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Sample records for proteomic analysis identifies

  1. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  2. Lens culinaris Medik. seed proteome: analysis to identify landrace markers.

    PubMed

    Ialicicco, Manuela; Viscosi, Vincenzo; Arena, Simona; Scaloni, Andrea; Trupiano, Dalila; Rocco, Mariapina; Chiatante, Donato; Scippa, Gabriella S

    2012-12-01

    Unlike modern cultivars selected for their growth performances in specific environmental conditions, local landraces have a high genetic variability that is an important resource for plant breeding. Consequent to their high adaptation to different environmental conditions, these landraces may have evolved adaptive gene complexes To promote the survival of endangered lentil landraces, we previously investigated the genetic relationship between two ancient landraces cultivated in the Molise region (Capracotta and Conca Casale, south-central Italy) and widely spread commercial varieties using an integrated approach consisting of morphological, DNA and protein characterization. In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to compare the mature seed proteomes of the Capracotta and Conca Casale lentil landraces. Multivariate analysis of 145 differentially expressed protein spots demonstrated that 52 proteins are required to discriminate among the two landraces. Therefore, these 52 proteins can be considered "landrace markers". The results of this study show that the combination of proteomics and multivariate analysis can be used to identify physiological and/or environmental markers, and is thus a powerful tool that complements the analysis of biodiversity in plant ecotypes.

  3. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Kveim Reagent Identifies Targets of Cellular Immunity in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert; Siddiqui, Nazneen; Potiphar, Lee; Goldin, Rob; Timms, John F.; Wells, Athol U.; Kon, Onn M.; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Mitchell, Donald; Weeks, Mark E.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    Background Kveim-reagent (Kv) skin testing was a historical method of diagnosing sarcoidosis. Intradermal injection of treated sarcoidosis spleen tissue resulted in a granuloma response at injection site by 4–6 weeks. Previous work indicates proteins as the possible trigger of this reaction. We aimed to identify Kv-specific proteins and characterise the ex vivo response of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from sarcoidosis, tuberculosis and healthy control patients when stimulated with both Kv and selected Kv-specific proteins. Methods Kv extracts were separated by 1D-SDS-PAGE and 2D-DIGE and then underwent mass spectrometric analysis for protein identification. Sarcoidosis and control PBMCs were first stimulated with Kv and then with three selected recombinant protein candidates which were identified from the proteomic analysis. PBMC secreted cytokines were subsequently measured by Multiplex Cytokine Assay. Results We observed significantly increased IFN-γ and TNF-α secretion from Kv-stimulated PBMCs of sarcoidosis patients vs. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (IFN-γ: 207.2 pg/mL vs. 3.86 pg/mL, p = 0.0018; TNF-α: 2375 pg/mL vs. 42.82 pg/mL, p = 0.0003). Through proteomic approaches we then identified 74 sarcoidosis tissue-specific proteins. Of these, 3 proteins (vimentin, tubulin and alpha-actinin-4) were identified using both 1D-SDS-PAGE and 2D-DIGE. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005150. Increased cytokine secretion was subsequently observed with vimentin stimulation of sarcoidosis PBMCs vs. tuberculosis PBMCs (IFN-γ: 396.6 pg/mL vs 0.1 pg/mL, p = 0.0009; TNF-α: 1139 pg/mL vs 0.1 pg/mL, p<0.0001). This finding was also observed in vimentin stimulation of sarcoidosis PBMCs compared to PBMCs from healthy controls (IFN-γ: 396.6 pg/mL vs. 0.1 pg/mL, p = 0.014; TNF-α: 1139 pg/mL vs 42.29 pg/mL, p = 0.027). No difference was found in cytokine secretion between sarcoidosis and control PBMCs when stimulated with either tubulin

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis identifies new effectors of FOXM1 involved in breast cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Yi; He, Bin; Meng, Yuesheng; Li, Yandong; Gao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The Forkhead Box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor plays important roles in tumorigenesis and tumor metastasis in multiple human carcinomas. However, the underlying mechanisms for FOXM1 function remain to be classified. In the present study, we employed quantitative proteomic approach to search new downstream targets of FOXM1 in breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. A total of 4125 proteins were identified and quantified by label-free quantitation, of which 318 proteins were significantly changed (with P-value <0.05) between FOXM1 knockdown cells and control cells. Among them, three proteins ACSL4, CGGBP1 and PGRMC2 were significantly downregulated with FOXM1 reduction by western blot analysis. Further functional assays revealed that knockdown of the three proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells attenuated the ability of cell migration, consistent with the phenotype of FOXM1 knockdown. These results suggest that new potential downstream effectors of FOXM1 were identified by proteomic approach, and may provide new potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:26884854

  6. Proteomic analysis of human substantia nigra identifies novel candidates involved in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Licker, Virginie; Turck, Natacha; Kövari, Enikö; Burkhardt, Karim; Côte, Mélanie; Surini-Demiri, Maria; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) pathology spreads throughout the brain following a region-specific process predominantly affecting the substantia nigra (SN) pars compacta. SN exhibits a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons responsible for the major cardinal motor symptoms, along with the occurrence of Lewy bodies in the surviving neurons. To gain new insights into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms in PD, we studied postmortem nigral tissues dissected from pathologically confirmed PD cases (n = 5) and neurologically intact controls (n = 8). Using a high-throughput shotgun proteomic strategy, we simultaneously identified 1795 proteins with concomitant quantitative data. To date, this represents the most extensive catalog of nigral proteins. Of them, 204 proteins displayed significant expression level changes in PD patients versus controls. These were involved in novel or known pathogenic processes including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, or cytoskeleton impairment. We further characterized four candidates that might be relevant to PD pathogenesis. We confirmed the differential expression of ferritin-L and seipin by Western blot and demonstrated the neuronal localization of gamma glutamyl hydrolase and nebulette by immunohistochemistry. Our preliminary findings suggest a role for nebulette overexpression in PD neurodegeneration, through mechanisms that may involve cytoskeleton dynamics disruption. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000427 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000427).

  7. Proteome and Acetylome Analysis Identifies Novel Pathways and Targets Regulated by Perifosine in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiao; Hua, Zhongyan; Dong, Yudi; Zhan, Yue; Zhang, Xiaowen; Tian, Wei; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J.; Li, Zhijie

    2017-01-01

    Perifosine, an Akt inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in controlling neuroblastoma tumor growth. However, studies indicate that in addition to the ability to inhibit Akt, other mechanisms contribute to perifosine’s anti-tumor activity. To gain insight into perifosine anti-tumor activity in neuroblastoma we have studied changes in the proteome and acetylome after perifosine treatment in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells using SILAC labeling, affinity enrichment, high-resolution and LC-MS/MS analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, a total of 5,880 proteins and 3,415 lysine acetylation sites were quantified in SK-N-AS cells and 216 differentially expressed proteins and 115 differentially expressed lysine acetylation sites were obtained. These differentially expressed proteins and lysine acetylated proteins were involved in a number of different biological functions, metabolic pathways and pathophysiological processes. This study details the impact of perifosine on proteome and lysine acetylome in SK-N-AS cells and expands our understanding of the mechanisms of perifosine action in neuroblastoma. PMID:28165023

  8. Proteome and Acetylome Analysis Identifies Novel Pathways and Targets Regulated by Perifosine in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao; Hua, Zhongyan; Dong, Yudi; Zhan, Yue; Zhang, Xiaowen; Tian, Wei; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Li, Zhijie

    2017-02-06

    Perifosine, an Akt inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in controlling neuroblastoma tumor growth. However, studies indicate that in addition to the ability to inhibit Akt, other mechanisms contribute to perifosine's anti-tumor activity. To gain insight into perifosine anti-tumor activity in neuroblastoma we have studied changes in the proteome and acetylome after perifosine treatment in SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells using SILAC labeling, affinity enrichment, high-resolution and LC-MS/MS analysis. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that, a total of 5,880 proteins and 3,415 lysine acetylation sites were quantified in SK-N-AS cells and 216 differentially expressed proteins and 115 differentially expressed lysine acetylation sites were obtained. These differentially expressed proteins and lysine acetylated proteins were involved in a number of different biological functions, metabolic pathways and pathophysiological processes. This study details the impact of perifosine on proteome and lysine acetylome in SK-N-AS cells and expands our understanding of the mechanisms of perifosine action in neuroblastoma.

  9. Proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) with domoic acid toxicosis identifies proteins associated with neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Soper, Jennifer L; Gulland, Frances M D; Bell, P Darwin; Kindy, Mark; Arthur, John M; Janech, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    Proteomic studies including marine mammals are rare, largely due to the lack of fully sequenced genomes. This has hampered the application of these techniques toward biomarker discovery efforts for monitoring of health and disease in these animals. We conducted a pilot label-free LC-MS/MS study to profile and compare the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with domoic acid toxicosis (DAT) and without DAT. Across 11 samples, a total of 206 proteins were identified (FDR<0.1) using a composite mammalian database. Several peptide identifications were validated using stable isotope labeled peptides. Comparison of spectral counts revealed seven proteins that were elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid from sea lions with DAT: complement C3, complement factor B, dickkopf-3, malate dehydrogenase 1, neuron cell adhesion molecule 1, gelsolin, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule. Immunoblot analysis found reelin to be depressed in the cerebrospinal fluid from California sea lions with DAT. Mice administered domoic acid also had lower hippocampal reelin protein levels suggesting that domoic acid depresses reelin similar to kainic acid. In summary, proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in marine mammals is a useful tool to characterize the underlying molecular pathology of neurodegenerative disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002105 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002105).

  10. Proteomic analysis from haploid and diploid embryos of Quercus suber L. identifies qualitative and quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Aranzazu; López, Juan Antonio; Pintos, Beatriz; Camafeita, Emilio; Bueno, Ma Angeles

    2009-09-01

    Quercus suber L. is a Mediterranean forest species with ecological, social and economic value. Clonal propagation of Q. suber elite trees has been successfully obtained from in vitro-derived somatic and gametic embryos. These clonal lines play a main role in breeding and genetic studies of Q. suber. To aid in unravelling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach is proposed. The proteomic analysis of Q. suber somatic and gametic in vitro culture-derived embryos, based on DIGE and MALDI-MS, has produced for the first time proteomic data on this species. Seventeen differentially expressed proteins have been identified which display significantly altered levels between gametic and somatic embryos. These proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, most of which had been neither previously associated with embryo development nor identified in the genus Quercus. Some of these proteins are involved in stress and pollen development and others play a role in the metabolism of tannins and phenylpropanoids, which represent two of the major pathways for the synthesis of cork chemical components. Furthermore, the augmented expression levels found for specific proteins are probably related to the homozygous state of a doubled-haploid sample. Proteins involved in synthesis of cork components can be detected at such early stages of development, showing the potential of the method to be useful in searching for biomarkers related to cork quality.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva Identifies Potential Biomarkers for Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Ellias, Mohd Faiz; Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Abdul Rahman, Mariati; Senafi, Shahidan; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya

    2012-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment has been shown to induce inflammation, followed by bone remodelling in the periodontium. These processes trigger the secretion of various proteins and enzymes into the saliva. This study aims to identify salivary proteins that change in expression during orthodontic tooth movement. These differentially expressed proteins can potentially serve as protein biomarkers for the monitoring of orthodontic treatment and tooth movement. Whole saliva from three healthy female subjects were collected before force application using fixed appliance and at 14 days after 0.014′′ Niti wire was applied. Salivary proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) over a pH range of 3–10, and the resulting proteome profiles were compared. Differentially expressed protein spots were then identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. Nine proteins were found to be differentially expressed; however, only eight were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Four of these proteins—Protein S100-A9, immunoglobulin J chain, Ig alpha-1 chain C region, and CRISP-3—have known roles in inflammation and bone resorption. PMID:22919344

  12. Combined expressional analysis, bioinformatics and targeted proteomics identify new potential therapeutic targets in glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stangeland, Biljana; Mughal, Awais A; Grieg, Zanina; Sandberg, Cecilie Jonsgar; Joel, Mrinal; Nygård, Ståle; Meling, Torstein; Murrell, Wayne; Vik Mo, Einar O; Langmoen, Iver A

    2015-09-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is both the most common and the most lethal primary brain tumor. It is thought that GBM stem cells (GSCs) are critically important in resistance to therapy. Therefore, there is a strong rationale to target these cells in order to develop new molecular therapies.To identify molecular targets in GSCs, we compared gene expression in GSCs to that in neural stem cells (NSCs) from the adult human brain, using microarrays. Bioinformatic filtering identified 20 genes (PBK/TOPK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7/DLGAP5/HURP, KIF18A, EZH2, HMMR/RHAMM/CD168, NOL4, MPP6, MDM1, RAPGEF4, RHBDD1, FNDC3B, FILIP1L, MCC, ATXN7L4/ATXN7L1, P2RY5/LPAR6 and FAM118A) that were consistently expressed in GSC cultures and consistently not expressed in NSC cultures. The expression of these genes was confirmed in clinical samples (TCGA and REMBRANDT). The first nine genes were highly co-expressed in all GBM subtypes and were part of the same protein-protein interaction network. Furthermore, their combined up-regulation correlated negatively with patient survival in the mesenchymal GBM subtype. Using targeted proteomics and the COGNOSCENTE database we linked these genes to GBM signalling pathways.Nine genes: PBK, CENPA, KIF15, DEPDC1, CDC6, DLG7, KIF18A, EZH2 and HMMR should be further explored as targets for treatment of GBM.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Amniotic Fluid to Identify Women with Preterm Labor and Intra-amniotic Inflammation/Infection

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Roberto; Espinoza, Jimmy; Rogers, Wade T.; Moser, Allan; Nien, Jyh Kae; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Erez, Offer; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Sam; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Examination of the amniotic fluid proteome has been used to identify biomarkers for intra-amniotic inflammation, as well as those that may be useful in predicting the outcome of preterm labor. The purpose of this study was to combine a novel computational method of pattern discovery with mass spectrometric proteomic profiling of amniotic fluid to discover biomarkers of intra-amniotic infection/inflammation (IAI). Methods This cross-sectional study included patients with spontaneous preterm labor and intact membranes who delivered at term (n=59) and those who delivered preterm with IAI (n=60). Proteomic profiling was performed using SELDI mass spectrometry. A proteomic profile was acquired through multiple simultaneous SELDI conditions which were combined in a single proteomic “fingerprint” using a novel computational approach. Classification of patients based on their associated SELDI-TOF mass spectra as belonging to either the class of individuals with preterm delivery with IAI or term delivery was accomplished by constructing an empirical model. The first phase in the construction of this empirical model involved the selection of adjustable parameters utilizing a training/testing subset of data. The second phase tested the generalization of the model by utilizing a blinded validation set of patients who were not employed in parameter selection. Results Gestational age at amniocentesis was not significantly different between the groups. Thirty-nine unique mass spectrometric peaks discriminated patients with preterm labor/delivery with IAI from those with preterm labor and term delivery. In the testing/training dataset, the classification accuracies (averaged over 100 random draws) were: 91.4% (40.2/44) for patients with preterm delivery with IAI, and 91.2% (40.1/44) for term delivery. The overall accuracy of the classification of patients in the validation dataset was 90.3% (28/31). Conclusions Proteomic analysis of amniotic fluid allowed the

  14. Highly Multiplexed Proteomic Analysis of Quantiferon Supernatants To Identify Biomarkers of Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary Ann; Higgins, Michael; Hraha, Thomas; Wall, Kirsten; Wilson, Michael L.; Sterling, David G.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Reves, Randall

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tests for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are limited by a poor predictive value for identifying people at the highest risk for progressing to active tuberculosis (TB) and have various sensitivities and specificities in different populations. Identifying a more robust signature for LTBI is important for TB prevention and elimination. A pilot study was conducted with samples from immigrants to the United States that were screened for LTBI by the three commercially approved tests, namely, the tuberculin skin test (TST), the Quantiferon-TB Gold in-tube (QFT-GIT), and the T-SPOT.TB (T-SPOT). QFT-GIT supernatants from 13 people with concordant positive results and 26 people with concordant negative results were analyzed via the highly multiplexed SOMAscan proteomic assay. The proteins in the stimulated supernatants that distinguished LTBI from controls included interleukin-2 (IL-2), monocyte chemotactic protein 2 (MCP-2), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14, also known as LIGHT), monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG), and granzyme B (P <0.00001). In addition, antigen stimulation increased the expression of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and activin AB in LTBI samples. In nil tubes, LIGHT was the most significant marker (P <0.0001) and was elevated in LTBI subjects. Other prominent markers in nonstimulated QFT-GIT supernatants were the complement-3 components C3b, iC3b, and C3d, which were upregulated in LTBI and markedly decreased upon stimulation. We found known and novel proteins that warrant further studies for developing improved tests for LTBI, for predicting progression to active disease, and for discriminating LTBI from active TB. PMID:27852671

  15. Novel targets of sulforaphane in primary cardiomyocytes identified by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Bianchi, Laura; Fabbri, Daniele; Motori, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Maraldi, Tullia; Bini, Luca; Brigidi, Patrizia; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the main cause of mortality in the industrialized world and the identification of effective preventive strategies is of fundamental importance. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to up-regulate phase II enzymes in cardiomyocytes and counteract oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Aim of the present study was the identification and characterization of novel sulforaphane targets in cardiomyocytes applying a proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to generate protein profiles of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated and untreated with 5 µM sulforaphane for 1-48 h. According to image analysis, 64 protein spots were found as differentially expressed and their functional correlations were investigated using the MetaCore program. We mainly focused on 3 proteins: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), CLP36 or Elfin, and glyoxalase 1, due to their possible involvement in cardioprotection. Validation of the time-dependent differential expression of these proteins was performed by western blotting. In particular, to gain insight into the cardioprotective role of the modulation of glyoxalase 1 by sulforaphane, further experiments were performed using methylglyoxal to mimic glycative stress. Sulforaphane was able to counteract methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, ROS production, and glycative stress, likely through glyoxalase 1 up-regulation. In this study, we reported for the first time new molecular targets of sulforaphane, such as MIF, CLP36 and glyoxalase 1. In particular, we gave new insights into the anti-glycative role of sulforaphane in cardiomyocytes, confirming its pleiotropic behavior in counteracting cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Novel Targets of Sulforaphane in Primary Cardiomyocytes Identified by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Bianchi, Laura; Fabbri, Daniele; Motori, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Maraldi, Tullia; Bini, Luca; Brigidi, Patrizia; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the main cause of mortality in the industrialized world and the identification of effective preventive strategies is of fundamental importance. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to up-regulate phase II enzymes in cardiomyocytes and counteract oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Aim of the present study was the identification and characterization of novel sulforaphane targets in cardiomyocytes applying a proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to generate protein profiles of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated and untreated with 5 µM sulforaphane for 1-48 h. According to image analysis, 64 protein spots were found as differentially expressed and their functional correlations were investigated using the MetaCore program. We mainly focused on 3 proteins: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), CLP36 or Elfin, and glyoxalase 1, due to their possible involvement in cardioprotection. Validation of the time-dependent differential expression of these proteins was performed by western blotting. In particular, to gain insight into the cardioprotective role of the modulation of glyoxalase 1 by sulforaphane, further experiments were performed using methylglyoxal to mimic glycative stress. Sulforaphane was able to counteract methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, ROS production, and glycative stress, likely through glyoxalase 1 up-regulation. In this study, we reported for the first time new molecular targets of sulforaphane, such as MIF, CLP36 and glyoxalase 1. In particular, we gave new insights into the anti-glycative role of sulforaphane in cardiomyocytes, confirming its pleiotropic behavior in counteracting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24349480

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Hane, James K.; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L.; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about how R. solani causes disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility to R. solani when expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806. PMID:26811357

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Rhizoctonia solani Identifies Infection-specific, Redox Associated Proteins and Insight into Adaptation to Different Plant Hosts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jonathan P; Hane, James K; Stoll, Thomas; Pain, Nicholas; Hastie, Marcus L; Kaur, Parwinder; Hoogland, Christine; Gorman, Jeffrey J; Singh, Karam B

    2016-04-01

    Rhizoctonia solaniis an important root infecting pathogen of a range of food staples worldwide including wheat, rice, maize, soybean, potato and others. Conventional resistance breeding strategies are hindered by the absence of tractable genetic resistance in any crop host. Understanding the biology and pathogenicity mechanisms of this fungus is important for addressing these disease issues, however, little is known about howR. solanicauses disease. This study capitalizes on recent genomic studies by applying mass spectrometry based proteomics to identify soluble, membrane-bound and culture filtrate proteins produced under wheat infection and vegetative growth conditions. Many of the proteins found in the culture filtrate had predicted functions relating to modification of the plant cell wall, a major activity required for pathogenesis on the plant host, including a number found only under infection conditions. Other infection related proteins included a high proportion of proteins with redox associated functions and many novel proteins without functional classification. The majority of infection only proteins tested were confirmed to show transcript up-regulation during infection including a thaumatin which increased susceptibility toR. solaniwhen expressed inNicotiana benthamiana In addition, analysis of expression during infection of different plant hosts highlighted how the infection strategy of this broad host range pathogen can be adapted to the particular host being encountered. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002806.

  19. Comparative proteomic analysis of horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes identifies candidate proteins for glyphosate resistance

    PubMed Central

    González-Torralva, Fidel; Brown, Adrian P.; Chivasa, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of glyphosate-resistant horseweed (Conyza canadensis) biotypes is an example of how unrelenting use of a single mode of action herbicide in agricultural weed control drives genetic adaptation in targeted species. While in other weeds glyphosate resistance arose from target site mutation or target gene amplification, the resistance mechanism in horseweed uses neither of these, being instead linked to reduced herbicide uptake and/or translocation. The molecular components underpinning horseweed glyphosate-resistance remain unknown. Here, we used an in vitro leaf disc system for comparative analysis of proteins extracted from control and glyphosate-treated tissues of glyphosate-resistant and glyphosate-susceptible biotypes. Analysis of shikimic acid accumulation, ABC-transporter gene expression, and cell death were used to select a suitable glyphosate concentration and sampling time for enriching proteins pivotal to glyphosate resistance. Protein gel analysis and mass spectrometry identified mainly chloroplast proteins differentially expressed between the biotypes before and after glyphosate treatment. Chloroplasts are the organelles in which the shikimate pathway, which is targeted by glyphosate, is located. Calvin cycle enzymes and proteins of unknown function were among the proteins identified. Our study provides candidate proteins that could be pivotal in engendering resistance and implicates chloroplasts as the primary sites driving glyphosate-resistance in horseweed. PMID:28198407

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Urine to Identify Breast Cancer Biomarker Candidates Using a Label-Free LC-MS/MS Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beretov, Julia; Wasinger, Valerie C.; Millar, Ewan K. A.; Schwartz, Peter; Graham, Peter H.; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease and is a leading cause of death in women. Early diagnosis and monitoring progression of breast cancer are important for improving prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify protein biomarkers in urine for early screening detection and monitoring invasive breast cancer progression. Method We performed a comparative proteomic analysis using ion count relative quantification label free LC-MS/MS analysis of urine from breast cancer patients (n = 20) and healthy control women (n = 20). Results Unbiased label free LC-MS/MS-based proteomics was used to provide a profile of abundant proteins in the biological system of breast cancer patients. Data analysis revealed 59 urinary proteins that were significantly different in breast cancer patients compared to the normal control subjects (p<0.05, fold change >3). Thirty-six urinary proteins were exclusively found in specific breast cancer stages, with 24 increasing and 12 decreasing in their abundance. Amongst the 59 significant urinary proteins identified, a list of 13 novel up-regulated proteins were revealed that may be used to detect breast cancer. These include stage specific markers associated with pre-invasive breast cancer in the ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) samples (Leucine LRC36, MAST4 and Uncharacterized protein CI131), early invasive breast cancer (DYH8, HBA, PEPA, uncharacterized protein C4orf14 (CD014), filaggrin and MMRN2) and metastatic breast cancer (AGRIN, NEGR1, FIBA and Keratin KIC10). Preliminary validation of 3 potential markers (ECM1, MAST4 and filaggrin) identified was performed in breast cancer cell lines by Western blotting. One potential marker MAST4 was further validated in human breast cancer tissues as well as individual human breast cancer urine samples with immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. Conclusions Our results indicate that urine is a useful non-invasive source of biomarkers and the profile patterns

  1. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  2. Yeast Proteome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter

    Yeast organisms, and specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have become model systems for many aspects in fundamental and applied research. Consistently, many papers have been published applying proteome techniques to study these organisms. The review will give an overview on the proteome research performed on yeast systems so far; however, due to the large number of publications, only selected reports can be cited neglecting many more interesting ones in the interest of space. The review will focus on research involving mass spectrom-etry as a basic proteome technique, although many more approaches are relevant for the functional characterization of proteins in the cell, e.g. the yeast two-hybrid system. We will provide an overview on yeasts as models in the context of pro-teome analysis, and explain the basic techniques currently applied in proteome approaches. The main part of the review will deal with a survey on the current status of proteomic studies in yeasts. In a first part of this chapter, we will deal with the currently available proteome maps of yeasts, and in the following part we will discuss studies dealing with fundamental aspects, but also mention proteome studies related to applied microbiology. Finally, we will envisage future perspectives of the proteome technology for studying yeasts, and draw major conclusion on the current status reached in this field of functional genomics.

  3. Ecto-Fc MS identifies ligand-receptor interactions through extracellular domain Fc fusion protein baits and shotgun proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Jeffrey N.; De Wit, Joris; Comoletti, Davide; Zemla, Roland; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-receptor interactions represent essential biological triggers which regulate many diverse and important cellular processes. We have developed a discovery-based proteomic biochemical protocol which couples affinity purification with multidimensional liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry (LCLC-MS/MS) and bioinformatic analysis. Compared to previous approaches, our analysis increases sensitivity, shortens analysis duration, and boosts comprehensiveness. In this protocol, receptor extracellular domains are fused with the Fc region of IgG to generate fusion proteins that are purified from transfected HEK293T cells. These “ecto-Fcs” are coupled to protein A beads and serve as baits for binding assays with prey proteins extracted from rodent brain. After capture, the affinity purified proteins are digested into peptides and comprehensively analyzed by LCLC-MS/MS with ion trap mass spectrometers. In four working days, this protocol can generate shortlists of candidate ligand-receptor protein-protein interactions. Our “Ecto-Fc MS” approach outperforms antibody-based approaches and provides a reproducible and robust framework to identify extracellular ligand – receptor interactions. PMID:25101821

  4. Comparative proteomic analysis of Streptococcus suis biofilms and planktonic cells that identified biofilm infection-related immunogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yi, Li; Wu, Zongfu; Shao, Jing; Liu, Guangjin; Fan, Hongjie; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Chengping

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is a zoonotic pathogen that causes severe disease symptoms in pigs and humans. Biofilms of SS bind to extracellular matrix proteins in both endothelial and epithelial cells and cause persistent infections. In this study, the differences in the protein expression profiles of SS grown either as planktonic cells or biofilms were identified using comparative proteomic analysis. The results revealed the existence of 13 proteins of varying amounts, among which six were upregulated and seven were downregulated in the Streptococcus biofilm compared with the planktonic controls. The convalescent serum from mini-pig, challenged with SS, was applied in a Western blot assay to visualize all proteins from the biofilm that were grown in vitro and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 10 immunoreactive protein spots corresponding to nine unique proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Of these nine proteins, five (Manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase, ornithine carbamoyltransferase, phosphoglycerate kinase, Hypothetical protein SSU05_0403) had no previously reported immunogenic properties in SS to our knowledge. The remaining four immunogenic proteins (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, hemolysin, pyruvate dehydrogenase and DnaK) were identified under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions. In conclusion, the protein expression pattern of SS, grown as biofilm, was different from the SS grown as planktonic cells. These five immunogenic proteins that were specific to SS biofilm cells may potentially be targeted as vaccine candidates to protect against SS biofilm infections. The four proteins common to both biofilm and planktonic cells can be targeted as vaccine candidates to protect against both biofilm and acute infections.

  5. Label-Free LC-MS/MS Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Protein/Pathway Alterations and Candidate Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mahlon A; An, Jiyan; Hood, Brian L; Conrads, Thomas P; Bowser, Robert P

    2015-11-06

    Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome has proven valuable to the study of neurodegenerative disorders. To identify new protein/pathway alterations and candidate biomarkers for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we performed comparative proteomic profiling of CSF from sporadic ALS (sALS), healthy control (HC), and other neurological disease (OND) subjects using label-free liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 1712 CSF proteins were detected and relatively quantified by spectral counting. Levels of several proteins with diverse biological functions were significantly altered in sALS samples. Enrichment analysis was used to link these alterations to biological pathways, which were predominantly related to inflammation, neuronal activity, and extracellular matrix regulation. We then used our CSF proteomic profiles to create a support vector machines classifier capable of discriminating training set ALS from non-ALS (HC and OND) samples. Four classifier proteins, WD repeat-containing protein 63, amyloid-like protein 1, SPARC-like protein 1, and cell adhesion molecule 3, were identified by feature selection and externally validated. The resultant classifier distinguished ALS from non-ALS samples with 83% sensitivity and 100% specificity in an independent test set. Collectively, our results illustrate the utility of CSF proteomic profiling for identifying ALS protein/pathway alterations and candidate disease biomarkers.

  6. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  7. Ptcorp gene induced by cold stress was identified by proteomic analysis in leaves of Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    PubMed

    Long, Guiyou; Song, Jinyu; Deng, Ziniu; Liu, Jie; Rao, Liqun

    2012-05-01

    A proteomic approach was employed to investigate the cold stress-responsive proteins in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.), which is a well-known cold tolerant citrus relative and widely used as rootstock in China. Two-year-old potted seedlings were exposed to freezing temperature (-6°C) for 50 min (nonlethal) and 80 min (lethal), and the total proteins were isolated from leaves of the treated plants. Nine differentially accumulated proteins over 2-fold changes in abundance were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, a resistance protein induced by the nonlethal cold treatment (protein spot #2 from P. trifoliata) was selected as target sequence for degenerated primer design. By using the designed primers, a PCR product of about 700 bp size was amplified from P. trifoliata genomic DNA, which was further cloned and sequenced. A nucleotide sequence of 676 bp was obtained and named Ptcorp. Blast retrieval showed that Ptcorp shared 88% homology with an EST of cold acclimated Bluecrop (Vaccinium corymbosum) library (Accession number: CF811080), indicating that Ptcorp had association with cold acclimation. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that Ptcorp gene was up-regulated by cold stress which was consistent with the former result of protein expression profile. As the resistance protein (NBS-LRR disease resistance protein family) gene was up-regulated by cold stress in trifoliate orange and satsuma mandarin, it may imply that NBS-LRR genes might be associated with cold resistance in citrus.

  8. System-based proteomic and metabonomic analysis of the Df(16)A+/− mouse identifies potential miR-185 targets and molecular pathway alterations

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, H; Xu, B; Want, E J; Holmes, E; Guest, P C; Karayiorgou, M; Gogos, J A; Bahn, S

    2017-01-01

    Deletions on chromosome 22q11.2 are a strong genetic risk factor for development of schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction. We employed shotgun liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomic and metabonomic profiling approaches on prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal (HPC) tissue from Df(16)A+/− mice, a model of the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Proteomic results were compared with previous transcriptomic profiling studies of the same brain regions. The aim was to investigate how the combined effect of the 22q11.2 deletion and the corresponding miRNA dysregulation affects the cell biology at the systems level. The proteomic brain profiling analysis revealed PFC and HPC changes in various molecular pathways associated with chromatin remodelling and RNA transcription, indicative of an epigenetic component of the 22q11.2DS. Further, alterations in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial function and lipid biosynthesis were identified. Metabonomic profiling substantiated the proteomic findings by identifying changes in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS)-related pathways, such as changes in ceramide phosphoethanolamines, sphingomyelin, carnitines, tyrosine derivates and panthothenic acid. The proteomic findings were confirmed using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, validating decreased levels of several proteins encoded on 22q11.2, increased levels of the computationally predicted putative miR-185 targets UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-peptide N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 110 kDa subunit (OGT1) and kinesin heavy chain isoform 5A and alterations in the non-miR-185 targets serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2B catalytic subunit gamma isoform, neurofilament light chain and vesicular glutamate transporter 1. Furthermore, alterations in the proteins associated with mammalian target of rapamycin signalling were detected in the PFC and with glutamatergic signalling in the hippocampus. Based on the proteomic and metabonomic findings, we were

  9. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identified HSC71 as a Novel Serum Biomarker for Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushi; Cai, Yi; Yu, Hongyan; Li, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most lethal urologic cancers and about 80% of RCC are of the clear-cell type (ccRCC). However, there are no serum biomarkers for the accurate diagnosis of RCC. In this study, we performed a quantitative proteomic analysis on serum samples from ccRCC patients and control group by using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis to access differentially expressed proteins. Overall, 16 proteins were significantly upregulated (ratio > 1.5) and 14 proteins were significantly downregulated (ratio < 0.67) in early-stage ccRCC compared to control group. HSC71 was selected and subsequently validated by Western blot in six independent sets of patients. ELISA subsequently confirmed HSC71 as a potential serum biomarker for distinguishing RCC from benign urologic disease with an operating characteristic curve (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.76~0.96), achieving sensitivity of 87% (95% CI 69%~96%) at a specificity of 80% (95% CI 61~92%) with a threshold of 15 ng/mL. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis led to identification of serum HSC71 as a novel serum biomarker of RCC, particularly useful in early diagnosis of ccRCC. PMID:26425554

  10. A label-free proteome analysis strategy for identifying quantitative changes in erythrocyte membranes induced by red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2012-12-05

    Red blood cells have been extensively studied but many questions regarding membrane properties and pathophysiology remain unanswered. Proteome analysis of red cell membranes is complicated by a very wide dynamic range of protein concentrations as well as the presence of proteins that are very large, very hydrophobic, or heterogeneously glycosylated. This study investigated the removal of other blood cell types, red cell membrane extraction, differing degrees of fractionation using 1-D SDS gels, and label-free quantitative methods to determine optimized conditions for proteomic comparisons of clinical blood samples. The results showed that fractionation of red cell membranes on 1-D SDS gels was more efficient than low-ionic-strength extractions followed by 1-D gel fractionation. When gel lanes were sliced into 30 uniform slices, a good depth of analysis that included the identification of most well-characterized, low-abundance red cell membrane proteins including those present at 500 to 10,000 copies per cell was obtained. Furthermore, the size separation enabled detection of changes due to proteolysis or in vivo protein crosslinking. A combination of Rosetta Elucidator quantitation and subsequent statistical analysis enabled the robust detection of protein differences that could be used to address unresolved questions in red cell disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  11. Comparative Analysis of Mafriwal (Bos taurus × Bos indicus) and Kedah Kelantan (Bos indicus) Sperm Proteome Identifies Sperm Proteins Potentially Responsible for Higher Fertility in a Tropical Climate

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Nathan, Sheila; Karsani, Saiful Anuar

    2013-01-01

    The fertility of zebu cattle (Bos indicus) is higher than that of the European purebred (Bos taurus) and crossbred (Bos taurus × Bos indicus) cattle in tropical areas. To identify proteins related to the higher thermo-tolerance and fertility of Zebu cattle, this study was undertaken to identify differences in sperm proteome between the high fertile Malaysian indigenous zebu cattle (Kedah Kelantan) and the sub-fertile crossbred cattle (Mafriwal). Frozen semen from three high performance bulls from each breed were processed to obtain live and pure sperm. Sperm proteins were then extracted, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis performed to compare proteome profiles. Gel image analysis identified protein spots of interest which were then identified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry quadrupole time-of-flight (LC MS/MS Q-TOF). STRING network analysis predicted interactions between at least 20 of the identified proteins. Among the identified proteins, a number of motility and energy related proteins were present in greater abundance in Kedah Kelantan. Sperm motility evaluation by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis (CASA) confirmed significantly higher motility in Kedah Kelantan. While results from this study do identify proteins that may be responsible for the higher fertility of Kedah Kelantan, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles in sperm fertility. PMID:23903046

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Droplets from Caco-2/TC7 Enterocytes Identifies Novel Modulators of Lipid Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Beilstein, Frauke; Bouchoux, Julien; Rousset, Monique; Demignot, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    In enterocytes, the dynamic accumulation and depletion of triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LD) during fat absorption suggests that cytosolic LD-associated TAG contribute to TAG-rich lipoprotein (TRL) production. To get insight into the mechanisms controlling the storage/secretion balance of TAG, we used as a tool hepatitis C virus core protein, which localizes onto LDs, and thus may modify their protein coat and decrease TRL secretion. We compared the proteome of LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 enterocytes expressing or not hepatitis C virus core protein by a differential proteomic approach (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry). We identified 42 proteins, 21 being involved in lipid metabolism. Perilipin-2/ADRP, which is suggested to stabilize long term-stored TAG, was enriched in LD fractions isolated from Caco-2/TC7 expressing core protein while perilipin-3/TIP47, which is involved in LD synthesis from newly synthesized TAG, was decreased. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated proteins were strongly decreased, suggesting reduced interactions between LD and endoplasmic reticulum, where TRL assembly occurs. For the first time, we show that 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (DHB2), which catalyzes the conversion of 17-keto to 17 β-hydroxysteroids and which was the most highly enriched protein in core expressing cells, is localized to LD and interferes with TAG secretion, probably through its capacity to inactivate testosterone. Overall, we identified potential new players of lipid droplet dynamics, which may be involved in the balance between lipid storage and secretion, and may be altered in enterocytes in pathological conditions such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes and obesity. PMID:23301014

  13. Proteomic analysis of Plasmodium falciparum induced alterations in humans from different endemic regions of India to decipher malaria pathogenesis and identify surrogate markers of severity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kumar, Vipin; Bhave, Amruta; Singh, Vaidhvi; Gogtay, Nithya J; Thatte, Urmila M; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-08

    India significantly contributes to the global malaria burden and has the largest population in the world at risk of malaria. This study aims to analyze alterations in the human serum proteome as a consequence of non-severe and severe infections by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to identify markers related to disease severity and to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and host immune responses. In discovery phase of the study, a comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis was performed using gel-based (2D-DIGE) and gel-free (iTRAQ) techniques on two independent mass spectrometry platforms (ESI-Q-TOF and Q-Exactive mass spectrometry), and selected targets were validated by ELISA. Proteins showing altered serum abundance in falciparum malaria patients revealed the modulation of different physiological pathways including chemokine and cytokine signaling, IL-12 signaling and production in macrophages, complement cascades, blood coagulation, and protein ubiquitination pathways. Some muscle related and cytoskeletal proteins such as titin and galectin-3-binding protein were found to be up-regulated in severe malaria patients. Hemoglobin levels and platelet counts were also found to be drastically lower in severe malaria patients. Identified proteins including serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, apolipoprotein E and haptoglobin, which exhibited sequential alterations in their serum abundance in different severity levels of malaria, could serve as potential predictive markers for disease severity. To the best of our information, we report here the first comprehensive analysis describing the serum proteomic alterations observed in severe P. falciparum infected patients from different malaria endemic regions of India. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  14. Chemical Proteomic Platform To Identify Citrullinated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are routinely used for disease diagnosis. Protein citrullination is also increased in cancer and other autoimmune disorders, suggesting that citrullinated proteins may serve as biomarkers for diseases beyond RA. To identify these citrullinated proteins, we developed biotin-conjugated phenylglyoxal (biotin-PG). Using this probe and our platform technology, we identified >50 intracellular citrullinated proteins. More than 20 of these are involved in RNA splicing, suggesting, for the first time, that citrullination modulates RNA biology. Overall, this chemical proteomic platform will play a key role in furthering our understanding of protein citrullination in rheumatoid arthritis and potentially a wider spectrum of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26360112

  15. Proteomics Analysis to Identify and Characterize the Biomarkers and Physical Activities of Non-Frail and Frail Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Hung; Liao, Chen-Chung; Huang, Chi-Huang; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hsu, Mei-Chich; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Globally, the proportion of older adults is increasing. Older people face chronic conditions such as sarcopenia and functional decline, which are often associated with disability and frailty. Proteomics assay of potential serum biomarkers of frailty in older adults. Older adults were divided into non-frail and frail groups (n = 6 each; 3 males in each group) in accordance with the Chinese-Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale. Adults were measured for grip power and the 6-min walk test for physical activity, and venous blood was sampled after adults fasted for 8 h. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used for proteomics assay. The groups were compared for levels of biomarkers by t test and Pearson correlation analysis. Non-frail and frail subjects had mean age 77.5±0.4 and 77.7±1.6 years, mean height 160.5±1.3 and 156.6±2.9 cm and mean weight 62.5±1.2 and 62.8±2.9 kg, respectively. Physical activity level was lower for frail than non-frail subjects (grip power: 13.8±0.4 vs 26.1±1.2 kg; 6-min walk test: 215.2±17.2 vs 438.3±17.2 m). Among 226 proteins detected, for 31, serum levels were significantly higher for frail than non-frail subjects; serum levels of Ig kappa chain V-III region WOL, COX7A2, and albumin were lower. The serum levels of ANGT, KG and AT were 2.05-, 1.76- and 2.22-fold lower (all p < 0.05; Figure 1A, 2A and 3A) for non-frail than frail subjects and were highly correlated with grip power (Figure 1B, 2B and 3B). Our study found that ANGT, KG and AT levels are known to increase with aging, so degenerated vascular function might be associated with frailty. In total, 226 proteins were revealed proteomics assay; levels of angiotensinogen (ANGT), kininogen-1 (KG) and antithrombin III (AT) were higher in frail than non-frail subjects (11.26±2.21 vs 5.09±0.74; 18.42±1.36 vs 11.64±1.36; 22.23±1.64 vs 9.52±0.95, respectively, p < 0.05). These 3 factors were highly correlated with grip

  16. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Lam, Ho-Sun; Kossenkov, Andrew; Ge, Jingping; Showe, Louise C; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2015-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal protein

  17. Bottom-up and Shotgun Proteomics to Identify a Comprehensive Cochlear Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Darville, Lancia N.F.; Sokolowski, Bernd H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is a commonly used approach that can provide insights into complex biological systems. The cochlear sensory epithelium contains receptors that transduce the mechanical energy of sound into an electro-chemical energy processed by the peripheral and central nervous systems. Several proteomic techniques have been developed to study the cochlear inner ear, such as two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), antibody microarray, and mass spectrometry (MS). MS is the most comprehensive and versatile tool in proteomics and in conjunction with separation methods can provide an in-depth proteome of biological samples. Separation methods combined with MS has the ability to enrich protein samples, detect low molecular weight and hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. Different digestion strategies can be applied to whole lysate or to fractionated protein lysate to enhance peptide and protein sequence coverage. Utilization of different separation techniques, including strong cation exchange (SCX), reversed-phase (RP), and gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) can be applied to reduce sample complexity prior to MS analysis for protein identification. PMID:24638115

  18. Bottom-up and shotgun proteomics to identify a comprehensive cochlear proteome.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2014-03-07

    Proteomics is a commonly used approach that can provide insights into complex biological systems. The cochlear sensory epithelium contains receptors that transduce the mechanical energy of sound into an electro-chemical energy processed by the peripheral and central nervous systems. Several proteomic techniques have been developed to study the cochlear inner ear, such as two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), antibody microarray, and mass spectrometry (MS). MS is the most comprehensive and versatile tool in proteomics and in conjunction with separation methods can provide an in-depth proteome of biological samples. Separation methods combined with MS has the ability to enrich protein samples, detect low molecular weight and hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. Different digestion strategies can be applied to whole lysate or to fractionated protein lysate to enhance peptide and protein sequence coverage. Utilization of different separation techniques, including strong cation exchange (SCX), reversed-phase (RP), and gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE) can be applied to reduce sample complexity prior to MS analysis for protein identification.

