levels. We also find that down regulation of the small GTPase Rab28 or the Estrogen Receptor ESRRA provide a survival benefit. Rab28 knockdown increased NRF2 protein levels, indicating that Rab28 may regulate NRF2 proteolysis. Conversely ESRRA down regulation increased NRF2 transcriptional activity without affecting NRF2 levels, suggesting a proteasome-independent mechanism. PMID:27832175

  10. Differential Motion Between Mediastinal Lymph Nodes and Primary Tumor in Radically Irradiated Lung Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schaake, Eva E.; Rossi, Maddalena M.G.; Buikhuisen, Wieneke A.; Burgers, Jacobus A.; Smit, Adrianus A.J.; Belderbos, José S.A.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: In patients with locally advanced lung cancer, planning target volume margins for mediastinal lymph nodes and tumor after a correction protocol based on bony anatomy registration typically range from 1 to 1.5 cm. Detailed information about lymph node motion variability and differential motion with the primary tumor, however, is lacking from large series. In this study, lymph node and tumor position variability were analyzed in detail and correlated to the main carina to evaluate possible margin reduction. Methods and Materials: Small gold fiducial markers (0.35 × 5 mm) were placed in the mediastinal lymph nodes of 51 patients with non-small cell lung cancer during routine diagnostic esophageal or bronchial endoscopic ultrasonography. Four-dimensional (4D) planning computed tomographic (CT) and daily 4D cone beam (CB) CT scans were acquired before and during radical radiation therapy (66 Gy in 24 fractions). Each CBCT was registered in 3-dimensions (bony anatomy) and 4D (tumor, marker, and carina) to the planning CT scan. Subsequently, systematic and random residual misalignments of the time-averaged lymph node and tumor position relative to the bony anatomy and carina were determined. Additionally, tumor and lymph node respiratory amplitude variability was quantified. Finally, required margins were quantified by use of a recipe for dual targets. Results: Relative to the bony anatomy, systematic and random errors ranged from 0.16 to 0.32 cm for the markers and from 0.15 to 0.33 cm for the tumor, but despite similar ranges there was limited correlation (0.17-0.71) owing to differential motion. A large variability in lymph node amplitude between patients was observed, with an average motion of 0.56 cm in the cranial-caudal direction. Margins could be reduced by 10% (left-right), 27% (cranial-caudal), and 10% (anteroposterior) for the lymph nodes and −2%, 15%, and 7% for the tumor if an online carina registration protocol replaced a

  11. A Substrate Radical Intermediate in Catalysis by the Antibiotic Resistance Protein Cfr

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tyler L.; Livada, Jovan; Schwalm, Erica L.; Green, Michael T.; Booker, Squire J.; Silakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Cfr-dependent methylation of C8 of adenosine 2503 (A2503) in 23S rRNA confers bacterial resistance to an array of clinically important antibiotics that target the large subunit of the ribosome, including the synthetic oxazolidinone antibiotic linezolid. The key element of the proposed mechanism for Cfr, a radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme, is the addition of a methylene radical — generated by hydrogen-atom abstraction from the methyl group of an S-methylated cysteine residue (mCys) — onto C8 of A2503 to form a protein – nucleic acid cross-linked species containing an unpaired electron. Herein we use continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques to provide direct spectroscopic evidence for this intermediate, showing a spin-delocalized radical with maximum spin density at N7 of the adenine ring. In addition, we use rapid-freeze quench EPR to show that the radical forms and decays with rate constants that are consistent with the rate of formation of the methylated product. PMID:23644479

  12. Laser induced photoluminiscence studies of primary photochemical production processes of cometary radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    A tunable vacuum ultraviolet flash lamp was constructed. This unique flash lamp was coupled with a tunable dye laser detector and permits the experimenter to measure the production rates of ground state radicals as a function of wavelength. A new technique for producing fluorescent radicals was discovered. This technique called multiphoton ultraviolet photodissociation is currently being applied to several problems of both cometary and stratospheric interest. It was demonstrated that NO2 will dissociate to produce an excited fragment and the radiation can possibly be used for remote detection of this species.

  13. Effects of oxidative modification on gel properties of isolated porcine myofibrillar protein by peroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feibai; Zhao, Mouming; Zhao, Haifeng; Sun, Weizheng; Cui, Chun

    2014-04-01

    AAPH-derived (2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride) peroxyl radicals were selected as representative free radicals of lipid peroxidation to investigate the effects of oxidative modifications on isolated porcine myofibrillar protein structures as well as their rheological and gelling properties. Incubation of myofibrillar protein with increasing concentrations of AAPH resulted in a gradual increase (p<0.05) in carbonyl content and SH→S-S conversion. Results from SDS-PAGE indicated that medium (~1 mM) and relatively high (>3 mM) concentrations of AAPH induced aggregation of myosin and denaturation of myosin, troponin and tropomyosin, respectively. These structural changes resulted in changes on gelation of myofibrillar protein. Low level protein oxidation (AAPH≤0.5 mM) had no remarkable effect (p>0.05) on the viscoelastic pattern of myofibrillar protein gelation. Moderate oxidative modification (AAPH~1mM) enhanced the water-holding capacity (WHC) and texture properties of gels, while further oxidation (AAPH>3mM) significantly reduced the gel quality.

  14. Evidence for roles of radicals in protein oxidation in advanced human atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, S; Davies, M J; Stocker, R; Dean, R T

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage might be important in atherogenesis. Oxidized lipids are present at significant concentrations in advanced human plaque, although tissue antioxidants are mostly present at normal concentrations. Indirect evidence of protein modification (notably derivatization of lysine) or oxidation has been obtained by immunochemical methods; the specificities of these antibodies are unclear. Here we present chemical determinations of six protein-bound oxidation products: dopa, o-tyrosine, m-tyrosine, dityrosine, hydroxyleucine and hydroxyvaline, some of which reflect particularly oxy-radical-mediated reaction pathways, which seem to involve mainly the participation of transition- metal ions. We compared the relative abundance of these oxidation products in normal intima, and in human carotid plaque samples with that observed after radiolytically generated hydroxyl radical attack on BSA in vitro. The close similarities in relative abundances in the latter two circumstances indicate that hydroxyl radical damage might occur in plaque. The relatively higher level of dityrosine in plaque than that observed after radiolysis suggests the additional involvement of HOCl-mediated reactions in advanced plaque. PMID:9677308

  15. Oxidation of glyoxylic acid by cerium(IV): Oxygen-induced enhancement of the primary radical concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, B. ||; Steinbock, O.; Dalal, N.S. |; Mueller, S.C. |||

    1996-07-25

    In order to help understand the role of oxygen in Ce(IV)-induced oxidation of small carbonic acids, we investigated the reaction of glyoxylic acid (HCOCOOH) and Ce(IV) in 1 M sulfuric acid. Spectrophotometric data showed that in excess of glyoxylic acid the consumption of Ce(IV) obeys pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 8.8 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1} at 25{degree}C and an activation energy of 80 kJ mol{sup -1}. Rapid-flow EPR measurements revealed an approximately 1:2:1 triplet with a g value of 2.0071{+-}0.0005 and a hyperfine splitting of 7.1{+-}0.2 G, assignable to the primary radical formed by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from hydrated glyoxylic acid. The rate constant for the anaerobic self-decay of the radical was measured as approximately 3.7x10{sup 9} L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Surprisingly, oxygen had no effect on the Ce(IV) kinetics, while the radical decay was significantly inhibited under aerobic conditions (ratio of experimental rate constants = 6.3). Amperometric measurements revealed accompanying oxygen consumption. Analyses based on numerical simulations show that the observed oxygen-induced increase in radical concentration cannot be explained in the framework of standard autooxidation mechanisms. An alternative reaction scheme is suggested which reproduces the observed aerobic radical kinetics and which thus could be relevant to similar oxidation reactions. 30 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Protein–DNA charge transport: Redox activation of a DNA repair protein by guanine radical

    PubMed Central

    Yavin, Eylon; Boal, Amie K.; Stemp, Eric D. A.; Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA charge transport (CT) chemistry provides a route to carry out oxidative DNA damage from a distance in a reaction that is sensitive to DNA mismatches and lesions. Here, DNA-mediated CT also leads to oxidation of a DNA-bound base excision repair enzyme, MutY. DNA-bound Ru(III), generated through a flash/quench technique, is found to promote oxidation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster of MutY to [4Fe-4S]3+ and its decomposition product [3Fe-4S]1+. Flash/quench experiments monitored by EPR spectroscopy reveal spectra with g = 2.08, 2.06, and 2.02, characteristic of the oxidized clusters. Transient absorption spectra of poly(dGC) and [Ru(phen)2dppz]3+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine), generated in situ, show an absorption characteristic of the guanine radical that is depleted in the presence of MutY with formation instead of a long-lived species with an absorption at 405 nm; we attribute this absorption also to formation of the oxidized [4Fe-4S]3+ and [3Fe-4S]1+ clusters. In ruthenium-tethered DNA assemblies, oxidative damage to the 5′-G of a 5′-GG-3′ doublet is generated from a distance but this irreversible damage is inhibited by MutY and instead EPR experiments reveal cluster oxidation. With ruthenium-tethered assemblies containing duplex versus single-stranded regions, MutY oxidation is found to be mediated by the DNA duplex, with guanine radical as an intermediate oxidant; guanine radical formation facilitates MutY oxidation. A model is proposed for the redox activation of DNA repair proteins through DNA CT, with guanine radicals, the first product under oxidative stress, in oxidizing the DNA-bound repair proteins, providing the signal to stimulate DNA repair. PMID:15738421

  17. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of proteins in plasma: formation of chloramines and nitrogen-centred radicals and their role in protein fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C L; Davies, M J

    1999-06-01

    Activated phagocyte cells generate hypochlorite (HOCl) via the release of H2O2 and the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Plasma proteins are major targets for HOCl, although little information is available about the mechanism(s) of oxidation. In this study the reaction of HOCl (at least 50 microM) with diluted fresh human plasma has been shown to generate material that oxidizes 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid; these oxidants are believed to be chloramines formed from the reaction of HOCl with protein amine groups. Chloramines have also been detected with isolated plasma proteins treated with HOCl. In both cases chloramine formation accounts for approx. 20-30% of the added HOCl. These chloramines decompose in a time-dependent manner when incubated at 20 or 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C. Ascorbate and urate remove these chloramines in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with the former being more efficient. The reaction of fresh diluted plasma with HOCl also gives rise to protein-derived nitrogen-centred radicals in a time- and HOCl-concentration-dependent manner; these have been detected by EPR spin trapping. Identical radicals have been detected with isolated HOCl-treated plasma proteins. Radical formation was inhibited by excess methionine, implicating protein-derived chloramines (probably from lysine side chains) as the radical source. Plasma protein fragmentation occurs in a time- and HOCl-concentration-dependent manner, as evidenced by the increased mobility of the EPR spin adducts, the detection of further radical species believed to be intermediates in protein degradation and the loss of the parent protein bands on SDS/PAGE. Fragmentation can be inhibited by methionine and other agents (ascorbate, urate, Trolox C or GSH) capable of removing chloramines and reactive radicals. These results are consistent with protein-derived chloramines, and the radicals derived from them, as contributing agents in HOCl-induced plasma protein oxidation.

  18. Survival and prognostic factors comparing stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer treated with primary radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Srisomboon, Jatupol; Kietpeerakool, Chumnan; Suprasert, Prapaporn; Manopanya, Manatsawee; Siriaree, Sitthicha; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Sae-Teng, Charuwan

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the survival rates of stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients and to evaluate the prognostic factors after treatment primarily with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL). Patients with stage IB cervical cancer undergoing primary RHPL at Chiang Mai University Hospital between January 2002 and December 2009 were evaluated for survival and recurrence. Clinicopathological variables were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors affecting the survival of the patients. During the study period, RHPL was performed on 570 stage IB 1 and 110 stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients. With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 98.1% and 82.8% respectively (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified four significant prognostic factors affecting survival including sub-staging, non-squamous cell carcinoma histology, lymph node metastasis and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion. In conclusion, with a primary radical hysterectomy, stage IB 1 cervical cancer patients have a significantly better survival rate than those with stage IB 2. Significant prognostic factors for stage IB cervical cancer include tumor histology, nodal status, and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion.

  19. Primary maxillary reconstruction after radical maxillectomy using a combined free flap and secondary dynamic suspension.

    PubMed

    Yoza, S; Gunji, H; Ono, I

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of maxillary reconstruction aimed at optimizing facial contour, oral function, and facial animation after radical maxillectomy. In the first stage, using combined latissimus dorsi serratus anterior flaps attached with ribs, we performed a three-dimensional restoration for midface defects. In the second stage, we performed dynamic reconstruction of the nasolabial fold and upper lip using a temporal muscle transposition. As a result, the upper lip was able to be elevated as much as 10 mm when the patient clenched his teeth, and the outcome was judged to be both aesthetically and functionally satisfactory.

  20. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression. PMID:18559982

  1. Direct evidence of iNOS-mediated in vivo free radical production and protein oxidation in acetone-induced ketosis.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G; Dallas, Shannon; Duma, Danielle; Mason, Ronald P; Kadiiska, Maria B

    2008-08-01

    Diabetic patients frequently encounter ketosis that is characterized by the breakdown of lipids with the consequent accumulation of ketone bodies. Several studies have demonstrated that reactive species are likely to induce tissue damage in diabetes, but the role of the ketone bodies in the process has not been fully investigated. In this study, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with novel spin-trapping and immunological techniques has been used to investigate in vivo free radical formation in a murine model of acetone-induced ketosis. A six-line EPR spectrum consistent with the alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone radical adduct of a carbon-centered lipid-derived radical was detected in the liver extracts. To investigate the possible enzymatic source of these radicals, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase knockout mice were used. Free radical production was unchanged in the NADPH oxidase knockout but much decreased in the iNOS knockout mice, suggesting a role for iNOS in free radical production. Longer-term exposure to acetone revealed iNOS overexpression in the liver together with protein radical formation, which was detected by confocal microscopy and a novel immunospin-trapping method. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation as a consequence of persistent free radical generation after 21 days of acetone treatment in control and NADPH oxidase knockout but not in iNOS knockout mice. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acetone administration, a model of ketosis, can lead to protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation through a free radical-dependent mechanism driven mainly by iNOS overexpression.

  2. [The inhibitor of free radical processes decrease of protein biosynthesis in gun short wound tissues and weaken development of the general adaptation syndrome].

    PubMed

    Todorov, I N; Bogdanov, G N; Mitrokhin, Iu I; Varfolomeev, V N; Sidorenko, L I; Mishchenko, D V

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of total protein biosynthesis and procollagen biosynthesis in skeletal muscle of injury tissues with the antioxidant BHT (dibunol) treatment and with common healing were studied. The obtained date indicate that the AO treatment reduce the rate of biosynthesis both the total proteins and procollagen at the 3th day of healing. Dibunol also considerably reduce the protein biosynthesis in adrenals and brake of corticosteroids biogenesis as measured by ESR-signals intensity of reduced adrenodoxine. AO treatment also reduce the protein biosynthesis in thymus, spleen and bone marrow. The lowering of functional activity of endocrine and immune systems indicate that the AO significantly inhibit the systemic reactions of organism induced by acute wound affect. It was suggested that as "primary mediator" of stress-reaction may be considered lipoperoxide radicals and decay products of lipohydroperoide.

  3. Supercharging by m-NBA Improves ETD-Based Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) is an MS-based technique for analyzing protein structure based on measuring the oxidation of amino acid side chains by hydroxyl radicals diffusing in solution. Spatial resolution of HRPF is limited by the smallest portion of the protein for which oxidation amounts can be accurately quantitated. Previous work has shown electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to be the most reliable method for quantifying the amount of oxidation of each amino acid side chain in a mixture of peptide oxidation isomers, but efficient ETD requires high peptide charge states, which limits its applicability for HRPF. Supercharging reagents have been used to enhance peptide charge state for ETD analysis, but previous work has shown supercharging reagents to enhance charge state differently for different peptides sequences; it is currently unknown if different oxidation isomers will experience different charge enhancement effects. Here, we report the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) on the ETD-based quantification of peptide oxidation. The addition of m-NBA to both a defined mixture of synthetic isomeric oxidized peptides and Robo-1 protein subjected to HRPF increased the abundance of higher charge state ions, improving our ability to perform efficient ETD of the mixture. No differences in the reported quantitation by ETD were noted in the presence or absence of m-NBA, indicating that all oxidation isomers were charge-enhanced to a similar extent. These results indicate the utility of m-NBA for residue-level quantification of peptide oxidation in HRPF and other applications.

  4. Supercharging by m-NBA Improves ETD-Based Quantification of Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF) is an MS-based technique for analyzing protein structure based on measuring the oxidation of amino acid side chains by hydroxyl radicals diffusing in solution. Spatial resolution of HRPF is limited by the smallest portion of the protein for which oxidation amounts can be accurately quantitated. Previous work has shown electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to be the most reliable method for quantifying the amount of oxidation of each amino acid side chain in a mixture of peptide oxidation isomers, but efficient ETD requires high peptide charge states, which limits its applicability for HRPF. Supercharging reagents have been used to enhance peptide charge state for ETD analysis, but previous work has shown supercharging reagents to enhance charge state differently for different peptides sequences; it is currently unknown if different oxidation isomers will experience different charge enhancement effects. Here, we report the effect of m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) on the ETD-based quantification of peptide oxidation. The addition of m-NBA to both a defined mixture of synthetic isomeric oxidized peptides and Robo-1 protein subjected to HRPF increased the abundance of higher charge state ions, improving our ability to perform efficient ETD of the mixture. No differences in the reported quantitation by ETD were noted in the presence or absence of m-NBA, indicating that all oxidation isomers were charge-enhanced to a similar extent. These results indicate the utility of m-NBA for residue-level quantification of peptide oxidation in HRPF and other applications.

  5. High structural resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting reveals an extended Robo1-heparin binding interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W; Linhardt, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2015-04-24

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

  6. High Structural Resolution Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting Reveals an Extended Robo1-Heparin Binding Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zixuan; Moniz, Heather; Wang, Shuo; Ramiah, Annapoorani; Zhang, Fuming; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of transmembrane receptors of the Robo family and the secreted protein Slit provides important signals in the development of the central nervous system and regulation of axonal midline crossing. Heparan sulfate, a sulfated linear polysaccharide modified in a complex variety of ways, serves as an essential co-receptor in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that closely related heparin octasaccharides bind to Drosophila Robo directly, and surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that Robo1 binds more tightly to full-length unfractionated heparin. For the first time, we utilized electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to identify two separate binding sites for heparin interaction with Robo1: one binding site at the previously identified site for heparin dp8 and a second binding site at the N terminus of Robo1 that is disordered in the x-ray crystal structure. Mutagenesis of the identified N-terminal binding site exhibited a decrease in binding affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance and heparin affinity chromatography. Footprinting also indicated that heparin binding induces a minor change in the conformation and/or dynamics of the Ig2 domain, but no major conformational changes were detected. These results indicate a second low affinity binding site in the Robo-Slit complex as well as suggesting the role of the Ig2 domain of Robo1 in heparin-mediated signal transduction. This study also marks the first use of electron transfer dissociation-based high spatial resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting, which shows great utility for the characterization of protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:25752613

  7. Combined radical radiation therapy and chemotherapy for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, B.J.; Rider, W.D.; Harwood, A.R.; Keane, T.J.; Thomas, G.M.; Erlichman, C.; Fine, S.

    1982-03-01

    Radical radiation therapy (5000 rads in 20 fractions in 4 weeks) combined with iv mitomycin (10 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1000 mg/m2/24 hours for 4 days) was used to treat 13 patients with locally advanced but operable squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal. All patients achieved local control and retained anal continence, and none developed metastases. The patients were followed from 4 to 34 months (median, 12). Severe acute gastrointestinal toxic effects were seen in three patients; the same patients had significant thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. Treatment with this combined program may allow conservative management of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and should be considered as an alternative to abdominoperineal resection.

  8. Genome Mining for Radical SAM Protein Determinants Reveals Multiple Sactibiotic-Like Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kiera; O'Sullivan, Orla; Rea, Mary C.; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Thuricin CD is a two-component bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis that kills a wide range of clinically significant Clostridium difficile. This bacteriocin has recently been characterized and consists of two distinct peptides, Trnβ and Trnα, which both possess 3 intrapeptide sulphur to α-carbon bridges and act synergistically. Indeed, thuricin CD and subtilosin A are the only antimicrobials known to possess these unusual structures and are known as the sactibiotics (sulplur to alpha carbon-containing antibiotics). Analysis of the thuricin CD-associated gene cluster revealed the presence of genes encoding two highly unusual SAM proteins (TrnC and TrnD) which are proposed to be responsible for these unusual post-translational modifications. On the basis of the frequently high conservation among enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of specific antimicrobials, we performed an in silico screen for novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters using the TrnC and TrnD radical SAM proteins as driver sequences to perform an initial homology search against the complete non-redundant database. Fifteen novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters were identified, based on the presence of TrnC and TrnD homologues in the context of neighbouring genes encoding potential bacteriocin structural peptides. Moreover, metagenomic analysis revealed that TrnC or TrnD homologs are present in a variety of metagenomic environments, suggesting a widespread distribution of thuricin-like operons in a variety of environments. In-silico analysis of radical SAM proteins is sufficient to identify novel putative sactibiotic clusters. PMID:21760885

  9. On-plate deposition of oxidized proteins to facilitate protein footprinting studies by radical probe mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maleknia, Simin D; Downard, Kevin M

    2012-10-15

    The on-plate deposition of oxidized proteins is described to advance footprinting applications by radical probe mass spectrometry (RP-MS). An electrospray ionization (ESI) needle assembly mounted vertically over a 384-target matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plate enabled the limited oxidation of proteins as they were released in the charged droplets ahead of their deposition on the plate. This method combined with on-plate proteolytic digestion protocols expedites the analysis of proteins oxidized by RP-MS, and avoids the need to collect and reconstitute samples prior to analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry. Oxidation of peptides from solutions in water as well as an ammonium bicarbonate solution was investigated to test the optimal conditions required for on-plate oxidation of proteins. These comprised of peptides with a wide range of reactive amino acids including Phe, Tyr, Pro, His, Leu, Met and Lys that were previously shown to oxidize in both electrospray discharge and synchrotron radiolysis based footprinting experiments. The on-plate deposition of lysozyme oxidized at electrospray needle voltages of 6 and 9 kV were carried out to demonstrate conditions suitable for footprinting experiments as well as those that induce the onset of protein damage.

  10. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  11. Fractionation and evaluation of radical-scavenging peptides from in vitro digests of buckwheat protein

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Youling L.; Zhai, Jianjun; Zhu, Haining; Dziubla, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Buckwheat protein (BWP) isolate was subjected to a two-stage in vitro digestion (1 h pepsin followed by 2 h pancreatin at 37 °C). The antioxidant potential of the BWP digests was compared by assessing their capacity to scavenge 2,2′-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiszoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+•) and hydroxyl (•OH) radicals. The 2-h pancreatin digest, which demonstrated the strongest activity against both radicals, was subjected to Sephadex G-25 gel filtration. Of the six fractions collected, fractions IV (456 Da) and VI (362 Da) showed the highest ABTS+• scavenging activity and were 23–27% superior to mixed BWP digest (P < 0.05). Fraction VI was most effective in neutralizing •OH and was 86 and 24% more efficient (P < 0.05) than mixed BWP digest and fraction IV, respectively. LC-MS/MS identified Trp-Pro-Leu, Val-Pro-Trp, and Val-Phe-Pro-Trp (IV), Pro-Trp (V) and tryptophan (VI) to be the prominant peptides/amino acid in these fractions. PMID:20352082

  12. Involvement of protein kinase C, phospholipase C, and protein tyrosine kinase pathways in oxygen radical generation by asbestos-stimulated alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y; Kim, S H; Kim, K A; Oh, M W; Lee, K H

    1997-09-01

    Although asbestos stimulates oxygen radical generation in alveolar macrophages, the exact mechanism is still not clear. The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of three asbestos fibers (amosite, chrysotile, and crocidolite) to generate oxygen radicals in macrophages and examine the mechanism of this action. All asbestos fibers were able to induce chemiluminescence but chrysotile induced maximal chemiluminescence at higher concentrations than amosite and crocidolite. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors (sphingosine and staurosporine) suppressed the ability of asbestos to induce oxygen radical generation. Phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitors (U73122 and neomycin) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors (erbstatin and genistein) decreased oxygen radical generation of asbestos-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Oxygen radical generation was not suppressed by an adenylate cyclase activator (forskolin), a protein kinase A inhibitor (H-8), and a protein serine-threonine phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid). PLC and PTK inhibitors suppressed the increment of phosphoinositide turnover by amosite. These results suggest that asbestos fibers induce the generation of oxygen radicals through PTK, PLC, and PKC pathways in a dose-response pattern.

  13. Patterns in protein primary sequences: classification, display and analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Saurugger, P. N.; Metfessel, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    The protein folding code, which is contained in the amino acid chain of a protein, has so far eluded elucidation. However, patterns of hydrophobic residues have previously been identified which show a specificity towards certain secondary structural elements. We are developing an analysis toolkit to find, visualize, and analyze patterns in primary sequences. Preliminary results show that there exist patterns in primary sequences which are useful for predicting the structural class of amino acid chains, performing especially well for the all-alpha helix and all-beta sheet classes. PMID:1807631

  14. Elucidating in Vivo Structural Dynamics in Integral Membrane Protein by Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yi; Guo, Tiannan; Park, Jung Eun; Li, Xin; Meng, Wei; Datta, Arnab; Bern, Marshall; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a novel footprinting technique to probe the in vivo structural dynamics of membrane protein. This method utilized in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals to oxidize and covalently modify biomolecules on living Escherichia coli cell surface. After enriching and purifying the membrane proteome, the modified amino acid residues of the protein were identified with tandem mass spectrometry to map the solvent-accessible surface of the protein that will form the footprint of in vivo structure of the protein. Of about 100 outer membrane proteins identified, we investigated the structure details of a typical β-barrel structure, the porin OmpF. We found that six modified tryptic peptides of OmpF were reproducibly detected with 19 amino acids modified under the physiological condition. The modified amino acid residues were widely distributed in the external loop area, β-strands, and periplasmic turning area, and all of them were validated as solvent-accessible according to the crystallography data. We further extended this method to study the dynamics of the voltage gating of OmpF in vivo using mimic changes of physiological circumstance either by pH or by ionic strength. Our data showed the voltage gating of porin OmpF in vivo for the first time and supported the proposed mechanism that the local electrostatic field changes in the eyelet region may alter the porin channels to switch. Thus, this novel method can be a potentially efficient method to study the structural dynamics of the membrane proteins of a living cell. PMID:19473960

  15. Trends and Outcome from Radical Therapy for Primary Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer in a UK Population

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Karen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing proportions of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK are presenting with non-metastatic disease. We investigated how treatment trends in this demographic have changed. Patient and Methods Non-metastatic cancers diagnosed from 2000–2010 in the UK Anglian Cancer network stratified by age and risk group were analysed [n = 10,365]. Radiotherapy [RT] and prostatectomy [RP] cancer specific survival [CSS] were further compared [n = 4755]. Results Over the decade we observed a fall in uptake of primary androgen deprivation therapy but a rise in conservative management [CM] and radical therapy [p<0.0001]. CM in particular has become the primary management for low-risk disease by the decade end [p<0.0001]. In high-risk disease however both RP and RT uptake increased significantly but in an age dependent manner [p<0.0001]. Principally, increased RP in younger men and increased RT in men ≥ 70y. In multivariate analysis of radically treated men both high-risk disease [HR 8.0 [2.9–22.2], p<0.0001] and use of RT [HR 1.9 [1.0–3.3], p = 0.024] were significant predictors of a poorer CSM. In age-stratified analysis however, the trend to benefit of RP over RT was seen only in younger men [≤ 60 years] with high-risk disease [p = 0.07]. The numbers needed to treat by RP instead of RT to save one cancer death was 19 for this group but 67 for the overall cohort. Conclusion This study has identified significant shifts in non-metastatic prostate cancer management over the last decade. Low-risk disease is now primarily managed by CM while high-risk disease is increasingly treated radically. Treatment of high-risk younger men by RP is supported by evidence of better CSM but this benefit is not evident in older men. PMID:25742020

  16. Antioxidants, free radicals, storage proteins, puroindolines, and proteolytic activities in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) seeds during accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Calucci, Lucia; Capocchi, Antonella; Galleschi, Luciano; Ghiringhelli, Silvia; Pinzino, Calogero; Saviozzi, Franco; Zandomeneghi, Maurizio

    2004-06-30

    Seeds of bread wheat were incubated at 40 degrees C and 100% relative humidity for 0, 3, 4, 6, and 10 days. The effects of accelerated aging on seed germinability and some biochemical properties of flour (carotenoid, free radical, and protein contents and proteolytic activity) and gluten (free radical content and flexibility) were investigated. Seed germinability decreased during aging, resulting in seed death after 10 days. A progressive decrease of carotenoid content, in particular, lutein, was observed, prolonging the incubation, whereas the free radical content increased in both flour and gluten. A degradation of soluble and storage proteins was found, associated with a marked increase of proteolytic activity and a loss of viscoelastic properties of gluten. On the contrary, puroindolines were quite resistant to the treatment. The results are discussed in comparison with those previously obtained during accelerated aging of durum wheat seeds.

  17. The free-radical theory of ageing--older, wiser and still alive: modelling positional effects of the primary targets of ROS reveals new support.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Kowald, Axel

    2012-08-01

    The continuing viability of the free-radical theory of ageing has been questioned following apparently incompatible recent results. We show by modelling positional effects of the generation and primary targets of reactive oxygen species that many of the apparently negative results are likely to be misleading. We conclude that there is instead a need to look more closely at the mechanisms by which free radicals contribute to age-related dysfunction in living systems. There also needs to be deeper understanding of the dynamics of accumulation and removal of the various kinds of molecular damage, in particular mtDNA mutations. Finally, the expectation that free-radical damage on its own might cause ageing needs to be relinquished in favour of the recognition that the free-radical theory is just one of the multiple mechanisms driving the ageing process.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE RADICAL-MEDIATED PRODUCTION OF BENZENE OXIDE PROTEIN ADDUCTS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    High background levels of benzene oxide (BO) adducts with hemoglobin and albumin (BO-Hb and BO-Alb) have been measured in unexposed humans and animals. To test the influence of radical-mediated pathways on production of these BO-protein adducts, we employed Fenton chemistry to...

  19. A comparative analysis of primary and secondary Gleason pattern predictive ability for positive surgical margins after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Sfoungaristos, S; Kavouras, A; Kanatas, P; Polimeros, N; Perimenis, P

    2011-01-01

    To compare the predictive ability of primary and secondary Gleason pattern for positive surgical margins in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6. A retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients undergone a radical prostatectomy between January 2005 and October 2010 was conducted. Patients' age, prostate volume, preoperative PSA, biopsy Gleason score, the 1st and 2nd Gleason pattern were entered a univariate and multivariate analysis. The 1st and 2nd pattern were tested for their ability to predict positive surgical margins using receiver operating characteristic curves. Positive surgical margins were noticed in 56 cases (38.1%) out of 147 studied patients. The 2nd pattern was significantly greater in those with positive surgical margins while the 1st pattern was not significantly different between the 2 groups of patients. ROC analysis revealed that area under the curve was 0.53 (p=0.538) for the 1st pattern and 0.60 (p=0.048) for the 2nd pattern. Concerning the cases with PSA <10 ng/ml, it was also found that only the 2nd pattern had a predictive ability (p=0.050). When multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted it was found that the 2nd pattern was the only independent predictor. The second Gleason pattern was found to be of higher value than the 1st one for the prediction of positive surgical margins in patients with preoperative Gleason score ≤ 6 and this should be considered especially when a neurovascular bundle sparing radical prostatectomy is planned, in order not to harm the oncological outcome.

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation from primary aliphatic amines with NO3 radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, Li; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III; Erupe, M. E.; Silva, P. J.

    2008-07-01

    Primary aliphatic amines are an important class of nitrogen containing compounds found to be emitted from automobiles, waste treatment facilities and agricultural animal operations. A series of experiments conducted at the UC-Riverside/CE-CERT Environmental Chamber is presented in which oxidation of methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine with NO3 has been investigated. Very little aerosol formation is observed in the presence of O3 only. However, after addition of NO, and by extension NO3, large yields of aerosol mass loadings (~44% for butylamine) are seen. Aerosol generated was determined to be organic in nature due to the small fraction of NO and NO2 in the total signal (<17% for all amines tested) as detected by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). We propose a reaction mechanism between carbonyl containing species and the parent amine leading to formation of particulate imine products. These findings can have significant impacts on rural communities and lead to elevated nighttime PM loadings, when significant levels on NO3 exist.

  1. Secondary organic aerosol formation from primary aliphatic amines with NO3 radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Q. G. J.; Qi, Li; Warren, B.; Cocker, D. R., III; Erupe, M. E.; Silva, P. J.

    2009-03-01

    Primary aliphatic amines are an important class of nitrogen containing compounds emitted from automobiles, waste treatment facilities and agricultural animal operations. A series of experiments conducted at the UC-Riverside/CE-CERT Environmental Chamber is presented in which oxidation of methylamine, ethylamine, propylamine, and butylamine with O3 and NO3 have been investigated. Very little aerosol formation is observed in the presence of O3 only. However, after addition of NO, and by extension NO3, large aerosol mass yields (~44% for butylamine) are seen. Aerosol generated was determined to be organic in nature due to the small fraction of NO and NO2 in the total signal (<1% for all amines tested) as detected by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). We propose a reaction mechanism between carbonyl containing species and the parent amine leading to formation of particulate imine products. These findings can have significant impacts on rural communities with elevated nighttime PM loadings, when significant levels of NO3 exist.

  2. Intensity-dependent direct solar radiation- and UVA-induced radical damage to human skin and DNA, lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Rachel; Andrady, Carima; Kassouf, Nick; Sheppard, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Skin can be exposed to high-intensity UV-radiation in hot countries and during sunbed use; however, the free-radical damage at these intensities is unknown. We used electron spin resonance spectroscopy to measure free-radical generation in ex vivo human skin/substitutes +/- the spin-trap 5,5 dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) exposed to solar-irradiation equivalent to Mediterranean sunlight. Skin-substitutes, model DNA-photosensitizer systems, lipids and proteins were also irradiated with low-intensity UVA/visible light. Without DMPO a broad singlet was detected (using both irradiations) in skin/substitutes, nail-keratin, tendon-collagen, phospholipid and DNA+melanin or riboflavin. In addition to lipid-derived (tentatively tert-alkoxyl/acyl-) and protein radicals detected with DMPO at lower intensities, isotropic carbon-, additional oxygen- and hydrogen-adducts were detected in solar-irradiated skin/substitutes at higher intensities. Carbon-adducts were detected in UVA-irradiated human skin cells, DNA+melanin or riboflavin and soybean-phospholipid. Anisotropic protein-adducts, comparable to adducts in solar-irradiated tendon-collagen, were absent in UVA-irradiated skin fibroblasts suggesting the trapping of extracellular collagen radicals. Absence of hydrogen-adducts in fibroblasts implies formation in the extracellular compartment. We conclude damage at high intensities is part cellular (carbon- and oxygen-radicals) and part extracellular (protein- and hydrogen/H(+)+e(-) ), and skin substitutes are suitable for sunscreen testing. While UVA absorption and lipid-oxidation is direct, DNA and protein-oxidation require photosensitisation.

  3. Probing the Time Scale of FPOP (Fast Photochemical Oxidation of Proteins): Radical Reactions Extend Over Tens of Milliseconds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidi, Siavash; Konermann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) labeling with mass spectrometry detection reports on protein conformations and interactions. Fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) involves ṡOH production via H2O2 photolysis by UV laser pulses inside a flow tube. The experiments are conducted in the presence of a scavenger (usually glutamine) that shortens the ṡOH lifetime. The literature claims that FPOP takes place within 1 μs. This ultrafast time scale implies that FPOP should be immune to labeling-induced artifacts that may be encountered with other techniques. Surprisingly, the FPOP time scale has never been validated in direct kinetic measurements. Here we employ flash photolysis for probing oxidation processes under typical FPOP conditions. Bleaching of the reporter dye cyanine-5 (Cy5) served as readout of the time-dependent radical milieu. Surprisingly, Cy5 oxidation extends over tens of milliseconds. This time range is four orders of magnitude longer than expected from the FPOP literature. We demonstrate that the glutamine scavenger generates metastable secondary radicals in the FPOP solution, and that these radicals lengthen the time frame of Cy5 oxidation. Cy5 and similar dyes are widely used for monitoring the radical dose experienced by proteins in solution. The measured Cy5 kinetics thus strongly suggest that protein oxidation in FPOP extends over a much longer time window than previously thought (i.e., many milliseconds instead of one microsecond). The optical approach developed here should be suitable for assessing the performance of future FPOP-like techniques with improved temporal labeling characteristics.

  4. [Free radical modification of proteins in brain structure of Sprague-Dawley rats and some behaviour indicators after prenatal stress].

    PubMed

    V'iushina, A V; Pritvorova, A V; Flerov, M A

    2012-08-01

    We studied the influence of late prenatal stress on free radical oxidation processes in Sprague-Dawley rats cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus proteins. It was shown that after prenatal stress most changes were observed in hypothalamus and hippocampus. It was shown that in hypothalamus spontaneous oxidation level increased, but level of induced oxidation decreased, the opposite changes were found in hippocampus. Simultaneously minor changes of protein modification were observed in cortex and striatum. It was shown that prenatal stress changed both correlation of proteins free radical oxidation in studied structures and values of these data regarding to control. In test of "open field" motor activity in rats after prenatal stress decreased and time of freezing and grooming increased; opposite, in T-labyrinth motor activity and time of grooming in rats after prenatal stress increased, but time of freezing decreased.

  5. Aluminum potentiates glutamate-induced calcium accumulation and iron-induced oxygen free radical formation in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Mundy, W R; Freudenrich, T M; Kodavanti, P R

    1997-01-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic metal that may be involved in the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although the mechanism of action is not known, aluminum has been shown to alter Ca2+ flux and homeostasis, and facilitate peroxidation of membrane lipids. Since abnormal increases of intracellular Ca2+ and oxygen free radicals have both been implicated in pathways leading to neurodegeneration, we examined the effect of aluminum on these parameters in vitro using primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. Exposure to glutamate (1-300 microM) caused a concentration-dependent uptake of 45Ca in granule cells to a maximum of 280% of basal. Pretreatment with AlCl3 (1-1000 microM) had no effect on 45Ca accumulation, but increased the uptake induced by glutamate. Similarly, AlCl3 had no effect on intracellular free Ca2+ levels measured using fluorescent probe fura-2, but potentiated the increase induced by glutamate. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined using the fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescin. By itself, AlCl3 had little effect on ROS production. However, AlCl3 pretreatment potentiated the ROS production induced by 50 microM Fe2+. These results suggest that aluminum may facilitate increases in intracellular Ca2+ and ROS, and potentially contribute to neurotoxicity induced by other neurotoxicants.

  6. Evaluation of 2D-ESEEM data of 15N-labeled radical cations of the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I and chlorophyll a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käβ, H.; Lubitz, W.

    1996-03-01

    Hyperfine couplings (hfc's) of the nitrogen nuclei in the 15N-labeled radical cations of chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I of spinach were investigated in frozen solution by two-dimensional stimulated echo ESEEM. 15N hfc tensors were evaluated by comparison of the experimental data with simulations of the time domain and frequency domain ESEEM signals. The results are discussed in the framework of a chlorophyll a dimer model for the radical cation of P 700.

  7. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Deanna M; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly (15)N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at "optimal" relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  8. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  9. ENDOR and ESEEM of the 15N labelled radical cations of chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in photosystem I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käβ, H.; Bittersmann-Weidlich, E.; Andréasson, L.-E.; Bönigk, B.; Lubitz, W.

    1995-05-01

    The hyperfine couplings of the nitrogen nuclei in the radical cations of both 15N-labelled chlorophyll a and the primary donor P 700 in Photosystem I of Synechococcus elongatus and spinach ( Spinacea oleracea) in frozen solutions were investigated by ENDOR and, for confirmation, by two-dimensional ESEEM techniques. In addition, 1H ENDOR experiments were performed on these compounds. The experimental 15N hyperfine couplings of the chlorophyll a radical cation are compared with theoretical ones obtained by RHF-INDO/SP calculations and with the respective hyperfine couplings in the closely related 15N-bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation. Based on the observed 15N and 1H hyperfine couplings two possible models are discussed for P 700+: (a) the special pair model with a strongly asymmetric spin density distribution over the dimer halves; (b) the model of a strongly perturbed chlorophyll a monomer.

  10. Thermodynamics and Kinetics for the Free Radical Oxygen Protein Oxidation Pathway in a Model for β-Structured Peptides.

    PubMed

    Green, Mandy C; Dubnicka, Laura J; Davis, Alex C; Rypkema, Heather A; Francisco, Joseph S; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V

    2016-04-28

    Oxidative stress plays a role in many biological phenomena, but involved mechanisms and individual reactions are not well understood. Correlated electronic structure calculations with the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) methods detail thermodynamic and kinetic information for the free radical oxygen protein oxidation pathway studied in a trialanine model system. The pathway includes aerobic, anaerobic and termination reactions. The course of the oxidation process depends on local conditions and availability of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS). A chemical mechanism is proposed for how oxidative stress promotes β-structure formation in the amyloid diseases. The work can be used to aid experimentalists as they explore individual reactions and mechanisms involving oxygen free radicals and oxidative stress in β-structured proteins.

  11. Characterization of a Cross-Linked Protein-Nucleic Acid Substrate Radical in the Reaction Catalyzed by RlmN

    SciTech Connect

    Silakov, Alexey; Grove, Tyler L.; Radle, Matthew I.; Bauerle, Matthew R.; Green, Michael T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Boal, Amie K.; Booker, Squire J.

    2014-08-14

    RlmN and Cfr are methyltransferases/methylsynthases that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine superfamily of enzymes. RlmN catalyzes C2 methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) of 23S rRNA, while Cfr catalyzes C8 methylation of the exact same nucleotide, and will subsequently catalyze C2 methylation if the site is unmethylated. A key feature of the unusual mechanisms of catalysis proposed for these enzymes is the attack of a methylene radical, derived from a methylcysteine residue, onto the carbon center undergoing methylation to generate a paramagnetic protein–nucleic acid cross-linked species. This species has been thoroughly characterized during Cfr-dependent C8 methylation, but does not accumulate to detectible levels in RlmN-dependent C2 methylation. Herein, we show that inactive C118S/A variants of RlmN accumulate a substrate-derived paramagnetic species. Characterization of this species by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in concert with strategic isotopic labeling shows that the radical is delocalized throughout the adenine ring of A2503, although predominant spin density is on N1 and N3. Moreover, 13C hyperfine interactions between the radical and the methylene carbon of the formerly [methyl-13C]Cys355 residue show that the radical species exists in a covalent cross-link between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate. X-ray structures of RlmN C118A show that, in the presence of SAM, the substitution does not alter the active site structure compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. Together, these findings have new mechanistic implications for the role(s) of C118 and its counterpart in Cfr (C105) in catalysis, and suggest involvement of the residue in resolution of the cross-linked species via a radical mediated process

  12. [Influence of antitumor preparations on the concentration of free radicals in cells of Fusarium bulbigenum var. blasticola fungus during primary and tumour-like secondary growth].

    PubMed

    Riabikin, Iu A; Nikitina, E T; Balgimbatva, A S; Zashkvara, O V; Shakiev, S Sh

    2007-01-01

    The fungus Fusarium bulbigenum var. blasticola in which secondary tumor-like formations appear under certain conditions in aging was used as a new test system to examine the action of antitumor preparations. Free radicals in the primary mycelium and tumor-like formations without introduction of preparations (control samples) and after the introduction of preparation into the cultivation medium of the fungus have been studied by EPR spectroscopy. The EPR spectra of the fungus represent single, somewhat asymmetrical lines with a width of deltaH = 0.4 divided by 0.6 mT and g = 2.0036 +/- 0.006, which enabled one to assign the paramagnetic centers observed to melanine radicals. It was found that the concentration of free radicals in tumor-like formations is always higher than in the primary mycelium, which may be related to intensive metabolism in tumor-like formations. It has been established that several antitumor preparations (fluorouracil, hydrea, methotrexat, and vepezide) completely inhibit the growth of tumor-like formations. Another group of preparations (cyclophosphanum, dacarbazin, adriablastin, and vinblastin), on the contrary, stimulate their growth, which is accompanied by an increase in the concentration of free radicals in cells of the primary mycelium and tumor-like formations. The preparations of the third group (mercaptopurine, lanvis, and farmorubicin), despite the increased level of free radicals in cells, have a weak inhibitory effect. It has been shown that, in the concentration range studied, vitamins B2, B12, C, and PP stimulate the growth of tumor-like formations, and, when used in combination with antitumor preparations, enhance or reduce the inhibitory properties of these preparations.

  13. Reaction of protein chloramines with DNA and nucleosides: evidence for the formation of radicals, protein-DNA cross-links and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Clare L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2002-08-01

    Stimulated phagocyte cells produce the oxidant HOCl, via the release of the enzyme myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide. HOCl is important in bacterial cell killing, but excessive or misplaced generation can damage the host tissue and may lead to the development of certain diseases such as cancer. The role of HOCl in the oxidation of isolated proteins, DNA and their components has been investigated extensively, but little work has been performed on the protein-DNA (nucleosome) complexes present in eukaryotic cell nuclei. Neither the selectivity of damage in such complexes nor the possibility of transfer of damage from the protein to DNA or vice versa, has been studied. In the present study, kinetic modelling has been employed to predict that reaction occurs predominantly with the protein and not with the DNA in the nucleosome, using molar HOCl excesses of up to 200-fold. With 50-200-fold excesses, 50-80% of the HOCl is predicted to react with histone lysine and histidine residues to yield chloramines. The yield and stability of such chloramines predicted by these modelling studies agrees well with experimental data. Decomposition of these species gives protein-derived, nitrogen-centred radicals, probably on the lysine side chains, as characterized by the EPR and spin-trapping experiments. It is shown that isolated lysine, histidine, peptide and protein chloramines can react with plasmid DNA to cause strand breaks. The protection against such damage afforded by the radical scavengers Trolox (a water-soluble alpha-tocopherol derivative) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide suggests a radical-mediated process. The EPR experiments and product analyses have also provided evidence for the rapid addition of protein radicals, formed on chloramine decomposition, to pyrimidine nucleosides to give nucleobase radicals. Further evidence for the formation of such covalent cross-links has been obtained from experiments performed using (3)H-lysine and (14)C-histidine chloramines

  14. Evidence for dissolved organic matter as the primary source and sink of photochemically produced hydroxyl radical in arctic surface waters.

    PubMed

    Page, Sarah E; Logan, J Robert; Cory, Rose M; McNeill, Kristopher

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (˙OH) is an indiscriminate oxidant that reacts at near-diffusion-controlled rates with organic carbon. Thus, while ˙OH is expected to be an important oxidant of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other recalcitrant compounds, the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of these compounds in aquatic ecosystems is not well known due to the poorly constrained sources and sinks of ˙OH, especially in pristine (unpolluted) natural waters. We measured the rates of ˙OH formation and quenching across a range of surface waters in the Arctic varying in concentrations of expected sources and sinks of ˙OH. Photochemical formation of ˙OH was observed in all waters tested, with rates of formation ranging from 2.6 ± 0.6 to 900 ± 100 × 10(-12) M s(-1). Steady-state concentrations ranged from 2 ± 1 to 290 ± 60 × 10(-17) M, and overlapped with previously reported values in surface waters. While iron-mediated photo-Fenton reactions likely contributed to the observed ˙OH production, several lines of evidence suggest that DOM was the primary source and sink of photochemically produced ˙OH in pristine arctic surface waters. DOM from first-order or headwater streams was more efficient in producing ˙OH than what has previously been reported for DOM, and ˙OH formation decreased with increasing residence time of DOM in sunlit surface waters. Despite the ubiquitous formation of ˙OH in arctic surface waters observed in this study, photochemical ˙OH formation was estimated to contribute ≤4% to the observed photo-oxidation of DOM; however, key uncertainties in this estimate must be addressed before ruling out the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of DOM in these waters.

  15. Kinetic evidence that a radical transfer pathway in protein R2 of mouse ribonucleotide reductase is involved in generation of the tyrosyl free radical.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P P; Rova, U; Katterle, B; Thelander, L; Gräslund, A

    1998-08-21

    Class I ribonucleotide reductases consist of two subunits, R1 and R2. The active site is located in R1; active R2 contains a diferric center and a tyrosyl free radical (Tyr.), both essential for enzymatic activity. The proposed mechanism for the enzymatic reaction includes the transport of a reducing equivalent, i.e. electron or hydrogen radical, across a 35-A distance between Tyr. in R2 and the active site in R1, which are connected by a hydrogen-bonded chain of conserved, catalytically essential amino acid residues. Asp266 and Trp103 in mouse R2 are part of this radical transfer pathway. The diferric/Tyr. site in R2 is reconstituted spontaneously by mixing iron-free apoR2 with Fe(II) and O2. The reconstitution reaction requires the delivery of an external reducing equivalent to form the diferric/Tyr. site. Reconstitution kinetics were investigated in mouse apo-wild type R2 and the three mutants D266A, W103Y, and W103F by rapid freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance with >/=4 Fe(II)/R2 at various reaction temperatures. The kinetics of Tyr. formation in D266A and W103Y is on average 20 times slower than in wild type R2. More strikingly, Tyr. formation is completely suppressed in W103F. No change in the reconstitution kinetics was found starting from Fe(II)-preloaded proteins, which shows that the mutations do not affect the rate of iron binding. Our results are consistent with a reaction mechanism using Asp266 and Trp103 for delivery of the external reducing equivalent. Further, the results with W103F suggest that an intact hydrogen-bonded chain is crucial for the reaction, indicating that the external reducing equivalent is a H. Finally, the formation of Tyr. is not the slowest step of the reaction as it is in Escherichia coli R2, consistent with a stronger interaction between Tyr. and the iron center in mouse R2. A new electron paramagnetic resonance visible intermediate named mouse X, strikingly similar to species X found in E. coli R2, was detected only

  16. G-protein-coupled receptors, Hedgehog signaling and primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has become an important model to study the cell biology of primary cilia, and reciprocally, the study of ciliary processes provides an opportunity to solve longstanding mysteries in the mechanism of vertebrate Hh signal transduction. The cilium is emerging as an unique compartment for G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in many systems. Two members of the GPCR family, Smoothened and Gpr161, play important roles in the Hh pathway. We review the current understanding of how these proteins may function to regulate Hh signaling and also highlight some of the critical unanswered questions being tackled by the field. Uncovering GPCR-regulated mechanisms important in Hh signaling may provide therapeutic strategies against the Hh pathway that plays important roles in development, regeneration and cancer.

  17. Modulation of primary radical pair kinetics and energetics in photosystem II by the redox state of the quinone electron acceptor Q(A).