  19. Proteomic analysis of breast cancer tissues to identify biomarker candidates by gel-assisted digestion and label-free quantification methods using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi-Na; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Na, MinKyun; Kang, Wonku; Chae, Yee Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Park, Hoyong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a proteomic method that differentiates between matched normal and breast tumor tissues from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive carcinoma from Korean women, to identify biomarker candidates and to understand pathogenesis of breast cancer in protein level. Proteins from tissues obtained by biopsy were extracted by RIPA buffer, digested by the gel-assisted method, and analyzed by nano-UPLC-MS/MS. From proteomic analysis based on label-free quantitation strategy, a non-redundant list of 298 proteins was identified from the normal and tumor tissues, and 244 proteins were quantified using IDEAL-Q software. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed two patterns classified as two groups, invasive carcinoma and DCIS, suggesting a difference between two carcinoma at the protein expression level as expected. Differentially expressed proteins in tumor tissues compared to the corresponding normal tissues were related to three biological pathways: antigen-processing and presentation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, and complement and coagulation cascades. Among them, the up-regulation of calreticulin (CRT) and protein disulfide isomerase A3 (PDIA3) was confirmed by Western blot analysis. In conclusion, this study showed the possibility of identifying biomarker candidates for breast cancer using tissues and might help to understand the pathophysiology of this cancer at the protein level.

  20. Proteomic analysis of the human KEOPS complex identifies C14ORF142 as a core subunit homologous to yeast Gon7

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Leo C.K.; Maisonneuve, Pierre; Szilard, Rachel K.; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Ng, Timothy F.; Manczyk, Noah; Huang, Hao; Laister, Rob; Caudy, Amy A.; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Durocher, Daniel; Sicheri, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The KEOPS/EKC complex is a tRNA modification complex involved in the biosynthesis of N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (t6A), a universally conserved tRNA modification found on ANN-codon recognizing tRNAs. In archaea and eukaryotes, KEOPS is composed of OSGEP/Kae1, PRPK/Bud32, TPRKB/Cgi121 and LAGE3/Pcc1. In fungi, KEOPS contains an additional subunit, Gon7, whose orthologs outside of fungi, if existent, remain unidentified. In addition to displaying defective t6A biosynthesis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains harboring KEOPS mutations are compromised for telomere homeostasis, growth and transcriptional co-activation. To identify a Gon7 ortholog in multicellular eukaryotes as well as to uncover KEOPS-interacting proteins that may link t6A biosynthesis to the diverse set of KEOPS mutant phenotypes, we conducted a proteomic analysis of human KEOPS. This work identified 152 protein interactors, one of which, C14ORF142, interacted strongly with all four KEOPS subunits, suggesting that it may be a core component of human KEOPS. Further characterization of C14ORF142 revealed that it shared a number of biophysical and biochemical features with fungal Gon7, suggesting that C14ORF142 is the human ortholog of Gon7. In addition, our proteomic analysis identified specific interactors for different KEOPS subcomplexes, hinting that individual KEOPS subunits may have additional functions outside of t6A biosynthesis. PMID:27903914

  1. Directed shotgun proteomics guided by saturated RNA-seq identifies a complete expressed prokaryotic proteome

    PubMed Central

    Omasits, Ulrich; Quebatte, Maxime; Stekhoven, Daniel J.; Fortes, Claudia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Robinson, Mark D.; Dehio, Christoph; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotes, due to their moderate complexity, are particularly amenable to the comprehensive identification of the protein repertoire expressed under different conditions. We applied a generic strategy to identify a complete expressed prokaryotic proteome, which is based on the analysis of RNA and proteins extracted from matched samples. Saturated transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq provided an endpoint estimate of the protein-coding genes expressed under two conditions which mimic the interaction of Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Directed shotgun proteomics experiments were carried out on four subcellular fractions. By specifically targeting proteins which are short, basic, low abundant, and membrane localized, we could eliminate their initial underrepresentation compared to the estimated endpoint. A total of 1250 proteins were identified with an estimated false discovery rate below 1%. This represents 85% of all distinct annotated proteins and ∼90% of the expressed protein-coding genes. Genes that were detected at the transcript but not protein level, were found to be highly enriched in several genomic islands. Furthermore, genes that lacked an ortholog and a functional annotation were not detected at the protein level; these may represent examples of overprediction in genome annotations. A dramatic membrane proteome reorganization was observed, including differential regulation of autotransporters, adhesins, and hemin binding proteins. Particularly noteworthy was the complete membrane proteome coverage, which included expression of all members of the VirB/D4 type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor. PMID:23878158

  2. Directed Shotgun Proteomics Guided by Saturated RNA-seq Identifies a Complete Expressed Prokaryotic Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Omasits, U.; Quebatte, Maxime; Stekhoven, Daniel J.; Fortes, Claudia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Robinson, Mark D.; Dehio, Christoph; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2013-11-01

    Prokaryotes, due to their moderate complexity, are particularly amenable to the comprehensive identification of the protein repertoire expressed under different conditions. We applied a generic strategy to identify a complete expressed prokaryotic proteome, which is based on the analysis of RNA and proteins extracted from matched samples. Saturated transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq provided an endpoint estimate of the protein-coding genes expressed under two conditions which mimic the interaction of Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Directed shotgun proteomics experiments were carried out on four subcellular fractions. By specifically targeting proteins which are short, basic, low abundant, and membrane localized, we could eliminate their initial underrepresentation compared to the estimated endpoint. A total of 1250 proteins were identified with an estimated false discovery rate below 1%. This represents 85% of all distinct annotated proteins and ~90% of the expressed protein-coding genes. Genes that were detected at the transcript but not protein level, were found to be highly enriched in several genomic islands. Furthermore, genes that lacked an ortholog and a functional annotation were not detected at the protein level; these may represent examples of overprediction in genome annotations. A dramatic membrane proteome reorganization was observed, including differential regulation of autotransporters, adhesins, and hemin binding proteins. Particularly noteworthy was the complete membrane proteome coverage, which included expression of all members of the VirB/D4 type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor.

  3. Serum proteomic analysis identifies sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism and inflammation profiles in adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The higher prevalence of Asperger Syndrome (AS) and other autism spectrum conditions in males has been known for many years. However, recent multiplex immunoassay profiling studies have shown that males and females with AS have distinct proteomic changes in serum. Methods Here, we analysed sera from adults diagnosed with AS (males = 14, females = 16) and controls (males = 13, females = 16) not on medication at the time of sample collection, using a combination of multiplex immunoassay and shotgun label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MSE). The main objective was to identify sex-specific serum protein changes associated with AS. Results Multiplex immunoassay profiling led to identification of 16 proteins that were significantly altered in AS individuals in a sex-specific manner. Three of these proteins were altered in females (ADIPO, IgA, APOA1), seven were changed in males (BMP6, CTGF, ICAM1, IL-12p70, IL-16, TF, TNF-alpha) and six were changed in both sexes but in opposite directions (CHGA, EPO, IL-3, TENA, PAP, SHBG). Shotgun LC-MSE profiling led to identification of 13 serum proteins which had significant sex-specific changes in the AS group and, of these, 12 were altered in females (APOC2, APOE, ARMC3, CLC4K, FETUB, GLCE, MRRP1, PTPA, RN149, TLE1, TRIPB, ZC3HE) and one protein was altered in males (RGPD4). The free androgen index in females with AS showed an increased ratio of 1.63 compared to controls. Conclusion Taken together, the serum multiplex immunoassay and shotgun LC-MSE profiling results indicate that adult females with AS had alterations in proteins involved mostly in lipid transport and metabolism pathways, while adult males with AS showed changes predominantly in inflammation signalling. These results provide further evidence that the search for biomarkers or novel drug targets in AS may require stratification into male and female subgroups, and could lead to the development of novel targeted treatment

  4. Proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic studies of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have recently received great attention because this animal is a useful model platform for the in vivo study of various biological problems relevant to human disease. In general, proteomic analysis is performed in order to address a...

  5. Proteomic analysis in cardiovascular research.

    PubMed

    Oda, Teiji; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi

    2016-03-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry technology and bioinformatics using clinical human samples have expanded quantitative proteomics in cardiovascular research. There are two major proteomic strategies: namely, "gel-based" or "gel-free" proteomics coupled with either "top-down" or "bottom-up" mass spectrometry. Both are introduced into the proteomic analysis using plasma or serum sample targeting 'biomarker" searches of aortic aneurysm and tissue samples, such as from the aneurysmal wall, calcific aortic valve, or myocardial tissue, investigating pathophysiological protein interactions and post-translational modifications. We summarize the proteomic studies that analyzed human samples taken during cardiovascular surgery to investigate disease processes, in order to better understand the system-wide changes behind known molecular factors and specific signaling pathways.

  6. New Molecular Features of Colorectal Cancer Identified - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) who comprehensively analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples, have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples

  7. Surface proteome analysis identifies platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha as a critical mediator of transforming growth factor-beta-induced collagen secretion.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Noskovičová, Nina; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Lindner, Michael; Hatz, Rudolf; Hauck, Stefanie M; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblasts are extracellular matrix-producing cells in the lung. Fibroblast activation by transforming growth factor-beta leads to myofibroblast-differentiation and increased extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of pulmonary fibrosis. While fibroblast function with respect to migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix deposition has been well-explored, little is known about the surface proteome of lung fibroblasts in general and its specific response to fibrogenic growth factors, in particular transforming growth factor-beta. We thus performed a cell-surface proteome analysis of primary human lung fibroblasts in presence/absence of transforming growth factor-beta, followed by characterization of our findings using FACS analysis, Western blot, and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. We identified 213 surface proteins significantly regulated by transforming growth factor-beta, platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha being one of the top down-regulated proteins. Transforming growth factor beta-induced downregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha induced upregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta expression and phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream target of platelet derived growth factor signaling. Importantly, collagen type V expression and secretion was strongly increased after forced knockdown of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha, an effect that was potentiated by transforming growth factor-beta. We therefore show previously underappreciated cross-talk of transforming growth factor-beta and platelet derived growth factor signaling in human lung fibroblasts, resulting in increased extracellular matrix deposition in a platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha dependent manner. These findings are of particular importance for the treatment of lung fibrosis patients with high pulmonary transforming growth factor-beta activity.

  8. Proteomic analysis of phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea as a potential tool for identifying pathogenicity factors, therapeutic targets and for basic research.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Acero, Francisco Javier; Jorge, Inmaculada; Calvo, Enrique; Vallejo, Inmaculada; Carbú, María; Camafeita, Emilio; Garrido, Carlos; López, Juan Antonio; Jorrin, Jesús; Cantoral, Jesús Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus causing disease in a substantial number of economically important crops. In an attempt to identify putative fungal virulence factors, the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) protein profile from two B. cinerea strains differing in virulence and toxin production were compared. Protein extracts from fungal mycelium obtained by tissue homogenization were analyzed. The mycelial 2-DE protein profile revealed the existence of qualitative and quantitative differences between the analyzed strains. The lack of genomic data from B. cinerea required the use of peptide fragmentation data from MALDI-TOF/TOF and ESI ion trap for protein identification, resulting in the identification of 27 protein spots. A significant number of spots were identified as malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The different expression patterns revealed by some of the identified proteins could be ascribed to differences in virulence between strains. Our results indicate that proteomic analysis are becoming an important tool to be used as a starting point for identifying new pathogenicity factors, therapeutic targets and for basic research on this plant pathogen in the postgenomic era.

  9. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  10. Proteome analysis of Apis mellifera royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Schönleben, Simone; Sickmann, Albert; Mueller, Martin J; Reinders, Joerg

    2007-10-01

    Royal jelly plays a pivotal role in the development of honey bee larvae. However, while various health promoting properties of royal jelly have been reported, most of the active substances within royal jelly that lead to these properties are still unknown. Since up to 50% (dry mass) of royal jelly is protein, royal jelly proteome analysis is a promising starting point for attempts to identify the proteins that provide health-promoting effects. However, the comprehensive analysis of royal jelly proteins is hampered by the enormous abundance of some proteins in the major royal jelly protein family, which constitutes 80-90% of the royal jelly proteome. The high heterogeneity of these proteins is an additional challenge for proteomic analysis, since it necessitates the use of analytical techniques that provide high resolution and a wide dynamic range. The application of individual methods such as 2D-PAGE or multidimensional chromatography can only yield certain subpopulations of a proteome due to the specific bias of each method. We applied different methods for the prefractionation and separation of royal jelly proteins in order to circumvent the shortcomings of the individual techniques and achieve a high coverage of the royal jelly proteome. In this way, we were able to identify 20 different proteins in total, as well as to show a very high degree of cleavage of different proteins of the major royal jelly protein family. Furthermore, we investigated the protein phosphorylation of royal jelly proteins, and identified and located two phosphorylation sites within venom protein 2.

  11. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  12. Extracellular matrix proteomics identifies molecular signature of symptomatic carotid plaques

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Sarah R.; Willeit, Karin; Didangelos, Athanasios; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Skroblin, Philipp; Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Lengquist, Mariette; Rungger, Gregor; Kapustin, Alexander; Kedenko, Ludmilla; Molenaar, Chris; Lu, Ruifang; Barwari, Temo; Suna, Gonca; Iglseder, Bernhard; Paulweber, Bernhard; Willeit, Peter; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Davies, Alun H.; Monaco, Claudia; Hedin, Ulf; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification of patients with high-risk atherosclerotic plaques prior to the manifestation of clinical events remains challenging. Recent findings question histology- and imaging-based definitions of the “vulnerable plaque,” necessitating an improved approach for predicting onset of symptoms. METHODS. We performed a proteomics comparison of the vascular extracellular matrix and associated molecules in human carotid endarterectomy specimens from 6 symptomatic versus 6 asymptomatic patients to identify a protein signature for high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Proteomics data were integrated with gene expression profiling of 121 carotid endarterectomies and an analysis of protein secretion by lipid-loaded human vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, epidemiological validation of candidate biomarkers was performed in two community-based studies. RESULTS. Proteomics and at least one of the other two approaches identified a molecular signature of plaques from symptomatic patients that comprised matrix metalloproteinase 9, chitinase 3-like-1, S100 calcium binding protein A8 (S100A8), S100A9, cathepsin B, fibronectin, and galectin-3-binding protein. Biomarker candidates measured in 685 subjects in the Bruneck study were associated with progression to advanced atherosclerosis and incidence of cardiovascular disease over a 10-year follow-up period. A 4-biomarker signature (matrix metalloproteinase 9, S100A8/S100A9, cathepsin D, and galectin-3-binding protein) improved risk prediction and was successfully replicated in an independent cohort, the SAPHIR study. CONCLUSION. The identified 4-biomarker signature may improve risk prediction and diagnostics for the management of cardiovascular disease. Further, our study highlights the strength of tissue-based proteomics for biomarker discovery. FUNDING. UK: British Heart Foundation (BHF); King’s BHF Center; and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Center based at Guy’s and St

  13. Multi-Scale Genomic, Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines to Identify Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Briffa, Romina; Um, Inhwa; Faratian, Dana; Zhou, Ying; Turnbull, Arran K.; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Selecting colorectal cancer (CRC) patients likely to respond to therapy remains a clinical challenge. The objectives of this study were to establish which genes were differentially expressed with respect to treatment sensitivity and relate this to copy number in a panel of 15 CRC cell lines. Copy number variations of the identified genes were assessed in a cohort of CRCs. IC50’s were measured for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ-235, a PI3K/mTOR inhibitor. Cell lines were profiled using array comparative genomic hybridisation, Illumina gene expression analysis, reverse phase protein arrays, and targeted sequencing of KRAS hotspot mutations. Frequent gains were observed at 2p, 3q, 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 12p, 13q, 14q, and 17q and losses at 2q, 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 14q, 18q, and 20p. Frequently gained regions contained EGFR, PIK3CA, MYC, SMO, TRIB1, FZD1, and BRCA2, while frequently lost regions contained FHIT and MACROD2. TRIB1 was selected for further study. Gene enrichment analysis showed that differentially expressed genes with respect to treatment response were involved in Wnt signalling, EGF receptor signalling, apoptosis, cell cycle, and angiogenesis. Stepwise integration of copy number and gene expression data yielded 47 candidate genes that were significantly correlated. PDCD6 was differentially expressed in all three treatment responses. Tissue microarrays were constructed for a cohort of 118 CRC patients and TRIB1 and MYC amplifications were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridisation. TRIB1 and MYC were amplified in 14.5% and 7.4% of the cohort, respectively, and these amplifications were significantly correlated (p≤0.0001). TRIB1 protein expression in the patient cohort was significantly correlated with pERK, Akt, and Caspase 3 expression. In conclusion, a set of candidate predictive biomarkers for 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and BEZ235 are described that warrant further study. Amplification of the putative oncogene TRIB1 has been described for

  14. Proteome analysis of wheat lemma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun-Hee; Kimura, Makoto; Higa-Nishiyama, Arisa; Dohmae, Naoshi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Jong, Seung-Keun; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    2003-11-01

    We report here for the first time on the construction of proteomes from wheat lemma at the anthesis stage. After transfer of lemma proteins to polyvinylidene difluoride membranes, seventy larger spots were subjected to peptide sequence analysis; the amino acid sequences could be described for forty-eight of these proteins. The result suggested that wheat proteins were less N-terminally blocked compared to rice proteins, which are known to have a much higher ratio of N-terminal blocks. We further analyzed the internal sequences of eight blocked proteins by the Cleveland peptide mapping method. Out of these total 56 amino acid sequences, forty-one could be assigned to the corresponding expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The expression profile of lemma proteins was generally similar to that of leaf, and the majority of identified proteins were related to cellular metabolisms. We analyzed the internal sequences of one protein spot present in lemma, which was not present in leaf.

  15. Systematic proteomic analysis identifies β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 2 and 1 (BACE2 and BACE1) substrates in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Ina; Selevsek, Nathalie; Esterházy, Daria; Schmidt, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-04-12

    Expansion of functional islet β-cell mass is a physiological process to compensate for increased insulin demand. Deficiency or pharmacological inhibition of the plasma membrane protease BACE2 enhances pancreatic β-cell function and proliferation, and therefore BACE2 is a putative target for the therapeutic intervention under conditions of β-cell loss and dysfunction. To gain a molecular understanding of BACE2 function, we performed a systematic and quantitative proteomic analysis to map the natural substrate repertoire of BACE2 and its homologue BACE1 in β-cells. Loss- and gain-of-function studies of in vitro and in vivo models identified specific and functionally heterogeneous targets. Our analysis revealed non-redundant roles of BACE1/2 in ectodomain shedding with BACE1 regulating a broader and BACE2 a more distinct set of β-cell-enriched substrates including two proteins of the seizure 6 protein family (SEZ6L and SEZ6L2). Lastly, our study provides insights into the global β-cell sheddome and secretome, an important prerequisite to uncover novel mechanisms contributing to β-cell homeostasis and a resource for therapeutic target and biomarker discoveries.

  16. Proteome Analysis of Peroxisomes from Etiolated Arabidopsis Seedlings Identifies a Peroxisomal Protease Involved in β-Oxidation and Development1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Sheng; Yang, Pingfang; Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Kaur, Navneet; Switzenberg, Robert; Aung, Kyaw; Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development. Peroxisomes in seeds/dark-grown seedlings and in photosynthetic tissues constitute two major subtypes of plant peroxisomes, which had been postulated to contain distinct primary biochemical properties. Multiple in-depth proteomic analyses had been performed on leaf peroxisomes, yet the major makeup of peroxisomes in seeds or dark-grown seedlings remained unclear. To compare the metabolic pathways of the two dominant plant peroxisomal subtypes and discover new peroxisomal proteins that function specifically during seed germination, we performed proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. The detection of 77 peroxisomal proteins allowed us to perform comparative analysis with the peroxisomal proteome of green leaves, which revealed a large overlap between these two primary peroxisomal variants. Subcellular targeting analysis by fluorescence microscopy validated around 10 new peroxisomal proteins in Arabidopsis. Mutant analysis suggested the role of the cysteine protease RESPONSE TO DROUGHT21A-LIKE1 in β-oxidation, seed germination, and growth. This work provides a much-needed road map of a major type of plant peroxisome and has established a basis for future investigations of peroxisomal proteolytic processes to understand their roles in development and in plant interaction with the environment. PMID:24130194

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Engineered Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds promise for the treatment of damaged and diseased tissues, especially for those tissues that do not undergo repair and regeneration readily in situ. Many techniques are available for cell and tissue culturing and differentiation of chondrocytes using a variety of cell types, differentiation methods, and scaffolds. In each case, it is critical to demonstrate the cellular phenotype and tissue composition, with particular attention to the extracellular matrix molecules that play a structural role and that contribute to the mechanical properties of the resulting tissue construct. Mass spectrometry provides an ideal analytical method with which to characterize the full spectrum of proteins produced by tissue-engineered cartilage. Using normal cartilage tissue as a standard, tissue-engineered cartilage can be optimized according to the entire proteome. Proteomic analysis is a complementary approach to biochemical, immunohistochemical, and mechanical testing of cartilage constructs. Proteomics is applicable as an analysis approach to most cartilage constructs generated from a variety of cellular sources including primary chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells, and embryonic stem cells. Additionally, proteomics can be used to optimize novel scaffolds and bioreactor applications, yielding cartilage tissue with the proteomic profile of natural cartilage.

  18. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  19. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  20. Comparative proteomic analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ppGpp-deficient mutant to identify a novel virulence protein required for intracellular survival in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The global ppGpp-mediated stringent response in pathogenic bacteria plays an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), several genes, including virulence genes, are regulated by ppGpp when bacteria are under the stringent response. To understand the control of virulence genes by ppGpp in S. Typhimurium, agarose 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry was used and a comprehensive 2-DE reference map of amino acid-starved S. Typhimurium strain SH100, a derivative of ATCC 14028, was established. Results Of the 366 examined spots, 269 proteins were successfully identified. The comparative analysis of the wild-type and ppGpp0 mutant strains revealed 55 proteins, the expression patterns of which were affected by ppGpp. Using a mouse infection model, we further identified a novel virulence-associated factor, STM3169, from the ppGpp-regulated and Salmonella-specific proteins. In addition, Salmonella strains carrying mutations in the gene encoding STM3169 showed growth defects and impaired growth within macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, we found that expression of stm3169 was controlled by ppGpp and SsrB, a response regulator of the two-component system located on Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. Conclusions A proteomic approach using a 2-DE reference map can prove a powerful tool for analyzing virulence factors and the regulatory network involved in Salmonella pathogenesis. Our results also provide evidence of a global response mediated by ppGpp in S. enterica. PMID:21176126

  1. A Novel Hydrolase Identified by Genomic-Proteomic Analysis of Phenylurea Herbicide Mineralization by Variovorax sp. Strain SRS16▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bers, Karolien; Leroy, Baptiste; Breugelmans, Philip; Albers, Pieter; Lavigne, Rob; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Aamand, Jens; De Mot, René; Wattiez, Ruddy; Springael, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The soil bacterial isolate Variovorax sp. strain SRS16 mineralizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron. The proposed pathway initiates with hydrolysis of linuron to 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) and N,O-dimethylhydroxylamine, followed by conversion of DCA to Krebs cycle intermediates. Differential proteomic analysis showed a linuron-dependent upregulation of several enzymes that fit into this pathway, including an amidase (LibA), a multicomponent chloroaniline dioxygenase, and enzymes associated with a modified chlorocatechol ortho-cleavage pathway. Purified LibA is a monomeric linuron hydrolase of ∼55 kDa with a Km and a Vmax for linuron of 5.8 μM and 0.16 nmol min−1, respectively. This novel member of the amidase signature family is unrelated to phenylurea-hydrolyzing enzymes from Gram-positive bacteria and lacks activity toward other tested phenylurea herbicides. Orthologues of libA are present in all other tested linuron-degrading Variovorax strains with the exception of Variovorax strains WDL1 and PBS-H4, suggesting divergent evolution of the linuron catabolic pathway in different Variovorax strains. The organization of the linuron degradation genes identified in the draft SRS16 genome sequence indicates that gene patchwork assembly is at the origin of the pathway. Transcription analysis suggests that a catabolic intermediate, rather than linuron itself, acts as effector in activation of the pathway. Our study provides the first report on the genetic organization of a bacterial pathway for complete mineralization of a phenylurea herbicide and the first report on a linuron hydrolase in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22003008

  2. Analysis of the Protein Kinase A-Regulated Proteome of Cryptococcus neoformans Identifies a Role for the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, J. M. H.; Caza, M.; Croll, D.; Stoynov, N.; Foster, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes life-threatening meningitis in immunocompromised individuals. The expression of virulence factors, including capsule and melanin, is in part regulated by the cyclic-AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) signal transduction pathway. In this study, we investigated the influence of PKA on the composition of the intracellular proteome to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the regulation that underpins virulence. Through quantitative proteomics, enrichment and bioinformatic analyses, and an interactome study, we uncovered a pattern of PKA regulation for proteins associated with translation, the proteasome, metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, and virulence-related functions. PKA regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in C. neoformans showed a striking parallel with connections between PKA and protein degradation in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and other human diseases. Further investigation of proteasome function with the inhibitor bortezomib revealed an impact on capsule production as well as hypersusceptibility for strains with altered expression or activity of PKA. Parallel studies with tunicamycin also linked endoplasmic reticulum stress with capsule production and PKA. Taken together, the data suggest a model whereby expression of PKA regulatory and catalytic subunits and the activation of PKA influence proteostasis and the function of the endoplasmic reticulum to control the elaboration of the polysaccharide capsule. Overall, this study revealed both broad and conserved influences of the cAMP/PKA pathway on the proteome and identified proteostasis as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:26758180

  3. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sandeep; Singh, Sachin K; Lakshmi, Mula G Meena; Meghah, Vuppalapaty; Bhatti, Bhawna; Swamy, Cherukuvada V Brahmendra; Sundaram, Curam S; Idris, Mohammed M

    2012-06-01

    The epimorphic regeneration of zebrafish caudal fin is rapid and complete. We have analyzed the biomechanism of zebrafish caudal fin regeneration at various time points based on differential proteomics approaches. The spectrum of proteome changes caused by regeneration were analyzed among controls (0 h) and 1, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postamputation involving quantitative differential proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and differential in-gel electrophoresis Orbitrap analysis. A total of 96 proteins were found differentially regulated between the control nonregenerating and regenerating tissues of different time points for having at least 1.5-fold changes. 90 proteins were identified as differentially regulated for regeneration based on differential in-gel electrophoresis analysis between the control and regenerating tissues. 35 proteins were characterized for its expression in all of the five regenerating time points against the control samples. The proteins identified and associated with regeneration were found to be directly allied with various molecular, biological, and cellular functions. Based on network pathway analysis, the identified proteome data set for regeneration was majorly associated in maintaining cellular structure and architecture. Also the proteins were found associated for the cytoskeleton remodeling pathway and cellular immune defense mechanism. The major proteins that were found differentially regulated during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration includes keratin and its 10 isoforms, cofilin 2, annexin a1, skeletal α1 actin, and structural proteins. Annexin A1 was found to be exclusively undergoing phosphorylation during regeneration. The obtained differential proteome and the direct association of the various proteins might lead to a new understanding of the regeneration mechanism.

  4. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  5. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: proteome analysis identifies galectin-10 as a novel marker essential for their anergy and suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Lutter, Petra; Bopp, Tobias; Stoll, Sabine; Becker, Christian; Huter, Eva; Richter, Christoph; Weingarten, Petra; Warger, Tobias; Knop, Jürgen; Müllner, Stefan; Wijdenes, John; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2007-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (CD25(+) Treg cells) direct the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by active suppression of autoaggressive T-cell populations. However, the molecules mediating the anergic state and regulatory function of CD25(+) Treg cells are still elusive. Using differential proteomics, we identified galectin-10, a member of the lectin family, as constitutively expressed in human CD25(+) Treg cells, while they are nearly absent in resting and activated CD4(+) T cells. These data were confirmed on the mRNA and protein levels. Single-cell staining and flow cytometry showed a strictly intracellular expression of galectin-10 in CD25(+) Treg cells. Specific inhibition of galectin-10 restored the proliferative capacity of CD25(+) Treg cells and abrogated their suppressive function. Notably, first identified here as expressed in human T lymphocytes, galectin-10 is essential for the functional properties of CD25(+) Treg cells.

  6. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Tanxi; Wu, Peng; Cui, Ziyou; Chen, Xiulan; Hou, Junjie; Xie, Zhensheng; Xue, Peng; Shi, Linan; Liu, Pingsheng; Yates, John R; Yang, Fuquan

    2009-10-01

    Mitochondria play essential roles in cell physiological processes including energy production, metabolism, ion homeostasis, cell growth, aging and apoptosis. Proteomic strategies have been applied to the study of mitochondria since 1998; these studies have yielded decisive information about the diverse physiological functions of the organelle. As an ideal model biological system, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been widely used in the study of several diseases, such as metabolic diseases and cancer. However, the mitochondrial proteome of C. elegans remains elusive. In this study, we purified mitochondria from C. elegans and performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis using the shotgun proteomic approach. A total of 1117 proteins have been identified with at least two unique peptides. Their physicochemical and functional characteristics, subcellular locations, related biological processes, and associations with human diseases, especially Parkinson's disease, are discussed. An orthology comparison was also performed between C. elegans and four other model organisms for a general depiction of the conservation of mitochondrial proteins during evolution. This study will provide new clues for understanding the role of mitochondria in the physiological and pathological processes of C. elegans.

  7. Proteomic analysis of inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yin, Chunyue; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Jaffe, Howard; Oldfield, Edward H; Zhuang, Zhengping; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2006-08-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM) is the most frequently acquired inflammatory myopathy of late adult life, yet its diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis remain poorly defined. Because effective treatment is lacking, research efforts have intensified to identify specific markers for this debilitating disorder. In this study, proteomic analysis of 4 cases of sporadic IBM was compared with 5 cases of inflammatory myopathy without clinicopathologic features of IBM to distinguish the IBM-specific proteome. Proteins were separated by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and profiled by mass spectrometric sequencing. Expression of most proteins remained unchanged; however, 16 proteins were upregulated and 6 proteins were downregulated in IBM compared with cases of non-IBM inflammatory myopathy. These IBM-specific proteins included apolipoprotein A-I, amyloid beta precursor protein, and transthyretin, which have been associated with amyloidosis; superoxide dismutase, enolase, and various molecular chaperones indicate perturbations in detoxification, energy metabolism, and protein folding, respectively. The IBM-downregulated proteins mainly serve as carriers for muscle contraction and other normal muscle functions. We further applied Western blot and immunohistochemistry to verify the proteomic findings. This study validates proteomics as a powerful tool in the study of muscle disease and indicates a unique pattern of protein expression in IBM.

  8. The MS(E)-proteomic analysis of gliadins and glutenins in wheat grain identifies and quantifies proteins associated with celiac disease and baker's asthma.

    PubMed

    Uvackova, Lubica; Skultety, Ludovit; Bekesova, Slavka; McClain, Scott; Hajduch, Martin

    2013-11-20

    Precise content of gliadin (Glia) and glutenin (Glu) proteins in wheat grain are largely unknown despite their association with celiac disease, various allergies, and physical processing properties of wheat. Developing methods to quantitatively measure clinically relevant proteins could support advancement in understanding exposure thresholds and clinical study design. The aim of this study was to use a data-independent mass spectrometry (MS(E)) approach for quantifying gliadin and glutenin proteins in wheat grain. The biologically replicated analysis yielded concentrations for 34 gliadin and 22 glutenin proteins. The primary focus of this survey was on measuring celiac disease proteins and baker's asthma associated proteins along with the proteins associated with viscoelastic properties of wheat flour and grain texture. The technical coefficients of variation ranged from 0.12 to 1.39 and indicate that MS(E) proteomics is a reproducible quantitative method for the determination of gliadin and glutenin content in the highly complex matrix of protein extracts from wheat grain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Plant Proteomics.

  9. A multidimensional proteomic approach to identify hypertrophy-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Merry L; Goshorn, Danielle K; Comte-Walters, Susana; Hendrick, Jennifer W; Hapke, Elizabeth; Zile, Michael R; Schey, Kevin

    2006-04-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a leading cause of congestive heart failure. The exact mechanisms that control cardiac growth and regulate the transition to failure are not fully understood, in part due to the lack of a complete inventory of proteins associated with LVH. We investigated the proteomic basis of LVH using the transverse aortic constriction model of pressure overload in mice coupled with a multidimensional approach to identify known and novel proteins that may be relevant to the development and maintenance of LVH. We identified 123 proteins that were differentially expressed during LVH, including LIM proteins, thioredoxin, myoglobin, fatty acid binding protein 3, the abnormal spindle-like microcephaly protein (ASPM), and cytoskeletal proteins such as actin and myosin. In addition, proteins with unknown functions were identified, providing new directions for future research in this area. We also discuss common pitfalls and strategies to overcome the limitations of current proteomic technologies. Together, the multidimensional approach provides insight into the proteomic changes that occur in the LV during hypertrophy.

  10. Plant proteome analysis: a 2006 update.

    PubMed

    Jorrín, Jesús V; Maldonado, Ana M; Castillejo, Ma Angeles

    2007-08-01

    This 2006 'Plant Proteomics Update' is a continuation of the two previously published in 'Proteomics' by 2004 (Canovas et al., Proteomics 2004, 4, 285-298) and 2006 (Rossignol et al., Proteomics 2006, 6, 5529-5548) and it aims to bring up-to-date the contribution of proteomics to plant biology on the basis of the original research papers published throughout 2006, with references to those appearing last year. According to the published papers and topics addressed, we can conclude that, as observed for the three previous years, there has been a quantitative, but not qualitative leap in plant proteomics. The full potential of proteomics is far from being exploited in plant biology research, especially if compared to other organisms, mainly yeast and humans, and a number of challenges, mainly technological, remain to be tackled. The original papers published last year numbered nearly 100 and deal with the proteome of at least 26 plant species, with a high percentage for Arabidopsis thaliana (28) and rice (11). Scientific objectives ranged from proteomic analysis of organs/tissues/cell suspensions (57) or subcellular fractions (29), to the study of plant development (12), the effect of hormones and signalling molecules (8) and response to symbionts (4) and stresses (27). A small number of contributions have covered PTMs (8) and protein interactions (4). 2-DE (specifically IEF-SDS-PAGE) coupled to MS still constitutes the almost unique platform utilized in plant proteome analysis. The application of gel-free protein separation methods and 'second generation' proteomic techniques such as multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), and those for quantitative proteomics including DIGE, isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), iTRAQ and stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) still remains anecdotal. This review is divided into seven sections: Introduction, Methodology, Subcellular proteomes, Development, Responses to biotic and abiotic

  11. High confidence proteomic analysis of yeast LDs identifies additional droplet proteins and reveals connections to dolichol synthesis and sterol acetylation[S

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Erin; Guo, Xiuling; Christiano, Romain; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kory, Nora; Harrison, Kenneth; Haas, Joel; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate protein inventories are essential for understanding an organelle’s functions. The lipid droplet (LD) is a ubiquitous intracellular organelle with major functions in lipid storage and metabolism. LDs differ from other organelles because they are bounded by a surface monolayer, presenting unique features for protein targeting to LDs. Many proteins of varied functions have been found in purified LD fractions by proteomics. While these studies have become increasingly sensitive, it is often unclear which of the identified proteins are specific to LDs. Here we used protein correlation profiling to identify 35 proteins that specifically enrich with LD fractions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of these candidates, 30 fluorophore-tagged proteins localize to LDs by microscopy, including six proteins, several with human orthologs linked to diseases, which we newly identify as LD proteins (Cab5, Rer2, Say1, Tsc10, YKL047W, and YPR147C). Two of these proteins, Say1, a sterol deacetylase, and Rer2, a cis-isoprenyl transferase, are enzymes involved in sterol and polyprenol metabolism, respectively, and we show their activities are present in LD fractions. Our results provide a highly specific list of yeast LD proteins and reveal that the vast majority of these proteins are involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:24868093

  12. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  13. A proteomic analysis of human uterine myoma.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, A; Franck, J; Pellegrino, M; De Nuccio, F; Simeone, P; Fiore, G; Di Tommaso, S; Malvasi, A; Tinelli, A; Fournier, I; Salzet, M; Maffia, M; Vergara, D

    2016-03-22

    Uterine leiomyoma is a benign smooth muscle tumor characterized by a high incidence in women of reproductive age. The aetiology of this tumor is still unknown but established risk factors include high levels of female hormones, family history, African ancestry, early age of menarche and obesity. Here, to identify proteomic features associated with this tumor type, we performed a liquid cromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of uterine myomas. The identified proteins were subjected to a gene ontology analysis to generate biological functions, molecular processes, and protein networks that were relevant to the uploaded dataset. Pathway-based analysis was an effective approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and to create biological hypotheses about regulation of our proteins including the identification of upstream regulators and main protein nodes. Moreover, proteomic and in silico data were combined with immunohistochemistry and western blotting to identify a group of proteins representative of some selected pathways, with a dysregulated expression in in myoma, pseudocapsule, and normal myometrium samples. Based on these results, we confirmed the over-expression of extracellular matrix components, and estrogen and progesterone receptors in uterine myomas, and proposed biological networks, canonical pathways and functions that may be relevant to the pathophysiology of this tumor.

  14. A Proteomic Approach to Identify Phosphorylation-Dependent Targets of BRCT Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0233 TITLE: A Proteomic Approach to...COVERED (From - To) 1 Mar 2006 – 28 Feb 2007 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Proteomic Approach to Identify Phosphorylation-Dependent Targets of BRCT...this award) BRCT domain, peptide library, OPAL, peptide array, proteomics , genome wide, signal transduction pathways, androgen receptor 16. SECURITY

  15. Proteomic analysis of placentas from cloned cat embryos identifies a set of differentially expressed proteins related to oxidative damage, senescence and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jae-Il; Bae, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Deb, Gautam K; Kim, Myeong-Ok; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Han, Chang-Hee; Kong, Il-Keun

    2011-12-01

    Production of cloned mammals by somatic cell nuclear transfer is associated with functional and structural abnormalities of placentation and with abnormal fetal development. A proteomic analysis was performed in domestic cats (Felis catus) to compare cloned term placentas (CTP) obtained from cesarean section (CS) to control placentas obtained from CS or vaginal delivery. The expression of 20 proteins was altered in CTP (p<0.05) compared to control placentas. The two control groups showed that the method of delivery, vaginal delivery or CS, did not affect protein expression (p>0.05). A total of 13 proteins were up-regulated in CTP, including apoptosis-related cathepsin D (CD), annexin A1 and heat shock protein 27 (HSP 27), and seven proteins were down-regulated in CTP, including prohibitin (PHB). The expression of PHB and CD was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. The abnormal expression of PHB and CD correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species, leading to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and telomeric DNA, which are associated with cellular senescence and apoptosis. In summary, a specific pattern of abnormal protein expression is associated with the impaired development and functions of cloned placentas and hence with decreased fetal viability. Strategies aimed at restoring normal placental protein expression may increase the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer and transgenic cat production and help restore endangered species.

  16. Deep transcriptome-sequencing and proteome analysis of the hydrothermal vent annelid Alvinella pompejana identifies the CvP-bias as a robust measure of eukaryotic thermostability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alvinella pompejana is an annelid worm that inhabits deep-sea hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean. Living at a depth of approximately 2500 meters, these worms experience extreme environmental conditions, including high temperature and pressure as well as high levels of sulfide and heavy metals. A. pompejana is one of the most thermotolerant metazoans, making this animal a subject of great interest for studies of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Results In order to complement existing EST resources we performed deep sequencing of the A. pompejana transcriptome. We identified several thousand novel protein-coding transcripts, nearly doubling the sequence data for this annelid. We then performed an extensive survey of previously established prokaryotic thermoadaptation measures to search for global signals of thermoadaptation in A. pompejana in comparison with mesophilic eukaryotes. In an orthologous set of 457 proteins, we found that the best indicator of thermoadaptation was the difference in frequency of charged versus polar residues (CvP-bias), which was highest in A. pompejana. CvP-bias robustly distinguished prokaryotic thermophiles from prokaryotic mesophiles, as well as the thermophilic fungus Chaetomium thermophilum from mesophilic eukaryotes. Experimental values for thermophilic proteins supported higher CvP-bias as a measure of thermal stability when compared to their mesophilic orthologs. Proteome-wide mean CvP-bias also correlated with the body temperatures of homeothermic birds and mammals. Conclusions Our work extends the transcriptome resources for A. pompejana and identifies the CvP-bias as a robust and widely applicable measure of eukaryotic thermoadaptation. Reviewer This article was reviewed by Sándor Pongor, L. Aravind and Anthony M. Poole. PMID:23324115

  17. In-depth Analysis of the Magnaporthe oryzae Conidial Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Emine; Franck, William L.; Oh, Yeonyee; Dean, Ralph A.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) is the causative agent of rice blast disease and presents a significant threat to worldwide rice production. To establish the groundwork for future research on the pathogenic development of M. oryzae, a global proteomic study of conidia was performed. The filter aided sample preparation method (FASP) and anion StageTip fractionation combined with long, optimized shallow 210 min nanoLC gradients prior to mass spectrometry analysis on an Orbitrap XL was applied, which resulted in a doubling of protein identifications in comparison to our previous GeLC analysis. Herein, we report the identification of 2912 conidial proteins at a 1% protein false discovery rate (FDR) and we present the most extensive study performed on M. oryzae conidia to date. A similar distribution between identified proteins and the predicted proteome was observed when subcellular localization analysis was performed, suggesting the detected proteins build a representative portion of the predicted proteome. A higher percentage of cytoplasmic proteins (associated with translation, energy and metabolism) were observed in the conidial proteome relative to the whole predicted proteome. Conversely, nuclear and extracellular proteins were less well represented in the conidial proteome. Further analysis by gene ontology revealed biological insights into identified proteins important for central metabolic processes and the physiology of conidia. PMID:23039028

  18. Proteome analysis in the assessment of ageing.

    PubMed

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Pich, Andreas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-11-01

    Based on demographic trends, the societies in many developed countries are facing an increasing number and proportion of people over the age of 65. The raise in elderly populations along with improved health-care will be concomitant with an increased prevalence of ageing-associated chronic conditions like cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory diseases, arthritis, dementia, and diabetes mellitus. This is expected to pose unprecedented challenges both for individuals and societies and their health care systems. An ultimate goal of ageing research is therefore the understanding of physiological ageing and the achievement of 'healthy' ageing by decreasing age-related pathologies. However, on a molecular level, ageing is a complex multi-mechanistic process whose contributing factors may vary individually, partly overlap with pathological alterations, and are often poorly understood. Proteome analysis potentially allows modelling of these multifactorial processes. This review summarises recent proteomic research on age-related changes identified in animal models and human studies. We combined this information with pathway analysis to identify molecular mechanisms associated with ageing. We identified some molecular pathways that are affected in most or even all organs and others that are organ-specific. However, appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm these findings based in in silico evaluation.

  19. Genetic and proteomic approaches to identify cancer drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Roti, G; Stegmaier, K

    2012-01-01

    While target-based small-molecule discovery has taken centre-stage in the pharmaceutical industry, there are many cancer-promoting proteins not easily addressed with a traditional target-based screening approach. In order to address this problem, as well as to identify modulators of biological states in the absence of knowing the protein target of the state switch, alternative phenotypic screening approaches, such as gene expression-based and high-content imaging, have been developed. With this renewed interest in phenotypic screening, however, comes the challenge of identifying the binding protein target(s) of small-molecule hits. Emerging technologies have the potential to improve the process of target identification. In this review, we discuss the application of genomic (gene expression-based), genetic (short hairpin RNA and open reading frame screening), and proteomic approaches to protein target identification. PMID:22166799

  20. Integrative proteomic and gene expression analysis identify potential biomarkers for adjuvant trastuzumab resistance: analysis from the Fin-her phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Debora; Rothé, Françoise; Vincent, Delphine; Ignatiadis, Michael; Desmedt, Christine; Salgado, Roberto; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Loi, Sherene; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Trastuzumab is a remarkably effective therapy for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) - positive breast cancer (BC). However, not all women with high levels of HER2 benefit from trastuzumab. By integrating mRNA and protein expression data from Reverse-Phase Protein Array Analysis (RPPA) in HER2-positive BC, we developed gene expression metagenes that reflect pathway activation levels. Next we assessed the ability of these metagenes to predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab using gene expression data from two independent datasets. 10 metagenes passed external validation (false discovery rate [fdr] < 0.05) and showed biological relevance with their pathway of origin. These metagenes were further screened for their association with trastuzumab resistance. An association with trastuzumab resistance was observed and validated only for the AnnexinA1 metagene (ANXA1). In the randomised phase III Fin-her study, tumours with low levels of the ANXA1 metagene showed a benefit from trastuzumab (multivariate: hazard ratio [HR] for distant recurrence = 0.16[95%CI 0.05–0.5]; p = 0.002; fdr = 0.03), while high expression levels of the ANXA1 metagene were associated with a lack of benefit to trastuzmab (HR = 1.29[95%CI 0.55–3.02]; p = 0.56). The association of ANXA1 with trastuzumab resistance was successfully validated in an independent series of subjects who had received trastuzumab with chemotherapy (Log Rank; p = 0.01). In conclusion, in HER2-positive BC, some proteins are associated with distinct gene expression profiles. Our findings identify the ANXA1metagene as a novel biomarker for trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26358523

  1. Integrative proteomic and gene expression analysis identify potential biomarkers for adjuvant trastuzumab resistance: analysis from the Fin-her phase III randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sonnenblick, Amir; Brohée, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Debora; Rothé, Françoise; Vincent, Delphine; Ignatiadis, Michael; Desmedt, Christine; Salgado, Roberto; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Loi, Sherene; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos

    2015-10-06

    Trastuzumab is a remarkably effective therapy for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)--positive breast cancer (BC). However, not all women with high levels of HER2 benefit from trastuzumab. By integrating mRNA and protein expression data from Reverse-Phase Protein Array Analysis (RPPA) in HER2-positive BC, we developed gene expression metagenes that reflect pathway activation levels. Next we assessed the ability of these metagenes to predict resistance to adjuvant trastuzumab using gene expression data from two independent datasets.10 metagenes passed external validation (false discovery rate [fdr] < 0.05) and showed biological relevance with their pathway of origin. These metagenes were further screened for their association with trastuzumab resistance. An association with trastuzumab resistance was observed and validated only for the AnnexinA1 metagene (ANXA1). In the randomised phase III Fin-her study, tumours with low levels of the ANXA1 metagene showed a benefit from trastuzumab (multivariate: hazard ratio [HR] for distant recurrence = 0.16[95%CI 0.05-0.5]; p = 0.002; fdr = 0.03), while high expression levels of the ANXA1 metagene were associated with a lack of benefit to trastuzmab (HR = 1.29[95%CI 0.55-3.02]; p = 0.56). The association of ANXA1 with trastuzumab resistance was successfully validated in an independent series of subjects who had received trastuzumab with chemotherapy (Log Rank; p = 0.01).In conclusion, in HER2-positive BC, some proteins are associated with distinct gene expression profiles. Our findings identify the ANXA1metagene as a novel biomarker for trastuzumab resistance.

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical reactions in a cell are regulated by highly specialized proteins, which are the prime mediators of the cellular phenotype. Therefore the identification, quantitation and characterization of all proteins in a cell are of utmost importance to understand the molecular processes that mediate cellular physiology. With the advent of robust and reliable mass spectrometers that are able to analyze complex protein mixtures within a reasonable timeframe, the systematic analysis of all proteins in a cell becomes feasible. Besides the ongoing improvements of analytical hardware, standardized methods to analyze and study all proteins have to be developed that allow the generation of testable new hypothesis based on the enormous pre-existing amount of biological information. Here we discuss current strategies on how to gather, filter and analyze proteomic data sates using available software packages. PMID:25033288

  3. Comparative proteomics analysis of spermary and ovary in Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianwu; Wang, Dexia; Zhou, Yan; Gu, Yiran; Wu, Di; Wang, Junhua; Hong, Yijiang

    2017-03-01

    We provide the first large-scale quantitative proteomics analysis in Hyriopsis schlegelii. To investigate the proteins expressed in the gonads, a quantitative proteomics approach has been utilized to analyze differentially expressed proteins between the spermary and ovary. In this study, we identified and quantified 2416 proteins in the gonads of Hyriopsis schlegelii. Of these, 559 proteins showed significantly different expression between the spermary and ovary. Some specific proteins expressed in either the spermary or ovary were identified in Hyriopsis schlegelii. In addition, a series of proteins related to gametogenesis were also identified. Compared with previous reports, many proteins in Hyriopsis schlegelii identified here have different expression patterns between the spermary and ovary. The special hermaphroditism in Hyriopsis schlegelii may contribute to these inconsistent results. The provided proteomics data could be considered as a starting point for subsequent studies focusing on the proteins involved in sexual gland development and maturity.

  4. Proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The vitreous humor is a transparent, gelatinous mass whose main constituent is water. It plays an important role in providing metabolic nutrient requirements of the lens, coordinating eye growth and providing support to the retina. It is in close proximity to the retina and reflects many of the changes occurring in this tissue. The biochemical changes occurring in the vitreous could provide a better understanding about the pathophysiological processes that occur in vitreoretinopathy. In this study, we investigated the proteome of normal human vitreous humor using high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Results The vitreous humor was subjected to multiple fractionation techniques followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. We identified 1,205 proteins, 682 of which have not been described previously in the vitreous humor. Most proteins were localized to the extracellular space (24%), cytoplasm (20%) or plasma membrane (14%). Classification based on molecular function showed that 27% had catalytic activity, 10% structural activity, 10% binding activity, 4% cell and 4% transporter activity. Categorization for biological processes showed 28% participate in metabolism, 20% in cell communication and 13% in cell growth. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000957. Conclusion This large catalog of vitreous proteins should facilitate biomedical research into pathological conditions of the eye including diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment and cataract. PMID:25097467

  5. Convergent transcriptomics and proteomics of environmental enrichment and cocaine identifies novel therapeutic strategies for addiction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yafang; Crofton, Elizabeth J; Fan, Xiuzhen; Li, Dingge; Kong, Fanping; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce A; Spratt, Heidi M; Lichti, Cheryl F; Green, Thomas A

    2016-12-17

    Transcriptomic and proteomic approaches have separately proven effective at identifying novel mechanisms affecting addiction-related behavior; however, it is difficult to prioritize the many promising leads from each approach. A convergent secondary analysis of proteomic and transcriptomic results can glean additional information to help prioritize promising leads. The current study is a secondary analysis of the convergence of recently published separate transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of nucleus accumbens (NAc) tissue from rats subjected to environmental enrichment vs. isolation and cocaine self-administration vs. saline. Multiple bioinformatics approaches (e.g. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA)) were used to interrogate these rich data sets. Although there was little correspondence between mRNA vs. protein at the individual target level, good correspondence was found at the level of gene/protein sets, particularly for the environmental enrichment manipulation. These data identify gene sets where there is a positive relationship between changes in mRNA and protein (e.g. glycolysis, ATP synthesis, translation elongation factor activity, etc.) and gene sets where there is an inverse relationship (e.g. ribosomes, Rho GTPase signaling, protein ubiquitination, etc.). Overall environmental enrichment produced better correspondence than cocaine self-administration. The individual targets contributing to mRNA and protein effects were largely not overlapping. As a whole, these results confirm that robust transcriptomic and proteomic data sets can provide similar results at the gene/protein set level even when there is little correspondence at the individual target level and little overlap in the targets contributing to the effects.

  6. Novel royal jelly proteins identified by gel-based and gel-free proteomics.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Lan; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2011-09-28

    Royal jelly (RJ) plays an important role in caste determination of the honeybee; the genetically same female egg develops into either a queen or worker bee depending on the time and amount of RJ fed to the larvae. RJ also has numerous health-promoting properties for humans. Gel-based and gel-free proteomics approaches and high-performance liquid chromatography-chip quadruple time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry were applied to comprehensively investigate the protein components of RJ. Overall, 37 and 22 nonredundant proteins were identified by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and gel-free analysis, respectively, and 19 new proteins were found by these two proteomics approaches. Major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) were identified as the principal protein components of RJ, and proteins related to carbohydrate metabolism such as glucose oxidase, α-glucosidase precursor, and glucose dehydrogenase were also successfully identified. Importantly, the 19 newly identified proteins were mainly classified into three functional categories: oxidation-reduction (ergic53 CG6822-PA isoform A isoform 1, Sec61 CG9539-PA, and ADP/ATP translocase), protein binding (regucalcin and translationally controlled tumor protein CG4800-PA isoform 1), and lipid transport (apolipophorin-III-like protein). These new findings not only significantly increase the RJ proteome coverage but also help to provide new knowledge of RJ for honeybee biology and potential use for human health promotion.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  8. Guaifenesin stone matrix proteomics: a protocol for identifying proteins critical to stone formation.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, A M; Mandel, N S; Cohen, S R; Kleinman, J G; Ahmed, F; Mandel, I C; Wesson, J A

    2016-07-19

    Drug-related kidney stones are a diagnostic problem, since they contain a large matrix (protein) fraction and are frequently incorrectly identified as matrix stones. A urine proteomics study patient produced a guaifenesin stone during her participation, allowing us to both correctly diagnose her disease and identify proteins critical to this drug stone-forming process. The patient provided three random midday urine samples for proteomics studies; one of which contained stone-like sediment with two distinct fractions. These solids were characterized with optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Immunoblotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to quantitatively identify the proteins in urine and stone matrix. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the sediment was 60 % protein and 40 % guaifenesin and its metabolite guaiacol. Of the 156 distinct proteins identified in the proteomic studies, 49 were identified in the two stone-components with approximately 50 % of those proteins also found in this patient's urine. Many proteins observed in this drug-related stone have also been reported in proteomic matrix studies of uric acid and calcium containing stones. More importantly, nine proteins were highly enriched and highly abundant in the stone matrix and 8 were reciprocally depleted in urine, suggesting a critical role for these proteins in guaifenesin stone formation. Accurate stone analysis is critical to proper diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones. Many matrix proteins were common to all stone types, but likely not related to disease mechanism. This protocol defined a small set of proteins that were likely critical to guaifenesin stone formation based on their high enrichment and high abundance in stone matrix, and it should be applied to all stone types.

  9. Ultrasensitive proteome analysis using paramagnetic bead technology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Christopher S; Foehr, Sophia; Garfield, David A; Furlong, Eileen E; Steinmetz, Lars M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain a systems-level understanding of a complex biological system, detailed proteome information is essential. Despite great progress in proteomics technologies, thorough interrogation of the proteome from quantity-limited biological samples is hampered by inefficiencies during processing. To address these challenges, here we introduce a novel protocol using paramagnetic beads, termed Single-Pot Solid-Phase-enhanced Sample Preparation (SP3). SP3 provides a rapid and unbiased means of proteomic sample preparation in a single tube that facilitates ultrasensitive analysis by outperforming existing protocols in terms of efficiency, scalability, speed, throughput, and flexibility. To illustrate these benefits, characterization of 1,000 HeLa cells and single Drosophila embryos is used to establish that SP3 provides an enhanced platform for profiling proteomes derived from sub-microgram amounts of material. These data present a first view of developmental stage-specific proteome dynamics in Drosophila at a single-embryo resolution, permitting characterization of inter-individual expression variation. Together, the findings of this work position SP3 as a superior protocol that facilitates exciting new directions in multiple areas of proteomics ranging from developmental biology to clinical applications. PMID:25358341

  10. Prefractionation techniques in proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Castagna, Annalisa; Herbert, Ben; Reymond, Frederic; Rossier, Joël S

    2003-08-01

    The present review deals with a number of prefractionation protocols in preparation for two-dimensional map analysis, both in the fields of chromatography and in the field of electrophoresis. In the first case, Fountoulaki's groups has reported just about any chromatographic procedure useful as a prefractionation step, including affinity, ion-exchange, and reversed-phase resins. As a result of the various enrichment steps, several hundred new species, previously undetected in unfractionated samples, could be revealed for the first time. Electrophoretic prefractionation protocols include all those electrokinetic methodologies which are performed in free solution, essentially all relying on isoelectric focusing steps. The devices here reviewed include multichamber apparatus, such as the multicompartment electrolyzer with Immobiline membranes, Off-Gel electrophoresis in a multicup device and the Rotofor, an instrument also based on a multichamber system but exploiting the conventional technique of carrier-ampholyte-focusing. Other instruments of interest are the Octopus, a continuous-flow device for isoelectric focusing in a upward flowing liquid curtain, and the Gradiflow, where different pI cuts are obtained by a multistep passage through two compartments buffered at different pH values. It is felt that this panoply of methods could offer a strong step forward in "mining below the tip of the iceberg" for detecting the "unseen proteome".

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Oral Brush Biopsies Identifies Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor as a Promising, Mechanism-Based Oral Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Ondrey, Frank G.; Wuertz, Beverly R. K.; Chen, Xiaobing; Zhu, Yaqin; Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    A decrease in the almost fifty percent mortality rate from oral cancer is needed urgently. Improvements in early diagnosis and more effective preventive treatments could affect such a decrease. Towards this end, we undertook for the first time an in-depth mass spectrometry-based quantitative shotgun proteomics study of non-invasively collected oral brush biopsies. Proteins isolated from brush biopsies from healthy normal tissue, oral premalignant lesion tissue (OPMLs), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and matched control tissue were compared. In replicated proteomic datasets, the secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) protein stood out based on its decrease in abundance in both OPML and OSCC lesion tissues compared to healthy normal tissue. Western blotting in additional brushed biopsy samples confirmed a trend of gradual decreasing SLPI abundance between healthy normal and OPML tissue, with a larger decrease in OSCC lesion tissue. A similar SLPI decrease was observed in-vitro comparing model OPML and OSCC cell lines. In addition, exfoliated oral cells in patients’ whole saliva showed a loss of SLPI correlated with oral cancer progression. These results, combined with proteomics data indicating a decrease in SLPI in matched healthy control tissue from OSCC patients compared to tissue from healthy normal tissue, suggested a systemic decrease of SLPI in oral cells correlated with oral cancer development. Finally, in-vitro experiments showed that treatment with SLPI significantly decreased NF-kB activity in an OPML cell line. The findings indicate anti-inflammatory activity in OPML, supporting a mechanistic role of SLPI in OSCC progression and suggesting its potential for preventative treatment of at-risk oral lesions. Collectively, our results show for the first time the potential for SLPI as a mechanism-based, non-invasive biomarker of oral cancer progression with potential in preventive treatment. PMID:24748380

  12. Proteomic analysis of mature Lagenaria siceraria seed.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Neha; Tajmul, Md; Yadav, Savita

    2015-04-01

    Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd) class belongs to Magnoliopsida family curcurbitaceae that is a traditionally used medicinal plant. Fruit of this plant are widely used as a therapeutic vegetable in various diseases, all over the Asia and Africa. Various parts of this plant like fruit, seed, leaf and root are used as alternative medicine. In the present study, primarily, we have focused on proteomic analysis of L. siceraria seed using phenol extraction method for protein isolation. Twenty-four colloidal coomassie blue stained protein spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) after resolving on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Out of 24 identified protein spots, four were grouped as unidentified proteins which clearly suggest that less work has been done in the direction of plant seed proteomics. These proteins have been found to implicate in various functions such as biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins, serine/threonine kinase activity, plant disease resistance and transferase activity against insects by means of insecticidal and larval growth inhibitory, anti-HIV, antihelmintic and antimicrobial properties. By Blast2GO annotation analysis, amongst the identified proteins of L. siceraria, molecular function for majority of proteins has indispensable role in catalytic activity, few in binding activity and antioxidant activity; it is mostly distributed in cell, organelle, membrane and macromolecular complex. Most of them involved in biological process such as metabolic process, cellular process, response to stimulus, single organism process, signalling, biological recognition, cellular component organization or biogenesis and localization.

  13. Quantitative HDL Proteomics Identifies Peroxiredoxin-6 as a Biomarker of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Burillo, Elena; Jorge, Inmaculada; Martínez-López, Diego; Camafeita, Emilio; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Egido, Jesús; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Vázquez, Jesús; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are complex protein and lipid assemblies whose composition is known to change in diverse pathological situations. Analysis of the HDL proteome can thus provide insight into the main mechanisms underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and potentially detect novel systemic biomarkers. We performed a multiplexed quantitative proteomics analysis of HDLs isolated from plasma of AAA patients (N = 14) and control study participants (N = 7). Validation was performed by western-blot (HDL), immunohistochemistry (tissue), and ELISA (plasma). HDL from AAA patients showed elevated expression of peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), HLA class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-I), retinol-binding protein 4, and paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1), whereas α-2 macroglobulin and C4b-binding protein were decreased. The main pathways associated with HDL alterations in AAA were oxidative stress and immune-inflammatory responses. In AAA tissue, PRDX6 colocalized with neutrophils, vascular smooth muscle cells, and lipid oxidation. Moreover, plasma PRDX6 was higher in AAA (N = 47) than in controls (N = 27), reflecting increased systemic oxidative stress. Finally, a positive correlation was recorded between PRDX6 and AAA diameter. The analysis of the HDL proteome demonstrates that redox imbalance is a major mechanism in AAA, identifying the antioxidant PRDX6 as a novel systemic biomarker of AAA. PMID:27934969

  14. Quantitative HDL Proteomics Identifies Peroxiredoxin-6 as a Biomarker of Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Jorge, Inmaculada; Martínez-López, Diego; Camafeita, Emilio; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Trevisan-Herraz, Marco; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Egido, Jesús; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Meilhac, Olivier; Vázquez, Jesús; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2016-12-09

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) are complex protein and lipid assemblies whose composition is known to change in diverse pathological situations. Analysis of the HDL proteome can thus provide insight into the main mechanisms underlying abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and potentially detect novel systemic biomarkers. We performed a multiplexed quantitative proteomics analysis of HDLs isolated from plasma of AAA patients (N = 14) and control study participants (N = 7). Validation was performed by western-blot (HDL), immunohistochemistry (tissue), and ELISA (plasma). HDL from AAA patients showed elevated expression of peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), HLA class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-I), retinol-binding protein 4, and paraoxonase/arylesterase 1 (PON1), whereas α-2 macroglobulin and C4b-binding protein were decreased. The main pathways associated with HDL alterations in AAA were oxidative stress and immune-inflammatory responses. In AAA tissue, PRDX6 colocalized with neutrophils, vascular smooth muscle cells, and lipid oxidation. Moreover, plasma PRDX6 was higher in AAA (N = 47) than in controls (N = 27), reflecting increased systemic oxidative stress. Finally, a positive correlation was recorded between PRDX6 and AAA diameter. The analysis of the HDL proteome demonstrates that redox imbalance is a major mechanism in AAA, identifying the antioxidant PRDX6 as a novel systemic biomarker of AAA.

  15. Proteomic analysis identifies differentially expressed proteins in AML1/ETO acute myeloid leukemia cells treated with DNMT inhibitors azacitidine and decitabine.

    PubMed

    Buchi, Francesca; Spinelli, Elena; Masala, Erico; Gozzini, Antonella; Sanna, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Ferrari, Germano; Santini, Valeria

    2012-05-01

    Azacitidine and decitabine are DNA methyltransferase inhibitors used to treat myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias. To further characterize different mechanisms between these two agents, cellular extracts from leukemic cells untreated or treated with either drug were analyzed using 2D electrophoresis. Numerous differentially expressed proteins were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Cyclophilin A, Catalase, Nucleophosmin and PCNA were decreased exclusively by azacitidine, TCP1 and hnRNP A2/B1 by both drugs; alpha-Enolase and Peroxiredoxin-1 by decitabine. Interestingly, the expression of the proinflammatory protein Cyclophilin A, also suggested as marker of cell necrosis, was stimulated by decitabine. Finally, a comprehensive pathway analysis of data highlighted a relationship between the identified proteins and potential effectors.

  16. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Pal, Ranadip

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, understanding the regulatory behavior of cells has been pursued through independent analysis of the transcriptome or the proteome. Based on the central dogma, it was generally assumed that there exist a direct correspondence between mRNA transcripts and generated protein expressions. However, recent studies have shown that the correlation between mRNA and Protein expressions can be low due to various factors such as different half lives and post transcription machinery. Thus, a joint analysis of the transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide useful insights that may not be deciphered from individual analysis of mRNA or protein expressions. This article reviews the existing major approaches for joint analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data. We categorize the different approaches into eight main categories based on the initial algorithm and final analysis goal. We further present analogies with other domains and discuss the existing research problems in this area. PMID:24082820

  17. Proteome analysis in thyroid pathology.

    PubMed

    Pagni, Fabio; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Bono, Francesca; Garancini, Mattia; Roversi, Gaia; De Sio, Gabriele; Galli, Manuel; Smith, Andrew James; Chinello, Clizia; Magni, Fulvio

    2015-08-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has continuously increased due to its detection in the preclinical stage. Clinical research in thyroid pathology is focusing on the development of new diagnostic tools to improve the stratification of nodules that have biological, practical and economic consequences on the management of patients. Several clinical questions related to thyroid carcinoma remain open and the use of proteomic research in the hunt for new targets with potential diagnostic applications has an important role in the solutions. Many different proteomic approaches are used to investigate thyroid lesions, including mass spectrometry profiling and imaging technologies. These approaches have been applied to different human tissues (cytological specimens, frozen sections, formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue or Tissue Micro Arrays). Moreover, other specimens are used for biomarker discovery, such as cell lines and the secretome. Alternative approaches, such as metabolomics and lipidomics, are also used and integrated within proteomics.

  18. Analysis of the human saliva proteome.

    PubMed

    Amado, Francisco Manuel Lemos; Vitorino, Rui Miguel Pinheiro; Domingues, Pedro Miguel Dimas Neves; Lobo, Maria João Calheiros; Duarte, José Alberto Ramos

    2005-08-01

    Interest in the characterization of the salivary proteome has increased in the last few years. This review discusses the different techniques and methodologies applied to the separation and identification of salivary proteins. Nowadays, proteomic techniques are the state of the art for the analysis of biologic materials and saliva is no exception. 2D electrophoresis and tryptic digest analysis by mass spectrometry are the typical methodology, but new approaches using 2D liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methods have already been introduced for saliva analysis. Due to their important physiologic role in the oral cavity, low-molecular-weight proteins and peptides are also included in this article and the methodologies discussed.

  19. Salivary and pellicle proteome: A datamining analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schweigel, Hardy; Wicht, Michael; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to comprehensively compare two compartmented oral proteomes, the salivary and the dental pellicle proteome. Systematic review and datamining was used to obtain the physico-chemical, structural, functional and interactional properties of 1,515 salivary and 60 identified pellicle proteins. Salivary and pellicle proteins did not differ significantly in their aliphatic index, hydrophaty, instability index, or isoelectric point. Pellicle proteins were significantly more charged at low and high pH and were significantly smaller (10–20 kDa) than salivary proteins. Protein structure and solvent accessible molecular surface did not differ significantly. Proteins of the pellicle were more phosphorylated and glycosylated than salivary proteins. Ion binding and enzymatic activities also differed significantly. Protein-protein-ligand interaction networks relied on few key proteins. The identified differences between salivary and pellicle proteins could guide proteome compartmentalization and result in specialized functionality. Key proteins could be potential targets for diagnostic or therapeutic application. PMID:27966577

  20. Salivary and pellicle proteome: A datamining analysis.

    PubMed

    Schweigel, Hardy; Wicht, Michael; Schwendicke, Falk

    2016-12-14

    We aimed to comprehensively compare two compartmented oral proteomes, the salivary and the dental pellicle proteome. Systematic review and datamining was used to obtain the physico-chemical, structural, functional and interactional properties of 1,515 salivary and 60 identified pellicle proteins. Salivary and pellicle proteins did not differ significantly in their aliphatic index, hydrophaty, instability index, or isoelectric point. Pellicle proteins were significantly more charged at low and high pH and were significantly smaller (10-20 kDa) than salivary proteins. Protein structure and solvent accessible molecular surface did not differ significantly. Proteins of the pellicle were more phosphorylated and glycosylated than salivary proteins. Ion binding and enzymatic activities also differed significantly. Protein-protein-ligand interaction networks relied on few key proteins. The identified differences between salivary and pellicle proteins could guide proteome compartmentalization and result in specialized functionality. Key proteins could be potential targets for diagnostic or therapeutic application.

  1. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  2. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-type and Mutant Huntingtin-associated Proteins in Mouse Brains Identifies Unique Interactions and Involvement in Protein Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Park, Sung K.; Choi, Jeong H.; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O.; Yates, John R.; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis. PMID:22556411

  4. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of four Bacillus clausii strains: proteomic expression signature distinguishes protein profile of the strains.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Rosa; Gnoni, Antonio; Abbrescia, Anna; Panelli, Damiano; Maiorano, Stefania; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Papa, Sergio; Gaballo, Antonio

    2011-11-18

    A comparative proteomic approach, using two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, has been developed to compare and elucidate the differences among the cellular proteomes of four closely related isogenic O/C, SIN, N/R and T, B. clausii strains during both exponential and stationary phases of growth. Image analysis of the electropherograms reveals a high degree of concordance among the four proteomes, some proteins result, however, differently expressed. The proteins spots exhibiting high different expression level were identified, by mass-spectrometry analysis, as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHA, EC1.2.1.3; ABC0046 isoform) aldehyde dehydrogenase (DHAS, EC 1.2.1.3; ABC0047 isoform) and flagellin-protein of B. clausii KSM-k16. The different expression levels of the two dehydrogenases were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR and dehydrogenases enzymatic activity. The different patterns of protein expression can be considered as cell proteome signatures of the different strains.

  6. Comparative proteomic profiling identifies potential prognostic factors for human clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Zhang, Hongwei; Luo, Longhua; Zhong, Kezhao; Ma, Yushui; Fan, Linlin; Fu, Da; Wan, Lijuan

    2016-12-01

    The identification of markers for disease diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive purposes will have a great effect in improving patient management. Proteomic‑based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis on four patients including clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and paired adjacent non‑cancerous renal tissues using label‑free quantitative proteomics and liquid chromatography‑tandem mass spectrometry (LC‑MS/MS) to identify differentially expressed proteins. Among 3,061 identified non‑redundant proteins, we found that 210 proteins were differentially expressed (83 overexpressed and 127 underexpressed) in ccRCC tissue when compared with normal kidney tissues. Two most significantly dysregulated proteins (PCK1 and SNRPF) were chosen to be confirmed by western blotting. Pathway analysis of 210 differentially expressed proteins showed that dysregulated proteins are related to many cancer‑related biological processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and amino acid synthetic pathways. Online survival analysis indicated the prognostic value of these dysregulated proteins. In conclusion, we identified some potential diagnostic biomarkers for ccRCC and an in‑depth understanding of their involved biological pathways may help pave the way to discover new therapeutic strategies for ccRCC.

  7. Global Phosphotyrosine Proteomics Identifies PKCδ as a Marker of Responsiveness to Src Inhibition in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W. Hayes; Luo, Weifeng; Zhao, Ping; Coffey, Robert J.; Hanks, Steven K.; Manning, H. Charles

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ), CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2), and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα). The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers. PMID:24260357

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Intact Flagella of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Cells Identifies Novel Flagellar Proteins with Unique Sub-localization and Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity. PMID:24741115

  9. Proteomic analysis of intact flagella of procyclic Trypanosoma brucei cells identifies novel flagellar proteins with unique sub-localization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Subota, Ines; Julkowska, Daria; Vincensini, Laetitia; Reeg, Nele; Buisson, Johanna; Blisnick, Thierry; Huet, Diego; Perrot, Sylvie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Duchateau, Magalie; Hourdel, Véronique; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Namane, Abdelkader; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Bastin, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Cilia and flagella are complex organelles made of hundreds of proteins of highly variable structures and functions. Here we report the purification of intact flagella from the procyclic stage of Trypanosoma brucei using mechanical shearing. Structural preservation was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy that showed that flagella still contained typical elements such as the membrane, the axoneme, the paraflagellar rod, and the intraflagellar transport particles. It also revealed that flagella severed below the basal body, and were not contaminated by other cytoskeletal structures such as the flagellar pocket collar or the adhesion zone filament. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a total of 751 proteins with high confidence, including 88% of known flagellar components. Comparison with the cell debris fraction revealed that more than half of the flagellum markers were enriched in flagella and this enrichment criterion was taken into account to identify 212 proteins not previously reported to be associated to flagella. Nine of these were experimentally validated including a 14-3-3 protein not yet reported to be associated to flagella and eight novel proteins termed FLAM (FLAgellar Member). Remarkably, they localized to five different subdomains of the flagellum. For example, FLAM6 is restricted to the proximal half of the axoneme, no matter its length. In contrast, FLAM8 is progressively accumulating at the distal tip of growing flagella and half of it still needs to be added after cell division. A combination of RNA interference and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching approaches demonstrated very different dynamics from one protein to the other, but also according to the stage of construction and the age of the flagellum. Structural proteins are added to the distal tip of the elongating flagellum and exhibit slow turnover whereas membrane proteins such as the arginine kinase show rapid turnover without a detectible polarity.

  10. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-04-29

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment.

  11. Quantitative and qualitative proteome characteristics extracted from in-depth integrated genomics and proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Low, Teck Yew; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; van den Toorn, Henk; Giansanti, Piero; Cristobal, Alba; Toonen, Pim; Schafer, Sebastian; Hübner, Norbert; van Breukelen, Bas; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cuppen, Edwin; Heck, Albert J R; Guryev, Victor

    2013-12-12

    Quantitative and qualitative protein characteristics are regulated at genomic, transcriptomic, and posttranscriptional levels. Here, we integrated in-depth transcriptome and proteome analyses of liver tissues from two rat strains to unravel the interactions within and between these layers. We obtained peptide evidence for 26,463 rat liver proteins. We validated 1,195 gene predictions, 83 splice events, 126 proteins with nonsynonymous variants, and 20 isoforms with nonsynonymous RNA editing. Quantitative RNA sequencing and proteomics data correlate highly between strains but poorly among each other, indicating extensive nongenetic regulation. Our multilevel analysis identified a genomic variant in the promoter of the most differentially expressed gene Cyp17a1, a previously reported top hit in genome-wide association studies for human hypertension, as a potential contributor to the hypertension phenotype in SHR rats. These results demonstrate the power of and need for integrative analysis for understanding genetic control of molecular dynamics and phenotypic diversity in a system-wide manner.

  12. Redefining the Breast Cancer Exosome Proteome by Tandem Mass Tag Quantitative Proteomics and Multivariate Cluster Analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, David J; Fondrie, William E; Liao, Zhongping; Hanson, Phyllis I; Fulton, Amy; Mao, Li; Yang, Austin J

    2015-10-20

    Exosomes are microvesicles of endocytic origin constitutively released by multiple cell types into the extracellular environment. With evidence that exosomes can be detected in the blood of patients with various malignancies, the development of a platform that uses exosomes as a diagnostic tool has been proposed. However, it has been difficult to truly define the exosome proteome due to the challenge of discerning contaminant proteins that may be identified via mass spectrometry using various exosome enrichment strategies. To better define the exosome proteome in breast cancer, we incorporated a combination of Tandem-Mass-Tag (TMT) quantitative proteomics approach and Support Vector Machine (SVM) cluster analysis of three conditioned media derived fractions corresponding to a 10 000g cellular debris pellet, a 100 000g crude exosome pellet, and an Optiprep enriched exosome pellet. The quantitative analysis identified 2 179 proteins in all three fractions, with known exosomal cargo proteins displaying at least a 2-fold enrichment in the exosome fraction based on the TMT protein ratios. Employing SVM cluster analysis allowed for the classification 251 proteins as "true" exosomal cargo proteins. This study provides a robust and vigorous framework for the future development of using exosomes as a potential multiprotein marker phenotyping tool that could be useful in breast cancer diagnosis and monitoring disease progression.

  13. Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Human Lens Fiber Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; David, Larry L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The human lens fiber cell insoluble membrane fraction contains important membrane proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and cytosolic proteins that are strongly associated with the membrane. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens fiber cell membrane proteome and phosphoproteome from human lenses. Methods. HPLC-mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), without or with phosphopeptide enrichment, was applied to study the proteome and phosphoproteome of lens fiber cell membranes, respectively. Results. In total, 951 proteins were identified, including 379 integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins. Enriched gene categories and pathways based on the proteomic analysis include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruvate metabolism), proteasome, cell-cell signaling and communication (GTP binding, gap junction, focal adhesion), glutathione metabolism, and actin regulation. The combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and MudPIT analysis revealed 855 phosphorylation sites on 271 proteins, including 455 phosphorylation sites that have not been previously identified. PKA, PKC, CKII, p38MAPK, and RSK are predicted as the major kinases for phosphorylation on the sites identified in the human lens membrane fraction. Conclusions. The results presented herein significantly expand the characterized proteome and phosphoproteome of the human lens fiber cell and provide a valuable reference for future research in studies of lens development and disease. PMID:23349431

  14. Proteomic Analysis of Human Mesenteric Lymph

    PubMed Central

    Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Damle, Sagar; Peltz, Erik; Campsen, Jeffrey; Kelher, Marguerite; Silliman, Christopher; Banerjee, Anirban; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive animal work has established mesenteric lymph as the mechanistic link between gut ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and distant organ injury. Our trauma and transplant services provide a unique opportunity to assess the relevance of our animal data to human mesenteric lymph under conditions that simulate those used in the laboratory. Mesenteric lymph was collected from eleven patients; with lymphatic injuries, during semi-elective spine reconstruction, or immediately before organ donation. The lymph was tested for its ability to activate human neutrophils in vitro, and was analyzed by label-free proteomic analysis. Human mesenteric lymph primed human PMNs in a pattern similar to that observed in previous rodent, swine, and primate studies. A total of 477 proteins were identified from the 11 subject’s lymph samples with greater than 99% confidence. In addition to classical serum proteins, markers of hemolysis, extracellular matrix components, and general tissue damage were identified. Both tissue injury and shock correlate strongly with production of bioactive lymph. Products of red blood cell hemolysis correlate strongly with human lymph bioactivity and immunoglobulins have a negative correlation with the pro-inflammatory lymph. These human data corroborate the current body of research implicating post shock mesenteric lymph in the development of systemic inflammation and multiple organ failure. Further studies will be required to determine if the proteins identified participate in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure and if they can be used as diagnostic markers. PMID:21192285

  15. On the Importance of Well-Calibrated Scores for Identifying Shotgun Proteomics Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the peptide responsible for generating an observed fragmentation spectrum requires scoring a collection of candidate peptides and then identifying the peptide that achieves the highest score. However, analysis of a large collection of such spectra requires that the score assigned to one spectrum be well-calibrated with respect to the scores assigned to other spectra. In this work, we define the notion of calibration in the context of shotgun proteomics spectrum identification, and we introduce a simple, albeit computationally intensive, technique to calibrate an arbitrary score function. We demonstrate that this calibration procedure yields an increased number of identified spectra at a fixed false discovery rate (FDR) threshold. We also show that proper calibration of scores has a surprising effect on a previously described FDR estimation procedure, making the procedure less conservative. Finally, we provide empirical results suggesting that even partial calibration, which is much less computationally demanding, can yield significant increases in spectrum identification. Overall, we argue that accurate shotgun proteomics analysis requires careful attention to score calibration. PMID:25482958

  16. Comprehensive Proteomic Analysis of Human Milk-derived Extracellular Vesicles Unveils a Novel Functional Proteome Distinct from Other Milk Components.

    PubMed

    van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; Zonneveld, Marijke I; Goerdayal, Soenita; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Garssen, Johan; Stahl, Bernd; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Redegeld, Frank A; Wauben, Marca H M

    2016-11-01

    Breast milk contains several macromolecular components with distinctive functions, whereby milk fat globules and casein micelles mainly provide nutrition to the newborn, and whey contains molecules that can stimulate the newborn's developing immune system and gastrointestinal tract. Although extracellular vesicles (EV) have been identified in breast milk, their physiological function and composition has not been addressed in detail. EV are submicron sized vehicles released by cells for intercellular communication via selectively incorporated lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Because of the difficulty in separating EV from other milk components, an in-depth analysis of the proteome of human milk-derived EV is lacking. In this study, an extensive LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis was performed of EV that had been purified from breast milk of seven individual donors using a recently established, optimized density-gradient-based EV isolation protocol. A total of 1963 proteins were identified in milk-derived EV, including EV-associated proteins like CD9, Annexin A5, and Flotillin-1, with a remarkable overlap between the different donors. Interestingly, 198 of the identified proteins are not present in the human EV database Vesiclepedia, indicating that milk-derived EV harbor proteins not yet identified in EV of different origin. Similarly, the proteome of milk-derived EV was compared with that of other milk components. For this, data from 38 published milk proteomic studies were combined in order to construct the total milk proteome, which consists of 2698 unique proteins. Remarkably, 633 proteins identified in milk-derived EV have not yet been identified in human milk to date. Interestingly, these novel proteins include proteins involved in regulation of cell growth and controlling inflammatory signaling pathways, suggesting that milk-derived EVs could support the newborn's developing gastrointestinal tract and immune system. Overall, this study provides an expansion of

  17. Complementary Proteomic Analysis of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Miteva, Yana; Conlon, Frank L.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic characterization of protein complexes leverages the versatile platform of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to elucidate molecular and cellular signaling processes underlying the dynamic regulation of macromolecular assemblies. Here, we describe a complementary proteomic approach optimized for immunoisolated protein complexes. As the relative complexity, abundance, and physiochemical properties of proteins can vary significantly between samples, we have provided (1) complementary sample preparation workflows, (2) detailed steps for HPLC and mass spectrometric method development, and (3) a bioinformatic workflow that provides confident peptide/protein identification paired with unbiased functional gene ontology analysis. This protocol can also be extended for characterization of larger complexity samples from whole cell or tissue Xenopus proteomes. PMID:22956100

  18. Proteomics analysis of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus identified two new occlusion-derived virus-associated proteins, HA44 and HA100.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Wang, Ranran; Fang, Minggang; Jiang, Yue; Xu, Xushi; Wang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xinwen; Arif, Basil M; Guo, Lin; Wang, Hualin; Hu, Zhihong

    2007-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the structural proteins of the occlusion-derived virus (ODV) of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV), a group II NPV. Twenty-three structural proteins of HearNPV ODV were identified, 21 of which have been reported previously as structural proteins or ODV-associated proteins in other baculoviruses. These include polyhedrin, P78/83, P49, ODV-E18, ODV-EC27, ODV-E56, P74, LEF-3, HA66 (AC66), DNA polymerase, GP41, VP39, P33, ODV-E25, helicase, P6.9, ODV/BV-C42, VP80, ODV-EC43, ODV-E66, and PIF-1. Two proteins encoded by HearNPV ORF44 (ha44) and ORF100 (ha100) were discovered as ODV-associated proteins for the first time. ha44 encodes a protein of 378 aa with a predicted mass of 42.8 kDa. ha100 encodes a protein of 510 aa with a predicted mass of 58.1 kDa and is a homologue of the gene for poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (parg). Western blot analysis and immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that HA44 is associated with the nucleocapsid and HA100 is associated with both the nucleocapsid and the envelope of HearNPV ODV. HA44 is conserved in group II NPVs and granuloviruses but does not exist in group I NPVs, while HA100 is conserved only in group II NPVs.