    PubMed Central

    Gibasiewicz, K; Dobek, A; Breton, J; Leibl, W

    2001-01-01

    Time-resolved photovoltage measurements on destacked photosystem II membranes from spinach with the primary quinone electron acceptor Q(A) either singly or doubly reduced have been performed to monitor the time evolution of the primary radical pair P680(+)Pheo(-). The maximum transient concentration of the primary radical pair is about five times larger and its decay is about seven times slower with doubly reduced compared with singly reduced Q(A). The possible biological significance of these differences is discussed. On the basis of a simple reversible reaction scheme, the measured apparent rate constants and relative amplitudes allow determination of sets of molecular rate constants and energetic parameters for primary reactions in the reaction centers with doubly reduced Q(A) as well as with oxidized or singly reduced Q(A). The standard free energy difference DeltaG degrees between the charge-separated state P680(+)Pheo(-) and the equilibrated excited state (Chl(N)P680)* was found to be similar when Q(A) was oxidized or doubly reduced before the flash (approximately -50 meV). In contrast, single reduction of Q(A) led to a large change in DeltaG degrees (approximately +40 meV), demonstrating the importance of electrostatic interaction between the charge on Q(A) and the primary radical pair, and providing direct evidence that the doubly reduced Q(A) is an electrically neutral species, i.e., is doubly protonated. A comparison of the molecular rate constants shows that the rate of charge recombination is much more sensitive to the change in DeltaG degrees than the rate of primary charge separation. PMID:11259277

  18. Identification of a unique Fe-S cluster binding site in a glycyl-radical type microcompartment shell protein.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michael C; Wheatley, Nicole M; Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R; Gidaniyan, Soheil D; Ahmed, Hoda; Yang, Zhongyu; McCarty, Krystal N; Whitelegge, Julian P; Yeates, Todd O

    2014-09-23

    Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the functional diversity of bacterial microcompartment (MCP) systems, which serve as protein-based metabolic organelles in diverse microbes. New types of MCPs have been identified, including the glycyl-radical propanediol (Grp) MCP. Within these elaborate protein complexes, BMC-domain shell proteins [bacterial microcompartment (in reference to the shell protein domain)] assemble to form a polyhedral barrier that encapsulates the enzymatic contents of the MCP. Interestingly, the Grp MCP contains a number of shell proteins with unusual sequence features. GrpU is one such shell protein whose amino acid sequence is particularly divergent from other members of the BMC-domain superfamily of proteins that effectively defines all MCPs. Expression, purification, and subsequent characterization of the protein showed, unexpectedly, that it binds an iron-sulfur cluster. We determined X-ray crystal structures of two GrpU orthologs, providing the first structural insight into the homohexameric BMC-domain shell proteins of the Grp system. The X-ray structures of GrpU, both obtained in the apo form, combined with spectroscopic analyses and computational modeling, show that the metal cluster resides in the central pore of the BMC shell protein at a position of broken 6-fold symmetry. The result is a structurally polymorphic iron-sulfur cluster binding site that appears to be unique among metalloproteins studied to date.

  19. Identification of Naegleria fowleri Proteins Linked to Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Melissa; Schmoyer, Jacqueline A; Park, Jay; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Cabral, Guy

    2017-01-12

    Naegleria fowleri (N. fowleri) causes Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS). This opportunistic pathogen can exist in cyst, flagellate, or amebic forms, depending on environmental conditions. The amebic form can invade the brain following introduction into the nasal passages. When applied intranasally to a mouse model, cultured N. fowleri amebae exhibit low virulence. However, upon serial passage in mouse brain the amebae acquire a highly virulent state. In the present study, a proteomics approach was applied to the identification of N. fowleri ameba proteins whose expression was associated with the highly virulent state in mice. Mice were inoculated intranasally with axenically cultured or with mouse-passaged amebae. Examination by light and electron microscopy revealed no morphological differences. However, mouse-passaged amebae were more virulent in mice as indicated by exhibiting a two log10 titer decrease in median infective dose 50 (ID50). Scatter plot analysis of amebic lysates revealed a subset of proteins the expression of which was associated with highly virulent amebae. Tandem mass spectrometry indicated that this subset contained proteins that shared homology with those linked to cytoskeletal rearrangement and the invasion process. Invasion assays were performed in the presence of a select inhibitor to expand on the findings. The collective results suggest that N. fowleri gene products linked to cytoskeletal rearrangement and invasion may be candidate targets in the management of PAM.

  20. Identification of a Unique Fe-S Cluster Binding Site in a Glycyl-Radical Type Microcompartment Shell Protein

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael C.; Wheatley, Nicole M.; Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gidaniyan, Soheil D.; Ahmed, Hoda; Yang, Zhongyu; McCarty, Krystal N.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the functional diversity of bacterial microcompartment (MCP) systems, which serve as protein-based metabolic organelles in diverse microbes. New types of MCPs have been identified, including the glycyl-radical propanediol (Grp) MCP. Within these elaborate protein complexes, BMC-domain shell proteins assemble to form a polyhedral barrier that encapsulates the enzymatic contents of the MCP. Interestingly, the Grp MCP contains a number of shell proteins with unusual sequence features. GrpU is one such shell protein, whose amino acid sequence is particularly divergent from other members of the BMC-domain superfamily of proteins that effectively defines all MCPs. Expression, purification, and subsequent characterization of the protein showed, unexpectedly, that it binds an iron-sulfur cluster. We determined X-ray crystal structures of two GrpU orthologs, providing the first structural insight into the homohexameric BMC-domain shell proteins of the Grp system. The X-ray structures of GrpU, both obtained in the apo form, combined with spectroscopic analyses and computational modeling, show that the metal cluster resides in the central pore of the BMC shell protein at a position of broken 6-fold symmetry. The result is a structurally polymorphic iron-sulfur cluster binding site that appears to be unique among metalloproteins studied to date. PMID:25102080

  1. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O(3P)+allyl radical intermediate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H2COCH)CH2Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H2COCH)CH2+Cl, c-(H2COCH)+CH2Cl, and C3H4O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H2COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C2H3O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H2CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C3H4O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H2COC)=CH2; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C3H5O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O(P3)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C2H4 and H2CO+C2H3 product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C2H4 products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H2CO+C2H3 product channel of the O(P3)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this experiment. The data also reveal substantial branching to an HCCH+H3

  2. Protein-resistant polyurethane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2009-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated simultaneous normal and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)). Oxygen plasma treatment was employed for initial activation of the PU surface. The grafted polymer chain length was adjusted by varying the molar ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution from 5:1 to 200:1. The modified PU surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Protein adsorption experiments from tris-buffered saline (TBS) and plasma were carried out to evaluate the protein-resistance of the surfaces. Adsorption from single and binary protein solutions as well as from plasma was significantly reduced after modification. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. Fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption on the 200:1 monomer/initiator surface was in the range of 3-33 ng/cm(2) representing 96-99% reduction compared with the unmodified PU. Fg adsorption from 0.01-10% plasma was as low as 1-5 ng/cm(2). Moreover, binary protein adsorption experiments using Fg and lysozyme (Lys) showed that protein size is a factor in the protein resistance of these surfaces.

  3. Mast Cells Density Positive to Tryptase Correlate with Microvascular Density in both Primary Gastric Cancer Tissue and Loco-Regional Lymph Node Metastases from Patients That Have Undergone Radical Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Pietro; Zizzo, Nicola; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Oltean, Mihai; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-11-15

    Mast Cells (MCs) play a role in immune responses and more recently MCs have been involved in tumoral angiogenesis. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro pro-angiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. MCs can release tryptase following c-Kit receptor activation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship among MCs Density Positive to Tryptase (MCDPT) and Microvascular Density (MVD) in both primary gastric cancer tissue and loco-regional lymph node metastases. A series of 75 GC patients with stage T2-3N2-3M₀ (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Seventh Edition) undergone to radical surgery were selected for the study. MCDPT and MVD were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by image analysis system and results were correlated each to other in primary tumor tissue and in metastatic lymph nodes harvested. Furthermore, tissue parameters were correlated with important clinico-pathological features. A significant correlation between MCDPT and MVD was found in primary gastric cancer tissue and lymph node metastases. Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.74 to 0.79; p-value ranged from 0.001 to 0.003). These preliminary data suggest that MCDPT play a role in angiogenesis in both primary tumor and in lymph node metastases from GC. We suggest that MCs and tryptase could be further evaluated as novel targets for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  4. Mast Cells Density Positive to Tryptase Correlate with Microvascular Density in both Primary Gastric Cancer Tissue and Loco-Regional Lymph Node Metastases from Patients That Have Undergone Radical Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Zuccalà, Valeria; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Pietro; Zizzo, Nicola; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Oltean, Mihai; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Mast Cells (MCs) play a role in immune responses and more recently MCs have been involved in tumoral angiogenesis. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro pro-angiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. MCs can release tryptase following c-Kit receptor activation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship among MCs Density Positive to Tryptase (MCDPT) and Microvascular Density (MVD) in both primary gastric cancer tissue and loco-regional lymph node metastases. A series of 75 GC patients with stage T2–3N2–3M0 (by AJCC for Gastric Cancer Seventh Edition) undergone to radical surgery were selected for the study. MCDPT and MVD were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and by image analysis system and results were correlated each to other in primary tumor tissue and in metastatic lymph nodes harvested. Furthermore, tissue parameters were correlated with important clinico-pathological features. A significant correlation between MCDPT and MVD was found in primary gastric cancer tissue and lymph node metastases. Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.74 to 0.79; p-value ranged from 0.001 to 0.003). These preliminary data suggest that MCDPT play a role in angiogenesis in both primary tumor and in lymph node metastases from GC. We suggest that MCs and tryptase could be further evaluated as novel targets for anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:27854307

  5. Beneficial effect of internal hydrogen bonding interactions on the beta-fragmentation of primary alkoxyl radicals. Two-step conversion of D-xylo- and D-ribofuranoses into L-threose and D-erythrose, respectively.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-García, Luís; Quintero, Leticia; Sánchez, Mario; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2007-10-26

    Primary alkoxyl free radicals were generated from their readily synthesized N-phthalimido derivatives under reductive conditions. Primary alkoxyl radicals derived from their corresponding xylo- and ribofuranose derivatives underwent, exclusively, an unusual beta-fragmentation affording L-threose and D-erythrose derivatives, respectively. This occurs because the alkoxyl radical is capable of achieving an internal hydrogen-bonding interaction leading to a stable six-membered ring intramolecular hydrogen-bonded structure. When the hydroxyl group is protected, the beta-fragmentation pathway is prevented and the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) pathway occurs. Computational studies provided strong support for the experimental observations.

  6. Free Radical Reactions in Food.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Irwin A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses reactions of free radicals that determine the chemistry of many fresh, processed, and stored foods. Focuses on reactions involving ascorbic acid, myoglobin, and palmitate radicals as representative radicals derived from a vitamin, metallo-protein, and saturated lipid. Basic concepts related to free radical structure, formation, and…

  7. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  8. Endogenous 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and dopaquinone modifications on protein tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H; Heibeck, Tyler H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O; Camp, David G; Pounds, Joel G; Jacobs, Jon M; Smith, Desmond J; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e. DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 50 and 14 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, whereas only a few nitrotyrosine-containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 20 and 12 dopaquinone-modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly one-fourth of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal binding properties, consistent with metal-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondrially associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation, suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially derived oxidative stress and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  9. Extended radical mastectomy versus simple mastectomy followed by radiotherapy in primary breast cancer. A fifty-year follow-up to the Copenhagen Breast Cancer randomised study.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Helge; Kaae, Sigvard; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2008-01-01

    From November 1951 to December 1957, 666 consecutive patients with untreated primary breast cancer admitted to the Radium Center in Copenhagen were randomised before their operability was evaluated into two groups, simple mastectomy with postoperative radiotherapy or extended radical mastectomy. Following physical examination 241 of the patients were excluded, primarily due to tumours deemed inoperable due to clinical criteria (n =107) and due to poor general condition (n =69). Twenty-five years results of disease-free free survival and fifty years results of survival are presented, showing no difference between the two groups. Patients with clinical stage I did significantly better than patients with stage II-III tumours. Patients with grade I tumours had a better survival than patients with grade II-III. The breast cancer associated mortality was lower in premenopausal patients compared to postmenopausal patients. An excess mortality due to breast cancer was evident up to 20-25 years following the primary diagnosis.

  10. EPR studies on a stable sulfinyl radical observed in the iron-oxygen-reconstituted Y177F/I263C protein R2 double mutant of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse.

    PubMed

    Adrait, Annie; Ohrström, Maria; Barra, Anne-Laure; Thelander, Lars; Gräslund, Astrid

    2002-05-21

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotides. The active enzyme contains a diiron center and a tyrosyl free radical required for enzyme activity. The radical is located at Y177 in the R2 protein of mouse RNR. The radical is formed concomitantly with the mu-oxo-bridged diferric center in a reconstitution reaction between ferrous iron and molecular oxygen in the protein. EPR at 9.6 and 285 GHz was used to investigate the reconstitution reaction in the double-mutant Y177F/I263C of mouse protein R2. The aim was to produce a protein-linked radical derived from the Cys residue in the mutant protein to investigate its formation and characteristics. The mutation Y177F hinders normal radical formation at Y177, and the I263C mutation places a Cys residue at the same distance from the iron center as Y177 in the native protein. In the reconstitution reaction, we observed small amounts of a transient radical with a probable assignment to a peroxy radical, followed by a stable sulfinyl radical, most likely located on C263. The unusual radical stability may be explained by the hydrophobic surroundings of C263, which resemble the hydrophobic pocket surrounding Y177 in native protein R2. The observation of a sulfinyl radical in RNR strengthens the relationship between RNR and another free radical enzyme, pyruvate formate-lyase, where a similar relatively stable sulfinyl radical has been observed in a mutant. Sulfinyl radicals may possibly be considered as stabilized forms of very short-lived thiyl radicals, proposed to be important intermediates in the radical chemistry of RNR.

  11. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Fibrinogen levels were found to be lowered to 62.8% of initial values (P < 0.05) in response to Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation.

  12. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  13. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; Banerjee, Ruma; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2015-02-09

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. In this paper, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms of IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Finally and notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site.

  14. Visualization of a radical B12 enzyme with its G-protein chaperone

    DOE PAGES

    Jost, Marco; Cracan, Valentin; Hubbard, Paul A.; ...

    2015-02-09

    G-protein metallochaperones ensure fidelity during cofactor assembly for a variety of metalloproteins, including adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and hydrogenase, and thus have both medical and biofuel development applications. In this paper, we present crystal structures of IcmF, a natural fusion protein of AdoCbl-dependent isobutyryl-CoA mutase and its corresponding G-protein chaperone, which reveal the molecular architecture of a G-protein metallochaperone in complex with its target protein. These structures show that conserved G-protein elements become ordered upon target protein association, creating the molecular pathways that both sense and report on the cofactor loading state. Structures determined of both apo- and holo-forms ofmore » IcmF depict both open and closed enzyme states, in which the cofactor-binding domain is alternatively positioned for cofactor loading and for catalysis. Finally and notably, the G protein moves as a unit with the cofactor-binding domain, providing a visualization of how a chaperone assists in the sequestering of a precious cofactor inside an enzyme active site.« less

  15. Reduction of the tyrosyl radical and the iron center in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse, herpes simplex virus and E. coli by p-alkoxyphenols.

    PubMed

    Pötsch, S; Sahlin, M; Langelier, Y; Gräslund, A; Lassmann, G

    1995-10-23

    The rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical in the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (protein R2) from E. coli, mouse, and herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) by a series of p-alkoxyphenols with different alkyl chains, have been studied by stopped-flow UV-vis and stopped-flow EPR spectroscopy. The reduction and release of iron in R2 by the inhibitors was followed using bathophenanthroline as chelator of Fe2+. p-Alkoxyphenols reduce the mouse R2 tyrosyl radical 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than the HSV-2 and E. coli radical. In contrast to E. coli, the iron center in R2 from mouse and HSV-2 is reduced by the inhibitors. For mouse R2, the rate of reduction of the tyrosyl radical increases in parallel with increasing alkyl chain length of the inhibitor, an observation which may be important for the design of new antiproliferative drugs.

  16. Oil, protein, antioxidants and free radical scavenging activity of stone from wild olive trees (Olea europaea L.).

    PubMed

    Hannachi, Hédia; Elfalleh, Walid; Marzouk, Sizaiem

    2013-05-01

    The wild olive trees or oleaster (var. sylvestris) and the cultivated olive trees (var. europaea) constitute the two botanical varieties of Olea europaea L. from Mediterranean. In this study, a partial chemical profile was conducted including the total lipids, the fatty acid profiles, soluble proteins, polyphenols, flavanoids contents and antioxidants activities of stone from six oleaster trees. The comparison was made by two olive cultivars cultivated in the same region. The oleaster and cultivar stones were richer in oil content having an average of 8.99 and 7.38 % dry weight basis (DW), respectively. Qualitatively, all studied oils have the same fatty acids profile with the oleic acid C18:1n-9 as the major fatty acid. The oleaster stone oils were richer in monounsaturated fatty acids having an average of 64.87%. They, also, richer in protein content with an average of 198.86 mg/g DW.The globulin is the major fraction, followed by the albumin, the prolamin and the glutemin fractions. The oleaster stone extracts contain polyphenols, flavonoids with an average of 151.14 and 11.91 mg gallic acid equivalent/100g of DW, respectively. The studied extracts showed antioxidant activity using the free radical scavenging activity determined by DPPH and ABTS. The unexploited oleaster stone seems to be a source of oil with good fatty acids balance, in protein and antioxidants metabolites and would be useful for the formulation of supplements and/or pharmaceutical ingredients.

  17. The effectiveness of clove extracts in the inhibition of hydroxyl radical oxidation-induced structural and rheological changes in porcine myofibrillar protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongsheng; Diao, Jingjing; Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation is a major cause of protein quality deterioration during the storage and processing of food. This study investigated the effects of clove extract (CE) on structural and rheological changes in porcine longissimus myofibrillar proteins (MP) and the effects of oxidizing radicals produced by a Fenton reaction system (FRS). Increased oxidation time was accompanied by increased carbonyl content, reduced Ca-ATPase activity, decreased enthalpy of denaturation, decreased thermal transition temperatures (P<0.05), and increased protein susceptibility to thermal aggregation. The addition of CE significantly inhibited carbonyl formation (P<0.05), enhanced solubility and thermal stability, and improved the gel formation ability (storage modulus, loss modulus) of MP. The protective effect of CE on protein denaturation was demonstrated by its efficacy in maintaining Ca-ATPase activity and decreasing the degree of protein aggregation. Overall, the hydroxyl radical-induced loss of the structural and functional properties of MP was significantly reduced by the presence of CE.

  18. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-09-07

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H{sub 2}COCH)CH{sub 2}+Cl, c-(H{sub 2}COCH)+CH{sub 2}Cl, and C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H{sub 2}COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H{sub 2}CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H{sub 2}COC)=CH{sub 2}; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C{sub 3}H{sub 5}O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O({sup 3}P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 3} product channel of the O({sup 3}P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from

  19. Comparison of two adjuvant hormone therapy regimens in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy: primary results of study CU1005.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun; Qin, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Bo; Zhu, Yao; Shi, Guo-Hai; Shen, Yi-Jun; Zhu, Yi-Ying; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant hormonal therapy and optimized regimens for high-risk localized prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy remains controversial. Herein, the clinical trial CU1005 prospectively evaluated two regimens of maximum androgen blockage  or bicalutamide 150 mg daily as immediate adjuvant therapy for high-risk localized prostate cancer. Overall, 209 consecutive patients were recruited in this study, 107 of whom received 9 months of adjuvant maximum androgen blockage, whereas 102 received 9 months of adjuvant bicalutamide 150 mg. The median postoperative follow-up time was 27.0 months. The primary endpoint was biochemical recurrence. Of the 209 patients, 59 patients developed biochemical recurrence. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to clinical characteristics, including age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, surgical margin status, or pathological stages. The maximum androgen blockage group experienced longer biochemical recurrence-free survival (P = 0.004) compared with the bicalutamide 150 mg group. Side-effects in the two groups were similar and could be moderately tolerated in all patients. In conclusion, immediate, 9-month maximum androgen blockage should be considered as an alternative to bicalutamide 150 mg as adjuvant treatment for high-risk localized prostate cancer patients after radical prostatectomy.

  20. [Probabilistic evaluation of homology of primary protein structures].

    PubMed

    Ismailov, I I; Sharov, M V; Sharov, M V; Bekmukhametova, Z U

    1994-11-01

    Criteria have been developed for resemblance of segments of certain length of different proteins to be considered as an evidence of those proteins relationship. A table is formed of minimal numbers of identical amino acids for which the probability of the causal coincidence in a segment of certain length is less then 1%. The criteria were corroborated by comparison of natural proteins and model amino acid sequences concocted by means of the random numbers generator.

  1. Changes in ascorbic acid content in primary cultured rat hepatocytes exposed to 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, a radical initiator.

    PubMed

    Sasakii, K; Kimura, K; Kitaguchi, Y; Onoue, T; Ogura, H; Aoyagi, Y

    2001-08-01

    Changes in ascorbate content in primary cultured rat hepatocytes exposed to oxidative stress derived from water soluble radical initiator 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) were examined. Cells were exposed to 0.05 and 5 mg/ml of AAPH as 'mild' and severe' oxidative stresses, respectively. Lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes was induced by 'severe' oxidative stress, but not by 'mild' oxidative stress. Ascorbate decreased at 6 hr after administration of both mild' and severe' oxidative stresses, and recovered to the control level after a further 6 hr. In cells treated with 'severe oxidative stress, however, total ascorbate (reduced form plus oxidized form) had increased 24 hr after administration. These results indicated that consumption alone did not account for the increase of ascorbate in hepatocytes under oxidative stress.

  2. Protein Primary Structure of the Vaccinia Virion at Increased Resolution

    PubMed

    Ngo, Tuan; Mirzakhanyan, Yeva; Moussatche, Nissin; Gershon, Paul David

    2016-11-01

    Here we examine the protein covalent structure of the vaccinia virus virion. Within two virion preparations, >88% of the theoretical vaccinia virus-encoded proteome was detected with high confidence, including the first detection of products from 27 open reading frames (ORFs) previously designated "predicted," "uncharacterized," "inferred," or "hypothetical" polypeptides containing as few as 39 amino acids (aa) and six proteins whose detection required nontryptic proteolysis. We also detected the expression of four short ORFs, each of which was located within an ORF ("ORF-within-ORF"), including one not previously recognized or known to be expressed. Using quantitative mass spectrometry (MS), between 58 and 74 proteins were determined to be packaged. A total of 63 host proteins were also identified as candidates for packaging. Evidence is provided that some portion of virion proteins are "nicked" via a combination of endoproteolysis and concerted exoproteolysis in a manner, and at sites, independent of virus origin or laboratory procedures. The size of the characterized virion phosphoproteome was doubled from 189 (J. Matson, W. Chou, T. Ngo, and P. D. Gershon, Virology 452-453:310-323, 2014, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2014.01.012) to 396 confident, unique phosphorylation sites, 268 of which were within the packaged proteome. This included the unambiguous identification of phosphorylation "hot spots" within virion proteins. Using isotopically enriched ATP, 23 sites of intravirion kinase phosphorylation were detected within nine virion proteins, all at sites already partially occupied within the virion preparations. The clear phosphorylation of proteins RAP94 and RP19 was consistent with the roles of these proteins in intravirion early gene transcription. In a blind search for protein modifications, cysteine glutathionylation and O-linked glycosylation featured prominently. We provide evidence for the phosphoglycosylation of vaccinia virus proteins.

  3. Chemical modification of lysozyme, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and bovine eye lens proteins induced by peroxyl radicals: role of oxidizable amino acid residues.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Andrea; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Kogan, Marcelo; Lissi, Eduardo; Davies, Michael J; Silva, Eduardo

    2013-01-18

    Chemical and structural alterations to lysozyme (LYSO), glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and bovine eye lens proteins (BLP) promoted by peroxyl radicals generated by the thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) under aerobic conditions were investigated. SDS-PAGE analysis of the AAPH-treated proteins revealed the occurrence of protein aggregation, cross-linking, and fragmentation; BLP, which are naturally organized in globular assemblies, were the most affected proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of BLP shows the formation of complex protein aggregates after treatment with AAPH. These structural modifications were accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl groups and protein hydroperoxides. The yield of carbonyls was lower than that for protein hydroperoxide generation and was unrelated to protein fragmentation. The oxidized proteins were also characterized by significant oxidation of Met, Trp, and Tyr (but not other) residues, and low levels of dityrosine. As the dityrosine yield is too low to account for the observed cross-linking, we propose that aggregation is associated with tryptophan oxidation and Trp-derived cross-links. It is also proposed that Trp oxidation products play a fundamental role in nonrandom fragmentation and carbonyl group formation particularly for LYSO and G6PD. These data point to a complex mechanism of peroxyl-radical mediated modification of proteins with monomeric (LYSO), dimeric (G6PD), and multimeric (BLP) structural organization, which not only results in oxidation of protein side chains but also gives rise to radical-mediated protein cross-links and fragmentation, with Trp species being critical intermediates.

  4. The primary structure of a plant storage protein: zein.

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, D; Peifer, M A; Rubenstein, I; Messing, J

    1981-01-01

    The protein sequence of a representative of the zeins, the major storage proteins of maize, has been derived from the nucleotide sequence of a zein cDNA clone. This cDNA was sequence both by the Maxam and Gilbert and the M13-dideoxy techniques. The nucleotide sequence encompasses the non-translated 3' terminus of the mRNA, the entire coding sequence specifying both the mature zein protein and a small signal peptide, and a portion of the non-translated 5' region. The deduced amino acid composition and the amino-terminal amino acid sequence closely resemble those derived from chemical analysis of the zein protein fraction. The data presented represent the first complete amino acid sequence of a plant storage protein. PMID:6895552

  5. Cigarette smoke-induced reduction in binding of the salivary translocator protein is not mediated by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagler, R; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M

    2016-02-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy of the head and neck and its main inducer is exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) in the presence of saliva. It is commonly accepted that CS contributes to the pathogenesis of oral cancer via reactive free radicals and volatile aldehydes. The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is an intracellular receptor involved in proliferation and apoptosis, and has been linked to various types of cancer. The presence of TSPO in human saliva has been linked to oral cancer, and its binding affinity to its ligand is reduced following exposure to CS. In the present study we wished to further investigate the mechanism behind the CS-induced reduction of TSPO binding by exploring the possible mediatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and volatile aldehydes in this process. We first analyzed TSPO binding in control saliva and in saliva exposed to CS in the presence and absence of various antioxidants. These experiments found that TSPO binding ability was not reversed by any of the antioxidants added, suggesting that CS exerts its effect on TSPO via mechanisms that do not involve volatile aldehydes and free radicals tested. Next, we analyzed TSPO binding in saliva following addition of exogenous ROS in the form of H2O2. These experiments found that TSPO binding was enhanced due to the treatment, once again showing that the CS-induced TSPO binding reduction is not mediated by this common form of ROS. However, the previously reported CS-induced reduction in salivary TSPO binding together with the role of TSPO in cells and its link to cancer strongly suggest that TSPO has a critical role in the pathogenesis of CS-induced oral cancer. The importance of further elucidating the mechanisms behind it should be emphasized.

  6. Oxidative and nitrosative stress induced in myofibrillar proteins by a hydroxyl-radical-generating system: impact of nitrite and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Adriana; Parra, Vita; Estévez, Mario

    2014-03-12

    Understanding the chemistry behind the redox properties of nitrite and ascorbate is essential to identify the impact of curing agents on food quality and optimize the formulation of cured meat products. This study was designed to gain insight into the interactions between curing agents and myofibrillar proteins (MPs) during in vitro oxidation by a hydroxyl-radical-generating system. MPs (4 mg/mL) were oxidized for 4 days at 37 °C under constant stirring with 25 μM iron(III) and 2.5 mM hydrogen peroxide. Dependent upon the addition of nitrite (0, 75, and 150 mg/L) and ascorbate (0, 250, and 500 mg/L), nine different reaction units were prepared in triplicate (n = 3) according to a total factorial design. Upon completion of the oxidation assay, samples were analyzed for the concentration of tryptophan (TRP), α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS), Schiff bases (SBs), and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT). Ascorbate at 250 mg/L significantly inhibited the depletion of TRP (∼20% inhibition) and the formation of AAS and SBs (>90% inhibition) in MP suspensions. Nitrite, alone, had a negligible effect on protein oxidation but induced the formation of a specific marker of nitrosative stress, namely, 3NT. Ascorbate was also efficient at inhibiting the formation of 3NT by a dose-dependent anti-nitrosative effect and enabled the antioxidant action of nitrite.

  7. An iron-binding protein, Dpr, from Streptococcus mutans prevents iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Poole, Leslie B; Hantgan, Roy R; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2002-06-01

    The dpr gene is an antioxidant gene which was isolated from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome by its ability to complement an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, and it was proven to play an indispensable role in oxygen tolerance in S. mutans. Here, we purified the 20-kDa dpr gene product, Dpr, from a crude extract of S. mutans as an iron-binding protein and found that Dpr formed a spherical oligomer about 9 nm in diameter. Molecular weight determinations of Dpr in solution by analytical ultracentrifugation and light-scattering analyses gave values of 223,000 to 292,000, consistent with a subunit composition of 11.5 to 15 subunits per molecule. The purified Dpr contained iron and zinc atoms and had an ability to incorporate up to 480 iron and 11.2 zinc atoms per molecule. Unlike E. coli Dps and two other members of the Dps family, Dpr was unable to bind DNA. One hundred nanomolar Dpr prevented by more than 90% the formation of hydroxyl radical generated by 10 microM iron(II) salt in vitro. The data shown in this study indicate that Dpr may act as a ferritin-like iron-binding protein in S. mutans and may allow this catalase- and heme-peroxidase-deficient bacterium to grow under air by limiting the iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction.

  8. Superparamagnetic lysozyme surface-imprinted polymer prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization and its application for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Gai, Qing-Qing; Qu, Feng; Liu, Zong-Jian; Dai, Rong-Ji; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2010-07-30

    Molecular imprinting as a promising and facile separation technique has received much attention because of their high selectivity for target molecules. In this study, the superparamagnetic lysozyme surface-imprinted polymer was prepared by a novel fabricating protocol, the grafting of the imprinted polymer on magnetic particles in aqueous media was done by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), and the properties of the imprinted polymer were characterized in detail. Its high selective adsorption and recognition to lysozyme demonstrated the separation ability of the magnetic imprinted material to template molecule, and it has been used for quick and direct separation of lysozyme from the mixture of standard proteins and real egg white samples under an external magnetic field. Furthermore, the elution of lysozyme from the imprinted material was achieved by PEG/sulphate aqueous two-phase system, which caused lysozyme not only desorption from the imprinted materials but also redistribution in the top and bottom phase of aqueous two-phase system. The aqueous two-phase system exhibited some of the extraction and enrichment effect to desorbed lysozyme. Our results showed that ATRP is a promising method for the protein molecularly imprinted polymer preparation.

  9. Locomotor proteins in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondakova, I. V.; Yunusova, N. V.; Spirina, L. V.; Shashova, E. E.; Kolegova, E. S.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Villert, A. B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper discusses the capability for active movement in an extracellular matrix, wherein remodeling of the cytoskeleton by actin binding proteins plays a significant role in metastases formation. We studied the expression of actin binding proteins and β-catenin in tissues of primary tumors and metastases of ovarian and breast cancer. Contents of p45 Ser β-catenin and the actin severing protein gelsolin were decreased in metastases of ovarian cancer relative to primary tumors. The level of the cofilin, functionally similar to gelsolin, was significantly higher in metastases compared to primary ovarian and breast tumor tissue. In breast cancer, significant increase in the number of an actin monomer binder protein thymosin-β4 was observed in metastases as compared to primary tumors. The data obtained suggest the involvement of locomotor proteins in metastases formation in ovarian and breast cancer.

  10. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  11. AdoMet radical proteins—from structure to evolution—alignment of divergent protein sequences reveals strong secondary structure element conservation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolet, Yvain; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen subclasses of S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) radical proteins have been aligned in the first bioinformatics study of the AdoMet radical superfamily to utilize crystallographic information. The recently resolved X-ray structure of biotin synthase (BioB) was used to guide the multiple sequence alignment, and the recently resolved X-ray structure of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemN) was used as the control. Despite the low 9% sequence identity between BioB and HemN, the multiple sequence alignment correctly predicted all but one of the core helices in HemN, and correctly predicted the residues in the enzyme active site. This alignment further suggests that the AdoMet radical proteins may have evolved from half-barrel structures (αβ)4 to three-quarter-barrel structures (αβ)6 to full-barrel structures (αβ)8. It predicts that anaerobic ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activase, an ancient enzyme that, it has been suggested, serves as a link between the RNA and DNA worlds, will have a half-barrel structure, whereas the three-quarter barrel, exemplified by HemN, will be the most common architecture for AdoMet radical enzymes, and fewer members of the superfamily will join BioB in using a complete (αβ)8 TIM-barrel fold to perform radical chemistry. These differences in barrel architecture also explain how AdoMet radical enzymes can act on substrates that range in size from 10 atoms to 608 residue proteins. PMID:15289575

  12. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120-b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Grant, Oliver C; Ito, Keigo; Wallace, Aaron; Wang, Shixia; Zhao, Peng; Wells, Lance; Lu, Shan; Woods, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2017-02-21

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120-bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120-b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb.

  13. The fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic coating by electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichuan; Yang, Guang; Liang, Bo; Fang, Lu; Ma, Guanglong; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Shengfu; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-02-01

    A well-controllable electrochemically mediated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (e-siATRP) method for the fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic hydrogel coatings based on poly(sulbetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) was developed in this work. The effects of the electric condition on polymerization as well as its antifouling performances both in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. Different potentials (-0.08 V, -0.15 V and -0.22 V) and polymerization times (from 8 to 48 h) were chosen to study the polymerization procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the properties of the polymer layers. Ellipsometry measurements showed that a higher potential provided faster polymerization and thicker polymer layers; however, the protein absorption experiments showed that the best polymerization condition was under a constant potential of -0.15 V and 32 h, under which the protein absorption was 0.8% in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (compared to a bare gold electrode). The electrodes with a pSBMA coating effectively deduced the current sensitivity decay both in undiluted serum and in vivo. The usage of the commercially available polymerization monomer of SBMA, the simple convenient synthesis process regardless of the presence of oxygen and the excellent controllability of e-siATRP make it a very promising and universal technique in the preparation of zwitterionic polymer coatings, especially in the development of biocompatible material for implantable devices such as neural and biosensor electrodes.

  14. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Vasilenko, A.; Zhai, M.; leapman, Richard D.; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-04-02

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of manganese-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications which introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions which inhibited Mn-accumulation or Mn redox-cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR resistant and sensitive bacteria, our findings support that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  15. A novel index for preoperative, non-invasive prediction of macro-radical primary surgery in patients with stage IIIC-IV ovarian cancer-a part of the Danish prospective pelvic mass study.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Mona Aarenstrup; Fagö-Olsen, Carsten; Høgdall, Estrid; Schnack, Tine Henrichsen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Lydolph, Magnus Christian; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Høgdall, Claus

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel index for preoperative, non-invasive prediction of complete primary cytoreduction in patients with FIGO stage IIIC-IV epithelial ovarian cancer. Prospectively collected clinical data was registered in the Danish Gynecologic Cancer Database. Blood samples were collected within 14 days of surgery and stored by the Danish CancerBiobank. Serum human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), serum cancer antigen 125 (CA125), age, performance status, and presence/absence of ascites at ultrasonography were evaluated individually and combined to predict complete tumor removal. One hundred fifty patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer were treated with primary debulking surgery (PDS). Complete PDS was achieved in 41 cases (27 %). The receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.785 for HE4, 0.678 for CA125, and 0.688 for age. The multivariate model (Cancer Ovarii Non-invasive Assessment of Treatment Strategy (CONATS) index), consisting of HE4, age, and performance status, demonstrated an AUC of 0.853. According to the Danish indicator level, macro-radical PDS should be achieved in 60 % of patients admitted to primary surgery (positive predictive value of 60 %), resulting in a negative predictive value of 87.5 %, sensitivity of 68.3 %, specificity of 83.5 %, and cutoff of 0.63 for the CONATS index. Non-invasive prediction of complete PDS is possible with the CONATS index. The CONATS index is meant as a supplement to the standard preoperative evaluation of each patient. Evaluation of the CONATS index combined with radiological and/or laparoscopic findings may improve the assessment of the optimal treatment strategy in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  16. Primary structure of the Aequorea victoria green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Prasher, D C; Eckenrode, V K; Ward, W W; Prendergast, F G; Cormier, M J

    1992-02-15

    Many cnidarians utilize green-fluorescent proteins (GFPs) as energy-transfer acceptors in bioluminescence. GFPs fluoresce in vivo upon receiving energy from either a luciferase-oxyluciferin excited-state complex or a Ca(2+)-activated phosphoprotein. These highly fluorescent proteins are unique due to the chemical nature of their chromophore, which is comprised of modified amino acid (aa) residues within the polypeptide. This report describes the cloning and sequencing of both cDNA and genomic clones of GFP from the cnidarian, Aequorea victoria. The gfp10 cDNA encodes a 238-aa-residue polypeptide with a calculated Mr of 26,888. Comparison of A. victoria GFP genomic clones shows three different restriction enzyme patterns which suggests that at least three different genes are present in the A. victoria population at Friday Harbor, Washington. The gfp gene encoded by the lambda GFP2 genomic clone is comprised of at least three exons spread over 2.6 kb. The nucleotide sequences of the cDNA and the gene will aid in the elucidation of structure-function relationships in this unique class of proteins.

  17. Expression of Yes-associated protein modulates Survivin expression in primary liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haibo; Gayyed, Mariana F; Lam-Himlin, Dora M; Klein, Alison P; Nayar, Suresh K; Xu, Yang; Khan, Mehtab; Argani, Pedram; Pan, Duojia; Anders, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma account for 95% of primary liver cancer. For each of these malignancies, the outcome is dismal; incidence is rapidly increasing, and mechanistic understanding is limited. We observed abnormal proliferation of both biliary epithelium and hepatocytes in mice after genetic manipulation of Yes-associated protein, a transcription coactivator. Here, we comprehensively documented Yes-associated protein expression in the human liver and primary liver cancers. We showed that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression is significantly increased in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. We found that increased Yes-associated protein levels in hepatocellular carcinoma are due to multiple mechanisms including gene amplification and transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Survivin, a member of the inhibitors-of-apoptosis protein family, has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for poor survival in both hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. We found that nuclear Yes-associated protein expression correlates significantly with nuclear Survivin expression for both intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, using mice engineered to conditionally overexpress Yes-associated protein in the liver, we found that Survivin messenger RNA expression depends upon Yes-associated protein levels. Our findings suggested that Yes-associated protein contributes to primary liver tumorigenesis and likely mediates its oncogenic effects through modulating Survivin expression.

  18. Successful treatment of primary extramedullary leukemia (EML) of the uterus with radical surgery, chemotherapy, autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and prophylactic local irradiation.

    PubMed

    Huter, O; Brezinka, C; Nachbaur, D; Schwaighofer, H; Lang, A; Niederwieser, D

    1996-09-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors are rare manifestations of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). While many advances in diagnosis have been made, dilemmas remain concerning the treatment of this disease. In primary extramedullary leukemia (EML) most reports agree upon a local therapy followed by systemic chemotherapy such as is used for ANLL. However, further prophylactic local or systemic therapy with stem cell support remains controversial. A 20-year-old patient was diagnosed as having granulocytic sarcoma (GS) of the uterus without evidence of ANLL in 1991. After resection of the tumor at the uterine cervix and chemotherapy with daunorubicin 50 mg/m2 (days 1-3) and cytosine-arabinoside 200 mg/m2 (days 1-7) in September 1991, complete remission was achieved. In October 1991 cytosine-arabinoside 1000 mg/m2 every 12 h from day 1 to day 6 and amsacrine 200 mg from day 5 to day 7 were given as consolidation. Two years later relapse occurred in the adnexae. After radical hysterectomy, the same induction and consolidation chemotherapy was administrated. Subsequently, cytoxane 60 mg/m2 and fractionated total body irradiation (6 x 200 cGy) were given as conditioning and the previously cryopreserved bone marrow was reinfused. Finally, after hematopoietic engraftment, prophylactic local irradiation (4500 cGy) to the pelvis was given resulting in a disease-free long-term survival of more than 36 months after relapse. Although this experience is confined to one patient, it may contribute to the design of prospective therapeutic studies in patients with primary EML.

  19. Combination of electrografting and atom-transfer radical polymerization for making the stainless steel surface antibacterial and protein antiadhesive.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Milena; Voccia, Samuel; Gilbert, Bernard; Markova, Nadya; Cossement, Damien; Gouttebaron, Rachel; Jérôme, Robert; Jérôme, Christine

    2006-01-03

    A two-step "grafting from" method has been successfully carried out, which is based on the electrografting of polyacrylate chains containing an initiator for the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of 2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate (TBAEMA) or copolymerization of TBAEMA with either monomethyl ether of poly(ethylene oxide) methacrylate (PEOMA) or acrylic acid (AA) or styrene. The chemisorption of this type of polymer brushes onto stainless steel surfaces has potential in orthopaedic surgery. These films have been characterized by ATR-FTIR, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and measurement of contact angles of water. The polymer formed in solution by ATRP and that one detached on purpose from the surface have been analyzed by size exclusion chromathography (SEC) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The strong adherence of the films onto stainless steel has been assessed by peeling tests. AFM analysis has shown that addition of hydrophilic comonomers to the grafted chains decreases the surface roughness. According to dynamic quartz crystal microbalance experiments, proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) are more effectively repelled whenever copolymer brushes contain neutral hydrophilic (PEOMA) co-units rather than negatively charged groups (PAA salt). Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold decrease in the fibrinogen adsorption is observed when TBAEMA is copolymerized with either PEOMA or AA rather than homopolymerized or copolymerized with styrene. Compared to the bare stainless steel surface, brushes of polyTBAEMA, poly(TBAEMA-co-PEOMA) and poly(TBAEMA-co-AA) decrease the bacteria adhesion by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude as revealed by Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus adhesion tests.

  20. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins: Structural and Functional Characterization of RimO from Thermotoga maritima, a Radical S-adenosylmethionine methylthiotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Arragain, S.; Latour, J; Forouhar, F; Neely, H; Montelione, G; Hunt, J; Mulliez, E; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826-1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family.

  1. Molecular basis of intramolecular electron transfer in proteins during radical-mediated oxidations: Computer simulation studies in model tyrosine-cysteine peptides in solution

    PubMed Central

    Petruk, Ariel A.; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Trujillo, Madia; Estrin, Darío A.; Murgida, Daniel; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Marti, Marcelo A.; Radi, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in hemeproteins and model Tyr/Cys-containing peptides exposed to oxidizing and nitrating species suggest that intramolecular electron transfer (IET) between tyrosyl radicals (Tyr-O●) and Cys residues controls oxidative modification yields. The molecular basis of this IET process is not sufficiently understood with structural atomic detail. Herein, we analyzed using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics-based computational calculations, mechanistic possibilities for the radical transfer reaction in Tyr/Cys-containing peptides in solution and correlated them with existing experimental data. Our results support that Tyr-O● to Cys radical transfer is mediated by an acid/base equilibrium that involves deprotonation of Cys to form the thiolate, followed by a likely rate-limiting transfer process to yield cysteinyl radical and a Tyr phenolate; proton uptake by Tyr completes the reaction. Both, the pKa values of the Tyr phenol and Cys thiol groups and the energetic and kinetics of the reversible IET are revealed as key physico-chemical factors. The proposed mechanism constitutes a case of sequential, acid/base equilibrium-dependent and solvent-mediated, proton-coupled electron transfer and explains the dependency of oxidative yields in Tyr/Cys peptides as a function of the number of alanine spacers. These findings contribute to explain oxidative modifications in proteins that contain sequence and/or spatially close Tyr-Cys residues. PMID:22640642

  2. Protein import into the photosynthetic organelles of Paulinella chromatophora and its implications for primary plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Bodył, Andrzej; Gagat, Przemysław

    2012-12-01

    The rhizarian amoeba Paulinella chromatophora harbors two photosynthetically active organelles of cyanobacterial origin that have been acquired independently of classic primary plastids. Because their acquisition did take place relatively recently, they are expected to provide new insight into the ancient cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis. During the process of Paulinella endosymbiont-to-organelle transformation, more than 30 genes have been transferred from the organelle to the host nuclear genome via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). The article discusses step-by-step protein import of EGT-derived proteins into Paulinella photosynthetic organelles with the emphasis on the nature of their targeting signals and the final passage of proteins through the inner organelle membrane. The latter most probably involves a simplified Tic translocon composed of Tic21- and Tic32-like proteins as well as a Hsp70-based motor responsible for pulling of imported proteins into the organelle matrix. Our results indicate that although protein translocation across the inner membrane of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles seems to resemble the one in classic primary plastids, the transport through the outer membrane does not. The differences could result from distinct integration pathways of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles and primary plastids with their respective host cells.

  3. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A.; Yang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes. PMID:24961486

  4. Function and regulation of primary cilia and intraflagellar transport proteins in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Serra, Rosa A; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the cell surface to enable transduction of various developmental signaling pathways. The process of intraflagellar transport (IFT) is crucial for the building and maintenance of primary cilia. Ciliary dysfunction has been found in a range of disorders called ciliopathies, some of which display severe skeletal dysplasias. In recent years, interest has grown in uncovering the function of primary cilia/IFT proteins in bone development, mechanotransduction, and cellular regulation. We summarize recent advances in understanding the function of cilia and IFT proteins in the regulation of cell differentiation in osteoblasts, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We also discuss the mechanosensory function of cilia and IFT proteins in bone cells, cilia orientation, and other functions of cilia in chondrocytes.

  5. Quantitative protein topography analysis and high-resolution structure prediction using hydroxyl radical labeling and tandem-ion mass spectrometry (MS).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parminder; Kiselar, Janna; Yang, Sichun; Chance, Mark R

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting based MS for protein structure assessment has the goal of understanding ligand induced conformational changes and macromolecular interactions, for example, protein tertiary and quaternary structure, but the structural resolution provided by typical peptide-level quantification is limiting. In this work, we present experimental strategies using tandem-MS fragmentation to increase the spatial resolution of the technique to the single residue level to provide a high precision tool for molecular biophysics research. Overall, in this study we demonstrated an eightfold increase in structural resolution compared with peptide level assessments. In addition, to provide a quantitative analysis of residue based solvent accessibility and protein topography as a basis for high-resolution structure prediction; we illustrate strategies of data transformation using the relative reactivity of side chains as a normalization strategy and predict side-chain surface area from the footprinting data. We tested the methods by examination of Ca(+2)-calmodulin showing highly significant correlations between surface area and side-chain contact predictions for individual side chains and the crystal structure. Tandem ion based hydroxyl radical footprinting-MS provides quantitative high-resolution protein topology information in solution that can fill existing gaps in structure determination for large proteins and macromolecular complexes.

  6. Sensitivity enhancement for membrane proteins reconstituted in parallel and perpendicular oriented bicelles obtained by using repetitive cross-polarization and membrane-incorporated free radicals.

    PubMed

    Koroloff, Sophie N; Tesch, Deanna M; Awosanya, Emmanuel O; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2017-02-01

    Multidimensional separated local-field and spin-exchange experiments employed by oriented-sample solid-state NMR are essential for structure determination and spectroscopic assignment of membrane proteins reconstituted in macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers. However, these experiments typically require a large number of scans in order to establish interspin correlations. Here we have shown that a combination of optimized repetitive cross polarization (REP-CP) and membrane-embedded free radicals allows one to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio by factors 2.4-3.0 in the case of Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in magnetically aligned bicelles with their normals being either parallel or perpendicular to the main magnetic field. Notably, spectral resolution is not affected at the 2:1 radical-to-protein ratio. Spectroscopic assignment of Pf1 coat protein in the parallel bicelles has been established as an illustration of the method. The proposed methodology will advance applications of oriented-sample NMR technique when applied to samples containing smaller quantities of proteins and three-dimensional experiments.

  7. Human prion protein-induced autophagy flux governs neuron cell damage in primary neuron cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Nazim, Uddin Md; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-05-24

    An unusual molecular structure of the prion protein, PrPsc is found only in mammals with transmissible prion diseases. Prion protein stands for either the infectious pathogen itself or a main component of it. Recent studies suggest that autophagy is one of the major functions that keep cells alive and has a protective effect against the neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated that the effect of human prion protein on autophagy-lysosomal system of primary neuronal cells. The treatment of human prion protein induced primary neuron cell death and decreased both LC3-II and p62 protein amount indicating autophagy flux activation. Electron microscope pictures confirmed the autophagic flux activation in neuron cells treated with prion protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux using pharmacological and genetic tools prevented neuron cell death induced by human prion protein. Autophagy flux induced by prion protein is more activated in prpc expressing cells than in prpc silencing cells. These data demonstrated that prion protein-induced autophagy flux is involved in neuron cell death in prion disease and suggest that autophagy flux might play a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases including prion disease.

  8. Predictability of gene ontology slim-terms from primary structure information in Embryophyta plant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are the key elements on the path from genetic information to the development of life. The roles played by the different proteins are difficult to uncover experimentally as this process involves complex procedures such as genetic modifications, injection of fluorescent proteins, gene knock-out methods and others. The knowledge learned from each protein is usually annotated in databases through different methods such as the proposed by The Gene Ontology (GO) consortium. Different methods have been proposed in order to predict GO terms from primary structure information, but very few are available for large-scale functional annotation of plants, and reported success rates are much less than the reported by other non-plant predictors. This paper explores the predictability of GO annotations on proteins belonging to the Embryophyta group from a set of features extracted solely from their primary amino acid sequence. Results High predictability of several GO terms was found for Molecular Function and Cellular Component. As expected, a lower degree of predictability was found on Biological Process ontology annotations, although a few biological processes were easily predicted. Proteins related to transport and transcription were particularly well predicted from primary structure information. The most discriminant features for prediction were those related to electric charges of the amino-acid sequence and hydropathicity derived features. Conclusions An analysis of GO-slim terms predictability in plants was carried out, in order to determine single categories or groups of functions that are most related with primary structure information. For each highly predictable GO term, the responsible features of such successfulness were identified and discussed. In addition to most published studies, focused on few categories or single ontologies, results in this paper comprise a complete landscape of GO predictability from primary structure encompassing 75 GO

  9. Cephaloridine induces translocation of protein kinase C delta into mitochondria and enhances mitochondrial generation of free radicals in the kidney cortex of rats causing renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kohda, Yuka; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-05-01

    We have previously reported that the enhancement of free radical generation in mitochondria isolated from the kidney cortex of rats exposed to cephaloridine (CER) is probably mediated by the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). We examined which isoenzymes of PKC might be involved in the development of nephrotoxicity induced by CER in rats. The CER-induced renal dysfunction observed 24 h after its injection was prevented by a potent antioxidant DPPD and well-known PKC inhibitors like H-7 and rottlerin. At 1.5 and 3.5 h after the CER injection, the free radical generation was increased markedly and this was associated with translocation of PKCdelta into the mitochondria of renal cortex tissue. Pretreatment of rats with H-7, a PKC inhibitor, significantly inhibited the CER-derived increase in mitochondrial generation of free radicals, suggesting that H-7 probably gets into the mitochondria and inhibits the activity of translocated PKC within the mitochondria. It was also shown that pretreatment of rats with rottlerin, a specific inhibitor of PKCdelta, suppressed the early translocation of PKCdelta into mitochondria and inhibited the CER-derived development of renal dysfunction. These results suggest that the CER-derived early translocation of PKCdelta into mitochondria probably leads to the enhanced production of free radicals through the mitochondrial respiratory chain during the development of the nephrotoxicity caused by CER. Understanding the role of PKCdelta in mitochondria may provide an important clue to the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and the free radical-induced renal failure in rats treated with CER.

  10. Ramipril-induced delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury involves bradykinin B2 receptor-NO pathway and protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhu-Qiu; Chen, Xiu

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injuries ex vivo and to determine the possible role of the bradykinin B2–nitric oxide (NO) pathway, prostaglandins(PGs) and protein synthesis in this delayed adaptive response.Rats were pretreated with ramipril (10 or 50 μg kg−1, i.v.) and hearts were isolated after 24, 48 and 72 h. Langendorff hearts were subjected to 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-induced injury.Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximal increase velocity (+dP/dtmax), coronary flow (CF), heart rate (HR), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in coronary effluent and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the myocardium were measured.The results showed that in the DPPH control group, 20 min after free radical-induced injury, LVDP, +dP/dtmax, CF, HR declined, whereas TBARS and LDH increased significantly. The above cardiac function parameters were significantly improved in RAM-pretreated rats after 24 and 48 h.Pretreatment with HOE 140, the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, NG-nitro-L-arginine, the NO synthase inhibitor, and actinomycin D, the RNA transcription inhibitor, prior to ramipril injection abolished the beneficial effects of ramipril at 24 h while indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, pretreatment had no effect on ramipril-induced delayed protection.In conclusion, ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury in the rat heart. This delayed protection was sustained for 48 h, is associated with the bradykinin B2 receptor–NO pathway and depends on protein but not prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:9806340

  11. Induction of heat shock proteins in response to primary alcohols in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Benndorf, D; Loffhagen, N; Babel, W

    1999-01-01

    Cells of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus 69-V, a species able to metabolize a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols, were confronted with ethanol, butanol, hexanol or heat shock during growth on acetate as sole source of carbon and energy. The primary alcohols and the heat shock led to the synthesis of new proteins or amplified expression of specific, common and general proteins, which were detected by silver staining after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Some of the alcohol-inducible proteins were identified as heat shock proteins by comparing protein patterns of alcohol-shocked cells with those of heat-shocked cells, and by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. DnaK was found to be amplified after all treatments, but GroEI only after heat shock and ethanol treatment. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein, which was considerably amplified after alcohol treatment and heat shock, shows homology to HtpG (high temperature protein G). Some of the heat shock proteins induced by ethanol differ from those induced by butanol and hexanol, suggesting there are at least two different signals for the induction of some heat shock proteins by primary alcohols. This could be due to the different localization of ethanol, butanol and hexanol in the membrane, or because higher cytoplasmic concentrations of ethanol than of butanol or hexanol were applied in these tests in order to keep concentrations of the alcohols in the membrane roughly similar. Besides heat shock proteins, a group of proteins were observed which were only induced by butanol and hexanol, possibly indicating the existence of a further defense mechanism against high concentrations of hydrophobic substrates preventing protein denaturation and membrane damage.