  19. Informatics View on the Challenges of Identifying Missing Proteins from Shotgun Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Choong, Wai-Kok; Chang, Hui-Yin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi

    2015-12-04

    Protein experiment evidence at protein level from mass spectrometry and antibody experiments are essential to characterize the human proteome. neXtProt (2014-09 release) reported 20 055 human proteins, including 16 491 proteins identified at protein level and 3564 proteins unidentified. Excluding 616 proteins at uncertain level, 2948 proteins were regarded as missing proteins. Missing proteins were unidentified partially due to MS limitations and intrinsic properties of proteins, for example, only appearing in specific diseases or tissues. Despite such reasons, it is desirable to explore issues affecting validation of missing proteins from an "ideal" shotgun analysis of human proteome. We thus performed in silico digestions on the human proteins to generate all in silico fully digested peptides. With these presumed peptides, we investigated the identification of proteins without any unique peptide, the effect of sequence variants on protein identification, difficulties in identifying olfactory receptors, and highly similar proteins. Among all proteins with evidence at transcript level, G protein-coupled receptors and olfactory receptors, based on InterPro classification, were the largest families of proteins and exhibited more frequent variants. To identify missing proteins, the above analyses suggested including sequence variants in protein FASTA for database searching. Furthermore, evidence of unique peptides identified from MS experiments would be crucial for experimentally validating missing proteins.

  20. SWATH-based proteomics identified carbonic anhydrase 2 as a potential diagnosis biomarker for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanzhang; Mok, Tin Seak; Lin, Xiuxian; Zhang, Wanling; Cui, Yizhi; Guo, Jiahui; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a serious threat to public health, and the biomarker discovery is of urgent needs. The data-independent mode (DIA) based sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH) mass spectrometry (MS) has been proved to be precise in protein quantitation and efficient for cancer biomarker researches. In this study, we performed the first SWATH-MS analysis comparing the NPC and normal tissues. Spike-in stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (super-SILAC) MS was used as a shotgun reference. We identified and quantified 1414 proteins across all SWATH-MS analyses. We found that SWATH-MS had a unique feature to preferentially detect proteins with smaller molecular weights than either super-SILAC MS or human proteome background. With SWATH-MS, 29 significant differentially express proteins (DEPs) were identified. Among them, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) was selected for further validation per novelty, MS quality and other supporting rationale. With the tissue microarray analysis, we found that CA2 had an AUC of 0.94 in differentiating NPC from normal tissue samples. In conclusion, SWATH-MS has unique features in proteome analysis, and it leads to the identification of CA2 as a potentially new diagnostic biomarker for NPC. PMID:28117408

  1. Targeted proteomics identifies liquid-biopsy signatures for extracapsular prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunee; Jeon, Jouhyun; Mejia, Salvador; Yao, Cindy Q; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Gramolini, Anthony O; Lance, Raymond S; Troyer, Dean A; Drake, Richard R; Boutros, Paul C; Semmes, O. John; Kislinger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are rapidly gaining importance in personalized medicine. Although numerous molecular signatures have been developed over the past decade, there is a lack of overlap and many biomarkers fail to validate in independent patient cohorts and hence are not useful for clinical application. For these reasons, identification of novel and robust biomarkers remains a formidable challenge. We combine targeted proteomics with computational biology to discover robust proteomic signatures for prostate cancer. Quantitative proteomics conducted in expressed prostatic secretions from men with extraprostatic and organ-confined prostate cancers identified 133 differentially expressed proteins. Using synthetic peptides, we evaluate them by targeted proteomics in a 74-patient cohort of expressed prostatic secretions in urine. We quantify a panel of 34 candidates in an independent 207-patient cohort. We apply machine-learning approaches to develop clinical predictive models for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Our results demonstrate that computationally guided proteomics can discover highly accurate non-invasive biomarkers. PMID:27350604

  2. Proteome Analysis of Human Perilymph using an Intraoperative Sampling Method.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Heike Andrea; Pich, Andreas; Schröder, Anke; Scheper, Verena; Lilli, Giorgio; Reuter, Günter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2017-03-10

    The knowledge about the etiology and pathophysiology of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is still very limited. The project aims at the improvement of understanding different types of SNHL by proteome analysis of human perilymph. Sampling of perilymph has been established during inner ear surgeries (cochlear implant and vestibular schwannoma surgeries) and safety of the sampling method was determined by pure tone audiometry. An in-depth shot-gun proteomics approach was performed to identify cochlear proteins and individual proteome in perilymph of patients. This method enables the identification and quantification of protein composition of perilymph. The proteome of 41 collected perilymph samples with volumes of 1-12 µl was analyzed by data dependent acquisition resulting in overall 878 detected protein groups. At least 203 protein groups were solely identified in perilymph, not in reference samples (serum, cerebrospinal fluid), displaying a specific protein pattern for perilymph. Samples were grouped according to age of patients and type of surgery leading to identification of some proteins specific to particular subgroups. Proteins with different abundances between different sample groups were subjected to classification by gene ontology annotations. The identified proteins might be used to develop tools for non-invasive inner ear diagnostics and to elucidate molecular profiles of SNHL.

  3. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  4. A proteomic approach to identify endosomal cargoes controlling cancer invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Vera, Jesica; Palmer, Sarah; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; Dornier, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Louise E.; Macpherson, Iain; Edwards, Joanne; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously shown that Rab17, a small GTPase associated with epithelial polarity, is specifically suppressed by ERK2 (also known as MAPK1) signalling to promote an invasive phenotype. However, the mechanisms through which Rab17 loss permits invasiveness, and the endosomal cargoes that are responsible for mediating this, are unknown. Using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics, we have found that knockdown of Rab17 leads to a highly selective reduction in the cellular levels of a v-SNARE (Vamp8). Moreover, proteomics and immunofluorescence indicate that Vamp8 is associated with Rab17 at late endosomes. Reduced levels of Vamp8 promote transition between ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and a more invasive phenotype. We developed an unbiased proteomic approach to elucidate the complement of receptors that redistributes between endosomes and the plasma membrane, and have pin-pointed neuropilin-2 (NRP2) as a key pro-invasive cargo of Rab17- and Vamp8-regulated trafficking. Indeed, reduced Rab17 or Vamp8 levels lead to increased mobilisation of NRP2-containing late endosomes and upregulated cell surface expression of NRP2. Finally, we show that NRP2 is required for the basement membrane disruption that accompanies the transition between DCIS and a more invasive phenotype. PMID:28062852

  5. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of HIV-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Krystal; Rivera, Linda; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Toro-Nieves, Dianedis

    2010-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes, macrophages, and microglia) play an important role in innate immunity against pathogens including HIV. These cells are also important viral reservoirs in the central nervous system and secrete inflammatory mediators and toxins that affect the tissue environment and function of surrounding cells. In the era of antiretroviral therapy, there are fewer of these inflammatory mediators. Proteomic approaches including surface enhancement laser desorption ionization, one- and two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry have been used to uncover the proteins produced by in vitro HIV-infected monocytes, macrophages, and microglia. These approaches have advanced the understanding of novel mechanisms for HIV replication and neuronal damage. They have also been used in tissue macrophages that restrict HIV replication to understand the mechanisms of restriction for future therapies. In this review, we summarize the proteomic studies on HIV-infected mononuclear phagocytes and discuss other recent proteomic approaches that are starting to be applied to this field. As proteomic instruments and methods evolve to become more sensitive and quantitative, future studies are likely to identify more proteins that can be targeted for diagnosis or therapy and to uncover novel disease mechanisms. PMID:21153888

  7. Proteomics Analysis of the Causative Agent of Typhoid Fever

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Yoon, Hyunjin; Norbeck, Angela D.; Gustin, Jean K.; McDermott, Jason E.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Rue, Joanne; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-02-01

    Typhoid fever is a potentially fatal disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. typhi). S. typhi infection is a complex process that involves numerous bacterially-encoded virulence determinants, and these are thought to confer both stringent human host specificity and a high mortality rate. In the present study we used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics strategy to investigate the proteome of logarithmic, stationary phase, and low pH/low magnesium (MgM) S. typhi cultures. This represents the first large scale comprehensive characterization of the S. typhi proteome. Our analysis identified a total of 2066 S. typhi proteins. In an effort to identify putative S. typhi-specific virulence factors, we then compared our S. typhi results to those obtained in a previously published study of the S. typhimurium proteome under similar conditions (Adkins J.N. et al (2006) Mol Cell Prot). Comparative proteomic analysis of S. typhi (strain Ty2) and S. typhimurium (strains LT2 and 14028) revealed a subset of highly expressed proteins unique to S. typhi that were exclusively detected under conditions that mimic the infective state in macrophage cells. These proteins included CdtB, HlyE, and a conserved protein encoded by t1476. The differential expression of selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Taken together with the current literature, our observations suggest that this subset of proteins may play a role in S. typhi pathogenesis and human host specificity. In addition, we observed products of the biotin (bio) operon displayed a higher abundance in the more virulent strains S. typhi-Ty2 and S. typhimurium-14028 compared to the virulence attenuated S. typhimurium strain LT2, suggesting bio proteins may contribute to Salmonella pathogenesis.

  8. Metrics for the Human Proteome Project 2016: Progress on Identifying and Characterizing the Human Proteome, Including Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S; Lane, Lydie; Lundberg, Emma K; Beavis, Ronald C; Overall, Christopher M; Deutsch, Eric W

    2016-11-04

    The HUPO Human Proteome Project (HPP) has two overall goals: (1) stepwise completion of the protein parts list-the draft human proteome including confidently identifying and characterizing at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene, with increasing emphasis on sequence variants, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and splice isoforms of those proteins; and (2) making proteomics an integrated counterpart to genomics throughout the biomedical and life sciences community. PeptideAtlas and GPMDB reanalyze all major human mass spectrometry data sets available through ProteomeXchange with standardized protocols and stringent quality filters; neXtProt curates and integrates mass spectrometry and other findings to present the most up to date authorative compendium of the human proteome. The HPP Guidelines for Mass Spectrometry Data Interpretation version 2.1 were applied to manuscripts submitted for this 2016 C-HPP-led special issue [ www.thehpp.org/guidelines ]. The Human Proteome presented as neXtProt version 2016-02 has 16,518 confident protein identifications (Protein Existence [PE] Level 1), up from 13,664 at 2012-12, 15,646 at 2013-09, and 16,491 at 2014-10. There are 485 proteins that would have been PE1 under the Guidelines v1.0 from 2012 but now have insufficient evidence due to the agreed-upon more stringent Guidelines v2.0 to reduce false positives. neXtProt and PeptideAtlas now both require two non-nested, uniquely mapping (proteotypic) peptides of at least 9 aa in length. There are 2,949 missing proteins (PE2+3+4) as the baseline for submissions for this fourth annual C-HPP special issue of Journal of Proteome Research. PeptideAtlas has 14,629 canonical (plus 1187 uncertain and 1755 redundant) entries. GPMDB has 16,190 EC4 entries, and the Human Protein Atlas has 10,475 entries with supportive evidence. neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and GPMDB are rich resources of information about post-translational modifications (PTMs), single amino acid

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Field Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    fragile X mental retardation protein interacting protein 1 [Homo sapiens] alpha-2-macroglobulin precursor [Homo sapiens] filamin A, alpha isoform 1...Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have undertaken a novel proteomic approach to identify proteins ...in normal cells, to discover cancer altered protein that could be more abundant in serum or urine since they would come from both benign and cancer

  10. Quantitative proteome and transcriptome analysis of the archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Pan, Cuiping; Nickell, Stephan; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nagy, István

    2010-09-03

    A comparative proteome and transcriptome analysis of Thermoplasma acidophilum cultured under aerobic and anaerobic conditions has been performed. One-thousand twenty-five proteins were identified covering 88% of the cytosolic proteome. Using a label-free quantitation method, we found that approximately one-quarter of the identified proteome (263 proteins) were significantly induced (>2 fold) under anaerobic conditions. Thirty-nine macromolecular complexes were identified, of which 28 were quantified and 15 were regulated under anaerobiosis. In parallel, a whole genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed showing that the expression levels of 445 genes were influenced by the absence of oxygen. Interestingly, more than 40% of the membrane protein-encoding genes (145 out of 335 ORFs) were up- or down-regulated at the mRNA level. Many of these proteins are functionally associated with extracellular protein or peptide degradation or ion and amino acid transport. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome showed only a weak positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression changes, which is indicative of extensive post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in T. acidophilum. Integration of transcriptomics and proteomics data generated hypotheses for physiological adaptations of the cells to anaerobiosis, and the quantitative proteomics data together with quantitative analysis of protein complexes provide a platform for correlation of MS-based proteomics studies with cryo-electron tomography-based visual proteomics approaches.

  11. Integration of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Data Sets for the Analysis of a Lymphoma B-Cell Line in the Context of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Díez, Paula; Droste, Conrad; Dégano, Rosa M; González-Muñoz, María; Ibarrola, Nieves; Pérez-Andrés, Martín; Garin-Muga, Alba; Segura, Víctor; Marko-Varga, Gyorgy; LaBaer, Joshua; Orfao, Alberto; Corrales, Fernando J; De Las Rivas, Javier; Fuentes, Manuel

    2015-09-04

    A comprehensive study of the molecular active landscape of human cells can be undertaken to integrate two different but complementary perspectives: transcriptomics, and proteomics. After the genome era, proteomics has emerged as a powerful tool to simultaneously identify and characterize the compendium of thousands of different proteins active in a cell. Thus, the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) is promoting a full characterization of the human proteome combining high-throughput proteomics with the data derived from genome-wide expression profiling of protein-coding genes. Here we present a full proteomic profiling of a human lymphoma B-cell line (Ramos) performed using a nanoUPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap Velos proteomic platform, combined to an in-depth transcriptomic profiling of the same cell type. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001933. Integration of the proteomic and transcriptomic data sets revealed a 94% overlap in the proteins identified by both -omics approaches. Moreover, functional enrichment analysis of the proteomic profiles showed an enrichment of several functions directly related to the biological and morphological characteristics of B-cells. In turn, about 30% of all protein-coding genes present in the whole human genome were identified as being expressed by the Ramos cells (stable average of 30% genes along all the chromosomes), revealing the size of the protein expression-set present in one specific human cell type. Additionally, the identification of missing proteins in our data sets has been reported, highlighting the power of the approach. Also, a comparison between neXtProt and UniProt database searches has been performed. In summary, our transcriptomic and proteomic experimental profiling provided a high coverage report of the expressed proteome from a human lymphoma B-cell type with a clear insight into the biological processes that characterized these cells. In this way, we demonstrated the usefulness of

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Advanced Ovarian Cancer Tissue to Identify Potential Biomarkers of Responders and Nonresponders to First-Line Chemotherapy of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Urmila; Pokhriyal, Ruchika; Gupta, Ashish Kumar; Hariprasad, Roopa; Khan, Mohd Imran; Gupta, Divya; Naru, Jasmine; Singh, Sundararajan Baskar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Vanamail, Perumal; Kumar, Lalit; Kumar, Sunesh; Hariprasad, Gururao

    2016-01-01

    Conventional treatment for advanced ovarian cancer is an initial debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel. Despite initial high response, three-fourths of these women experience disease recurrence with a dismal prognosis. Patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer who underwent cytoreductive surgery were enrolled and tissue samples were collected. Post surgery, these patients were started on chemotherapy and followed up till the end of the cycle. Fluorescence-based differential in-gel expression coupled with mass spectrometric analysis was used for discovery phase of experiments, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and pathway analysis were performed for expression and functional validation of differentially expressed proteins. While aldehyde reductase, hnRNP, cyclophilin A, heat shock protein-27, and actin are upregulated in responders, prohibitin, enoyl-coA hydratase, peroxiredoxin, and fibrin-β are upregulated in the nonresponders. The expressions of some of these proteins correlated with increased apoptotic activity in responders and decreased apoptotic activity in nonresponders. Therefore, the proteins qualify as potential biomarkers to predict chemotherapy response. PMID:26997873

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Spatio-temporal Based Molecular Kinetics of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Identifies a Time- and Segment-specific Window for Effective Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Stephanie; Cizkova, Dasa; Quanico, Jusal; Franck, Julien; Nataf, Serge; Pays, Laurent; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Maass, Peter; Kobarg, Jan H; Kobeissy, Firas; Mériaux, Céline; Wisztorski, Maxence; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Cigankova, Viera; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a major debilitating health issue with a direct socioeconomic burden on the public and private sectors worldwide. Although several studies have been conducted to identify the molecular progression of injury sequel due from the lesion site, still the exact underlying mechanisms and pathways of injury development have not been fully elucidated. In this work, based on OMICs, 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, cytokines arrays, confocal imaging we established for the first time that molecular and cellular processes occurring after SCI are altered between the lesion proximity, i.e. rostral and caudal segments nearby the lesion (R1-C1) whereas segments distant from R1-C1, i.e. R2-C2 and R3-C3 levels coexpressed factors implicated in neurogenesis. Delay in T regulators recruitment between R1 and C1 favor discrepancies between the two segments. This is also reinforced by presence of neurites outgrowth inhibitors in C1, absent in R1. Moreover, the presence of immunoglobulins (IgGs) in neurons at the lesion site at 3 days, validated by mass spectrometry, may present additional factor that contributes to limited regeneration. Treatment in vivo with anti-CD20 one hour after SCI did not improve locomotor function and decrease IgG expression. These results open the door of a novel view of the SCI treatment by considering the C1 as the therapeutic target.

  14. The proteome signature of the inflammatory breast cancer plasma membrane identifies novel molecular markers of disease

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Arroyo, Ivette J; Feliz-Mosquea, Yismeilin R; Pérez-Laspiur, Juliana; Arju, Rezina; Giashuddin, Shah; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Cubano, Luis A; Schneider, Robert J; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is the most lethal form of breast cancer with a 35% 5-year survival rate. The accurate and early diagnosis of IBC and the development of targeted therapy against this deadly disease remain a great medical challenge. Plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) such as E-cadherin and EGFR, play an important role in the progression of IBC. Because the critical role of PMPs in the oncogenic processes they are the perfect candidates as molecular markers and targets for cancer therapies. In the present study, Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) followed by mass spectrometry analysis was used to compare the relative expression levels of membrane proteins (MP) between non-cancerous mammary epithelial and IBC cells, MCF-10A and SUM-149, respectively. Six of the identified PMPs were validated by immunoblotting using the membrane fractions of non-IBC and IBC cell lines, compared with MCF-10A cells. Immunohistochemical analysis using IBC, invasive ductal carcinoma or normal mammary tissue samples was carried out to complete the validation method in nine of the PMPs. We identified and quantified 278 MPs, 76% of which classified as PMPs with 1.3-fold or higher change. We identified for the first time the overexpression of the novel plasminogen receptor, PLGRKT in IBC and of the carrier protein, SCAMP3. Furthermore, we describe the positive relationship between L1CAM expression and metastasis in IBC patients and the role of SCAMP3 as a tumor-related protein. Overall, the membrane proteomic signature of IBC reflects a global change in cellular organization and suggests additional strategies for cancer progression. Together, this study provides insight into the specialized IBC plasma membrane proteome with the potential to identify a number of novel therapeutic targets for IBC. PMID:27648361

  15. Quantitative analysis of the chromatin proteome in disease reveals remodeling principles and identifies high mobility group protein B2 as a regulator of hypertrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sarah; Chen, Haodong; Mitchell-Jordan, Scherise; Ren, Shuxun; Wang, Yibin; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how genome-wide changes in gene expression are enacted in response to a finite stimulus. Recent studies have mapped changes in nucleosome localization, determined the binding preferences for individual transcription factors, and shown that the genome adopts a nonrandom structure in vivo. What remains unclear is how global changes in the proteins bound to DNA alter chromatin structure and gene expression. We have addressed this question in the mouse heart, a system in which global gene expression and massive phenotypic changes occur without cardiac cell division, making the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling centrally important. To determine factors controlling genomic plasticity, we used mass spectrometry to measure chromatin-associated proteins. We have characterized the abundance of 305 chromatin-associated proteins in normal cells and measured changes in 108 proteins that accompany the progression of heart disease. These studies were conducted on a high mass accuracy instrument and confirmed in multiple biological replicates, facilitating statistical analysis and allowing us to interrogate the data bioinformatically for modules of proteins involved in similar processes. Our studies reveal general principles for global shifts in chromatin accessibility: altered linker to core histone ratio; differing abundance of chromatin structural proteins; and reprogrammed histone post-translational modifications. Using small interfering RNA-mediated loss-of-function in isolated cells, we demonstrate that the non-histone chromatin structural protein HMGB2 (but not HMGB1) suppresses pathologic cell growth in vivo and controls a gene expression program responsible for hypertrophic cell growth. Our findings reveal the basis for alterations in chromatin structure necessary for genome-wide changes in gene expression. These studies have fundamental implications for understanding how global chromatin remodeling occurs with specificity and

  16. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning; Bonderup, Ole Kristian; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Meyer, Michael Kruse; Bøgsted, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2017-01-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were extracted by colonoscopy and analyzed by label-free quantitative proteomics, enabling the quantitation of 5366 proteins. The abundance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was statistically significantly increased in RA-patient biopsies compared with controls and correlated with the administered dosage of methotrexate (MTX), the most frequently prescribed immunosuppressive drug for RA. Additionally, our data suggest that treatment with Leflunomide, a common alternative to MTX, increases DHFR. The findings were supported by immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy, which furthermore demonstrated that DHFR was located in the cytosol of the intestinal epithelial and interstitial cells. Finally, we identified 223 citrullinated peptides from 121 proteins. Three of the peptides were unique to RA. The list of citrullinated proteins was enriched in extracellular and membrane proteins and included known targets of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Our findings support that the colon mucosa could trigger the production of ACPAs, which could contribute to the onset of RA. The MS data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001608 and PXD003082.

  17. Proteomic analysis of hyperadhesive Candida glabrata clinical isolates reveals a core wall proteome and differential incorporation of adhesins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Molero, Emilia; de Boer, Albert D; Dekker, Henk L; Moreno-Martínez, Ana; Kraneveld, Eef A; Ichsan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Weig, Michael; de Soet, Johannes J; de Koster, Chris G; Bader, Oliver; de Groot, Piet W J

    2015-12-01

    Attachment to human host tissues or abiotic medical devices is a key step in the development of infections by Candida glabrata. The genome of this pathogenic yeast codes for a large number of adhesins, but proteomic work using reference strains has shown incorporation of only few adhesins in the cell wall. By making inventories of the wall proteomes of hyperadhesive clinical isolates and reference strain CBS138 using mass spectrometry, we describe the cell wall proteome of C. glabrata and tested the hypothesis that hyperadhesive isolates display differential incorporation of adhesins. Two clinical strains (PEU382 and PEU427) were selected, which both were hyperadhesive to polystyrene and showed high surface hydrophobicity. Cell wall proteome analysis under biofilm-forming conditions identified a core proteome of about 20 proteins present in all C. glabrata strains. In addition, 12 adhesin-like wall proteins were identified in the hyperadherent strains, including six novel adhesins (Awp8-13) of which only Awp12 was also present in CBS138. We conclude that the hyperadhesive capacity of these two clinical C. glabrata isolates is correlated with increased and differential incorporation of cell wall adhesins. Future studies should elucidate the role of the identified proteins in the establishment of C. glabrata infections.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  19. Preparation and proteomic analysis of chloroplast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenichi

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics of chloroplast ribosomes in spinach and Chlamydomonas revealed unique protein composition and structures of plastid ribosomes. These studies have suggested the presence of some ribosomal proteins unique to plastid ribosomes which may be involved in plastid-unique translation regulation. Considering the strong background of genetic analysis and molecular biology in Arabidopsis, the in-depth proteomic characterization of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomes would facilitate further understanding of plastid translation in higher plants. Here, I describe simple and rapid methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomes from Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis using sucrose gradients. I also describe purity criteria and methods for yield estimation of the purified plastid ribosomes and subunits, methods for the preparation of plastid ribosomal proteins, as well as the identification of some Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  20. Proteome Screening of Pleural Effusions Identifies Galectin 1 as a Diagnostic Biomarker and Highlights Several Prognostic Biomarkers for Malignant Mesothelioma*

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Filip; Johansson, Henrik J.; Forshed, Jenny; Arslan, Sertaç; Metintas, Muzaffer; Dobra, Katalin; Lehtiö, Janne; Hjerpe, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-induced cancer, and affected patients have a median survival of approximately one year after diagnosis. It is often difficult to reach a conclusive diagnosis, and ancillary measurements of soluble biomarkers could increase diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, few soluble mesothelioma biomarkers are suitable for clinical application. Here we screened the effusion proteomes of mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma patients to identify novel soluble mesothelioma biomarkers. We performed quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomics using isobaric tags for quantification and used narrow-range immobilized pH gradient/high-resolution isoelectric focusing (pH 4–4.25) prior to analysis by means of nano liquid chromatography coupled to MS/MS. More than 1,300 proteins were identified in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma (n = 6), lung adenocarcinoma (n = 6), or benign mesotheliosis (n = 7). Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000531. The identified proteins included a set of known mesothelioma markers and proteins that regulate hallmarks of cancer such as invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion, plus several new candidate proteins. Seven candidates (aldo-keto reductase 1B10, apolipoprotein C-I, galectin 1, myosin-VIIb, superoxide dismutase 2, tenascin C, and thrombospondin 1) were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in a larger group of patients with mesothelioma (n = 37) or metastatic carcinomas (n = 25) and in effusions from patients with benign, reactive conditions (n = 16). Galectin 1 was identified as overexpressed in effusions from lung adenocarcinoma relative to mesothelioma and was validated as an excellent predictor for metastatic carcinomas against malignant mesothelioma. Galectin 1, aldo-keto reductase 1B10, and apolipoprotein C-I were all identified as potential prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma. This analysis of the effusion proteome

  1. Biomarkers of systemic lupus erythematosus identified using mass spectrometry-based proteomics: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, Orthodoxia; Kousios, Andreas; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Lauwerys, Bernard; Sokratous, Kleitos; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2016-11-23

    Advances in mass spectrometry technologies have created new opportunities for discovering novel protein biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a systematic review of published reports on proteomic biomarkers identified in SLE patients using mass spectrometry-based proteomics and highlight their potential disease association and clinical utility. Two electronic databases, MEDLINE and EMBASE, were systematically searched up to July 2015. The methodological quality of studies included in the review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Twenty-five studies were included in the review, identifying 241 SLE candidate proteomic biomarkers related to various aspects of the disease including disease diagnosis and activity or pinpointing specific organ involvement. Furthermore, 13 of the 25 studies validated their results for a selected number of biomarkers in an independent cohort, resulting in the validation of 28 candidate biomarkers. It is noteworthy that 11 candidate biomarkers were identified in more than one study. A significant number of potential proteomic biomarkers that are related to a number of aspects of SLE have been identified using mass spectrometry proteomic approaches. However, further studies are required to assess the utility of these biomarkers in routine clinical practice.

  2. Proteomic approach to identify champagne wine proteins as modified by Botrytis cinerea infection.

    PubMed

    Cilindre, Clara; Jégou, Sandrine; Hovasse, Agnès; Schaeffer, Christine; Castro, Antonio J; Clément, Christophe; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Jeandet, Philippe; Marchal, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The presence of the fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea, in the vineyard causes reductions in both quality and quantity of grapes and wine. Because proteins are involved in the foam stabilization of sparkling wines, we have undertaken, for the first time, a thorough proteomic analysis of two champagne base wines prepared with either healthy or botrytized Chardonnay grapes, using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) coupled with immunodetection and tandem mass spectrometry. Most of the identified proteins were from grape origin: invertase and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The disappearance of numerous grape proteins was observed in the botrytized wine, suggesting that they were probably degraded or even repressed or the result of a differential expression of grape proteins upon fungal infection. On the other hand, two pectinolytic enzymes secreted by B. cinerea were found in the botrytized wine.

  3. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-18

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and -beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function.

  4. Organellar proteomics: analysis of pancreatic zymogen granule membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuequn; Walker, Angela K; Strahler, John R; Simon, Eric S; Tomanicek-Volk, Sarah L; Nelson, Bradley B; Hurley, Mary C; Ernst, Stephen A; Williams, John A; Andrews, Philip C

    2006-02-01

    The zymogen granule (ZG) is the specialized organelle in pancreatic acinar cells for digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion and has been a model for studying secretory granule functions. In an initial effort to comprehensively understand the functions of this organelle, we conducted a proteomic study to identify proteins from highly purified ZG membranes. By combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional LC with tandem mass spectrometry, 101 proteins were identified from purified ZG membranes including 28 known ZG proteins and 73 previously unknown proteins, including SNAP29, Rab27B, Rab11A, Rab6, Rap1, and myosin Vc. Moreover several hypothetical proteins were identified that represent potential novel proteins. The ZG localization of nine of these proteins was further confirmed by immunocytochemistry. To distinguish intrinsic membrane proteins from soluble and peripheral membrane proteins, a quantitative proteomic strategy was used to measure the enrichment of intrinsic membrane proteins through the purification process. The iTRAQ ratios correlated well with known or Transmembrane Hidden Markov Model-predicted soluble or membrane proteins. By combining subcellular fractionation with high resolution separation and comprehensive identification of proteins, we have begun to elucidate zymogen granule functions through proteomic and subsequent functional analysis of its membrane components.

  5. In-depth proteomic analysis of mouse cochlear sensory epithelium by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2013-08-02

    Proteomic analysis of sensory organs such as the cochlea is challenging due to its small size and difficulties with membrane protein isolation. Mass spectrometry in conjunction with separation methods can provide a more comprehensive proteome, because of the ability to enrich protein samples, detect hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. GELFrEE as well as different separation and digestion techniques were combined with FASP and nanoLC-MS/MS to obtain an in-depth proteome analysis of cochlear sensory epithelium from 30-day-old mice. Digestion with LysC/trypsin followed by SCX fractionation and multiple nanoLC-MS/MS analyses identified 3773 proteins with a 1% FDR. Of these, 694 protein IDs were in the plasmalemma. Protein IDs obtained by combining outcomes from GELFrEE/LysC/trypsin with GELFrEE/trypsin/trypsin generated 2779 proteins, of which 606 additional proteins were identified using the GELFrEE/LysC/trypsin approach. Combining results from the different techniques resulted in a total of 4620 IDs, including a number of previously unreported proteins. GO analyses showed high expression of binding and catalytic proteins as well as proteins associated with metabolism. The results show that the application of multiple techniques is needed to provide an exhaustive proteome of the cochlear sensory epithelium that includes many membrane proteins. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD000231.

  6. In-depth Proteomic Analysis of Mouse Cochlear Sensory Epithelium by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Darville, Lancia N.F.; Sokolowski, Bernd H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of sensory organs such as the cochlea is challenging due to its small size and difficulties with membrane protein isolation. Mass spectrometry in conjunction with separation methods can provide a more comprehensive proteome, because of the ability to enrich protein samples, detect hydrophobic proteins, and identify low abundant proteins by reducing the proteome dynamic range. GELFrEE as well as different separation and digestion techniques were combined with FASP and nanoLC-MS/MS to obtain an in-depth proteome analysis of cochlear sensory epithelium from 30-day-old mice. Digestion with LysC/trypsin followed by SCX fractionation and multiple nanoLC-MS/MS analyses identified 3773 proteins with a 1% FDR. Of these, 694 protein IDs were in the plasmalemma. Protein IDs obtained by combining outcomes from GELFrEE/LysC/trypsin with GELFrEE/trypsin/trypsin generated 2779 proteins, of which 606 additional proteins were identified using the GELFrEE/LysC/trypsin approach. Combining results from the different techniques resulted in a total of 4620 IDs, including a number of previously unreported proteins. GO analyses showed high expression of binding and catalytic proteins as well as proteins associated with metabolism. The results show that the application of multiple techniques is needed to provide an exhaustive proteome of the cochlear sensory epithelium that includes many membrane proteins. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD000231. PMID:23721421

  7. Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2012-04-16

    Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

  8. Proteomic analysis of the porcine platelet proteome and alterations induced by thrombin activation.

    PubMed

    Esteso, Gloria; Mora, María Isabel; Garrido, Juan José; Corrales, Fernando; Moreno, Angela

    2008-12-02

    Platelets are enucleated cells derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes and defects in platelet functions could be involved in many cardiovascular diseases. Proteomics can be used to provide a new insight in the study of these platelet functions and can help to identify the biochemical events underlying platelet activation. In this study, we have obtained a reference 2-DE map of porcine platelet proteins. A large number of cytoskeletal and metabolic proteins were found as well as some proteins related to cell mobility and immunological functions. Other proteins implicated in the cell signalling process, transport or apoptosis were also identified. Moreover, we have analysed, by 2D-DIGE methodology, quantitative modifications of platelet proteins following their activation by thrombin. 26 spots exhibited statistically significant differences, and a total of 16 spots corresponding to 13 different proteins were successfully identified. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, the association of the deregulated proteins with canonical pathways highlighted two major pathways; coagulation system and integrin signalling. These results confirm that this proteomic approach (based on 2D-DIGE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatic and pathway databases) has proved to be a powerful tool when applied to studying signalling pathways that could play a relevant role in the activation of platelets.

  9. Proteomics-driven analysis of ovine whey colostrum.

    PubMed

    Scumaci, Domenica; Trimboli, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Ludovica; Concolino, Antonio; Pappaianni, Giusi; Tammè, Laura; Vignola, Giorgio; Luciani, Alessia; Morelli, Daniela; Cuda, Giovanni; Boari, Andrea; Britti, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to shed light in to the complexity of the ovine colostrum proteome, with a specific focus on the low abundance proteins. The ovine colostrum is characterized by a few dominating proteins, as the immunoglobulins, but it also contains less represented protein species, equally important for the correct development of neonates. Ovine colostrum, collected immediately after lambing, was separated by 1D SDS-PAGE. Proteins bands were digested with trypsin and the resulting peptides were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, a total of 343 unique proteins were identified. To our knowledge, this study represents the most comprehensive analysis of ovine colostrum proteome.

  10. Proteomic analysis of human dental cementum and alveolar bone

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Cristiane R.; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Ruiz, Karina Gonzales Silvério; Foster, Brian L.; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Sallum, Enilson Antonio; Somerman, Martha J.; Nociti, Francisco H.

    2013-01-01

    Dental cementum (DC) is a bone-like tissue covering the tooth root and responsible for attaching the tooth to the alveolar bone (AB) via the periodontal ligament (PDL). Studies have unsuccessfully tried to identify factors specific to DC versus AB, in an effort to better understand DC development and regeneration. The present study aimed to use matched human DC and AB samples (n=7) to generate their proteomes for comparative analysis. Bone samples were harvested from tooth extraction sites, whereas DC samples were obtained from the apical root portion of extracted third molars. Samples were denatured, followed by protein extraction reduction, alkylation and digestion for analysis by nanoAcquity HPLC system and LTQ-FT Ultra. Data analysis demonstrated that a total of 318 proteins were identified in AB and DC. In addition to shared proteins between these tissues, 105 and 83 proteins exclusive to AB or DC were identified, respectively. This is the first report analyzing the proteomic composition of human DC matrix and identifying putative unique and enriched proteins in comparison to alveolar bone. These findings may provide novel insights into developmental differences between DC and AB, and identify candidate biomarkers that may lead to more efficient and predictable therapies for periodontal regeneration. PMID:24007660

  11. Proteomic analysis of wheat flour allergens.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Handoyo, Tri; Ishii, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Shigenori; Morita, Naofumi; Suyama, Kyozo

    2007-08-22

    Wheat can cause severe IgE-mediated systematic reactions, but knowledge on relevant wheat allergens at the molecular level is scanty. The aim of the present study was to achieve a more detailed and comprehensive characterization of the wheat allergens involved in food allergy to wheat using proteomic strategies, referred to as "allergenomics". Whole flour proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with isoelectric focusing and lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Then, IgE-binding proteins were detected by immunoblotting with sera of patients with a food allergy to wheat. After tryptic digestion, the peptides of IgE-binding proteins were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In this study, we identified four previously reported wheat allergens or their sequentially homologous proteins [serpin, alpha-amylase inhibitor, gamma-gliadin, and low molecular weight (LMW) glutenin] by a database search. As a result of the high resolution of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, nine subunits of LMW glutenins were identified as the most predominant IgE-binding antigens. The two-dimensional allergen map can be beneficial in many ways. It could be used, for example, for precise diagnosis of wheat-allergic patients and assessment of wheat allergens in food. Additionally, we compared allergenomics to conventional biochemical methods and evaluated the usefulness of a proteomic strategy for identifying putative allergens to wheat allergy.

  12. Comparative proteomic analysis of urine and laser microdissected glomeruli in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyuan; Yin, Zhong; Li, Zuoxiang; Xu, Jiayun; Wang, Linna; Shen, Wanjun; Lu, Yang; Cai, Guangyan; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xiangmei

    2017-01-21

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the differential proteins that synchronously change in urine and glomeruli and could be used to monitor glomerular lesions of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). The proteomes of urine and glomeruli from 4 IgAN patients who were graded III/IV according to the grading system of Lee et al were compared to the urine proteomes of 4 healthy volunteers and the glomeruli proteomes of adjacent normal tissue from 4 patients with renal tumors, respectively. Western blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence assay were applied to verify the results of the proteomic analysis. In the proteomic analysis of urine from IgAN patients and healthy volunteers, 714 proteins were identified, with 246 proteins identified as differential proteins. In the proteomic analysis of glomeruli from renal biopsy tissue of IgAN patients and from adjacent normal tissue of patients with renal tumors, 161 proteins were identified altogether, and 20 proteins of these were recognized as differential proteins. After comparatively analyzing the differential proteins identified in the urine and glomeruli, five synchronously changed differential proteins were found: complement C9, Ig kappa chain C region and three cytoskeleton proteins. In summary, our findings indicate that certain immunological indices in urine appear to be associated with glomerular lesions of IgAN. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparative quantitative proteomic study identifies new proteins relevant for sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Sylvester, Marc; Kröninger, Lena; Dahl, Christiane

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we compared the proteome response of Allochromatium vinosum when growing photoautotrophically in the presence of sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur with the proteome response when the organism was growing photoheterotrophically on malate. Applying tandem mass tag analysis as well as two-dimensional (2D) PAGE, we detected 1,955 of the 3,302 predicted proteins by identification of at least two peptides (59.2%) and quantified 1,848 of the identified proteins. Altered relative protein amounts (≥1.5-fold) were observed for 385 proteins, corresponding to 20.8% of the quantified A. vinosum proteome. A significant number of the proteins exhibiting strongly enhanced relative protein levels in the presence of reduced sulfur compounds are well documented essential players during oxidative sulfur metabolism, e.g., the dissimilatory sulfite reductase DsrAB. Changes in protein levels generally matched those observed for the respective relative mRNA levels in a previous study and allowed identification of new genes/proteins participating in oxidative sulfur metabolism. One gene cluster (hyd; Alvin_2036-Alvin_2040) and one hypothetical protein (Alvin_2107) exhibiting strong responses on both the transcriptome and proteome levels were chosen for gene inactivation and phenotypic analyses of the respective mutant strains, which verified the importance of the so-called Isp hydrogenase supercomplex for efficient oxidation of sulfide and a crucial role of Alvin_2107 for the oxidation of sulfur stored in sulfur globules to sulfite. In addition, we analyzed the sulfur globule proteome and identified a new sulfur globule protein (SgpD; Alvin_2515).

  14. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian L; Darfler, Marlene M; Guiel, Thomas G; Furusato, Bungo; Lucas, David A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Krizman, David B

    2005-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue would enable retrospective biomarker investigations of this vast archive of pathologically characterized clinical samples that exist worldwide. These FFPE tissues are, however, refractory to proteomic investigations utilizing many state of the art methodologies largely due to the high level of covalently cross-linked proteins arising from formalin fixation. A novel tissue microdissection technique has been developed and combined with a method to extract soluble peptides directly from FFPE tissue for mass spectral analysis of prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Hundreds of proteins from PCa and BPH tissue were identified, including several known PCa markers such as prostate-specific antigen, prostatic acid phosphatase, and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1. Quantitative proteomic profiling utilizing stable isotope labeling confirmed similar expression levels of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase in BPH and PCa cells, whereas the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 was found to be greater in PCa as compared with BPH cells.

  15. A Human Proteome Array Approach to Identifying Key Host Proteins Targeted by Toxoplasma Kinase ROP18.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Hou, Yongheng; Hao, Taofang; Rho, Hee-Sool; Wan, Jun; Luan, Yizhao; Gao, Xin; Yao, Jianping; Pan, Aihua; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Liao, Wanqin; Zhu, Heng; Zhou, Xingwang

    2017-03-01

    Toxoplasma kinase ROP18 is a key molecule responsible for the virulence of Toxoplasma gondii; however, the mechanisms by which ROP18 exerts parasite virulence via interaction with host proteins remain limited to a small number of identified substrates. To identify a broader array of ROP18 substrates, we successfully purified bioactive mature ROP18 and used it to probe a human proteome array. Sixty eight new putative host targets were identified. Functional annotation analysis suggested that these proteins have a variety of functions, including metabolic process, kinase activity and phosphorylation, cell growth, apoptosis and cell death, and immunity, indicating a pleiotropic role of ROP18 kinase. Among these proteins, four candidates, p53, p38, UBE2N, and Smad1, were further validated. We demonstrated that ROP18 targets p53, p38, UBE2N, and Smad1 for degradation. Importantly, we demonstrated that ROP18 phosphorylates Smad1 Ser-187 to trigger its proteasome-dependent degradation. Further functional characterization of the substrates of ROP18 may enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of Toxoplasma infection and provide new therapeutic targets. Similar strategies could be used to identify novel host targets for other microbial kinases functioning at the pathogen-host interface.

  16. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases.

  17. [Proteomic analysis of urinary exosomes].

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Aki

    2014-07-01

    Exosomes are 40-100-nm membrane vesicles secreted into the extracellular space by various types of cell in many biological fluids, including serum, saliva, breast milk, amniotic fluid, and urine. Exosomes, which contain several key proteins, lipids, mRNAs, and microRNAs, were considered as an alternative secretion pathway. In addition, recent findings suggest that the exosome itself is a functional biomolecule involved in intracellular communication; thus, its components can be transferred to recipient cells by fusion, changing the function of the target cell. Recently, urinary exosomes have attracted much attention because some of their proteins have been identified as biomarkers related to certain physiological events and disease-related metabolism of the kidney. This review provides an overview of urinary exosomes, including methods of isolation and associated problems, and focuses on urinary exosomes as protein biomarker sources involved in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  18. Analyses of the Xylem Sap Proteomes Identified Candidate Fusarium virguliforme Proteinacious Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the ascomycete fungus, Fusarium virguliforme, exhibits root necrosis and leaf scorch or foliar SDS. The pathogen has never been identified from the above ground diseased foliar tissues. Foliar SDS is believed to be caused by host selective toxins, including FvTox1, secreted by the fungus. This study investigated if the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants contains secreted F. virguliforme-proteins, some of which could cause foliar SDS development. Results Xylem sap samples were collected from five biological replications of F. virguliforme-infected and uninfected soybean plants under controlled conditions. We identified five F. virguliforme proteins from the xylem sap of the F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants by conducting LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. These five proteins were also present in the excreted proteome of the pathogen in culture filtrates. One of these proteins showed high sequence identity to cerato-platanin, a phytotoxin produced by Ceratocystis fimbriata f. sp. platani to cause canker stain disease in the plane tree. Of over 500 soybean proteins identified in this study, 112 were present in at least 80% of the sap samples collected from F. virguliforme-infected and -uninfected control plants. We have identified four soybean defense proteins from the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000873. Conclusion This study confirms that a few F. virguliforme proteins travel through the xylem, some of which could be involved in foliar SDS development. We have identified five candidate proteinaceous toxins, one of which showed high similarity to a previously characterized phytotoxin. We have also shown the presence of four soybean defense proteins in the xylem sap of F. virguliforme-infected soybean plants. This study laid the foundation for studying the molecular basis of foliar SDS development in soybean and

  19. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products.

    PubMed

    Wright, M H; Sieber, S A

    2016-05-04

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied "in situ" - in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss 'competitive mode' approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed.

  20. Chemical proteomics approaches for identifying the cellular targets of natural products

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2010 up to 2016 Deconvoluting the mode of action of natural products and drugs remains one of the biggest challenges in chemistry and biology today. Chemical proteomics is a growing area of chemical biology that seeks to design small molecule probes to understand protein function. In the context of natural products, chemical proteomics can be used to identify the protein binding partners or targets of small molecules in live cells. Here, we highlight recent examples of chemical probes based on natural products and their application for target identification. The review focuses on probes that can be covalently linked to their target proteins (either via intrinsic chemical reactivity or via the introduction of photocrosslinkers), and can be applied “in situ” – in living systems rather than cell lysates. We also focus here on strategies that employ a click reaction, the copper-catalysed azide–alkyne cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), to allow minimal functionalisation of natural product scaffolds with an alkyne or azide tag. We also discuss ‘competitive mode’ approaches that screen for natural products that compete with a well-characterised chemical probe for binding to a particular set of protein targets. Fuelled by advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and bioinformatics, many modern strategies are now embracing quantitative proteomics to help define the true interacting partners of probes, and we highlight the opportunities this rapidly evolving technology provides in chemical proteomics. Finally, some of the limitations and challenges of chemical proteomics approaches are discussed. PMID:27098809

  1. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/).

  2. Advances in Proteomics Data Analysis and Display Using an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jennifer S.D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Proteomics has recently demonstrated utility in understanding cellular processes on the molecular level as a component of systems biology approaches and for identifying potential biomarkers of various disease states. The large amount of data generated by utilizing high efficiency (e.g., chromatographic) separations coupled to high mass accuracy mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics analyses presents challenges related to data processing, analysis, and display. This review focuses on recent advances in nanoLC-FTICR-MS-based proteomics approaches and the accompanying data processing tools that have been developed to display and interpret the large volumes of data being produced. PMID:16429408

  3. Preparation of urine samples for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Rembert

    2008-01-01

    Reproducible procedures for the preparation of protein samples isolated from human urine are essential for meaningful proteomic analyses. Key applications are the discovery of novel proteins or their modifications in the human urine as well as protein biomarker discovery for diseases and drug treatments. The methodology presented here features experimental steps aimed at limiting protein losses because of organic solvent precipitation, effective separation of proteins from other compounds in the human urine and molecular weight-based enrichment of proteins in two distinct fractions. Urinary proteins are separated from cellular debris in the urine via centrifugation, concentrated with 5-kDa-cutoff membrane concentration devices and separated via size exclusion chromatography into fractions with a higher and a lower molecular weight than 30 kDa, respectively. A successive optional affinity removal step for highly abundant plasma proteins is described. Finally, buffer exchange steps useful for specific downstream proteomic analysis experiments of urinary proteins are presented, such as 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, differential protein or peptide labeling and digestion with trypsin for LC-MS/MS analysis.

  4. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  5. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Liao, Zhi; Wang, Xin-Xing; Bao, Lin-Fei; Fan, Mei-Hua; Li, Xiao-Min; Wu, Chang-Wen; Xia, Shu-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Vasopressin-Responsive Nuclear Proteins in Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Laura K.; Bolger, Steven J.; Luginbuhl, Kelli; Gonzales, Patricia A.; Rinschen, Markus M.; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Hoffert, Jason D.; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Vasopressin controls transport in the renal collecting duct, in part, by regulating transcription. This complex process, which can involve translocation and/or modification of transcriptional regulators, is not completely understood. Here, we applied a method for large-scale profiling of nuclear proteins to quantify vasopressin-induced changes in the nuclear proteome of cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD) cells. Using stable isotope labeling and tandem mass spectrometry, we quantified 3987 nuclear proteins and identified significant changes in the abundance of 65, including previously established targets of vasopressin signaling in the collecting duct. Vasopressin-induced changes in the abundance of the transcription factors JunB, Elf3, Gatad2b, and Hmbox1; transcriptional co-regulators Ctnnb1 (β-catenin) and Crebbp; subunits of the Mediator complex; E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4; nuclear transport regulator RanGap1; and several proteins associated with tight junctions and adherens junctions. Bioinformatic analysis showed that many of the quantified transcription factors have putative binding sites in the 5′-flanking regions of genes coding for the channel proteins Aqp2, Aqp3, Scnn1b (ENaCβ), and Scnn1g (ENaCγ), which are known targets of vasopressin. Immunoblotting demonstrated that the increase in β-catenin in nuclear fractions was accompanied by an even larger increase in its phosphorylated form (pSer552). The findings provide a new online database resource for nuclear proteomics (http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mNPD/) and generate new hypotheses regarding vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation in the collecting duct. PMID:22440904

  7. Proteomics and the Analysis of Proteomic Data: 2013 Overview of Current Protein-Profiling Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Can; Stone, Kathryn; Gulcicek, Erol; Williams, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a major tool in the study of proteomes. The analysis of proteolytic peptides and their fragment ions by this technique enables the identification and quantitation of the precursor proteins in a mixture. However, deducing chemical structures and then protein sequences from mass-to-charge ratios is a challenging computational task. Software tools incorporating powerful algorithms and statistical methods improved our ability to process the large quantities of proteomics data. Repositories of spectral data make both data analysis and experimental design more efficient. New approaches in quantitative and statistical proteomics make possible a greater coverage of the proteome, the identification of more post-translational modifications and a greater sensitivity in the quantitation of targeted proteins. PMID:23504934

  8. Downregulation of GNA13-ERK network in prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia brain identified by combined focused and targeted quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Hirayama-Kurogi, Mio; Takizawa, Yohei; Kunii, Yasuto; Matsumoto, Junya; Wada, Akira; Hino, Mizuki; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Sakon; Kondo, Takeshi; Ito, Shingo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2017-03-31

    Schizophrenia is a disabling mental illness associated with dysfunction of the prefrontal cortex, which affects cognition and emotion. The purpose of the present study was to identify altered molecular networks in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenia patients by comparing protein expression levels in autopsied brains of patients and controls, using a combination of targeted and focused quantitative proteomics. We selected 125 molecules possibly related to schizophrenia for quantification by knowledge-based targeted proteomics. Among the quantified molecules, GRIK4 and MAO-B were significantly decreased in plasma membrane and cytosolic fractions, respectively, of prefrontal cortex. Focused quantitative proteomics identified 15 increased and 39 decreased proteins. Network analysis identified "GNA13-ERK1-eIF4G2 signaling" as a downregulated network, and proteins involved in this network were significantly decreased. Furthermore, searching downstream of eIF4G2 revealed that eIF4A1/2 and CYFIP1 were decreased, suggesting that downregulation of the network suppresses expression of CYFIP1, which regulates actin remodeling and is involved in axon outgrowth and spine formation. Downregulation of this signaling seems likely to impair axon formation and synapse plasticity of neuronal cells, and could be associated with development of cognitive impairment in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  9. A Systematic Analysis of a Deep Mouse Epididymal Sperm Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvin, Theodore; Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Nicora, Carrie D.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Roberts, Kenneth P.

    2012-12-21

    Spermatozoa are highly specialized cells that, when mature, are capable of navigating the female reproductive tract and fertilizing an oocyte. The sperm cell is thought to be largely quiescent in terms of transcriptional and translational activity. As a result, once it has left the male reproductive tract, the sperm cell is essentially operating with a static population of proteins. It is therefore theoretically possible to understand the protein networks contained in a sperm cell and to deduce its cellular function capabilities. To this end we have performed a proteomic analysis of mouse sperm isolated from the cauda epididymis and have confidently identified 2,850 proteins, which is the most comprehensive sperm proteome for any species reported to date. These proteins comprise many complete cellular pathways, including those for energy production via glycolysis, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, protein folding and transport, and cell signaling systems. This proteome should prove a useful tool for assembly and testing of protein networks important for sperm function.

  10. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rate of CH4 release from thawing permafrost in the Arctic has been regarded as one of the determining factors on future global climate. It is uncertain how indigenous microorganisms would interact with such changing environmental conditions and hence their impact on the fate of carbon compounds that are sequestered in the cryosol. Multitudinous studies of pristine surface cryosol (top 5 cm) and microcosm experiments have provided growing evidence of effective methanotrophy. Cryosol samples corresponding to active layer were sampled from a sparsely vegetated, ice-wedge polygon at the McGill Arctic Research Station at Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada (N79°24, W90°45) before the onset of annual thaw. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene indicated the occurrence of methanotroph-containing bacterial families as minor components (~5%) in pristine cryosol including Bradyrhizobiaceae, Methylobacteriaceae and Methylocystaceae within alpha-Proteobacteria, and Methylacidiphilaceae within Verrucomicrobia. The potential of methanotrophy is supported by preliminary analysis of metagenome data, which indicated putative methane monooxygenase gene sequences relating to Bradyrhizobium sp. and Pseudonocardia sp. are present. Proteome profiling in general yielded minute traces of proteins, which likely hints at dormant nature of the soil microbial consortia. The lack of specific protein database for permafrost posted additional challenge to protein identification. Only 35 proteins could be identified in the pristine cryosol and of which 60% belonged to Shewanella sp. Most of the identified proteins are known to be involved in energy metabolism or post-translational modification of proteins. Microcosms amended with sodium acetate exhibited a net methane consumption of ~65 ngC-CH4 per gram (fresh weight) of soil over 16 days of aerobic incubation at room temperature. The pH in microcosm materials remained acidic (decreased from initial 4.7 to 4.5). Protein extraction and

  11. Toward a standardized saliva proteome analysis methodology.

    PubMed

    Vitorino, Rui; Guedes, Sofia; Manadas, Bruno; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco

    2012-09-18

    The present study aimed the evaluation of saliva sample pre-treatment, in particular the sample clearance usually performed by centrifugation, to the contribution of salivary proteome and peptidome. Using in-gel and off-gel approaches, a large content of salivary proteins was detected in the pellet fraction that is usually discarded. In addition, chaotropic/detergent treatment in combination with sonication, before the centrifugation step, resulted in salivary complex disruption and consequently in the extraction of high amounts of proteins. Based on this data, we suggest the use of urea/detergent with sonication as a standard saliva sample pre-treatment procedure. We also described a procedure to extract salivary peptides which can be performed even after saliva sample treatment with chaotropic/detergents. In overall, we reported for the first time the contribution of the pellet fraction to the whole saliva proteome. iTRAQ analysis highlighted a higher number of different peptides as well as distinct quantities of each protein class when after sample treatment with urea and sonication, acetone precipitation followed by solubilization with acetonitrile/HCl was performed.

  12. Functional module search in protein networks based on semantic similarity improves the analysis of proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Desislava; Nilla, Santosh; Klau, Gunnar W; Dandekar, Thomas; Müller, Tobias; Dittrich, Marcus

    2014-07-01

    The continuously evolving field of proteomics produces increasing amounts of data while improving the quality of protein identifications. Albeit quantitative measurements are becoming more popular, many proteomic studies are still based on non-quantitative methods for protein identification. These studies result in potentially large sets of identified proteins, where the biological interpretation of proteins can be challenging. Systems biology develops innovative network-based methods, which allow an integrated analysis of these data. Here we present a novel approach, which combines prior knowledge of protein-protein interactions (PPI) with proteomics data using functional similarity measurements of interacting proteins. This integrated network analysis exactly identifies network modules with a maximal consistent functional similarity reflecting biological processes of the investigated cells. We validated our approach on small (H9N2 virus-infected gastric cells) and large (blood constituents) proteomic data sets. Using this novel algorithm, we identified characteristic functional modules in virus-infected cells, comprising key signaling proteins (e.g. the stress-related kinase RAF1) and demonstrate that this method allows a module-based functional characterization of cell types. Analysis of a large proteome data set of blood constituents resulted in clear separation of blood cells according to their developmental origin. A detailed investigation of the T-cell proteome further illustrates how the algorithm partitions large networks into functional subnetworks each representing specific cellular functions. These results demonstrate that the integrated network approach not only allows a detailed analysis of proteome networks but also yields a functional decomposition of complex proteomic data sets and thereby provides deeper insights into the underlying cellular processes of the investigated system.

  13. Label-free quantitative urinary proteomics identifies the arginase pathway as a new player in congenital obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets.

  14. Label-free Quantitative Urinary Proteomics Identifies the Arginase Pathway as a New Player in Congenital Obstructive Nephropathy*

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Chrystelle; Caubet, Cécile; Gonzalez-de-Peredo, Anne; Breuil, Benjamin; Bouyssié, David; Stella, Alexandre; Garrigues, Luc; Le Gall, Caroline; Raevel, Anthony; Massoubre, Angelique; Klein, Julie; Decramer, Stéphane; Sabourdy, Frédérique; Bandin, Flavio; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schanstra, Joost-Peter; Bascands, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive nephropathy is a frequently encountered situation in newborns. In previous studies, the urinary peptidome has been analyzed for the identification of clinically useful biomarkers of obstructive nephropathy. However, the urinary proteome has not been explored yet and should allow additional insight into the pathophysiology of the disease. We have analyzed the urinary proteome of newborns (n = 5/group) with obstructive nephropathy using label free quantitative nanoLC-MS/MS allowing the identification and quantification of 970 urinary proteins. We next focused on proteins exclusively regulated in severe obstructive nephropathy and identified Arginase 1 as a potential candidate molecule involved in the development of obstructive nephropathy, located at the crossroad of pro- and antifibrotic pathways. The reduced urinary abundance of Arginase 1 in obstructive nephropathy was verified in independent clinical samples using both Western blot and MRM analysis. These data were confirmed in situ in kidneys obtained from a mouse obstructive nephropathy model. In addition, we also observed increased expression of Arginase 2 and increased total arginase activity in obstructed mouse kidneys. mRNA expression analysis of the related arginase pathways indicated that the pro-fibrotic arginase-related pathway is activated during obstructive nephropathy. Taken together we have identified a new actor in the development of obstructive nephropathy in newborns using quantitative urinary proteomics and shown its involvement in an in vivo model of disease. The present study demonstrates the relevance of such a quantitative urinary proteomics approach with clinical samples for a better understanding of the pathophysiology and for the discovery of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25205225

  15. Proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Zhang, Wei; Kho, Yoonjung; Zhao, Yingming

    2004-04-01

    Efficient methods for profiling proteins integral to the plasma membrane are highly desirable for the identification of overexpressed proteins in disease cells. Such methods will aid in both understanding basic biological processes and discovering protein targets for the design of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Avoiding contamination by subcellular organelles and cytosolic proteins is crucial to the successful proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins. Here we report a biotin-directed affinity purification (BDAP) method for the preparation of integral plasma membrane proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of cell surface membrane proteins in viable cells, (2) affinity enrichment using streptavidin beads, and (3) depletion of plasma membrane-associated cytosolic proteins by harsh washes with high-salt and high-pH buffers. The integral plasma membrane proteins are then extracted and subjected to SDS-PAGE separation and HPLC/MS/MS for protein identification. We used the BDAP method to prepare integral plasma membrane proteins from a human lung cancer cell line. Western blotting analysis showed that the preparation was almost completely devoid of actin, a major cytosolic protein. Nano-HPLC/MS/MS analysis of only 30 microg of protein extracted from the affinity-enriched integral plasma membrane preparation led to the identification of 898 unique proteins, of which 781 were annotated with regard to their plasma membrane localization. Among the annotated proteins, at least 526 (67.3%) were integral plasma membrane proteins. Notable among them were 62 prenylated proteins and 45 Ras family proteins. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins in mammalian cells to date. Given the importance of integral membrane proteins for drug design, the described approach will expedite the characterization of plasma membrane subproteomes and the discovery of plasma membrane protein drug targets.

  16. FunRich proteomics software analysis, let the fun begin!

    PubMed

    Benito-Martin, Alberto; Peinado, Héctor

    2015-08-01

    Protein MS analysis is the preferred method for unbiased protein identification. It is normally applied to a large number of both small-scale and high-throughput studies. However, user-friendly computational tools for protein analysis are still needed. In this issue, Mathivanan and colleagues (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2597-2601) report the development of FunRich software, an open-access software that facilitates the analysis of proteomics data, providing tools for functional enrichment and interaction network analysis of genes and proteins. FunRich is a reinterpretation of proteomic software, a standalone tool combining ease of use with customizable databases, free access, and graphical representations.

  17. Salivary proteins associated with hyperglycemia in diabetes: a proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bencharit, Sompop; Baxter, Sarah Schwartz; Carlson, Jim; Byrd, Warren C; Mayo, Mary Virginia; Border, Michael B; Kohltfarber, Heidi; Urrutia, Eugene; Howard-Williams, Escher L; Offenbacher, Steven; Wu, Michael C; Buse, John B

    2013-11-01

    Effective monitoring of glucose levels is necessary for patients to achieve greater control over their diabetes. However, only about a quarter of subjects with diabetes who requires close serum glucose monitoring, regularly check their serum glucose daily. One of the potential barriers to patient compliance is the blood sampling requirement. Saliva and its protein contents can be altered in subjects with diabetes, possibly due to changes in glycemic control. We propose here that salivary proteomes of subjects with diabetes may be different based on their glycemic control as reflected in A1C levels. A total of 153 subjects with type 1 or 2 diabetes were recruited. Subjects in each type of diabetes were divided into 5 groups based on their A1C levels; <7, 7-8, 8-9, 9-10, >10. To examine the global proteomic changes associated with A1C, the proteomic profiling of pooled saliva samples from each group was created using label-free quantitative proteomics. Similar proteomic analysis for individual subjects (N=4, for each group) were then applied to examine proteins that may be less abundant in pooled samples. Principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (p<0.01 and p<0.001) were used to define the proteomic differences. We, therefore, defined the salivary proteomic changes associated with A1C changes. This study demonstrates that differences exist between salivary proteomic profiles in subjects with diabetes based on the A1C levels.

  18. Salivary proteins associated with hyperglycemia in diabetes: a proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Baxter, Sarah Schwartz; Carlson, Jim; Byrd, Warren C.; Mayo, Mary Virginia; Border, Michael B.; Kohltfarber, Heidi; Urrutia, Eugene; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Offenbacher, Steven; Wu, Michael C.; Buse, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Effective monitoring of glucose levels is necessary for patients to achieve greater control over their diabetes. However, only about a quarter of subjects with diabetes who requires close serum glucose monitoring, regularly check their serum glucose daily. One of the potential barriers to patient compliance is the blood sampling requirement. Saliva and its protein contents can be altered in subjects with diabetes, possibly due to changes in glycemic control. We propose here that salivary proteomes of subjects with diabetes may be different based on their glycemic control as reflected in A1C levels. A total of 153 subjects with type 1 or 2 diabetes were recruited. Subjects in each type of diabetes were divided into 5 groups based on their A1C levels; <7, 7–8, 8–9, 9–10, >10. To examine the global proteomic changes associated with A1C, the proteomic profiling of pooled saliva samples from each group was created using label-free quantitative proteomics. Similar proteomic analysis for individual subjects (N=4, for each group) were then applied to examine proteins that may be less abundant in pooled samples. Principle component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (p<0.01 and p<0.001) were used to define the proteomic differences. We, therefore, defined the salivary proteomic changes associated with A1C changes. This study demonstrates that differences exist between salivary proteomic profiles in subjects with diabetes based on the A1C levels. PMID:24056972

  19. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  20. Quantitative proteomics identifies NCOA4 as the cargo receptor mediating ferritinophagy

    PubMed Central

    Mancias, Joseph D.; Wang, Xiaoxu; Gygi, Steven P.; Harper, J. Wade; Kimmelman, Alec C.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy, the process by which proteins and organelles are sequestered in double-membrane structures called autophagosomes and delivered to lysosomes for degradation, is critical in diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration1,2. Much of our understanding of this process has emerged from analysis of bulk cytoplasmic autophagy, but our understanding of how specific cargo including organelles, proteins, or intracellular pathogens are targeted for selective autophagy is limited3. We employed quantitative proteomics to identify a cohort of novel and known autophagosome-enriched proteins, including cargo receptors. Like known cargo receptors, NCOA4 was highly enriched in autophagosomes, and associated with ATG8 proteins that recruit cargo-receptor complexes into autophagosomes. Unbiased identification of NCOA4-associated proteins revealed ferritin heavy and light chains, components of an iron-filled cage structure that protects cells from reactive iron species4 but is degraded via autophagy to release iron5,6 through an unknown mechanism. We found that delivery of ferritin to lysosomes required NCOA4, and an inability of NCOA4-deficient cells to degrade ferritin leads to decreased bioavailable intracellular iron. This work identifies NCOA4 as a selective cargo receptor for autophagic turnover of ferritin (ferritinophagy) critical for iron homeostasis and provides a resource for further dissection of autophagosomal cargo-receptor connectivity. PMID:24695223

  1. f-divergence cutoff index to simultaneously identify differential expression in the integrated transcriptome and proteome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaojun; Hemberg, Martin; Cansizoglu, Ertugrul; Belin, Stephane; Kosik, Kenneth; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith

    2016-01-01

    The ability to integrate ‘omics’ (i.e. transcriptomics and proteomics) is becoming increasingly important to the understanding of regulatory mechanisms. There are currently no tools available to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) across different ‘omics’ data types or multi-dimensional data including time courses. We present fCI (f-divergence Cut-out Index), a model capable of simultaneously identifying DEGs from continuous and discrete transcriptomic, proteomic and integrated proteogenomic data. We show that fCI can be used across multiple diverse sets of data and can unambiguously find genes that show functional modulation, developmental changes or misregulation. Applying fCI to several proteogenomics datasets, we identified a number of important genes that showed distinctive regulation patterns. The package fCI is available at R Bioconductor and http://software.steenlab.org/fCI/. PMID:26980280

  2. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Winck, Flavia V.; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Paes Leme, Adriana F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis. PMID:26538482

  3. Insights into immune responses in oral cancer through proteomic analysis of saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Winck, Flavia V; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Ramos Domingues, Romênia; Ling, Liu Yi; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Rivera, César; Brandão, Thaís Bianca; Gouvea, Adriele Ferreira; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Coletta, Ricardo D; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2015-11-05

    The development and progression of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involves complex cellular mechanisms that contribute to the low five-year survival rate of approximately 20% among diagnosed patients. However, the biological processes essential to tumor progression are not completely understood. Therefore, detecting alterations in the salivary proteome may assist in elucidating the cellular mechanisms modulated in OSCC and improve the clinical prognosis of the disease. The proteome of whole saliva and salivary extracellular vesicles (EVs) from patients with OSCC and healthy individuals were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and label-free protein quantification. Proteome data analysis was performed using statistical, machine learning and feature selection methods with additional functional annotation. Biological processes related to immune responses, peptidase inhibitor activity, iron coordination and protease binding were overrepresented in the group of differentially expressed proteins. Proteins related to the inflammatory system, transport of metals and cellular growth and proliferation were identified in the proteome of salivary EVs. The proteomics data were robust and could classify OSCC with 90% accuracy. The saliva proteome analysis revealed that immune processes are related to the presence of OSCC and indicate that proteomics data can contribute to determining OSCC prognosis.

  4. Molecular classification and survival prediction in human gliomas based on proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yasuo; Sakaida, Tsukasa; Hiwasa, Takaki; Nagai, Yuichiro; Ishikura, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Masaki; Yamaura, Akira

    2004-04-01

    The biological features of gliomas, which are characterized by highly heterogeneous biological aggressiveness even in the same histological category, would be precisely described by global gene expression data at the protein level. We investigated whether proteome analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry can identify differences in protein expression between high- and low-grade glioma tissues. Proteome profiling patterns were compared in 85 tissue samples: 52 glioblastoma multiforme, 13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 10 atrocytomas, and 10 normal brain tissues. We could completely distinguish the normal brain tissues from glioma tissues by cluster analysis based on the proteome profiling patterns. Proteome-based clustering significantly correlated with the patient survival, and we could identify a biologically distinct subset of astrocytomas with aggressive nature. Discriminant analysis extracted a set of 37 proteins differentially expressed based on histological grading. Among them, many of the proteins that were increased in high-grade gliomas were categorized as signal transduction proteins, including small G-proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the expression of identified proteins in glioma tissues. The present study shows that proteome analysis is useful to develop a novel system for the prediction of biological aggressiveness of gliomas. The proteins identified here could be novel biomarkers for survival prediction and rational targets for antiglioma therapy.

  5. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  6. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  7. Integrated proteomic and genomic analysis of colorectal cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators who analyzed 95 human colorectal tumor samples have determined how gene alterations identified in previous analyses of the same samples are expressed at the protein level. The integration of proteomic and genomic data, or proteogenomics, pro

  8. PeptideDepot: flexible relational database for visual analysis of quantitative proteomic data and integration of existing protein information.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kebing; Salomon, Arthur R

    2009-12-01

    Recently, dramatic progress has been achieved in expanding the sensitivity, resolution, mass accuracy, and scan rate of mass spectrometers able to fragment and identify peptides through MS/MS. Unfortunately, this enhanced ability to acquire proteomic data has not been accompanied by a concomitant increase in the availability of flexible tools allowing users to rapidly assimilate, explore, and analyze this data and adapt to various experimental workflows with minimal user intervention. Here we fill this critical gap by providing a flexible relational database called PeptideDepot for organization of expansive proteomic data sets, collation of proteomic data with available protein information resources, and visual comparison of multiple quantitative proteomic experiments. Our software design, built upon the synergistic combination of a MySQL database for safe warehousing of proteomic data with a FileMaker-driven graphical user interface for flexible adaptation to diverse workflows, enables proteomic end-users to directly tailor the presentation of proteomic data to the unique analysis requirements of the individual proteomics lab. PeptideDepot may be deployed as an independent software tool or integrated directly with our high throughput autonomous proteomic pipeline used in the automated acquisition and post-acquisition analysis of proteomic data.

  9. PeptideDepot: Flexible Relational Database for Visual Analysis of Quantitative Proteomic Data and Integration of Existing Protein Information

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kebing; Salomon, Arthur R.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, dramatic progress has been achieved in expanding the sensitivity, resolution, mass accuracy, and scan rate of mass spectrometers able to fragment and identify peptides through tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Unfortunately, this enhanced ability to acquire proteomic data has not been accompanied by a concomitant increase in the availability of flexible tools allowing users to rapidly assimilate, explore, and analyze this data and adapt to a variety of experimental workflows with minimal user intervention. Here we fill this critical gap by providing a flexible relational database called PeptideDepot for organization of expansive proteomic data sets, collation of proteomic data with available protein information resources, and visual comparison of multiple quantitative proteomic experiments. Our software design, built upon the synergistic combination of a MySQL database for safe warehousing of proteomic data with a FileMaker-driven graphical user interface for flexible adaptation to diverse workflows, enables proteomic end-users to directly tailor the presentation of proteomic data to the unique analysis requirements of the individual proteomics lab. PeptideDepot may be deployed as an independent software tool or integrated directly with our High Throughput Autonomous Proteomic Pipeline (HTAPP) used in the automated acquisition and post-acquisition analysis of proteomic data. PMID:19834895

  10. Urinary proteome analysis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young Ah; Cain, Kevin; Jarrett, Monica; Smith, Lynne; Voss, Joachim; Tolentino, Ernie; Tsuji, Joyce; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Panchaud, Alexandre; Goodlett, David R.; Shulman, Robert J.; Heitkemper, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with alterations in bowel function. Given the heterogeneity of the symptoms, multiple pathophysiologic factors are suspected to play a role. We classified women with IBS into four subgroups based on distinct symptom profiles. In-depth shotgun proteomic analysis was carried out to profile the urinary proteomes to identify possible proteins associated with these subgroups. First void urine samples with urine creatinine level ≥ 100 mg/dL were used after excluding samples that tested positive for blood. Urine from ten subjects representing each symptom subgroup was pooled for proteomic analysis. The urine proteome was analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a data-independent method known as Precursor Acquisition Independent From Ion Count (PAcIFIC) that allowed extended detectable dynamic range. Differences in protein quantities were determined by peptide spectral counting followed by validation of select proteins with ELISA or a targeted single reaction monitoring (LC-SRM/MS) approach. Four IBS symptom subgroups were selected: 1) Constipation, 2) Diarrhea + Low Pain, 3) Diarrhea + High Pain, and 4) High Pain + High Pychological Distress. A fifth group consisted of Healthy Control subjects. From comparisons of quantitative spectral counting data among the symptom subgroups and controls, a total of 18 proteins that showed quantitative differences in relative abundance and possible physiological relevance to IBS were selected for further investigation. Three of the 18 proteins were chosen for validation by either ELISA or SRM. An elevated expression of gelsolin (GSN) was associated with the high pain groups. Trefoil Factor 3 (TFF3) levels were higher in IBS groups compared to controls. In this study the IBS patients subclassified by predominant symptoms showed differences in urine proteome levels. Proteins

  11. Proteome analysis of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Muhammad Asim; Grossmann, Jonas; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baginsky, Sacha

    2006-12-01

    We report a comprehensive proteome analysis of chromoplasts from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.). The combination of a novel strategy for database-independent detection of proteins from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data with standard database searches allowed us to identify 151 proteins with a high level of confidence. These include several well-known plastid proteins but also novel proteins that were not previously reported from other plastid proteome studies. The majority of the identified proteins are active in plastid carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among the most abundant individual proteins are capsanthin/capsorubin synthase and fibrillin, which are involved in the synthesis and storage of carotenoids that accumulate to high levels in chromoplasts. The relative abundances of the identified chromoplast proteins differ remarkably compared with their abundances in other plastid types, suggesting a chromoplast-specific metabolic network. Our results provide an overview of the major metabolic pathways active in chromoplasts and extend existing knowledge about prevalent metabolic activities of different plastid types.

  12. Shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shohei; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Nakatani, Masako; Okutani, Mie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2014-04-01

    The epitheliochorial nature of the porcine placenta prevents the transfer of maternal immunity. Therefore, ingestion of the colostrum immediately after birth is crucial for neonatal piglets to acquire passive immunity from the sow. We performed a shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine milk to reveal in detail the protein composition of porcine milk. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, 113 and 118 proteins were identified in the porcine colostrum and mature milk, respectively, and 50 of these proteins were common to both samples. Some immune-related proteins, including interleukin-18 (IL-18), were unique to the colostrum. The IL-18 concentration in the colostrum and mature milk of four sows was measured to validate the proteomic analysis, and IL-18 was only detected in the colostrum (191.0 ± 53.9 pg/mL) and not in mature milk. In addition, some proteins involved in primary defense, such as azurocidin, which has never been detected in any other mammal's milk, were also identified in the colostrum.

  13. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type and SAP Domain Mutant Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus-Infected Porcine Cells Identifies the Ubiquitin-Activating Enzyme UBE1 Required for Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zixiang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Keshan; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Wang, Guoqing; Mao, Ruoqing; Li, Dan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2015-10-02

    Leader protein (L(pro)) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) manipulates the activities of several host proteins to promote viral replication and pathogenicity. L(pro) has a conserved protein domain SAP that is suggested to subvert interferon (IFN) production to block antiviral responses. However, apart from blocking IFN production, the roles of the SAP domain during FMDV infection in host cells remain unknown. Therefore, we identified host proteins associated with the SAP domain of L(pro) by a high-throughput quantitative proteomic approach [isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) in conjunction with liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry]. Comparison of the differentially regulated proteins in rA/FMDVΔmSAP- versus rA/FMDV-infected SK6 cells revealed 45 down-regulated and 32 up-regulated proteins that were mostly associated with metabolic, ribosome, spliceosome, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways. The results also imply that the SAP domain has a function similar to SAF-A/B besides its potential protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (PIAS) function. One of the identified proteins UBE1 was further analyzed and displayed a novel role for the SAP domain of L(pro). Overexpression of UBE1 enhanced the replication of FMDV, and knockdown of UBE1 decreased FMDV replication. This shows that FMDV manipulates UBE1 for increased viral replication, and the SAP domain was involved in this process.

  14. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed's potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30 °C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0-90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue.

  15. Is Five Percent Too Small? Analysis of the Overlaps between Disorder, Coiled Coil and Collagen Predictions in Complete Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Gáspári, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Identification of intrinsic disorder in proteins and proteomes has revealed important novel aspects of protein function and interactions. However, it has been pointed out that several oligomeric fibrillar protein motifs such as coiled coils and collagen triple helical segments can also identified as intrinsically disordered. This feature has not yet been investigated in more detail at the proteome level. The present work aims at the identification and quantification of such overlaps in full proteomes to assess their significance in large-scale studies of protein disorder. It was found that the percentage of cross-predicted residues is around 5% in the human proteome and is generally near that value in other metazoan ones but shows remarkable variation in different organisms. In particular, smaller proteomes are increasingly prone to such cross-predictions, thus, especially the analysis of viral proteomes requires the use of specific prediction tools. PMID:28250370

  16. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometr...

  17. Systematic VCP-UBXD Adaptor Network Proteomics Identifies a Role for UBXN10 in Regulating Ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Malavika; Sergeev, Mikhail; Garnaas, Maija; Lydeard, John R.; Huttlin, Edward L.; Goessling, Wolfram; Shah, Jagesh V.; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase VCP (also known as p97 or CDC48) uses ATP hydrolysis to “segregate” ubiquitinated proteins from their binding partners. VCP acts via UBX-domain containing adaptors that provide target specificity, but targets and functions of UBXD proteins remain poorly understood. Through systematic proteomic analysis of UBXD proteins in human cells, we reveal a network of over 195 interacting proteins, implicating VCP in diverse cellular pathways. We have explored one such complex between an unstudied adaptor UBXN10 and the intraflagellar transport B (IFT-B) complex, which regulates anterograde transport into cilia. UBXN10 localizes to cilia in a VCP-dependent manner and both VCP and UBXN10 are required for ciliogenesis. Pharmacological inhibition of VCP destabilized the IFT-B complex and increased trafficking rates. Depletion of UBXN10 in zebrafish embryos causes defects in left-right asymmetry, which depends on functional cilia. This study provides a resource for exploring the landscape of UBXD proteins in biology and identifies an unexpected requirement for VCP-UBXN10 in ciliogenesis. PMID:26389662

  18. A chemical proteomic atlas of brain serine hydrolases identifies cell type-specific pathways regulating neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viader, Andreu; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Joslyn, Christopher M; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Mori, Simone; Nguyen, William; Conti, Bruno; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic specialization among major brain cell types is central to nervous system function and determined in large part by the cellular distribution of enzymes. Serine hydrolases are a diverse enzyme class that plays fundamental roles in CNS metabolism and signaling. Here, we perform an activity-based proteomic analysis of primary mouse neurons, astrocytes, and microglia to furnish a global portrait of the cellular anatomy of serine hydrolases in the brain. We uncover compelling evidence for the cellular compartmentalization of key chemical transmission pathways, including the functional segregation of endocannabinoid (eCB) biosynthetic enzymes diacylglycerol lipase-alpha (DAGLα) and –beta (DAGLβ) to neurons and microglia, respectively. Disruption of DAGLβ perturbed eCB-eicosanoid crosstalk specifically in microglia and suppressed neuroinflammatory events in vivo independently of broader effects on eCB content. Mapping the cellular distribution of metabolic enzymes thus identifies pathways for regulating specialized inflammatory responses in the brain while avoiding global alterations in CNS function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12345.001 PMID:26779719

  19. Novel seminal fluid proteins in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus identified by a proteomic and transcriptomic approach.

    PubMed

    Bayram, H; Sayadi, A; Goenaga, J; Immonen, E; Arnqvist, G

    2017-02-01

    The seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus is a significant agricultural pest and increasingly studied model of sexual conflict. Males possess genital spines that increase the transfer of seminal fluid proteins (SFPs) into the female body. As SFPs alter female behaviour and physiology, they are likely to modulate reproduction and sexual conflict in this species. Here, we identified SFPs using proteomics combined with a de novo transcriptome. A prior 2D-sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis identified male accessory gland protein spots that were probably transferred to the female at mating. Proteomic analysis of these spots identified 98 proteins, a majority of which were also present within ejaculates collected from females. Standard annotation workflows revealed common functional groups for SFPs, including proteases and metabolic proteins. Transcriptomic analysis found 84 transcripts differentially expressed between the sexes. Notably, genes encoding 15 proteins were highly expressed in male abdomens and only negligibly expressed within females. Most of these sequences corresponded to 'unknown' proteins (nine of 15) and may represent rapidly evolving SFPs novel to seed beetles. Our combined analyses highlight 44 proteins for which there is strong evidence that they are SFPs. These results can inform further investigation, to better understand the molecular mechanisms of sexual conflict in seed beetles.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Vitreous Humor in Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Michael; Dacheva, Ivanka; Nobl, Matthias; Siwy, Justyna; Schanstra, Joost P.; Mullen, William; Koch, Frank H. J.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Kretz, Florian T. A.; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Koss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the protein profile of human vitreous of untreated patients with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Methods Sixty-eight vitreous humor (VH) samples (44 from patients with treatment naïve RVO, 24 controls with idiopathic floaters) were analyzed in this clinical-experimental study using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometer and tandem mass spectrometry. To define potential candidate protein markers of RVO, proteomic analysis was performed on RVO patients (n = 30) and compared with controls (n = 16). To determine validity of potential biomarker candidates in RVO, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was performed by using proteome data of independent RVO (n = 14) and control samples (n = 8). Results Ninety-four different proteins (736 tryptic peptides) could be identified. Sixteen proteins were found to be significant when comparing RVO and control samples (P = 1.43E-05 to 4.48E-02). Five proteins (Clusterin, Complement C3, Ig lambda-like polypeptide 5 (IGLL5), Opticin and Vitronectin), remained significant after using correction for multiple testing. These five proteins were also detected significant when comparing subgroups of RVO (central RVO, hemi-central RVO, branch RVO) to controls. Using independent samples ROC-Area under the curve was determined proving the validity of the results: Clusterin 0.884, Complement C3 0.955, IGLL5 1.000, Opticin 0.741, Vitronectin 0.786. In addition, validation through ELISA measurements was performed. Conclusion The results of the study reveal that the proteomic composition of VH differed significantly between the patients with RVO and the controls. The proteins identified may serve as potential biomarkers for pathogenesis induced by RVO. PMID:27362861

  1. Proteomics analysis of heterogeneous flagella in brown algae (stramenopiles).

    PubMed

    Fu, Gang; Nagasato, Chikako; Oka, Seiko; Cock, J Mark; Motomura, Taizo

    2014-09-01

    Flagella are conserved organelles among eukaryotes and they are composed of many proteins, which are necessary for flagellar assembly, maintenance and function. Stramenopiles, which include brown algae, diatoms and oomycetes, possess two laterally inserted flagella. The anterior flagellum (AF) extends forward and bears tripartite mastigonemes, whilst the smooth posterior flagellum (PF) often has a paraflagellar body structure. These heterogeneous flagella have served as crucial structures in algal studies especially from a viewpoint of phylogeny. However, the protein compositions of the flagella are still largely unknown. Here we report a LC-MS/MS based proteomics analysis of brown algal flagella. In total, 495 flagellar proteins were identified. Functional annotation of the proteome data revealed that brown algal flagellar proteins were associated with cell motility, signal transduction and various metabolic activities. We separately isolated AF and PF and analyzed their protein compositions. This analysis led to the identification of several AF- and PF-specific proteins. Among the PF-specific proteins, we found a candidate novel blue light receptor protein involved in phototaxis, and named it HELMCHROME because of the steering function of PF. Immunological analysis revealed that this protein was localized along the whole length of the PF and concentrated in the paraflagellar body.

  2. [Comparative proteome analysis of blood plasma of patients with early-stage chronic cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Kisrieva, Y S; Petushkova, N A; Samenkova, N F; Kuznetsova, G P; Larina, O V; Zavialova, M G; Teryaeva, N B; Belyaev, A Y; Karuzina, I I

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we explored the technology of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) for the proteome analysis of blood plasma of patients with early chronic cerebral ischemia. Analysis of mass-spectrometer data carried out in automatic mode using the software Progenesis LS-MS. As a result of this study identified 43 proteins. The differences identified in the study group compared with the control in 7 proteins. It was found that in the early stages of chronic cerebral ischemia proteome changes in blood plasma affect proteins related to the immune system, the system for the maintenance of hemostasis and lipid metabolism.

  3. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  4. Proteomic analysis of murine testes lipid droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiyi; Wei, Suning; Li, Linghai; Su, Xueying; Du, Congkuo; Li, Fengjuan; Geng, Bin; Liu, Pingsheng; Xu, Guoheng

    2015-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells contain abundant cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) as a cholesteryl-ester store for releasing cholesterols as the precursor substrate for testosterone biosynthesis. Here, we identified the protein composition of testicular LDs purified from adult mice by using mass spectrometry and immunodetection. Among 337 proteins identified, 144 were previously detected in LD proteomes; 44 were confirmed by microscopy. Testicular LDs contained multiple Rab GTPases, chaperones, and proteins involved in glucuronidation, ubiquination and transport, many known to modulate LD formation and LD-related cellular functions. In particular, testicular LDs contained many members of both the perilipin family and classical lipase/esterase superfamily assembled predominately in adipocyte LDs. Thus, testicular LDs might be regulated similar to adipocyte LDs. Remarkably, testicular LDs contained a large number of classical enzymes for biosynthesis and metabolism of cholesterol and hormonal steroids, so steroidogenic reactions might occur on testicular LDs or the steroidogenic enzymes and products could be transferred through testicular LDs. These characteristics differ from the LDs in most other types of cells, so testicular LDs could be an active organelle functionally involved in steroidogenesis. PMID:26159641

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the brainstem following lethal sarin exposure.