  12. Primary Blast Injury Depressed Hippocampal Long-Term Potentiation through Disruption of Synaptic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Edward W; Rwema, Steve H; Meaney, David F; Bass, Cameron R Dale; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-03-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a major threat to United States service members in military conflicts worldwide. The effects of primary blast, caused by the supersonic shockwave interacting with the skull and brain, remain unclear. Our group has previously reported that in vitro primary blast exposure can reduce long-term potentiation (LTP), the electrophysiological correlate of learning and memory, in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) without significant changes to cell viability or basal, evoked neuronal function. We investigated the time course of primary blast-induced deficits in LTP and the molecular mechanisms that could underlie these deficits. We found that pure primary blast exposure induced LTP deficits in a delayed manner, requiring longer than 1 hour to develop, and that these deficits spontaneously recovered by 10 days following exposure depending on blast intensity. Additionally, we observed that primary blast exposure reduced total α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) subunit expression and phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit at the serine-831 site. Blast also reduced the expression of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and phosphorylation of stargazin protein at the serine-239/240 site. Finally, we found that modulation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway ameliorated electrophysiological and protein-expression changes caused by blast. These findings could inform the development of novel therapies to treat blast-induced loss of neuronal function.

  13. Localized surface plasmon resonance nanosensing of C-reactive protein with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted gold nanoparticles prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Yukiya; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-03

    Highly sensitive and selective protein nanosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on which polymerized specific ligands were grafted as an artificial protein recognition layer for the target protein were demonstrated. As a model, optical nanosensing for C-reactive protein (CRP), a known biomarker for chronic inflammation that predicts the risk of arteriosclerosis or heart attacks, was achieved by measuring the shift of LSPR spectra derived from the change of permittivity of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted AuNPs (PMPC-g-AuNPs) upon interacting with CRP, in which the PMPC-g-AuNPs layer were grafted on AuNPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This nanosensing system was effective even for detecting CRP concentrations in a human serum solution diluted to 1% (w/w), at which point a limit of detection was ~50 ng/mL and nonspecific adsorption of other proteins was negligible. The nanosensing system using specific ligand-grafted AuNPs has several strengths, such as low preparation cost, avoiding the need for expensive instruments, no necessary complex pretreatments, and high stability, because it does not contain biobased molecules. We believe this novel synthetic route for protein nanosensors, composed of AuNPs and a polymerized specific ligand utilizing surface-initiated controlled/living radical polymerization, will provide a foundation for the design and synthesis of nanosensors targeting various other biomarker proteins, paving the way for future advances in the field of biosensing.

  14. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  15. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates. PMID:27635128

  16. Osteoclast radicals.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S

    1994-11-01

    In biological research, new ideas arise and quickly spread to encompass the entire field. Thus, the evolution of molecular biology has significantly changed our methods of approaching our research. A similar far-reaching finding has been the advent of radical reactions into biology. Although radical chemistry has been utilized for many technological advances that affect our daily lives, the appreciation of this same process within our cells has opened an unexplored arena for research enquiry. As cellular messengers, radical molecules seem whimsically designed: they are evanescent, rapidly and apparently indiscriminately reactive, and barely detectable by most biological methods. Yet, our initial probing of these reactive agents in cells and organisms has led us to postulate a virtually undescribed system of communication within and among cells which may have significant effects in multiple organs. In bone, radical reactants have been attributed with an important role in the control of bone resorption.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  18. The Radical S-Adenosyl-l-methionine Enzyme QhpD Catalyzes Sequential Formation of Intra-protein Sulfur-to-Methylene Carbon Thioether Bonds*

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Hori, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Motonari; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Okajima, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial enzyme designated QhpD belongs to the radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) superfamily of enzymes and participates in the post-translational processing of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. QhpD is essential for the formation of intra-protein thioether bonds within the small subunit (maturated QhpC) of quinohemoprotein amine dehydrogenase. We overproduced QhpD from Paracoccus denitrificans as a stable complex with its substrate QhpC, carrying the 28-residue leader peptide that is essential for the complex formation. Absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra together with the analyses of iron and sulfur contents suggested the presence of multiple (likely three) [4Fe-4S] clusters in the purified and reconstituted QhpD. In the presence of a reducing agent (sodium dithionite), QhpD catalyzed the multiple-turnover reaction of reductive cleavage of SAM into methionine and 5′-deoxyadenosine and also the single-turnover reaction of intra-protein sulfur-to-methylene carbon thioether bond formation in QhpC bound to QhpD, producing a multiknotted structure of the polypeptide chain. Homology modeling and mutagenic analysis revealed several conserved residues indispensable for both in vivo and in vitro activities of QhpD. Our findings uncover another challenging reaction catalyzed by a radical SAM enzyme acting on a ribosomally translated protein substrate. PMID:25778402

  19. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  20. Protein oxidation: identification and utilisation of molecular markers to differentiate singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical-mediated oxidative pathways.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Jeffrey E; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu; Grosvenor, Anita J; Dyer, Jolon M

    2013-11-01

    The effect of reactive oxidation species (ROS) on tryptophan or tyrosine was investigated by qualitatively determining the major detectable oxidation products generated by hydroxyl radicals, produced by the Fenton process, or singlet oxygen, generated by exposure to green light in the presence of Rose Bengal, on these photosensitive amino acids in synthetic pentapeptides. Based on mass spectrometric analysis it would appear that the hydroxyl radical favours a pathway leading to the formation of tryptophandione-based products from tryptophan. In contrast singlet oxygen attack appears to favour the formation of kynurenine-type products from tryptophan. Specific oxidative products observed proteomically are therefore potentially able to discriminate between predominant ROS-mediated pathways. To validate these findings, a keratin-enriched extract was exposed to UVB light under aqueous conditions. The observation of the conversion of tryptophan to hydroxytryptophan in marker peptides, and the absence of singlet-oxygen specific modifications, suggested that under these conditions oxidative degradation occurred primarily via hydroxyl radical attack. These observations provide the first direct proteomic evidence of the dominant photodegradation pathways in wet wool.

  1. Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A interacts with primary microcephaly protein ASPM, localizes to centrosomes and regulates chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Singhmar, Pooja; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly) protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome.

  2. Angelman Syndrome Protein UBE3A Interacts with Primary Microcephaly Protein ASPM, Localizes to Centrosomes and Regulates Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Singhmar, Pooja; Kumar, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Many proteins associated with the phenotype microcephaly have been localized to the centrosome or linked to it functionally. All the seven autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) proteins localize at the centrosome. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II protein PCNT and Seckel syndrome (also characterized by severe microcephaly) protein ATR are also centrosomal proteins. All of the above findings show the importance of centrosomal proteins as the key players in neurogenesis and brain development. However, the exact mechanism as to how the loss-of-function of these proteins leads to microcephaly remains to be elucidated. To gain insight into the function of the most commonly mutated MCPH gene ASPM, we used the yeast two-hybrid technique to screen a human fetal brain cDNA library with an ASPM bait. The analysis identified Angelman syndrome gene product UBE3A as an ASPM interactor. Like ASPM, UBE3A also localizes to the centrosome. The identification of UBE3A as an ASPM interactor is not surprising as more than 80% of Angelman syndrome patients have microcephaly. However, unlike in MCPH, microcephaly is postnatal in Angelman syndrome patients. Our results show that UBE3A is a cell cycle regulated protein and its level peaks in mitosis. The shRNA knockdown of UBE3A in HEK293 cells led to many mitotic abnormalities including chromosome missegregation, abnormal cytokinesis and apoptosis. Thus our study links Angelman syndrome protein UBE3A to ASPM, centrosome and mitosis for the first time. We suggest that a defective chromosome segregation mechanism is responsible for the development of microcephaly in Angelman syndrome. PMID:21633703

  3. Spectroscopic Studies of the Iron and Manganese Reconstituted Tyrosyl Radical in Bacillus Cereus Ribonucleotide Reductase R2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tomter, Ane B.; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Bell, Caleb B.; Barra, Anne-Laure; Andersen, Niels H.; Solomon, Edward I.; Andersson, K. Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in DNA synthesis where ribonucleotides are reduced to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides. Class Ib RNRs consist of two homodimeric subunits: R1E, which houses the active site; and R2F, which contains a metallo cofactor and a tyrosyl radical that initiates the ribonucleotide reduction reaction. We studied the R2F subunit of B. cereus reconstituted with iron or alternatively with manganese ions, then subsequently reacted with molecular oxygen to generate two tyrosyl-radicals. The two similar X-band EPR spectra did not change significantly over 4 to 50 K. From the 285 GHz EPR spectrum of the iron form, a g1-value of 2.0090 for the tyrosyl radical was extracted. This g1-value is similar to that observed in class Ia E. coli R2 and class Ib R2Fs with iron-oxygen cluster, suggesting the absence of hydrogen bond to the phenoxyl group. This was confirmed by resonance Raman spectroscopy, where the stretching vibration associated to the radical (C-O, ν7a = 1500 cm−1) was found to be insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange. Additionally, the 18O-sensitive Fe-O-Fe symmetric stretching (483 cm−1) of the metallo-cofactor was also insensitive to deuterium-oxide exchange indicating no hydrogen bonding to the di-iron-oxygen cluster, and thus, different from mouse R2 with a hydrogen bonded cluster. The HF-EPR spectrum of the manganese reconstituted RNR R2F gave a g1-value of ∼2.0094. The tyrosyl radical microwave power saturation behavior of the iron-oxygen cluster form was as observed in class Ia R2, with diamagnetic di-ferric cluster ground state, while the properties of the manganese reconstituted form indicated a magnetic ground state of the manganese-cluster. The recent activity measurements (Crona et al., (2011) J Biol Chem 286: 33053–33060) indicates that both the manganese and iron reconstituted RNR R2F could be functional. The manganese form might be very important, as it has 8 times higher

  4. Defining intact protein primary structures from saliva: A step toward the human proteome project

    PubMed Central

    Halgand, F.; Zabrouskov, V.; Bassilian, S.; Souda, P.; Loo, J.A.; Faull, K.F.; Wong, D.T.; Whitelegge, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Top-down mass spectrometry has been used to investigate structural diversity within some abundant salivary protein families. In this study we report the identification of two isoforms of protein II-2 which differed in mass by less than 1 Da, the determination of a sequence for protein IB8a that was best satisfied by including a mutation and a covalent modification in the C-terminal part, and the assignment of a sequence of a previously unreported protein of mass 10433 Da. The final characterization of Peptide P-J was achieved and the discovery of a truncated form of this peptide was reported. The first sequence assignment was done at low resolution using a hybrid quadrupole time of flight instrument to quickly identify and characterize proteins and data acquisition was switched to FTICR for proteins that required additional sequence coverage and certainty of assignment. High-resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometry on a FTICR-MS instrument combined with ECD provided the most informative datasets, with the more frequent presence of ‘unique’ ions that unambiguously define the primary structure. A mixture of predictable and unusual post-translational modifications in the protein sequence precluded the use of shotgun-annotated databases at this stage, requiring manual iterations of sequence refinement in many cases. This led us to propose guidelines for an iterative processing workflow of MS and MSMS datasets that allow researchers to completely assign the identity and the structure of a protein. PMID:22509742

  5. Interaction of Tissue Engineering Substrates with Serum Proteins and Its Influence on Human Primary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Nagaraj, Chandran; Reishofer, David; Spirk, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Kargl, Rupert

    2017-02-13

    Polymer-based biomaterials particularly polycaprolactone (PCL) are one of the most promising substrates for tissue engineering. The surface chemistry of these materials plays a major role since it governs protein adsorption, cell adhesion, viability, degradation, and biocompatibility in the first place. This study correlates the interaction of the most abundant serum proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins, fibrinogen) with the surface properties of PCL and its influence on the morphology and metabolic activity of primary human arterial endothelial cells that are seeded on the materials. Prior to that, thin films of PCL are manufactured by spin-coating and characterized in detail. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), a multiparameter surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy instrument (MP-SPR), wettability data, and atomic force microscopy are combined to elucidate the pH-dependent protein adsorption on the PCL substrates. Primary endothelial cells are cultured on the protein modified polymer, and conclusions are drawn on the significant impact of type and form of proteins coatings on cell morphology and metabolic activity.

  6. A new hybrid coding for protein secondary structure prediction based on primary structure similarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Shunpu; Zhang, Qifeng; Wu, Wuming

    2017-03-16

    The coding pattern of protein can greatly affect the prediction accuracy of protein secondary structure. In this paper, a novel hybrid coding method based on the physicochemical properties of amino acids and tendency factors is proposed for the prediction of protein secondary structure. The principal component analysis (PCA) is first applied to the physicochemical properties of amino acids to construct a 3-bit-code, and then the 3 tendency factors of amino acids are calculated to generate another 3-bit-code. Two 3-bit-codes are fused to form a novel hybrid 6-bit-code. Furthermore, we make a geometry-based similarity comparison of the protein primary structure between the reference set and the test set before the secondary structure prediction. We finally use the support vector machine (SVM) to predict those amino acids which are not detected by the primary structure similarity comparison. Experimental results show that our method achieves a satisfactory improvement in accuracy in the prediction of protein secondary structure.

  7. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vasudev R.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Prasad, Vinayaka R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood–brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26714725

  8. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vasudev R; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood-brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes.

  9. Identification of Surface-Exposed Protein Radicals and A Substrate Oxidation Site in A-Class Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase from Thermomonospora curvata

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Ruben; Chen, Xuejie; Ramyar, Kasra X.; Hayati, Zahra; Carlson, Eric A.; Bossmann, Stefan H.; Song, Likai; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Li, Ping

    2016-12-12

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of heme peroxidases in which a catalytic distal aspartate is involved in H2O2 activation to catalyze oxidations under acidic conditions. They have received much attention due to their potential applications in lignin compound degradation and biofuel production from biomass. However, the mode of oxidation in bacterial DyPs remains unknown. We have recently reported that the bacterial TcDyP from Thermomonospora curvata is among the most active DyPs and shows activity toward phenolic lignin model compounds. On the basis of the X-ray crystal structure solved at 1.75 Å, sigmoidal steady-state kinetics with Reactive Blue 19 (RB19), and formation of compound II like product in the absence of reducing substrates observed with stopped-flow spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we hypothesized that the TcDyP catalyzes oxidation of large-size substrates via multiple surface-exposed protein radicals. Among 7 tryptophans and 3 tyrosines in TcDyP consisting of 376 residues for the matured protein, W263, W376, and Y332 were identified as surface-exposed protein radicals. Only the W263 was also characterized as one of the surface-exposed oxidation sites. SDS-PAGE and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that W376 represents an off-pathway destination for electron transfer, resulting in the cross-linking of proteins in the absence of substrates. Mutation of W376 improved compound I stability and overall catalytic efficiency toward RB19. While Y332 is highly conserved across all four classes of DyPs, its catalytic function in A-class TcDyP is minimal, possibly due to its extremely small solvent-accessible areas. Identification of surface-exposed protein radicals and substrate oxidation sites is important for understanding the DyP mechanism and modulating its catalytic functions for improved activity on phenolic lignin.

  10. The diagnosis and management of cow milk protein intolerance in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Whitney Merrill; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2005-01-01

    Cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) affects 3% of infants under the age of 12 months and is often misdiagnosed as GERD or colic, risking dangerous exposure to antigens. Most infants out grow CMPI by 12 months; however, those with IgE-mediated reactions usually continue to be intolerant to cow's milk proteins and also develop other allergens including environmental allergens that cause asthmatic symptoms. Clinical manifestations of CMPI include diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, feeding refusal, eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, allergic rhinitis, coughing, wheezing, failure to thrive, and anaphylaxis. The research and literature showed that CMPI is easily missed in the primary care setting and needs to be considered as a cause of infant distress and clinical symptoms. This article focuses on correctly diagnosing CMPI and managing it in the primary care setting.

  11. Human hedgehog interacting protein expression and promoter methylation in medulloblastoma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rey, Juan A.; Fan, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common pediatric brain tumor and its development is affected by genetic and epigenetic factors. In this study we found there is low or no expression of the hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP), a negative regulator of the sonic hedgehog pathway, in most medulloblastoma cell lines and primary samples explored. We proceeded to promoter methylation assays of this gene by MCA-Meth, and found that HHIP was hypermethylated in all medulloblastoma cell lines, but only in 2 out of 14 (14%) primary tumor samples. Methylation correlated with low or unexpressed HHIP in cell lines but not in primary tumor samples. These results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of HHIP in medulloblastoma, similarly to gastric, hepatic and pancreatic cancer. However, HHIP seems to be not only under regulation of promoter methylation, but under other factors involved in the control of its low levels of expression in medulloblastoma. PMID:20853133

  12. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Martin, Gregory G.; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H. Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Kier, Ann B.

    2012-01-01

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  13. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in <1 min and initial rate and maximal uptake of HDL free cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2

  14. Immortalization of primary human keratinocytes by the helix–loop–helix protein, Id-1

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Rhoda M.; Hasskarl, Jens; Grace, Miranda; Hernandez, Maria-Clementia; Israel, Mark A.; Münger, Karl

    1999-01-01

    Basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) DNA-binding proteins have been demonstrated to regulate tissue-specific transcription within multiple cell lineages. The Id family of helix–loop–helix proteins does not possess a basic DNA-binding domain and functions as a negative regulator of bHLH proteins. Overexpression of Id proteins within a variety of cell types has been shown to inhibit their ability to differentiate under appropriate conditions. We demonstrate that ectopic expression of Id-1 leads to activation of telomerase activity and immortalization of primary human keratinocytes. These immortalized cells have a decreased capacity to differentiate as well as activate phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. Additionally, these cells acquire an impaired p53-mediated DNA-damage response as a late event in immortalization. We conclude that bHLH proteins play a pivotal role in regulating normal keratinocyte growth and differentiation, which can be disrupted by the immortalizing functions of Id-1 through activation of telomerase activity and inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein. PMID:10449746

  15. Analysis of Soluble Protein Entry into Primary Cilia Using Semi-Permeabilized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, David K.; Nachury, Maxence V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium is a protrusion from the cell surface that serves as a specialized compartment for signal transduction. Many signaling factors are known to be dynamically concentrated within cilia and to require cilia for their function. Yet protein entry into primary cilia remains poorly understood. To enable a mechanistic analysis of soluble protein entry into cilia, we developed a method for semi-permeabilization of mammalian cells in which the plasma membrane is permeabilized while the ciliary membrane remains intact. Using semi-permeabilized cells as the basis for an in vitro diffusion-to-capture assay, we uncovered a size-dependent diffusion barrier that restricts soluble protein exchange between the cytosol and the cilium. The manipulability of this in vitro system enabled an extensive characterization of the ciliary diffusion barrier and led us to show that the barrier is mechanistically distinct from those at the axon initial segment and the nuclear pore complex. Because semi-permeabilized cells enable a range of experimental perturbations that would not be easily feasible in intact cells, we believe this methodology will provide a unique resource for investigating primary cilium function in development and disease. PMID:25837393

  16. Protein-protein interactions among components of the Drosophila primary sex determination signal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Belote, J M

    1995-07-28

    Sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster is initiated in the early embryo by a signal provided by three types of genes: (1) X-linked numerator elements [e.g., sisterless-a (sis-a) and sisterless-b (sis-b)], (2) autosomally linked denominator elements [e.g., deadpan (dpn)], and (3) maternal factors [e.g., daughterless (da)]. This signal acts to stimulate transcription from an embryo-specific promoter of the master regulatory gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) in embryos that have two X chromosomes (females), while it fails to activate Sxl in those with only one X (males). It has been previously proposed that competitive dimerizations among the components of this signal might provide the molecular basis for this sex specificity. Here, we use the yeast two-hybrid system to demonstrate specific protein-protein interactions among the above-mentioned factors, and to delimit their interacting domains. These results support and extend the model of the molecular basis of the X/A ratio signal.

  17. Photochemical tyrosine oxidation in the structurally well-defined α3Y protein: proton-coupled electron transfer and a long-lived tyrosine radical.

    PubMed

    Glover, Starla D; Jorge, Christine; Liang, Li; Valentine, Kathleen G; Hammarström, Leif; Tommos, Cecilia

    2014-10-08

    Tyrosine oxidation-reduction involves proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and a reactive radical state. These properties are effectively controlled in enzymes that use tyrosine as a high-potential, one-electron redox cofactor. The α3Y model protein contains Y32, which can be reversibly oxidized and reduced in voltammetry measurements. Structural and kinetic properties of α3Y are presented. A solution NMR structural analysis reveals that Y32 is the most deeply buried residue in α3Y. Time-resolved spectroscopy using a soluble flash-quench generated [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+) oxidant provides high-quality Y32-O• absorption spectra. The rate constant of Y32 oxidation (kPCET) is pH dependent: 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 5.5), 1.8 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) (pH 8.5), 5.4 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 5.5), and 4.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) (pD 8.5). k(H)/k(D) of Y32 oxidation is 2.5 ± 0.5 and 4.5 ± 0.9 at pH(D) 5.5 and 8.5, respectively. These pH and isotope characteristics suggest a concerted or stepwise, proton-first Y32 oxidation mechanism. The photochemical yield of Y32-O• is 28-58% versus the concentration of [Ru(2,2'-bipyridine)3](3+). Y32-O• decays slowly, t1/2 in the range of 2-10 s, at both pH 5.5 and 8.5, via radical-radical dimerization as shown by second-order kinetics and fluorescence data. The high stability of Y32-O• is discussed relative to the structural properties of the Y32 site. Finally, the static α3Y NMR structure cannot explain (i) how the phenolic proton released upon oxidation is removed or (ii) how two Y32-O• come together to form dityrosine. These observations suggest that the dynamic properties of the protein ensemble may play an essential role in controlling the PCET and radical decay characteristics of α3Y.

  18. Atom transfer radical polymerization to fabricate monodisperse poly[glycidyl methacrylate-co-poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] microspheres and its application for protein affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Shi, Zhuan Zhuan; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-09-01

    Poly[glycidyl methacrylate-co-poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] microspheres for the first time were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method at room temperature. The co-polymerization approach was investigated to delicately control the microsphere morphology and size-distribution by reaction conditions including solvent percentage, monomer loading and rotation speed. The results show that the average size of the microspheres is ∼5.7 μm with coexistence of epoxy, hydroxyl and ether groups, which provide plentiful functional sites for protein anchoring. The mechanism of the microsphere formation is proposed. The microsphere successfully demonstrates its unique application for affinity purification of proteins, in which the functional epoxy group facilitates a simple and efficient protein covalent immobilization to purify immunoglobulin G on the microspheres, while the hydrophilic poly (ethylene glycol) motif can repulse nonspecific protein adsorption for good specificity. This microspheres can be used in broad protein biosensors due to their abundant functional groups and high surface to volume ratio.

  19. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, JB; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several functionally unconfirmed

  20. Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage within peptides via ultraviolet irradiation of an electrospray plume.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu

    2013-05-21

    Radical induced disulfide bond cleavage in peptides was demonstrated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the electrospray ionization (ESI) plume using a low pressure mercury (LP-Hg) lamp. Tandem mass spectrometry and accurate mass measurements confirmed that the primary reaction products were due to disulfide bond cleavage to form thiol (-SH) and sulfinyl radical (-SO˙). Mechanistic studies showed that the 185 nm emission from a LP-Hg lamp was responsible for UV photolysis of atmospheric O2, which further initiated secondary radical formation and subsequent disulfide bond cleavage by radical attack. The radical induced disulfide bond cleavage was found to be analytically useful in providing rich sequence information for naturally occurring peptides containing intrachain disulfide bonds. The utility of this method was also demonstrated for facile disulfide peptide identification and characterization from protein digests.

  1. Tyrosine-lipid peroxide adducts from radical termination: para coupling and intramolecular Diels-Alder cyclization.

    PubMed

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N; Kim, Hye-young H; Hatch, Duane M; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael; Porter, Ned A

    2010-12-15

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogues of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometry (MS). The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic (13)C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl (13)C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All of the NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignments of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision-induced dissociation data. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined, and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion to give a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found in either the primary or cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts, which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein cross-links via interprotein Michael adducts.

  2. Determination of the primary structure of two lipid transfer proteins from apricot (Prunus armeniaca).

    PubMed

    Conti, A; Fortunato, D; Ortolani, C; Giuffrida, M G; Pravettoni, V; Napolitano, L; Farioli, L; Perono Garoffo, L; Trambaioli, C; Pastorello, E A

    2001-05-25

    It has been recently demonstrated that the major allergen of apricot is a protein of molecular mass (Mr) 9000 belonging to the family of Lipid Transfer Protein. The aim of this study was the determination of the primary structure of apricot LTP by micro-sequencing and mass spectrometric analyses. Apricot LTP is a 91 amino acids protein like peach and almond LTPs with a sequence identity of 91% and 94%, respectively. Like for the peach LTP, out of the 25 amino acids forming the inner surface of the tunnel-like hydrophobic cavity in maize ns-LTP, 16 are identical and 7 similar in the apricot LTP, supporting the hypothesis of a similar function.

  3. Photolysis of CH₃CHO at 248 nm: evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH₃ and HCO radicals and H atoms.

    PubMed

    Morajkar, Pranay; Bossolasco, Adriana; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH3CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO2 radicals by reaction with O2. The CH3 radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH3O2. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO2 profiles, obtained under various O2 concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH3 yield has been determined relative to the CH3 yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH3I. Time resolved HO2 profiles under very low O2 concentrations suggest that another unknown HO2 forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O2. HO2 profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH3CHO + hν(248nm) → CH3CHO*, CH3CHO* → CH3 + HCO ϕ(1a) = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH3CHO* → CH3 + H + CO ϕ(1e) = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH3CHO*[Formula: see text]CH3CO + HO2 ϕ(1f) = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH3O2 quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ(CH₃) = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH3 yields derived from the HO2 measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH3CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO2 and CH3 measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH3CHO* → CH4 + CO ϕ(1b) = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered pathway: CH3CHO* → CH3CO + H ϕ(1c) = 0.

  4. Prognostic significance of the bcl-2 apoptotic family of proteins in primary and recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, R. A.; Caldwell, C.; Iles, R. K.; Lowe, D.; Shepherd, J. H.; Chard, T.

    1998-01-01

    bcl-2 is one of a family of genes that control the apoptotic threshold of a cell. bcl-2 protein and its anti-apoptotic homologue, mcl-1, with the pro-apoptotic protein, bax, are thought to function by forming homo- and heterotypic dimers that then control the progression to apoptosis. p53 is also involved as a down-regulator of bcl-2 and a promoter of bax. To determine the effect of these apoptotic mechanisms, we used immunohistochemistry to determine the prognostic significance of the expression of bcl-2, mcl-1, bax and p53 in primary and recurrent cervical cancer. Tissues from 46 patients with primary cervical cancer and 28 women with recurrent carcinoma were stained for bcl-2, mcl-1, bax and p53. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed using the log-rank test for differences between groups. In the primary disease group, positive staining for bcl-2 was associated with a better 5-year survival (bcl-2 +ve, 84% vs bcl-2 -ve, 53%, P = 0.03). Positive staining for p53 was associated with a survival disadvantage (p53 +ve, 4-year survival 38% vs p53 -ve, 4-year survival 78%, P = 0.02). mcl-1 and bax staining were not useful as prognostic indicators in primary disease. No marker was prognostic in recurrent disease. Positive bcl-2 staining defines a group of patients with primary disease with a good prognosis. p53, an activator of the bax promoter, identifies a group with a worse outcome. In recurrent disease, none of the markers reflected prognosis. PMID:9683295

  5. Modulation of genotoxic effects in asbestos-exposed primary human mesothelial cells by radical scavengers, metal chelators and a glutathione precursor.

    PubMed

    Poser, Ina; Rahman, Qamar; Lohani, Mohtashim; Yadav, Santosh; Becker, Hans-Henner; Weiss, Dieter G; Schiffmann, Dietmar; Dopp, Elke

    2004-04-11

    The genotoxicity of asbestos fibers is generally mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and by insufficient antioxidant protection. To further elucidate which radicals are involved in asbestos-mediated genotoxicity and to which extent, we have carried out experiments with the metal chelators deferoxamine (DEF) and phytic acid (PA), and with the radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and the glutathione precursor Nacystelyn trade mark (NAL). We investigated the influence of these compounds on the potency of crocidolite, an amphibole asbestos fiber with a high iron content (27%), and chrysotile, a serpentine asbestos fiber with a low iron content (2%), to induce micronuclei (MN) in human mesothelial cells (HMC) after an exposure time of 24-72 h. Our results show that the number of crocidolite-induced MN is significantly reduced after pretreatment of fibers with PA and DEF. This effect was not observed with chrysotile. In contrast, simultaneous treatment of cells with asbestos and the OH*scavenging DMTU or the O2- -scavenging SOD significantly decreased the number of MN induced by chrysotile and crocidolite. In particular, DMTU almost completely suppressed micronucleus induction by both fiber types. A similar effect was observed in the presence of the H(2)O(2)-scavenging NAL after chrysotile treatment of HMC. By means of kinetochore analysis, it could be shown that the number of clastogenic events is decreased after PA and DEF pretreatment of fibers as well as after application of the above-mentioned scavengers. Our results show that chrysotile asbestos induces an increased release of H(2)O(2) in contrast to crocidolite. Also, the iron content of the fiber plays an important role in radical formation, but nevertheless, chrysotile produces oxy radicals to a similar extent as crocidolite, probably by phagocytosis-mediated oxidative bursting.

  6. Co-opting sulphur-carrier proteins from primary metabolic pathways for 2-thiosugar biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Eita; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, He G; Lu, Mei-yeh Jade; Liu, Tsung-lin; Ou, Albert; Li, Jeng-yi; Chen, Yu-hsiang; Ealick, Steven E; Liu, Hung-wen

    2014-06-19

    Sulphur is an essential element for life and is ubiquitous in living systems. Yet how the sulphur atom is incorporated into many sulphur-containing secondary metabolites is poorly understood. For bond formation between carbon and sulphur in primary metabolites, the major ionic sulphur sources are the persulphide and thiocarboxylate groups on sulphur-carrier (donor) proteins. Each group is post-translationally generated through the action of a specific activating enzyme. In all reported bacterial cases, the gene encoding the enzyme that catalyses the carbon-sulphur bond formation reaction and that encoding the cognate sulphur-carrier protein exist in the same gene cluster. To study the production of the 2-thiosugar moiety in BE-7585A, an antibiotic from Amycolatopsis orientalis, we identified a putative 2-thioglucose synthase, BexX, whose protein sequence and mode of action seem similar to those of ThiG, the enzyme that catalyses thiazole formation in thiamine biosynthesis. However, no gene encoding a sulphur-carrier protein could be located in the BE-7585A cluster. Subsequent genome sequencing uncovered a few genes encoding sulphur-carrier proteins that are probably involved in the biosynthesis of primary metabolites but only one activating enzyme gene in the A. orientalis genome. Further experiments showed that this activating enzyme can adenylate each of these sulphur-carrier proteins and probably also catalyses the subsequent thiolation, through its rhodanese domain. A proper combination of these sulphur-delivery systems is effective for BexX-catalysed 2-thioglucose production. The ability of BexX to selectively distinguish sulphur-carrier proteins is given a structural basis using X-ray crystallography. This study is, to our knowledge, the first complete characterization of thiosugar formation in nature and also demonstrates the receptor promiscuity of the A. orientalis sulphur-delivery system. Our results also show that co-opting the sulphur-delivery machinery

  7. Comparison of gel properties and biochemical characteristics of myofibrillar protein from bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) affected by frozen storage and a hydroxyl radical-generation oxidizing system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Han; Zhang, Longteng; Li, Qingzheng; Luo, Yongkang

    2017-05-15

    We wanted to clarify whether gel properties can be affected by in vivo or in vitro myofibrillar protein oxidation and, thus, to provide relevant information and a scientific foundation for the processing of gel products. To accomplish this, we measured the changes in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), total disulfide (SS) content, surface hydrophobicity (So-ANS), carbonyl content, and gel texture and water-holding capacity (WHC) of isolated myofibrillar protein from bighead carp fillets during frozen storage and under different H2O2 concentrations, which were used to represent in vivo and in vitro conditions, respectively. The results indicated that a certain range in content of disulfide crosslinks (0.91mol/10(5)g protein) would promote gel hardness. Mild protein oxidation caused by a certain degree of frozen storage and hydroxyl radicals can promote gel texture and WHC. Based on those results, freezing bighead carp for a certain period can be used to produce gel products.

  8. Ultrastructural Localization of a Bean Glycine-Rich Protein in Unlignified Primary Walls of Protoxylem Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryser, U; Keller, B

    1992-01-01

    A polyclonal antibody was used to localize a glycine-rich cell wall protein (GRP 1.8) in French bean hypocotyls with the indirect immunogold method. GRP 1.8 could be localized mainly in the unlignified primary cell walls of the oldest protoxylem elements and also in cell corners of both proto- and metaxylem elements. In addition, GRP 1.8 was detected in phloem using tissue printing. The labeled primary walls of dead protoxylem cells showed a characteristically dispersed ultrastructure, resulting from the action of hydrolases during the final steps of cell maturation and from mechanical stress due to hypocotyl growth. Primary walls of living protoxylem and adjacent parenchyma cells were only weakly labeled. This was true also for the secondary walls of proto- and metaxylem cells, which in addition showed high background labeling. Inhibition of lignification with a specific and potent inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase did not lead to enhanced labeling of secondary walls, showing that lignin does not mask the presence of GRP 1.8 in these walls. Dictyosomes of living proto- and metaxylem cells were not labeled, but dictyosomes of xylem parenchyma cells without secondary walls, adjacent to strongly labeled protoxylem elements, were clearly labeled. These observations suggest that GRP 1.8 is not produced by xylem vessels but by xylem parenchyma cells that export the protein to the wall of protoxylem vessels. PMID:12297662

  9. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D; McComb, Rodney D; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-02-17

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling.

  10. Endocytic recycling protein EHD1 regulates primary cilia morphogenesis and SHH signaling during neural tube development

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Rainey, Mark A; Arya, Priyanka; Dutta, Samikshan; George, Manju; Storck, Matthew D.; McComb, Rodney D.; Muirhead, David; Todd, Gordon L.; Gould, Karen; Datta, Kaustubh; Waes, Janee Gelineau-van; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Members of the four-member C-terminal EPS15-Homology Domain-containing (EHD) protein family play crucial roles in endocytic recycling of cell surface receptors from endosomes to the plasma membrane. In this study, we show that Ehd1 gene knockout in mice on a predominantly B6 background is embryonic lethal. Ehd1-null embryos die at mid-gestation with a failure to complete key developmental processes including neural tube closure, axial turning and patterning of the neural tube. We found that Ehd1-null embryos display short and stubby cilia on the developing neuroepithelium at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5). Loss of EHD1 also deregulates the ciliary SHH signaling with Ehd1-null embryos displaying features indicative of increased SHH signaling, including a significant downregulation in the formation of the GLI3 repressor and increase in the ventral neuronal markers specified by SHH. Using Ehd1-null MEFS we found that EHD1 protein co-localizes with the SHH receptor Smoothened in the primary cilia upon ligand stimulation. Under the same conditions, EHD1 was shown to co-traffic with Smoothened into the developing primary cilia and we identify EHD1 as a direct binding partner of Smoothened. Overall, our studies identify the endocytic recycling regulator EHD1 as a novel regulator of the primary cilium-associated trafficking of Smoothened and Hedgehog signaling. PMID:26884322

  11. Defining intact protein primary structures from saliva: a step toward the human proteome project.

    PubMed

    Halgand, F; Zabrouskov, V; Bassilian, S; Souda, P; Loo, J A; Faull, K F; Wong, D T; Whitelegge, J P

    2012-05-15

    Top-down mass spectrometry has been used to investigate structural diversity within some abundant salivary protein families. In this study, we report the identification of two isoforms of protein II-2 which differed in mass by less than 1 Da, the determination of a sequence for protein IB8a that was best satisfied by including a mutation and a covalent modification in the C-terminal part, and the assignment of a sequence of a previously unreported protein of mass 10433 Da. The final characterization of Peptide P-J was achieved, and the discovery of a truncated form of this peptide was reported. The first sequence assignment was done at low resolution using a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight instrument to quickly identify and characterize proteins, and data acquisition was switched to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) for proteins that required additional sequence coverage and certainty of assignment. High-resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometry on a FTICR-mass spectrometry (MS) instrument combined with electron-capture dissociation (ECD) provided the most informative data sets, with the more frequent presence of "unique" ions that unambiguously define the primary structure. A mixture of predictable and unusual post-translational modifications in the protein sequence precluded the use of shotgun-annotated databases at this stage, requiring manual iterations of sequence refinement in many cases. This led us to propose guidelines for an iterative processing workflow of MS and MSMS data sets that allow researchers to completely assign the identity and the structure of a protein.

  12. Turnover of thylakoid membrane proteins during senescence of primary bean leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Mattoo, A.K.; Thompson, J.E.

    1986-04-01

    Pulse-labelling of primary bean leaves (Phaseolus vulgaris) with /sup 35/S-methionine has revealed differential changes in the rates at which proteins in thylakoid membranes are synthesized during senescence. In particular, synthesis of the 32 Kd herbicide-binding protein remains highly active throughout senescence, whereas turnover of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of ATPase and of the LHCP declines. During a 24-h pulse chase experiment with unlabelled methionine, only the 32 KD protein showed evidence of degradation. Degradation of the 32 Kd unit and, to a lesser extent, of other thylakoid proteins was also observed when the membranes were aged in vitro. The latter process resembled that observed in vivo in that it was light dependent, sensitive to DCMU, and it was inhibited by spermine and Ca/sup 2 +/, both of which alter membrane fluidity. Collectively, these observations suggest that in vitro aging of thylakoid membranes is a useful model system for studying the characteristics of the thylakoid protein degradation.

  13. Molecular Recognition of PTS-1 Cargo Proteins by Pex5p: Implications for Protein Mistargeting in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3–4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state. PMID:25689234

  14. Molecular recognition of PTS-1 cargo proteins by Pex5p: implications for protein mistargeting in primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Torres, Noel; Tomic, Nenad; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo; Pey, Angel L

    2015-02-13

    Peroxisomal biogenesis and function critically depends on the import of cytosolic proteins carrying a PTS1 sequence into this organelle upon interaction with the peroxin Pex5p. Recent structural studies have provided important insights into the molecular recognition of cargo proteins by Pex5p. Peroxisomal import is a key feature in the pathogenesis of primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1), where alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) undergoes mitochondrial mistargeting in about a third of patients. Here, we study the molecular recognition of PTS1 cargo proteins by Pex5p using oligopeptides and AGT variants bearing different natural PTS1 sequences, and employing an array of biophysical, computational and cell biology techniques. Changes in affinity for Pex5p (spanning over 3-4 orders of magnitude) reflect different thermodynamic signatures, but overall bury similar amounts of molecular surface. Structure/energetic analyses provide information on the contribution of ancillary regions and the conformational changes induced in Pex5p and the PTS1 cargo upon complex formation. Pex5p stability in vitro is enhanced upon cargo binding according to their binding affinities. Moreover, we provide evidence that the rational modulation of the AGT: Pex5p binding affinity might be useful tools to investigate mistargeting and misfolding in PH1 by pulling the folding equilibria towards the native and peroxisomal import competent state.

  15. Neuronal inclusion protein TDP-43 has no primary genetic role in FTD and ALS.

    PubMed

    Gijselinck, Ilse; Sleegers, Kristel; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Robberecht, Wim; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Vandenberghe, Rik; Sciot, Raf; Dermaut, Bart; Goossens, Dirk; van der Zee, Julie; De Pooter, Tim; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Santens, Patrick; De Jonghe, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Cruts, Marc

    2009-08-01

    The nuclear TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is deposited in ubiquitin-positive inclusions in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two clinicopathologically overlapping neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we excluded mutations and copy number variations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (TARDBP) from an extended series of 173 FTD and 237 ALS patients. Further, we did not identify association of common genetic variants in these patients. Our data implicate that TDP-43 has no primary genetic role in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying central nervous system neurodegeneration in these diseases.

  16. Novel protein transfection of primary rat cortical neurons using an antibody that penetrates living cells.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, R H; Baldwin, R; Huh, B; Zack, D J; Nishimura, R

    2000-06-01

    An Ab-based system to deliver functional proteins into neurons was developed using the murine mAb, mAb 3E10. This was achieved by covalently conjugating catalase to the Ab so that the conjugate retained high activity for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide. Three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy was used to demonstrate penetration of the Ab into the nucleus of living primary cortical neurons. The Ab conjugate localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. Retention of catalase activity after penetration and distribution of conjugate was demonstrated by reduction in cell death following exposure of treated neurons to hydrogen peroxide. These studies illustrate the potential of this method for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins.

  17. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  18. Detection of radicals produced by reaction of hydroperoxides with rat liver microsomal fractions.

    PubMed

    Greenley, T L; Davies, M J

    1992-04-22

    EPR spin trapping using the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulphonic acid (DBNBS) has been employed to examine the generation of radicals produced on reaction of a number of primary, secondary and lipid hydroperoxides with rat liver microsomal fractions in both the presence and absence of reducing equivalents. Two major mechanisms of radical generation have been elucidated. In the absence of NADPH or NADH, oxidative degradation of the hydroperoxide occurs to give initially a peroxyl radical which in the majority of cases can be detected as a spin adduct to DMPO; these radicals can undergo further reactions which result in the generation of alkoxyl and carbon-centered radicals. In the presence of NADPH (and to a lesser extent NADH) alkoxyl radicals are generated directly via reductive cleavage of the hydroperoxide. These alkoxyl radicals undergo further fragmentation and rearrangement reactions to give carbon-centered species which can be identified by trapping with DBNBS. The type of transformation that occurs is highly dependent on the structure of the alkoxyl radical with species arising from beta-scission, 1,2-hydrogen shifts and ring closure reactions being identified; these processes are in accord with previous chemical studies and are characteristic of alkoxyl radicals present in free solution. Studies using specific enzyme inhibitors and metal-ion chelators suggest that most of the radical generation occurs via a catalytic process involving haem proteins and in particular cytochrome P-450. An unusual species (an acyl radical) is observed with lipid hydroperoxides; this is believed to arise via a cage reaction after beta-scission of an initial alkoxyl radical.

  19. Mechanisms of hydroxyl radical-induced contraction of rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Liu, Weimin; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-09-19

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl radicals (*OH), generated via the Fe2+-mediated Fenton reaction, on isolated rat aortic rings with and without endothelium. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, generation of *OH alone elicited an endothelium-independent contraction in rat aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyl radical-induced contractions of denuded rat aortic rings appeared, however, to be slightly stronger than those on intact rat aortic rings. The contractile responses to *OH were neither reversible nor reproducible in the same ring; even small concentrations of *OH radicals resulted in tachyphylaxis. Removal of extracellular calcium ions (Ca2+) or buffering intracellular Ca2+ with 10 microM acetyl methyl ester of bis(o-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N',-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) significantly attenuated the contractile actions of *OH radicals. The presence of 1 microM staurosporine, 1 microM bisindolylmaleimide I, 1 microM Gö6976 [inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC)], 2 microM PD-980592 (inhibitor of ERK), 10 microM genistein, and 1 microM wortmannin significantly inhibited the contractions induced by *OH. Proadifen (10 microM), on the other hand, significantly potentiated the hydroxyl radical-induced contractions. Exposure of primary cultured aortic smooth muscle cells to *OH produced significant, rapid rises of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Several, specific antagonists of possible endogenously formed vasoconstrictors did not inhibit or attenuate either hydroxyl radical-induced contractions or the elevation of [Ca2+]i. Our new results suggest that hydroxyl radical-triggered contractions on rat aortic rings are Ca2+-dependent. Several intracellular signal transduction systems seem to play some role in hydroxyl radical-induced vasoconstriction of rat aortic rings.

  20. ToF-SIMS Analysis of Adsorbed Proteins: Principal Component Analysis of the Primary Ion Species Effect on the Protein Fragmentation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Graham, Daniel J; Wagner, Matthew S; Lee, Tae Geol; Moon, Dae Won; Castner, David G

    2011-12-15

    In time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), the choice of primary ion used for analysis can influence the resulting mass spectrum. This is because different primary ion types can produce different fragmentation pathways. In this study, analysis of single-component protein monolayers were performed using monatomic, tri-atomic, and polyatomic primary ion sources. Eight primary ions (Cs(+), Au(+), Au(3) (+), Bi(+), Bi(3) (+), Bi(3) (++), C(60) (+)) were used to examine to the low mass (m/z < 200) fragmentation patterns from five different proteins (bovine serum albumin, bovine serum fibrinogen, bovine immunoglobulin G and chicken egg white lysozyme) adsorbed onto mica surfaces. Principal component analysis (PCA) processing of the ToF-SIMS data showed that variation in peak intensity caused by the primary ions was greater than differences in protein composition. The spectra generated by Cs(+), Au(+) and Bi(+) primary ions were similar, but the spectra generated by monatomic, tri-atomic and polyatomic primary ion ions varied significantly. C(60) primary ions increased fragmentation of the adsorbed proteins in the m/z < 200 region, resulting in more intense low m/z peaks. Thus, comparison of data obtained by one primary ion species with that obtained by another primary ion species should be done with caution. However, for the spectra generated using a given primary ion beam, discrimination between the spectra of different proteins followed similar trends. Therefore, a PCA model of proteins created with a given ion source should only be applied to datasets obtained using the same ion source. The type of information obtained from PCA depended on the peak set used. When only amino acid peaks were used, PCA was able to identify the relationship between proteins by their amino acid composition. When all peaks from m/z 12-200 were used, PCA separated proteins based on a ratio of C(4)H(8)N(+) to K(+) peak intensities. This ratio correlated with the thickness

  1. Primary Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma B Cell Receptors Recognize CNS Proteins.

    PubMed

    Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Purschke, Frauke G; Brunn, Anna; May, Caroline; Nordhoff, Eckhard; Marcus, Katrin; Deckert, Martina

    2015-08-01

    Primary lymphoma of the CNS (PCNSL) is a diffuse large B cell lymphoma confined to the CNS. To elucidate its peculiar organ tropism, we generated recombinant Abs (recAbs) identical to the BCR of 23 PCNSLs from immunocompetent patients. Although none of the recAbs showed self-reactivity upon testing with common autoantigens, they recognized 1547 proteins present on a large-scale protein microarray, indicating polyreactivity. Interestingly, proteins (GRINL1A, centaurin-α, BAIAP2) recognized by the recAbs are physiologically expressed by CNS neurons. Furthermore, 87% (20/23) of the recAbs, including all Abs derived from IGHV4-34 using PCNSL, recognized galectin-3, which was upregulated on microglia/macrophages, astrocytes, and cerebral endothelial cells upon CNS invasion by PCNSL. Thus, PCNSL Ig may recognize CNS proteins as self-Ags. Their interaction may contribute to BCR signaling with sustained NF-κB activation and, ultimately, may foster tumor cell proliferation and survival. These data may also explain, at least in part, the affinity of PCNSL cells for the CNS.

  2. Protein Homeostasis Defects of Alanine-Glyoxylate Aminotransferase: New Therapeutic Strategies in Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I

    PubMed Central

    Pey, Angel L.; Albert, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase catalyzes the transamination between L-alanine and glyoxylate to produce pyruvate and glycine using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor. Human alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase is a peroxisomal enzyme expressed in the hepatocytes, the main site of glyoxylate detoxification. Its deficit causes primary hyperoxaluria type I, a rare but severe inborn error of metabolism. Single amino acid changes are the main type of mutation causing this disease, and considerable effort has been dedicated to the understanding of the molecular consequences of such missense mutations. In this review, we summarize the role of protein homeostasis in the basic mechanisms of primary hyperoxaluria. Intrinsic physicochemical properties of polypeptide chains such as thermodynamic stability, folding, unfolding, and misfolding rates as well as the interaction of different folding states with protein homeostasis networks are essential to understand this disease. The view presented has important implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies based on targeting specific elements of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase homeostasis. PMID:23956997

  3. The Lowe syndrome protein OCRL1 is involved in primary cilia assembly.

    PubMed

    Coon, Brian G; Hernandez, Victor; Madhivanan, Kayalvizhi; Mukherjee, Debarati; Hanna, Claudia B; Barinaga-Rementeria Ramirez, Irene; Lowe, Martin; Beales, Philip L; Aguilar, R Claudio

    2012-04-15

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is a devastating, X-linked genetic disease characterized by the presence of congenital cataracts, profound learning disabilities and renal dysfunction. Unfortunately, children affected with LS often die early of health complications including renal failure. Although this syndrome was first described in the early 1950s and the affected gene, OCRL1, was identified more than 17 years ago, the mechanism by which Ocrl1 defects lead to LS's symptoms remains unknown. Here we show that LS display characteristics of a ciliopathy. Specifically, we found that patients' cells have defects in the assembly of primary cilia and this phenotype was reproduced in cell lines by knock-down of Ocrl1. Importantly, this defect could be rescued by re-introduction of WT Ocrl1 in both patient and Ocrl1 knock-down cells. In addition, a zebrafish animal model of LS exhibited cilia defects and multiple morphological and anatomical abnormalities typically seen in ciliopathies. Mechanistically, we show that Ocrl1 is involved in protein trafficking to the primary cilia in an Rab8-and IPIP27/Ses-dependent manner. Taking into consideration the relevance of the signaling pathways hosted by the primary cilium, our results suggest hitherto unrecognized mechanisms by which Ocrl1 deficiency may contribute to the phenotypic characteristics of LS. This conceptual change in our understanding of the disease etiology may provide an alternative avenue for the development of therapies.

  4. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root.

  5. Cofactor Editing by the G-protein Metallochaperone Domain Regulates the Radical B12 Enzyme IcmF*♦

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhu; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Twahir, Umar T.; Cracan, Valentin; Chapman, Derrell; Warncke, Kurt; Banerjee, Ruma

    2017-01-01

    IcmF is a 5′-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon skeleton rearrangement of isobutyryl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. It is a bifunctional protein resulting from the fusion of a G-protein chaperone with GTPase activity and the cofactor- and substrate-binding mutase domains with isomerase activity. IcmF is prone to inactivation during catalytic turnover, thus setting up its dependence on a cofactor repair system. Herein, we demonstrate that the GTPase activity of IcmF powers the ejection of the inactive cob(II)alamin cofactor and requires the presence of an acceptor protein, adenosyltransferase, for receiving it. Adenosyltransferase in turn converts cob(II)alamin to AdoCbl in the presence of ATP and a reductant. The repaired cofactor is then reloaded onto IcmF in a GTPase-gated step. The mechanistic details of cofactor loading and offloading from the AdoCbl-dependent IcmF are distinct from those of the better characterized and homologous methylmalonyl-CoA mutase/G-protein chaperone system. PMID:28130442

  6. Proinflammatory proteins in female and male patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Bećarević, Mirjana; Ignjatović, Svetlana

    2016-10-01

    The latest classification criteria for the diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, an autoimmune disease characterized by thromboses, miscarriages and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (Abs)) emphasized that thrombotic manifestations of APS should be without any signs of an inflammatory process. However, atherosclerosis (a chronic inflammatory response to the accumulation of lipoproteins in the walls of arteries) and APS are characterized by some similar features. We evaluated whether proinflammatory proteins were associated with the features of the primary APS (PAPS). PAPS patients without obstetric complications and with impaired lipid profile were included in the study. Antiphospholipid antibodies, TNF-alpha, and apo(a) were determined by ELISA. Complement components and hsCRP were measured by immunonephelometry. Decreased C3c was observed in female patients with increased titers of IgG anti-β2gpI (χ(2) = 3.939, P = 0.047) and in male patients with increased IgM anticardiolipin Abs (χ(2) = 4.286, P = 0.038). Pulmonary emboli were associated with interleukin (IL)-6 in male (χ(2) = 6.519, P = 0.011) and in female (χ(2) = 10.405, P = 0.001) patients. Cerebrovascular insults were associated with LDL-cholesterol (P = 0.05, 95 % CI: 1.003 - 12.739) in female and with apo(a) (P = 0.016, 95 % CI: 0.000-0.003) in male patients. Older female patients had increased LDL-cholesterol levels and frequency of myocardial infarctions. Proinflammatory proteins were associated with features of primary APS. No real gender differences in regard to proinflammatory protein levels were observed. Premenopausal state of female PAPS patients confers lower cardiovascular risk.