    PubMed

    Meade, Mitchell L; Hoffmann, Andrea; Makley, Meghan K; Snider, Thomas H; Schlager, John J; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2015-06-22

    The brainstem represents a major tissue area affected by sarin organophosphate poisoning due to its function in respiratory and cardiovascular control. While the acute toxic effects of sarin on brainstem-related responses are relatively unknown, other brain areas e.g., cortex or cerebellum, have been studied more extensively. The study objective was to analyze the guinea pig brainstem toxicology response following sarin (2×LD50) exposure by proteome pathway analysis to gain insight into the complex regulatory mechanisms that lead to impairment of respiratory and cardiovascular control. Guinea pig exposure to sarin resulted in the typical acute behavior/physiology outcomes with death between 15 and 25min. In addition, brain and blood acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly reduced in the presence of sarin to 95%, and 89%, respectively, of control values. Isobaric-tagged (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 198 total proteins of which 23% were upregulated, and 18% were downregulated following sarin exposure. Direct gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed a sarin-specific broad-spectrum proteomic profile including glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, calcium overload, energy depletion responses, and compensatory carbohydrate metabolism, increases in ROS defense, DNA damage and chromatin remodeling, HSP response, targeted protein degradation (ubiquitination) and cell death response. With regards to the sarin-dependent effect on respiration, our study supports the potential interference of sarin with CO2/H(+) sensitive chemoreceptor neurons of the brainstem retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) that send excitatory glutamergic projections to the respiratory centers. In conclusion, this study gives insight into the brainstem broad-spectrum proteome following acute sarin exposure and the gained information will assist in the development of novel countermeasures.

  6. Micro‐proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level

    PubMed Central

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro‐proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin‐associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro‐proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat‐shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat‐shock, including variable induction of heat‐shock proteins. The micro‐proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  7. Micro-proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-02-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro-proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin-associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro-proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat-shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat-shock, including variable induction of heat-shock proteins. The micro-proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource.

  8. Global analysis of a "simple" proteome : methanococcus jannaschii.

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C. S.; Reich, C.; Tollaksen, S.; Babnigg, G.; Lim, H.; Zhu, W.; Olsen, G.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; Scripps Inst.

    2002-12-25

    The completed genome of Methanococcus jannaschii, including the main chromosome and two extra-chromosomal elements, predicts a proteome comprised of 1783 proteins. How many of those proteins are expressed at any given time and the relative abundance of the expressed proteins, however, cannot be predicted solely from the genome sequence. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with peptide mass spectrometry is being used to identify the proteins expressed by M. jannaschii cells grown under different conditions as part of an effort to correlate protein expression with regulatory mechanisms. Here we describe the identification of 170 of the most abundant proteins found in total lysates of M. jannaschii grown under optimal fermentation conditions. To optimize the number of proteins detected, two different protein specific stains (Coomassie Blue R250 or silver nitrate) and two different first dimension separation methods (isoelectric focusing or nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) were used. Thirty-two percent of the proteins identified are annotated as hypothetical (21% conserved hypothetical and 11% hypothetical), 21% are enzymes involved in energy metabolism, 12% are proteins required for protein synthesis, and the remainder include proteins necessary for intermediary metabolism, cell division, and cell structure. Evidence of post-translational modification of numerous M. jannaschii proteins has been found, as well as indications of incomplete dissociation of protein-protein complexes. These results demonstrate the complexity of proteome analysis even when dealing with a relatively simple genome.

  9. Global analysis of a 'simple' proteome : methanoccus jannaschii.

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C. S.; Reich, C.; Tollaksen, S.; Babnigg, G.; Lim, H.; Zhu, W.; Yates, J., III; Olsen, G.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; The Scripps Inst.

    2002-12-25

    The completed genome of Methanococcus jannaschii, including the main chromosome and two extra-chromosomal elements, predicts a proteome comprised of 1783 proteins. How many of those proteins are expressed at any given time and the relative abundance of the expressed proteins, however, cannot be predicted solely from the genome sequence. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with peptide mass spectrometry is being used to identify the proteins expressed by M. jannaschii cells grown under different conditions as part of an effort to correlate protein expression with regulatory mechanisms. Here we describe the identification of 170 of the most abundant proteins found in total lysates of M. jannaschii grown under optimal fermentation conditions. To optimize the number of proteins detected, two different protein specific stains (Coomassie Blue R250 or silver nitrate) and two different first dimension separation methods (isoelectric focusing or nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis) were used. Thirty-two percent of the proteins identified are annotated as hypothetical (21% conserved hypothetical and 11% hypothetical), 21% are enzymes involved in energy metabolism, 12% are proteins required for protein synthesis, and the remainder include proteins necessary for intermediary metabolism, cell division, and cell structure. Evidence of post-translational modification of numerous M. jannaschii proteins has been found, as well as indications of incomplete dissociation of protein-protein complexes. These results demonstrate the complexity of proteome analysis even when dealing with a relatively simple genome.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Naturally-Sourced Biological Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiyao; Uygun, Basak E.; Geerts, Sharon; Ozer, Sinan; Scalf, Mark; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Ott, Harald C.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Welham, Nathan V.; Frey, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge to the clinical implementation of decellularized scaffold-based tissue engineering lies in understanding the process of removing cells and immunogenic material from a donor tissue/organ while maintaining the biochemical and biophysical properties of the scaffold that will promote growth of newly seeded cells. Current criteria for evaluating whole organ decellularization are primarily based on nucleic acids, as they are easy to quantify and have been directly correlated to adverse host responses. However, numerous proteins cause immunogenic responses and thus should be measured directly to further understand and quantify the efficacy of decellularization. In addition, there has been increasing appreciation for the role of the various protein components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in directing cell growth and regulating organ function. We performed in-depth proteomic analysis on four types of biological scaffolds and identified a large number of both remnant cellular and ECM proteins. Measurements of individual protein abundances during the decellularization process revealed significant removal of numerous cellular proteins, but preservation of most structural matrix proteins. The observation that decellularized scaffolds still contain many cellular proteins, although at decreased abundance, indicates that elimination of DNA does not assure adequate removal of all cellular material. Thus, proteomic analysis provides crucial characterization of the decellularization process to create biological scaffolds for future tissue/organ replacement therapies. PMID:26476196

  11. Proteomic analysis of fetal programming-related obesity markers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hye; Yoo, Jae Young; You, Young-Ah; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Lee, Sang Mi; Pang, Myung-Geol; Kim, Young Ju

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to analyze fetal programming in rat brain using proteomic analysis and to identify fetal programming-related obesity markers. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four feeding groups: (i) the Ad Libitum (AdLib)/AdLib group was given a normal diet during pregnancy and the lactation period; (ii) the AdLib/maternal food restriction group (FR) was subjected to 50% FR during the lactation period; (iii) the FR/AdLib group was subjected to 50% FR during pregnancy; and (iv) the FR/FR group was subjected to 50% FR during pregnancy and the lactation period. Offspring from each group were sacrificed at 3 weeks of age and whole brains were dissected. To obtain a maximum number of protein markers related to obesity, 2DE and Pathway Studio bioinformatics analysis were performed. The identities of the markers among the selected and candidate proteins were confirmed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Proteomic and bioinformatics analyses revealed that expression of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) and Secernin 1 (SCRN1) were significantly different in the FR/AdLib group compared with the AdLib/AdLib group for both male and female offspring. These findings suggest that UCHL1 and SCRN1 may be used as fetal programming-related obesity markers.

  12. Analysis of proteins and proteomes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mann, M; Hendrickson, R C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-01

    A decade after the discovery of electrospray and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI), methods that finally allowed gentle ionization of large biomolecules, mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool in protein analysis and the key technology in the emerging field of proteomics. The success of mass spectrometry is driven both by innovative instrumentation designs, especially those operating on the time-of-flight or ion-trapping principles, and by large-scale biochemical strategies, which use mass spectrometry to detect the isolated proteins. Any human protein can now be identified directly from genome databases on the basis of minimal data derived by mass spectrometry. As has already happened in genomics, increased automation of sample handling, analysis, and the interpretation of results will generate an avalanche of qualitative and quantitative proteomic data. Protein-protein interactions can be analyzed directly by precipitation of a tagged bait followed by mass spectrometric identification of its binding partners. By these and similar strategies, entire protein complexes, signaling pathways, and whole organelles are being characterized. Posttranslational modifications remain difficult to analyze but are starting to yield to generic strategies.

  13. Proteomic analysis of indium embryotoxicity in cultured postimplantation rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Usami, Makoto; Nakajima, Mikio; Mitsunaga, Katsuyoshi; Miyajima, Atsuko; Sunouchi, Momoko; Doi, Osamu

    2009-12-01

    Indium embryotoxicity was investigated by proteomic analysis with two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat embryos cultured from day 10.5 of gestation for 24h in the presence of 50 microM indium trichloride. In the embryo proper, indium increased quantity of several protein spots including those identified as serum albumin, phosphorylated cofilin 1, phosphorylated destrin and tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. The increased serum albumin, derived from the culture medium composed of rat serum, may decrease the toxicity of indium. The increase of phosphorylated cofilin 1 might be involved in dysmorphogenicity of indium through perturbation of actin functions. In the yolk sac membrane, indium induced quantitative and qualitative changes in the protein spots. Proteins from appeared spots included stress proteins, and those from decreased or disappeared spots included serum proteins, glycolytic pathway enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins, indicating yolk sac dysfunction. Thus, several candidate proteins that might be involved in indium embryotoxicity were identified.

  14. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  15. Prediction of acute coronary syndromes by urinary proteome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Nay M.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Lyons, Jasmine; Petit, Thibault; Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Ramirez-Torres, Adela; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Maahs, David; Schanstra, Joost P.; Pontillo, Claudia; Pejchinovski, Martin; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; Delles, Christian; Mischak, Harald; Staessen, Jan A.; Shaw, Jonathan E.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of individuals who are at risk of suffering from acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may allow to introduce preventative measures. We aimed to identify ACS-related urinary peptides, that combined as a pattern can be used as prognostic biomarker. Proteomic data of 252 individuals enrolled in four prospective studies from Australia, Europe and North America were analyzed. 126 of these had suffered from ACS within a period of up to 5 years post urine sampling (cases). Proteomic analysis of 84 cases and 84 matched controls resulted in the discovery of 75 ACS-related urinary peptides. Combining these to a peptide pattern, we established a prognostic biomarker named Acute Coronary Syndrome Predictor 75 (ACSP75). ACSP75 demonstrated reasonable prognostic discrimination (c-statistic = 0.664), which was similar to Framingham risk scoring (c-statistics = 0.644) in a validation cohort of 42 cases and 42 controls. However, generating by a composite algorithm named Acute Coronary Syndrome Composite Predictor (ACSCP), combining the biomarker pattern ACSP75 with the previously established urinary proteomic biomarker CAD238 characterizing coronary artery disease as the underlying aetiology, and age as a risk factor, further improved discrimination (c-statistic = 0.751) resulting in an added prognostic value over Framingham risk scoring expressed by an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.273 ± 0.048 (P < 0.0001) and net reclassification improvement of 0.405 ± 0.113 (P = 0.0007). In conclusion, we demonstrate that urinary peptide biomarkers have the potential to predict future ACS events in asymptomatic patients. Further large scale studies are warranted to determine the role of urinary biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:28273075

  16. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to Identify and Implement Highly Characterized Targeted Proteomics Assays.

    PubMed

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Halusa, Goran N; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John A; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, D R; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Meyer, Matthew R; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A; Chan, Daniel W; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri R; Ellis, Matthew J C; Fenyö, David; Hiltke, Tara; Ketchum, Karen A; Kinsinger, Chris; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel C; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael J; Qian, Wei-Jun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D; Ruggles, Kelly V; Scott, Mitchell G; Smith, Richard D; Thomas, Stefani; Townsend, R Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-01-01

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and posttranslational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  17. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  18. A Proteomic Analysis of Maize Chloroplast Biogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Lonosky, Patricia M.; Zhang, Xiaosi; Honavar, Vasant G.; Dobbs, Drena L.; Fu, Aigen; Rodermel, Steve R.

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics studies to explore global patterns of protein expression in plant and green algal systems have proliferated within the past few years. Although most of these studies have involved mapping of the proteomes of various organs, tissues, cells, or organelles, comparative proteomics experiments have also led to the identification of proteins that change in abundance in various developmental or physiological contexts. Despite the growing use of proteomics in plant studies, questions of reproducibility have not generally been addressed, nor have quantitative methods been widely used, for example, to identify protein expression classes. In this report, we use the de-etiolation (“greening”) of maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts as a model system to explore these questions, and we outline a reproducible protocol to identify changes in the plastid proteome that occur during the greening process using techniques of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. We also evaluate hierarchical and nonhierarchical statistical methods to analyze the patterns of expression of 526 “high-quality,” unique spots on the two-dimensional gels. We conclude that Adaptive Resonance Theory 2—a nonhierarchical, neural clustering technique that has not been previously applied to gene expression data—is a powerful technique for discriminating protein expression classes during greening. Our experiments provide a foundation for the use of proteomics in the design of experiments to address fundamental questions in plant physiology and molecular biology. PMID:14966246

  19. Proteome analysis of the plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shu; Luo, Jianying; Pan, Xiayan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Wenjun; Chen, Changjun; Hou, Yiping; Ma, Hongyu; Zhou, Mingguo

    2013-08-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the causal agent of bacterial blight, which is one of the most serious diseases of rice. Xoo has been studied for over one century, and much has been learned about it, but proteomic investigation has been neglected. In this study, proteome reference maps of Xoo were constructed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and 628 spots in the gels representing 469 different protein species were identified with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The identified spots were assigned to 15 functional categories according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database and the annotations from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. The data set has been deposited in the World-2DPAGE database (Database ID: 0044). In addition, comparative proteomic analysis revealed that proteins related to the TonB-dependent transportation system and energy metabolism are involved in the phenazine-1-carboxylic acid resistance in Xoo. In conclusion, we have established a proteome database for Xoo and have used this database in a comparative proteomic analysis that identified proteins potentially contributing to phenazine-1-carboxylic acid resistance in Xoo.

  20. Nanobiocatalysis for protein digestion in proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungbae; Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-02-01

    The process of protein digestion is a critical step for successful protein identification in the bottom-up proteomic analysis. To substitute the present practice of in-solution protein digestion, which is long, tedious, and difficult to automate, a lot of efforts have been dedicated for the development of a rapid, recyclable and automated digestion system. Recent advances of nanobiocatalytic approaches have improved the performance of protein digestion by using various nanomaterials such as nanoporous materials, magnetic nanoparticles, and polymer nanofibers. Especially, the unprecedented success of trypsin stabilization in the form of trypsin-coated nanofibers, showing no activity decrease under repeated uses for one year and retaining good resistance to proteolysis, has demonstrated its great potential to be employed in the development of automated, high-throughput, and on-line digestion systems. This review discusses recent developments of nanobiocatalytic approaches for the improved performance of protein digestion in speed, detection sensitivity, recyclability, and trypsin stability. In addition, we also introduce the protein digestions under unconventional energy inputs for protein denaturation and the development of microfluidic enzyme reactors that can benefit from recent successes of these nanobiocatalytic approaches.

  1. A Comprehensive Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Hydra Head Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hendrik O.; Höger, Stefanie K.; Looso, Mario; Lengfeld, Tobias; Kuhn, Anne; Warnken, Uwe; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Schnölzer, Martina; Krüger, Marcus; Özbek, Suat; Simakov, Oleg; Holstein, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    The cnidarian freshwater polyp Hydra sp. exhibits an unparalleled regeneration capacity in the animal kingdom. Using an integrative transcriptomic and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture proteomic/phosphoproteomic approach, we studied stem cell-based regeneration in Hydra polyps. As major contributors to head regeneration, we identified diverse signaling pathways adopted for the regeneration response as well as enriched novel genes. Our global analysis reveals two distinct molecular cascades: an early injury response and a subsequent, signaling driven patterning of the regenerating tissue. A key factor of the initial injury response is a general stabilization of proteins and a net upregulation of transcripts, which is followed by a subsequent activation cascade of signaling molecules including Wnts and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-related factors. We observed moderate overlap between the factors contributing to proteomic and transcriptomic responses suggesting a decoupled regulation between the transcriptional and translational levels. Our data also indicate that interstitial stem cells and their derivatives (e.g., neurons) have no major role in Hydra head regeneration. Remarkably, we found an enrichment of evolutionarily more recent genes in the early regeneration response, whereas conserved genes are more enriched in the late phase. In addition, genes specific to the early injury response were enriched in transposon insertions. Genetic dynamicity and taxon-specific factors might therefore play a hitherto underestimated role in Hydra regeneration. PMID:25841488

  2. Proteomic analysis of amphiphilic proteins of hexaploid wheat kernels.

    PubMed

    Amiour, Nardjis; Merlino, Marielle; Leroy, Philippe; Branlard, Gérard

    2002-06-01

    Wheat proteins and specially gluten proteins have been well studied and are closely associated with baking products. Amphiphilic proteins (proteins that are soluble using nonionic detergent Triton X-114 ) also play an important role in wheat quality. Some of them, like puroindolines, are lipid binding proteins, and are strongly linked to dough foaming properties and to fine crumb texture. However many amphiphilic proteins are still unknown and both their physiological and technological functions remain to be analysed. In order to explore these proteins, proteomic analysis was carried out using 81 F9 lines, progeny obtained from an interspecific cross "W7984"x"Opata", and already used to built a map of more than 2000 molecular markers (International Triticeae Mapping Initiative, ITMImap). Two-dimensional electrophoresis (immobilized pH gradient (pH 6-11)x sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) was performed on amphiphilic proteins with three to five replicates for each line. Silver stained gels were analysed using Melanie 3 software. Genetic determinism was carried out on 170 spots segregating between the two parental hexaploïd wheats. Many of these spots were mapped on different chromosomes of the ITMImap. Spots of interest were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight and some of them were partly sequenced using electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. This proteomic approach provided some very useful information about some proteic components linked to bread wheat quality and particularly to kernel hardness.

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Proton Beam Irradiated Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Elas, Martyna; Sowa, Urszula; Swakon, Jan; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Olko, Pawel; Romanowska-Dixon, Bozena; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy) of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times) change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i) DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH), (ii) cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70), (iii) cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP), and (iv) cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B). A substantial decrease (2.3 x) was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma. PMID:24392146

  4. Two-dimensional gel proteomic analysis of Dermatophagoides farinae feces.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophagoides farinae fecal allergens are a major source of immunogens in home environments; however, as the source of mite fecal allergen is considered spent growth medium extract that can only mimic the pure fecal extract. In this study, we prepared and using proteomic methods analyzed a D. farinae fecal extract for the first time. The preparation approach used D. farinae feces that were produced within 8 weeks of initiating cultivation in minimized growth media. The feces were collected via adhesion to the tissue culture flask surfaces after removing the SGM and mites. This study contains in-depth proteomic mapping of the allergenic isoforms from the D. farinae fecal extract. Despite extensive analysis, MALDI TOF/TOF spectrometry showed that only six proteins/allergens, Der f1, Der f2, Der f3, Der f6, Der f15 and ferritin, originated from D. farinae. No other analyzed proteins were exactly assigned to Dermatophagoides or to similar invertebrate species by sequence similarity. The remaining proteins were assigned mostly to yeasts or cereals (originally dietary proteins); however, many of the proteins were not successfully identified in the current NCBInr. The numerous dietary proteins identified in the feces suggest that these proteins remained highly stable after passing through the gut. Isoforms of the allergens Der f1, Der f3 and Der f15 were identified in more MWs indicating the presence of zymogens and active-enzyme forms. The identified fecal allergens accumulate in the environment during the life of the mite and represent quantitatively greater amounts of mite immunogens than those that were missed in the 2D-E. The results contribute to our understanding of D. farinae digestive physiology with regard to the enzymes/proteins present in the feces.

  5. Human saliva proteome analysis and disease biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shen; Loo, Joseph A; Wong, David T

    2007-08-01

    Human saliva is an attractive body fluid for disease diagnosis and prognosis because saliva testing is simple, safe, low-cost and noninvasive. Comprehensive analysis and identification of the proteomic content in human whole and ductal saliva will not only contribute to the understanding of oral health and disease pathogenesis, but also form a foundation for the discovery of saliva protein biomarkers for human disease detection. In this article, we have summarized the proteomic technologies for comprehensive identification of proteins in human whole and ductal saliva. We have also discussed potential quantitative proteomic approaches to the discovery of saliva protein biomarkers for human oral and systemic diseases. With the fast development of mass spectrometry and proteomic technologies, we are enthusiastic that saliva protein biomarkers will be developed for clinical diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases in the future.

  6. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris—Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed Central

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J.; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications. PMID:26986963

  7. Annotation of the zebrafish genome through an integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Provost, Elayne; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Manda, Srikanth S; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N; Wang, Chieh-Huei; Datta, Keshava K; Woo, Sunghee; Dwivedi, Sutopa B; Renuse, Santosh; Getnet, Derese; Huang, Tai-Chung; Kim, Min-Sik; Pinto, Sneha M; Mitchell, Christopher J; Madugundu, Anil K; Kumar, Praveen; Sharma, Jyoti; Advani, Jayshree; Dey, Gourav; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Syed, Nazia; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Goel, Renu; Prasad, T S Keshava; Bafna, Vineet; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Gowda, Harsha; Wang, Charles; Leach, Steven D; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-11-01

    Accurate annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary tasks upon the completion of whole genome sequencing of any organism. In this study, we used an integrated transcriptomic and proteomic strategy to validate and improve the existing zebrafish genome annotation. We undertook high-resolution mass-spectrometry-based proteomic profiling of 10 adult organs, whole adult fish body, and two developmental stages of zebrafish (SAT line), in addition to transcriptomic profiling of six organs. More than 7,000 proteins were identified from proteomic analyses, and ∼ 69,000 high-confidence transcripts were assembled from the RNA sequencing data. Approximately 15% of the transcripts mapped to intergenic regions, the majority of which are likely long non-coding RNAs. These high-quality transcriptomic and proteomic data were used to manually reannotate the zebrafish genome. We report the identification of 157 novel protein-coding genes. In addition, our data led to modification of existing gene structures including novel exons, changes in exon coordinates, changes in frame of translation, translation in annotated UTRs, and joining of genes. Finally, we discovered four instances of genome assembly errors that were supported by both proteomic and transcriptomic data. Our study shows how an integrative analysis of the transcriptome and the proteome can extend our understanding of even well-annotated genomes.

  8. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    PubMed

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  9. A targeted proteomic multiplex CSF assay identifies increased malate dehydrogenase and other neurodegenerative biomarkers in individuals with Alzheimer's disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Heywood, W E; Heslegrave, A J; Magdalinou, N K; Andreasson, U; Sirka, E; Bliss, E; Slattery, C F; Toombs, J; Svensson, J; Johansson, P; Fox, N C; Zetterberg, H; Mills, K; Schott, J M

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Biomarkers are required to identify individuals in the preclinical phase, explain phenotypic diversity, measure progression and estimate prognosis. The development of assays to validate candidate biomarkers is costly and time-consuming. Targeted proteomics is an attractive means of quantifying novel proteins in cerebrospinal and other fluids, and has potential to help overcome this bottleneck in biomarker development. We used a previously validated multiplexed 10-min, targeted proteomic assay to assess 54 candidate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in two independent cohorts comprising individuals with neurodegenerative dementias and healthy controls. Individuals were classified as ‘AD' or ‘non-AD' on the basis of their CSF T-tau and amyloid Aβ1–42 profile measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; biomarkers of interest were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. In all, 35/31 individuals in Cohort 1 and 46/36 in Cohort 2 fulfilled criteria for AD/non-AD profile CSF, respectively. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, five proteins were elevated significantly in AD CSF compared with non-AD CSF in both cohorts: malate dehydrogenase; total APOE; chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40); osteopontin and cystatin C. In an independent multivariate orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), these proteins were also identified as major contributors to the separation between AD and non-AD in both cohorts. Independent of CSF Aβ1–42 and tau, a combination of these biomarkers differentiated AD and non-AD with an area under curve (AUC)=0.88. This targeted proteomic multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-based assay can simultaneously and rapidly measure multiple candidate CSF biomarkers. Applying this technique to AD we demonstrate differences in proteins involved in glucose metabolism and neuroinflammation that collectively have potential clinical

  10. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPARgamma as an exosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W; Shen, Rong-Fong; Daniels, Mathew P; Levine, Stewart J

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPARgamma as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  11. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  12. Proteomic analysis of urine exosomes by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Hill, Salisha; Luther, James M; Hachey, David L; Schey, Kevin L

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles that are secreted by cells upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomal proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to understand the molecular composition of exosomes and has potential to accelerate biomarker discovery. Different proteomic analysis methods have been previously employed to establish several exosome protein databases. In this study, TFE solution-phase digestion was compared with in-gel digestion and found to yield similar results. Proteomic analysis of urinary exosomes was performed by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) after TFE digestion. Nearly, 3280 proteins were identified from nine human urine samples with 31% overlap among nine samples. Gene ontology (GO) analysis, coupled with detection of all of the members of ESCRT machinery complex, supports the multivesicular origin of these particles. These results significantly expand the existing database of urinary exosome proteins. Our results also indicate that more than 1000 proteins can be detected from exosomes prepared from as little as 25 mL of urine. This study provides the largest set of proteins present in human urinary exosome proteomes, provides a valuable reference for future studies, and provides methods that can be applied to exosomal proteomic analysis from other tissue sources.

  13. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Scott M; Moore, Kaitlyn E; Sankaran, Saumya M; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E; Gozani, Or

    2015-05-08

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5' splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates.

  14. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    results support the use of this experimental approach to systematically identify cell pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in tick–pathogen interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002181. PMID:26424601

  15. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    support the use of this experimental approach to systematically identify cell pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in tick-pathogen interactions. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002181.

  16. SILAC proteomics of planarians identifies Ncoa5 as a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Böser, Alexander; Drexler, Hannes C A; Reuter, Hanna; Schmitz, Henning; Wu, Guangming; Schöler, Hans R; Gentile, Luca; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2013-11-27

    Planarian regeneration depends on the presence of pluripotent stem cells in the adult. We developed an in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) protocol in planarians to identify proteins that are enriched in planarian stem cells. Through a comparison of SILAC proteomes of normal and stem cell-depleted planarians and of a stem cell-enriched population of sorted cells, we identified hundreds of stem cell proteins. One of these is an ortholog of nuclear receptor coactivator-5 (Ncoa5/CIA), which is known to regulate estrogen-receptor-mediated transcription in human cells. We show that Ncoa5 is essential for the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell population in planarians and that a putative mouse ortholog is expressed in pluripotent cells of the embryo. Our study thus identifies a conserved component of pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating that planarians, in particular, when combined with in vivo SILAC, are a powerful model in stem cell research.

  17. Proteomic analysis of the Cyanophora paradoxa muroplast provides clues on early events in plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Pribil, Mathias; Oster, Ulrike; Ebert, Nina J; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Leister, Dario; Weber, Andreas P M

    2013-02-01

    Glaucophytes represent the first lineage of photosynthetic eukaryotes of primary endosymbiotic origin that diverged after plastid establishment. The muroplast of Cyanophora paradoxa represents a primitive plastid that resembles its cyanobacterial ancestor in pigment composition and the presence of a peptidoglycan wall. To attain insights into the evolutionary history of cyanobiont integration and plastid development, it would thus be highly desirable to obtain knowledge on the composition of the glaucophyte plastid proteome. Here, we provide the first proteomic analysis of the muroplast of C. paradoxa. Mass spectrometric analysis of the muroplast proteome identified 510 proteins with high confidence. The protein repertoire of the muroplast revealed novel paths for reduced carbon flow and export to the cytosol through a sugar phosphate transporter of chlamydial origin. We propose that C. paradoxa possesses a primordial plastid mirroring the situation in the early protoalga.

  18. Proteomic analysis uncovers a metabolic phenotype in C. elegans after nhr-40 reduction of function

    SciTech Connect

    Pohludka, Michal; Simeckova, Katerina; Vohanka, Jaroslav; Yilma, Petr; Novak, Petr; Krause, Michael W.; Kostrouchova, Marta; Kostrouch, Zdenek

    2008-09-12

    Caenorhabditis elegans has an unexpectedly large number (284) of genes encoding nuclear hormone receptors, most of which are nematode-specific and are of unknown function. We have exploited comparative two-dimensional chromatography of synchronized cultures of wild type C. elegans larvae and a mutant in nhr-40 to determine if proteomic approaches will provide additional insight into gene function. Chromatofocusing, followed by reversed-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, identified altered chromatographic patterns for a set of proteins, many of which function in muscle and metabolism. Prompted by the proteomic analysis, we find that the penetrance of the developmental phenotypes in the mutant is enhanced at low temperatures and by food restriction. The combination of our phenotypic and proteomic analysis strongly suggests that NHR-40 provides a link between metabolism and muscle development. Our results highlight the utility of comparative two-dimensional chromatography to provide a relatively rapid method to gain insight into gene function.

  19. Preprocessing and Analysis of LC-MS-Based Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Wang, Minkun; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2016-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been widely used for profiling protein expression levels. This chapter is focused on LC-MS data preprocessing, which is a crucial step in the analysis of LC-MS based proteomics. We provide a high-level overview, highlight associated challenges, and present a step-by-step example for analysis of data from LC-MS based untargeted proteomic study. Furthermore, key procedures and relevant issues with the subsequent analysis by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) are discussed. PMID:26519169

  20. Proteomics Analysis of Alfalfa Response to Heat Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Wei, Zhenwu; Qiao, Zhihong; Wu, Zinian; Cheng, Lixiang; Wang, Yuyang

    2013-01-01

    The proteome responses to heat stress have not been well understood. In this study, alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. cv. Huaiyin) seedlings were exposed to 25°C (control) and 40°C (heat stress) in growth chambers, and leaves were collected at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. The morphological, physiological and proteomic processes were negatively affected under heat stress. Proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and differentially expressed protein spots were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Totally, 81 differentially expressed proteins were identified successfully by MALDI-TOF/TOF. These proteins were categorized into nine classes: including metabolism, energy, protein synthesis, protein destination/storage, transporters, intracellular traffic, cell structure, signal transduction and disease/defence. Five proteins were further analyzed for mRNA levels. The results of the proteomics analyses provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of heat-stress responses in alfalfa. PMID:24324825

  1. Evaluation of proteomic search engines for the analysis of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-10-03

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118.

  2. Evaluation of Proteomic Search Engines for the Analysis of Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  3. Comparative Analysis of Genomics and Proteomics in Bacillus thuringiensis 4.0718

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Jie; He, Hao; Wang, Ting; Ding, Xuezhi; Zuo, Mingxing; Quan, Meifang; Sun, Yunjun; Yu, Ziquan; Hu, Shengbiao; Xia, Liqiu

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used biopesticide that produced various insecticidal active substances during its life cycle. Separation and purification of numerous insecticide active substances have been difficult because of the relatively short half-life of such substances. On the other hand, substances can be synthetized at different times during development, so samples at different stages have to be studied, further complicating the analysis. A dual genomic and proteomic approach would enhance our ability to identify such substances, and particularily using mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. The comparative analysis for genomic and proteomic data have showed that not all of the products deduced from the annotated genome could be identified among the proteomic data. For instance, genome annotation results showed that 39 coding sequences in the whole genome were related to insect pathogenicity, including five cry genes. However, Cry2Ab, Cry1Ia, Cytotoxin K, Bacteriocin, Exoenzyme C3 and Alveolysin could not be detected in the proteomic data obtained. The sporulation-related proteins were also compared analysis, results showed that the great majority sporulation-related proteins can be detected by mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed Spo0A~P, SigF, SigE(+), SigK(+) and SigG(+), all known to play an important role in the process of spore formation regulatory network, also were displayed in the proteomic data. Through the comparison of the two data sets, it was possible to infer that some genes were silenced or were expressed at very low levels. For instance, found that cry2Ab seems to lack a functional promoter while cry1Ia may not be expressed due to the presence of transposons. With this comparative study a relatively complete database can be constructed and used to transform hereditary material, thereby prompting the high expression of toxic proteins. A theoretical basis is provided for constructing highly virulent engineered bacteria and for

  4. Targeted proteomics in urinary extracellular vesicles identifies biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Tamara; Rigau, Marina; Chiva, Cristina; Montes, Melania; Garcia-Grau, Iolanda; Garcia, Marta; Diaz, Sherley; Celma, Ana; Bijnsdorp, Irene; Campos, Alex; Di Mauro, Primiano; Borrós, Salvador; Reventós, Jaume; Doll, Andreas; Paciucci, Rosanna; Pegtel, Michiel; de Torres, Inés; Sabidó, Eduard; Morote, Juan; Olivan, Mireia

    2017-01-17

    Rapid and reliable diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is highly desirable as current used methods lack specificity. In addition, identification of PCa biomarkers that can classify patients into high- and low-risk groups for disease progression at early stage will improve treatment decision-making. Here, we describe a set of protein-combination panels in urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs), defined by targeted proteomics and immunoblotting techniques that improve early non-invasive detection and stratification of PCa patients.We report a two-protein combination in urinary EVs that classifies benign and PCa patients (ADSV-TGM4), and a combination of five proteins able to significantly distinguish between high- and low-grade PCa patients (CD63-GLPK5-SPHM-PSA-PAPP). Proteins composing the panels were validated by immunohistochemistry assays in tissue microarrays (TMAs) confirming a strong link between the urinary EVs proteome and alterations in PCa tissues. Moreover, ADSV and TGM4 abundance yielded a high diagnostic potential in tissue and promising TGM4 prognostic power. These results suggest that the proteins identified in urinary EVs distinguishing high- and low grade PCa are a reflection of histological changes that may be a consequence of their functional involvement in PCa development. In conclusion, our study resulted in the identification of protein-combination panels present in urinary EVs that exhibit high sensitivity and specificity for PCa detection and patient stratification. Moreover, our study highlights the potential of targeted proteomic approaches-such as selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-as diagnostic assay for liquid biopsies via urinary EVs to improve diagnosis and prognosis of suspected PCa patients.

  5. Glycomic and Proteomic Profiling of Pancreatic Cyst Fluids Identifies Hyperfucosylated Lactosamines on the N-linked Glycans of Overexpressed Glycoproteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; House, Michael G.; Schmidt, C. Max; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and it is associated with an alarmingly low 5-year survival rate of 5%. However, a patient's prognosis is considerably improved when the malignant lesions are identified at an early stage of the disease and removed by surgical resection. Unfortunately, the absence of a practical screening strategy and clinical diagnostic test for identifying premalignant lesions within the pancreas often prevents early detection of pancreatic cancer. To aid in the development of a molecular screening system for early detection of the disease, we have performed glycomic and glycoproteomic profiling experiments on 21 pancreatic cyst fluid samples, including fluids from mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, two types of mucinous cysts that are considered high risk to undergo malignant transformation. A total of 80 asparagine-linked (N-linked) glycans, including high mannose and complex structures, were identified. Of special interest was a series of complex N-linked glycans containing two to six fucose residues, located predominantly as substituents on β-lactosamine extensions. Following the observation of these “hyperfucosylated” glycans, bottom-up proteomics experiments utilizing a label-free quantitative approach were applied to the investigation of two sets of tryptically digested proteins derived from the cyst fluids: 1) all soluble proteins in the raw samples and 2) a subproteome of the soluble cyst fluid proteins that were selectively enriched for fucosylation through the use of surface-immobilized Aleuria aurantia lectin. A comparative analysis of these two proteomic data sets identified glycoproteins that were significantly enriched by lectin affinity. Several candidate glycoproteins that appear hyperfucosylated were identified, including triacylglycerol lipase and pancreatic α-amylase, which were 20- and 22-fold more abundant, respectively

  6. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Urine from Gamma-Irradiated Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, Stephanie D; Burdine, Marie S; Orr, Lisa; Moreland, Linley; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Authier, Simon; Pouliot, Mylene; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    The molecular effects of total body gamma-irradiation exposure are of critical importance as large populations of people could be exposed either by terrorists, nuclear blast, or medical therapy. In this study, we aimed to identify changes in the urine proteome using a non-human primate model system, Rhesus macaque, in order to characterize effects of acute radiation syndrome following whole body irradiation (Co-60) at 6.7 Gy and 7.4 Gy with a twelve day observation period. The urine proteome is potentially a valuable and non-invasive diagnostic for radiation exposure. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 2346 proteins in the urine proteome. We show proteins involved in disease, cell adhesion, and metabolic pathway were significantly changed upon exposure to differing levels and durations of radiation exposure. Cell damage increased at a faster rate at 7.4 Gy compared with 6.7 Gy exposures. We report sets of proteins that are putative biomarkers of time- and dose-dependent radiation exposure. The proteomic study presented here is a comprehensive analysis of the urine proteome following radiation exposure. PMID:26962295

  7. Trends in proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor samples.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ana S; Santos, Fátima M; Monteiro, João P; Castro-de-Sousa, João P; Queiroz, João A; Tomaz, Cândida T; Passarinha, Luís A

    2014-09-01

    Proteomic analysis of human vitreous humor (VH) may elucidate the pathogenesis of retinal ocular diseases and may provide information for the development of potential therapeutic targets due to its pivotal location near lens and retina. The discovery of whole VH proteome involves a complex analysis of thousands of proteins simultaneously. Therefore, in proteomic studies the protein fractionation is important for reducing sample complexity, facilitating the access to the low-abundant proteins, and recognizing them as biotargets for clinical research. Although several separation methods have been used, gel-based proteomics are the most popular and versatile ones applied for global protein separation. However, chromatographic methods and its combination with other separation techniques are now beginning to be used as promising set-ups for VH protein identification. This review attempts to offer an overview of the techniques currently used with VH, exploring its methodological demands, exposing its advantages, and helping the reader to plan future experiences. Moreover, this review shows the relevance of VH proteomic analysis as a tool for the study of the mechanisms underlying some ocular diseases and for the development of new therapeutic approaches.

  8. Comprehensive genome-wide proteomic analysis of human placental tissue for the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Na, Keun; Lee, Min Jung; Lee, Sun Hee; Lim, Jong-Sun; Cha, Hyun-Jeong; Cho, Jin-Young; Kwon, Ja-Young; Kim, Hoguen; Song, Si Young; Yoo, Jong Shin; Park, Young Mok; Kim, Hail; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2013-06-07

    As a starting point of the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), we established strategies of genome-wide proteomic analysis, including protein identification, quantitation of disease-specific proteins, and assessment of post-translational modifications, using paired human placental tissues from healthy and preeclampsia patients. This analysis resulted in identification of 4239 unique proteins with high confidence (two or more unique peptides with a false discovery rate less than 1%), covering 21% of approximately 20, 059 (Ensembl v69, Oct 2012) human proteins, among which 28 proteins exhibited differentially expressed preeclampsia-specific proteins. When these proteins are assigned to all human chromosomes, the pattern of the newly identified placental protein population is proportional to that of the gene count distribution of each chromosome. We also identified 219 unique N-linked glycopeptides, 592 unique phosphopeptides, and 66 chromosome 13-specific proteins. In particular, protein evidence of 14 genes previously known to be specifically up-regulated in human placenta was verified by mass spectrometry. With respect to the functional implication of these proteins, 38 proteins were found to be involved in regulatory factor biosynthesis or the immune system in the placenta, but the molecular mechanism of these proteins during pregnancy warrants further investigation. As far as we know, this work produced the highest number of proteins identified in the placenta and will be useful for annotating and mapping all proteins encoded in the human genome.

  9. Integration of proteomic and transcriptomic profiles identifies a novel PDGF-MYC network in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) has been implicated in the proliferation, migration and synthetic activities of smooth muscle cells that characterize physiologic and pathologic tissue remodeling in hollow organs. However, neither the molecular basis of PDGFR-regulated signaling webs, nor the extent to which specific components within these networks could be exploited for therapeutic benefit has been fully elucidated. Results Expression profiling and quantitative proteomics analysis of PDGF-treated primary human bladder smooth muscle cells identified 1,695 genes and 241 proteins as differentially expressed versus non-treated cells. Analysis of gene expression data revealed MYC, JUN, EGR1, MYB, RUNX1, as the transcription factors most significantly networked with up-regulated genes. Forty targets were significantly altered at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation, migration and angiogenesis were the biological processes most significantly associated with this signature, and MYC was the most highly networked master regulator. Alterations in master regulators and gene targets were validated in PDGF-stimulated smooth muscle cells in vitro and in a model of bladder injury in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of MYC and JUN confirmed their role in SMC proliferation and migration. Network analysis identified the diaphanous-related formin 3 as a novel PDGF target regulated by MYC and JUN, which was necessary for PDGF-stimulated lamellipodium formation. Conclusions These findings provide the first systems-level analysis of the PDGF-regulated transcriptome and proteome in normal smooth muscle cells. The analyses revealed an extensive cohort of PDGF-dependent biological processes and connected key transcriptional effectors to their regulation, significantly expanding current knowledge of PDGF-stimulated signaling cascades. These observations also implicate MYC as a novel target for pharmacological intervention in fibroproliferative expansion of

  10. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Groslambert, Marine; Glass, Mandy; Orr, Anne; Hay, Ronald T.; Everett, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO) family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection. PMID:26200910

  11. Proteomic analysis of arabidopsis seed germination and priming.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, K; Job, C; Groot, S P; Puype, M; Demol, H; Vandekerckhove, J; Job, D

    2001-06-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-regulation) of 74 proteins were observed during germination sensu stricto (i.e. prior to radicle emergence) and the radicle protrusion step. This approach was also used to analyze protein changes occurring during industrial seed pretreatments such as priming that accelerate seed germination and improve seedling uniformity. Several proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Some of them had previously been shown to play a role during germination and/or priming in several plant species, a finding that underlines the usefulness of using Arabidopsis as a model system for molecular analysis of seed quality. Furthermore, the present study, carried out at the protein level, validates previous results obtained at the level of gene expression (e.g. from quantitation of differentially expressed mRNAs or analyses of promoter/reporter constructs). Finally, this approach revealed new proteins associated with the different phases of seed germination and priming. Some of them are involved either in the imbibition process of the seeds (such as an actin isoform or a WD-40 repeat protein) or in the seed dehydration process (e.g. cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). These facts highlight the power of proteomics to unravel specific features of complex developmental processes such as germination and to detect protein markers that can be used to characterize seed vigor of commercial seed lots and to develop and monitor priming treatments.

  12. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lima, Beatriz D.; Roepstorff, Peter; Ricart, Carlos A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote, and amastigote. The differentiation from infective trypomastigotes into replicative amastigotes, called amastigogenesis, takes place in vivo inside mammalian host cells after a period of incubation in an acidic phagolysosome. This differentiation process can be mimicked in vitro by incubating tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes in acidic DMEM. Here we used this well-established differentiation protocol to perform a comprehensive quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of T. cruzi amastigogenesis. Samples from fully differentiated forms and two biologically relevant intermediate time points were Lys-C/trypsin digested, iTRAQ-labeled, and multiplexed. Subsequently, phosphopeptides were enriched using a TiO2 matrix. Non-phosphorylated peptides were fractionated via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics procedures were used for protein and phosphopeptide quantitation, identification, and phosphorylation site assignment. We were able to identify regulated proteins and pathways involved in coordinating amastigogenesis. We also observed that a significant proportion of the regulated proteins were membrane proteins. Modulated phosphorylation events coordinated by protein kinases and phosphatases that are part of the signaling cascade induced by incubation in acidic medium were also evinced. To our knowledge, this work is the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics study of T. cruzi amastigogenesis, and these data will serve as a trustworthy basis for future studies, and possibly for new potential drug targets. PMID:25225356

  13. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  14. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  15. Proteomic analysis of symbiosome membranes in Cnidaria-dinoflagellate endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shao-En; Wang, Yu-Bao; Wang, Li-Hsueh; Chen, Wan-Nan Uang; Lu, Chi-Yu; Fang, Lee-Shing; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2010-03-01

    Symbiosomes are specific intracellular membrane-bound vacuoles containing microalgae in a mutualistic Cnidaria (host)-dinoflagellate (symbiont) association. The symbiosome membrane is originally derived from host plasma membranes during phagocytosis of the symbiont; however, its molecular components and functions are not clear. In order to investigate the protein components of the symbiosome membranes, homogenous symbiosomes were isolated from the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and their purities and membrane intactness examined by Western blot analysis for host contaminants and microscopic analysis using various fluorescent probes, respectively. Pure and intact symbiosomes were then subjected to biotinylation by a cell impermeant agent (Biotin-XX sulfosuccinimidyl ester) to label membrane surface proteins. The biotinylated proteins, both Triton X-100 soluble and insoluble fractions, were subjected to 2-D SDS-PAGE and identified by MS using an LC-nano-ESI-MS/MS. A total of 17 proteins were identified. Based on their different subcellular origins and functional categories, it indicates that symbiosome membranes serve as the interface for interaction between host and symbiont by fulfilling several crucial cellular functions such as those of membrane receptors/cell recognition, cytoskeletal remodeling, ATP synthesis/proton homeostasis, transporters, stress responses/chaperones, and anti-apoptosis. The results of proteomic analysis not only indicate the molecular identity of the symbiosome membrane, but also provide insight into the possible role of symbiosome membranes during the endosymbiotic association.

  16. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics identifies UPF1 as a critical gene expression regulator in MonoMac 6 cells.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Meike J; Ossipova, Elena; Oliynyk, Ganna; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix; Jakobsson, Per-Johan

    2013-06-07

    5-Lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyzes the two initial steps in the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, a group of inflammatory lipid mediators derived from arachidonic acid. Recently, we have demonstrated that 5-LO mRNA expression is regulated by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). In addition to this, 5-LO protein expression was reduced on translational level in UPF1 knockdown cells, suggesting that UPF1 has a positive influence on 5-LO translation. Therefore, a mass spectrometry-based proteomics study was performed to identify compartment-specific protein expression changes upon UPF1 knockdown in differentiated and undifferentiated MM6 cells. The proteomics analysis revealed that the knockdown of UPF1 results in numerous protein changes in the microsomal fraction (~21%) but not in the cytosolic fraction (<1%). The results suggest that UPF1 is a critical gene expression regulator in a compartment-specific way. During differentiation by TGFβ and calcitriol, the majority of UPF1 regulated proteins were adjusted to normal level. This indicates that the translational regulation by UPF1 can potentially be cell differentiation-dependent.

  17. Use of Quantitative Membrane Proteomics Identifies a Novel Role of Mitochondria in Healing Injured Muscles*

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nimisha; Medikayala, Sushma; Defour, Aurelia; Rayavarapu, Sree; Brown, Kristy J.; Hathout, Yetrib; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are proficient at healing from a variety of injuries. Healing occurs in two phases, early and late phase. Early phase involves healing the injured sarcolemma and restricting the spread of damage to the injured myofiber. Late phase of healing occurs a few days postinjury and involves interaction of injured myofibers with regenerative and inflammatory cells. Of the two phases, cellular and molecular processes involved in the early phase of healing are poorly understood. We have implemented an improved sarcolemmal proteomics approach together with in vivo labeling of proteins with modified amino acids in mice to study acute changes in the sarcolemmal proteome in early phase of myofiber injury. We find that a notable early phase response to muscle injury is an increased association of mitochondria with the injured sarcolemma. Real-time imaging of live myofibers during injury demonstrated that the increased association of mitochondria with the injured sarcolemma involves translocation of mitochondria to the site of injury, a response that is lacking in cultured myoblasts. Inhibiting mitochondrial function at the time of injury inhibited healing of the injured myofibers. This identifies a novel role of mitochondria in the early phase of healing injured myofibers. PMID:22778268

  18. Proteomic analysis of an unsequenced plant--Mangifera indica.

    PubMed

    Renuse, Santosh; Harsha, H C; Kumar, Praveen; Acharya, Pradip Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Goel, Renu; Kumar, Ghantasala S Sameer; Raju, Rajesh; Prasad, T S Keshava; Slotta, Tracey; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2012-10-22

    Mangifera indica (Mango) is an important fruit crop in tropical countries with India being the leading producer in the world. Substantial research efforts are being devoted to produce fruit that have desirable characteristics including those that pertain to taste, hardiness and resistance to pests. Characterization of the genome and proteome of mango would help in the improvement of cultivars. As the mango genome has not yet been sequenced, we employed a mass spectrometry-based approach followed by database searches of mango-derived ESTs and proteins along with proteins from six other closely related plant species to characterize its proteome. In addition to this, de novo sequencing followed by homology-based protein identification was also carried out. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the mango leaf proteome was performed using an accurate mass quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This integrative approach enabled the identification of 1001 peptides that matched to 538 proteins. To our knowledge, this study is the first high-throughput analysis of mango leaf proteome and could pave the way for further genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic studies.

  19. Proteomic analysis of ripening tomato fruit infected by Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Powell, Ann L T; Orlando, Ron; Bergmann, Carl; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2012-04-06

    Botrytis cinerea, a model necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes gray mold as it infects different organs on more than 200 plant species, is a significant contributor to postharvest rot in fresh fruit and vegetables, including tomatoes. By describing host and pathogen proteomes simultaneously in infected tissues, the plant proteins that provide resistance and allow susceptibility and the pathogen proteins that promote colonization and facilitate quiescence can be identified. This study characterizes fruit and fungal proteins solubilized in the B. cinerea-tomato interaction using shotgun proteomics. Mature green, red ripe wild type and ripening inhibited (rin) mutant tomato fruit were infected with B. cinerea B05.10, and the fruit and fungal proteomes were identified concurrently 3 days postinfection. One hundred eighty-six tomato proteins were identified in common among red ripe and red ripe-equivalent ripening inhibited (rin) mutant tomato fruit infected by B. cinerea. However, the limited infections by B. cinerea of mature green wild type fruit resulted in 25 and 33% fewer defense-related tomato proteins than in red and rin fruit, respectively. In contrast, the ripening stage of genotype of the fruit infected did not affect the secreted proteomes of B. cinerea. The composition of the collected proteins populations and the putative functions of the identified proteins argue for their role in plant-pathogen interactions.

  20. Pathway analysis of kidney cancer using proteomics and metabolic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Perroud, Bertrand; Lee, Jinoo; Valkova, Nelly; Dhirapong, Amy; Lin, Pei-Yin; Fiehn, Oliver; Kültz, Dietmar; Weiss, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the sixth leading cause of cancer death and is responsible for 11,000 deaths per year in the US. Approximately one-third of patients present with disease which is already metastatic and for which there is currently no adequate treatment, and no biofluid screening tests exist for RCC. In this study, we have undertaken a comprehensive proteomic analysis and subsequently a pathway and network approach to identify biological processes involved in clear cell RCC (ccRCC). We have used these data to investigate urinary markers of RCC which could be applied to high-risk patients, or to those being followed for recurrence, for early diagnosis and treatment, thereby substantially reducing mortality of this disease. Results Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis, we identified 31 proteins which were differentially expressed with a high degree of significance in ccRCC as compared to adjacent non-malignant tissue, and we confirmed some of these by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and comparison to published transcriptomic data. When evaluated by several pathway and biological process analysis programs, these proteins are demonstrated to be involved with a high degree of confidence (p values < 2.0 E-05) in glycolysis, propanoate metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, urea cycle and arginine/proline metabolism, as well as in the non-metabolic p53 and FAS pathways. In a pilot study using random urine samples from both ccRCC and control patients, we performed metabolic profiling and found that only sorbitol, a component of an alternative glycolysis pathway, is significantly elevated at 5.4-fold in RCC patients as compared to controls. Conclusion Extensive pathway and network analysis allowed for the discovery of highly significant pathways from a set of clear cell RCC samples. Knowledge of activation of these processes will lead to novel assays identifying their proteomic and/or metabolomic signatures in biofluids

  1. Computational Proteomics: High-throughput Analysis for Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, William R.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2007-01-03

    High-throughput (HTP) proteomics is a rapidly developing field that offers the global profiling of proteins from a biological system. The HTP technological advances are fueling a revolution in biology, enabling analyses at the scales of entire systems (e.g., whole cells, tumors, or environmental communities). However, simply identifying the proteins in a cell is insufficient for understanding the underlying complexity and operating mechanisms of the overall system. Systems level investigations are relying more and more on computational analyses, especially in the field of proteomics generating large-scale global data.

  2. Proteomic analysis of tissue samples in translational breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Gromov, Pavel; Moreira, José M A; Gromova, Irina

    2014-06-01

    In the last decade, many proteomic technologies have been applied, with varying success, to the study of tissue samples of breast carcinoma for protein expression profiling in order to discover protein biomarkers/signatures suitable for: characterization and subtyping of tumors; early diagnosis, and both prognosis and prediction of outcome of chemotherapy. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise what has been achieved to date using proteomic technologies and to bring forward novel strategies - based on the analysis of clinically relevant samples - that promise to accelerate the translation of basic discoveries into the daily breast cancer clinical practice. In particular, we address major issues in experimental design by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of current proteomic strategies in the context of the analysis of human breast tissue specimens.

  3. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Two Strains of Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup B and Neisseria lactamica

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Raheleh; Amin, Mansour; Hamidinia, Maryam; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad Ali; Rostami, Soodabeh; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antigenic similarities between Neisseria lactamica as a commensal species and N. meningitidis serogroup B (NmB) as an important cause of meningitis infection have been considered for the development of an effective vaccine based on their common proteins to prevent life-threatening bacterial meningitis. Objectives: The main aims of this study were to determine whole proteome profiles of N. lactamica strains and to compare them with whole proteome profile of a reference strain of NmB for identification of some of common proteins between the two species. Materials and Methods: We compared the whole proteomic profiles of N. lactamica strains and a reference strain of NmB. Lysates from bacterial strains were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by Coomassie Brilliant blue staining. Some of the protein spots were excised from the gel and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) analysis. Results: The analysis of Coomassie-stained gels using ImageMaster 2D Platinum software identified approximately 800 reproducible protein spots in the range of pI 4.5 - 9.5 and Mr of 8 - 100 kDa for each 2-DE gel of the studied bacterial strains. By comparing proteome maps of 2-DE gels, more than 200 common protein spots were recognized between the two species. Forty-eight common protein spots between the studied bacterial strains were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The results indicated that among the protein spots identified by MOLDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, the groups of proteins included cell surface, energy metabolism, amino acid transport and metabolism, coenzyme metabolism, defense, multifunctional cellular processes, DNA, RNA and protein synthesis, ribosomal structure, regulatory functions, replication, transcription, translation, unknown and hypothetical proteins with unknown function. We found that N. lactamica strains have a proteome profile somewhat similar to

  4. Comprehensive data analysis of human ureter proteome

    PubMed Central

    Magdeldin, Sameh; Hirao, Yoshitoshi; El Guoshy, Amr; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yates, John R.; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive human ureter proteome dataset was generated from OFFGel fractionated ureter samples. Our result showed that among 2217 non-redundant ureter proteins, 751 protein candidates (33.8%) were detected in urine as urinary protein/polypeptide or exosomal protein. On the other hand, comparing ureter protein hits (48) that are not shown in corresponding databases to urinary bladder and prostate human protein atlas databases pinpointed 21 proteins that might be unique to ureter tissue. In conclusion, this finding offers future perspectives for possible identification of ureter disease-associated biomarkers such as ureter carcinoma. In addition, Cytoscape GO annotation was examined on the final ureter dataset to better understand proteins molecular function, biological processes, and cellular component. The ureter proteomic dataset published in this article will provide a valuable resource for researchers working in the field of urology and urine biomarker discovery. PMID:26937461

  5. Using the CPTAC Assay Portal to identify and implement highly characterized targeted proteomics assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Rodriguez, Henry; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2016-02-12

    The Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as an open-source repository of well-characterized targeted proteomic assays. The portal is designed to curate and disseminate highly characterized, targeted mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays by providing detailed assay performance characterization data, standard operating procedures, and access to reagents. Assay content is accessed via the portal through queries to find assays targeting proteins associated with specific cellular pathways, protein complexes, or specific chromosomal regions. The position of the peptide analytes for which there are available assays are mapped relative to other features of interest in the protein, such as sequence domains, isoforms, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and post-translational modifications. The overarching goals are to enable robust quantification of all human proteins and to standardize the quantification of targeted MS-based assays to ultimately enable harmonization of results over time and across laboratories.

  6. A proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts isolated from sweet orange fruits [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yunliu; Pan, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuduan; Zhu, Andan; Cao, Hongbo; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2011-01-01

    Here, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts purified from sweet orange using Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation is reported. A GeLC-MS/MS shotgun approach was used to identify the proteins of pooled chromoplast samples. A total of 493 proteins were identified from purified chromoplasts, of which 418 are putative plastid proteins based on in silico sequence homology and functional analyses. Based on the predicted functions of these identified plastid proteins, a large proportion (∼60%) of the chromoplast proteome of sweet orange is constituted by proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid/protein synthesis, and secondary metabolism. Of note, HDS (hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase), PAP (plastid-lipid-associated protein), and psHSPs (plastid small heat shock proteins) involved in the synthesis or storage of carotenoid and stress response are among the most abundant proteins identified. A comparison of chromoplast proteomes between sweet orange and tomato suggested a high level of conservation in a broad range of metabolic pathways. However, the citrus chromoplast was characterized by more extensive carotenoid synthesis, extensive amino acid synthesis without nitrogen assimilation, and evidence for lipid metabolism concerning jasmonic acid synthesis. In conclusion, this study provides an insight into the major metabolic pathways as well as some unique characteristics of the sweet orange chromoplasts at the whole proteome level. PMID:21841170

  7. A proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts isolated from sweet orange fruits [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yunliu; Pan, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuduan; Zhu, Andan; Cao, Hongbo; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2011-11-01

    Here, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of the chromoplasts purified from sweet orange using Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation is reported. A GeLC-MS/MS shotgun approach was used to identify the proteins of pooled chromoplast samples. A total of 493 proteins were identified from purified chromoplasts, of which 418 are putative plastid proteins based on in silico sequence homology and functional analyses. Based on the predicted functions of these identified plastid proteins, a large proportion (∼60%) of the chromoplast proteome of sweet orange is constituted by proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid/protein synthesis, and secondary metabolism. Of note, HDS (hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase), PAP (plastid-lipid-associated protein), and psHSPs (plastid small heat shock proteins) involved in the synthesis or storage of carotenoid and stress response are among the most abundant proteins identified. A comparison of chromoplast proteomes between sweet orange and tomato suggested a high level of conservation in a broad range of metabolic pathways. However, the citrus chromoplast was characterized by more extensive carotenoid synthesis, extensive amino acid synthesis without nitrogen assimilation, and evidence for lipid metabolism concerning jasmonic acid synthesis. In conclusion, this study provides an insight into the major metabolic pathways as well as some unique characteristics of the sweet orange chromoplasts at the whole proteome level.

  8. Proteomic analysis of blastema formation in regenerating axolotl limbs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Following amputation, urodele salamander limbs reprogram somatic cells to form a blastema that self-organizes into the missing limb parts to restore the structure and function of the limb. To help understand the molecular basis of blastema formation, we used quantitative label-free liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based methods to analyze changes in the proteome that occurred 1, 4 and 7 days post amputation (dpa) through the mid-tibia/fibula of axolotl hind limbs. Results We identified 309 unique proteins with significant fold change relative to controls (0 dpa), representing 10 biological process categories: (1) signaling, (2) Ca2+ binding and translocation, (3) transcription, (4) translation, (5) cytoskeleton, (6) extracellular matrix (ECM), (7) metabolism, (8) cell protection, (9) degradation, and (10) cell cycle. In all, 43 proteins exhibited exceptionally high fold changes. Of these, the ecotropic viral integrative factor 5 (EVI5), a cell cycle-related oncoprotein that prevents cells from entering the mitotic phase of the cell cycle prematurely, was of special interest because its fold change was exceptionally high throughout blastema formation. Conclusion Our data were consistent with previous studies indicating the importance of inositol triphosphate and Ca2+ signaling in initiating the ECM and cytoskeletal remodeling characteristic of histolysis and cell dedifferentiation. In addition, the data suggested that blastema formation requires several mechanisms to avoid apoptosis, including reduced metabolism, differential regulation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins, and initiation of an unfolded protein response (UPR). Since there is virtually no mitosis during blastema formation, we propose that high levels of EVI5 function to arrest dedifferentiated cells somewhere in the G1/S/G2 phases of the cell cycle until they have accumulated under the wound epidermis and enter mitosis in response to neural and

  9. Proteomic analysis of early seed development in Pinus massoniana L.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yan; Zhao, Zhen-Zhou; Zheng, Ren-Hua; Shi, Jisen

    2012-05-01

    Understanding seed development is important for large-scale propagation and germplasm conservation for the Masson pine. We undertook a proteomic analysis of Masson pine seeds during the early stages of embryogenesis. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) was used to quantify the differences in protein expression during early seed development. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, we identified proteins from 43 gel spots that had been excised from preparative "pick" gels. Proteins involved in carbon metabolism were identified and were predominantly expressed at higher levels during the cleavage polyembryony and columnar embryo stages. Functional annotation of one seed protein revealed it involvement in programmed cell death and translation of selective mRNAs, which may play an important role in subordinate embryo elimination and suspensor degeneration in polyembryonic seed gymnosperms. Other identified proteins were associated with protein folding, nitrogen metabolism, disease/defense response, and protein storage, synthesis and stabilization. The comprehensive protein expression profiles generated by this study will provide new insights into the complex developmental process of seed development in Masson pine.

  10. Proteomic analysis of Toxocara canis excretory and secretory (TES) proteins.

    PubMed

    Sperotto, Rita Leal; Kremer, Frederico Schmitt; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Costa de Avila, Luciana F; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Monteiro, Karina Mariante; Caumo, Karin Silva; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Berne, Natália; Borsuk, Sibele

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected disease, and its main etiological agent is the nematode Toxocara canis. Serological diagnosis is performed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using T. canis excretory and secretory (TES) antigens produced by in vitro cultivation of larvae. Identification of TES proteins can be useful for the development of new diagnostic strategies since few TES components have been described so far. Herein, we report the results obtained by proteomic analysis of TES proteins using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. TES fractions were separated by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The MS/MS spectra were compared with a database of protein sequences deduced from the genome sequence of T. canis, and a total of 19 proteins were identified. Classification according to the signal peptide prediction using the SignalP server showed that seven of the identified proteins were extracellular, 10 had cytoplasmic or nuclear localization, while the subcellular localization of two proteins was unknown. Analysis of molecular functions by BLAST2GO showed that the majority of the gene ontology (GO) terms associated with the proteins present in the TES sample were associated with binding functions, including but not limited to protein binding (GO:0005515), inorganic ion binding (GO:0043167), and organic cyclic compound binding (GO:0097159). This study provides additional information about the exoproteome of T. canis, which can lead to the development of new strategies for diagnostics or vaccination.

  11. Proteome analysis of yeast response to various nutrient limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Fullaondo, Asier; Olsthoorn, Maurien M A; Pronk, Jack T; Slijper, Monique; Heck, Albert J R

    2006-01-01

    We compared the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to carbon (glucose) and nitrogen (ammonia) limitation in chemostat cultivation at the proteome level. Protein levels were differentially quantified using unlabeled and 15N metabolically labeled yeast cultures. A total of 928 proteins covering a wide range of isoelectric points, molecular weights and subcellular localizations were identified. Stringent statistical analysis identified 51 proteins upregulated in response to glucose limitation and 51 upregulated in response to ammonia limitation. Under glucose limitation, typical glucose-repressed genes encoding proteins involved in alternative carbon source utilization, fatty acids β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation displayed an increased protein level. Proteins upregulated in response to nitrogen limitation were mostly involved in scavenging of alternative nitrogen sources and protein degradation. Comparison of transcript and protein levels clearly showed that upregulation in response to glucose limitation was mainly transcriptionally controlled, whereas upregulation in response to nitrogen limitation was essentially controlled at the post-transcriptional level by increased translational efficiency and/or decreased protein degradation. These observations underline the need for multilevel analysis in yeast systems biology. PMID:16738570

  12. A Pilot Proteomic Analysis of Salivary Biomarkers in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ngounou Wetie, Armand G; Wormwood, Kelly L; Russell, Stefanie; Ryan, Jeanne P; Darie, Costel C; Woods, Alisa G

    2015-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) prevalence is increasing, with current estimates at 1/68-1/50 individuals diagnosed with an ASD. Diagnosis is based on behavioral assessments. Early diagnosis and intervention is known to greatly improve functional outcomes in people with ASD. Diagnosis, treatment monitoring and prognosis of ASD symptoms could be facilitated with biomarkers to complement behavioral assessments. Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics may help reveal biomarkers for ASD. In this pilot study, we have analyzed the salivary proteome in individuals with ASD compared to neurotypical control subjects, using MS-based proteomics. Our goal is to optimize methods for salivary proteomic biomarker discovery and to identify initial putative biomarkers in people with ASDs. The salivary proteome is virtually unstudied in ASD, and saliva could provide an easily accessible biomaterial for analysis. Using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, we found statistically significant differences in several salivary proteins, including elevated prolactin-inducible protein, lactotransferrin, Ig kappa chain C region, Ig gamma-1 chain C region, Ig lambda-2 chain C regions, neutrophil elastase, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1. Our results indicate that this is an effective method for identification of salivary protein biomarkers, support the concept that immune system and gastrointestinal disturbances may be present in individuals with ASDs and point toward the need for larger studies in behaviorally-characterized individuals.

  13. Urinary proteomic and non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis during pregnancy and non-pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progress in the fields of protein separation and identification technologies has accelerated research into biofluids proteomics for protein biomarker discovery. Urine has become an ideal and rich source of biomarkers in clinical proteomics. Here we performed a proteomic analysis of urine samples from pregnant and non-pregnant patients using gel electrophoresis and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we also apply a non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic approach using mTRAQ labeling to evaluate the expression of specific phosphoproteins during pregnancy comparison with non-pregnancy. Results In total, 2579 proteins (10429 unique peptides) were identified, including 1408 from the urine of pregnant volunteers and 1985 from the urine of non-pregnant volunteers. One thousand and twenty-three proteins were not reported in previous studies at the proteome level and were unique to our study. Furthermore, we obtained 237 phosphopeptides, representing 105 phosphoproteins. Among these phosphoproteins, 16 of them were found to be significantly differentially expressed, of which 14 were up-regulated and two were down-regulated in urine samples from women just before vaginal delivery. Conclusion Taken together, these results offer a comprehensive urinary proteomic profile of healthy women during before and after vaginal delivery and novel information on the phosphoproteins that are differentially regulated during the maintenance of normal pregnancy. Our results may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of pregnancy maintenance, potentially leading to the development of biomarker-based sensitive assays for understanding pregnancy. PMID:24215720

  14. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein

    PubMed Central

    Woellhaf, Michael W.; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2016-01-01

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker’s yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries. PMID:27582385

  15. Proteomic profiling of the mitochondrial ribosome identifies Atp25 as a composite mitochondrial precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Sommer, Frederik; Schroda, Michael; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-10-15

    Whereas the structure and function of cytosolic ribosomes are well characterized, we only have a limited understanding of the mitochondrial translation apparatus. Using SILAC-based proteomic profiling, we identified 13 proteins that cofractionated with the mitochondrial ribosome, most of which play a role in translation or ribosomal biogenesis. One of these proteins is a homologue of the bacterial ribosome-silencing factor (Rsf). This protein is generated from the composite precursor protein Atp25 upon internal cleavage by the matrix processing peptidase MPP, and in this respect, it differs from all other characterized mitochondrial proteins of baker's yeast. We observed that cytosolic expression of Rsf, but not of noncleaved Atp25 protein, is toxic. Our results suggest that eukaryotic cells face the challenge of avoiding negative interference from the biogenesis of their two distinct translation machineries.

  16. A proteomic strategy for global analysis of plant protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Xiong, Yi; McBride, Zachary; Kihara, Daisuke; Xie, Jun; Hall, Mark C; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2014-10-01

    Global analyses of protein complex assembly, composition, and location are needed to fully understand how cells coordinate diverse metabolic, mechanical, and developmental activities. The most common methods for proteome-wide analysis of protein complexes rely on affinity purification-mass spectrometry or yeast two-hybrid approaches. These methods are time consuming and are not suitable for many plant species that are refractory to transformation or genome-wide cloning of open reading frames. Here, we describe the proof of concept for a method allowing simultaneous global analysis of endogenous protein complexes that begins with intact leaves and combines chromatographic separation of extracts from subcellular fractions with quantitative label-free protein abundance profiling by liquid chromatography-coupled mass spectrometry. Applying this approach to the crude cytosolic fraction of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves using size exclusion chromatography, we identified hundreds of cytosolic proteins that appeared to exist as components of stable protein complexes. The reliability of the method was validated by protein immunoblot analysis and comparisons with published size exclusion chromatography data and the masses of known complexes. The method can be implemented with appropriate instrumentation, is applicable to any biological system, and has the potential to be further developed to characterize the composition of protein complexes and measure the dynamics of protein complex localization and assembly under different conditions.

  17. Proteomic analysis on acetate metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Man; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Son, Mi-Kyung; Jung, Young-Mi; Yang, Seung-Ok; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Hur, Sung-Ho; Yum, Jong Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Mass production of glucosamine (GlcN) using microbial cells is a worthy approach to increase added values and keep safety problems in GlcN production process. Prior to set up a microbial cellular platform, this study was to assess acetate metabolism in Citrobacter sp. BL-4 (BL-4) which has produced a polyglucosamine PGB-2. The LC-MS analysis was conducted after protein separation on the 1D-PAGE to accomplish the purpose of this study. 280 proteins were totally identified and 188 proteins were separated as acetate-related proteins in BL-4. Acetate was converted to acetyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA synthetase up-regulated in the acetate medium. The glyoxylate bypass in the acetate medium was up-regulated with over-expression of isocitrate lyases and 2D-PAGE confirmed this differential expression. Using (1)H-NMR analysis, the product of isocitrate lyases, succinate, increased about 15 times in the acetate medium. During acetate metabolism proteins involved in the lipid metabolism and hexosamine biosynthesis were over-expressed in the acetate medium, while proteins involved in TCA cycle, pentose phosphate cycle and purine metabolism were down-regulated. Taken together, the results from the proteomic analysis can be applied to improve GlcN production and to develop metabolic engineering in BL-4.

  18. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Potential Regulatory Proteins Involved in Chicken Eggshell Brownness

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guiqin; Shi, Fengying; Liu, Aiqiao; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Brown eggs are popular in many countries and consumers regard eggshell brownness as an important indicator of egg quality. However, the potential regulatory proteins and detailed molecular mechanisms regulating eggshell brownness have yet to be clearly defined. In the present study, we performed quantitative proteomics analysis with iTRAQ technology in the shell gland epithelium of hens laying dark and light brown eggs to investigate the candidate proteins and molecular mechanisms underlying variation in chicken eggshell brownness. The results indicated 147 differentially expressed proteins between these two groups, among which 65 and 82 proteins were significantly up-regulated in the light and dark groups, respectively. Functional analysis indicated that in the light group, the down-regulated iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein (Iba57) would decrease the synthesis of protoporphyrin IX; furthermore, the up-regulated protein solute carrier family 25 (mitochondrial carrier; adenine nucleotide translocator), member 5 (SLC25A5) and down-regulated translocator protein (TSPO) would lead to increased amounts of protoporphyrin IX transported into the mitochondria matrix to form heme with iron, which is supplied by ovotransferrin protein (TF). In other words, chickens from the light group produce less protoporphyrin IX, which is mainly used for heme synthesis. Therefore, the exported protoporphyrin IX available for eggshell deposition and brownness is reduced in the light group. The current study provides valuable information to elucidate variation of chicken eggshell brownness, and demonstrates the feasibility and sensitivity of iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics analysis in providing useful insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying brown eggshell pigmentation. PMID:28006025

  19. Methods for Pseudopodia Purification and Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Feng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2007-08-21

    Directional cell migration (chemotaxis) plays a central role in a wide spectrum of physiological and pathological processes, including embryo development, wounding healing, immunity, and cancer metastasis (1, 2). The process of chemotaxis is characterized by the sustained migration of cells in the direction of an increasing concentration of chemoattractant and/or ECM protein. Upon sensing the chemoattractant cells response with localized amplification of signals on the side facing the gradient (3-7). The spatial signal propagation facilitates reorganization of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton leading to extension of a dominant pseudopodium (PD) only in the direction of chemoattractant (7-10). While it is clear that localized signaling is critical for pseudopodium formation and chemotaxis, the molecular mechanisms that mediate this response remain poorly defined. To investigate mechanisms of pseudopodia formation, we recently described a novel approach to separate the PD and cell body (CB) compartments for large scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using chambers equipped with microporous filters (Fig. 1) (3, 7, 11). This in vitro system recapitulates physiological events associates with pseudopodial protrusion through small openings in the ECM and the vessel wall during immune cell intravasation and cancer cell metastasis (12, 13). The model system has been used to reveal important signaling pathways and novel proteins that mediate cell migration. This model, combined with the state-of-the-art proteomics and phosphoproteomics technology, will provide an effective approach to systematically analyze the proteins that differentially localized or phosphorylated in the front and the back of polarized migrating cells. In the following sections, we will describe in detail the protocols used to purify the PD and CB compartments for large-scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using mass spectrometry.

  20. Low-molecular weight plasma proteome analysis using centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Simpson, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular weight fraction (LMF) of the human plasma proteome is an invaluable source of biological information, especially in the context of identifying plasma-based biomarkers of disease. This protocol outlines a standardized procedure for the rapid/reproducible LMF profiling of human plasma samples using centrifugal ultrafiltration fractionation, followed by 1D-SDS-PAGE separation and nano-LC-MS/MS. Ultrafiltration is a convective process that uses anisotropic semipermeable membranes to separate macromolecular species on the basis of size. We have optimized centrifugal ultrafiltration for plasma fractionation with respect to buffer and solvent composition, centrifugal force, duration and temperature to facilitate >95% recovery, and enrichment of low-M (r) components from human plasma. Using this protocol, >260 unique peptides can be identified from a single plasma profiling experiment using 100 μL of plasma (Greening and Simpson, J Proteomics 73:637-648, 2010). The efficacy of this method is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of several plasma proteins (e.g., protein KIAA0649 (Q9Y4D3), rheumatoid factor D5, serine protease inhibitor A3, and transmembrane adapter protein PAG) previously not reported in extant high-confidence Human Proteome Organization Plasma Proteome Project datasets.

  1. Preparation of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling proteomes for identifying metacaspase substrates by N-terminal COFRADIC.

    PubMed

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Stael, Simon; Van Damme, Petra; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Proteome-wide discovery of in vivo metacaspase substrates can be obtained by positional proteomics approaches such as N-terminal COFRADIC, for example by comparing the N-terminal proteomes (or N-terminomes) of wild-type plants to transgenic plants not expressing a given metacaspase. In this chapter we describe a protocol for the preparation of plant tissue proteomes, including differential isotopic labelling allowing for a comparison of in vivo N-terminomes that serves as the starting point for N-terminal COFRADIC studies.

  2. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  3. Detailed tail proteomic analysis of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) using an mRNA-seq reference database.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Turan; Keskin, Ilknur; Dumlu, Seda Nilgün; Aytürk, Nilüfer; Avşaroğlu, Mahmut Erhan; Akgün, Emel; Öztürk, Gürkan; Baykal, Ahmet Tarık

    2017-01-01

    Salamander axolotl has been emerging as an important model for stem cell research due to its powerful regenerative capacity. Several advantages, such as the high capability of advanced tissue, organ, and appendages regeneration, promote axolotl as an ideal model system to extend our current understanding on the mechanisms of regeneration. Acknowledging the common molecular pathways between amphibians and mammals, there is a great potential to translate the messages from axolotl research to mammalian studies. However, the utilization of axolotl is hindered due to the lack of reference databases of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. Here, we introduce the proteome analysis of the axolotl tail section searched against an mRNA-seq database. We translated axolotl mRNA sequences to protein sequences and annotated these to process the LC-MS/MS data and identified 1001 nonredundant proteins. Functional classification of identified proteins was performed by gene ontology searches. The presence of some of the identified proteins was validated by in situ antibody labeling. Furthermore, we have analyzed the proteome expressional changes postamputation at three time points to evaluate the underlying mechanisms of the regeneration process. Taken together, this work expands the proteomics data of axolotl to contribute to its establishment as a fully utilized model.

  4. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report. PMID:22008648

  5. Comparative shotgun proteomic analysis of Clostridium acetobutylicum from butanol fermentation using glucose and xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sivagnanam, Kumaran; Raghavan, Vijaya G. S.; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Lefsrud, Mark G

    2011-01-01

    Background: Butanol is a second generation biofuel produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum through acetonebutanol- ethanol (ABE) fermentation process. Shotgun proteomics provides a direct approach to study the whole proteome of an organism in depth. This paper focuses on shotgun proteomic profiling of C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation using glucose and xylose to understand the functional mechanisms of C. acetobutylicum proteins involved in butanol production. Results: We identified 894 different proteins in C. acetobutylicum from ABE fermentation process by two dimensional - liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) method. This includes 717 proteins from glucose and 826 proteins from the xylose substrate. A total of 649 proteins were found to be common and 22 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified between glucose and xylose substrates. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that flagellar proteins are highly up-regulated with glucose compared to xylose substrate during ABE fermentation. Chemotactic activity was also found to be lost with the xylose substrate due to the absence of CheW and CheV proteins. This is the first report on the shotgun proteomic analysis of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in ABE fermentation between glucose and xylose substrate from a single time data point and the number of proteins identified here is more than any other study performed on this organism up to this report.

  6. The Revolution and Evolution of Shotgun Proteomics for Large-Scale Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has evolved at an exponential rate over the last 100 years. Innovations in the development of mass spectrometers have created powerful instruments capable of analyzing a wide range of targets, from rare atoms and molecules to very large molecules such as a proteins, protein complexes and DNA. These performance gains have been driven by sustaining innovations, punctuated by the occasional disruptive innovation. The use of mass spectrometry for proteome analysis was driven by disruptive innovations that created a capability for large-scale analysis of proteins and modifications. PMID:23294060

  7. PROTEINCHALLENGE: crowd sourcing in proteomics analysis and software development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah F; Falkenberg, Heiner; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Khoudoli, Guennadi A; Mageean, Craig J; Linding, Rune

    2013-08-02

    In large-scale proteomics studies there is a temptation, after months of experimental work, to plug resulting data into a convenient-if poorly implemented-set of tools, which may neither do the data justice nor help answer the scientific question. In this paper we have captured key concerns, including arguments for community-wide open source software development and "big data" compatible solutions for the future. For the meantime, we have laid out ten top tips for data processing. With these at hand, a first large-scale proteomics analysis hopefully becomes less daunting to navigate. However there is clearly a real need for robust tools, standard operating procedures and general acceptance of best practises. Thus we submit to the proteomics community a call for a community-wide open set of proteomics analysis challenges--PROTEINCHALLENGE--that directly target and compare data analysis workflows, with the aim of setting a community-driven gold standard for data handling, reporting and sharing.

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Meningiomas for the Identification of Surrogate Protein Markers

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Samridhi; Ray, Sandipan; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Sridhar, Epari; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common non-glial tumors of the brain and spine. Pathophysiology and definite histological grading of meningiomas are frequently found to be deceptive due to their unusual morphological features and locations. Here for the first time we report a comprehensive serum proteomic analysis of different grades of meningiomas by using multiple quantitative proteomic and immunoassay-based approaches to obtain mechanistic insights about disease pathogenesis and identify grade specific protein signatures. In silico functional analysis revealed modulation of different vital physiological pathways including complement and coagulation cascades, metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins, immune signaling, cell growth and apoptosis and integrin signaling in meningiomas. ROC curve analysis demonstrated apolipoprotein E and A-I and hemopexin as efficient predictors for meningiomas. Identified proteins like vimentin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein B and A-I and antithrombin-III, which exhibited a sequential increase in different malignancy grades of meningiomas, could serve as potential predictive markers. PMID:25413266

  9. Proteomic analysis of strawberry leaves infected with Colletotrichum fragariae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Wenyue; Xin, Ya; Zhang, Hengmu; Yan, Chengqi; Yu, Hong; Liu, Hui; Xiao, Wenfei; Wang, Shuzhen; Zheng, Guizhen; Liu, Hongbo; Jin, Liang; Ma, Huasheng; Ruan, Songlin

    2012-07-16

    Understanding the defense mechanisms used by anthracnose-resistant strawberries against Colletotrichum infection is important for breeding purposes. To characterize cell responses to Colletotrichum infection, proteomes from strawberry seedling leaves that had or had not been infected with Colletotrichum fragariae were characterized at different time points post infection by 2-DE and by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS and database-searching protein identification. Mass spectrometry identified 49 differentially expressed proteins with significant intensity differences (>1.5-fold, p<0.05) in mock- and C. fragariae-infected leaves at least at one time point. Notably, 2-DE analysis revealed that C. fragariae infection increased the expression of well-known and novel pathogen-responsive proteins whose expression patterns tended to correlate with physiological changes in the leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to examine the transcriptional profiles of infected and uninfected strawberry leaves, and western blotting confirmed the induction of β-1,3-glucanase and a low-molecular-weight heat shock protein in response to C. fragariae infection. During the late phase of infection, proteins involved in the Calvin cycle and glycolysis pathway had suppressed expression. The abundance changes, putative functions, and participation in physiological reactions for the identified proteins produce a pathogen-responsive protein network in C. fragariae-infected strawberry leaves. Together, these findings increase our knowledge of pathogen resistance mechanisms, especially those found in non-model plant species.

  10. Cell-specific proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuet, Kai P.; Doma, Meenakshi K.; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Moradian, Annie; Hess, Sonja; Schuman, Erin M.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of rare cells in heterogeneous environments presents difficult challenges. Systematic methods are needed to enrich, identify, and quantify proteins expressed in specific cells in complex biological systems including multicellular plants and animals. Here, we have engineered a Caenorhabditis elegans phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase capable of tagging proteins with the reactive noncanonical amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine. We achieved spatiotemporal selectivity in the labeling of C. elegans proteins by controlling expression of the mutant synthetase using cell-selective (body wall muscles, intestinal epithelial cells, neurons, and pharyngeal muscle) or state-selective (heat-shock) promoters in several transgenic lines. Tagged proteins are distinguished from the rest of the protein pool through bioorthogonal conjugation of the azide side chain to probes that permit visualization and isolation of labeled proteins. By coupling our methodology with stable-isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), we successfully profiled proteins expressed in pharyngeal muscle cells, and in the process, identified proteins not previously known to be expressed in these cells. Our results show that tagging proteins with spatiotemporal selectivity can be achieved in C. elegans and illustrate a convenient and effective approach for unbiased discovery of proteins expressed in targeted subsets of cells. PMID:25691744

  11. Serum proteome analysis of vivax malaria: An insight into the disease pathogenesis and host immune response.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Kamath, Karthik S; Srivastava, Rajneesh; Raghu, Dinesh; Gollapalli, Kishore; Jain, Rekha; Gupta, Shipra V; Ray, Sayantan; Taur, Santosh; Dhali, Snigdha; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-06-06

    Vivax malaria is the most widely distributed human malaria resulting in 80-300 million clinical cases every year. It causes severe infection and mortality but is generally regarded as a benign disease and has not been investigated in detail. The present study aimed to perform human serum proteome analysis in a malaria endemic area in India to identify potential serum biomarkers for vivax malaria and understand host response. The proteomic analysis was performed on 16 age and gender matched subjects (vivax patients and control) in duplicate. Protein extraction protocols were optimized for large coverage of the serum proteome and to obtain high-resolution data. Identification of 67 differentially expressed and statistically significant (Student's t-test; p<0.05) protein spots was established by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Many of the identified proteins such as apolipoprotein A and E, serum amyloid A and P, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, and hemopexin are interesting from a diagnostic point of view and could further be studied as potential serum biomarkers. The differentially expressed serum proteins in vivax malaria identified in this study were subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple software, including Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) functional annotation tool for better understanding of the biological context of the identified proteins, their involvement in various physiological pathways and association with disease pathogenesis. Functional pathway analysis of the differentially expressed proteins suggested the modulation of multiple vital physiological pathways, including acute phase response signaling, complement and coagulation cascades, hemostasis and vitamin D metabolism pathway due to this parasitic infection. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics: The clinical link.