  7. Tanshinone I increases CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wayne Y W; Zhou, Xuelin; Or, Penelope M Y; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Yeung, John H K

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of Danshen and its active ingredients on the protein expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A2 in primary rat hepatocytes. The ethanolic extract of Danshen roots (containing mainly tanshinones) inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation (IC(50)=24.6 μg/ml) in primary rat hepatocytes while the water extract containing mainly salvianolic acid B and danshenshu had no effect. Individual tanshinones such as cryptotanshinone, dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone IIA inhibited the CYP1A2-mediated metabolism with IC(50) values at 12.9, 17.4 and 31.9 μM, respectively. After 4-day treatment of the rat hepatocytes, the ethanolic extract of Danshen and tanshinone I increased rat CYP1A2 activity by 6.8- and 5.2-fold, respectively, with a concomitant up-regulation of CYP1A2 protein level by 13.5- and 6.5-fold, respectively. CYP1A2 induction correlated with the up-regulation of mRNA level of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which suggested a positive feedback mechanism of tanshinone I-mediated CYP1A2 induction. A formulated Danshen pill (containing mainly danshensu and salvianolic acid B and the tanshinones) up-regulated CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity, but danshensu and salvianolic acid B, when used individually, did not affect CYP1A2 activity. This study was the first report on the Janus action of the tanshinones on rat CYP1A2 activity.

  8. Benidipine reduces myocardial infarct size involving reduction of hydroxyl radicals and production of protein kinase C-dependent nitric oxide in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningyuan; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Chen, Xue-Hai; Arai, Masazumi; Uno, Yoshihiro; Lu, ChuanJiang; Misao, Yu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Takemura, Genzou; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi

    2004-06-01

    Japanese white rabbits underwent 30 minutes of ischemia and 48 hours of reperfusion. Benidipine (3 or 10 microg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before ischemia with and without pretreatment with L-NAME (10 mg/kg, i.v., a NOS inhibitor), chelerythrine (5 mg/kg, i.v., a PKC blocker) or 5-HD (5 mg/kg, i.v. a mitochondrial KATP channel blocker), genistein (5 mg/kg, i.v. a protein tyrosin kinase blocker). SNAP (2.5 mg/kg/min x 70 minutes, i.v., an NO donor) was also administered 10 minutes before ischemia. Benidipine significantly reduced the infarct size in a dose-dependent manner (3 microg/kg: 29.0 +/- 2.7%, n = 8, 10 microg/kg: 23.0 +/- 2.4%, n = 10) compared with the control (41.6 +/- 3.3%, n = 10). This effect was completely blocked by L-NAME (39.9 +/- 3.6%, n = 8) and chelerythrine (35.5 +/- 2.4%, n = 8) but not by 5-HD (23.0 +/- 2.4%, n = 10) or genistein (24.6 +/- 3.1%, n = 10). SNAP also reduced the infarct size (24.6 +/- 3.1%, n = 8). Benidipine significantly increased the expression of eNOS mRNA at 30 minutes after reperfusion and significantly increased the expression of eNOS protein at 3 hours after reperfusion in the ischemic area of the left ventricle. Benidipine and SNAP significantly decreased myocardial interstitial 2,5-DHBA levels, an indicator of hydroxyl radicals, during ischemia and reperfusion. Benidipine increased myocardial interstitial NOx levels, which effect was blocked by chelerythrine, during 0 to 30 minutes and 150 to 180 minutes after reperfusion. Benidipine reduces the infarct size through PKC-dependent production of nitric oxide and decreasing hydroxyl radicals but not through involving protein tyrosine kinase or mitochondrial KATP channels in rabbits.

  9. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  10. Foxp3-dependent Transformation of Human Primary CD4+ T Lymphocytes by the Retroviral Protein Tax

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. PMID:26381169

  11. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

  12. Ganglioside inhibition of glutamate-mediated protein kinase C translocation in primary cultures of cerebellar neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarino, F.; Guidotti, A.; Costa, E.

    1987-12-01

    In primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, protein kinase C (PKC) translocation and activation can be triggered by the stimulation of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter receptors. Glutamate evokes a dose-related translocation of 4-..beta..-(/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate /(/sup 3/H)-P(BtO)/sub 2// binding sites from the cytosol to the neuronal membrane and stimulates the incorporation of /sup 32/P into a number of membrane proteins, particularly protein bands in the range of 80, 50, and 40 kDa. The glutamate-evoked PKC translocation is Mg/sup 2 +/ sensitive, is prevented by 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate and phencyclidine, is not inhibited by nitrendipine (a voltage-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/-channel-blocker) but is abolished by the removal of Ca/sup 2 +/ from the incubation medium, suggesting that glutamate-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ influx is operative in the redistribution of PKC. Exposure of granule cells to the gangliosides trisialosylgangliotetraglycosylceramide (GT1b) of monosialosylgangliotetraglycosylceramide (GM1) inhibits the translocation and activation of PKC evoked by glutamate. These glycosphingolipids fail to interfere with glutamate binding to its high-affinity recognition site of with the (/sup 3/H)P(BtO)/sub 2/ binding, nor do they affect the Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. These gangliosides may prevent PKC translocation by interfering with the PKC binding to the neuronal membrane phosphatidylserine.

  13. PERK regulates Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siying; McGrath, Barbara C; Bai, Yuting; Tang, Xin; Cavener, Douglas R

    2016-10-01

    PERK (EIF2AK3) is an ER-resident eIF2α kinase required for behavioral flexibility and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent long-term depression via its translational control. Motivated by the recent discoveries that PERK regulates Ca(2+) dynamics in insulin-secreting β-cells underlying glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and modulates Ca(2+) signals-dependent working memory, we explored the role of PERK in regulating Gq protein-coupled Ca(2+) dynamics in pyramidal neurons. We found that acute PERK inhibition by the use of a highly specific PERK inhibitor reduced the intracellular Ca(2+) rise stimulated by the activation of acetylcholine, metabotropic glutamate and bradykinin-2 receptors in primary cortical neurons. More specifically, acute PERK inhibition increased IP3 receptor mediated ER Ca(2+) release, but decreased receptor-operated extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Impaired Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) rise was also observed in genetic Perk knockout neurons. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel role of PERK in neurons, which is eIF2α-independent, and suggest that the impaired working memory in forebrain-specific Perk knockout mice may stem from altered Gq protein-coupled intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in cortical pyramidal neurons.

  14. Picosecond Raman Study of Vibrational Cooling and Protein Dynamics in the Primary Photochemistry of Rhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Judy; Mathies, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Picosecond Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra are used to probe the structural dynamics and reactive energy flow of both the chromophore and binding pocket residues in the primary cis-to-trans isomerization reaction of rhodopsin. The appearance of characteristic ethylenic, hydrogen out-of-plane (HOOP) and low-wavenumber photoproduct bands in the Stokes Raman spectra of the chromophore is instrument-response limited, consistent with a sub-picosecond product appearance time (1,2). Intense high and low-frequency anti-Stokes chromophore peaks demonstrate that the all-trans photoproduct, photorhodopsin, is produced vibrationally hot on the ground-state surface (2). Specifically, the low-frequency modes at 282, 350 and 477 cm-1 are highly vibrationally excited (T > 2000 K) immediately following isomerization, revealing that these low-frequency motions directly participate in the reactive curve-crossing process. The anti-Stokes modes are characterized by a ˜2.5 ps temporal decay that coincides with the conversion of photorhodopsin to bathorhodopsin. This correspondence shows that the photo-to-batho transition is a ground-state cooling process, and that energy storage in the primary visual photoproduct is complete on the picosecond time scale. The remarkable similarity between the room-temperature picosecond vibrational structure of photo- and bathorhodopsin and that of the low-temperature trapped primary photoproduct suggests that chromophore isomerization impulsively excites and drives changes in nearby protein residues. These amino acid changes within the binding pocket are probed by picosecond UV Raman spectroscopy of aromatic residues (3). Difference spectra reveal that at least one tryptophan (trp265) and one tyrosine (tyr191, 268 and/or 178) residue undergoes structural changes in < 5 ps, presumably due to steric interaction with the isomerizing chromophore as well as energy flow from chromophore to the binding pocket. This result indicates that the protein

  15. Potential cytoprotection: antioxidant defence by caffeic acid phenethyl ester against free radical-induced damage of lipids, DNA, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Lixiang; Wu, Weimin; Long, Yuan; Wang, Rui

    2008-05-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, possesses a variety of biological and pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study, we focused on the diverse antioxidative functionalities of CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters on cellular macromolecules in vitro. The effects on human erythrocyte membrane ghost lipid peroxidation, plasmid pBR322 DNA, and protein damage initiated by the water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides and by DNA nicking assay, single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters elicited remarkable inhibitory effects on erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation. The results suggest that CAPE is a potent exogenous cytoprotective and antigenotoxic agent against cell oxidative damage that could be used as a template for designing novel drugs to combat diseases induced by oxidative stress components, such as various types of cancer.

  16. On the Involvement of Single-Bond Rotation in the Primary Photochemistry of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Andreas D.; Hospes, Marijke; Singhal, Kushagra; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, have led to the proposal that C4-C7 single-bond rotation may play an important role in the primary photochemistry of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We therefore synthesized an analog of this protein's 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore, (5-hydroxy indan-(1E)-ylidene)acetic acid, in which rotation across the C4-C7 single bond has been locked with an ethane bridge, and we reconstituted the apo form of the wild-type protein and its R52A derivative with this chromophore analog. In PYP reconstituted with the rotation-locked chromophore, 1), absorption spectra of ground and intermediate states are slightly blue-shifted; 2), the quantum yield of photochemistry is ∼60% reduced; 3), the excited-state dynamics of the chromophore are accelerated; and 4), dynamics of the thermal recovery reaction of the protein are accelerated. A significant finding was that the yield of the transient ground-state intermediate in the early phase of the photocycle was considerably higher in the rotation-locked samples than in the corresponding samples reconstituted with p-coumaric acid. In contrast to theoretical predictions, the initial photocycle dynamics of PYP were observed to be not affected by the charge of the amino acid residue at position 52, which was varied by 1), varying the pH of the sample between 5 and 10; and 2), site-directed mutagenesis to construct R52A. These results imply that C4-C7 single-bond rotation in PYP is not an alternative to C7=C8 double-bond rotation, in case the nearby positive charge of R52 is absent, but rather facilitates, presumably with a compensatory movement, the physiological Z/E isomerization of the blue-light-absorbing chromophore. PMID:21889456

  17. Structural Analysis of the Glycosylated Intact HIV-1 gp120–b12 Antibody Complex Using Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp120 is a surface antigen and virulence factor of human immunodeficiency virus 1. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that react to gp120 from a variety of HIV isolates offer hope for the development of broadly effective immunogens for vaccination purposes, if the interactions between gp120 and bNAbs can be understood. From a structural perspective, gp120 is a particularly difficult system because of its size, the presence of multiple flexible regions, and the large amount of glycosylation, all of which are important in gp120–bNAb interactions. Here, the interaction of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with bNAb b12 is probed using high-resolution hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HR-HRPF) by fast photochemical oxidation of proteins. HR-HRPF allows for the measurement of changes in the average solvent accessible surface area of multiple amino acids without the need for measures that might alter the protein conformation, such as mutagenesis. HR-HRPF of the gp120–b12 complex coupled with computational modeling shows a novel extensive interaction of the V1/V2 domain, probably with the light chain of b12. Our data also reveal HR-HRPF protection in the C3 domain caused by interaction of the N330 glycan with the b12 light chain. In addition to providing information about the interactions of full-length, glycosylated gp120 with b12, this work serves as a template for the structural interrogation of full-length glycosylated gp120 with other bNAbs to better characterize the interactions that drive the broad specificity of the bNAb. PMID:28102671

  18. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials.

  19. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  20. Plasma steroid-binding proteins: primary gatekeepers of steroid hormone action

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biologically active steroids are transported in the blood by albumin, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). These plasma proteins also regulate the non-protein-bound or ‘free’ fractions of circulating steroid hormones that are considered to be biologically active; as such, they can be viewed as the ‘primary gatekeepers of steroid action’. Albumin binds steroids with limited specificity and low affinity, but its high concentration in blood buffers major fluctuations in steroid concentrations and their free fractions. By contrast, SHBG and CBG play much more dynamic roles in controlling steroid access to target tissues and cells. They bind steroids with high (~nM) affinity and specificity, with SHBG binding androgens and estrogens and CBG binding glucocorticoids and progesterone. Both are glycoproteins that are structurally unrelated, and they function in different ways that extend beyond their transportation or buffering functions in the blood. Plasma SHBG and CBG production by the liver varies during development and different physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and abnormalities in the plasma levels of SHBG and CBG or their abilities to bind steroids are associated with a variety of pathologies. Understanding how the unique structures of SHBG and CBG determine their specialized functions, how changes in their plasma levels are controlled, and how they function outside the blood circulation provides insight into how they control the freedom of steroids to act in health and disease. PMID:27113851

  1. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  2. Protein Analysis of Glioblastoma Primary and Posttreatment Pairs Suggests a Mesenchymal Shift at Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Reis, Gerald F; Reuss, David E; Phillips, Joanna J

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are aggressive brain tumors that inevitably recur despite surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation. The degree to which recurrent GBM retains its initial immunophenotype is incompletely understood. We generated tissue microarrays of paired initial and posttreatment GBM (3 pairs positive and 17 negative for IDH1(R132H)) from the same patients and made comparisons in the IDH1(R132H)-negative group for immunohistochemical and gene expression differences between primary and recurrent tumors. In initial tumors, immunopositivity for Ki-67 in > 20% of tumor cells was associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival. Recurrent tumors showed decreased staining for CD34 suggesting lower vessel density. A subset of tumors showed increased staining for markers associated with the mesenchymal gene expression pattern, including CD44, phosphorylated STAT3, and YKL40. Recurrent tumors with the greatest increase in mesenchymal marker expression had rapid clinical progression, but no difference in overall survival after second surgery. Comparison of protein and gene expression data from the same samples revealed a poor correlation. A subset of tumors (15%) showed loss of neurofibromin protein in both initial and recurrent tumors. These data support the notion that GBM progression is associated with a shift toward a mesenchymal phenotype in a subset of tumors and this may portend a more aggressive behavior.

  3. Detection and quantification of apoptosis in primary cells using Taqman® protein assay.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Christina; Pfrommer, Heike; Tatagiba, Marcos S; Roser, Florian

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods to detect apoptosis using cleaved caspase-3 and each harbors its own advantages and disadvantages. When primary cell cultures are used, the disadvantages of the standard methods can make apoptosis detection difficult due to their slow growth rate and replicative senescence, thereby limiting the available cell number and experiment time span. In this chapter, we describe apoptosis detection and quantification using an innovative method named TaqMan(®) protein assay. TaqMan(®) protein assay uses antibodies and proximity ligation for quantitative real-time PCR. Biotinylated antibodies are labeled with oligonucleotides. When the labeled antibodies bind in close proximity, the oligonucleotides are connected using DNA ligase. The ligation product is amplified and detected using Taqman(®) based Real-Time PCR. Using this technique, we can not only detect apoptosis with a 1,000-fold higher sensitivity than western blot, but we can also exactly quantify cleaved caspase-3 expression. Thereby apoptosis can be determined and quantified in a fast reliable manner.

  4. Expression of c-erbB3 protein in primary breast carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, R.; Yadav, M.; Nair, S.; Kutty, M. K.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of c-erbB3 protein was investigated in 104 primary breast carcinomas comprising nine comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 91 invasive ductal carcinomas and four invasive lobular carcinomas using two monoclonal antibodies, RTJ1 and RTJ2. Of the 91 invasive ductal carcinomas, seven contained the comedo DCIS component adjacent to the invasive component. An immunohistochemical technique was used to evaluate the association between expression of c-erbB3 and clinical parameters and tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-erbB2, cathepsin-D and p53 in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour tissues. Our results indicated that RTJ1 and RTJ2 gave identical staining patterns and concordant results. It was found that the overexpression of c-erbB3 protein was observed in 67% (6/9) of comedo DCIS, 52% (44/84) of invasive ductal carcinomas, 71% (5/7) of carcinomas containing both the in situ and invasive lesions and 25% (1/4) of invasive lobular carcinomas. A significant relationship (P < 0.05) was observed between strong immunoreactivity of c-erbB3 protein and histological grade, EGFR and cathepsin-D, but not with expression of c-erbB2, p53, oestrogen receptor status, lymph node metastases or age of patient. However, we noted that a high percentage of oestrogen receptor-negative tumours (59%), lymph node-positive tumours (63%) and c-erbB2 (63%) were strongly positive for c-erbB3 protein. We have also documented that a high percentage of EGFR (67%), c-erbB2 (67%), p53 (75%) and cathepsin-D-positive DCIS (60%) were strongly positive for c-erbB3. These observations suggest that overexpression of c-erbB3 protein could play an important role in tumour progression from non-invasive to invasive and, also, that it may have the potential to be used as a marker for poor prognosis of breast cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9823984

  5. MGMT promoter methylation and correlation with protein expression in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Toffolatti, L; Scquizzato, E; Cavallin, S; Canal, F; Scarpa, M; Stefani, P M; Gherlinzoni, F; Dei Tos, A P

    2014-11-01

    The O (6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene encodes for a DNA repairing enzyme of which silencing by promoter methylation is involved in brain tumorigenesis. MGMT promoter methylation represents a favorable prognostic factor and has been associated with a better response to alkylating agents in glioma and systemic lymphoma. Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal malignant lymphoma. The current standard of care, based on high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy, has improved prognosis but outcome remains poor for a majority of patients. Therapeutic progress in this field is conditioned by limited biological and molecular knowledge about the disease. Temozolomide has recently emerged as an alternative option for PCNSL treatment. We aimed to analyze the MGMT gene methylation status in a series of 24 PCNSLs, to investigate the relationship between methylation status of the gene and immunohistochemical expression of MGMT protein and to evaluate the possible prognostic significance of these biomarkers. Our results confirm that methylation of the MGMT gene and loss of MGMT protein are frequent events in these lymphomas (54 % of our cases) and suggest that they are gender and age related. MGMT methylation showed high correlation with loss of protein expression (concordance correlation coefficient = -0.49; Fisher exact test: p < 0.01), different from what has been observed in other brain tumors. In the subgroup of ten patients who received high dose chemotherapy, the presence of methylated MGMT promoter (n = 4), seems to be associated with a prolonged overall survival (>60 months in three of four patients). The prognostic significance of these molecular markers in PCNSL needs to be further studied in groups of patients treated in a homogeneous way.

  6. Substance P suppresses GABAA receptor function via protein kinase C in primary sensory neurones of bullfrogs.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, K; Akasu, T

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of substance P (SP) and related tachykinins on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors were examined in acutely dissociated neurones of bullfrog dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. 2. Application of SP (10 nM to 1 microM) depressed inward currents produced by GABAA receptor activation (IGABA). Neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) also depressed IGABA; the rank order of agonist potency was SP > NKA > NKB. Spantide ([D-Arg1, D-Trp7,9,Leu11]SP) and L-703,606, NK1 receptor antagonists, blocked the SP-induced depression of IGABA. 3. SP irreversibly depressed IGABA, when neurones were intracellularly dialysed with GTP gamma S. Intracellular application of GDP beta S prevented the SP-induced depression of IGABA. Pertussis toxin (PTX) did not block the inhibitory effect of SP on IGABA. 4. The depression of IGABA produced by SP was inhibited by H-7 and PKC(19-36), protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, but not by H-9 and HA-1004, protein kinase A inhibitors. IGABA was suppressed by application of sn-1,2-dioctanoyl glycerol (DOG), a PKC activator. 5. It is concluded that activation of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors downregulates the function of the GABAA receptor of primary sensory neurones through a PTX-insensitive G-protein. PKC may be involved in the transduction pathway of the tachykinin-induced inhibition of the GABAA receptor. PMID:8910228

  7. Mutations in STIL, encoding a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, cause primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Girimaji, Satish C; Duvvari, Mahesh R; Blanton, Susan H

    2009-02-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) is an autosomal-recessive congenital disorder characterized by smaller-than-normal brain size and mental retardation. MCPH is genetically heterogeneous with six known loci: MCPH1-MCPH6. We report mapping of a novel locus, MCPH7, to chromosome 1p32.3-p33 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417, corresponding to a physical distance of 8.39 Mb. Heterogeneity analysis of 24 families previously excluded from linkage to the six known MCPH loci suggested linkage of five families (20.83%) to the MCPH7 locus. In addition, four families were excluded from linkage to the MCPH7 locus as well as all of the six previously known loci, whereas the remaining 15 families could not be conclusively excluded or included. The combined maximum two-point LOD score for the linked families was 5.96 at marker D1S386 at theta = 0.0. The combined multipoint LOD score was 6.97 between markers D1S2797 and D1S417. Previously, mutations in four genes, MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ, that code for centrosomal proteins have been shown to cause this disorder. Three different homozygous mutations in STIL, which codes for a pericentriolar and centrosomal protein, were identified in patients from three of the five families linked to the MCPH7 locus; all are predicted to truncate the STIL protein. Further, another recently ascertained family was homozygous for the same mutation as one of the original families. There was no evidence for a common haplotype. These results suggest that the centrosome and its associated structures are important in the control of neurogenesis in the developing human brain.

  8. The Fusion Protein Specificity of the Parainfluenza Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein Is Not Solely Defined by the Primary Structure of Its Stalk Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Morihiro; Ohtsuka, Junpei; Hara, Kenichiro; Komada, Hiroshi; Nishio, Machiko; Nosaka, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus-specific interaction between the attachment protein (HN) and the fusion protein (F) is prerequisite for the induction of membrane fusion by parainfluenza viruses. This HN-F interaction presumably is mediated by particular amino acids in the HN stalk domain and those in the F head domain. We found in the present study, however, that a simian virus 41 (SV41) F-specific chimeric HPIV2 HN protein, SCA, whose cytoplasmic, transmembrane, and stalk domains were derived from the SV41 HN protein, could not induce cell-cell fusion of BHK-21 cells when coexpressed with an SV41 HN-specific chimeric PIV5 F protein, no. 36. Similarly, a headless form of the SV41 HN protein failed to induce fusion with chimera no. 36, whereas it was able to induce fusion with the SV41 F protein. Interestingly, replacement of 13 amino acids of the SCA head domain, which are located at or around the dimer interface of the head domain, with SV41 HN counterparts resulted in a chimeric HN protein, SCA-RII, which induced fusion with chimera no. 36 but not with the SV41 F protein. More interestingly, retroreplacement of 11 out of the 13 amino acids of SCA-RII with the SCA counterparts resulted in another chimeric HN protein, IM18, which induced fusion either with chimera no. 36 or with the SV41 F protein, similar to the SV41 HN protein. Thus, we conclude that the F protein specificity of the HN protein that is observed in the fusion event is not solely defined by the primary structure of the HN stalk domain. IMPORTANCE It is appreciated that the HN head domain initially conceals the HN stalk domain but exposes it after the head domain has bound to the receptors, which allows particular amino acids in the stalk domain to interact with the F protein and trigger it to induce fusion. However, other regulatory roles of the HN head domain in the fusion event have been ill defined. We have shown in the current study that removal of the head domain or amino acid substitutions in a particular

  9. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110 nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420 ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50 ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20 nm and about 110 nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio.

  10. Construction of gene/protein interaction networks for primary myelofibrosis and KEGG pathway-enrichment analysis of molecular compounds.

    PubMed

    Sun, C G; Cao, X J; Zhou, C; Liu, L J; Feng, F B; Liu, R J; Zhuang, J; Li, Y J

    2015-12-08

    The objective of this study was the development of a gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis based on gene expression, and the enrichment analysis of KEGG pathways underlying the molecular complexes in this network. To achieve this, genes involved in primary myelofibrosis were selected from the OMIM database. A gene/protein interaction network for primary myelofibrosis was obtained through Cytoscape with the literature mining performed using the Agilent Literature Search plugin. The molecular complexes in the network were detected by ClusterViz plugin and KEGG pathway enrichment of molecular complexes was performed using DAVID online. We found 75 genes associated with primary myelofibrosis in the OMIM database. The gene/protein interaction network of primary myelofibrosis contained 608 nodes, 2086 edges, and 4 molecular complexes with a correlation integral value greater than 4. Molecular complexes involved in KEGG pathways are related to cytokine regulation, immune function regulation, ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, actin cytoskeleton regulation, cell adhesion molecules, and other biological behavior of tumors, which can provide a reliable direction for the treatment of primary myelofibrosis and the bioinformatic foundation for further understanding the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  11. Towards a comprehensive view of the primary structure of venom proteins from the parasitoid wasp Pimpla hypochondriaca.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Neil M; Conyers, Christine; Keen, Jeff; MacNicoll, Alan; Smith, Ian; Audsley, Neil; Weaver, Robert

    2004-06-01

    Venom from the parasitoid wasp Pimpla hypochondriaca has potent in vivo activity against insect haemocytes and disrupts host immune responses. Using hybridisation techniques, and more recently random sequence analysis, we had previously identified cDNAs encoding 10 venom proteins from this wasp and deduced their primary structures. We have now extended the random sequence analysis and discovered a further nine cDNAs encoding proteins with predicted signal sequences. The mature proteins were calculated to have masses of between 4 and 22 kDa. Post-signal sequence residues predicted from the cDNAs matched those derived by Edman degradation from venom proteins separated using gel filtration and reverse phase chromatography, confirming that the cloned cDNAs encode proteins which are secreted into the venom sac. Proteins containing at least six cysteine residues were abundant and seven of these cysteine-rich venom proteins, cvp1-7, were identified. The sequences of some of these proteins were similar, or contained similar cysteine arrangements, to Kunitz type protease inhibitors, pacifastin, the trypsin inhibitor domain protein family, atracotoxin and omega-conotoxin, respectively, which occur in a diverse range of animals including spiders, molluscs, humans and grasshoppers. Two small venom proteins, svp1 and svp2, as well as cvp7 did not have similar sequences to proteins in the GenBank protein database suggesting they may be highly specialised venom components. The random sequencing approach has provided a rapid means of determining the primary structure of the majority of Pimpla hypochondriaca venom proteins.

  12. Reading the primary structure of a protein with 0.07 nm3 resolution using a subnanometre-diameter pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Dong, Zhuxin; Tennant, Clare; Timp, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    The primary structure of a protein consists of a sequence of amino acids and is a key factor in determining how a protein folds and functions. However, conventional methods for sequencing proteins, such as mass spectrometry and Edman degradation, suffer from short reads and lack sensitivity, so alternative approaches are sought. Here, we show that a subnanometre-diameter pore, sputtered through a thin silicon nitride membrane, can be used to detect the primary structure of a denatured protein molecule. When a denatured protein immersed in electrolyte is driven through the pore by an electric field, measurements of a blockade in the current reveal nearly regular fluctuations, the number of which coincides with the number of residues in the protein. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the fluctuations are highly correlated with the volumes that are occluded by quadromers (four residues) in the primary structure. Each fluctuation, therefore, represents a read of a quadromer. Scrutiny of the fluctuations reveals that the subnanometre pore is sensitive enough to read the occluded volume that is related to post-translational modifications of a single residue, measuring volume differences of ∼0.07 nm3, but it is not sensitive enough to discriminate between the volumes of all twenty amino acids.

  13. Mutations in Centrosomal Protein CEP152 in Primary Microcephaly Families Linked to MCPH4

    PubMed Central

    Guernsey, Duane L.; Jiang, Haiyan; Hussin, Julie; Arnold, Marc; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Perry, Scott; Babineau-Sturk, Tina; Beis, Jill; Dumas, Nadine; Evans, Susan C.; Ferguson, Meghan; Matsuoka, Makoto; Macgillivray, Christine; Nightingale, Mathew; Patry, Lysanne; Rideout, Andrea L.; Thomas, Aidan; Orr, Andrew; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Michaud, Jacques L.; Awadalla, Philip; Meek, David C.; Ludman, Mark; Samuels, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Primary microcephaly is a rare condition in which brain size is substantially diminished without other syndromic abnormalities. Seven autosomal loci have been genetically mapped, and the underlying causal genes have been identified for MCPH1, MCPH3, MCPH5, MCPH6, and MCPH7 but not for MCPH2 or MCPH4. The known genes play roles in mitosis and cell division. We ascertained three families from an Eastern Canadian subpopulation, each with one microcephalic child. Homozygosity analysis in two families using genome-wide dense SNP genotyping supported linkage to the published MCPH4 locus on chromosome 15q21.1. Sequencing of coding exons of candidate genes in the interval identified a nonconservative amino acid change in a highly conserved residue of the centrosomal protein CEP152. The affected children in these two families were both homozygous for this missense variant. The third affected child was compound heterozygous for the missense mutation plus a second, premature-termination mutation truncating a third of the protein and preventing its localization to centrosomes in transfected cells. CEP152 is the putative mammalian ortholog of Drosphila asterless, mutations in which affect mitosis in the fly. Published data from zebrafish are also consistent with a role of CEP152 in centrosome function. By RT-PCR, CEP152 is expressed in the embryonic mouse brain, similar to other MCPH genes. Like some other MCPH genes, CEP152 shows signatures of positive selection in the human lineage. CEP152 is a strong candidate for the causal gene underlying MCPH4 and may be an important gene in the evolution of human brain size. PMID:20598275

  14. Regulation of protein kinase D during differentiation and proliferation of primary mouse keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ernest Dodd, M; Ristich, Vladimir L; Ray, Sagarika; Lober, Robert M; Bollag, Wendy B

    2005-08-01

    Diseased skin often exhibits a deregulated program of the keratinocyte maturation necessary for epidermal stratification and function. Protein kinase D (PKD), a serine/threonine kinase, is expressed in proliferating keratinocytes, and PKD activation occurs in response to mitogen stimulation in other cell types. We have proposed that PKD functions as a pro-proliferative and/or anti-differentiative signal in keratinocytes and hypothesized that differentiation inducers will downmodulate PKD to allow differentiation to proceed. Thus, changes in PKD levels, autophosphorylation, and activity were analyzed upon stimulation of differentiation and proliferation in primary mouse keratinocytes. Elevated extracellular calcium and acute 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) treatments induced differentiation and triggered a downmodulation of PKD levels, autophosphorylation at serine 916, and activity. Chronic TPA treatment stimulated proliferation and resulted in a recovery of PKD levels, autophosphorylation, and activity. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated PKD localization predominantly in the proliferative basal layer of mouse epidermis. Co-expression studies revealed a pro-proliferative, anti-differentiative effect of PKD on keratinocyte maturation as monitored by increased and decreased promoter activities of keratin 5, a proliferative marker, and involucrin, a differentiative marker, respectively. This work describes the inverse regulation of PKD during keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation and the pro-proliferative/anti-differentiative effects of PKD co-expression on keratinocyte maturation.

  15. Cadmium induces apoptosis in primary rat osteoblasts through caspase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongyan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dai, Nannan; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xuezhong; Bian, Jianchun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to cadmium (Cd) induces apoptosis in osteoblasts (OBs); however, little information is available regarding the specific mechanisms of Cd-induced primary rat OB apoptosis. In this study, Cd reduced cell viability, damaged cell membranes and induced apoptosis in OBs. We observed decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potentials, ultrastructure collapse, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and increased concentrations of cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 following Cd treatment. Cd also increased the phosphorylation of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in OBs. Pretreatment with the caspase inhibitor, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone, ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 inhibitor (SB203580) and JNK inhibitor (SP600125) abrogated Cd-induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, Cd-treated OBs exhibited signs of oxidative stress protection, including increased antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase levels and decreased formation of reactive oxygen species. Taken together, the results of our study clarified that Cd has direct cytotoxic effects on OBs, which are mediated by caspase- and MAPK pathways in Cd-induced apoptosis of OBs. PMID:26425111

  16. TGF beta-induced growth inhibition in primary fibroblasts requires the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R E; Mäkelä, T P; Weinberg, R A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) inhibits cell proliferation by inducing a G1 cell-cycle arrest. Cyclin/CDK complexes have been implicated in this arrest, because TGF beta treatment leads to inhibition of cyclin/CDK activity. We have investigated the role of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in TGF beta-induced growth arrest by using RB+/+ and RB-/- primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. In both of these cell types, TGF beta inhibits CDK4-associated kinase activity. However, whereas CDK2-associated kinase activity was completely inhibited by TGF beta in the wild-type cells, it was reduced only slightly in the RB mutant cells. In addition, at high-cell density the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF beta are no longer observed in the RB-/- cells; on the contrary, TGF beta treatment promotes the growth of these mutant fibroblasts. Thus, under certain cellular growth conditions, elimination of pRb transforms the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF beta into growth-stimulatory effects. These observations could help to explain why TGF beta is often found to enhance tumorigenicity in vivo and why inactivation of the RB gene leads to tumorigenesis.

  17. Heat shock proteins and chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bårdsen, Kjetil; Nilsen, Mari Mæland; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Norheim, Katrine Brække; Jonsson, Grete; Omdal, Roald

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue occurs frequently in patients with cancer, neurological diseases and chronic inflammatory diseases, but the biological mechanisms that lead to and regulate fatigue are largely unknown. When the innate immune system is activated, heat shock proteins (HSPs) are produced to protect cells. Some extracellular HSPs appear to recognize cellular targets in the brain, and we hypothesize that fatigue may be generated by specific HSPs signalling through neuronal or glial cells in the central nervous system. From a cohort of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome, 20 patients with high and 20 patients with low fatigue were selected. Fatigue was evaluated with a fatigue visual analogue scale. Plasma concentrations of HSP32, HSP60, HSP72 and HSP90α were measured and analysed to determine if there were associations with the level of fatigue. Plasma concentrations of HSP90α were significantly higher in patients with high fatigue compared with those with low fatigue, and there was a tendency to higher concentrations of HSP72 in patients with high fatigue compared with patients with low fatigue. There were no differences in concentrations of HSP32 and HSP60 between the high- and low-fatigue groups. Thus, extracellular HSPs, particularly HSP90α, may signal fatigue in chronic inflammation. This supports the hypothesis that fatigue is generated by cellular defence mechanisms.

  18. The tyrosyl free radical in ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Gräslund, A; Sahlin, M; Sjöberg, B M

    1985-01-01

    The enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase, catalyses the formation of deoxyribonucleotides from ribonucleotides, a reaction essential for DNA synthesis in all living cells. The Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase, which is the prototype of all known eukaryotic and virus-coded enzymes, consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins B1 and B2. The B2 subunit contains an antiferromagnetically coupled pair of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of ferric ions and a stable tyrosyl free radical. EPR studies show that the tyrosyl radical, formed by loss of an electron, has its unpaired spin density delocalized in the aromatic ring of tyrosine. Effects of iron-radical interaction indicate a relatively close proximity between the iron center and the radical. The EPR signal of the radical can be studied directly in frozen packed cells of E. coli or mammalian origin, if the cells are made to overproduce ribonucleotide reductase. The hypothetic role of the tyrosyl free radical in the enzymatic reaction is not yet elucidated, except in the reaction with the inhibiting substrate analogue 2'-azido-CDP. In this case, the normal tyrosyl radical is destroyed with concomitant appearance of a 2'-azido-CDP-localized radical intermediate. Attempts at spin trapping of radical reaction intermediates have turned out negative. In E. coli the activity of ribonucleotide reductase may be regulated by enzymatic activities that interconvert a nonradical containing form and the fully active protein B2. In synchronized mammalian cells, however, the cell cycle variation of ribonucleotide reductase, studied by EPR, was shown to be due to de novo protein synthesis. Inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase are of medical interest because of their ability to control DNA synthesis. One example is hydroxyurea, used in cancer therapy, which selectively destroys the tyrosyl free radical. PMID:3007085

  19. EFFECT OF ARSENICALS ON THE EXPRESSION OF CELL CYCLE PROTEINS AND EARLY SIGNALING EVENTS IN PRIMARY HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Arsenicals on the Expression of Cell Cycle Proteins and Early Signaling Events in Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    Mudipalli, A, Owen R. D. and R. J. Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711.

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is a m...

  20. Superoxide activates uncoupling proteins by generating carbon-centered radicals and initiating lipid peroxidation: studies using a mitochondria-targeted spin trap derived from alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael P; Echtay, Karim S; Blaikie, Frances H; Asin-Cayuela, Jordi; Cocheme, Helena M; Green, Katherine; Buckingham, Julie A; Taylor, Ellen R; Hurrell, Fiona; Hughes, Gillian; Miwa, Satomi; Cooper, Christopher E; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Smith, Robin A J; Brand, Martin D

    2003-12-05

    Although the physiological role of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) 2 and 3 is uncertain, their activation by superoxide and by lipid peroxidation products suggest that UCPs are central to the mitochondrial response to reactive oxygen species. We examined whether superoxide and lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal act independently to activate UCPs, or if they share a common pathway, perhaps by superoxide exposure leading to the formation of lipid peroxidation products. This possibility can be tested by blocking the putative reactive oxygen species cascade with selective antioxidants and then reactivating UCPs with distal cascade components. We synthesized a mitochondria-targeted derivative of the spin trap alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, which reacts rapidly with carbon-centered radicals but is unreactive with superoxide and lipid peroxidation products. [4-[4-[[(1,1-Dimethylethyl)-oxidoimino]methyl]phenoxy]butyl]triphenylphosphonium bromide (MitoPBN) prevented the activation of UCPs by superoxide but did not block activation by hydroxynonenal. This was not due to MitoPBN reacting with superoxide or the hydroxyl radical or by acting as a chain-breaking antioxidant. MitoPBN did react with carbon-centered radicals and also prevented lipid peroxidation by the carbon-centered radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-methyl propionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPH). Furthermore, AAPH activated UCPs, and this was blocked by MitoPBN. These data suggest that superoxide and lipid peroxidation products share a common pathway for the activation of UCPs. Superoxide releases iron from iron-sulfur center proteins, which then generates carbon-centered radicals that initiate lipid peroxidation, yielding breakdown products that activate UCPs.

  1. Understanding the relationship between the primary structure of proteins and its propensity to be soluble on overexpression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Balaji, Petety V.

    2005-01-01

    Solubility of proteins on overexpression in Escherichia coli is a manifestation of the net effect of several sequence-dependent and sequence-independent factors. This study aims to delineate the relationship between the primary structure and solubility on overexpression. The amino acid sequences of proteins reported to be soluble or to form inclusion bodies on overexpression in E. coli under normal growth conditions were analyzed. The results show a positive correlation between thermostability and solubility of proteins, and an inverse correlation between the in vivo half-life of proteins and solubility. The amino acid (Asn, Thr, Tyr) composition and the tripeptide frequency of the protein were also found to influence its solubility on overexpression. The amino acids that were seen to be present in a comparatively higher frequency in inclusion body-forming proteins have a higher sheet propensity, whereas those that are seen more in soluble proteins have a higher helix propensity; this is indicative of a possible correlation between sheet propensity and inclusion body formation. Thus, the present analysis shows that thermostability, in vivo half-life, Asn, Thr, and Tyr content, and tripeptide composition of a protein are correlated to the propensity of a protein to be soluble on overexpression in E. coli. The precise mechanism by which these properties affect the solubility status of the overexpressed protein remains to be understood. PMID:15689506

  2. TP53 Promoter Methylation in Primary Glioblastoma: Relationship with TP53 mRNA and Protein Expression and Mutation Status

    PubMed Central

    Szybka, Malgorzata; Malachowska, Beata; Fendler, Wojciech; Potemski, Piotr; Piaskowski, Sylwester; Jaskolski, Dariusz; Papierz, Wielislaw; Skowronski, Wieslaw; Och, Waldemar; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2014-01-01

    Reduced expression of TP53 by promoter methylation has been reported in several neoplasms. It remains unclear whether TP53 promoter methylation is associated with reduced transcriptional and protein expression in glioblastoma (GB). The aim of our work was to study the impact of TP53 methylation and mutations on TP53 mRNA level and protein expression in 42 molecularly characterized primary GB tumors. We also evaluate the impact of all molecular alterations on the overall patient survival. The frequency of TP53 promoter methylation was found in 21.4%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing such high frequency of TP53 promoter methylation in primary GB. There was no relation between TP53 promoter methylation and TP53 mRNA level (p=0.5722) and between TP53 promoter methylation and TP53 protein expression (p=0.2045). No significant associations were found between TP53 mRNA expression and mutation of TP53 gene (p=0.9076). However, significant association between TP53 mutation and TP53 protein expression was found (p=0.0016). Our data suggest that in primary GB TP53 promoter methylation does not play a role in silencing of TP53 transcriptional and protein expression and is probably regulated by other genetic and epigenetic mechanisms associated with genes involved in the TP53 pathway. PMID:24506545

  3. Primary, secondary, and tertiary structure of the core of a histone H1-like protein from the sperm of Mytilus.

    PubMed

    Jutglar, L; Borrell, J I; Ausió, J

    1991-05-05

    We have analyzed the structure of the trypsin-resistant core of the protein PL-II* of the sperm from Mytilus californianus. The peptide has a molecular mass of 8436 Da and its primary sequence is ATGGAKKP STLSMIVAAIQAMKNRKGSSVQAIRKYILANNKG INTSRLGSAMKLAFAKGLKSGVLVRPKTSAGA SGATGSFRVG. This sequence bears an enormous homology and fulfills the constraints of the consensus sequence of the trypsin-resistant peptides of the proteins of the histone H1 family. Secondary structure analysis using Fourier-transform infared spectroscopy as well as predictive methods indicate the presence of 20-30% beta-structure and approximately 25% alpha-helix for this peptide. As in the case of histone H1 proteins, the protein PL-II* core exhibits a compact globular structure as deduced from hydrodynamic measurements. The presence of a histone H1 protein with protamine-like features, seems to be thus, a common general feature of the chromatin composition in the sperm of the bivalve molluscs.

  4. Behavior of Primary Cilia and Tricellular Tight Junction Proteins during Differentiation in Temperature-Sensitive Mouse Cochlear Precursor Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    In the sensory hair cells of the mammalian cochlea, the primary cilia in the planar cell polarity as well as the tight junctions in the epithelial cell polarity and the barrier are important to maintain normal hearing. Temperature-sensitive mouse cochlear precursor hair cells were used to investigate the behavior of primary cilia and tricellular tight junction proteins during the differentiation of sensory hair cells. In undifferentiated cells (incubated at 33°C), many acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia were observed, and each was accompanied with an x03B3;-tubulin-positive basal body. The primary cilia had a '9 + 0' architecture with nine outer microtubule doublets but lacking a central pair of microtubules. In differentiated cells (incubated at 39°C), acetylated tubulin-positive primary cilia as well as acetylated tubulin-positive cilia-like structures were partially observed on the cell surface. In differentiated cells, the number of primary cilia was markedly reduced compared with undifferentiated cells, and innumerable cilia-like structures with no ciliary pockets were partially observed on the cell surface. In undifferentiated cells, few tricellulin molecules and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptors (LSRs) were observed in the cytoplasm. In differentiated cells, many tricellulin molecules and LSRs were observed on the membranes and within the cytoplasm. Conditional immortalized mouse cochlear precursor hair cells may be useful to investigate the roles of primary cilia and tricellular tight junctions during cellular differentiation and degeneration such as apoptosis.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  6. Weak cation magnetic separation technology and MALDI-TOF-MS in screening serum protein markers in primary type I osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, X L; Li, C W; Liang, B C; He, K H; Li, X Y

    2015-11-30

    We investigated weak cation magnetic separation technology and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) in screening serum protein markers of primary type I osteoporosis. We selected 16 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and nine postmenopausal women as controls to find a new method for screening biomarkers and establishing a diagnostic model for primary type I osteoporosis. Serum samples were obtained from controls and patients. Serum protein was extracted with the WCX protein chip system; protein fingerprints were examined using MALDI-TOF-MS. The preprocessed and model construction data were handled by the ProteinChip system. The diagnostic models were established using a genetic arithmetic model combined with a support vector machine (SVM). The SVM model with the highest Youden index was selected. Combinations with the highest accuracy in distinguishing different groups of data were selected as potential biomarkers. From the two groups of serum proteins, 123 cumulative MS protein peaks were selected. Significant intensity differences in the protein peaks of 16 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were screened. The difference in Youden index between the four groups of protein peaks showed that the highest peaks had mass-to-charge ratios of 8909.047, 8690.658, 13745.48, and 15114.52. A diagnosis model was established with these four markers as the candidates, and the model specificity and sensitivity were found to be 100%. Two groups of specimens in the SVM results on the scatterplot were distinguishable. We established a diagnosis model, and provided a new serological method for screening and diagnosis of osteoporosis with high sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Dynamics of Radical-Mediated Enzyme Catalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke, Kurt

    1997-11-01

    An emergent class of enzymes harnesses the extreme reactivity of electron-deficient free radical species to perform some of the most difficult reactions in biology. The regio- and stereo-selectivity achieved by these enzymes defies long-held ideas that radical reactions are non-specific. The common primary step in these catalyses is metal- or metallocenter-assisted generation of an electron-deficient organic "initiator radical". The initiator radical abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, opening a new reaction channel for rearrangement to the product. Our aim is to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms of the radical pair separation and radical rearrangement steps. Radical pair separation and substrate radical rearrangement are tracked by using time-resolved (10-7 to 10-3 s) techniques of pulsed-electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FT-EPR, ESEEM). Synchronous time-evolution of the reactions is attained by triggering with a visible laser pulse. Transient non-Boltzmann population of the states of the spin-coupled systems, and resultant electron spin polarization, facilitates study at or near room temperature under conditions where the enzymes are operative. The systems examined include ethanolamine deaminase, a vitamin B12 coenzyme-dependent enzyme, ribonucleotide reductase and photosynthetic reaction centers. The electronic and nuclear structural and kinetic information obtained from the pulsed-EPR studies is used to address how the initiator radicals are stabilized against deleterious recombination with the metal, and to distinguish the participation of concerted versus sequential rearrangement pathways.

  8. Autoantibodies from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis recognize a region within the nucleoplasmic domain of inner nuclear membrane protein LBR.

    PubMed

    Lin, F; Noyer, C M; Ye, Q; Courvalin, J C; Worman, H J

    1996-01-01

    Autoantibodies from rare patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) recognize LBR, or lamin B receptor, an integral membrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Human LBR has a nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain of 208 amino acids followed by a carboxyl-terminal domain with eight putative transmembrane segments. Autoantibodies against LBR from four patients with PBC recognized the nucleoplasmic, amino-terminal domain but not the carboxyl-terminal domain. Immunoblotting of smaller fusion proteins demonstrated that these autoantibodies recognized a conformational epitope(s) contained within the stretch of amino acids from 1 to 60. These results, combined with those of previous studies, show that autoepitopes of nuclear membrane proteins are located within their nucleocytoplasmic domains and that autoantibodies from patients with PBC predominantly react with one domain of a protein antigen. This work also provides further characterization of anti-LBR antibodies that have found utility as reagents in cell biology research.

  9. Students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure: drawing secondary protein structure reveals student understanding better than simple recognition of structures.

    PubMed

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary nature of biochemistry courses requires students to use both chemistry and biology knowledge to understand biochemical concepts. Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations in addition to a fragmented understanding of fundamental biochemistry concepts. This project focuses on students' understanding of primary and secondary protein structure and drawings (representations) of hydrogen-bonding in alpha helices and beta sheets. Analysis demonstrated that students can recognize and identify primary protein structure concepts when given a polypeptide. However, when asked to draw alpha helices and beta sheets and explain the role of hydrogen bonding their drawings students exhibited a fragmented understanding that lacked coherence. Faculty are encouraged to have students draw molecular level representations to make their mental models more explicit, complete, and coherent. This is in contrast to recognition and identification tasks, which do not adequately probe mental models and molecular level understanding.

  10. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard

    2010-12-09

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with "intermediate risk" as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with

  11. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease – a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with “intermediate risk” as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals

  12. BLUF Domain Function Does Not Require a Metastable Radical Intermediate State

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BLUF (blue light using flavin) domain proteins are an important family of blue light-sensing proteins which control a wide variety of functions in cells. The primary light-activated step in the BLUF domain is not yet established. A number of experimental and theoretical studies points to a role for photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between a highly conserved tyrosine and the flavin chromophore to form a radical intermediate state. Here we investigate the role of PET in three different BLUF proteins, using ultrafast broadband transient infrared spectroscopy. We characterize and identify infrared active marker modes for excited and ground state species and use them to record photochemical dynamics in the proteins. We also generate mutants which unambiguously show PET and, through isotope labeling of the protein and the chromophore, are able to assign modes characteristic of both flavin and protein radical states. We find that these radical intermediates are not observed in two of the three BLUF domains studied, casting doubt on the importance of the formation of a population of radical intermediates in the BLUF photocycle. Further, unnatural amino acid mutagenesis is used to replace the conserved tyrosine with fluorotyrosines, thus modifying the driving force for the proposed electron transfer reaction; the rate changes observed are also not consistent with a PET mechanism. Thus, while intermediates of PET reactions can be observed in BLUF proteins they are not correlated with photoactivity, suggesting that radical intermediates are not central to their operation. Alternative nonradical pathways including a keto–enol tautomerization induced by electronic excitation of the flavin ring are considered. PMID:24579721

  13. Contemporary Radical Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Howard J.

    1984-01-01

    The origins of contemporary radical economics are examined. Applications of radical economics to price and value theory, labor segmentation theory, business cycles, industrial organization, government and business, imperialism and development, and comparative systems are reviewed. (Author/RM)

  14. Isolation and primary structure of a methionine- and cystine-rich seed protein of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Odani, S; Odani, S

    1998-04-01

    A 10-kDa protein was isolated from resting seeds of hemp (Cannabis sativa) by buffer extraction, gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography, and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The protein did not inhibit bovine trypsin. It consisted of subunits composed of 27 and 61 residues and was held together by two disulfide bonds. The complete amino acid sequence was identified by protein analysis, and had 20 mole% of amino acids containing sulfur. The protein was most similar to a methionine-rich protein of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) and to Mabinlin IV, a sweetness-inducing protein of Capparis masaikai. The high methionine content and the absence of trypsin inhibitory activity suggested that the seed protein can be used to improve the nutritional quality of plant food-stuffs.

  15. Vreteno, a gonad-specific protein, is essential for germline development and primary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zamparini, Andrea L.; Davis, Marie Y.; Malone, Colin D.; Vieira, Eric; Zavadil, Jiri; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lehmann, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, Piwi proteins associate with Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and protect the germline genome by silencing mobile genetic elements. This defense system acts in germline and gonadal somatic tissue to preserve germline development. Genetic control for these silencing pathways varies greatly between tissues of the gonad. Here, we identified Vreteno (Vret), a novel gonad-specific protein essential for germline development. Vret is required for piRNA-based transposon regulation in both germline and somatic gonadal tissues. We show that Vret, which contains Tudor domains, associates physically with Piwi and Aubergine (Aub), stabilizing these proteins via a gonad-specific mechanism that is absent in other fly tissues. In the absence of vret, Piwi-bound piRNAs are lost without changes in piRNA precursor transcript production, supporting a role for Vret in primary piRNA biogenesis. In the germline, piRNAs can engage in an Aub- and Argonaute 3 (AGO3)-dependent amplification in the absence of Vret, suggesting that Vret function can distinguish between primary piRNAs loaded into Piwi-Aub complexes and piRNAs engaged in the amplification cycle. We propose that Vret plays an essential role in transposon regulation at an early stage of primary piRNA processing. PMID:21831924

  16. The radical amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The radical amplifier as a method for measuring radical concentrations in the atmosphere has received renewed attention lately. In principle, it can measure the total concentration of HO(x) and RO(x) radicals by reacting ambient air with high concentrations of CO (3-10 percent) and NO (2-6 ppmv), and measuring the NO2 produced.

  17. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  18. The Arabidopsis pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase regulatory proteins encode a novel, unprecedented Ser/Thr protein kinase primary structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) is a ubiquitous, low abundance metabolic enzyme of undetermined function in C3 plants. Its activity in C3 chloroplasts is light-regulated via reversible phosphorylation of an active-site Thr residue by the PPDK regulatory protein (RP), a most unusual, bifuncti...

  19. VUV Photoionisation of hydrocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, C.; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Gans, Bérenger; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Gauyacq, Dolorès; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo

    2008-09-01

    Hydrocarbon radicals CxHy are constituents of various planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as a result of the methane photochemistry induced by the solar radiation. They contribute to the neutral chemistry, but are also important for the ionosphere through their photoionisation leading to their cations CxHy +. These cations are also produced by ion-molecule reactions starting from the reaction of the primary ions CH4 + and CH3 + which are created in the non-dissociative and dissociative photoionisation of CH4. This work aims at caracterizing the VUV photoionisation of small hydrocarbon radicals as a function of photon energy. The objective is to provide laboratory data for modelers on the spectroscopy, the thermochemistry, and the reactivity of the radicals and their cations. The hydrocarbon radicals are much less caracterized than stable molecules since they have to be produced in situ in the laboratory experiment. We have adapted at Orsay [1-3] a pyrolysis source (Figure 1) well suited to produce cold beams of hydrocarbon radicals to our experimental setups. Available now at Orsay, we have two new sources of VUV radiation, complementary in terms of tunability and resolution, that can be used for these studies. The first one is the DESIRS beamline [4] at the new french synchrotron, SOLEIL. The second one is the VUV laser developped at the Centre Laser de l'Université Paris-Sud (CLUPS) [5]. At SOLEIL, a photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer is used to monitor the photoionisation on a large photon energy range. At the CLUPS, a pulsedfield ionisation (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer allows studies at higher resolution on selected photon energies. The first results obtained with these new setups will be presented. References [1] Fischer, I., Schussler, T., Deyerl, H.J., Elhanine, M. & Alcaraz, C., Photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the allyl radical, C3H5. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 261 (2-3), 227-233 (2007) [2] Schüßler, T., Roth, W., Gerber

  20. Electrophoretic pattern and distribution of cytoskeletal proteins in flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski-Treska, J; Ulrich, G; Mensch, C; Aunis, D

    1984-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional electrophoresis patterns and distribution of major cytoskeletal proteins were studied in primary astrocytes with either flat-epitheloid or stellate appearance. No major differences in the electrophoretic patterns of actin, tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin were detected between flat-epitheloid and stellate process-bearing astrocytes produced by the exposure of cultures to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dBcAMP). However the morphological changes of astrocytes were accompanied by marked changes in the quantitative distribution of cytoskeletal proteins. The most prominent change was a large and specific decrease in the amount of actin, detected by [(35)S]methionine incorporation, densitometric scanning of one-dimensional gels and DNase inhibition assay. In stellate astrocytes produced by a 4 day treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP, the amount of actin decreased by 50%. This decrease was not apparently related to the depolymerization of actin.

  1. The family of light-harvesting-related proteins (LHCs, ELIPs, HLIPs): was the harvesting of light their primary function?

    PubMed

    Montané, M H; Kloppstech, K

    2000-11-27

    Light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCs) and early light-induced proteins (ELIPs) are essential pigment-binding components of the thylakoid membrane and are encoded by one of the largest and most complex higher plant gene families. The functional diversification of these proteins corresponded to the transition from extrinsic (phycobilisome-based) to intrinsic (LHC-based) light-harvesting antenna systems during the evolution of chloroplasts from cyanobacteria, yet the functional basis of this diversification has been elusive. Here, we propose that the original function of LHCs and ELIPs was not to collect light and to transfer its energy content to the reaction centers but to disperse the absorbed energy of light in the form of heat or fluorescence. These energy-dispersing proteins are believed to have originated in cyanobacteria as one-helix, highly light-inducible proteins (HLIPs) that later acquired four helices through two successive gene duplication steps. We suggest that the ELIPs arose first in this succession, with a primary function in energy dispersion for protection of photosynthetic pigments from photo-oxidation. We consider the LHC I and II families as more recent and very successful evolutionary additions to this family that ultimately attained a new function, thereby replacing the ancestral extrinsic light-harvesting system. Our model accounts for the non-photochemical quenching role recently shown for higher plant psbS proteins.

  2. Primary structure and androgen regulation of a 20-kilodalton protein specific to rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Ho, K C; Snoek, R; Quarmby, V; Viskochil, D H; Rennie, P S; Wilson, E M; French, F S; Bruchovsky, N

    1989-07-25

    Nuclear and cytosolic forms of a 20-kdalton rat ventral prostate protein were purified and partially sequenced from their N-termini. Isolated nuclei were treated with micrococcal nuclease and extracted in 0.6 M NaCl, and proteins were separated by affinity chromatography on Matrex gel green A, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superose 12. The 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the nuclear 20-kdalton protein was identical with the cytosolic protein except it lacked 7 N-terminal amino acids present in the cytosolic form. The DNA sequence of a full-length complementary DNA clone isolated from a ventral prostate gt11 library extended the N-terminal sequence of the cytosolic form by an additional nine amino acids from the predicted initiation methionine. The cDNA included the nucleotide sequence for the 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the purified 20-kdalton protein and predicted molecular weights of 16,686, 17,521, and 18,650, respectively, for the nuclear, cytoplasmic, and nonprocessed proteins. Northern blot analyses of reproductive tract tissue RNAs using the 20-kdalton protein cDNA as probe revealed a single mRNA species of 0.92 kb detectable only in extracts of rat ventral prostate. Expression of the 0.92-kb mRNA was androgen dependent since the mRNA was undetectable in extracts obtained 4 days after castration and was restored 16 h after restimulation with androgen.

  3. Semiconduction of proteins as an attribute of the living state: the ideas of Albert Szent-Györgyi revisited in light of the recent knowledge regarding oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed

    Nagy, I Z

    1995-01-01

    Oxyradicals have been considered as harmful byproducts causing molecular damage during aging. However, evidence is accumulating to show that the actual situation is more complex: the living state implicitly involves the production of oxyradicals. (1) Blast type cells produce much less oxyradicals than the differentiated ones, and an increased production of OH radicals induce differentiation of various lines of leukemia cells; meanwhile, their superoxide dismutase expression increases to a very high extent. (2) The supramolecular organization of the cells is developed by means of "useful" crosslinking effects OH radicals. (3) Repiratory inhibition of oxyradical production (KCN-intoxication, suffocation, etc.) would kill living organisms prior to the exhaustion of energy reserves. It is assumed that the continuous flux of OH radicals is a prerequisite for a electron delocalization on the proteins, which is a semiconduction of p-type, proposes already in 1941 by Albert Szent-Györgyi, and refuted on a "theoretical" basis. It has become clear by now that the carbon-based semiconduction is possible because diamond transistors are known to exist. The recently developed atomic force microscopy offers some real possibilities for experimental testing of this assumption. This concept may lead us to new horizons in interpretation of living functions, such as the basic memory mechanisms in brain cells and their impairment during aging.

  4. The Talpid3 gene (KIAA0586) encodes a centrosomal protein that is essential for primary cilia formation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yili; Bangs, Fiona; Paton, I Robert; Prescott, Alan; James, John; Davey, Megan G; Whitley, Paul; Genikhovich, Grigory; Technau, Ulrich; Burt, David W; Tickle, Cheryll

    2009-02-01

    The chicken talpid(3) mutant, with polydactyly and defects in other embryonic regions that depend on hedgehog (Hh) signalling (e.g. the neural tube), has a mutation in KIAA0568. Similar phenotypes are seen in mice and in human syndromes with mutations in genes that encode centrosomal or intraflagella transport proteins. Such mutations lead to defects in primary cilia, sites where Hh signalling occurs. Here, we show that cells of talpid(3) mutant embryos lack primary cilia and that primary cilia can be rescued with constructs encoding Talpid3. talpid(3) mutant embryos also develop polycystic kidneys, consistent with widespread failure of ciliogenesis. Ultrastructural studies of talpid(3) mutant neural tube show that basal bodies mature but fail to dock with the apical cell membrane, are misorientated and almost completely lack ciliary axonemes. We also detected marked changes in actin organisation in talpid(3) mutant cells, which may explain misorientation of basal bodies. KIAA0586 was identified in the human centrosomal proteome and, using an antibody against chicken Talpid3, we detected Talpid3 in the centrosome of wild-type chicken cells but not in mutant cells. Cloning and bioinformatic analysis of the Talpid3 homolog from the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis identified a highly conserved region in the Talpid3 protein, including a predicted coiled-coil domain. We show that this region is required to rescue primary cilia formation and neural tube patterning in talpid(3) mutant embryos, and is sufficient for centrosomal localisation. Thus, Talpid3 is one of a growing number of centrosomal proteins that affect both ciliogenesis and Hh signalling.

  5. Access of Hydrogen-Radicals to the Peptide-Backbone as a Measure for Estimating the Flexibility of Proteins Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mitsuo; Nagoshi, Keishiro; Iimuro, Ryunosuke; Inatomi, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    A factor for estimating the flexibility of proteins is described that uses a cleavage method of “in-source decay (ISD)” coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The MALDI-ISD spectra of bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin and thioredoxin show discontinuous intense ion peaks originating from one-side preferential cleavage at the N-Cα bond of Xxx-Asp, Xxx-Asn, Xxx-Cys and Gly-Xxx residues. Consistent with these observations, Asp, Asn and Gly residues are also identified by other flexibility measures such as B-factor, turn preference, protection and fluorescence decay factors, while Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly residues are identified by turn preference factor based on X-ray crystallography. The results suggest that protein molecules embedded in/on MALDI matrix crystals partly maintain α-helix and that the reason some of the residues are more susceptible to ISD (Asp, Asn, Cys and Gly) and others less so (Ile and Val) is because of accessibility of the peptide backbone to hydrogen-radicals from matrix molecules. The hydrogen-radical accessibility in MALDI-ISD could therefore be adopted as a factor for measuring protein flexibility. PMID:24828203

  6. The Dps protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens does not bind to DNA but protects it toward oxidative cleavage: x-ray crystal structure, iron binding, and hydroxyl-radical scavenging properties.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Ilari, Andrea; Falvo, Elisabetta; Chiancone, Emilia

    2003-05-30

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens Dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells), encoded by the dps gene located on the circular chromosome of this plant pathogen, was cloned, and its structural and functional properties were determined in vitro. In Escherichia coli Dps, the family prototype, the DNA binding properties are thought to be associated with the presence of the lysine-containing N-terminal tail that extends from the protein surface into the solvent. The x-ray crystal structure of A. tumefaciens Dps shows that the positively charged N-terminal tail, which is 11 amino acids shorter than in the E. coli protein, is blocked onto the protein surface. This feature accounts for the lack of interaction with DNA. The intersubunit ferroxidase center characteristic of Dps proteins is conserved and confers to the A. tumefaciens protein a ferritin-like activity that manifests itself in the capacity to oxidize and incorporate iron in the internal cavity and to release it after reduction. In turn, sequestration of Fe(II) correlates with the capacity of A. tumefaciens Dps to reduce the production of hydroxyl radicals from H2O2 through Fenton chemistry. These data demonstrate conclusively that DNA protection from oxidative damage in vitro does not require formation of a Dps-DNA complex. In vivo, the hydroxyl radical scavenging activity of A. tumefaciens Dps may be envisaged to act in concert with catalase A to counteract the toxic effect of H2O2, the major component of the plant defense system when challenged by the bacterium.

  7. [Lavoisier and radicals].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Lavoisier and his co-workers (Guyton de Morveau, Bertholet, Fourcroy) considered that acids were constituted of oxygen and of something else that they called radicals. These radicals were known in some cases, i.e. nitrogen for nitrous acid, carbon for carbonic acid, phosphorus for phosphoric acid. In the case of sulfur, the sulfuric radical could be associated with different quantities of oxigen leading to sulfuric or sulfurous acids. In other cases radicals remained unknown at the time i.e. muriatic radical for muriatic acid, or benzoyl radical for benzoic acid. It is interesting to notice that Lavoisier evoked the case of compound radicals constituted of different substances such as carbon and hydrogen.

  8. Primary evaluation of methenamine as a NPN compound with probable effects on increasing ruminal escaped protein.

    PubMed

    Mohebbi-Fani, M; Shekarforoosh, S; Maleki, M; Vahedi, N

    2002-06-01

    The effects of methenamine as a non-protein nitrogenous compound on protein and health status of feedlot lambs were studied in three groups of lambs receiving 5, 10, or 15 g of the substance daily in their feed for 100 days. The results were compared with data obtained from a control group receiving a diet low in crude protein without methenamine. Serum total protein, serum urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were measured every 10 days as indicators of protein metabolism and kidney function. Urine samples were also examined on the same days for possible side-effects of methenamine on the urinary tract. Following slaughter, various internal organs, including the brain and various parts of the gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, were examined both grossly and microscopically to detect any lesions. All groups receiving methenamine had serum total protein and serum urea nitrogen levels higher than those in the control group. The serum creatinine level was normal in all the groups throughout the experiment. No gross or microscopic lesion attributed to the toxic effects of methenamine was detected in any of the internal organs. Therefore, it is concluded that methenamine can be used as a non-protein nitrogenous compound without serious side-effects.

  9. The primary structure of papaya mosaic virus coat protein: a revision.

    PubMed

    Verde, C; Malorni, A; Parente, A

    1989-12-01

    The presence of an acetyl blocking group at the N-terminus of the coat protein of papaya mosaic virus has been identified by FAB mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we have found that the N-terminal sequence of the protein is four amino-acid residues (AC-Ser-Lys-Ser-Ser-) longer than that previously reported, while Glu instead of Gln is the C-terminal residue. The present paper shows that PMV-protein is made up of 215 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 22,960 Da.

  10. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  11. Protein kinase Cμ mediates adenosine-stimulated steroidogenesis in primary rat adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chia; Chen, Ying; Huang, Shih-Horng; Wang, Seu-Mei

    2010-11-05

    Adenosine (Ado), an endogenous nucleoside, can stimulate corticosterone synthesis in adrenal cells via the A(2A)/A(2B) adenosine receptors (ARs). This study evaluated the contribution of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in Ado-induced steroidogenesis. The PKC inhibitor calphostin c blocked Ado-induced steroidogenesis, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-related regulated kinase (ERK)-cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein cascade, and the mRNA expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11B1. Further analyses revealed that PKCμ was indeed activated by Ado. Moreover, downregulation of PKCμ by small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited Ado-stimulated steroidogenesis and ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of either A(2A)AR or A(2B)AR led to the suppression of PKCμ phosphorylation. Together, these findings suggest that A(2)AR-PKCμ-MEK signaling mediates Ado-stimulated adrenal steroidogenesis.

  12. An Exercise on the Determination of the Primary Structure of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leader, David P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an exercise that extends the actual determination of the amino acid sequence of a simple dipeptide to the theoretical determination of the complete primary structure of a larger polypeptide. Includes diagrams of display cards and duplicated sheets used in the theoretical portion of the exercise. (CS)

  13. Effects of phytoestrogens on protein turnover in rainbow trout primary myocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean-derived ingredients used in aquaculture feeds may contain phytoestrogens, but it is unknown if these compounds can mimic the catabolic effects of estradiol in fish muscle. Six day-old rainbow trout primary myocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations (10 nM – 100 µM) of either geniste...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a 'fluorous' (fluorinated alkyl) affinity reagent that labels primary amine groups in proteins/peptides.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jiang; Cole, Richard B; Cai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Strong non-covalent interactions such as biotin-avidin affinity play critical roles in protein/peptide purification. A new type of 'fluorous' (fluorinated alkyl) affinity approach has gained popularity due especially to its low level of non-specific binding to proteins/peptides. We have developed a novel water-soluble fluorous labeling reagent that is reactive (via an active sulfo-N-hydroxylsuccinimidyl ester group) to primary amine groups in proteins/peptides. After fluorous affinity purification, the bulky fluorous tag moiety and the long oligoethylene glycol (OEG) spacer of this labeling reagent can be trimmed via the cleavage of an acid labile linker. Upon collision-induced dissociation, the labeled peptide ion yields a characteristic fragment that can be retrieved from the residual portion of the fluorous affinity tag, and this fragment ion can serve as a marker to indicate that the relevant peptide has been successfully labeled. As a proof of principle, the newly synthesized fluorous labeling reagent was evaluated for peptide/protein labeling ability in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Results show that both the aqueous environment protein/peptide labeling and the affinity enrichment/separation process were highly efficient.

  15. Transfection of primary brain capillary endothelial cells for protein synthesis and secretion of recombinant erythropoietin: a strategy to enable protein delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Annette; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Aigner, Achim; Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Moos, Torben

    2017-03-14

    Treatment of chronic disorders affecting the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated by the inability of drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Non-viral gene therapy applied to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) denotes a novel approach to overcome the restraints in this passage, as turning BCECs into recombinant protein factories by transfection could result in protein secretion further into the brain. The present study aims to investigate the possibility of transfecting primary rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs) for recombinant protein synthesis and secretion of the neuroprotective protein erythropoietin (EPO). We previously showed that 4% of RBECs with BBB properties can be transfected without disrupting the BBB integrity in vitro, but it can be questioned whether this is sufficient to enable protein secretion at therapeutic levels. The present study examined various transfection vectors, with regard to increasing the transfection efficiency without disrupting the BBB integrity. Lipofectamine 3000™ was the most potent vector compared to polyethylenimine (PEI) and Turbofect. When co-cultured with astrocytes, the genetically modified RBECs secreted recombinant EPO into the cell culture medium both luminally and abluminally, and despite lower levels of EPO reaching the abluminal chamber, the amount of recombinant EPO was sufficient to evolve a biological effect on astrocytes cultured at the abluminal side in terms of upregulated gene expression of brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF). In conclusion, non-viral gene therapy to RBECs leads to protein secretion and signifies a method for therapeutic proteins to target cells inside the CNS otherwise omitted due to the BBB.

  16. Primary structure of streptococcal Pep M5 protein: Absence of extensive sequence repeats

    PubMed Central

    Manjula, Belur N.; Mische, Sheenah M.; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive sequence repeats have been observed in a biologically active fragment of type 24 streptococcal M protein, namely Pep M24 [Beachey, E. H., Sayer, J. M. & Kang, A. H. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3163-3167]. To determine whether such extensive repetition in sequence is a common characteristic of the antiphagocytic streptococcal M proteins, we have determined the sequences of the clostripain peptides of Pep M5, a biologically active fragment of the type 5 M protein that is analogous to Pep M24. These sequences, together with the amino-terminal sequence of the whole molecule, accounted for nearly two thirds of the Pep M5 molecule. However, extensive identical repeats of the kind observed in Pep M24 were not present in Pep M5. Preliminary study of the amino acid sequence analysis of the M protein from type 6 Streptococcus has also indicated the absence of sequence repeats within the regions of this molecule examined so far. These results suggest that extensive sequence repeats may not be a common characteristic of M-protein molecules. On the other hand, the seven-residue periodicity of the nonpolar residues, a characteristic of α-helical coiled-coil structures, appeared to extend over most of the Pep M5 molecule. This feature has been observed previously for the partial sequences of three M protein serotypes. Thus, the important element of the M-protein structure appears to be the seven-residue periodicity necessary for the maintenance of the coiled-coil structure rather than extensive identical amino acid sequence repeats. PMID:16593365

  17. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  18. In recurrent primary biliary cirrhosis after liver transplantation, biliary epithelial cells show increased expression of mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Motoko; Hsu, Maylee; Yeh, Matthew M; Nakanuma, Yasuni

    2015-10-01

    In biliary epithelial lesions in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), mitochondrial proteins associated with deregulated autophagy are abnormally expressed. We examined whether this could be used as a diagnostic marker for end-stage PBC and recurrent PBC after liver transplantation. We examined the expression of the mitochondrial protein pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2 component and cytochrome c oxidase, subunit I (CCO), the autophagy-related marker microtubule-associated protein-light chain 3 (LC3), and p62/sequestosome-1 and the senescence markers p16(Ink4a) and p21(WAF1/Cip1) in small bile ducts and bile ductules in explanted livers from patients with PBC (n = 20) in comparison with liver tissue from control patients (n = 21) and post-transplant samples including recurrent PBC and cellular rejection (n = 28). Intense granular expression of mitochondrial proteins was significantly more frequent in small bile ducts in explanted livers with PBC than in control livers (p < 0.05). Post-transplant samples comprised of three groups: group A (positive for mitochondrial proteins, n = 7), group B (positive for either autophagy-related or senescence markers but negative for mitochondrial proteins, n = 7), and group C (all negative, n = 14). All but one case of group A were clinically and histologically diagnosed as recurrent PBC. In contrast, all cases of group B were diagnosed as cellular rejection. This study suggests that the expression of mitochondrial proteins in small bile ducts may be a useful diagnostic marker for end-stage PBC and recurrent PBC after liver transplantation.

  19. Primary Role of the Chromophore Bond Length Alternation in Reversible Photoconversion of Red Fluorescence Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, Mikhail; Hughes, Thomas E.; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Wnuk, Pawel; O'Donnell, Kieran; Scott, J. Nathan; Callis, Patrik R.; Mikhaylov, Alexander; Dokken, Leslie; Rebane, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    Rapid photobleaching of fluorescent proteins can limit their use in imaging applications. The underlying kinetics is multi-exponential and strongly depends on the local chromophore environment. The first, reversible, step may be attributed to a rotation around one of the two exocyclic C-C bonds bridging phenol and imidazolinone groups in the chromophore. However it is not clear how the protein environment controls this motion - either by steric hindrances or by modulating the electronic structure of the chromophore through electrostatic interactions. Here we study the first step of the photobleaching kinetics in 13 red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with different chromophore environment and show that the associated rate strongly correlates with the bond length alternation (BLA) of the two bridge bonds. The sign of the BLA appears to determine which rotation is activated. Our results present experimental evidence for the dominance of electronic effects in the conformational dynamics of the RFP chromophore. PMID:23008753

  20. Protein-engineered scaffolds for in vitro 3D culture of primary adult intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    DiMarco, Rebecca L; Dewi, Ruby E; Bernal, Gabriela; Kuo, Calvin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2015-10-15

    Though in vitro culture of primary intestinal organoids has gained significant momentum in recent years, little has been done to investigate the impact of microenvironmental cues provided by the encapsulating matrix on the growth and development of these fragile cultures. In this work, the impact of various in vitro culture parameters on primary adult murine organoid formation and growth are analyzed with a focus on matrix properties and geometric culture configuration. The air-liquid interface culture configuration was found to result in enhanced organoid formation relative to a traditional submerged configuration. Additionally, through use of a recombinantly engineered extracellular matrix (eECM), the effects of biochemical and biomechanical cues were independently studied. Decreasing mechanical stiffness and increasing cell adhesivity were found to increase organoid yield. Tuning of eECM properties was used to obtain organoid formation efficiency values identical to those observed in naturally harvested collagen I matrices but within a stiffer construct with improved ease of physical manipulation. Increased ability to remodel the surrounding matrix through mechanical or enzymatic means was also shown to enhance organoid formation. As the engineering and tunability of recombinant matrices is essentially limitless, continued property optimization may result in further improved matrix performance and may help to identify additional microenvironmental cues that directly impact organoid formation, development, differentiation, and functional behavior. Continued culture of primary organoids in recombinant matrices could therefore prove to be largely advantageous in the field of intestinal tissue engineering for applications in regenerative medicine and in vitro tissue mimics.

  1. An Ensemble Method for Predicting Subnuclear Localizations from Primary Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guo Sheng; Yu, Zu Guo; Anh, Vo; Krishnajith, Anaththa P. D.; Tian, Yu-Chu

    2013-01-01

    Background Predicting protein subnuclear localization is a challenging problem. Some previous works based on non-sequence information including Gene Ontology annotations and kernel fusion have respective limitations. The aim of this work is twofold: one is to propose a novel individual feature extraction method; another is to develop an ensemble method to improve prediction performance using comprehensive information represented in the form of high dimensional feature vector obtained by 11 feature extraction methods. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel two-stage multiclass support vector machine is proposed to predict protein subnuclear localizations. It only considers those feature extraction methods based on amino acid classifications and physicochemical properties. In order to speed up our system, an automatic search method for the kernel parameter is used. The prediction performance of our method is evaluated on four datasets: Lei dataset, multi-localization dataset, SNL9 dataset and a new independent dataset. The overall accuracy of prediction for 6 localizations on Lei dataset is 75.2% and that for 9 localizations on SNL9 dataset is 72.1% in the leave-one-out cross validation, 71.7% for the multi-localization dataset and 69.8% for the new independent dataset, respectively. Comparisons with those existing methods show that our method performs better for both single-localization and multi-localization proteins and achieves more balanced sensitivities and specificities on large-size and small-size subcellular localizations. The overall accuracy improvements are 4.0% and 4.7% for single-localization proteins and 6.5% for multi-localization proteins. The reliability and stability of our classification model are further confirmed by permutation analysis. Conclusions It can be concluded that our method is effective and valuable for predicting protein subnuclear localizations. A web server has been designed to implement the proposed method. It is freely available

  2. Subpicosecond protein backbone changes detected during the green-absorbing proteorhodopsin primary photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Kralj, Joel M; Chieffo, Logan R; Wang, Xihua; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2007-10-11

    Recent studies demonstrate that photoactive proteins can react within several picoseconds to photon absorption by their chromophores. Faster subpicosecond protein responses have been suggested to occur in rhodopsin-like proteins where retinal photoisomerization may impulsively drive structural changes in nearby protein groups. Here, we test this possibility by investigating the earliest protein structural changes occurring in proteorhodopsin (PR) using ultrafast transient infrared (TIR) spectroscopy with approximately 200 fs time resolution combined with nonperturbing isotope labeling. PR is a recently discovered microbial rhodopsin similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) found in marine proteobacteria and functions as a proton pump. Vibrational bands in the retinal fingerprint (1175-1215 cm(-1)) and ethylenic stretching (1500-1570 cm(-1)) regions characteristic of all-trans to 13-cis chromophore isomerization and formation of a red-shifted photointermediate appear with a 500-700 fs time constant after photoexcitation. Bands characteristic of partial return to the ground state evolve with a 2.0-3.5 ps time constant. In addition, a negative band appears at 1548 cm(-1) with a time constant of 500-700 fs, which on the basis of total-15N and retinal C15D (retinal with a deuterium on carbon 15) isotope labeling is assigned to an amide II peptide backbone mode that shifts to near 1538 cm(-1) concomitantly with chromophore isomerization. Our results demonstrate that one or more peptide backbone groups in PR respond with a time constant of 500-700 fs, almost coincident with the light-driven retinylidene chromophore isomerization. The protein changes we observe on a subpicosecond time scale may be involved in storage of the absorbed photon energy subsequently utilized for proton transport.

  3. Forgotten Radicals in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Luc, Rochette; Vergely, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Redox reactions play key roles in intra- and inter-cellular signaling, and in adaptative processes of tissues towards stress. Among the major free radicals with essential functions in cells are reactive oxygen species (ROS) including superoxide anion (O2•-), hydroxyl radical (•OH) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (•NO). In this article, we review the forgotten and new radicals with potential relevance to cardiovascular pathophysiology. Approximately 0.3% of O2•- present in cytosol exists in its protonated form: hydroperoxyl radical (HO2•). Water (H2O) can be split into two free radicals: •OH and hydrogen radical (H•). Several free radicals, including thiyl radicals (RS•) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) are known to isomerize double bonds. In the omega-6 series of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), cis-trans isomerization of γ-linolenate and arachidonate catalyzed by RS• has been investigated. Evidence is emerging that hydrogen disulphide (H2S) is a signaling molecule in vivo which can be a source of free radicals. The Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme can oxidize the ionized form of H2S to hydro-sulphide radical: HS•. Recent studies suggest that H2S plays an important function in cardiovascular functions. Carbonate radical, which can be formed when •OH reacts with carbonate or bicarbonate ions, is also involved in the activity of Cu-Zn-SOD. Recently, it has been reported that carbonate anion were potentially relevant oxidants of nucleic acids in physiological environments. In conclusion, there is solid evidence supporting the formation of many free radicals by cells leading which may play an important role in their homeostasis. PMID:23675099

  4. Protein Biomarkers Identify Patients Unlikely to Benefit from Primary Prevention ICDs: Findings from the PROSE-ICD Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alan; Zhang, Yiyi; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Dalal, Darshan; Butcher, Barbara; Norgard, Sanaz; Eldadah, Zayd; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Dickfeld, Timm; Spragg, David D.; Marine, Joseph E.; Guallar, Eliseo; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduce all-cause mortality but the benefits are heterogeneous. Current risk stratification based on left ventricular ejection fraction has limited discrimination power. We hypothesize that biomarkers for inflammation, neurohumoral activation and cardiac injury can predict appropriate shocks and all-cause mortality in patients with primary prevention ICDs. Methods and Results The Prospective Observational Study of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (PROSe-ICD) enrolled 1,189 patients with systolic heart failure who underwent ICD implantation for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. The primary endpoint was an ICD shock for adjudicated ventricular tachyarrhythmia. The secondary endpoint was all-cause mortality. After a median follow-up of 4.0 years, 137 subjects experienced an appropriate ICD shock and 343 participants died (incidence rates of 3.2 and 5.8 per 100 person-years, respectively). In multivariable adjusted models, higher interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels increased the risk of appropriate ICD shocks. In contrast, C-reactive protein, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II, pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and cardiac troponin T showed significant linear trends for increased risk of all-cause mortality across quartiles. A score combining these 5 biomarkers identified patients who were much more likely to die than to receive an appropriate shock from the ICD. Conclusions An increase in serum biomarkers of inflammation, neurohumoral activation and myocardial injury increased the risk for death but poorly predicted the likelihood of an ICD shock. These findings highlight the potential importance of serum-based biomarkers in identifying patients who are unlikely to benefit from primary prevention ICDs. PMID:25273351

  5. Radical prostatectomy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostatectomy - discharge; Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy - discharge; LRP - discharge; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy - discharge ; RALP - discharge; Pelvic lymphadenectomy - discharge; Prostate cancer - prostatectomy

  6. G-protein-coupled receptors and localized signaling in the primary cilium during ventral neural tube patterning.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sun-Hee; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    The primary cilium is critical in sonic hedgehog (Shh)-dependent ventral patterning of the vertebrate neural tube. Most mutants that cause disruption of the cilium result in decreased Shh signaling in the neural tube. In contrast, mutations in the intraflagellar complex A (IFT-A) and the tubby family protein, Tulp3, result in increased Shh signaling in the neural tube. Proteomic analysis of Tulp3-binding proteins first pointed to the role of the IFT-A complex in trafficking Tulp3 into the cilia. Tulp3 directs trafficking of rhodopsin family G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to the cilia, suggesting the role of a GPCR in mediating the paradoxical effects of the Tulp3/IFT-A complex in causing increased Shh signaling. Gpr161 has recently been identified as a Tulp3/IFT-A-regulated GPCR that localizes to the primary cilium. A null knock-out mouse model of Gpr161 phenocopies Tulp3 and IFT-A mutants, and causes increased Shh signaling throughout the neural tube. In the absence of Shh, the bifunctional Gli transcription factors are proteolytically processed into repressor forms in a protein kinase A (PKA) -dependent and cilium-dependent manner. Gpr161 activity results in increased cAMP levels in a Gαs -coupled manner, and determines processing of Gli3. Shh signaling also results in removal of Gpr161 from the cilia, suggesting that Gpr161 functions in a positive feedback loop in the Shh pathway. As PKA-null and Gαs mutant embryos also exhibit increased Shh signaling in the neural tube, Gpr161 is a strong candidate for a GPCR that regulates ciliary cAMP levels, and activates PKA in close proximity to the cilia.

  7. Leucine and isoleucine reduce protein degradation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) primary myoblast cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myogenic precursor cells were isolated from rainbow trout skeletal muscle and incubated in media containing 10% fetal bovine serum for 7 days, thereby differentiating into myoblasts. Rates of protein degradation were determined in response to minimal essential media (MEM) of various amino acid (AA)...

  8. Reversed cellular polarity in primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma: A study on tight junction protein expression in sweat gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yusuke; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2017-04-01

    Primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma (PCMC) is a rare sweat gland tumor characterized by the presence of abundant mucin around the tumor islands, but the molecular mechanisms for this structure are not well elucidated. Because mucin is epithelial in nature, it is likely to be produced by epithelial tumor cells, not by surrounding stromal cells. We hypothesized that the abundant mucin is a result of reversed cellular polarity of the tumor. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an immunohistological study to investigate expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins occludin and ZO-1 in PCMC, as well as in normal sweat glands and other sweat gland tumors. Dot-like or linear expression of TJ proteins was observed at ductal structures of sweat glands, and ductal or cystic structures of related tumors. In PCMC, however, TJ protein expression was clearly visible at the edges of tumor cell islands. This study provides evidence to show that the characteristic histological structure of PCMC is caused by inverse polarization of the tumor cells, and that TJ proteins are useful markers of ductal differentiation in sweat gland tumors.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated degradation of protein: different oxidation modes of copper- and iron-dependent hydroxyl radicals on the degradation of albumin.

    PubMed

    Kocha, T; Yamaguchi, M; Ohtaki, H; Fukuda, T; Aoyagi, T

    1997-02-08

    Cupric ions (Cu2+) added to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were found to generate hydroxyl radicals (HO) capable of benzoate hydroxylation. Although ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) ions, when added to H2O2, resulted in very little production of HO, the addition of EDTA to the reaction mixture markedly increased their catalytic activity. In the absence of albumin, catalase (a H2O2 scavenger) and mannitol (an HO radical scavenger) effectively inhibited the formation of HO in H2O2/Cu2+ and H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation systems. On analysis using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, catalase was shown to prevent the degradation of albumin by both oxidation systems, whereas mannitol was an effective scavenger of the H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation system but not of the H2O2/Cu2+ oxidation system. Furthermore, the effect of alteration of benzoate hydroxylation and H2O2 consumption on the H2O2/Cu2+ and H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation systems resulted in opposite behavior that was dependent upon the presence or absence of albumin. These observations suggest that copper ions bind to albumin and induce site-specific degradation by HO generated at the copper-binding site, whereas the Fe2+/EDTA-catalyzed oxidation system induces non-specific degradation of albumin by HO generated by the Fenton reaction between H2O2 and free Fe2+/EDTA in solution.

  10. Morphology and primary crystal structure of a silk-like protein polymer synthesized by genetically engineered Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J P; Cappello, J; Martin, D C

    1994-08-01

    The morphology and primary crystal structure of SLPF, a protein polymer produced by genetically engineered Escherichia coli bacteria, were characterized. SLPF is a segmented copolymer consisting of amino acid sequence blocks modeled on the crystalline segments of silk fibroin and the cell attachment domain of human fibronectin. Wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and molecular simulations were used to analyze the primary crystal structure of SLPF. TEM experiments conducted on SLPF droplets cast from formic acid on amorphous carbon film demonstrated that these protein films have a microstructure formed of woven sheaves. The sheaves are composed of well-defined whisker crystallites. The width of the whiskers, 11.8 +/- 2.2 nm, may be correlated to the length of the silk-like segment in SLPF as predicted by molecular simulations. WAXS data, TEM images, SAED, patterns, molecular simulations, and theoretical diffraction patterns all were consistent with the crankshaft model proposed for Silk I by Lotz and Keith.

  11. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Sottrup-Jensen, L; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, T; Tack, B F

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the results of complete or partial sequence determination of a random selection of 38 tryptic peptides covering 685 residues of the subunit of PZP, that PZP and alpha 2M indeed are extensively homologous. In the stretches of PZP sequenced so far, the degree of identically placed residues in the two proteins is 68%, indicating a close evolutionary relationship between PZP and alpha 2M. Although the function of PZP in pregnancy is largely unknown, its close structural relationship to alpha 2M suggests analogous proteinase binding properties and a potential for being taken up in cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this regard our studies indicate a bait region in PZP significantly different from that present in alpha 2M. PZP could be the human equivalent of the acute-phase alpha-macroglobulins (e.g., rat alpha 2M and rabbit alpha 1M) described earlier. PMID:6209714

  12. StAR-related lipid transfer domain protein 5 binds primary bile acids[S

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Frappier, Vincent; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2012-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory-related lipid transfer (START) domain proteins are involved in the nonvesicular intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The STARD1 (STARD1 and STARD3) and STARD4 subfamilies (STARD4–6) have an internal cavity large enough to accommodate sterols. To provide a deeper understanding on the structural biology of this domain, the binding of sterols to STARD5, a member of the STARD4 subfamily, was monitored. The SAR by NMR [1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC)] approach, complemented by circular dichroism (CD) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), was used. Titration of STARD5 with cholic (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), leads to drastic perturbation of the 1H-15N HSQC spectra and the identification of the residues in contact with those ligands. The most perturbed residues in presence of ligands are lining the internal cavity of the protein. Ka values of 1.8·10−4 M−1 and 6.3·104 M−1 were measured for CA and CDCA, respectively. This is the first report of a START domain protein in complex with a sterol ligand. Our original findings indicate that STARD5 may be involved in the transport of bile acids rather than cholesterol. PMID:23018617

  13. Protein fucosylation regulates synapsin Ia/Ib expression and neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Murrey, Heather E.; Gama, Cristal I.; Kalovidouris, Stacey A.; Luo, Wen.-I.; Driggers, Edward M.; Porton, Barbara; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Although fucose-α(1-2)-galactose [Fucα(1-2)Gal] carbohydrates have been implicated in cognitive processes such as long-term memory, the molecular mechanisms by which these sugars influence neuronal communication are not well understood. Here, we present molecular insights into the functions of Fucα(1-2)Gal sugars, demonstrating that they play a role in the regulation of synaptic proteins and neuronal morphology. We show that synapsins Ia and Ib, synapse-specific proteins involved in neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis, are the major Fucα(1-2)Gal glycoproteins in mature cultured neurons and the adult rat hippocampus. Fucosylation has profound effects on the expression and turnover of synapsin in cells and protects synapsin from degradation by the calcium-activated protease calpain. Our studies suggest that defucosylation of synapsin has critical consequences for neuronal growth and morphology, leading to stunted neurite outgrowth and delayed synapse formation. We also demonstrate that Fucα(1-2)Gal carbohydrates are not limited to synapsin but are found on additional glycoproteins involved in modulating neuronal architecture. Together, our studies identify important roles for Fucα(1-2)Gal sugars in the regulation of neuronal proteins and morphological changes that may underlie synaptic plasticity. PMID:16373512

  14. KAI1/CD82 protein expression in primary prostate cancer and in BPH associated with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lijovic, Marijana; Somers, Gino; Frauman, Albert G

    2002-01-01

    Current prognostic methods in primary prostate cancer cannot accurately identify patients with clinically significant disease at highest risk of developing metastases. This study examined KAI1/CD82 metastasis suppressor expression by quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer specimens. Altogether, prostate cancers exhibited significant KAI1 overexpression compared to BPH not associated with cancer (P = 0.022). Increased KAI1 expression in well and moderately differentiated cancers, above levels seen in BPH, with decreased expression in poorly differentiated cancers was observed. Interestingly, KAI1 expression in BPH associated with cancers was significantly higher than in BPH not associated with cancer (P = 0.009). Thus, KAI1 overexpression may restrain onset and early stage prostate cancer development, whilst its loss may predispose the patient to more aggressive cancer behaviour. Altered KAI1 expression in prostate cancers and BPH associated with cancer may have important diagnostic roles.

  15. Symptomatology and growth in infants with cow's milk protein intolerance using two different whey-protein hydrolysate based formulas in a Primary Health Care setting.

    PubMed

    Verwimp, J J; Bindels, J G; Barents, M; Heymans, H S

    1995-09-01

    Both growth and the course of allergic symptoms were evaluated in 79 infants with cow's milk protein intolerance, aged three months or younger, diagnosed by standard elimination/provocation and treated with a whey-hydrolysate based infant formula: Nutrilon Pept or Pepti Junior. The efficacy of both products, in terms of symptomatology and growth, was compared with each other. The products differ in fat source (Pepti Junior 50% of its fat as MCT, Nutrilon Pepti normal LCT fat blend) and the presence of lactose (Pepti Junior: lactose free; Nutrilon Pepti: 40% of its carbohydrate as lactose). The study was part of a large project that aimed at standardising the approach towards cow's milk protein intolerance in Baby Health Clinics. Nearly 50 Baby Health Clinics participated in this project. In this study, growth and symptomatology (skin, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract) were monitored during an intervention period of at least 10 weeks. Infants in both feeding groups showed normal growth, and in at least 80% of the infants an improvement of the overall symptomatology could be seen during the intervention period. Most profound were the decreases in prevalence and severity of eczema and infantile colic. No differences in efficacy were found in this study between the two infant formulas. It was concluded that the exclusive use of either whey hydrolysate based infant formula resulted in an improvement of allergic symptoms and in normal growth in infants diagnosed by elimination/provocation for cow's milk protein intolerance in a Primary Health Care setting.

  16. Predicting whole genome protein interaction networks from primary sequence data in model and non-model organisms using ENTS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The large-scale identification of physical protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is an important step toward understanding how biological networks evolve and generate emergent phenotypes. However, experimental identification of PPIs is a laborious and error-prone process, and current methods of PPI prediction tend to be highly conservative or require large amounts of functional data that may not be available for newly-sequenced organisms. Results In this study we demonstrate a random-forest based technique, ENTS, for the computational prediction of protein-protein interactions based only on primary sequence data. Our approach is able to efficiently predict interactions on a whole-genome scale for any eukaryotic organism, using pairwise combinations of conserved domains and predicted subcellular localization of proteins as input features. We present the first predicted interactome for the forest tree Populus trichocarpa in addition to the predicted interactomes for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparing our approach to other PPI predictors, we find that ENTS performs comparably to or better than a number of existing approaches, including several that utilize a variety of functional information for their predictions. We also find that the predicted interactions are biologically meaningful, as indicated by similarity in functional annotations and enrichment of co-expressed genes in public microarray datasets. Furthermore, we demonstrate some of the biological insights that can be gained from these predicted interaction networks. We show that the predicted interactions yield informative groupings of P. trichocarpa metabolic pathways, literature-supported associations among human disease states, and theory-supported insight into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes in paleopolyploid plants. Conclusion We conclude that the ENTS classifier will be a valuable tool for the de novo annotation of genome

  17. Expression and prognostic relevance of centromere protein A in primary osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Min; Fu, Jie; Feng, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Xue; Wang, Shou-Mei; Chen, Xin-Feng; Zhu, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Shu-Hui

    2014-04-01

    Centromere protein A (CENP-A) is one of the fundamental components of the human active kinetochore and plays important roles in cell-cycle regulation, cell survival, and genetic stability. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression and prognostic significance of CENP-A in osteosarcoma. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting analysis revealed an enhanced expression of CENP-A in osteosarcomas relative to adjacent non-tumorous bone tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunohistochemically, 72 of the 123 osteosarcoma specimens (58.5%) had high expression of CENP-A. CENP-A overexpression was significantly correlated with tumor size (P=0.002), poor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.016), local recurrence/lung metastasis (P=0.001), high Ki-67 index (P=0.004), and P53 positivity (P=0.005). Median overall and recurrence-free survival time was significantly shorter in patients with high-CENP-A osteosarcomas than in those with low-CENP-A osteosarcomas. Multivariate analysis identified CENP-A as an independent poor prognostic factor for osteosarcoma. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that elevated CENP-A expression is significantly associated with osteosarcoma progression and has an independent prognostic value in predicting overall and recurrence-free survival for patients with osteosarcoma.

  18. Loss of p53 protein during radiation transformation of primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wazer, D E; Chu, Q; Liu, X L; Gao, Q; Safaii, H; Band, V

    1994-01-01

    The causative factors leading to breast cancer are largely unknown. Increased incidence of breast cancer following diagnostic or therapeutic radiation suggests that radiation may contribute to mammary oncogenesis. This report describes the in vitro neoplastic transformation of a normal human mammary epithelial cell strain, 76N, by fractionated gamma-irradiation at a clinically used dose (30 Gy). The transformed cells (76R-30) were immortal, had reduced growth factor requirements, and produced tumors in nude mice. Remarkably, the 76R-30 cells completely lacked the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Loss of p53 was due to deletion of the gene on one allele and a 26-bp deletion within the third intron on the second allele which resulted in abnormal splicing out of either the third or fourth exon from the mRNA. PCR with a mutation-specific primer showed that intron 3 mutation was present in irradiated cells before selection for immortal phenotype. 76R-30 cells did not exhibit G1 arrest in response to radiation, indicating a loss of p53-mediated function. Expression of the wild-type p53 gene in 76R-30 cells led to their growth inhibition. Thus, loss of p53 protein appears to have contributed to neoplastic transformation of these cells. This unique model should facilitate analyses of molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced breast cancer and allow identification of p53-regulated cellular genes in breast cells. Images PMID:7511207

  19. Plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 proteolysis is increased in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helle, S I; Geisler, S; Aas, T; Paulsen, T; Holly, J M P; Lønning, P E

    2001-01-01

    Fasting blood samples were obtained before definitive surgery or biopsy in 128 patients referred to the department of surgery with suspected or manifest breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and free IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay, while IGFBP-3 proteolysis was evaluated by Western immunoblot. 12 patients had ductal carcinoma in situ benign conditions, while staging revealed metastatic disease in 15 of 16 patients with invasive cancers. IGFBP-3 proteolysis above the normal range was recorded in 19 patients with invasive cancers, but in none of the patients suffering from DCIS/benign conditions. Increased IGFBP-3 proteolysis was most frequently recorded in patients harbouring large tumours and metastatic disease (Stage I: 0/19, 0%; Stage II: 3/45, 7%, Stage III: 9/37, 24%, and Stage IV: 7/15, 47%). IGFBP-3 proteolysis was significantly higher in Stage III (P =0.01) and IV (P< 0.001) patients compared to the other stage groups (P = 0.001). IGF-I and IGF-II correlated negatively to IGFBP-3 proteolysis and age. Plasma levels of IGF-I and -II were significantly lower in patients with elevated IGFBP-3 proteolysis compared to those within the normal range. Our findings reveal alterations in the IGF-system among a substantial number of patients with large primary breast cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437405

  20. Recombinant soluble gp130 protein reduces DEN-induced primary hepatocellular carcinoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jing; Wang, Hang; Shen, Guoying; Lin, Da; Lin, Yanxue; Ye, Nanhui; Guo, Yashan; Li, Qiaoling; Ye, Nanhui; Deng, Chengjun; Meng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    IL-6 (interleukin 6) plays an important role in the development and growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) via both classic signaling and trans-signaling pathways. Soluble gp130 (sgp130) is known to be a natural inhibitor of the trans-signaling pathway. In the present study, our goal was to investigate whether recombinant sgp130 could suppress the initiation and progression of HCC in mouse models. Our results demonstrate that sgp130 induced an apoptosis of HepG2 cells and inhibited the clonogenicity of HepG2 in vitro. Moreover, the IL-6 trans-signaling pathway is significantly suppressed by sgp130 as reflected by the decrease in the level of STAT3 phosphorylation and other inflammatory factors both in vitro and in vivo. In the DEN-induced HCC mouse model, intravenous injection of sgp130 attenuated hepatic fibrosis at 16 weeks and reduced the initiation and progression of primary HCC at 36 weeks. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that intravenous administration of sgp130 significantly suppressed the growth and metastasis of xenograft human HCC in NOD/SCID mice. PMID:27080032

  1. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution.

  2. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  3. Glycyl radical activating enzymes: structure, mechanism, and substrate interactions.

    PubMed

    Shisler, Krista A; Broderick, Joan B

    2014-03-15

    The glycyl radical enzyme activating enzymes (GRE-AEs) are a group of enzymes that belong to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily and utilize a [4Fe-4S] cluster and SAM to catalyze H-atom abstraction from their substrate proteins. GRE-AEs activate homodimeric proteins known as glycyl radical enzymes (GREs) through the production of a glycyl radical. After activation, these GREs catalyze diverse reactions through the production of their own substrate radicals. The GRE-AE pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is extensively characterized and has provided insights into the active site structure of radical SAM enzymes including GRE-AEs, illustrating the nature of the interactions with their corresponding substrate GREs and external electron donors. This review will highlight research on PFL-AE and will also discuss a few GREs and their respective activating enzymes.

  4. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Novogrodsky, A; Ravid, A; Rubin, A L; Stenzel, K H

    1982-01-01

    Agents that are known to be scavengers of hydroxyl radicals inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to a greater extent than they inhibit mitogenesis induced by concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. These agents include dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoate, thiourea, dimethylurea, tetramethylurea, L-tryptophan, mannitol, and several other alcohols. Their inhibitory effect is not associated with cytotoxicity. The hydroxyl radical scavengers do not inhibit PMA-dependent amino acid transport in T cells or PMA-induced superoxide production by monocytes. Thus, they do not inhibit the primary interaction of PMA with responding cells. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PMA increased cellular guanylate cyclase in most experiments, and dimethyl sulfoxide tended to inhibit this increase. In addition to inhibition of PMA-induced mitogenesis, hydroxyl radical scavengers markedly inhibited the activity of lymphocyte activating factor (interleukin 1). The differential inhibition of lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by different mitogens appears to be related to the differential macrophage requirements of the mitogens. The data suggest that hydroxyl radicals may be involved in mediating the triggering signal for lymphocyte activation. Some of the hydroxyl radical scavengers are inducers of cellular differentiation,. nd it is possible that their differentiating activity is related to their ability to scavenge free radicals. PMID:6122209

  5. Radical chemistry of artemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Evgenii T.; Solodova, S. L.; Denisova, Taisa G.

    2010-12-01

    The review summarizes physicochemical characteristics of the natural sesquiterpene peroxide artemisinin. The kinetic schemes of transformations of artemisinin radicals under anaerobic conditions are presented and analyzed. The sequence of radical reactions of artemisinin in the presence of oxygen is considered in detail. Special emphasis is given to the intramolecular chain oxidation resulting in the transformation of artemisinin into polyatomic hydroperoxide. The kinetic characteristics of elementary reaction steps involving alkyl, alkoxyl, and peroxyl radicals generated from artemisinin are discussed. The results of testing of artemisinin and its derivatives for the antimalarial activity and the scheme of the biochemical synthesis of artemisinin in nature are considered.

  6. Radical aminomethylation of imines.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Konishi, Takehito; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Yamaoka, Yousuke; Takasu, Kiyosei; Yamada, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-05

    Taking advantage of the high level of performance of N-alkoxycarbonyl-imines, we achieved the first example of addition of the aminomethyl radical to imine. The reaction efficiency depended on the structure of the radical precursor, whether it is an iodide or a xanthate, and an electron-withdrawing group on the nitrogen atom of the radical. This reaction allows direct introduction of an N-substituted aminomethyl group onto imine to provide 1,2-diamine as well as the short-step synthesis of ICI-199,441.

  7. Cytosolic protein concentration is the primary volume signal in dog red cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    It is not known whether the activation of Na/H exchange by shrinkage in dog red cells is due to the packing of cell contents or a change in cell configuration. To make this distinction we prepared resealed ghosts that resembled intact cells in hemoglobin concentration and surface area, but had one-third their volume. A shrinkage-induced, amiloride-sensitive Na flux in the ghosts was activated at a much smaller volume in the ghosts than in the intact cells, but at the same concentration (by weight) of dry solids in both preparations. Na/H exchange in ghosts containing a mixture of 40% albumin and 60% hemoglobin (weight/weight) was activated by osmotic shrinkage at a dry solid concentration similar to that of intact cells or of ghosts containing only hemoglobin. We conclude that the process of Na/H exchange activation by cell shrinkage originates with an increase in the concentration of intracellular protein and not with a change in membrane configuration or tension. The macromolecular crowding that accompanies the reduction in cell volume probably alters the activities of key enzymes that in turn modulate the Na/H exchanger. PMID:1662684

  8. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  9. PTH1R Mutants Found in Patients with Primary Failure of Tooth Eruption Disrupt G-Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kollert, Sina; Rukoyatkina, Natalia; Sturm, Julia; Gambaryan, Stepan; Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Eigenthaler, Martin; Wischmeyer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Aim Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is causally linked to heterozygous mutations of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) gene. The mutants described so far lead to exchange of amino acids or truncation of the protein that may result in structural changes of the expressed PTH1R. However, functional effects of these mutations have not been investigated yet. Materials and Methods In HEK293 cells, PTH1R wild type was co-transfected with selected PTH1R mutants identified in patients with PFE. The effects on activation of PTH-regulated intracellular signaling pathways were analyzed by ELISA and Western immunoblotting. Differential effects of wild type and mutated PTH1R on TRESK ion channel regulation were analyzed by electrophysiological recordings in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Results In HEK293 cells, activation of PTH1R wild type increases cAMP and in response activates cAMP-stimulated protein kinase as detected by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). In contrast, the PTH1R mutants are functionally inactive and mutant PTH1R/Gly452Glu has a dominant negative effect on the signaling of PTH1R wild type. Confocal imaging revealed that wild type PTH1R is expressed on the cell surface, whereas PTH1R/Gly452Glu mutant is mostly retained inside the cell. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type PTH1R which substantially augmented K+ currents of TRESK channels, coupling of mutated PTH1R to TRESK channels was completely abolished. Conclusions PTH1R mutations affect intracellular PTH-regulated signaling in vitro. In patients with primary failure of tooth eruption defective signaling of PTH1R mutations is suggested to occur in dento-alveolar cells and thus may lead to impaired tooth movement. PMID:27898723

  10. Expression profile of the matricellular protein osteopontin in primary open-angle glaucoma and the normal human eye.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Uttio Roy; Jea, Seung-Youn; Oh, Dong-Jin; Rhee, Douglas J; Fautsch, Michael P

    2011-08-16

    PURPOSE. To characterize the role of osteopontin (OPN) in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and normal eyes. METHODS. OPN quantification was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in aqueous humor (AH) obtained from human donor eyes (POAG and normal) and surgical samples (POAG and elective cataract removal). OPN expression and localization in whole eye tissue sections and primary normal human trabecular meshwork (NTM) cells were studied by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Latanoprost-free acid (LFA)-treated NTM cells were analyzed for OPN gene and protein expression. Intraocular pressure was measured by tonometry, and central corneal thickness was measured by optical coherence tomography in young OPN(-/-) and wild-type mice. RESULTS. OPN levels were significantly reduced in donor POAG AH compared with normal AH (0.54 ± 0.18 ng/μg [n = 8] vs. 0.77 ± 0.23 ng/μg [n = 9]; P = 0.039). A similar trend was observed in surgical AH (1.05 ± 0.31 ng/μg [n = 20] vs. 1.43 ± 0.88 ng/μg [n = 20]; P = 0.083). OPN was present in the trabecular meshwork, corneal epithelium and endothelium, iris, ciliary body, retina, vitreous humor, and optic nerve. LFA increased OPN gene expression, but minimal change in OPN protein expression was observed. No difference in intraocular pressure (17.5 ± 2.0 mm Hg [n = 56] vs. 17.3 ± 1.9 mm Hg [n = 68]) but thinner central corneal thickness (91.7 ± 3.6 μm [n = 50] vs. 99.2 ± 5.5 μm [n = 70]) was noted between OPN(-/-) and wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS. OPN is widely distributed in the human eye and was found in lower concentrations in POAG AH. Reduction of OPN in young mice does not affect IOP.

  11. Increased Mitochondrial Pro-oxidant Activity Mediates Up-regulation of Complex I S-glutathionylation via Protein Thiyl Radical in the Murine Heart of eNOS−/−

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2014-01-01

    In response to oxidative stress, mitochondrial Complex I is reversibly S-glutathionylated. We hypothesized that protein S-glutathionylation (PrSSG) of Complex I is mediated by a kinetic mechanism involving reactive protein thiyl radical (PrS•) and GSH in vivo. Previous studies have shown that in vitro S-glutathionylation of isolated Complex I at the 51 kDa and 75 kDa subunits was detected under the conditions of •O2− production, and mass spectrometry confirmed that formation of Complex I PrS• mediates PrSSG. Exposure of myocytes to menadione resulted in enhanced Complex I PrSSG and PrS• (Kang et al Free Radical Biol. Med. 2012; 52: 962–73). In this investigation, we tested our hypothesis in the murine heart of eNOS−/−. The eNOS−/− mouse is known to be hypertensive and develops the pathological phenotype of progressive cardiac hypertrophy. The mitochondria isolated from the eNOS−/− myocardium exhibited a marked dysfunction with impaired state 3 respiration, a declining respiratory control index, and decreasing enzymatic activities of ETC components. Further biochemical analysis and EPR measurement indicated defective aconitase activity, a marked increase in •O2− generation activity, and a more oxidized physiological setting. These results suggest increasing prooxidant activity and subsequent oxidative stress in the mitochondria of the eNOS−/− murine heart. When Complex I from the mitochondria of the eNOS−/− murine heart was analyzed by immuno-spin trapping and probed with anti-GSH antibody, both PrS• and PrSSG of Complex I were significantly enhanced. Overexpression of SOD2 in the murine heart dramatically diminished the detected PrS•, supporting the conclusion that mediation of Complex I PrSSG by oxidative stress-induced PrS• is a unique pathway for the redox regulation of mitochondrial function in vivo. PMID:25445401

  12. Evaluation of DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, radical scavenging and in vitro cytotoxic activities of ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2,4-dihydroxy benzylidene ligands.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-12-01

    The new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, 4-Methyl-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), 4-Methoxy-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)), 4-Bromo-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)), were synthesized and characterized by various spectro analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligands were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The DNA binding studies of the ligands and complexes were examined by absorption, fluorescence, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods. The results indicated that the ligands and complexes could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis assay, which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleaving agents. The binding interaction of the ligands and complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method. Antioxidant studies showed that the complexes have a strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibit significant anticancer activity.

  13. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models.

    PubMed

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-12-02

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency.

  14. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models

    PubMed Central

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency. PMID:27910923

  15. Secreted frizzled-related protein disrupts PCP in eye lens fiber cells that have polarised primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Stump, Richard J. W.; Nguyen, Anke; Wen, Li; Chen, Yongjuan; Wang, Yanshu; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Lovicu, Frank J.; McAvoy, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling polarises cells along tissue axes. Although pathways involved are becoming better understood, outstanding issues include; (i) existence/identity of cues that orchestrate global polarisation in tissues, and (ii) the generality of the link between polarisation of primary cilia and asymmetric localisation of PCP proteins. Mammalian lenses are mainly comprised of epithelial-derived fiber cells. Concentrically arranged fibers are precisely aligned as they elongate along the anterior-posterior axis and orientate towards lens poles where they meet fibers from other segments to form characteristic sutures. We show that lens exhibits PCP, with each fiber cell having a apically situated cilium and in most cases this is polarised towards the anterior pole. Frizzled and other PCP proteins are also asymmetrically localised along the equatorial-anterior axis. Mutations in core PCP genes Van Gogh-like 2 and Celsr1 perturb oriented fiber alignment and suture formation. Suppression of the PCP pathway by overexpressing Sfrp2, shows that whilst local groups of fibers are often similarly oriented, they lack global orientation; consequently when local groups of fibers with different orientations meet they form multiple, small, ectopic suture-like configurations. This indicates that this extracellular inhibitor disrupts a global polarising signal that utilises a PCP-mediated mechanism to coordinate the global alignment and orientation of fibers to lens poles. PMID:19968984

  16. XNAP, a conserved ankyrin repeat-containing protein with a role in the Notch pathway during Xenopus primary neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Katia; Kricha, Sadia; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2002-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in many cell-fate decisions during development. Here we investigate the regulation and function of the conserved gene XNAP, which is a member of the Delta-Notch synexpression group in Xenopus. XNAP encodes a small protein with two C-terminal tandem ankyrin repeats which is expressed in the neurectoderm and in the presomitic mesoderm in a pattern that resembles that of other component of the Notch pathway. When a myc-tag form of XNAP is overexpressed in Xenopus or Hela cells, XNAP protein is detected both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In embryos and in animal cap assays, XNAP expression is activated, perhaps directly, by the Notch pathway and this activation appears to be Su(H) dependent. Overexpression of XNAP in embryos decreases Notch signaling, which leads to an increase in the number of primary neurons that form within the domains of the neural plate where neurogenesis normally occurs. In culture Hela cells, XNAP overexpression interferes with ICD activation of a Notch regulated reporter gene. Together, these data indicate that XNAP is a novel target of the Notch pathway that may, in a feedback loop, modulate its activity.

  17. Effects of nutritional and hormonal factors on the metabolism of retinol-binding protein by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.L.; Goodman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to explore hormonal and nutritional factors that might be involved in the regulation of retinol-binding protein (RBP) synthesis and secretion by the liver. The studies employed primary cultures of hepatocytes from normal rats. When cells were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium alone, a high rate of RBP secretion was observed initially, which declined and became quite low by 24 hr. Supplementing the medium with amino acids maintained RBP and albumin secretion at moderate (but less than initial) rates for at least 3 days. Further addition of dexamethasone maintained the production and secretion rates of RBP, transthyretin, and albumin close to the initial rates for up to 3-5 days in culture as measured by radioimmunoassay. Hormonally treated hepatocytes produced and secreted RBP, transthyretin, and albumin at both absolute and relative rates similar to physiological values, as estimated from rates reported by others from studies in vivo and with perfused livers. Glucagon addition partially maintained the secretion rates of these 3 proteins, but less effectively than did dexamethasone. A number of other hormones, added singly or in combination, did not affect RBP production or secretion. Addition of retinol to the cultured normal hepatocytes was without effect upon RBP secretion. These studies show that supplementing the culture medium of hepatocytes with amino acids and dexamethasone maintains RBP production and secretion for several days. In normal hepatocytes, with ample supply of retinol available within the cell, addition of exogenous retinol does not appear to influence RBP metabolism or secretion by the cells.

  18. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation.

  19. PqqD Is a Novel Peptide Chaperone That Forms a Ternary Complex with the Radical S-Adenosylmethionine Protein PqqE in the Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Biosynthetic Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Latham, John A.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Barr, Ian; Juthani, Prerak V.; Klinman, Judith P.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a product of a ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified pathway consisting of five conserved genes, pqqA-E. PqqE is a radical S-adenosylmethionine (RS) protein with a C-terminal SPASM domain, and is proposed to catalyze the formation of a carbon-carbon bond between the glutamate and tyrosine side chains of the peptide substrate PqqA. PqqD is a 10-kDa protein with an unknown function, but is essential for PQQ production. Recently, in Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp), PqqD and PqqE were shown to interact; however, the stoichiometry and KD were not obtained. Here, we show that the PqqE and PqqD interaction transcends species, also occurring in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 (Me). The stoichiometry of the MePqqD and MePqqE interaction is 1:1 and the KD, determined by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), was found to be ∼12 μm. Moreover, using SPR and isothermal calorimetry techniques, we establish for the first time that MePqqD binds MePqqA tightly (KD ∼200 nm). The formation of a ternary MePqqA-D-E complex was captured by native mass spectrometry and the KD for the MePqqAD-MePqqE interaction was found to be ∼5 μm. Finally, using a bioinformatic analysis, we found that PqqD orthologues are associated with the RS-SPASM family of proteins (subtilosin, pyrroloquinoline quinone, anaerobic sulfatase maturating enzyme, and mycofactocin), all of which modify either peptides or proteins. In conclusion, we propose that PqqD is a novel peptide chaperone and that PqqD orthologues may play a similar role in peptide modification pathways that use an RS-SPASM protein. PMID:25817994

  20. Analysis of nonadditive protein accumulation in young primary roots of a maize (Zea mays L.) F(1)-hybrid compared to its parental inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Nadine; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Sarholz, Barbara; Paschold, Anja; Fladerer, Claudia; Madlung, Johannes; Wurster, Karl; Stahl, Mark; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nordheim, Alfred; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Heterosis describes the superior performance of heterozygous F(1)-hybrids compared to their homozygous parental inbred lines. Heterosis is already manifested during early maize (Zea mays L.) primary root development. In this study, the most abundant soluble proteins have been investigated before the phenotypic manifestation of heterosis in 3.5-day-old primary roots in the flint inbred line UH002, the dent inbred line UH301 and the corresponding hybrid UH301 x UH002. In CBB-stained 2-DE gels, 150 of 304 detected proteins (49%) were accumulated in a nonadditive fashion in the hybrid compared to the average of their parental inbred lines (Student's t-test: p < 0.05). Remarkably, expression of 51% (76/150) of the nonadditively accumulated proteins exceeded the high parent or was below the low parent. ESI-MS/MS identified 75 of the 76 proteins that belonged to these expression classes. The most abundant functional classes among the 75 proteins that were encoded by 60 different genes were metabolism (58%) and disease and defense (19%). Nonadditive protein accumulation in primary roots of maize hybrids might be associated with heterosis manifestation. Identification of these proteins could therefore contribute to the better understanding of the molecular basis of heterosis.

  1. Discovery and Validation of Predictive Biomarkers of Survival for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiotherapy: Two Proteins With Predictive Value.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michael J; Zhou, Cong; Backen, Alison; Pernemalm, Maria; Williamson, Andrew J K; Priest, Lynsey J C; Koh, Pek; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death world-wide. Radiotherapy alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Currently there is no predictive marker with clinical utility to guide treatment decisions in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Identification of such markers would allow treatment options to be considered for more effective therapy. To enable the identification of appropriate protein biomarkers, plasma samples were collected from patients with non-small cell lung cancer before and during radiotherapy for longitudinal comparison following a protocol that carries sufficient power for effective discovery proteomics. Plasma samples from patients pre- and during radiotherapy who had survived > 18 mo were compared to the same time points from patients who survived < 14 mo using an 8 channel isobaric tagging tandem mass spectrometry discovery proteomics platform. Over 650 proteins were detected and relatively quantified. Proteins which showed a change during radiotherapy were selected for validation using an orthogonal antibody-based approach. Two of these proteins were verified in a separate patient cohort: values of CRP and LRG1 combined gave a highly significant indication of extended survival post one week of radiotherapy treatment.

  2. Concordance of the HER2 protein and gene status between primary and corresponding lymph node metastatic sites of extramammary Paget disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Sasajima, Yuko; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Namikawa, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Akira; Tsutsumida, Arata; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Yamazaki, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have reported the overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in primary extramammary Paget disease (EMPD). These results indicate that therapies that target HER2 may be useful in treating metastatic EMPD, for which the prognosis is poor. However, there is limited information on the expression and gene amplification of HER2 in metastatic EMPD. Twenty-six corresponding lymph node metastatic sites of primary EMPD underwent immunohistochemical evaluation of HER2 protein overexpression. In cases of HER2 protein overexpression, further analysis into the amplification of the HER2 gene was undertaken using dual colored in situ hybridization. In the corresponding lymph node metastasis of EMPD, HER2 protein overexpression and gene amplification were detected in 38 % and 19 % of cases, respectively. In 22 out of 26 cases (85 %), there were no differences in HER2 protein overexpression between the primary tumors and the corresponding lymph node metastasis (kappa coefficient 0.65). Likewise, HER2 gene amplification status was concordant in 92 % of cases (kappa coefficient 0.75). HER2 status is in good overall concordance between primary tumors and the corresponding metastatic sites. As there was a discrepancy in a minority of cases, HER2 status should be evaluated at both the primary and the metastatic sites, whenever possible.

  3. Chemistry of ascorbic acid radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of ascorbic acid free radicals is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on identification and characterization of ascorbate radicals by spectrophotometric and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques, the kinetics of formation and disappearance of ascorbate free radicals in enzymatic and nonenzymatic reactions, the effect of pH upon the spectral and kinetic properties of ascorbate anion radical, and chemical reactivity of ascorbate free radicals.

  4. Molecular and immunocytochemical characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain: Differential expression of neuronal and glial protein markers.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Bailey, Jason A; Sarkar, Sumit; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-11-15

    Neurobiological studies using primary neuronal cultures commonly employ fetal-derived neurons, but much less often adult brain-derived neurons. Our goal is to perform morphological and molecular characterization of primary neuronal cultures from adult rat brain, including the relative expression of neuronal and glial cell markers at different time points. We tested the hypothesis that long-term neuronal viability is compatible with glial proliferation in adult neuron culture. We examined neuron culture from adult rat brain, which was maintained at steady state up to 24 days, and characterized them on the basis of cellular, molecular and biochemical properties at different time points of the culture. We identified neuronal and glial cells by both immunocytochemical and western immunoblotting techniques using NSE and Tau as neuronal markers and GFAP as glial protein marker, which revealed the presence of predominantly neuronal cells in the initial phase of the culture and a rise in glial cells from day 12 onwards. Notably, neuronal cells were preserved in the culture along with the glial cells even at day 24. Transfection of the cultured cells with a GFP expression vector and plasmids containing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of two different gene promoters demonstrated DNA transfectability. Taken together, these results suggest a differential expression of neuronal and glial cells at different time points and long-term neuronal viability in the presence of glial proliferation. Such adult neurons serve as a suitable system for the application of neurodegeneration models and for drug target discovery in various brain disorders including Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Primary endosymbiosis events date to the later Proterozoic with cross-calibrated phylogenetic dating of duplicated ATPase proteins.

    PubMed

    Shih, Patrick M; Matzke, Nicholas J

    2013-07-23

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria descended from bacterial ancestors, but the dating of these primary endosymbiosis events remains very uncertain, despite their importance for our understanding of the evolution of both bacteria and eukaryotes. All phylogenetic dating in the Proterozoic and before is difficult: Significant debates surround potential fossil calibration points based on the interpretation of the Precambrian microbial fossil record, and strict molecular clock methods cannot be expected to yield accurate dates over such vast timescales because of strong heterogeneity in rates. Even with more sophisticated relaxed-clock analyses, nodes that are distant from fossil calibrations will have a very high uncertainty in dating. However, endosymbiosis events and gene duplications provide some additional information that has never been exploited in dating; namely, that certain nodes on a gene tree must represent the same events, and thus must have the same or very similar dates, even if the exact date is uncertain. We devised techniques to exploit this information: cross-calibration, in which node date calibrations are reused across a phylogeny, and cross-bracing, in which node date calibrations are formally linked in a hierarchical Bayesian model. We apply these methods to proteins with ancient duplications that have remained associated and originated from plastid and mitochondrial endosymbionts: the α and β subunits of ATP synthase and its relatives, and the elongation factor thermo unstable. The methods yield reductions in dating uncertainty of 14-26% while only using date calibrations derived from phylogenetically unambiguous Phanerozoic fossils of multicellular plants and animals. Our results suggest that primary plastid endosymbiosis occurred ∼900 Mya and mitochondrial endosymbiosis occurred ∼1,200 Mya.

  6. Radicals in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Veronika

    2012-05-14

    Stable radicals and recombination of photogenerated lophyl radicals are investigated in ionic liquids. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yloxyl derivatives contain various substituents at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group, including hydrogen-bond-forming or ionic substituents that undergo additional interactions with the individual ions of the ionic liquids. Some of these spin probes contain similar ions to ionic liquids to avoid counter-ion exchange with the ionic liquid. Depending on the ionic liquid anion, the Stokes-Einstein theory or the Spernol-Gierer-Wirtz theory can be applied to describe the temperature dependence of the average rotational correlation time of the spin probe in the ionic liquids. Furthermore, the spin probes give information about the micropolarity of the ionic liquids. In this context the substituent at the 4-position to the nitroxyl group plays a significant role. Covalent bonding of a spin probe to the imidazolium ion results in bulky spin probes that are strongly immobilized in the ionic liquid. Furthermore, lophyl radical recombination in the dark, which is chosen to understand the dynamics of bimolecular reactions in ionic liquids, shows a slow process at longer timescale and a rise time at a shorter timescale. Although various reactions may contribute to the slower process during lophyl radical recombination, it follows a second-order kinetics that does not clearly show solvent viscosity dependence. However, the rise time, which may be attributed to radical pair formation, increases with increasing solvent viscosity.

  7. Gli2a protein localization reveals a role for Iguana/DZIP1 in primary ciliogenesis and a dependence of Hedgehog signal transduction on primary cilia in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In mammalian cells, the integrity of the primary cilium is critical for proper regulation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal transduction pathway. Whether or not this dependence on the primary cilium is a universal feature of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling has remained contentious due, in part, to the apparent divergence of the intracellular transduction pathway between mammals and teleost fish. Results Here, using a functional Gli2-GFP fusion protein, we show that, as in mammals, the Gli2 transcription factor localizes to the primary cilia of cells in the zebrafish embryo and that this localization is modulated by the activity of the Hh pathway. Moreover, we show that the Igu/DZIP1protein, previously implicated in the modulation of Gli activity in zebrafish, also localizes to the primary cilium and is required for its proper formation. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a conserved role of the primary cilium in mediating Hedgehog signalling activity across the vertebrate phylum and validate the use of the zebrafish as a representative model for the in vivo analysis of vertebrate Hedgehog signalling. PMID:20487519

  8. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO + hν{sub 248nm} → CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + HCO ϕ{sub 1a} = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 3} + H + CO ϕ{sub 1e} = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}→{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO + HO{sub 2} ϕ{sub 1f} = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} → CH{sub 4} + CO ϕ{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be

  9. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu; Chen, Hongbo; Cheng, Yanfen; Nasir, Mohammad Abdel; Kemper, Nicole; Bao, Endong

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42˚C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480‑min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB.

  10. The interactive association between heat shock factor 1 and heat shock proteins in primary myocardial cells subjected to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    TANG, SHU; CHEN, HONGBO; CHENG, YANFEN; NASIR, MOHAMMAD ABDEL; KEMPER, NICOLE; BAO, ENDONG

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a heat shock transcription factor that rapidly induces heat shock gene transcription following thermal stress. In this study, we subjected primary neonatal rat myocardial cells to heat stress in vitro to create a model system for investigating the trends in expression and association between various heat shock proteins (HSPs) and HSF1 under adverse environmental conditions. After the cells were subjected to heat stress at 42°C for different periods of time, HSP and HSF1 mRNA and protein levels were detected by qPCR and western blot analysis in the heat-stressed cells. The HSF1 expression levels significantly increased in the cells following 120 min of exposure to heat stess compared to the levels observed at the beginning of heat stress exposure. HSP90 followed a similar trend in expression to HSF1, whereas HSP70 followed an opposite trend. However, no significant changes were observed in the crystallin, alpha B (CRYAB, also known as HSP beta-5) expression levels during the 480-min period of exposure to heat stress. The interaction between the HSPs and HSF1 was analyzed by STRING 9.1, and it was found that HSF1 interacted with HSP90 and HSP70, and that it did not play a role in regulating CRYAB expression. Based on our findings, HSP70 may suppress HSF1 in rat myocardial cells under conditions of heat stress. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that HSF1 is not the key factor for all HSPs, and this was particularly the case for CRYAB. PMID:26719858

  11. Interaction between alkyl radicals and single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Denis, Pablo A

    2012-06-30

    The addition of primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl radicals to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was studied by means of dispersion corrected density functional theory. The PBE, B97-D, M06-L, and M06-2X functionals were used. Consideration of Van der Waals interactions is essential to obtain accurate addition energies. In effect, the enthalpy changes at 298 K, for the addition of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and tert-butyl radicals onto a (5,5) SWCNT are: -25.7, -25.1, -22.4, and -16.6 kcal/mol, at the M06-2X level, respectively, whereas at PBE/6-31G* level they are significantly lower: -25.0, -19.0, -16.7, and -5.0 kcal/mol respectively. Although the binding energies are small, the attached alkyl radicals are expected to be stable because of the large desorption barriers. The importance of nonbonded interactions was more noticeable as we moved from primary to tertiary alkyl radicals. Indeed, for the tert-butyl radical, physisorption onto the (11,0) SWCNT is preferred rather than chemisorption. The bond dissociation energies determined for alkyl radicals and SWCNT follow the trend suggested by the consideration of radical stabilization energies. However, they are in disagreement with some degrees of functionalization observed in recent experiments. This discrepancy would stem from the fact that for some HiPco nanotubes, nonbonded interactions with alkyl radicals are stronger than covalent bonds.

  12. Homocysteine stimulates the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 receptor (CCR2) in human monocytes: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; O, K

    2001-01-01

    Homocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. The development of atherosclerosis involves monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)-mediated monocyte recruitment to the lesion site. The action of MCP-1 is mostly via its interaction with MCP-1 receptor (CCR2), which is the major receptor for MCP-1 on the surface of monocytes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression in human THP-1 monocytes. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of homocysteine for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The expression of CCR2 mRNA was determined by nuclease protection assay and the CCR2 protein was measured by Western immunoblotting analysis. The binding of MCP-1 to CCR2 as a functional receptor on the monocyte surface was determined by flow cytometry. Homocysteine (0.05-0.2 mM) significantly enhanced the expression of CCR2 mRNA (129-209% of the control) and CCR2 protein (up to 183% of control) in these cells after 24 h of incubation. Stimulation of CCR2 expression was associated with a parallel increase in the binding activity of CCR2 (129-191% of control) as well as an enhanced chemotactic response of homocysteine-treated monocytes. Further investigation revealed that the levels of superoxide were significantly elevated in cells incubated with homocysteine for 12-48 h. The addition of superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of superoxide, to the culture medium abolished the stimulatory effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression as well as the binding activity of the receptor. The stimulatory effect of homocysteine on the expression of CCR2 mRNA and the levels of CCR2 protein was also observed in human peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, the present study has clearly demonstrated that homocysteine stimulates CCR2 expression in monocytes, leading to an enhanced binding activity and chemotatic response. Homocysteine-induced superoxide formation might serve as one of the underlying mechanisms for this effect

  13. Promiscuous targeting of bromodomains by bromosporine identifies BET proteins as master regulators of primary transcription response in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Leonards, Katharina; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Dovey, Oliver; Wells, Christopher; Fedorov, Oleg; Monteiro, Octovia; Fujisawa, Takao; Wang, Chen-Yi; Lingard, Hannah; Tallant, Cynthia; Nikbin, Nikzad; Guetzoyan, Lucie; Ingham, Richard; Ley, Steven V.; Brennan, Paul; Muller, Susanne; Samsonova, Anastasia; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Schwaller, Juerg; Vassiliou, George; Knapp, Stefan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomains (BRDs) have emerged as compelling targets for cancer therapy. The development of selective and potent BET (bromo and extra-terminal) inhibitors and their significant activity in diverse tumor models have rapidly translated into clinical studies and have motivated drug development efforts targeting non-BET BRDs. However, the complex multidomain/subunit architecture of BRD protein complexes complicates predictions of the consequences of their pharmacological targeting. To address this issue, we developed a promiscuous BRD inhibitor [bromosporine (BSP)] that broadly targets BRDs (including BETs) with nanomolar affinity, creating a tool for the identification of cellular processes and diseases where BRDs have a regulatory function. As a proof of principle, we studied the effects of BSP on leukemic cell lines known to be sensitive to BET inhibition and found, as expected, strong antiproliferative activity. Comparison of the modulation of transcriptional profiles by BSP after a short exposure to the inhibitor resulted in a BET inhibitor signature but no significant additional changes in transcription that could account for inhibition of other BRDs. Thus, nonselective targeting of BRDs identified BETs, but not other BRDs, as master regulators of context-dependent primary transcription response. PMID:27757418

  14. Peroxyl radical reactions with carotenoids in microemulsions: Influence of microemulsion composition and the nature of peroxyl radical precursor.

    PubMed

    El-Agamey, Ali; McGarvey, David J

    2016-01-01

    The reactions of acetylperoxyl radicals with different carotenoids (7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene and ζ-carotene) in SDS and CTAC microemulsions of different compositions were investigated using laser flash photolysis (LFP) coupled with kinetic absorption spectroscopy. The primary objective of this study was to explore the influence of microemulsion composition and the type of surfactant used on the yields and kinetics of various transients formed from the reaction of acetylperoxyl radicals with carotenoids. Also, the influence of the site (hydrocarbon phases or aqueous phase) of generation of the peroxyl radical precursor was examined by using 4-acetyl-4-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (APPHCl) and 1,1-diphenylacetone (11DPA) as water-soluble and lipid-soluble peroxyl radical precursors, respectively. LFP of peroxyl radical precursors with 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene (77DH) in different microemulsions gives rise to the formation of three distinct transients namely addition radical (λmax=460 nm), near infrared transient1 (NIR, λmax=700 nm) and 7,7'-dihydro-β-carotene radical cation (77DH(•+), λmax=770 nm). In addition, for ζ-carotene (ZETA) two transients (near infrared transient1 (NIR1, λmax=660 nm) and ζ-carotene radical cation (ZETA(•+), λmax=730-740 nm)) are generated following LFP of peroxyl radical precursors in the presence of ζ-carotene (ZETA) in different microemulsions. The results show that the composition of the microemulsion strongly influences the observed yield and kinetics of the transients formed from the reactions of peroxyl radicals (acetylperoxyl radicals) with carotenoids (77DH and ZETA). Also, the type of surfactant used in the microemulsions influences the yield of the transients formed. The dependence of the transient yields and kinetics on microemulsion composition (or the type of surfactant used in the microemulsion) can be attributed to the change of the polarity of the microenvironment of the carotenoid. Furthermore, the nature of

  15. Biochemistry of free radicals: from electrons to tissues.

    PubMed

    Boveris, A

    1998-01-01

    Free radicals are chemical species with an unpaired electron in the outer valence orbitals. The unpaired electron makes them paramagnetic (physics) and relatively reactive (chemistry). The free radicals that are normal metabolites in aerobic biological systems have varied reactivities, ranging from the high reactivity of hydroxyl radical (t1/2 = 10(-9) s) to the low reactivity of melanins (t1/2 = days). The univalent reduction of oxygen that takes place in mammalian organs produces superoxide radicals at a rate of about 2% of the total oxygen uptake. The primary production of superoxide radicals sustains a free radical chain reaction involving a series of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl and peroxyl radical and singlet oxygen). Nitric oxide is almost unreactive as free radical except for its termination reaction with superoxide radical to yield the strong oxidant peroxynitrite. Nitric oxide also reacts with ubiquinol in a redox reaction, with cytochrome oxidase competitively with oxygen, and oxymyoglobin and oxyhemoglobin displacing oxygen. Septic shock and endotoxemia produce muscle dysfunction and oxidative stress due to increased steady state concentrations of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  16. Radical Socioeducational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigmon, Scott B.

    This book describes an interactive-interdisciplinary way of looking at the social conditions which impinge upon schooling, and which impact upon the social facts of life. It examines current schooling problems from the perspective of radical social democratic thought. The book is organized into four major sections. Part 1 provides an overview and…

  17. Against Radical Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jeff

    This essay presents two strands of arguments against radical or critical emancipatory multiculturalism. In strand 1, "'Culture' is...whatever..." the looseness of the core concept of "culture," which can refer to anything at all concerning a social group that itself may exist only theoretically, is shown. In strand 2, "From ideology to leveling,…

  18. Beyond Radical Educational Cynicism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, George H.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative is presented to counter current radical arguments that the schools cannot bring about social change because they are instruments of capitalism. The works of Samuel Bowles, Herbert Gintis, and Louis Althusser are discussed. Henry Giroux's "Ideology, Culture and the Process of Schooling" provides an alternative to cynicism.…

  19. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Cotí, Karla K.; Benítez, Diego; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John-Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmielli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William A.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication.

  20. Radical School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Beatrice, Ed.; Gross, Ronald, Ed.

    This book provides a comprehensive examination of the nature of the school crisis and the ways in which radical thinkers and educators are dealing with it. Excerpts from the writings of Jonathan Kozol, John Holt, Kenneth Clark, and others are concerned with the realities of education in ghettos and suburbs. Paul Goodman, Marshall McLuhan, Sylvia…

  1. Haptoglobin Binding Stabilizes Hemoglobin Ferryl Iron and the Globin Radical on Tyrosine β145

    PubMed Central

    Schaer, Dominik J.; Buehler, Paul W.; Wilson, Michael T.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Svistunenko, Dimitri A.; Bulow, Leif; Alayash, Abdu I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Hemoglobin (Hb) becomes toxic when released from the erythrocyte. The acute phase protein haptoglobin (Hp) binds avidly to Hb and decreases oxidative damage to Hb itself and to the surrounding proteins and lipids. However, the molecular mechanism underpinning Hp protection is to date unclear. The aim of this study was to use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, stopped flow optical spectrophotometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to explore the mechanism and specifically the role of specific tyrosine residues in this protection. Results: Following peroxide challenge Hb produces reactive oxidative intermediates in the form of ferryl heme and globin free radicals. Hp binding increases the steady state level of ferryl formation during Hb-catalyzed lipid peroxidation, while at the same time dramatically inhibiting the overall reaction rate. This enhanced ferryl stability is also seen in the absence of lipids and in the presence of external reductants. Hp binding is not accompanied by a decrease in the pK of ferryl protonation; the protonated ferryl species still forms, but is intrinsically less reactive. Ferryl stabilization is accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of the peroxide-induced tyrosine free radical. EPR spectral parameters and mutagenesis studies suggest that this radical is located on tyrosine 145, the penultimate C-terminal amino acid on the beta Hb subunit. Innovation: Hp binding decreases both the ferryl iron and free radical reactivity of Hb. Conclusion: Hp protects against Hb-induced damage in the vasculature, not by preventing the primary reactivity of heme oxidants, but by rendering the resultant protein products less damaging. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2264–2273. PMID:22702311

  2. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  3. Beta-amyloid oligomers induce early loss of presynaptic proteins in primary neurons by caspase-dependent and proteasome-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bong Geum; In, Sua; Choi, Boyoung; Kim, Min-Ju

    2014-11-12

    Beta-amyloid is a major pathogenic molecule for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be aggregated into a soluble oligomer, which is a toxic intermediate, before amyloid fibril formation. Beta-amyloid oligomers are associated closely with early synaptic loss in AD. However, it is still unknown which synaptic proteins are involved in the synaptotoxicity, and a direct comparison among the synaptic proteins should also be addressed. Here, we investigated changes in the expression of several presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins in primary neurons after treatment with a low-molecular weight and a high-molecular weight beta-amyloid oligomer. Both oligomers induced early neuronal dysfunction after 4 h and significantly reduced presynaptic protein (synaptophysin, syntaxin, synapsin, and synaptotagmin) expression. However, the expression of postsynaptic proteins (PSD95, NMDAR2A/B, and GluR2/3), except NMDAR1 was not reduced, and some protein expression levels were increased. Glutamate treatment, which is correlated with postsynaptic activation, showed more postsynaptic-specific protein loss compared with beta-amyloid oligomer treatment. Finally, the caspase inhibitor zVAD and the proteasomal inhibitor MG132 attenuated presynaptic protein loss. Thus, our data showed changes in synaptic proteins by beta-amyloid oligomers, which provides an understanding of early synaptotoxicity and suggests new approaches for AD treatment.

  4. Alternative radical pairs for cryptochrome-based magnetoreception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alpha A.; Lau, Jason C. S.; Hogben, Hannah J.; Biskup, Till; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the remarkable ability of animals, in particular birds, to sense the direction of the Earth's magnetic field relies on magnetically sensitive photochemical reactions of the protein cryptochrome. It is generally assumed that the magnetic field acts on the radical pair [FAD•− TrpH•+] formed by the transfer of an electron from a group of three tryptophan residues to the photo-excited flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor within the protein. Here, we examine the suitability of an [FAD•− Z•] radical pair as a compass magnetoreceptor, where Z• is a radical in which the electron spin has no hyperfine interactions with magnetic nuclei, such as hydrogen and nitrogen. Quantum spin dynamics simulations of the reactivity of [FAD•− Z•] show that it is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to the direction of the geomagnetic field than is [FAD•− TrpH•+] under the same conditions (50 µT magnetic field, 1 µs radical lifetime). The favourable magnetic properties of [FAD•− Z•] arise from the asymmetric distribution of hyperfine interactions among the two radicals and the near-optimal magnetic properties of the flavin radical. We close by discussing the identity of Z• and possible routes for its formation as part of a spin-correlated radical pair with an FAD radical in cryptochrome. PMID:24671932

  5. Effect of Curcumin Against Oxidation of Biomolecules by Hydroxyl Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Gurumurthy, Prema; Jayamathi; Iqbal, Shabeer S; Mahendra, Little

    2014-01-01

    Background: Among various reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radicals have the strongest chemical activity, which can damage a wide range of essential biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of curcumin on prevention of oxidative damage of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals generated in in vitro by a Fenton like reaction. Materials and Methods: We have incubated the serum, plasma and whole blood with H2O2/Cu2+/ Ascorbic acid system for 4 hours at 37 0C and observed the oxidation of biomolecules like albumin, lipids, proteins and DNA. Results: Curcumin at the concentrations of 50,100 and 200 μmoles, prevented the formation of ischemia modified albumin, MDA, protein carbonyls, oxidized DNA and increased the total antioxidant levels and GSH significantly. Conclusion: These observations suggest the hydroxyl radical scavenging potentials of curcumin and protective actions to prevent the oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals. PMID:25478334

  6. Toward Radicalizing Community Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    This article advocates a radicalized theoretical construction of community service learning. To accomplish this radicalization, I initially take up a discussion of traditional understandings of CSL rooted in pragmatic/progressive thought. I then suggest that this traditional structural foundation can be radicalized by incorporating Deborah…

  7. Functional Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Serous Ovarian Cancer using Reverse Phase Protein Array: TGFβ Pathway Signaling Indicates Response to Primary Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Mark S.; Agarwal, Roshan; Gilks, Blake; Swenerton, Kenneth; Kalloger, Steve; Santos, Jennifer; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Zhang, Fan; Coombes, Kevin; Miller, Dianne; Huntsman, David; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) we measured protein expression associated with response to primary chemotherapy in patients with advanced-stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Experimental Design: Tumor samples were obtained from forty-five patients with advanced high-grade serous cancers from the Gynecology Tumor Bank at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Treatment consisted of platinum-based chemotherapy following debulking surgery. Protein lysates were prepared from fresh frozen tumor samples and 80 validated proteins from signaling pathways implicated in ovarian carcinogenesis were measured by RPPA. Normalization of Ca-125 by the 3rd cycle of chemotherapy was chosen as the primary outcome measure of chemotherapy response. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis to identify protein predictors of Ca-125 normalization, and Cox regression to test for the association between protein expression and PFS. A significance level of p ≤ 0.05 was used. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 56.8 years. EGFR, YKL-40 and several TGFβ pathway proteins (c-Jun N-terminal kinase JNK, JNK phosphorylated at residues 183 and 185, PAI-1, Smad3, TAZ) showed significant associations with Ca-125 normalization on univariate testing. On multivariate analysis, EGFR (p < 0.02), JNK (p < 0.01), and Smad3 (p < 0.04) were significantly associated with normalization of Ca-125. Contingency table analysis of pathway-classified proteins revealed that the selection of TGFβ pathway proteins was unlikely due to false discovery (p < 0.007, Bonferroni-adjusted). Conclusion: TGFβ pathway signaling likely plays an important role as a marker or mediator of chemoresistance in advanced serous ovarian cancer. On this basis, future studies to develop and validate a useful predictor of treatment failure are warranted. PMID:20460476

  8. Photo-induced free radicals on a simulated Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, S.-S.; Chang, S.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an electron spin resonance study of free radicals in the ultraviolet irradiation of a simulated Martian surface suggest that the ultraviolet photolysis of CO or CO2, or a mixture of both, adsorbed on silica gel at minus 170 C involves the formation of OH radicals and possibly of H atoms as the primary process, followed by the formation of CO2H radicals. It is concluded that the photochemical synthesis of organic compounds could occur on Mars if the siliceous surface dust contains enough silanol groups and/or adsorbed H2O in the form of bound water.

  9. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Takahide; Kawamoto, Takuji; Kobayashi, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products. PMID:24062844

  10. Radicals in melanin biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Riley, P A

    1988-01-01

    Melanins are light-absorbant polymeric pigments found widely dispersed in nature. They possess many interesting physicochemical properties. One of these is the expression in the polymer of stable free radicals which appear to have a protective action in cells, probably by acting as a sink for diffusible free-radical species. Polymer formation is thought to occur by a free-radical process in which semiquinones are added to the chain. Semiquinones are formed by redox equilibration interactions between metabolic intermediates formed during the tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation process. In the continued presence of substrate, steady-state concentrations of reactive species are predicted in the reaction system, and the melanogenic pathway may be considered as potentially hazardous for pigment-generating cells. This feature has been exploited by the use of analogue substrates to generate cytotoxic species as a possible rational approach to the treatment of malignant melanoma. One such substance is 4-hydroxyanisole, the oxidation of which gives rise to semiquinone radical species. The possibility that the anisyl semiquinone initiates a mechanism leading to cell damage has not been excluded. However, the current view is that the major cytotoxicity due to the oxidation products of this compound is the result of the action of the corresponding orthoquinone. A number of mechanisms exist for detoxifying quinones if they reach the cytosol such as O-methylation and the formation of thiol adducts with cysteine or glutathione, and these can be used as markers of melanogenesis. In general, however, only small amounts of reactive intermediates of melanogenesis escape from the confines of the melanosome, probably because of their limited lipid solubility. The selective toxic action of anisyl quinone in the treatment of melanoma may, in part, be due to membrane defects in the melanosomes of malignant melanocytes.

  11. Free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1979-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a getter additive comprising a compound or mixture of compounds capable of capturing or deactivating free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive. Exemplary getter additives are isocyanates, olefins and iodine.

  12. Probability and radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of probability appears to be very important in the radical behaviorism of Skinner. Yet, it seems that this probability has not been accurately defined and is still ambiguous. I give a strict, relative frequency interpretation of probability and its applicability to the data from the science of behavior as supplied by cumulative records. Two examples of stochastic processes are given that may model the data from cumulative records that result under conditions of continuous reinforcement and extinction, respectively. PMID:22478114

  13. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a free radical propulsion system, utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust, is analyzed. The system, operating at a theoretical impulse with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, is hypothesized to bridge the gap between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. A comparative methodology is outlined by which characteristics of chemical and electric propulsion for orbit raising mission can be investigated. It is noted that free radicals proposed in rockets previously met with difficulty and complexity in terms of storage requirements; the present study proposes to eliminate the storage requirements by using electric energy to achieve a continuous-flow product of free radicals which are recombined to produce a high velocity propellant. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas is transferred to the propellant via three-body-recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Microwave plasma discharge was found in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressure in preliminary experiments, and microwave heating compared to electrothermal heating showed much higher temperatures in gasdynamic equations.

  14. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  15. Types of radical hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Plesca, M; Bordea, CI; Moga, MA; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for cervical cancer is a complex, multidisciplinary issue, which applies according to the stage of the disease. The surgical elective treatment of cervical cancer is represented by the radical abdominal hysterectomy. In time, many surgeons perfected this surgical technique; the ones who stood up for this idea were Thoma Ionescu and Ernst Wertheim. There are many varieties of radical hysterectomies performed by using the abdominal method and some of them through vaginal and mixed way. Each method employed has advantages and disadvantages. At present, there are three classifications of radical hysterectomies which are used for the simplification of the surgical protocols: Piver-Rutledge-Smith classification which is the oldest, GCG-EORTC classification and Querlow and Morrow classification. The last is the most evolved and recent classification; its techniques can be adapted for conservative operations and for different types of surgical approaches: abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic or robotic. Abbreviations: GCG-EORTC = Gynecologic Cancer Group of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer; LEEP = loop electrosurgical excision procedure; I.O.B. = Institute of Oncology Bucharest; PRS = Piver-Rutledge-Smith PMID:25408722

  16. [Radical prostatectomy - pro robotic].

    PubMed

    Gillitzer, R

    2012-05-01

    Anatomical radical prostatectomy was introduced in the early 1980s by Walsh and Donker. Elucidation of key anatomical structures led to a significant reduction in the morbidity of this procedure. The strive to achieve similar oncological and functional results to this gold standard open procedure but with further reduction of morbidity through a minimally invasive access led to the establishment of laparoscopic prostatectomy. However, this procedure is complex and difficult and is associated with a long learning curve. The technical advantages of robotically assisted surgery coupled with the intuitive handling of the device led to increased precision and shortening of the learning curve. These main advantages, together with a massive internet presence and aggressive marketing, have resulted in a rapid dissemination of robotic radical prostatectomy and an increasing patient demand. However, superiority of robotic radical prostatectomy in comparison to the other surgical therapeutic options has not yet been proven on a scientific basis. Currently robotic-assisted surgery is an established technique and future technical improvements will certainly further define its role in urological surgery. In the end this technical innovation will have to be balanced against the very high purchase and running costs, which remain the main limitation of this technology.

  17. Extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein is associated with an increase in both NF-kappa B binding and protein kinase C activity in primary human astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Conant, K; Ma, M; Nath, A; Major, E O

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been associated with an increase in the binding of the transcription factor NF-kappa B to its consensus sequence in the viral promoter. Using cultures of primary human fetal astrocytes, we show that exogenous HIV-1 Tat protein, which has been demonstrated to be released from infected cells, is associated with an increase in the binding of this transcription factor to an HIV-1 long terminal repeat kappa B sequence. This effect occurs rapidly and is independent of new protein synthesis. We also demonstrate that extracellular Tat protein is associated with an increase in protein kinase C activity. If Tat functions similarly in other cell types, such findings could relate to some of this protein's previously described physiological effects. These effects include Tat's ability to upregulate the synthesis of specific cytokines and to act as a growth factor. PMID:8627654

  18. Free radical tissue damage: Protective role of antioxidant nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Machling, L.J.; Bendich, A. )

    1987-12-01

    Highly reactive molecules called free radicals can cause tissue damage by reacting with polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular membranes, nucleotides in DNA, and critical sulfhydryl bonds in proteins. Free radicals can originate endogenously from normal metabolic reactions or exogenously as components of tobacco smoke and air pollutants and indirectly through the metabolism of certain solvents, drugs, and pesticides as well as through exposure to radiation. There is some evidence that free radical damage contributes to the etiology of many chronic health problems such as emphysema, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, cataracts, and cancer. The extent of tissue damage is the result of the balance between the free radicals generated and the antioxidant protective defense system. Several dietary micronutrients contribute greatly to the protective system. Based on the growing interest in free radical biology and the lack of effective therapies for many of the chronic diseases, the usefulness of essential, safe nutrients in protecting against the adverse effects of oxidative injury warrants further study.

  19. Salamander-derived, human-optimized nAG protein suppresses collagen synthesis and increases collagen degradation in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Shier, Medhat K; Abd-Alwahed, Mervat M; Mawlana, Ola H; El-Wetidy, Mohammed S; Bagayawa, Reginald S; Ali, Hebatallah H; Al-Nbaheen, May S; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2013-01-01

    Unlike humans, salamanders regrow their amputated limbs. Regeneration depends on the presence of regenerating axons which upregulate the expression of newt anterior gradient (nAG) protein. We had the hypothesis that nAG might have an inhibitory effect on collagen production since excessive collagen production results in scarring, which is a major enemy to regeneration. nAG gene was designed, synthesized, and cloned. The cloned vector was then transfected into primary human fibroblasts. The results showed that the expression of nAG protein in primary human fibroblast cells suppresses the expression of collagen I and III, with or without TGF- β 1 stimulation. This suppression is due to a dual effect of nAG both by decreasing collagen synthesis and by increasing collagen degradation. Furthermore, nAG had an inhibitory effect on proliferation of transfected fibroblasts. It was concluded that nAG suppresses collagen through multiple effects.

  20. Enhanced Expression of Stim, Orai, and TRPC Transcripts and Proteins in Endothelial Progenitor Cells Isolated from Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dragoni, Silvia; Laforenza, Umberto; Bonetti, Elisa; Reforgiato, Marta; Poletto, Valentina; Lodola, Francesco; Bottino, Cinzia; Guido, Daniele; Rappa, Alessandra; Pareek, Sumedha; Tomasello, Mario; Guarrera, Maria Rosa; Cinelli, Maria Pia; Aronica, Adele; Guerra, Germano; Barosi, Giovanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background An increase in the frequency of circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs), the only subset of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) truly belonging to the endothelial phenotype, occurs in patients affected by primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Herein, they might contribute to the enhanced neovascularisation of fibrotic bone marrow and spleen. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) activated by the depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ store drives proliferation in ECFCs isolated from both healthy donors (N-ECFCs) and subjects suffering from renal cellular carcinoma (RCC-ECFCs). SOCE is up-regulated in RCC-ECFCs due to the over-expression of its underlying molecular components, namely Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized Ca2+ imaging, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and functional assays to evaluate molecular structure and the functional role of SOCE in ECFCs derived from PMF patients (PMF-ECFCs). SOCE, induced by either pharmacological (i.e. cyclopiazonic acid or CPA) or physiological (i.e. ATP) stimulation, was significantly higher in PMF-ECFCs. ATP-induced SOCE was inhibited upon blockade of the phospholipase C/InsP3 signalling pathway with U73111 and 2-APB. The higher amplitude of SOCE was associated to the over-expression of the transcripts encoding for Stim2, Orai2–3, and TRPC1. Conversely, immunoblotting revealed that Stim2 levels remained constant as compared to N-ECFCs, while Stim1, Orai1, Orai3, TRPC1 and TRPC4 proteins were over-expressed in PMF-ECFCs. ATP-induced SOCE was inhibited by BTP-2 and low micromolar La3+ and Gd3+, while CPA-elicited SOCE was insensitive to Gd3+. Finally, BTP-2 and La3+ weakly blocked PMF-ECFC proliferation, while Gd3+ was ineffective. Conclusions Two distinct signalling pathways mediate SOCE in PMF-ECFCs; one is activated by passive store depletion and is Gd3+-resistant, while the other one is regulated by the InsP3-sensitive Ca2

  1. The SPARC-related modular calcium binding protein 2 (SMOC2) gene polymorphism in primary glaucoma: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Najwa; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Al-Dohayan, Nourah; Mustafa, Md; Arfin, Misbahul; Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman K

    2017-01-01

    Primary glaucomas are among the most common eye diseases that may potentially result in bilateral blindness. Both genetics and environmental factors are reported to be involved in the etiology of primary glaucomas. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-related modular calcium binding protein 2 (SMOC2) is a matricellular glycoprotein encoded by the SMOC2 gene and known to regulate the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which play an important role in the pathogenesis of primary glaucomas. The frequencies of alleles and genotypes of SMOC2 variants were examined in 406 Saudi subjects, including primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, n=140) and primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG, n=64) patients and 202 matched healthy controls using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. Genotyping of SMOC2 polymorphism (rs13208776) revealed a significantly higher frequency of the heterozygous genotype GA (P<0.01) and a lower frequency of wild type GG genotype (P=0.05) in glaucoma patients compared to the controls. Upon stratification of the patients on the basis of types of glaucoma, PACG patients had a significantly higher frequency of GA genotype as compared to the controls (P<0.01), whereas there was no significant difference between the POAG patient and control groups in frequencies of SMOC2 alleles and genotypes. Further, there was no significant difference in frequency distribution of alleles and genotypes between male and female patients. This study indicates that the GA genotype of SMOC2 (G>A) polymorphism is significantly associated with PACG and may be a risk factor. However, further large-scale studies in the Saudi population as well as in other ethnic populations are needed to confirm this association. PMID:28356709

  2. TULP3 bridges the IFT-A complex and membrane phosphoinositides to promote trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors into primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Wen, Xiaohui; Chih, Ben; Nelson, Christopher D; Lane, William S; Scales, Suzie J; Jackson, Peter K

    2010-10-01

    Primary cilia function as a sensory signaling compartment in processes ranging from mammalian Hedgehog signaling to neuronal control of obesity. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is an ancient, conserved mechanism required to assemble cilia and for trafficking within cilia. The link between IFT, sensory signaling, and obesity is not clearly defined, but some novel monogenic obesity disorders may be linked to ciliary defects. The tubby mouse, which presents with adult-onset obesity, arises from mutation in the Tub gene. The tubby-like proteins comprise a related family of poorly understood proteins with roles in neural development and function. We find that specific Tubby family proteins, notably Tubby-like protein 3 (TULP3), bind to the IFT-A complex. IFT-A is linked to retrograde ciliary transport, but, surprisingly, we find that the IFT-A complex has a second role directing ciliary entry of TULP3. TULP3 and IFT-A, in turn, promote trafficking of a subset of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but not Smoothened, to cilia. Both IFT-A and membrane phosphoinositide-binding properties of TULP3 are required for ciliary GPCR localization. TULP3 and IFT-A proteins both negatively regulate Hedgehog signaling in the mouse embryo, and the TULP3-IFT-A interaction suggests how these proteins cooperate during neural tube patterning.

  3. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adducts formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26431796

  4. Port-site metastasis as a primary complication following retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma or nephron-sparing surgery: A report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; WANG, KAI; ZHONG, DACHUAN; LIU, XIA; SUN, JI; LIN, LIANXIANG; GE, LINNA; YANG, BO

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the clinical data of two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma and one patient with renal carcinoma who developed port-site metastasis following retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery. The current study aimed to identify the cause and prognosis of the occurrence of port-site metastasis subsequent to laparoscopic radical resection of renal pelvis carcinoma and nephron-sparing surgery. Post-operative pathology confirmed the presence of high-grade urothelial cell carcinoma in two patients and Fuhrman grade 3 renal clear cell carcinoma in one patient. Port-site metastasis was initially detected 1–7 months post-surgery. The two patients with renal pelvis carcinoma succumbed to the disease 2 and 4 months following the identification of the port-site metastasis, respectively, whereas the patient with renal carcinoma survived with no disease progression during the targeted therapy period. The occurrence of port-site metastasis may be attributed to systemic and local factors. Measures to reduce the development of this complication include strict compliance with the operating guidelines for tumor surgery, avoidance of air leakage at the port-site, complete removal of the specimen with an impermeable bag, irrigation of the laparoscopic instruments and incisional wound with povidone-iodine when necessary, and enhancement of the body's immunity. Close post-operative follow-up observation for signs of recurrence or metastasis is essential, and systemic chemotherapy may be required in patients with high-grade renal pelvis carcinoma and renal carcinoma in order to prolong life expectancy. PMID:27313720

  5. The hydroxyl radical in plants: from seed to seed.

    PubMed

    Richards, Siân L; Wilkins, Katie A; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Anderson, Alexander A; Habib, Noman; Smith, Alison G; McAinsh, Martin; Davies, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) is the most potent yet short-lived of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) radicals. Just as hydrogen peroxide was once considered to be simply a deleterious by-product of oxidative metabolism but is now acknowledged to have signalling roles in plant cells, so evidence is mounting for the hydroxyl radical as being more than merely an agent of destruction. Its oxidative power is harnessed to facilitate germination, growth, stomatal closure, reproduction, the immune response, and adaptation to stress. It features in plant cell death and is a key tool in microbial degradation of plant matter for recycling. Production of the hydroxyl radical in the wall, at the plasma membrane, and intracellularly is facilitated by a range of peroxidases, superoxide dismutases, NADPH oxidases, and transition metal catalysts. The spatio-temporal activity of these must be tightly regulated to target substrates precisely to the site of radical production, both to prevent damage and to accommodate the short half life and diffusive capacity of the hydroxyl radical. Whilst research has focussed mainly on the hydroxyl radical's mode of action in wall loosening, studies now extend to elucidating which proteins are targets in signalling systems. Despite the difficulties in detecting and manipulating this ROS, there is sufficient evidence now to acknowledge the hydroxyl radical as a potent regulator in plant cell biology.

  6. Catalysis of Radical Reactions: A Radical Chemistry Perspective.

    PubMed

    Studer, Armido; Curran, Dennis P

    2016-01-04

    The area of catalysis of radical reactions has recently flourished. Various reaction conditions have been discovered and explained in terms of catalytic cycles. These cycles rarely stand alone as unique paths from substrates to products. Instead, most radical reactions have innate chains which form products without any catalyst. How do we know if a species added in "catalytic amounts" is a catalyst, an initiator, or something else? Herein we critically address both catalyst-free and catalytic radical reactions through the lens of radical chemistry. Basic principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are used to address problems of initiation, propagation, and inhibition of radical chains. The catalysis of radical reactions differs from other areas of catalysis. Whereas efficient innate chain reactions are difficult to catalyze because individual steps are fast, both inefficient chain processes and non-chain processes afford diverse opportunities for catalysis, as illustrated with selected examples.

  7. Are free radicals involved in thiol-based redox signaling?

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C

    2015-03-01

    Cells respond to many stimuli by transmitting signals through redox-regulated pathways. It is generally accepted that in many instances signal transduction is via reversible oxidation of thiol proteins, although there is uncertainty about the specific redox transformations involved. The prevailing view is that thiol oxidation occurs by a two electron mechanism, most commonly involving hydrogen peroxide. Free radicals, on the other hand, are considered as damaging species and not generally regarded as important in cell signaling. This paper examines whether it is justified to dismiss radicals or whether they could have a signaling role. Although there is no direct evidence that radicals are involved in transmitting thiol-based redox signals, evidence is presented that they are generated in cells when these signaling pathways are activated. Radicals produce the same thiol oxidation products as two electron oxidants, although by a different mechanism, and at this point radical-mediated pathways should not be dismissed. There are unresolved issues about how radical mechanisms could achieve sufficient selectivity, but this could be possible through colocalization of radical-generating and signal-transducing proteins. Colocalization is also likely to be important for nonradical signaling mechanisms and identification of such associations should be a priority for advancing the field.

  8. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  9. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers.

  10. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  11. Radically innovative steelmaking technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Julian

    1980-09-01

    The steel industry is faced with serious problems caused by the increasing cost of energy, labor and capital and by tough overseas competition, employing new highly efficient process plants. The very high cost of capital and of capital equipment renders the construction of new green field site plants, exemplifying the best available technology economically unattractive. For this reason, over the long term the development radically innovative steelmaking technologies appears to be the only satisfactory resolution of this dilemma. The purpose of this article is to present a critical review of some of the radically innovative steelmaking technologies that have been proposed during the past few years and to develop the argument that these indeed do deserve serious consideration at the present time. It should be stressed, however, that these innovative technologies can be implemented only as part of a carefully conceived long range plan, which contains as a subset short term solutions, such as trigger prices improved investment credits, and so forth and intermediate term solutions, such as more extensive use of continuous casting, external desulfurization and selective modernization in general.

  12. UV and X-ray structural studies of a 101-residue long Tat protein from a HIV-1 primary isolate and of its mutated, detoxified, vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Marine; Mayol, Katia; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique; Bussat, Marie-Claire; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine; Verrier, Bernard; Beck, Alain; Haser, Richard; Gouet, Patrice; Guillon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    The 101-residue long Tat protein of primary isolate 133 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), wt-Tat(133) displays a high transactivation activity in vitro, whereas the mutant thereof, STLA-Tat(133), a vaccine candidate for HIV-1, has none. These two proteins were chemically synthesized and their biological activity was validated. Their structural properties were characterized using circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence emission, gel filtration, dynamic light scattering, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. SAXS studies revealed that both proteins were extended and belong to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins. CD measurements showed that wt-Tat(133) or STLA-Tat(133) underwent limited structural rearrangements when complexed with specific fragments of antibodies. Crystallization trials have been performed on the two forms, assuming that the Tat(133) proteins might have a better propensity to fold in supersaturated conditions, and small crystals have been obtained. These results suggest that biologically active Tat protein is natively unfolded and requires only a limited gain of structure for its function.

  13. Intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on contractile proteins and metabolic muscle enzymes as revealed by label-free mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Ashling; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Dowling, Paul; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2014-01-01

    While the long-term physiological adaptation of the neuromuscular system to changed functional demands is usually reflected by unilateral skeletal muscle transitions, the progressive degeneration of distinct motor neuron populations is often associated with more complex changes in the abundance and/or isoform expression pattern of contractile proteins and metabolic enzymes. In order to evaluate these intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on the skeletal muscle proteome, label-free MS was employed to study global alterations in the WR (wobbler) mouse model of progressive neurodegeneration. In motor neuron disease, fibre-type specification and the metabolic weighting of bioenergetic pathways appear to be strongly influenced by both a differing degree of a subtype-specific vulnerability of neuromuscular synapses and compensatory mechanisms of fibre-type shifting. Proteomic profiling confirmed this pathobiochemical complexity of disease-induced changes and showed distinct alterations in 72 protein species, including a variety of fibre-type-specific isoforms of contractile proteins, metabolic enzymes, metabolite transporters and ion-regulatory proteins, as well as changes in molecular chaperones and various structural proteins. Increases in slow myosin light chains and the troponin complex and a decrease in fast MBP (myosin-binding protein) probably reflect the initial preferential loss of the fast type of neuromuscular synapses in motor neuron disease. PMID:24895011

  14. Kinetics of Propargyl Radical Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Miller, James A; Jasper, Ahren W

    2015-07-16

    Due to the prominent role of the propargyl radical for hydrocarbon growth within combustion environments, it is important to understand the kinetics of its formation and loss. The ab initio transition state theory-based master equation method is used to obtain theoretical kinetic predictions for the temperature and pressure dependence of the thermal decomposition of propargyl, which may be its primary loss channel under some conditions. The potential energy surface for the decomposition of propargyl is first mapped at a high level of theory with a combination of coupled cluster and multireference perturbation calculations. Variational transition state theory is then used to predict the microcanonical rate coefficients, which are subsequently implemented within the multiple-well multiple-channel master equation. A variety of energy transfer parameters are considered, and the sensitivity of the thermal rate predictions to these parameters is explored. The predictions for the thermal decomposition rate coefficient are found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental data. Modified Arrhenius representations of the rate constants are reported for utility in combustion modeling.

  15. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  16. The primary structure of component 8c-1, a subunit protein of intermediate filaments in wool keratin. Relationships with proteins from other intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, L M; Crewther, W G; Inglis, A S

    1986-01-01

    Component 8c-1, one of four highly homologous component-8 subunit proteins present in the microfibrils of wool, was isolated as its S-carboxymethyl derivative and its amino acid sequence was determined. Large peptides were isolated after cleaving the protein chemically or enzymically and the sequence of each was determined with an automatic Sequenator. The peptides were ordered by sequence overlaps and, in some instances, by homology with known sequences from other component-8 subunits. The C-terminal residues were identified by three procedures. Full details of the various procedures used have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50133 (4 pp.) at the British Library Lending Division, Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1986) 233, 5. The result showed that the protein comprises 412 residues and has an Mr, including the N-terminal acetyl group, of 48,300. The sequence of residues 98-200 of component 8c-1 was found to correspond to the partial or complete sequences of four homologous type I helical segments previously isolated from helical fragments recovered from chymotryptic digests of microfibrillar proteins of wool [Crewther & Dowling (1971) Appl. Polym. Symp. 18, 1-20; Crewther, Gough, Inglis & McKern (1978) Text. Res. J. 48, 160-162; Gough, Inglis & Crewther (1978) Biochem. J. 173, 385]. Considered in relation to amino acid sequences of other intermediate-filament proteins, the sequence is in accord with the view that keratin filament proteins are of two types [Hanukoglu & Fuchs (1983) Cell (Cambridge, Mass.) 33, 915-924]. Filament proteins from non-keratinous tissues, such as desmin, vimentin, neurofilament proteins and the glial fibrillary acidic protein, which form monocomponent filaments, constitute a third type. It is suggested that as a whole the proteins from intermediate filaments be classed as filamentins, the three types at present identified forming

  17. Signalling protein complexes isolated from primary human skin-resident T cells can be analysed by Multiplex IP-FCM.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen E P; Neier, Steven C; Davis, Tessa R; Pittelkow, Mark R; Gil, Diana; Schrum, Adam G

    2014-04-01

    Studying signal transduction in skin-resident T cells (sr-T cells) can be limited by the small size of clinical biopsies. Here, we isolated sr-T cells from clinical samples and analysed signalling protein complexes by multiplex immunoprecipitation detected by flow cytometry (mIP-FCM). In samples from two independent donors, antigenic stimulation induced signalling proteins to join shared complexes that were observed in seven pairwise combinations among five proteins. This demonstrates that sr-T cells isolated from small clinical samples provide sufficient material for mIP-FCM-based analysis of signalling-induced protein complexes. We propose that this strategy may be useful for gaining improved mechanistic insight of sr-T cell signal transduction associated with dermatological disease.

  18. Reactions of hydroxyl radicals with alkenes in low-temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltham, Emma J.; Almond, Matthew J.; Marston, George; Wiltshire, Karen S.; Goldberg, Nicola

    2000-11-01

    The reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a number of stable alkenes have been studied in low-temperature matrices. The reactions were initiated by broad band UV-visible irradiation of matrices containing H 2O 2 and the alkene under investigation. The hydroxyalkyl radical products were identified principally by comparison of their spectra with the spectra of corresponding stable alcohols. Accordingly, IR spectra were recorded for the following series of alcohols isolated in argon matrices — methanol, ethanol, ethanol- d6, propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, butan-2-ol, 2-methylpropan-1-ol ( iso-butyl alcohol), 2-methylpropan-2-ol ( tert-butyl alcohol), 2-methylbutan-2-ol ( tert-amyl alcohol), 3-methylbutan-2-ol and 2,3-dimethylbutan-2-ol. The hydroxyalkyl radicals, which appear to be formed from the alkenes studied were as follows — from ethene, 2-hydroxyethyl radical; from cis- or trans-but-2-ene, 1-methyl-2-hydroxypropyl radical; from propene, 1-methyl-2-hydroxyethyl and 2-hydroxypropyl radicals; from but-1-ene, 1-hydroxymethylpropyl and 2-hydroxybutyl radicals; from 2-methylpropene ( iso-butene), 1,1-dimethyl-2-hydroxyethyl and 2-methyl-2-hydroxypropyl radicals; the radical products from buta-1,3-diene and isoprene could not be identified. In the cases, where two radical products were possible, i.e. when propene, but-1-ene or 2-methylpropene were the substrates, it was found that the concentration of the secondary or tertiary radical always exceeded that of the primary radical. However, the relative concentration of these radicals appears to be determined by subsequent photolysis to give carbonyl compounds. There seems, therefore, to be little preference for the secondary and tertiary radicals over the primary radicals in the primary addition process. Comments on the mechanism of the transformation from radical to carbonyl compound based upon identification of intermediates within the matrix and isotopic substitution experiments are made. The characterisation of the 2

  19. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed Central

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595–605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually. PMID:25713083

  20. Radicals in Berkeley?

    PubMed

    Linn, Stuart

    2015-04-03

    In a previous autobiographical sketch for DNA Repair (Linn, S. (2012) Life in the serendipitous lane: excitement and gratification in studying DNA repair. DNA Repair 11, 595-605), I wrote about my involvement in research on mechanisms of DNA repair. In this Reflections, I look back at how I became interested in free radical chemistry and biology and outline some of our bizarre (at the time) observations. Of course, these studies could never have succeeded without the exceptional aid of my mentors: my teachers; the undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and senior lab visitors in my laboratory; and my faculty and staff colleagues here at Berkeley. I am so indebted to each and every one of these individuals for their efforts to overcome my ignorance and set me on the straight and narrow path to success in research. I regret that I cannot mention and thank each of these mentors individually.

  1. Free radical propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, C. E.; Nakanishi, S.

    1981-01-01

    A free radical propulsion concept utilizing the recombination energy of dissociated low molecular weight gases to produce thrust was examined. The concept offered promise of a propulsion system operating at a theoretical impulse, with hydrogen, as high as 2200 seconds at high thrust to power ratio, thus filling the gas existing between chemical and electrostatic propulsion capabilities. Microwave energy used to dissociate a continuously flowing gas was transferred to the propellant via three body recombination for conversion to propellant kinetic energy. Power absorption by the microwave plasma discharge was in excess of 90 percent over a broad range of pressures. Gas temperatures inferred from gas dynamic equations showed much higher temperatures from microwave heating than from electrothermal heating. Spectroscopic analysis appeared to corroborate the inferred temperatures of one of the gases tested.

  2. Primary structures of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2, B1, and C2 proteins: a diversity of RNA binding proteins is generated by small peptide inserts.

    PubMed Central

    Burd, C G; Swanson, M S; Görlach, M; Dreyfuss, G

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs for the major heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2, B1, and C2 proteins and determined their nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences. The A2 and B1 cDNAs are identical except for a 36-nucleotide in-frame insert in B1. Similarly, the sequence of the C2 protein cDNA is related to that of C1 in that C2 contains an extra 39 in-frame nucleotides. Therefore, the B1 amino acid sequence is identical to A2 except for the insertion of 12 amino acids near its amino terminus, and C1 and C2 are also identical to each other except for an extra 13 amino acids near the middle of C2. All three proteins are members of a large family of RNA binding proteins that contain the consensus sequence-type RNA binding domain (CS-RBD). The A2 and B1 proteins have a modular structure similar to that of the hnRNP protein A1: they contain two CS-RBDs and a glycine-rich auxiliary domain at the carboxyl terminus. The CS-RBDs of A2 and B1 have approximately 80% amino acid identity with those of A1, whereas the glycine-rich auxiliary domain is considerably more divergent with less than 30% of the amino acids being identical. These findings indicate that the addition of small peptides, probably by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, generates some of the diversity apparent among hnRNP proteins. Images PMID:2557628

  3. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    PubMed Central

    Frangione, B; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence. Protein Sut has the C region sequence associated with the C lambda isotype Mcg-, Kern-, Oz+ and represents a product of the C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) gene. Protein Mor has a C region sequence associated with Mcg-, Kern-, and Oz- proteins but differs from protein Sut by the presence of three amino acid interchanges at positions 168, 176, and 194. These substitutions distinguish protein Mor from lambda chains encoded by the C lambda 1 (Mcg+), C lambda 2 (Kern-, Oz-), and C lambda 3 (Kern-, Oz+) genes and provide further evidence for polymorphism of the human C lambda genome. The gene encoding the C region sequence of lambda chain Mor is designated CMor lambda. PMID:3923477

  4. Isolation and determination of the primary structure of a lectin protein from the serum of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Merchant, Mark E; Maccha, Venkata; Siddavarapu, Vivekananda Reddy; Hasan, Azeem; Murray, Kermit K

    2012-02-01

    Mass spectrometry in conjunction with de novo sequencing was used to determine the amino acid sequence of a 35kDa lectin protein isolated from the serum of the American alligator that exhibits binding to mannose. The protein N-terminal sequence was determined using Edman degradation and enzymatic digestion with different proteases was used to generate peptide fragments for analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). Separate analysis of the protein digests with multiple enzymes enhanced the protein sequence coverage. De novo sequencing was accomplished using MASCOT Distiller and PEAKS software and the sequences were searched against the NCBI database using MASCOT and BLAST to identify homologous peptides. MS analysis of the intact protein indicated that it is present primarily as monomer and dimer in vitro. The isolated 35kDa protein was ~98% sequenced and found to have 313 amino acids and nine cysteine residues and was identified as an alligator lectin. The alligator lectin sequence was aligned with other lectin sequences using DIALIGN and ClustalW software and was found to exhibit 58% and 59% similarity to both human and mouse intelectin-1. The alligator lectin exhibited strong binding affinities toward mannan and mannose as compared to other tested carbohydrates.

  5. The sequence and antiapoptotic functional domains of the human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 immediate early protein are conserved in multiple primary strains.

    PubMed

    Hayajneh, W A; Colberg-Poley, A M; Skaletskaya, A; Bartle, L M; Lesperance, M M; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D G; Kedersha, N L; Goldmacher, V S

    2001-01-05

    The human cytomegalovirus UL37 exon 1 gene encodes the immediate early protein pUL37x1 that has antiapoptotic and regulatory activities. Deletion mutagenesis analysis of the open reading frame of UL37x1 identified two domains that are necessary and sufficient for its antiapoptotic activity. These domains are confined within the segments between amino acids 5 to 34, and 118 to 147, respectively. The first domain provides the targeting of the protein to mitochondria. Direct PCR sequencing of UL37 exon 1 amplified from 26 primary strains of human cytomegalovirus demonstrated that the promoter, polyadenylation signal, and the two segments of pUL37x1 required for its antiapoptotic function were invariant in all sequenced strains and identical to those in AD169 pUL37x1. In total, UL37 exon 1 varies between 0.0 and 1.6% at the nucleotide level from strain AD169. Only 11 amino acids were found to vary in one or more viral strains, and these variations occurred only in the domains of pUL37x1 dispensable for its antiapoptotic function. We infer from this remarkable conservation of pUL37x1 in primary strains that this protein and, probably, its antiapoptotic function are required for productive replication of human cytomegalovirus in humans.

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 is involved in seed formation and modulation of primary and lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-García, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) cascades are signal transduction modules highly conserved in all eukaryotes regulating various aspects of plant biology, including stress responses and developmental programmes. In this study, we characterized the role of MAPK 6 (MPK6) in Arabidopsis embryo development and in post-embryonic root system architecture. We found that the mpk6 mutation caused altered embryo development giving rise to three seed phenotypes that, post-germination, correlated with alterations in root architecture. In the smaller seed class, mutant seedlings failed to develop the primary root, possibly as a result of an earlier defect in the division of the hypophysis cell during embryo development, but they had the capacity to develop adventitious roots to complete their life cycle. In the larger class, the MPK6 loss of function did not cause any evident alteration in seed morphology, but the embryo and the mature seed were bigger than the wild type. Seedlings developed from these bigger seeds were characterized by a primary root longer than that of the wild type, accompanied by significantly increased lateral root initiation and more and longer root hairs. Apparently, the increment in primary root growth resulted from an enhanced cell production and cell elongation. Our data demonstrated that MPK6 plays an important role during embryo development and acts as a repressor of primary and lateral root development. PMID:24218326

  7. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D.; Bigelow, Lance; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E.; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Ma, Ming; Yang, Dong; Clancy, Shonda; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, Ben

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  8. Silencing and trans-activation of the mouse IL-2 gene in Xenopus oocytes by proteins from resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mouzaki, A; Weil, R; Muster, L; Rungger, D

    1991-01-01

    The Xenopus oocyte system was used to test functionally, putative trans-active elements involved in the transcriptional control of the mouse interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene in resting and mitogen-induced primary T-lymphocytes. The IL-2 gene injected into the oocyte is active over a wide range of DNA concentrations. This basal activity is silenced by the addition of protein extracts from G0-arrested spleen cells. Extracts from 8 h-stimulated spleen cells do not silence but moderately increase transcription over basal level. When IL-2 transcription is silenced first by an injection of extract from resting spleen cells, the addition of proteins from stimulated cells results in a strong increase in transcription (derepression). Use of proteins from purified splenic T-lymphocytes shows that both silencer(s) and activator(s) are contributed by these cells. Extracts from control tissues have neither a silencing nor stimulatory effect. None of the proteins tested affects the activities of co-injected control genes. Injections with IL-2 promoter mutants indicate that the main target sequence of the silencing and activating factors is a purine region (Pu-box) lying between positions -261 and -292 upstream of the IL-2 gene. Bandshift assays show differential binding of the Pu-box with proteins from resting or activated T-cells. Images PMID:2026141

  9. Primary structure of an apical protein from Xenopus laevis that participates in amiloride-sensitive sodium channel activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    High resistance epithelia express on their apical side an amiloride- sensitive sodium channel that controls sodium reabsorption. A cDNA was found to encode a 1,420-amino acid long polypeptide with no signal sequence, a putative transmembrane segment, and three predicted amphipathic alpha helices. A corresponding 5.2-kb mRNA was detected in Xenopus laevis kidney, intestine, and oocytes, with weak expression in stomach and eyes. An antibody directed against a fusion protein containing a COOH-terminus segment of the protein and an antiidiotypic antibody known to recognize the amiloride binding site of the epithelial sodium channel (Kleyman, T. R., J.-P. Kraehenbuhl, and S. A. Ernst. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:3907-3915) immunoprecipitated a similar protein complex from [35S]methionine-labeled and from apically radioiodinated Xenopus laevis kidney-derived A6 cells. A single integral of 130-kD protein was recovered from samples reduced with DTT. The antibody also cross-reacted by ELISA with the putative amiloride- sensitive sodium channel isolated from A6 cells (Benos, D. J., G. Saccomani, and S. Sariban-Sohraby. 1987. J. Biol. Chem. 262:10613- 10618). Although the protein is translated, cRNA injected into oocytes did not reconstitute amiloride-sensitive sodium transport, while antisense RNA or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides specific for two distinct sequences of the cloned cDNA inhibited amiloride-sensitive sodium current induced by injection of A6 cell mRNA. We propose that the cDNA encodes an apical plasma membrane protein that plays a role in the functional expression of the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel. It may represent a subunit of the Xenopus laevis sodium channel or a regulatory protein essential for sodium channel function. PMID:1334959

  10. Radical Change by Entrepreneurial Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    This article offers a conceptual framework to understand radical change. It opens with a typology that defines change in terms of its pace and scope...known entrepreneurs who have been successful in molding and shaping the radical change process. The implications of this conceptual framework to

  11. Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Leads to Increased Prion Protein in Plasma: A Potential Biomarker for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the “signature injury” of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4–206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL±0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL±0.14 SE; two tailed test p<0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  12. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats leads to increased prion protein in plasma: a potential biomarker for blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the "signature injury" of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4-206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL ± 0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL ± 0.14 SE; two tailed test p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI.

  13. [Research progress on free radicals in human body].

    PubMed

    Wang, Q B; Xu, F P; Wei, C X; Peng, J; Dong, X D

    2016-08-10

    Free radicals are the intermediates of metabolism, widely exist in the human bodies. Under normal circumstances, the free radicals play an important role in the metabolic process on human body, cell signal pathway, gene regulation, induction of cell proliferation and apoptosis, so as to maintain the normal growth and development of human body and to inhibit the growth of bacteria, virus and cancer. However, when organic lesion occurs affected by external factors or when equilibrium of the free radicals is tipped in the human body, the free radicals will respond integratedly with lipids, protein or nucleic acid which may jeopardize the health of human bodies. This paper summarizes the research progress of the free radicals conducted in recent years, in relations to the perspective of the types, origins, test methods of the free radicals and their relationship with human's health. In addition, the possible mechanisms of environmental pollutants (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) mediating oxidative stress and free radicals scavenging in the body were also summarized.

  14. Mineral dust exposure and free radical-mediated lung damage

    SciTech Connect

    Doelman, C.J.; Leurs, R.; Oosterom, W.C.; Bast, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Chronic exposure to several types of mineral dust particles induces an inflammatory reaction in the lung. Dust particles activate alveolar macrophages and prime leukocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), leading to an enhanced release of reactive oxygen species. Sometimes mineral dust particles also contain radicals. Reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen) may lead to tissue damage. These are able to break DNA strands, to destroy proteins, and to induce the process of lipid peroxidation. The effects of oxygen radicals on the beta-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor response of the guinea pig and rat tracheal strip are described. The beta-adrenergic receptor response appeared to be more susceptible to oxidative stress than the muscarinic receptor response. This may lead to an autonomic imbalance on exposure to oxygen radicals. The lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2,3-trans-nonenal diminished the beta-adrenergic responsiveness in guinea pig tracheal preparations. Histologic examinations indicated that at low concentrations of cumene hydroperoxide (10(-4) M) the epithelial layer of rat trachea was already destroyed, whereas no effect on the muscarinic response was found. Oxygen radical-mediated damage in lung tissue may lead to lung emphysema, hyperresponsiveness, and hypersensitivity. Pharmacotherapeutic interventions that prevent initiation or propagation of these free radical reactions may have a beneficial effect in mineral dust-associated lung disease. 70 references.

  15. GGPP-Mediated Protein Geranylgeranylation in Oocyte Is Essential for the Establishment of Oocyte-Granulosa Cell Communication and Primary-Secondary Follicle Transition in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Na; Zhu, Rui-Lou; Wang, Xiu-Xing; Chen, Zhong; Tao, Wei-Wei; Yao, Bing; Sun, Hai-Xiang; Huang, Xing-Xu; Xue, Bin; Li, Chao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Folliculogenesis is a progressive and highly regulated process, which is essential to provide ova for later reproductive life, requires the bidirectional communication between the oocyte and granulosa cells. This physical connection-mediated communication conveys not only the signals from the oocyte to granulosa cells that regulate their proliferation but also metabolites from the granulosa cells to the oocyte for biosynthesis. However, the underlying mechanism of establishing this communication is largely unknown. Here, we report that oocyte geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP), a metabolic intermediate involved in protein geranylgeranylation, is required to establish the oocyte-granulosa cell communication. GGPP and geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (Ggpps) levels in oocytes increased during early follicular development. The selective depletion of GGPP in mouse oocytes impaired the proliferation of granulosa cells, primary-secondary follicle transition and female fertility. Mechanistically, GGPP depletion inhibited Rho GTPase geranylgeranylation and its GTPase activity, which was responsible for the accumulation of cell junction proteins in the oocyte cytoplasm and the failure to maintain physical connection between oocyte and granulosa cells. GGPP ablation also blocked Rab27a geranylgeranylation, which might account for the impaired secretion of oocyte materials such as Gdf9. Moreover, GGPP administration restored the defects in oocyte-granulosa cell contact, granulosa cell proliferation and primary-secondary follicle transition in Ggpps depletion mice. Our study provides the evidence that GGPP-mediated protein geranylgeranylation contributes to the establishment of oocyte-granulosa cell communication and then regulates the primary-secondary follicle transition, a key phase of folliculogenesis essential for female reproductive function. PMID:28072828

  16. Impairment of liver synthetic function and the production of plasma proteins in primary breast cancer patients on doxorubicincyclophosphamide (AC) protocol.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Zikria; Ahmad, Mobasher; Hashmi, Furqan Khurshid; Saeed, Hamid; Aziz, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-09-01

    Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (AC protocol) combination is usually considered as a first line therapy in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Thus, a retrospective observational study was conducted to monitor the effect of AC protocol on liver synthetic functions and production of plasma proteins in breast cancer patients, reporting to specialized cancer care hospital of Lahore, Pakistan. A total of 75 patients (n=75) on AC protocol with breast cancer were observed in this study. The patient data including age, gender, body surface area, dosage, disease status and laboratory biochemical values were recorded by reviewing historical treatment records. Pre-treatment values were taken as baseline values for albumin, globulin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio and total proteins. The baseline values were compared after each cycle of by applying ANOVA using statistical tool SPSS® version 21. The plasma levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total protein and globulin dropped significantly (p<0.05) in patients of all age groups. However, the albumin levels were not significantly changed (p>0.05). The A/G ratio level increased (p<0.05) as a result of reduction in globulin levels. Significant changes in plasma protein levels were observed in the elderly patients (50 to 65 years) than patients between 20 to 50 years of age. AC protocol impairs liver synthetic functions as observed by decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and plasma protein levels.

  17. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  18. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: Impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-03-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  19. Common Prairie feeds with different soluble and insoluble fractions used for CPM diet formulation in dairy cattle: impact of carbohydrate-protein matrix structure on protein and other primary nutrient digestion.

    PubMed

    Peng, Quanhui; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship of carbohydrates molecular spectral characteristics to rumen degradability of primary nutrients in Prairie feeds in dairy cattle. In total, 12 different types of feeds were selected, each type of feed was from three different source with total 37 samples. Six types of them were energy-sourced feeds and the others were protein-sourced feeds. The carbohydrates molecular spectral intensity of various functional groups were collected using Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (ATR-FT/IR) spectroscopy. In the in situ study, the results showed that the rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of primary nutrients (DM, OM, NCP, and CP) were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. The spectral bands features were significantly different (P<0.05) among the feeds. Spectral intensities of A_Cell, H_1415 and H_1370 were weakly positively correlated with in situ rumen digestibility and digestible fractions of DM, OM and NCP. Spectral intensities of H_1150, H_1015, A_1, and A_3 were weakly negatively associated with in situ rumen degradation of CP. Spectral intensities of A_1240 and H_1240, mainly associated with cellulosic compounds, were correlated with rumen CP degradation. The multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the spectral intensities of A_3 and H_1415 played the most important role and could be used as a potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feeds in dairy cattle. In conclusion, this study showed that the carbohydrates as a whole have an effect on protein rumen degradation, rather than cellulose alone, indicating carbohydrate-protein matrix structure impact protein utilization in dairy cattle. The non-invasive molecular spectral technique (ATR-FT/IR) could be used as a rapid potential tool to predict rumen protein degradation of feedstuffs by using molecular spectral bands intensities in carbohydrate fingerprint region.

  20. Bureaucratic Activism and Radical School Change in Tamil Nadu, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niesz, Tricia; Krishnamurthy, Ramchandar

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, Activity Based Learning (ABL), a child-centered, activity-based method of pedagogical practice, transformed classrooms in all of the over 37,000 primary-level government schools in Tamil Nadu, India. The large scale, rapid pace, and radical nature of educational change sets the ABL initiative apart from most school reform efforts.…

  1. Young Children and Radical Change Characteristics in Picture Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleo, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    The Radical Change conceptual framework provides theory for understanding, appreciating, and evaluating three types of significant change in contemporary literature for children and youth: changing forms and formats, changing perspectives, and changing boundaries. A paucity of research has explored primary students' literary understandings of and…

  2. Studies of radiation-produced radicals and radical ions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    The radiolytic oxidation of anti-5-methylbicyclo(2.1.0)pentane gives the 1-methylcyclopentene radical cation as the sole rearrangement product H migration whereas oxidation of its syn isomer results in the highly selective formation of the 3-methylcyclopentene radical cation by methyl group migration. Since exactly the same stereoselectivity of olefin formation was observed in corresponding PET (photosensitized electron transfer) studies in the liquid phase, it is concluded that the rearrangement in this case also occurs through the intermediacy of radical cations. Clearly, the radical cation rearrangement must occur very rapidly (10{sup {minus}8}--10{sup {minus}9}s) under liquid-phase conditions at room temperature to compete with back electron transfer, and therefore the hydrogen (or methyl) migration is a fast process under these conditions. An intramolecular cycloaddition reaction was demonstrated in the radical cation rearrangement of 4-vinylcyclohexene to bicyclo(3.2.1)oct-2-ene. ESR studies show that the radiolytic oxidation of quadricyclane in Freon matrices under conditions of high substrate dilution leads to the bicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-2,6-diene radical cation as well as the previously reported norbornadiene radical cation, the former species predominating at sufficiently low concentrations.

  3. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to study the solvent exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide linked N-hydrosuccinimide ester modified silica coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide r...

  4. The primary structures of Pseudomonas AM1 amicyanin and pseudoazurin. Two new sequence classes of blue copper proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ambler, R P; Tobari, J

    1985-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of two blue copper proteins from the pink facultative methylotroph Pseudomonas AM1 (N.C.I.B. 9133) were determined. They each consist of a single polypeptide chain and bind one copper atom. Amicyanin contains 99 and pseudoazurin 123 residues. Copper-binding sites, consisting of the side chains of two histidine, one cysteine and one methionine residues, can be recognized in each protein by analogy with azurin and plastocyanin, but the spacings of the ligand residues are different, and other sequence similarity is limited. Proteins that are in the pseudoazurin sequence class can be recognized in some strains of Alcaligenes, and probably also in Paracoccus denitrificans. Detailed evidence for the amino acid sequences of the proteins has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50130 (23 pp.) at the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1985) 225, 5. PMID:4091802

  5. Primary and predicted secondary structures of the Actinomadura R39 extracellular DD-peptidase, a penicillin-binding protein (PBP) related to the Escherichia coli PBP4.

    PubMed Central

    Granier, B; Duez, C; Lepage, S; Englebert, S; Dusart, J; Dideberg, O; Van Beeumen, J; Frère, J M; Ghuysen, J M

    1992-01-01

    As derived from gene cloning and sequencing, the 489-amino-acid DD-peptidase/penicillin-binding protein (PBP) produced by Actinomadura R39 has a primary structure very similar to that of the Escherichia coli PBP4 [Mottl, Terpstra & Keck (1991) FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 78, 213-220]. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of the two proteins shows that, providing that a large 174-amino-acid stretch is excluded from the analysis, the bulk of the two polypeptide chains possesses homologues of the active-site motifs and secondary structures found in the class A beta-lactamase of Streptomyces albus G of known three-dimensional structure. The 174-amino-acid insert occurs at equivalent places in the two PBPs, between helices alpha 2 and alpha 3, away from the active site. Such an insert is unique among the penicilloyl serine transferases. It is proposed that the Actinomadura R39 PBP and E. coli PBP4 form a special class, class C, of low-Mr PBPs/DD-peptidases. A vector has been constructed and introduced by electrotransformation in the original Actinomadura R39 strain, allowing high-level expression and secretion of the DD-peptidase/PBP (250 mg.l-1). The gene encoding the desired protein is processed differently in Actinomadura R39 and Streptomyces lividans. Incorrect processing in Streptomyces lividans leads to a secreted protein which is inert in terms of DD-peptidase activity and penicillin-binding capacity. Images Fig. 5. PMID:1554361

  6. Id proteins expression in prostate cancer: high-level expression of Id-4 in primary prostate cancer is associated with development of metastases.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hiu-Fung; Chua, Chee-Wai; Chan, Yuen-Piu; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Wang, Xianghong; Chan, Kwok-Wah

    2006-07-01

    A major cause of treatment failure for prostate cancer is the development of androgen-independent metastatic disease. Id protein family, a group of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has been shown to be involved in carcinogenesis and a prognostic marker in several types of human cancers. In this study, we examined the expressions of four Id proteins, Id-1, -2, -3 and -4, in 125 clinical prostate cancer specimens as well as 40 nodular hyperplasia specimens by immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Id proteins were correlated with Gleason grading and metastatic progress of the tumors. We found that Id proteins were dysregulated in prostate cancer. Id-1 and -2 expressions were elevated while Id-3 and -4 expressions were reduced in prostate cancers compared to nodular hyperplasia. Cytoplasmic staining of Id-1 (P=0.013) and nuclear staining of Id-2 (P=0.001) and Id-4 (P<0.001) were positively correlated with Gleason score. The results indicate that these Id proteins may play a positive role in the development of prostate cancer. In contrast, Id-3 might have an inverse relationship with prostate neoplastic transformation (P=0.002) and cancer progression (P=0.022). We found that Id-4 nuclear overexpression in the primary prostate cancers significantly increased the risks to the development of metastasis in the patients (odds ratio=3.215, 95% confidence interval=1.150-8.987, P=0.026). Our results suggest that in prostate cancer patients, differential Id proteins expressions may be a useful marker for poor prognosis, and Id-4 may be a potential prognostic marker for distant metastasis.

  7. RNA-binding protein DUS16 plays an essential role in primary miRNA processing in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomohito; Onishi, Masayuki; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Cerutti, Heriberto; Ohama, Takeshi

    2016-09-20

    Canonical microRNAs (miRNAs) are embedded in duplexed stem-loops in long precursor transcripts and are excised by sequential cleavage by DICER nuclease(s). In this miRNA biogenesis pathway, dsRNA-binding proteins play important roles in animals and plants by assisting DICER. However, these RNA-binding proteins are poorly characterized in unicellular organisms. Here we report that a unique RNA-binding protein, Dull slicer-16 (DUS16), plays an essential role in processing of primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii In animals and plants, dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis harbor two or three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs), whereas DUS16 contains one dsRBD and also an ssRNA-binding domain (RRM). The null mutant of DUS16 showed a drastic reduction in most miRNA species. Production of these miRNAs was complemented by expression of full-length DUS16, but the expression of RRM- or dsRBD-truncated DUS16 did not restore miRNA production. Furthermore, DUS16 is predominantly localized to the nucleus and associated with nascent (unspliced form) pri-miRNAs and the DICER-LIKE 3 protein. These results suggest that DUS16 recognizes pri-miRNA transcripts cotranscriptionally and promotes their processing into mature miRNAs as a component of a microprocessor complex. We propose that DUS16 is an essential factor for miRNA production in Chlamydomonas and, because DUS16 is functionally similar to the dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis in animals and land plants, our report provides insight into this mechanism in unicellular eukaryotes.

  8. RNA-binding protein DUS16 plays an essential role in primary miRNA processing in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Cerutti, Heriberto; Ohama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Canonical microRNAs (miRNAs) are embedded in duplexed stem–loops in long precursor transcripts and are excised by sequential cleavage by DICER nuclease(s). In this miRNA biogenesis pathway, dsRNA-binding proteins play important roles in animals and plants by assisting DICER. However, these RNA-binding proteins are poorly characterized in unicellular organisms. Here we report that a unique RNA-binding protein, Dull slicer-16 (DUS16), plays an essential role in processing of primary-miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In animals and plants, dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis harbor two or three dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs), whereas DUS16 contains one dsRBD and also an ssRNA-binding domain (RRM). The null mutant of DUS16 showed a drastic reduction in most miRNA species. Production of these miRNAs was complemented by expression of full-length DUS16, but the expression of RRM- or dsRBD-truncated DUS16 did not restore miRNA production. Furthermore, DUS16 is predominantly localized to the nucleus and associated with nascent (unspliced form) pri-miRNAs and the DICER-LIKE 3 protein. These results suggest that DUS16 recognizes pri-miRNA transcripts cotranscriptionally and promotes their processing into mature miRNAs as a component of a microprocessor complex. We propose that DUS16 is an essential factor for miRNA production in Chlamydomonas and, because DUS16 is functionally similar to the dsRNA-binding proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis in animals and land plants, our report provides insight into this mechanism in unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27582463

  9. Increases in transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 mRNA and protein in primary afferent neurons stimulated by protein kinase C and their possible role in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    A recent study by our group demonstrates pharmacologically that the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to initiate neurogenic inflammation by the release of neuropeptides in the periphery. In this study, expression of TRPV1, phosphorylated protein kinase C (p-PKC) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were visualized using immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blots to examine whether increases in TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels evoked by capsaicin injection are subject to modulation by the activation of PKC and to analyze the role of this process in the pathogenesis of neurogenic inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the hindpaw skin of anesthetized rats evoked increases in the expression of TRPV1, CGRP and p-PKC in mRNA and/or protein levels and in the number of single labeled TRPV1, p-PKC and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral L4–5 DRGs. Co-expressions of TRPV1 with p-PKC and/or CGRP in DRG neurons were also significantly increased after CAP injection. These evoked expressions both at molecular and cellular levels were significantly inhibited after TRPV1 receptors were blocked by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5 μg) or PKC was inhibited by chelerythrine chloride (5 μg). Taken together, these results provide evidence that up-regulation of TRPV1 mRNA and protein levels under inflammatory conditions evoked by capsaicin injection is subject to modulation by the PKC cascade in which increased CGRP level in DRG neurons may be related to the initiation of neurogenic inflammation. Thus, up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons seems critical for initiating acute neurogenic inflammation. PMID:18752301

  10. Free radicals and male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Allamaneni, Shyam S R

    2011-03-01

    Male factor accounts for almost 50% cases of infertility. The exact mechanism of sperm dysfunction is not known in many cases. Extensive research in the last decade has led to the identification of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) as mediators of sperm dysfunction in both specific diagnoses and idiopathic cases of male infertility. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species are seen in up to 30-80% of men with male infertility. The role of free radicals has been studied extensively in the process of human reproduction. We know now that a certain level of free radicals is necessary for normal sperm function, whereas an excessive level of free radicals can cause detrimental effect on sperm function and subsequent fertilisation and offspring health. Oxidative stress develops when there is an imbalance between generation of free radicals and scavenging capacity of anti-oxidants in reproductive tract. Oxidative stress has been shown to affect both standard semen parameters and fertilising capacity. In addition, high levels of free radicals have been associated with lack of or poor fertility outcome after natural conception or assisted reproduction. Diagnostic techniques to quantify free radicals in infertile patients can assist physicians treating patients with infertility to plan for proper treatment strategies. In vivo anti-oxidants can be used against oxidative stress in male reproductive tract. Supplementation of in vitro anti-oxidants can help prevent the oxidative stress during sperm preparation techniques in assisted reproduction.

  11. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-03-04

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin's potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated.

  12. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  13. S100 protein positive dendritic cells in primary biliary cirrhosis and other chronic inflammatory liver diseases. Relevance to pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Sever, C.; Kakizoe, S.; Oguma, S.; Starzl, T. E.; Jaffe, R.

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine the location of dendritic cells, in chronic inflammatory liver disease was performed. S100 protein positivity and dendritic cytoplasmic morphology were used to identify dendritic cells. S100 protein positive dendritic cells (S100 + DC) were found inside the basement membrane between biliary epithelial cells of septal bile ducts of livers affected by early stage PBC, but were not present at later stages. S100 + DC also were seen in areas of piecemeal necrosis in chronic active hepatitis of various etiologies. In contrast, intra-epithelial S100 + DC were not found with any consistency in sclerosing cholangitis, secondary biliary cirrhosis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, or chronic liver allograft rejection, all of which are characterized by inflammatory bile duct damage. The possible relevance of DC in the pathogenesis of PBC is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2705505

  14. Ion implanted, radical-rich surfaces for the rapid covalent immobilization of active biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, Stacey L.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Bax, Daniel V.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Kosobrodova, Elena; Tsoutas, Kostadinos; Tran, Clara T. H.; Waterhouse, Anna; Yin, Yongbai; Nosworthy, Neil J.; McKenzie, David R.; dos Remedios, Christobal G.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2013-04-01

    Protein immobilization through the use of direct radical induced covalent coupling is described. Ions implanted in a polymer surface generate a highly cross-linked surface layer that is rich in radicals. These radicals can diffuse to the surface and covalently immobilize physically adsorbed proteins, as illustrated in a kinetic model for the covalent attachment process. Radical induced covalent coupling provides rapid covalent attachment, while also retaining native protein conformation and enabling control over the composition of the adsorbed protein layer when adsorbed from a protein mixture. Advantages of using this method for improving the biocompatibility of implanted biomedical devices and for immobilizing antibodies in protein microarrays for disease diagnosis and early detection are highlighted.

  15. B7 Requirements for Primary and Secondary Protein- and Polysaccharide-Specific Ig Isotype Responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (R36A) to determine the B7 requirements for induction of Ig, specific for two determinants on R36A, the phosphorylcholine ...protein A (PspA)4 and to the phosphorylcholine (PC) determinant of the cell wall C-polysaccharide have been used as models. We recently re- ported that...Jackson Laboratory. Mice were used at 7–10 wk of age and were maintained in a pathogen-free environment. Reagents PC (6-(O- phosphorylcholine

  16. AMPA Receptors Are Involved in Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Interact with STIM Proteins in Rat Primary Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczynska-Biegala, Joanna; Sladowska, Maria; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The process of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) leads to refilling the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with calcium ions (Ca2+) after their release into the cytoplasm. Interactions between (ER)-located Ca2+ sensors (stromal interaction molecule 1 [STIM1] and STIM2) and plasma membrane-located Ca2+ channel-forming protein (Orai1) underlie SOCE and are well described in non-excitable cells. In neurons, however, SOCE appears to be more complex because of the importance of Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated or ionotropic receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. We found that the SOCE inhibitors ML-9 and SKF96365 reduced α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-induced [Ca2+]i amplitude by 80% and 53%, respectively. To assess the possible involvement of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in SOCE, we used their specific inhibitors. As estimated by Fura-2 acetoxymethyl (AM) single-cell Ca2+ measurements in the presence of CNQX or NBQX, thapsigargin (TG)-induced Ca2+ influx decreased 2.2 or 3.7 times, respectively. These results suggest that under experimental conditions of SOCE when Ca2+ stores are depleted, Ca2+ can enter neurons also through AMPARs. Using specific antibodies against STIM proteins or GluA1/GluA2 AMPAR subunits, co-immunoprecipitation assays indicated that when Ca2+ levels are low in the neuronal ER, a physical association occurs between endogenous STIM proteins and endogenous AMPAR receptors. Altogether, our data suggest that STIM proteins in neurons can control AMPA-induced Ca2+ entry as a part of the mechanism of SOCE. PMID:27826230

  17. The RNA-binding protein QKI5 regulates primary miR-124-1 processing via a distal RNA motif during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hongmei; Ma, Yanni; Li, Yuxia; Zhai, Di; Pi, Jingnan; Si, Yanmin; Xu, Jiayue; Dong, Lei; Su, Rui; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhu, Yong; Ren, Xiaoxia; Miao, Fei; Liu, Wenjie; Li, Feng; Zhang, Junwu; He, Aibin; Shan, Ge; Hui, Jingyi; Wang, Linfang; Yu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis is finely controlled by complex layers of post-transcriptional regulators, including RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here, we show that an RBP, QKI5, activates the processing of primary miR-124-1 (pri-124-1) during erythropoiesis. QKI5 recognizes a distal QKI response element and recruits Microprocessor through interaction with DGCR8. Furthermore, the recruited Microprocessor is brought to pri-124-1 stem loops by a spatial RNA-RNA interaction between two complementary sequences. Thus, mutations disrupting their base-pairing affect the strength of QKI5 activation. When erythropoiesis proceeds, the concomitant decrease of QKI5 releases Microprocessor from pri-124-1 and reduces mature miR-124 levels to facilitate erythrocyte maturation. Mechanistically, miR-124 targets TAL1 and c-MYB, two transcription factors involved in normal erythropoiesis. Importantly, this QKI5-mediated regulation also gives rise to a unique miRNA signature, which is required for erythroid differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate the pivotal role of QKI5 in primary miRNA processing during erythropoiesis and provide new insights into how a distal element on primary transcripts affects miRNA biogenesis.

  18. Effects of febuxostat on insulin resistance and expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with primary gout.

    PubMed

    Meng, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Yuan, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yuewu

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of febuxostat on IR and the expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with primary gout. Forty-two cases of primary gout patients without uric acid-lowering therapy were included in this study. After a physical examination, 20 age- and sex-matched patients were included as normal controls. The levels of fasting insulin (INS), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and hs-CRP were determined. IR was assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Gout patients had higher levels of UA, INS, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP than normal controls (P < 0.05). After 4-, 12-, and 24-week febuxostat treatments, UA and hs-CRP concentrations were significantly lower than baseline (P < 0.05). INS and HOM-IR decreased slightly after a 4-week treatment with febuxostat but declined significantly after 12 and 24 weeks of treatment. Importantly, hs-CRP values positively correlated with those of HOMA-IR (r = 0.353, P = 0.018) and INS (r = 0.426, P = 0.034). Our findings confirm that IR exists in gout patients and implicate that febuxostat can effectively control the level of serum UA and increase insulin sensitivity in primary gout patients.

  19. Primary structure of bovine pituitary secretory protein I (chromogranin A) deduced from the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, T.G.; Cohn, D.V.; Gorr, S.U.; Ornstein, D.L.; Kashdan, M.A.; Levine, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    Secretory protein I (SP-I), also referred to as chromogranin A, is an acidic glycoprotein that has been found in every tissue of endocrine and neuroendocrine origin examined but never in exocrine or epithelial cells. Its co-storage and co-secretion with peptide hormones and neurotransmitters suggest that it has an important endocrine or secretory function. The authors have isolated cDNA clones from a bovine pituitary lambdagt11 expression library using an antiserum to parathyroid SP-I. The largest clone (SP4B) hybridized to a transcript of 2.1 kilobases in RNA from parathyroid, pituitary, and adrenal medulla. Immunoblots of bacterial lysates derived from SP4B lysognes demonstrated specific antibody binding to an SP4B/..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein (160 kDa) with a cDNA-derived component of 46 kDa. Radioimmunoassay of the bacterial lystates with SP-I antiserum yielded parallel displacement curves of /sup 125/I-labeled SP-I by the SP4B lysate and authentic SP-I. SP4B contains a cDNA of 1614 nucleotides that encodes a 449-amino acid protein (calculated mass, 50 kDa). The nucleotide sequences of the pituitary SP-I cDNA and adrenal medullary SP-I cDNAs are nearly identical. Analysis of genomic DNA suggests that pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid SP-I are products of the same gene.

  20. The 2A2 protein of Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 induces apoptosis in primary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyu; Ou, Xumin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-12-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1, (DHAV-1) 2A2(pro), is one of the most highly conserved viral proteins within the DHAV serotypes. However, its effect on host cells is unclear. We predicted that DHAV-1 2A2(pro) was a GTPase-like protein based on the results of multiple sequence alignment and homologous modeling analysis. Upon transfection of a recombinant plasmid expressing DHAV-1 2A2, cells displayed fragmented nuclei, chromatin condensation, oligonucleosome-sized DNA ladder, and positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining; hence, cell death has the characteristics of apoptosis. By staining cells with fluorescein Annexin V-FITC and PI, it is possible to distinguish and quantitatively analyze nonapoptotic cells, early apoptotic cells, late apoptotic/necrotic cells, and dead cells through flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. The percentage of apoptotic cells gradually increased and reached a maximum after 48 h of transfection. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by this GTPase-like protein may contribute to DHAV-1 pathogenesis.

  1. Chicken growth-associated protein (GAP)-43: primary structure and regulated expression of mRNA during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Baizer, L; Alkan, S; Stocker, K; Ciment, G

    1990-01-01

    Growth-associated protein (GAP)-43 is a neuron-specific phosphoprotein whose expression is associated with axonal outgrowth during neuronal development and regeneration. In order to investigate the expression of this gene product in the early developing nervous system we have isolated and sequenced a cDNA for chicken GAP-43. The predicted amino acid sequence for chicken GAP-43 displays extensive similarity to that of the mammalian protein, particularly in the amino-terminal region, to which functional domains of the protein have been assigned. The cDNA hybridizes with two RNAs of differing molecular weights on Northern blots; both appear to be regulated similarly. These RNAs first appear in the brain on embryonic day 3 (E3), suggesting that GAP-43 begins to be expressed when neuroblasts become post-mitotic. In situ hybridization analysis reveals that GAP-43 RNA is expressed by several neural structures in the chick embryo, including derivatives of the neural tube, neural crest, and neuroectodermal placodes.

  2. Modulation of NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic functions of natural killer cells by viral protein R from HIV-1 primary isolates.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram N Q; Richard, Jonathan; Gerard, Francine C A; Power, Christopher; Cohen, Éric A

    2011-12-01

    HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) from laboratory-adapted virus strains activates the DNA damage/stress sensor ATR kinase and induces cell cycle arrest at the G(2)/M phase through a process that requires Vpr to engage the DDB1-CUL4A (VprBP/DCAF-1) E3 ligase complex. Activation of this DNA damage/stress checkpoint in G(2) by Vpr was shown to modulate NKG2D-dependent NK cell effector functions via enhancing expression of NKG2D ligands, notably ULBP2. However, it is unknown whether Vpr from HIV-1 primary isolates (groups M, N, O, and P) could modulate NKG2D-mediated cytotoxic functions of NK cells. Here, we report that Vpr from most HIV-1 primary isolates can upregulate ULBP2 expression and induce NKG2D-dependent NK cell killing. Importantly, these activities were always accompanied by an active G(2) cell cycle arrest function. Interestingly, Vpr variants from group P and a clade D isolate of group M were defective at enhancing NKG2D-mediated NK cell lysis owing to their inability to augment ULBP2 expression. However, distinct mechanisms were responsible for their failure to do so. While Vpr from group P was deficient in its ability to engage the DDB1-CUL4A (VprBP/DCAF-1) E3 ligase complex, the Vpr variant from group D was unable to properly localize to the nucleus, underlining the importance of these biological properties in Vpr function. In conclusion, the ability of Vpr from HIV-1 primary isolates to regulate NK cell effector function underscores the importance of this HIV-1 accessory protein in the modulation of the host's innate immune responses.

  3. The Nectin-4/Afadin Protein Complex and Intercellular Membrane Pores Contribute to Rapid Spread of Measles Virus in Primary Human Airway Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Hornick, Andrew L.; Krishnamurthy, Sateesh; Locke, Anna C.; Mendoza, Crystal A.; Mateo, Mathieu; Miller-Hunt, Catherine L.; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The discovery that measles virus (MV) uses the adherens junction protein nectin-4 as its epithelial receptor provides a new vantage point from which to characterize its rapid spread in the airway epithelium. We show here that in well-differentiated primary cultures of airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE), MV infectious centers form rapidly and become larger than those of other respiratory pathogens: human respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus 5, and Sendai virus. While visible syncytia do not form after MV infection of HAE, the cytoplasm of an infected cell suddenly flows into an adjacent cell, as visualized through wild-type MV-expressed cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein (GFP). High-resolution video microscopy documents that GFP flows through openings that form on the lateral surfaces between columnar epithelial cells. To assess the relevance of the protein afadin, which connects nectin-4 to the actin cytoskeleton, we knocked down its mRNA. This resulted in more-limited infectious-center formation. We also generated a nectin-4 mutant without the afadin-binding site in its cytoplasmic tail. This mutant was less effective than wild-type human nectin-4 at promoting MV infection in primary cultures of porcine airway epithelia. Thus, in airway epithelial cells, MV spread requires the nectin-4/afadin complex and is based on cytoplasm transfer between columnar cells. Since the viral membrane fusion apparatus may open the passages that allow cytoplasm transfer, we refer to them as intercellular membrane pores. Virus-induced intercellular pores may contribute to extremely efficient measles contagion by promoting the rapid spread of the virus through the upper respiratory epithelium. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), while targeted for eradication, still causes about 120,000 deaths per year worldwide. The recent reemergence of measles in insufficiently vaccinated populations in Europe and North America reminds us that measles is extremely

  4. Spin relaxation of radicals in cryptochrome and its role in avian magnetoreception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worster, Susannah; Kattnig, Daniel R.; Hore, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    Long-lived spin coherence and rotationally ordered radical pairs have previously been identified as key requirements for the radical pair mechanism of the avian magnetic compass sense. Both criteria are hard to meet in a biological environment, where thermal motion of the radicals creates dynamic disorder and drives efficient spin relaxation. This has long been cited as a major stumbling block of the radical pair hypothesis. Here we combine Redfield relaxation theory with analytical solutions to a rotational diffusion equation to assess the impact of restricted rotational motion of the radicals on the operation of the compass. The effects of such motions are first investigated generally in small, model systems and are then critically examined in the magnetically sensitive flavin-tryptophan radical pair that is formed photochemically in the proposed magnetoreceptor protein, cryptochrome. We conclude that relaxation is slowest when rotational motion of the radicals within the protein is fast and highly constrained; that in a regime of slow relaxation, the motional averaging of hyperfine interactions has the potential to improve the sensitivity of the compass; and that consideration of motional effects can significantly alter the design criteria for an optimal compass. In addition, we demonstrate that motion of the flavin radical is likely to be compatible with its role as a component of a functioning radical-pair compass, whereas the motion of the tryptophan radical is less ideal, unless it is particularly fast.

  5. Expression of tripartite motif-containing protein 28 in primary breast carcinoma predicts metastasis and is involved in the stemness, chemoresistance, and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Damineni, Surekha; Balaji, Sai A; Shettar, Abhijith; Nayanala, Swetha; Kumar, Neeraj; Kruthika, Banavathy S; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram; Vijayakumar, M; Mukherjee, Geetashree; Gupta, Vaijayanti; Kondaiah, Paturu

    2017-04-01

    The prediction of who develops metastasis has been the most difficult aspect in the management of breast cancer patients. The lymph node metastasis has been the most useful predictor of prognosis and patient management. However, a good proportion of patients with lymph node positivity remain disease free for 5 years or more, while about a third of those who were lymph node negative develop distant metastasis within the same period. This warrants a robust biomarker(s), preferably gene expression based. In order to elucidate gene-based biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancers, gene expression profiling of primary tumors and follow-up for over 5 years has been performed. The analysis revealed a network of genes centered around the tripartite motif-containing protein 28 as an important indicator of disease progression. Short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of tripartite motif-containing protein 28 in breast cancer cells revealed a decreased expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers and increased expression of epithelial markers, decreased migration and invasion, and increased chemosensitivity to doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and methotrexate. Furthermore, knockdown of tripartite motif-containing protein 28 resulted in the decrease of stemness as revealed by sphere formation assay as well as decreased expression of CD44 and Bmi1. Moreover, tripartite motif-containing protein 28 knockdown significantly reduced the tumor size and lung metastasis in orthotopic tumor xenograft assay in immunocompromised mice. The tumor size was further reduced when these mice were treated with doxorubicin. These data provide evidence for tripartite motif-containing protein 28 as a biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  6. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  7. [Simultaneous radical retropubic prostatectomy, diverticulectomy].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Sokolov, A E; Guspanov, R I; Polegen'kiĭ, V V

    2014-01-01

    Presented clinical case demonstrates a combination of rare congenital abnormality - giant true diverticula of the bladder - and high-risk prostate cancer, as well as a successful result of simultaneous operation - a radical prostatectomy with diverticulectomy.

  8. Free radical inactivation of pepsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josimović, Lj; Ruvarac, I.; Janković, I.; Jovanović, S. V.

    1994-06-01

    Alkylperoxy radicals containing one, two or three chlorine atoms, CO -2, O 2 - were reacted with pepsin in aqueous solutions. It was found that only Cl 3COO and CO -2 inactive pepsin, attacking preferentially the disulfide bridge. Transient spectra obtained upon completion of the Cl 3COO + pepsin reaction at pH 5 indicate that 20% of initially produced Cl 3COO radicals oxidizes tryptophan residues, and 40% disulfide bridges. The inactivation induced by the Cl 3COO radical increases at lower pH, and the maximal inactivation, Gin = 5.8, was observed at pH 1.5. The inactivation of pepsin by CO -2 radicals depends on the absorbed dose. The maximal inactivation, Gin = 4.5, was determined in the dose range from 38 to 53 Gy.

  9. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis

  10. Generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxide tumor promoters in isolated mouse keratinocytes. Formation of alkyl and alkoxyl radicals from tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Taffe, B G; Takahashi, N; Kensler, T W; Mason, R P

    1987-09-05

    The organic hydroperoxides tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide are tumor promoters in the skin of SENCAR mice, and this activity is presumed to be mediated through the activation of the hydroperoxides to free radical species. In this study we have assessed the generation of free radicals from organic hydroperoxides in the target cell (the murine basal keratinocyte) using electron spin resonance. Incubation of primary isolates of keratinocytes from SENCAR mice in the presence of spin traps (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide or 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane) and either tert-butyl hydroperoxide or cumene hydroperoxide resulted in the generation and detection of radical adducts of these spin traps. tert-Butyl alkoxyl and alkyl radical adducts of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide were detected shortly after addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide, whereas only alkyl radical adducts were observed with cumene hydroperoxide. Spin trapping of the alkyl radicals with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane led to the identification of methyl and ethyl radical adducts following both tert-butyl hydroperoxide and cumene hydroperoxide exposures. Prior heating of the cells to 100 degrees C for 30 min prevented radical formation. The radical generating capacity of subcellular fractions of these epidermal cells was examined using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide and cumene hydroperoxide, and this activity was confined to the 105,000 X g supernatant fraction.

  11. Contribution of the R-Ras2 GTP-binding protein to primary breast tumorigenesis and late-stage metastatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larive, Romain M.; Moriggi, Giulia; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Cañamero, Marta; Álava, Enrique De; Alarcón, Balbino; Dosil, Mercedes; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2014-05-01

    R-Ras2 is a transforming GTPase that shares downstream effectors with Ras subfamily proteins. However, little information exists about the function of this protein in tumorigenesis and its signalling overlap with classical Ras GTPases. Here we show, by combining loss- and gain-of-function studies in breast cancer cells, mammary epithelial cells and mouse models, that endogenous R-Ras2 has a role in both primary breast tumorigenesis and the late metastatic steps of cancer cells in the lung parenchyma. R-Ras2 drives tumorigenesis in a phosphatidylinostiol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent and signalling autonomous manner. By contrast, its prometastatic role requires other priming oncogenic signals and the engagement of several downstream elements. R-Ras2 function is required even in cancer cells exhibiting constitutive activation of classical Ras proteins, indicating that these GTPases are not functionally redundant. Our results also suggest that application of long-term R-Ras2 therapies will result in the development of compensatory mechanisms in breast tumours.

  12. Rb protein is essential to the senescence-associated heterochromatic foci formation induced by HMGA2 in primary WI38 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xi; Tian, Baoqing; Liu, Lingxia; Gao, Yanyan; Ma, Chi; Mwichie, Namusamba; Ma, Wenlong; Han, Liping; Huang, Baiqu; Lu, Jun; Zhang, Yu

    2013-08-20

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible form of cell cycle arrest that provides a barrier to neoplastic transformation. The integrity of the Rb (Retinoblastoma) pathway is necessary for the formation of the senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHF) that offers a molecular basis for the stability of the senescent state. Surprisingly, although high mobility group A2 protein (HMGA2) can promote tumorigenesis and inhibit Rb function in tumor cells, high-level expression of HMGA2 is sufficient to induce SAHF formation in primary cells. It therefore becomes significant to determine whether Rb protein is necessary in HMGA2-induced SAHF formation. In this study, we established the cellular senescence and SAHF assembly WI38 cell model by ectopic expression of HMGA2, in which typical senescent markers were seen, including notable upregulation of p53, p21 and p16, and elevated SA-β-galactosidase staining together with downregulation of E2F target genes. We then showed that the Rb pathway inhibitor E7 protein was able to partly abolish the ability of SAHF formation after HMGA2 expression in WI38 cells, indicating that Rb is a crucial factor for HMGA2-induced SAHF formation. However, Rb depletion did not completely rescue the cell growth arrest induced by HMGA2, suggesting that Rb is not an exclusive pathway for HMGA2-induced senescence in WI38 cells.

  13. Structural Diversity in the AdoMet Radical Enzyme Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Vey, Jessica L.; Croft, Anna K.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2012-01-01

    AdoMet radical enzymes are involved in processes such as cofactor biosynthesis, anaerobic metabolism, and natural product biosynthesis. These enzymes utilize the reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to afford L-methionine and a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently generates a substrate radical species. By harnessing radical reactivity, the AdoMet radical enzyme superfamily is responsible for an incredible diversity of chemical transformations. Structural analysis reveals that family members adopt a full or partial Triose-phosphate Isomerase Mutase (TIM) barrel protein fold, containing core motifs responsible for binding a catalytic [4Fe-4S] cluster and AdoMet. Here we evaluate over twenty structures of AdoMet radical enzymes and classify them into two categories: traditional and ThiC-like (named for the structure of 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine phosphate synthase (ThiC)). In light of new structural data, we reexamine the traditional structural motifs responsible for binding the [4Fe-4S] cluster and AdoMet, and compare and contrast these motifs with the ThiC case. We also review how structural data combine with biochemical, spectroscopic, and computational data to help us understand key features of this enzyme superfamily, such as the energetics, the triggering, and the molecular mechanisms of AdoMet reductive cleavage. PMID:22579873

  14. Primary photochemistry of the dark- and light-adapted states of the YtvA protein from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Hun; Madsen, Dorte; van der Steen, Jeroen B; Pullman, Robert; Freer, Lucy H; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Larsen, Delmar S

    2013-11-12

    The primary (100 fs to 10 ns) and secondary (10 ns to 100 μs) photodynamics in the type II light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domain from the blue light YtvA photoreceptor extracted from Bacillus subtilis were explored with transient absorption spectroscopy. The photodynamics of full-length YtvA were characterized after femtosecond 400 nm excitation of both the dark-adapted D447 state and the light-adapted S390 state. The S390 state relaxes on a 43 min time scale at room temperature back into D447, which is weakly accelerated by the introduction of imidazole. This is ascribed to an obstructed cavity in YtvA that hinders access to the embedded FMN chromophore and is more open in type I LOV domains. The primary photochemistry of dark-adapted YtvA is qualitatively similar to that of the type I LOV domains, including AsLOV2 from Avena sativa, but exhibits an appreciably higher (60% greater) terminal triplet yield, estimated near the maximal ΦISC value of ≈78%; the other 22% decays via non-triplet-generating fluorescence. The subsequent secondary dynamics are inhomogeneous, with three triplet populations co-evolving: the faster-decaying (I)T* population (38% occupancy) with a 200 ns decay time is nonproductive in generating the S390 adduct state, a slower (II)T* population (57% occupancy) exhibits a high yield (Φadduct ≈ 100%) in generating S390 and a third (5%) (III)T*population persists (>100 μs) with unresolved photoactivity. The ultrafast photoswitching dynamics of the S390 state appreciably differ from those previously resolved for the type I AcLOV2 domain from Adiantum capillus-veneris [Kennis, J. T., et al. (2004) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126, 4512], with a low-yield dissociation (Φdis ≈ 2.5%) reaction, which is due to an ultrafast recombination reaction, following photodissociation, and is absent in AcLOV2, which results in the increased photoswitching activity of the latter domain.

  15. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  16. Tryptophan tryptophylquinone biosynthesis: a radical approach to posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Victor L; Liu, Aimin

    2012-11-01

    Protein-derived cofactors are formed by irreversible covalent posttranslational modification of amino acid residues. An example is tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) found in the enzyme methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH). TTQ biosynthesis requires the cross-linking of the indole rings of two Trp residues and the insertion of two oxygen atoms onto adjacent carbons of one of the indole rings. The diheme enzyme MauG catalyzes the completion of TTQ within a precursor protein of MADH. The preMADH substrate contains a single hydroxyl group on one of the tryptophans and no crosslink. MauG catalyzes a six-electron oxidation that completes TTQ assembly and generates fully active MADH. These oxidation reactions proceed via a high valent bis-Fe(IV) state in which one heme is present as Fe(IV)=O and the other is Fe(IV) with both axial heme ligands provided by amino acid side chains. The crystal structure of MauG in complex with preMADH revealed that catalysis does not involve direct contact between the hemes of MauG and the protein substrate. Rather it is accomplished through long-range electron transfer, which presumably generates radical intermediates. Kinetic, spectrophotometric, and site-directed mutagenesis studies are beginning to elucidate how the MauG protein controls the reactivity of the hemes and mediates the long range electron/radical transfer required for catalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Radical SAM enzymes and Radical Enzymology.

  17. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: II. Involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigations in Atlantic croaker ovaries and primary co-cultured theca and granulosa cells have identified multiple signal transduction pathways involved in the control of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis, including adenylyl cyclase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. In the present study, evidence was obtained for an involvement of a third signal transduction pathway, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling cascade, in the regulation of gonadal steroidogenesis in this lower vertebrate teleost model. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone synthesis was markedly attenuated by two antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1/2 (MEK1/2, also known as Map2k1/Map2k2). Moreover, treatment with gonadotropin-induced MEK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, also known as Mapk3/Mapk1) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in co-cultured croaker theca and granulosa cells. Active MEK1/2 was required for a complete steroidogenic response to activators of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, including forskolin and dbcAMP, suggesting that the target(s) of MAP kinase signaling are distal to cAMP generation and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Interestingly, dbcAMP caused a similar increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation as was observed with gonadotropin treatment, although an inhibitor of PKA did not attenuate this response. Finally, there was no evidence of cross-talk between calcium-dependent signaling pathways and this MAP kinase cascade. While drugs that block calcium-dependent signal transduction, including inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, calmodulin, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, significantly reduced gonadotropin-induced testosterone accumulation, these drugs had no apparent effect on hCG-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  18. Crystalline bipyridinium radical complexes and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Barnes, Jonathan C.; Li, Hao; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Basuray, Ashish Neil; Sampath, Srinivasan

    2015-09-01

    Described herein are methods of generating 4,4'-bipyridinium radical cations (BIPY.sup..cndot.+), and methods for utilizing the radical-radical interactions between two or more BIPY.sup..cndot.+ radical cations that ensue for the creation of novel materials for applications in nanotechnology. Synthetic methodologies, crystallographic engineering techniques, methods of physical characterization, and end uses are described.

  19. Whole exome sequencing implicates eye development, the unfolded protein response and plasma membrane homeostasis in primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Sharma, Shiwani; Landers, John; Mills, Richard; Goldberg, Ivan; Healey, Paul R.; Graham, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Galanopoulos, Anna; Casson, Robert J.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Ellis, Jonathan; Leo, Paul; Brown, Matthew A.; MacGregor, Stuart; Lynn, David J.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To identify biological processes associated with POAG and its subtypes, high-tension (HTG) and normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), by analyzing rare potentially damaging genetic variants. Methods A total of 122 and 65 unrelated HTG and NTG participants, respectively, with early onset advanced POAG, 103 non-glaucoma controls and 993 unscreened ethnicity-matched controls were included in this study. Study participants without myocilin disease-causing variants and non-glaucoma controls were subjected to whole exome sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq2000. Exomes of participants were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq2000. Qualifying variants were rare in the general population (MAF < 0.001) and potentially functionally damaging (nonsense, frameshift, splice or predicted pathogenic using SIFT or Polyphen2 software). Genes showing enrichment of qualifying variants in cases were selected for pathway and network analysis using InnateDB. Results POAG cases showed enrichment of rare variants in camera-type eye development genes (p = 1.40×10–7, corrected p = 3.28×10–4). Implicated eye development genes were related to neuronal or retinal development. HTG cases were significantly enriched for key regulators in the unfolded protein response (UPR) (p = 7.72×10–5, corrected p = 0.013). The UPR is known to be involved in myocilin-related glaucoma; our results suggest the UPR has a role in non-myocilin causes of HTG. NTG cases showed enrichment in ion channel transport processes (p = 1.05×10–4, corrected p = 0.027) including calcium, chloride and phospholipid transporters involved in plasma membrane homeostasis. Network analysis also revealed enrichment of the MHC Class I antigen presentation pathway in HTG, and the EGFR1 and cell-cycle pathways in both HTG and NTG. Conclusion This study suggests that mutations in eye development genes are enriched in POAG. HTG can result from aberrant responses to protein misfolding which may be amenable to molecular chaperone therapy. NTG

  20. The dopamine transporter protein gene (SLC6A3): Primary linage mapping and linkage studies in Tourette syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gelernter, J.; Kruger, S.D.; Pakstis, A.J. |

    1995-12-10

    The dopamine transporter, the molecule responsible for presynaptic reuptake of dopamine and a major site of action of psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine, is encoded by locus SLC6A3 (alias DAT1). The protein`s actions and DAT`s specific localization to dopaminergic neurons make it a candidate gene for several psychiatric illnesses. SLC6A3 has been mapped to distal chromosome 5p, using physical methods. Genetic linkage methods were used to place SLC6A3 in the genetic linkage map. Four extended pedigrees (one of which overlaps with CEPH) were typed. Linkage with Tourette syndrome (TS) was also examined. SLC6A3 showed close linkage with several markers previously mapped to distal chromosome 5p, including D5S11 (Z{sub max} = 16.0, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0.03, results from four families) and D5S678 (Z{sub max} = 7.84, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0, results from two families). Observed crossovers established that SLC6A3 is a distal marker close to D5S10 and D5S678, but these three distal markers could not be ordered. Linkage between TS and SLC6A3 could be excluded independently in two branches of a large kindred segregating TS; the lod score in a third family was also negative, but not significant. Cumulative results show a lod score of -6.2 at {theta} = 0 and of -3.9 at {theta} = 0.05 (dominant model, narrow disease definition). SLC6A3 thus maps to distal chromosome 5p by linkage analysis, in agreement with previous physical mapping data. A mutation at SLC6A3 is not causative for TS in the two large families that generated significant negative lod scores (if the parameters of our analyses were correct) and is unlikely to be causative in the family that generated a negative lod score that did not reach significance. These results do not exclude a role for the dopamine transporter in influencing risk for TS in combination with other loci. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Structural Proteins Are the Primary Viral Determinants of Non-Viraemic Transmission between Ticks whereas Non-Structural Proteins Affect Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khasnatinov, Maxim A.; Tuplin, Andrew; Gritsun, Dmitri J.; Slovak, Mirko; Kazimirova, Maria; Lickova, Martina; Havlikova, Sabina; Klempa, Boris; Gould, Ernest A.

    2016-01-01

    Over 50 million humans live in areas of potential exposure to tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). The disease exhibits an estimated 16,000 cases recorded annually over 30 European and Asian countries. Conventionally, TBEV transmission to Ixodes spp. ticks occurs whilst feeding on viraemic animals. However, an alternative mechanism of non-viraemic transmission (NVT) between infected and uninfected ticks co-feeding on the same transmission-competent host, has also been demonstrated. Here, using laboratory-bred I. ricinus ticks, we demonstrate low and high efficiency NVT for TBEV strains Vasilchenko (Vs) and Hypr, respectively. These virus strains share high sequence similarity but are classified as two TBEV subtypes. The Vs strain is a Siberian subtype, naturally associated with I. persulcatus ticks whilst the Hypr strain is a European subtype, transmitted by I. ricinus ticks. In mammalian cell culture (porcine kidney cell line PS), Vs and Hypr induce low and high cytopathic effects (cpe), respectively. Using reverse genetics, we engineered a range of viable Vs/Hypr chimaeric strains, with substituted genes. No significant differences in replication rate were detected between wild-type and chimaeric viruses in cell culture. However, the chimaeric strain Vs[Hypr str] (Hypr structural and Vs non-structural genomic regions) demonstrated high efficiency NVT in I. ricinus whereas the counterpart Hypr[Vs str] was not transmitted by NVT, indicating that the virion structural proteins largely determine TBEV NVT transmission efficiency between ticks. In contrast, in cell culture, the extent of cpe was largely determined by the non-structural region of the TBEV genome. Chimaeras with Hypr non-structural genes were more cytotoxic for PS cells when compared with Vs genome-based chimaeras. PMID:27341437

  2. Growth factors and steroid mediated regulation of cytoskeletal protein expression in serum-deprived primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Bronzi, Daniela; Tomassoni, Daniele; Costa, Antonino; Raciti, Giuseppina; Avitabile, Marcello; Amenta, Francesco; Avola, Roberto

    2008-12-01

    In this research we aimed to investigate the interactions between growth factors (GFs) and dexamethasone (DEX) on cytoskeletal proteins GFAP and vimentin (VIM) expression under different experimental conditions. Condition I: 24 h pretreatment with bFGF, subsequent 72 h switching in serum-free medium (SFM) and final addition of GFs, alone or by two in the last 24 h, after a prolonged (60 h) DEX treatment. Condition II: 36 h pretreatment with DEX (with bFGF in the last 24 h), followed by SFM for 60 h and final addition for 24 h with growth factors alone or two of them together. Western blot analysis data showed a marked GFAP expression in cultures submitted to Condition I comparing results to untreated or treated controls. VIM expression was instead significantly reduced after GFs addition in the last 24 h of 60 h DEX treatment, respect to control DEX-pretreated ones. Referring data to untreated controls, VIM expression was significantly enhanced after GFs addition. GFAP showed also a significant increase in astrocytes submitted to Condition II, respect to untreated or treated control cultures. VIM expression was up and down regulated under Condition II. Collectively, our findings evidence an interactive dialogue between GFs and DEX in astroglial cultures, co-pretreated with DEX and bFGF, regulating cytoskeletal network under stressful conditions.

  3. Primary deficiency of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein in human abetalipoproteinemia is associated with loss of CD1 function.

    PubMed

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Dougan, Stephanie K; Barral, Duarte C; Junker, Yvonne; Chen, Zhangguo; Kaser, Arthur; Ho, Madelyn; Mandel, Hannah; McIntyre, Adam; Kennedy, Susan M; Painter, Gavin F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Yue, Simon; Beladi, Sarah; Behar, Samuel M; Chen, Xiuxu; Gumperz, Jenny E; Breckpot, Karine; Raper, Anna; Baer, Amanda; Exley, Mark A; Hegele, Robert A; Cuchel, Marina; Rader, Daniel J; Davidson, Nicholas O; Blumberg, Richard S

    2010-08-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is a rare Mendelian disorder of lipid metabolism due to genetic deficiency in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). It is associated with defects in MTP-mediated lipid transfer onto apolipoprotein B (APOB) and impaired secretion of APOB-containing lipoproteins. Recently, MTP was shown to regulate the CD1 family of lipid antigen-presenting molecules, but little is known about immune function in ABL patients. Here, we have shown that ABL is characterized by immune defects affecting presentation of self and microbial lipid antigens by group 1 (CD1a, CD1b, CD1c) and group 2 (CD1d) CD1 molecules. In dendritic cells isolated from ABL patients, MTP deficiency was associated with increased proteasomal degradation of group 1 CD1 molecules. Although CD1d escaped degradation, it was unable to load antigens and exhibited functional defects similar to those affecting the group 1 CD1 molecules. The reduction in CD1 function resulted in impaired activation of CD1-restricted T and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and reduced numbers and phenotypic alterations of iNKT cells consistent with central and peripheral CD1 defects in vivo. These data highlight MTP as a unique regulator of human metabolic and immune pathways and reveal that ABL is not only a disorder of lipid metabolism but also an immune disease involving CD1.

  4. Preparation and primary application of monoclonal antibodies against a novel ribosome-inactivating protein Moschatin from pumpkin seeds.

    PubMed

    Xia, Heng-Chuan; Hu, Wei-Guo; Yang, Xin-Xiu; Li, Feng; Zhang, Zu-Chuan

    2004-02-01

    Plant ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) have multiple biological functions, and have been widely used in the studies on biomedical and agronomic applications. Moschatin is a novel single-chain RIP recently purified from pumpkin seeds, and it has been successfully applied to construct the immunotoxin that can selectively kill the cultured human melanoma cells. Six stable strains of hybridomas (2H8, 4A8, 5B6, 6F8, 4H10 and 6C2) that can secrete high specific monoclonal antibodies against Moschatin have been successfully prepared using hybridoma technique. The isotypes of these monoclonal antibodies are IgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG1, IgG2a and IgGM. Their affinity constants were determined to be 1.42x10(8), 2.71x10(8), 8.72x10(7), 2.06x10(8), 1.36x10(8) and 1.51x10(8) M(-1) in a sequent order, measured by non-competitive ELISA. The monoclonal antibody 4A8 has been used to detect Moschatin in Western blot. An immunoaffinity gel, which consisted of a monoclonal antibody 4H10 and Sepharose 4B, was prepared and used to purify Moschatin from pumpkin seeds crude extract.

  5. Intraflagellar Transport Protein 172 is essential for primary cilia formation and plays a vital role in patterning the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Gorivodsky, Marat; Mukhopadhyay, Mahua; Wilsch-Braeuninger, Michaela; Phillips, Matthew; Teufel, Andreas; Kim, Changmee; Malik, Nasir; Huttner, Wieland; Westphal, Heiner

    2008-01-01

    IFT172, also known as Selective Lim-domain Binding protein (SLB), is a component of the Intraflagellar Transport (IFT) complex. In order to evaluate the biological role of the Ift172 gene, we generated a loss-of-function mutation in the mouse. The resulting Slb mutant embryos die between E12.5–13.0, and exhibit severe cranio-facial malformations, failure to close the cranial neural tube, holoprosencephaly, heart edema and extensive hemorrhages. Cilia outgrowth in cells of the neuroepithelium is initiated but the axonemes are severely truncated and do not contain visible microtubules. Morphological and molecular analyses revealed a global brain-patterning defect along the dorsal-ventral (DV) and anterior-posterior (AP) axes. We demonstrate that Ift172 gene function is required for early regulation of Fgf8 at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and maintenance of the isthmic organizer. In addition, Ift172 is required for proper function of the embryonic node, the early embryonic organizer and for formation of the head organizing center (the anterior mesendoderm, or AME). We propose a model suggesting that forebrain and mid-hindbrain growth and AP patterning depends on the early function of Ift172 at gastrulation. Our data suggest that the formation and function of the node and AME in the mouse embryo relies on an indispensable role of Ift172 in cilia morphogenesis and cilia-mediated signaling. PMID:18930042

  6. Thermochemical properties for isooctane and carbon radicals: computational study.

    PubMed

    Snitsiriwat, Suarwee; Bozzelli, Joseph W

    2013-01-17

    Thermochemical properties for isooctane, its internal rotation conformers, and radicals with corresponding bond energies are determined by use of computational chemistry. Enthalpies of formation are determined using isodesmic reactions with B3LYP density function theory and composite CBS-QB3 methods. Application of group additivity with comparison to calculated values is illustrated. Entropy and heat capacities are determined using geometric parameters, internal rotor potentials, and frequencies from B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) calculations for the lowest energy conformer. Internal rotor potentials are determined for the isooctane parent and for the primary, secondary, and tertiary radicals in order to identify isomer energies. Intramolecular interactions are shown to have a significant effect on the enthalpy of formation of the isooctane parent and its radicals. The computed standard enthalpy of formation for the lowest energy conformers of isooctane from this study is -54.40 ± 1.60 kcal mol(-1), which is 0.8 kcal mol(-1) lower than the evaluated experimental value -53.54 ± 0.36 kcal mol(-1). The standard enthalpy of formation for the primary radical for a methyl on the quaternary carbon is -5.00 ± 1.69 kcal mol(-1), for the primary radical on the tertiary carbon is -5.18 ± 1.69 kcal mol(-1), for the secondary isooctane radical is -9.03 ± 1.84 kcal mol(-1), and for the tertiary isooctane radical is -12.30 ± 2.02 kcal mol(-1). Bond energy values for the isooctane radicals are 100.64 ± 1.73, 100.46 ± 1.73, 96.41 ± 1.88 and 93.14 ± 2.05 kcal mol(-1) for C3•CCCC2, C3CCCC2•, C3CC•CC2, and C3CCC•C2, respectively. Entropy and heat capacity values are reported for the lowest energy homologues.

  7. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    PubMed Central

    Minnaard, Margaretha C.; de Groot, Joris A.H.; Hopstaken, Rogier M.; Schierenberg, Alwin; de Wit, Niek J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Broekhuizen, Berna D.L.; van Vugt, Saskia F.; Neven, Arie Knuistingh; Graffelman, Aleida W.; Melbye, Hasse; Rainer, Timothy H.; Steurer, Johann; Holm, Anette; Gonzales, Ralph; Dinant, Geert-Jan; van de Pol, Alma C.; Verheij, Theo J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify the added value of CRP measurement. METHODS: We included studies of the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in adult outpatients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection. We contacted authors of eligible studies for inclusion of data and for additional data as needed. The value of adding CRP measurement to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n = 5308) provided their data sets. In all of the data sets, discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia improved after CRP measurement was added to the prediction model (extended model), with a mean improvement in the area under the curve of 0.075 (range 0.02–0.18). In a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients, the proportion of patients without pneumonia correctly classified at low risk increased from 28% to 36% in the extended model, and the proportion with pneumonia correctly classified at high risk increased from 63% to 70%. The number of patients with pneumonia classified at low risk did not change (n = 4). Overall, the proportion of patients assigned to the intermediate-risk category decreased from 56% to 51%. INTERPRETATION: Adding CRP measurement to the diagnostic work-up for suspected pneumonia in primary care improved the discrimination and risk classification of patients. However, it still left a substantial group of patients classified at intermediate risk, in which clinical decision-making remains challenging. PMID:27647618

  8. Pancreatic endocrine tumours: mutational and immunohistochemical survey of protein kinases reveals alterations in targetable kinases in cancer cell lines and rare primaries

    PubMed Central

    Corbo, V.; Beghelli, S.; Bersani, S.; Antonello, D.; Talamini, G.; Brunelli, M.; Capelli, P.; Falconi, M.; Scarpa, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Kinases represent potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs). Patients and methods: Thirty-five kinase genes were sequenced in 36 primary PETs and three PET cell lines: (i) 4 receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), tyrosine-protein kinase KIT (KIT), platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha); (ii) 6 belonging to the Akt/mTOR pathway; and (iii) 25 frequently mutated in cancers. The immunohistochemical expression of the four RTKs and the copy number of EGFR and HER2 were assessed in 140 PETs. Results: Somatic mutations were found in KIT in one and ATM in two primary neoplasms. Among 140 PETs, EGFR was immunopositive in 18 (13%), HER2 in 3 (2%), KIT in 16 (11%), and PDGFRalpha in 135 (96%). HER2 amplification was found in 2/130 (1.5%) PETs. KIT membrane immunostaining was significantly associated with tumour aggressiveness and shorter patient survival. PET cell lines QGP1, CM and BON harboured mutations in FGFR3, FLT1/VEGFR1 and PIK3CA, respectively. Conclusions: Only rare PET cases, harbouring either HER2 amplification or KIT mutation, might benefit from targeted drugs. KIT membrane expression deserves further attention as a prognostic marker. ATM mutation is involved in a proportion of PET. The finding of specific mutations in PET cell lines renders these models useful for preclinical studies involving pathway-specific therapies. PMID:21447618

  9. Regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL anti-apoptotic protein expression by nuclear receptor PXR in primary cultures of human and rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nathalie; de Sousa, Georges; Bailly-Maitre, Béatrice; Gugenheim, Jean; Bars, Rémi; Lemaire, Géraldine; Rahmani, Roger

    2005-08-15

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays a major role in the protection of the body by regulating the genes involved in the metabolism and elimination of potentially toxic xeno- and endobiotics. We previously described that PXR activator dexamethasone protects hepatocytes from spontaneous apoptosis. We hypothesise a PXR-dependent co-regulation process between detoxication and programmed cell death. Using primary cultured human and rat hepatocytes, we investigated to determine if PXR is implicated in the regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, two crucial apoptosis inhibitors. In the present study we demonstrated that the treatment of primary cultured hepatocytes with PXR agonists increased hepatocyte viability and protects them from staurosporine-induced apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic capacity of PXR activation was correlated with Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL induction at both the transcriptional and protein levels in man and rats, respectively. The inhibition of PXR expression by antisense oligonucleotide abolished PXR activators Bcl-xL induction. Accordingly, PXR overexpression in HepG2 cells led to bcl-2 induction upon clotrimazole treatment and protects cells against Fas-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that PXR expression is required for Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL up-regulation upon PXR activators treatment in human and rat hepatocytes. They also suggest that PXR may protect the liver against chemicals by simultaneously regulating detoxication and the apoptotic pathway.

  10. Observation of multiple radical pair states in photosystem 2 reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Booth, P J; Crystall, B; Ahmad, I; Barber, J; Porter, G; Klug, D R

    1991-07-30

    Charge recombination of the primary radical pair in D1/D2 reaction centers from photosystem 2 has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The kinetics of the primary radical pair are multiexponential and exhibit at least two lifetimes of 20 and 52 ns. In addition, a third lifetime of approximately 500 ps also appears to be present. These multiexponential charge-recombination kinetics reflect either different conformational states of D1/D2 reaction centers, with the different conformers exhibiting different radical pair lifetimes, or relaxations in the free energy of the radical pair state. Whichever model is invoked, the free energies of formation of the different radical pair states exhibit a linear temperature dependence from 100 to 220 K, indicating that they are dominated by entropy with negligible enthalpy contributions. These results are in agreement with previous determinations of the thermodynamics that govern primary charge separation in both D1/D2 reaction centers [Booth, P.J., Crystall, B., Giorgi, L. B., Barber, J., Klug, D.R., & Porter, G. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1016, 141-152] and reaction centers of purple bacteria [Woodbury, N.W.T., & Parson, W.W. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 767, 345-361]. It is possible that these observations reflect structural changes that accompanying primary charge separation and assist in stabilization of the radical pair state thus optimizing the efficiency of primary electron transfer.

  11. Standard Electrode Potentials Involving Radicals in Aqueous Solution: Inorganic Radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David A.; Huie, Robert E.; Koppenol, Willem H.; Lymar, Sergei V.; Merenyi, Gabor; Neta, Pedatsur; Ruscic, Branko; Stanbury, David M.; Steenken, Steen; Wardman, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recommendations are made for standard potentials involving select inorganic radicals in aqueous solution at 25 °C. These recommendations are based on a critical and thorough literature review and also by performing derivations from various literature reports. The recommended data are summarized in tables of standard potentials, Gibbs energies of formation, radical pKa’s, and hemicolligation equilibrium constants. In all cases, current best estimates of the uncertainties are provided. An extensive set of Data Sheets is appended that provide original literature references, summarize the experimental results, and describe the decisions and procedures leading to each of the recommendations

  12. Ghrelin Increases Beta-Catenin Level through Protein Kinase A Activation and Regulates OPG Expression in Rat Primary Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mrak, Emanuela; Casati, Lavinia; Pagani, Francesca; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Zarattini, Guido; Sibilia, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, by binding growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), promotes osteoblast proliferation but the signaling mechanism of GHS-R on these cells remains unclear. Since canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critically associated with bone homeostasis, we investigated its involvement in mediating ghrelin effects in osteoblasts and in osteoblast-osteoclast cross talk. Ghrelin (10−10M) significantly increased β-catenin levels in rat osteoblasts (rOB). This stimulatory action on β-catenin involves a specific interaction with GHS-R1a, as it is prevented by the selective GHS-R1a antagonist, D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (10−7M). The effect of ghrelin on β-catenin involves the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β via protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of PKA activity reduces the facilitatory action of ghrelin on β-catenin stabilization. Ghrelin treatment of rOB significantly increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which plays an important role in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis, and this effect is blocked by D-Lys3-GHRP-6. Furthermore, ghrelin reduced RANKL/OPG ratio thus contrasting osteoclastogenesis. Accordingly, conditioned media from rOB treated with ghrelin decreased the number of multinucleated TRAcP+ cells as compared with the conditioned media from untreated-control rOB. Our data suggest new roles for ghrelin in modulating bone homeostasis via a specific interaction with GHSR-1a in osteoblasts with subsequent enhancement of both β-catenin levels and OPG expression. PMID:25866509

  13. Skeletal response to diet with soya bean seeds used as primary source of protein in growing broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Olkowski, B; Charuta, A; Radzki, R; Bieńko, M; Toczko, R

    2016-08-01

    The study was conducted using 120 commercial broiler chicks (Ross 308) randomly allocated to two experimental groups. The experimental diets, differing only in protein source, either solvent-extracted soya bean meal (SBM) or traditional (non-genetically modified) full-fat soya bean seeds (FFS), were prepared using practical corn-based formulation designed to meet nutritional requirements of broilers. Performance parameters were monitored weekly. Also, the subjects were evaluated daily for overt changes in skeletal anatomy and gait physiology. Randomly selected chickens from each group (seven males and seven females) were euthanized at 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks of age, and bone specimens were collected for further study. Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined in tibiotarsal bones. Broilers fed FFS diet showed retarded growth rate and decreased feed intake (both p < 0.001). Both BMD and BMC parameters were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in bones of chickens from the FFS group in comparison with the SBM group. The chickens fed the FFS diet showed higher incidence of skeletal pathology including angular deformities and torticollis (both p < 0.01). Of note, cases of torticollis were observed only in FFS group. In many cases, skeletal abnormalities resulted in considerable changes in gait pattern, and in some instances, the pathology of leg bones was so advanced that the affected individuals were unable to walk, but this deformity was not seen in SBM group. From this study, it can be inferred that raw soya beans contain factors that have some specific detrimental effects on skeletal system of chickens.

  14. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  15. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  16. Missing peroxy radical sources within a summertime ponderosa pine forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-05-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or underpredicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e., self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (~120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many

  17. Missing peroxy radical sources within a rural forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (~ 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  18. Missing Peroxy Radical Sources Within a Rural Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, G. M.; Cantrell, C.; Kim, S.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Karl, T.; Harley, P.; Turnipseed, A.; Zheng, W.; Flocke, F.; Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Boyle, E. S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Graus, M.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.; Guenther, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Organic peroxy (RO2) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals are key intermediates in the photochemical processes that generate ozone, secondary organic aerosol and reactive nitrogen reservoirs throughout the troposphere. In regions with ample biogenic hydrocarbons, the richness and complexity of peroxy radical chemistry presents a significant challenge to current-generation models, especially given the scarcity of measurements in such environments. We present peroxy radical observations acquired within a Ponderosa pine forest during the summer 2010 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics and Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study (BEACHON-ROCS). Total peroxy radical mixing ratios reach as high as 180 pptv and are among the highest yet recorded. Using the comprehensive measurement suite to constrain a near-explicit 0-D box model, we investigate the sources, sinks and distribution of peroxy radicals below the forest canopy. The base chemical mechanism underestimates total peroxy radicals by as much as a factor of 3. Since primary reaction partners for peroxy radicals are either measured (NO) or under-predicted (HO2 and RO2, i.e. self-reaction), missing sources are the most likely explanation for this result. A close comparison of model output with observations reveals at least two distinct source signatures. The first missing source, characterized by a sharp midday maximum and a strong dependence on solar radiation, is consistent with photolytic production of HO2. The diel profile of the second missing source peaks in the afternoon and suggests a process that generates RO2 independently of sun-driven photochemistry, such as ozonolysis of reactive hydrocarbons. The maximum magnitudes of these missing sources (approximately 120 and 50 pptv min-1, respectively) are consistent with previous observations alluding to unexpectedly intense oxidation within forests. We conclude that a similar mechanism may underlie many such observations.

  19. The role of free radicals in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and disability in both the civilian and the military populations. The primary impact causes initial tissue damage, which initiates biochemical cascades, known as secondary injury, that expand the damage. Free radicals are implicated as major contributors to the secondary injury. Our review of recent rodent and human research reveals the prominent role of the free radicals superoxide anion, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite in secondary brain injury. Much of our current knowledge is based on rodent studies, and the authors identified a gap in the translation of findings from rodent to human TBI. Rodent models are an effective method for elucidating specific mechanisms of free radical-induced injury at the cellular level in a well-controlled environment. However, human TBI does not occur in a vacuum, and variables controlled in the laboratory may affect the injury progression. Additionally, multiple experimental TBI models are accepted in rodent research, and no one model fully reproduces the heterogeneous injury seen in humans. Free radical levels are measured indirectly in human studies based on assumptions from the findings from rodent studies that use direct free radical measurements. Further study in humans should be directed toward large samples to validate the findings in rodent studies. Data obtained from these studies may lead to more targeted treatment to interrupt the secondary injury cascades.

  20. Inhomogeneous ensembles of radical pairs in chemical compasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2016-11-01

    The biophysical basis for the ability of animals to detect the geomagnetic field and to use it for finding directions remains a mystery of sensory biology. One much debated hypothesis suggests that an ensemble of specialized light-induced radical pair reactions can provide the primary signal for a magnetic compass sensor. The question arises what features of such a radical pair ensemble could be optimized by evolution so as to improve the detection of the direction of weak magnetic fields. Here, we focus on the overlooked aspect of the noise arising from inhomogeneity of copies of biomolecules in a realistic biological environment. Such inhomogeneity leads to variations of the radical pair parameters, thereby deteriorating the signal arising from an ensemble and providing a source of noise. We investigate the effect of variations in hyperfine interactions between different copies of simple radical pairs on the directional response of a compass system. We find that the choice of radical pair parameters greatly influences how strongly the directional response of an ensemble is affected by inhomogeneity.

  1. Inhomogeneous ensembles of radical pairs in chemical compasses

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The biophysical basis for the ability of animals to detect the geomagnetic field and to use it for finding directions remains a mystery of sensory biology. One much debated hypothesis suggests that an ensemble of specialized light-induced radical pair reactions can provide the primary signal for a magnetic compass sensor. The question arises what features of such a radical pair ensemble could be optimized by evolution so as to improve the detection of the direction of weak magnetic fields. Here, we focus on the overlooked aspect of the noise arising from inhomogeneity of copies of biomolecules in a realistic biological environment. Such inhomogeneity leads to variations of the radical pair parameters, thereby deteriorating the signal arising from an ensemble and providing a source of noise. We investigate the effect of variations in hyperfine interactions between different copies of simple radical pairs on the directional response of a compass system. We find that the choice of radical pair parameters greatly influences how strongly the directional response of an ensemble is affected by inhomogeneity. PMID:27804956

  2. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  3. Primary structures of the precursor and mature forms of stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase from safflower embryos and requirement of ferredoxin for enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, G A; Scherer, D E; Foxall-Van Aken, S; Kenny, J W; Young, H L; Shintani, D K; Kridl, J C; Knauf, V C

    1991-01-01

    Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (EC 1.14.99.6) catalyzes the principal conversion of saturated fatty acids to unsaturated fatty acids in the synthesis of vegetable oils. Stearoyl-ACP desaturase was purified from developing embryos of safflower seed, and extensive amino acid sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence was used in conjunction with polymerase chain reactions to clone a full-length cDNA. The primary structure of the protein, as deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNA, includes a 33-amino-acid transit peptide not found in the purified enzyme. Expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding the mature form of stearoyl-ACP desaturase did not result in an altered fatty acid composition. However, active enzyme was detected when assayed in vitro with added spinach ferredoxin. The lack of significant activity in vitro without added ferredoxin and the lack of observed change in fatty acid composition indicate that ferredoxin is a required cofactor for the enzyme and that E. coli ferredoxin functions poorly, if at all, as an electron donor for the plant enzyme. Images PMID:2006194

  4. Extensive Chemical Modifications in the Primary Protein Structure of IgG1 Subvisible Particles Are Necessary for Breaking Immune Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Boll, Björn; Bessa, Juliana; Folzer, Emilien; Ríos Quiroz, Anacelia; Schmidt, Roland; Bulau, Patrick; Finkler, Christof; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Huwyler, Jörg; Iglesias, Antonio; Koulov, Atanas V

    2017-03-07

    A current concern with the use of therapeutic proteins is the likely presence of aggregates and submicrometer, subvisible, and visible particles. It has been proposed that aggregates and particles may lead to unwanted increases in the immune response with a possible impact on safety or efficacy. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate the ability of subvisible particles of a therapeutic antibody to break immune tolerance in an IgG1 transgenic mouse model and to understand the particle attributes that might play a role in this process. We investigated the immunogenic properties of subvisible particles (unfractionated, mixed populations, and well-defined particle size fractions) using a transgenic mouse model expressing a mini-repertoire of human IgG1 (hIgG1 tg). Immunization with proteinaceous subvisible particles generated by artificial stress conditions demonstrated that only subvisible particles bearing very extensive chemical modifications within the primary amino acid structure could break immune tolerance in the hIgG1 transgenic mouse model. Protein particles exhibiting low levels of chemical modification were not immunogenic in this model.

  5. Carnivorous pitcher plant uses free radicals in the digestion of prey.

    PubMed

    Chia, Tet Fatt; Aung, Hnin Hnin; Osipov, Anatoly N; Goh, Ngoh Khang; Chia, Lian Sai

    2004-01-01

    A study of the involvement of free oxygen radicals in trapping and digestion of insects by carnivorous plants was the main goal of the present investigation. We showed that the generation of oxygen free radicals by pitcher fluid of Nepenthes is the first step of the digestion process, as seen by EPR spin trapping assay and gel-electrophoresis. The EPR spectrum of N. gracilis fluid in the presence of DMPO spin trap showed the superposition of the hydroxyl radical spin adduct signal and of the ascorbyl radical signal. Catalase addition decreased the generation of hydroxyl radicals showing that hydroxyl radicals are generated from hydrogen peroxide, which can be derived from superoxide radicals. Gel-electrophoresis data showed that myosin, an abundant protein component of insects, can be rapidly broken down by free radicals and protease inhibitors do not inhibit this process. Addition of myoglobin to the pitcher plant fluid decreased the concentration of detectable radicals. Based on these observations, we conclude that oxygen free radicals produced by the pitcher plant aid in the digestion of the insect prey.

  6. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  7. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    PubMed

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  8. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    PubMed Central

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  9. Radical prostatectomy in high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ischia, Joseph; Gleave, Martin

    2013-03-01

    One consistent finding in the studies regarding treating men with prostate cancer is that men with high-risk disease have the most to gain from treatment with curative intent. Men with high-risk or locally-advanced prostate cancer require treatment to the primary cancer or risk dying prematurely from their disease. Increasingly, combined androgen deprivation therapy + radiation treatment is seen as the standard treatment as a result of prospective studies in this space, and the perceived increased morbidity of radical prostatectomy in the setting of a "low" cure rate as monotherapy. In the absence of a well-conducted randomized trial, there is no definite evidence that one treatment is superior to the other. The advantages of radical prostatectomy are that it provides excellent local control of the primary tumor without an increase in morbidity, accurately stages the disease to guide further therapy, and removes benign sources of prostate-specific antigen so that failures can be promptly identified and subsequent treatment can be initiated in a timely manner. Although several guidelines recommend radiation treatment over radical prostatectomy as first-line treatment, there is no evidence that surgery is inferior and radical prostatectomy should remain part of any informed discussion regarding treatment options for men with high-risk prostate cancer.

  10. Contribution of aquaporin 9 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 to differential sensitivity to arsenite between primary cultured chorion and amnion cells prepared from human fetal membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Yuta; Yuan, Bo; Kaise, Toshikazu; Takeichi, Makoto; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Toyoda, Hiroo

    2011-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (arsenite, As{sup III}) has shown a remarkable clinical efficacy, whereas its side effects are still a serious concern. Therefore, it is critical to understand the effects of As{sup III} on human-derived normal cells for revealing the mechanisms underlying these side effects. We examined the effects of As{sup III} on primary cultured chorion (C) and amnion (A) cells prepared from human fetal membranes. A significant dose-dependent As{sup III}-mediated cytotoxicity was observed in the C-cells accompanied with an increase of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Higher concentrations of As{sup III} were required for the A-cells to show cytotoxicity and LDH release, suggesting that the C-cells were more sensitive to As{sup III} than the A-cells. The expression levels of aquaporin 9 (AQP9) were approximately 2 times higher in the C-cells than those in the A-cells. Both intracellular arsenic accumulation and its cytotoxicity in the C-cells were significantly abrogated by sorbitol, a competitive AQP9 inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. The protein expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 were downregulated by As{sup III} in the C-cells, but not in the A-cells. No significant differences in the expression levels of MRP1 were observed