  12. Analysis of Paracoccidioides lutzii mitochondria: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Casaletti, L; Lima, P S; Oliveira, L N; Borges, C L; Báo, S N; Bailão, A M; Soares, C M A

    2016-11-25

    The genus Paracoccidioides is composed of thermal dimorphic fungi, causative agents of paracoccidioidomycosis, one of the most frequent systemic mycoses in Latin America. Mitochondria have sophisticated machinery for ATP production, which involves metabolic pathways such as citric acid and glyoxylate cycles, electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, this organelle performs a variety of functions in the cell, working as an exceptional metabolic signalling centre that contributes to cellular stress responses, as autophagy and apoptosis in eukaryotic organisms. The aim of this work was to perform a descriptive proteomic analysis of mitochondria in Paracoccidioides lutzii yeast cells. After mitochondria fractionation, samples enriched in mitochondrial proteins were digested with trypsin and analysed using a NanoUPLC-MS(E) system (Waters Corporation, Manchester, UK). Ours results revealed that the established protocol for purification of mitochondria was very effective for P. lutzii, and 298 proteins were identified as primarily mitochondrial, in our analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first compilation of mitochondrial proteins from P. lutzii, to date. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Comparative Proteomics of Activated THP-1 Cells Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identifies Putative Clearance Biomarkers for Tuberculosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kaewseekhao, Benjawan; Naranbhai, Vivek; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Namwat, Wises; Paemanee, Atchara; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Faksri, Kiatichai

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for determining clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection during anti-tuberculosis therapy or following exposure could facilitate enhanced monitoring and treatment. We screened for biomarkers indicating clearance of Mtb infection in vitro. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using GeLC MSI/MS. Intracellular and secreted proteomes from activated THP-1 cells infected with the Mtb H37Rv strain (MOI = 1) and treated with isoniazid and rifampicin for 1 day (infection stage) and 5 days (clearance stage) were analyzed. Host proteins associated with early infection (n = 82), clearance (n = 121), sustained in both conditions (n = 34) and suppressed by infection (n = 46) were elucidated. Of the potential clearance markers, SSFA2 and CAECAM18 showed the highest and lowest protein intensities, respectively. A western blot of CAECAM18 validated the LC MS/MS result. For three clearance markers (SSFA2, PARP14 and PSME4), in vivo clinical validation was concordantly reported in previous patient cohorts. A network analysis revealed that clearance markers were enriched amongst four protein interaction networks centered on: (i) CD44/CCND1, (ii) IFN-β1/NF-κB, (iii) TP53/TGF-β and (iv) IFN-γ/CCL2. After infection, proteins associated with proliferation, and recruitment of immune cells appeared to be enriched possibly reflecting recruitment of defense mechanisms. Counteracting proteins (CASP3 vs. Akt and NF-κB vs. TP53) associated with apoptosis regulation and its networks were enriched among the early and sustained infection biomarkers, indicating host-pathogen competition. The BRCA1/2 network was suppressed during infection, suggesting that cell proliferation suppression is a feature of Mtb survival. Our study provides insights into the mechanisms of host-Mtb interaction by comparing the stages of infection clearance. The identified clearance biomarkers may be useful in monitoring tuberculosis treatment.

  14. Up-to-Date Workflow for Plant (Phospho)proteomics Identifies Differential Drought-Responsive Phosphorylation Events in Maize Leaves.

    PubMed

    Vu, Lam Dai; Stes, Elisabeth; Van Bel, Michiel; Nelissen, Hilde; Maddelein, Davy; Inzé, Dirk; Coppens, Frederik; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris; De Smet, Ive

    2016-12-02

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), which can regulate protein activity and localization as well as protein-protein interactions in numerous cellular processes. Phosphopeptide enrichment techniques enable plant researchers to acquire insight into phosphorylation-controlled signaling networks in various plant species. Most phosphoproteome analyses of plant samples still involve stable isotope labeling, peptide fractionation, and demand a lot of mass spectrometry (MS) time. Here, we present a simple workflow to probe, map, and catalogue plant phosphoproteomes, requiring relatively low amounts of starting material, no labeling, no fractionation, and no excessive analysis time. Following optimization of the different experimental steps on Arabidopsis thaliana samples, we transferred our workflow to maize, a major monocot crop, to study signaling upon drought stress. In addition, we included normalization to protein abundance to identify true phosphorylation changes. Overall, we identified a set of new phosphosites in both Arabidopsis thaliana and maize, some of which are differentially phosphorylated upon drought. All data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003634, but to provide easy access to our model plant and crop data sets, we created an online database, Plant PTM Viewer ( bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/ptm_viewer/ ), where all phosphosites identified in our study can be consulted.

  15. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human spliceosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaolan; Licklider, Lawrence J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Reed, Robin

    2002-09-01

    The precise excision of introns from pre-messenger RNA is performed by the spliceosome, a macromolecular machine containing five small nuclear RNAs and numerous proteins. Much has been learned about the protein components of the spliceosome from analysis of individual purified small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and salt-stable spliceosome `core' particles. However, the complete set of proteins that constitutes intact functional spliceosomes has yet to be identified. Here we use maltose-binding protein affinity chromatography to isolate spliceosomes in highly purified and functional form. Using nanoscale microcapillary liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we identify ~145 distinct spliceosomal proteins, making the spliceosome the most complex cellular machine so far characterized. Our spliceosomes comprise all previously known splicing factors and 58 newly identified components. The spliceosome contains at least 30 proteins with known or putative roles in gene expression steps other than splicing. This complexity may be required not only for splicing multi-intronic metazoan pre-messenger RNAs, but also for mediating the extensive coupling between splicing and other steps in gene expression.

  16. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Giegé, Philippe; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete set of nuclear genes that encode proteins targeted to mitochondria in plants is currently undefined and thus the full range of mitochondrial functions in plants is unknown. Analysis of two-dimensional gel separations of Arabidopsis cell culture mitochondrial protein revealed approximately 100 abundant proteins and 250 low-abundance proteins. Comparison of subfractions of mitochondrial protein on two-dimensional gels provided information on the soluble, membrane, or integral membrane locations of this protein set. A total of 170 protein spots were excised, trypsin-digested, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry spectra obtained. Using this dataset, 91 of the proteins were identified by searching translated Arabidopsis genomic databases. Of this set, 81 have defined functions based on sequence comparison. These functions include respiratory electron transport, tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein import, processing, and assembly, transcription, membrane transport, and antioxidant defense. A total of 10 spectra were matched to Arabidopsis putative open reading frames for which no specific function has been determined. A total of 64 spectra did not match to an identified open reading frame. Analysis of full-length putative protein sequences using bioinformatic tools to predict subcellular targeting (TargetP, Psort, and MitoProt) revealed significant variation in predictions, and also a lack of mitochondrial targeting prediction for several characterized mitochondrial proteins. PMID:11743115

  17. Proteomic analysis of lamellar bodies isolated from rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Narayanaperumal, Jeyaparthasarathy; Ayalew, Sahlu; Hartson, Steven; Liu, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Background Lamellar bodies are lysosome-related secretory granules and store lung surfactant in alveolar type II cells. To better understand the mechanisms of surfactant secretion, we carried out proteomic analyses of lamellar bodies isolated from rat lungs. Results With peptide mass fingerprinting by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization – Time of Flight mass spectrometry, 44 proteins were identified with high confidence. These proteins fell into diverse functional categories: surfactant-related, membrane trafficking, calcium binding, signal transduction, cell structure, ion channels, protein processing and miscellaneous. Selected proteins were verified by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Conclusion This proteomic profiling of lamellar bodies provides a basis for further investigations of functional roles of the identified proteins in lamellar body biogenesis and surfactant secretion. PMID:18577212

  18. Proteomics-Identified Bvg-Activated Autotransporters Protect against Bordetella pertussis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    de Gouw, Daan; Jonge, Marien I. de.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Zomer, Aldert; Berends, Alinda; Pratt, Catherine; Berbers, Guy A.; Mooi, Frits R.; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A.

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly infectious respiratory disease of humans caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis has re-emerged globally. Causes for the re-emergence of pertussis include limited duration of protection conferred by acellular pertussis vaccines (aP) and pathogen adaptation. Pathogen adaptations involve antigenic divergence with vaccine strains, the emergence of strains which show enhanced in vitro expression of a number of virulence-associated genes and of strains that do not express pertactin, an important aP component. Clearly, the identification of more effective B. pertussis vaccine antigens is of utmost importance. To identify novel antigens, we used proteomics to identify B. pertussis proteins regulated by the master virulence regulatory system BvgAS in vitro. Five candidates proteins were selected and it was confirmed that they were also expressed in the lungs of naïve mice seven days after infection. The five proteins were expressed in recombinant form, adjuvanted with alum and used to immunize mice as stand-alone antigens. Subsequent respiratory challenge showed that immunization with the autotransporters Vag8 and SphB1 significantly reduced bacterial load in the lungs. Whilst these antigens induced strong opsonizing antibody responses, we found that none of the tested alum-adjuvanted vaccines - including a three-component aP - reduced bacterial load in the nasopharynx, suggesting that alternative immunological responses may be required for efficient bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx. PMID:25133400

  19. Proteomics-identified Bvg-activated autotransporters protect against bordetella pertussis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Gouw, Daan; Gouw, Daan de; de Jonge, Marien I; Jonge, Marien I de; Hermans, Peter W M; Wessels, Hans J C T; Zomer, Aldert; Berends, Alinda; Pratt, Catherine; Berbers, Guy A; Mooi, Frits R; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A

    2014-01-01

    Pertussis is a highly infectious respiratory disease of humans caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. Despite high vaccination coverage, pertussis has re-emerged globally. Causes for the re-emergence of pertussis include limited duration of protection conferred by acellular pertussis vaccines (aP) and pathogen adaptation. Pathogen adaptations involve antigenic divergence with vaccine strains, the emergence of strains which show enhanced in vitro expression of a number of virulence-associated genes and of strains that do not express pertactin, an important aP component. Clearly, the identification of more effective B. pertussis vaccine antigens is of utmost importance. To identify novel antigens, we used proteomics to identify B. pertussis proteins regulated by the master virulence regulatory system BvgAS in vitro. Five candidates proteins were selected and it was confirmed that they were also expressed in the lungs of naïve mice seven days after infection. The five proteins were expressed in recombinant form, adjuvanted with alum and used to immunize mice as stand-alone antigens. Subsequent respiratory challenge showed that immunization with the autotransporters Vag8 and SphB1 significantly reduced bacterial load in the lungs. Whilst these antigens induced strong opsonizing antibody responses, we found that none of the tested alum-adjuvanted vaccines - including a three-component aP - reduced bacterial load in the nasopharynx, suggesting that alternative immunological responses may be required for efficient bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx.

  20. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Anne O.; Miller, Susan M.; Wall, Judy; Lipton, Mary

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  1. Altered protein profile in chronic myeloid leukemia chronic phase identified by a comparative proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Pizzatti, Luciana; Sá, Lílian Ayres; de Souza, Jamison Menezes; Bisch, Paulo Mascarello; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2006-05-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a hematological disorder in which the Ph chromosome is a marker of the disease, detected virtually in all cases. The chimeric transcripts encode a 210-kDa chimeric protein with altered tyrosine kinase activity, responsible for the disease phenotype. In this work, we tried to identify which are the molecular changes common to chronic phase patients, those that represent the chronic phase molecular phenotype. To address this problem we analyzed through a comparative proteomic approach, several CML bone marrow cells protein profile from patients in chronic phase and healthy bone marrow donors. From these results, we identified 31 differentially expressed proteins. Among these proteins, we pointed out c-Myc binding protein 1, 53BP1, Mdm4, OSBP-related protein 3 and Mortalin as putative candidates to BCR-ABL targets in chronic phase. Moreover, we describe for the first time the cytoplasmic protein map from bone marrow cells that helped in the elucidation of the changes we were looking for.

  2. Characterization of the mouse pancreatic islet proteome and comparative analysis with other mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Hinault, Charlotte; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Singhal, Mudita; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans and insulin-producing beta cells in particular play a central role in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and the islet dysfunction is associated with the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To contribute to the understanding of the biology of the pancreatic islets we applied proteomic techniques based on liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Here as an initial step we present the first comprehensive proteomic characterization of pancreas islets of the mouse, the commonly used animal model for diabetes research. Two-dimensional SCX LC/RP LC-MS/MS has been applied to characterize of the mouse islet proteome, resulting in the confident identification of 17,350 different tryptic peptides covering 2,612 proteins with at least two unique peptide identifications per protein. The dataset also allowed identification of a number of post-translational modifications including several modifications relevant to oxidative stress and phosphorylation. While many of the identified phosphorylation sites corroborates with previous known sites, the oxidative modifications observed on cysteinyl residues potentially reveal novel information related to the role of oxidation stress in islet functions. Comparative analysis of the islet proteome database with 15 available proteomic datasets from other mouse tissues and cells revealed a set of 68 proteins uniquely detected only in the pancreatic islets. Besides proteins with known functions, like islet secreted peptide hormones, this unique set contains a number of proteins with yet unknown functions. The resulting peptide and protein database will be available at ncrr.pnl.gov web site of the NCRR proteomic center (ncrr.pnl.gov).

  3. Image analysis tools and emerging algorithms for expression proteomics

    PubMed Central

    English, Jane A.; Lisacek, Frederique; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Dunn, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Since their origins in academic endeavours in the 1970s, computational analysis tools have matured into a number of established commercial packages that underpin research in expression proteomics. In this paper we describe the image analysis pipeline for the established 2-D Gel Electrophoresis (2-DE) technique of protein separation, and by first covering signal analysis for Mass Spectrometry (MS), we also explain the current image analysis workflow for the emerging high-throughput ‘shotgun’ proteomics platform of Liquid Chromatography coupled to MS (LC/MS). The bioinformatics challenges for both methods are illustrated and compared, whilst existing commercial and academic packages and their workflows are described from both a user’s and a technical perspective. Attention is given to the importance of sound statistical treatment of the resultant quantifications in the search for differential expression. Despite wide availability of proteomics software, a number of challenges have yet to be overcome regarding algorithm accuracy, objectivity and automation, generally due to deterministic spot-centric approaches that discard information early in the pipeline, propagating errors. We review recent advances in signal and image analysis algorithms in 2-DE, MS, LC/MS and Imaging MS. Particular attention is given to wavelet techniques, automated image-based alignment and differential analysis in 2-DE, Bayesian peak mixture models and functional mixed modelling in MS, and group-wise consensus alignment methods for LC/MS. PMID:21046614

  4. [FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN BRYOZOAN COLONY: A PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Kutyumov, V A; Maltseva, A L; Kotenko, N; Ostrovsky, A N

    2016-01-01

    Bryozoans are typical modular organisms. They consist of repetitive structural units, the zooids. Bryozoan colonies grow by zooidal budding, with the distribution pattern of the budding loci underlying the diversity of colony forms. Budding is usually restricted to the zooids at the periphery of the colony, which form a "growing edge" or local terminal growth zones. Non-budding parts of the colony can be functionally subdivided, too. In many species colonies consists of regular, often repetitive zones of feeding and non-feeding modules, associated with a periodical degeneration and regeneration of the polypide, retractile tentacle crown with a gut and the accompanying musculature. So, there is functional differentiation in bryozoan colonies but its mechanisms are unknown. Presumably, budding and/or polypide recycling in different colony parts are induced or inhibited by certain determinants of functional specialization. An effective tool of their identification is the comparison of proteomes of functionally different zones. Here we report the results of proteomic analysis of three bryozoan species from the White Sea, which have a different colony form: Flustrellidra hispida, Terminoflustra membranaceotruncata and Securiflustra securifrons. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we compared proteomes of the growing edge and the zones consisting of feeding and non-feeding zooids in these species. We estimated the overall proteome variability, revealed proteins whose relative abundance gradually changed along the proximal-distal colony axis and suggested that they might be involved in the functional differentiation of the colony.

  5. Quantitative proteomics identify DAB2 as a cardiac developmental regulator that inhibits WNT/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hofsteen, Peter; Robitaille, Aaron M; Chapman, Daniel Patrick; Moon, Randall T; Murry, Charles E

    2016-01-26

    To reveal the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac lineage determination and differentiation, we quantified the proteome of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), and cardiomyocytes during a time course of directed differentiation by label-free quantitative proteomics. This approach correctly identified known stage-specific markers of cardiomyocyte differentiation, including SRY-box2 (SOX2), GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4), and myosin heavy chain 6 (MYH6). This led us to determine whether our proteomic screen could reveal previously unidentified mediators of heart development. We identified Disabled 2 (DAB2) as one of the most dynamically expressed proteins in hESCs, CPCs, and cardiomyocytes. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) mutagenesis in zebrafish to assess whether DAB2 plays a functional role during cardiomyocyte differentiation. We found that deletion of Dab2 in zebrafish embryos led to a significant reduction in cardiomyocyte number and increased endogenous WNT/β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, the Dab2-deficient defects in cardiomyocyte number could be suppressed by overexpression of dickkopf 1 (DKK1), an inhibitor of WNT/β-catenin signaling. Thus, inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling by DAB2 is essential for establishing the correct number of cardiomyocytes in the developing heart. Our work demonstrates that quantifying the proteome of human stem cells can identify previously unknown developmental regulators.

  6. Adipose proteome analysis: focus on mediators of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoli; Hess, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    As is well known, adipose tissue is an important site for lipid metabolism and insulin-responsive glucose uptake. The recent discovery of the endocrine function of adipose tissue and the association of obesity with chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue has reinforced the concept of the central role of adipose tissue in mediating obesity-linked insulin resistance and metabolic dysregulation. The study of adipose cells has provided new insights into the mechanism underlying insulin resistance as well as the therapeutic strategies for diabetes. Numerous efforts have been made in identifying key molecular regulators of insulin action and metabolism, including the utilization of advanced proteomics technology. Various proteomic approaches have been applied to identify the adipose secretome, protein-expression profiling and post-translational modifications in adipose cells in the pathological state. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the proteomics of adipose tissue, and discuss the identified proteins that potentially play important roles in insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:19086862

  7. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  8. Proteomic analysis through larval development of Solea senegalensis flatfish.

    PubMed

    Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Asensio, Esther; Cañavate, José Pedro; Alhama, José; López-Barea, Juan

    2015-12-01

    The post-embryonic development of the Senegalese sole, Solea senegalensis, a flatfish of growing interest in fisheries and aquaculture, is associated with drastic morpho-physiological changes during metamorphosis. Although in the last two decades knowledge on sole culture has notably increased, especially in Southern Europe, its progress was restricted due to lack of methods to control reproduction, improve larval quality and increase juvenile disease resistance. A limited knowledge of the physiological, molecular and genetic mechanisms involved is at the base of such limitation. A proteomic study was carried out to explore the molecular events that occur during S. senegalensis ontogenesis. Protein expression changes were monitored in larvae from 5 to 21 dph by combining 2DE and protein identification with de novo MS/MS sequencing. An average of 6177 ± 282 spots was resolved in 2DE gels. Hierarchical cluster analysis of the 705 selected spots grouped them in eight patterns. Thirty-four proteins were identified and assigned biological functions including structure, metabolism highlighting energy metabolism, transport, protein folding, stress response, chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. These changes provide a sequential description of the molecular events associated with the biochemical and biological transformations that occur during sole larval development.

  9. Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes: a comparative proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Joana M. S.; Anjo, Sandra I.; Fonseca, Luís; Egas, Conceição; Manadas, Bruno; Abrantes, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, recognized as a worldwide major forest pest, is a migratory endoparasitic nematode with capacity to feed on pine tissues and also on fungi colonizing the trees. Bursaphelenchus mucronatus, the closest related species, differs from B. xylophilus on its pathogenicity, making this nematode a good candidate for comparative analyses. Secretome profiles of B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus were obtained and proteomic differences were evaluated by quantitative SWATH-MS. From the 681 proteins initially identified, 422 were quantified and compared between B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes and from these, 243 proteins were found differentially regulated: 158 and 85 proteins were increased in B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus secretomes, respectively. While increased proteins in B. xylophilus secretome revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with peptidase activity, the increased proteins in B. mucronatus secretome were mainly related to oxidative stress responses. The changes in peptidases were evaluated at the transcription level by RT-qPCR, revealing a correlation between the mRNA levels of four cysteine peptidases with secretion levels. The analysis presented expands our knowledge about molecular basis of B. xylophilus and B. mucronatus hosts interaction and supports the hypothesis of a key role of secreted peptidases in B. xylophilus pathogenicity. PMID:27941947

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots exposed to high arsenate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Li, Ming; Han, Chao; Wu, Fengxia; Tu, Bingkun; Yang, Pingfang

    2013-10-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water and cereals is a serious threat to humans all over the world. Rice (Oryza sativa "Nipponbare"), as a main cereal crop, can accumulate arsenic more than 10-fold that of in other cereals. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the response of rice subjected to 100 µM arsenate stress, a comparative proteomic analysis of rice shoots in combination with morphological and biochemical investigations have been performed in this study. The results demonstrated that arsenate suppressed the growth of rice seedlings, destroyed the cellular ultra-structure and changed the homeostasis of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, a total of 38 differentially displayed proteins, which were mainly involved in metabolism, redox and protein-metabolism, were identified. The data suggest the arsenic can inhibit rice growth through negatively affecting chloroplast structure and photosynthesis. In addition, upregulation of the proteins involved in redox and protein metabolism might help the rice to be resistant or tolerant to arsenic toxicity. In general, this study improves our understanding about the rice arsenic responsive mechanism.

  11. Proteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to simulated-microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Xiaoming; Ma, Wenwen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Cong; Sun, Yeqing

    Microgravity can induce a serial of physiological and pathological changes in human body, such as cardiovascular functional disorder, bone loss, muscular atrophy and impaired immune system function, etc. In this research, we focus on the influence of microgravity to vertebrate embryo development. As a powerful model for studying vertebrate development, zebrafish embryos at 8 hpf (hour past fertilization) and 24 hpf were placed into a NASA developed bioreac-tor (RCCS) to simulate microgravity for 64 and 48 hours, respectively. The same number of control embryos from the same parents were placed in a tissue culture dish at the same temper-ature of 28° C. Each experiment was repeated 3 times and analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Image analysis of silver stained 2-D gels revealed that 64 from total 292 protein spots showed quantitative and qualitative variations that were significantly (P<0.05) and reproducibly different between simulate-microgravity treatment and the stationary control samples. 4 protein spots with significant expression alteration (P<0.01) were excised from 2-D gels and analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra primarily. Of these proteins, 3 down-regulated proteins were identified as bectin 2, centrosomal protein of 135kDa and tropomyosin 4, while the up-regulated protein was identified as creatine kinase muscle B. Other protein spots showed significant expression alteration will be identified successively and the corresponding genes expression will also be measured by Q-PCR method at different development stages. The data presented in this study illustrate that zebrafish embryo can be significantly induced by microgravity on the expression of proteins involved in bone and muscle formation. Key Words: Danio rerio; Simulated-microgravity; Proteomics

  12. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human milk proteome: contribution of protein fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mangé, A; Bellet, V; Tuaillon, E; Van de Perre, P; Solassol, J

    2008-12-15

    In-depth analysis of the milk proteome by mass spectrometry is challenged by the presence of few high-abundance proteins that interfere with the detection of lower-abundance proteins. Here, we evaluated the proteomic analysis of milk samples following a strong anion exchange fractionation procedure using denaturating conditions ensuring the disruption of protein-protein interactions. Crude whey or skim milk and their different resulting fractions were analyzed by protein chip array mass spectrometry. Using protein chip array mass spectrometry, several high-abundance proteins were localized in distinct fractions increasing the total number of unique peptides and proteins detected. This total number increased by about 20-30% by combining different chromatographic surface arrays used for capture. Reproducible results were obtained in human skim milk and whey; however this approach was not successful with milk fat globule membrane and required refinement. Hence, milk profiling by anion exchange fractionation combined to protein chip array mass spectrometry represents a promising tool to detect unknown low-abundance milk proteins that may ultimately prove useful as biomarkers of diseases transmitted by breastfeeding.

  13. Integrated proteomics identified up-regulated focal adhesion-mediated proteins in human squamous cell carcinoma in an orthotopic murine model.

    PubMed

    Granato, Daniela C; Zanetti, Mariana R; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R; Aragão, Annelize Z; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Vidal, Ramon O; Flores, Isadora L; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K; Silva, Alan R S; Coletta, Ricardo D; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules.

  14. Integrated Proteomics Identified Up-Regulated Focal Adhesion-Mediated Proteins in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Daniela C.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Aragão, Annelize Z.; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Flores, Isadora L.; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Silva, Alan R. S.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules. PMID:24858105

  15. Differential proteomic and tissue expression analyses identify valuable diagnostic biomarkers of hepatocellular differentiation and hepatoid adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Reis, Henning; Padden, Juliet; Ahrens, Maike; Pütter, Carolin; Bertram, Stefanie; Pott, Leona L; Reis, Anna-Carinna; Weber, Frank; Juntermanns, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Andreas-C; Eisenacher, Martin; Schlaak, Joörg F; Canbay, Ali; Meyer, Helmut E; Sitek, Barbara; Baba, Hideo A

    2015-10-01

    The exact discrimination of lesions with true hepatocellular differentiation from secondary tumours and neoplasms with hepatocellular histomorphology like hepatoid adenocarcinomas (HAC) is crucial. Therefore, we aimed to identify ancillary protein biomarkers by using complementary proteomic techniques (2D-DIGE, label-free MS). The identified candidates were immunohistochemically validated in 14 paired samples of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and non-tumourous liver tissue (NT). The candidates and HepPar1/Arginase1 were afterwards tested for consistency in a large cohort of hepatocellular lesions and NT (n = 290), non-hepatocellular malignancies (n = 383) and HAC (n = 13). Eight non-redundant, differentially expressed proteins were suitable for further immunohistochemical validation and four (ABAT, BHMT, FABP1, HAOX1) for further evaluation. Sensitivity and specificity rates for HCC/HAC were as follows: HepPar1 80.2%, 94.3% / 80.2%, 46.2%; Arginase1 82%, 99.4% / 82%, 69.2%; BHMT 61.4%, 93.8% / 61.4%, 100%; ABAT 84.4%, 33.7% / 84.4%, 30.8%; FABP1 87.2%, 95% / 87.2%, 69.2%; HAOX1 95.5%, 36.3% / 95.5%, 46.2%. The best 2×/3× biomarker panels for the diagnosis of HCC consisted of Arginase1/HAOX1 and BHMT/Arginase1/HAOX1 and for HAC consisted of Arginase1/FABP1 and BHMT/Arginase1/FABP1. In summary, we successfully identified, validated and benchmarked protein biomarker candidates of hepatocellular differentiation. BHMT in particular exhibited superior diagnostic characteristics in hepatocellular lesions and specifically in HAC. BHMT is therefore a promising (panel based) biomarker candidate in the differential diagnostic process of lesions with hepatocellular aspect.

  16. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Placenta from Pregnant Women with Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Guo, Yueshuai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Daozhen; Xiang, Jingying; Zhou, Zuomin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) usually occurs in the third trimester and associated with increased risks in fetal complications. Currently, the exact cause of this disease is unknown. In this study we aim to investigate the potential proteins in placenta, which may participate in the molecular mechanisms of ICP-related fetal complications using iTRAQ-based proteomics approach. Methods The iTRAQ analysis combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was performed to separate differentially expressed placental proteins from 4 pregnant women with ICP and 4 healthy pregnant women. Bioinformatics analysis was used to find the relative processes that these differentially expressed proteins were involved in. Three apoptosis related proteins ERp29, PRDX6 and MPO that resulted from iTRAQ-based proteomics were further verified in placenta by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Placental apoptosis was also detected by TUNEL assay. Results Proteomics results showed there were 38 differentially expressed proteins from pregnant women with ICP and healthy pregnant women, 29 were upregulated and 9 were downregulated in placenta from pregnant women with ICP. Bioinformatics analysis showed most of the identified proteins was functionally related to specific cell processes, including apoptosis, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism. The expression levels of ERp29, PRDX6 and MPO were consistent with the proteomics data. The apoptosis index in placenta from ICP patients was significantly increased. Conclusion This preliminary work provides a better understanding of the proteomic alterations of placenta from pregnant women with ICP and may provide us some new insights into the pathophysiology and potential novel treatment targets for ICP. PMID:24391750

  17. Metabolomics-assisted proteomics identifies succinylation and SIRT5 as important regulators of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Liu, Xiaojing; Ryu, Dongryeol; Nelson, Ornella D.; Stupinski, John A.; Li, Zhi; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Weiss, Robert S.; Auwerx, Johan; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolites, such as acyl-CoA, can modify proteins, leading to protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs). One such PTM is lysine succinylation, which is regulated by sirtuin 5 (SIRT5). Although numerous proteins are modified by lysine succinylation, the physiological significance of lysine succinylation and SIRT5 remains elusive. Here, by profiling acyl-CoA molecules in various mouse tissues, we have discovered that different tissues have different acyl-CoA profiles and that succinyl-CoA is the most abundant acyl-CoA molecule in the heart. This interesting observation has prompted us to examine protein lysine succinylation in different mouse tissues in the presence and absence of SIRT5. Protein lysine succinylation predominantly accumulates in the heart when Sirt5 is deleted. Using proteomic studies, we have identified many cardiac proteins regulated by SIRT5. Our data suggest that ECHA, a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is a major enzyme that is regulated by SIRT5 and affects heart function. Sirt5 knockout (KO) mice have lower ECHA activity, increased long-chain acyl-CoAs, and decreased ATP in the heart under fasting conditions. Sirt5 KO mice develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as evident from the increased heart weight relative to body weight, as well as reduced shortening and ejection fractions. These findings establish that regulating heart metabolism and function is a major physiological function of lysine succinylation and SIRT5. PMID:27051063

  18. Multidimensional Proteomics Analysis of Amniotic Fluid to Provide Insight into the Mechanisms of Idiopathic Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Buhimschi, Irina A.; Zhao, Guomao; Rosenberg, Victor A.; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya; Thung, Stephen; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Though recent advancement in proteomics has provided a novel perspective on several distinct pathogenetic mechanisms leading to preterm birth (inflammation, bleeding), the etiology of most preterm births still remains elusive. We conducted a multidimensional proteomic analysis of the amniotic fluid to identify pathways related to preterm birth in the absence of inflammation or bleeding. Methodology/Principal Findings A proteomic fingerprint was generated from fresh amniotic fluid using surface-enhanced laser desorbtion ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry in a total of 286 consecutive samples retrieved from women who presented with signs or symptoms of preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Inflammation and/or bleeding proteomic patterns were detected in 32% (92/286) of the SELDI tracings. In the remaining tracings, a hierarchical algorithm was applied based on descriptors quantifying similarity/dissimilarity among proteomic fingerprints. This allowed identification of a novel profile (Q-profile) based on the presence of 5 SELDI peaks in the 10–12.5 kDa mass area. Women displaying the Q-profile (mean±SD, gestational age: 25±4 weeks, n = 40) were more likely to deliver preterm despite expectant management in the context of intact membranes and normal amniotic fluid clinical results. Utilizing identification-centered proteomics techniques (fluorescence two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis, robotic tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry) coupled with Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) ontological classifications, we determined that in amniotic fluids with Q-profile the differentially expressed proteins are primarily involved in non-inflammatory biological processes such as protein metabolism, signal transduction and transport. Conclusion/Significance Proteomic profiling of amniotic fluid coupled with non-hierarchical bioinformatics algorithms identified a subgroup of

  19. Proteomic analysis of Chlorella vulgaris: Potential targets for enhanced lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guarnieri, Michael T.; Nag, Ambarish; Yang, Shihui; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2013-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are capable of producing large quantities of fatty acids and triacylglycerides. As such, they are promising feedstocks for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. Genetic strain-engineering strategies offer a means to accelerate the commercialization of algal biofuels by improving the rate and total accumulation of microalgal lipids. However, the industrial potential of these organisms remains to be met, largely due to the incomplete knowledgebase surrounding the mechanisms governing the induction of algal lipid biosynthesis. Such strategies require further elucidation of genes and gene products controlling algal lipid accumulation. In this study, we have set out to examine these mechanisms and identify novel strain-engineering targets in the oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris. Comparative shotgun proteomic analyses have identified a number of novel targets, including previously unidentified transcription factors and proteins involved in cell signaling and cell cycle regulation. These results lay the foundation for strain-improvement strategies and demonstrate the power of translational proteomic analysis.

  20. Proteomic profiling of the mesenteric lymph after hemorrhagic shock: Differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Experiments show that upon traumatic injury the composition of mesenteric lymph changes such that it initiates an immune response that can ultimately result in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). To identify candidate protein mediators of this process we carried out a quantitative proteomic study on mesenteric lymph from a well characterized rat shock model. We analyzed three animals using analytical 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Intra-animal variation for the majority of protein spots was minor. Functional clustering of proteins revealed changes arising from several global classes that give novel insight into fundamental mechanisms of MODS. Mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis of proteins in mesenteric lymph can effectively be used to identify candidate mediators and loss of protective agents in shock models. PMID:21906351

  1. Peptide-Centric Proteome Analysis: An Alternative Strategy for the Analysis of Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Ying S.; Egertson, Jarrett D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Kim, Sangtae; MacLean, Brendan; Kall, Lukas; Aebersold, Ruedi; Smith, Richard D.; Noble, William; MacCoss, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In mass spectrometry-based bottom-up proteomics, data-independent acquisition (DIA) is an emerging technique due to its comprehensive and unbiased sampling of precursor ions. However, current DIA methods use wide precursor isolation windows, resulting in co- fragmentation and complex mixture spectra. Thus, conventional database searching tools that identify peptides by interpreting individual MS/MS spectra are inherently limited in analyzing DIA data. Here we discuss an alternative approach, peptide-centric analysis, which tests directly for the presence and absence of query peptides. We discuss how peptide-centric analysis resolves some limitations of traditional spectrum-centric analysis, and we outline the benefits of peptide-centric analysis in general.

  2. Proteomic analysis of liver mitochondria from rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Lu, De-Zhao; Li, You-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Qun; Zhou, Xin-Xin; Jin, Xi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore mitochondrial dysfunction in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by analyzing the proteome of liver mitochondria from a NASH model. METHODS: The NASH rat model was established by feeding rats a fat-rich diet for 24 wk and was confirmed using hematoxylin and eosin staining of liver tissue and by changes in the levels of serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglyceride, total cholesterol and other markers. Liver mitochondria from each group were isolated using differential centrifugation. The mitochondrial samples were lyzed, purified and further analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Bioinformatic analyses of assigned gene ontology and biological pathway was used to study functional enrichments in the abundant proteomic data. RESULTS: Eight up-regulated and sixteen down-regulated proteins were identified that showed greater than 1.5-fold differences between the controls and the NASH group. These dysregulated proteins were predicted to be involved in different metabolic processes including fatty acid β-oxidation processes, lipid metabolic processes, cell-cycle arrest, cell polarity maintenance, and adenosine triphosphate/sex hormone metabolic processes. Novel proteins that may be involved in NASH pathogenesis including the trifunctional enzyme Hadha, thyroxine, prohibitin, aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH1L2, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B31, and carbamoyl-phosphate synthase were identified using bioinformatics tools. The decreased expression of Hadha in NASH liver was verified by Western blotting, which was used as a complementary technique to confirm the proteomic results. CONCLUSION: This novel report on the liver mitochondrial proteome of a NASH model may provide a reservoir of information on the pathogenesis and treatment of NASH. PMID:24782632

  3. Global proteomic analysis of two tick-borne emerging zoonotic agents: Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Mingqun ..; Kikuchi, Takane; Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-02-17

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis are obligatory intracellular {alpha}-proteobacteria that infect human leukocytes and cause potentially fatal emerging zoonoses. In the present study, we determined global protein expression profiles of these bacteria cultured in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Mass spectrometric (MS) analyses identified a total of 1,212 A. phagocytophilum and 1,021 E. chaffeensis proteins, representing 89.3 and 92.3% of the predicted bacterial proteomes, respectively. Nearly all bacterial proteins ({approx}99%) with known functions were expressed, whereas only approximately 80% of hypothetical proteins were detected in infected human cells. Quantitative MS/MS analyses indicated that highly expressed proteins in both bacteria included chaperones, enzymes involved in biosynthesis and metabolism, and outer membrane proteins, such as A. phagocytophilum P44 and E. chaffeensis P28/OMP-1. Among 113 A. phagocytophilum p44 paralogous genes, 110 of them were expressed and 88 of them were encoded by pseudogenes. In addition, bacterial infection of HL-60 cells up-regulated the expression of human proteins involved mostly in cytoskeleton components, vesicular trafficking, cell signaling, and energy metabolism, but down regulated some pattern recognition receptors involved in innate immunity. Our proteomics data represent a comprehensive analysis of A. phagocytophilum and E. chaffeensis proteomes, and provide a quantitative view of human host protein expression profiles regulated by bacterial infection. The availability of these proteomic data will provide new insights into biology and pathogenesis of these obligatory intracellular pathogens.

  4. Proteomics analysis of human tears from aqueous-deficient and evaporative dry eye patients

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Natarajan; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high global prevalence of dry eye syndrome (DES), the fundamental processes underlying this pathology remain largely unexplored. Therefore, this study endeavoured to investigate in-depth the tear proteome of DES patients employing the mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic strategies. Eighty patients were recruited and subdivided into three major DES subgroups, which are the aqueous-deficient (DRYaq), evaporative (DRYlip) and a combination of the two (DRYaqlip), as well as healthy subjects (CTRL). Discovery proteomics strategy was employed to identify large number of significantly differentially expressed tear proteins in DRYlip vs. CTRL, DRYaq vs. CTRL and DRYaqlip vs. CTRL with 22, 58 and 67 proteins, respectively. Biological functional analysis demonstrated for the first time that various metabolic processes were highly expressed in DRYaq and DRYaqlip, which might modulate various other known processes, especially the inflammatory and immune processes. Targeted proteomics strategy verified that 13 major proteins were differentially expressed in specific DES subgroups, comprising of PRR4, ZG16B, SCGB2A1, DMBT1, PROL1, LACRT, ALDH3A1, ENO1, TF, S100A8, S100A9, PEBP1 and ORM1. In conclusion, this study had explored in-depth the pathology of DES by unravelling various new fundamental processes and the major proteins responsible for the maintenance of tear film stability. PMID:27436115

  5. Proteomic analysis of pRb loss highlights a signature of decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolay, Brandon N.; Danielian, Paul S.; Kottakis, Filippos; Lapek, John D.; Sanidas, Ioannis; Miles, Wayne O.; Dehnad, Mantre; Tschöp, Katrin; Gierut, Jessica J.; Manning, Amity L.; Morris, Robert; Haigis, Kevin; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Lees, Jacqueline A.; Haas, Wilhelm; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRb) protein associates with chromatin and regulates gene expression. Numerous studies have identified Rb-dependent RNA signatures, but the proteomic effects of Rb loss are largely unexplored. We acutely ablated Rb in adult mice and conducted a quantitative analysis of RNA and proteomic changes in the colon and lungs, where RbKO was sufficient or insufficient to induce ectopic proliferation, respectively. As expected, RbKO caused similar increases in classic pRb/E2F-regulated transcripts in both tissues, but, unexpectedly, their protein products increased only in the colon, consistent with its increased proliferative index. Thus, these protein changes induced by Rb loss are coupled with proliferation but uncoupled from transcription. The proteomic changes in common between RbKO tissues showed a striking decrease in proteins with mitochondrial functions. Accordingly, RB1 inactivation in human cells decreased both mitochondrial mass and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function. RBKO cells showed decreased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and the accumulation of hypopolarized mitochondria. Additionally, RB/Rb loss altered mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation from 13C-glucose through the TCA cycle in mouse tissues and cultured cells. Consequently, RBKO cells have an enhanced sensitivity to mitochondrial stress conditions. In summary, proteomic analyses provide a new perspective on Rb/RB1 mutation, highlighting the importance of pRb for mitochondrial function and suggesting vulnerabilities for treatment. PMID:26314710

  6. A Combined Metabolomic and Proteomic Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Joanna; Klupczynska, Agnieszka; Dereziński, Paweł; Matysiak, Jan; Kokot, Piotr; Nowak, Dorota M.; Gajęcka, Marzena; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Kokot, Zenon J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to apply a novel combined metabolomic and proteomic approach in analysis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The investigation was performed with plasma samples derived from pregnant women with diagnosed gestational diabetes mellitus (n = 18) and a matched control group (n = 13). The mass spectrometry-based analyses allowed to determine 42 free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptide profiles. Different expressions of several peptides and altered amino acid profiles were observed in the analyzed groups. The combination of proteomic and metabolomic data allowed obtaining the model with a high discriminatory power, where amino acids ethanolamine, l-citrulline, l-asparagine, and peptide ions with m/z 1488.59; 4111.89 and 2913.15 had the highest contribution to the model. The sensitivity (94.44%) and specificity (84.62%), as well as the total group membership classification value (90.32%) calculated from the post hoc classification matrix of a joint model were the highest when compared with a single analysis of either amino acid levels or peptide ion intensities. The obtained results indicated a high potential of integration of proteomic and metabolomics analysis regardless the sample size. This promising approach together with clinical evaluation of the subjects can also be used in the study of other diseases. PMID:26694367

  7. Proteomic analysis of human aqueous humor using multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Matthew R; Price, Marianne O; Price, Francis W; Pardo, Jennifer C; Grandin, Juan C; You, Jinsam; Wang, Mu; Yoder, Mervin C

    2009-12-11

    Aqueous humor (AH) supports avascular tissues in the anterior segment of the eye, maintains intraocular pressure, and potentially influences the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Nevertheless, the AH proteome is still poorly defined despite several previous efforts, which were hindered by interfering high abundance proteins, inadequate animal models, and limited proteomic technologies. To facilitate future investigations into AH function, the AH proteome was extensively characterized using an advanced proteomic approach. Samples from patients undergoing cataract surgery were pooled and depleted of interfering abundant proteins and thereby divided into two fractions: albumin-bound and albumin-depleted. Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was utilized for each fraction; this incorporates strong cation exchange chromatography to reduce sample complexity before reversed-phase liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Twelve proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-bound fraction and 50 proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-depleted fraction. Gene ontological analyses were performed to determine which cellular components and functions were enriched. Many proteins were previously identified in the AH and for several their potential role in the AH has been investigated; however, the majority of identified proteins were novel and only speculative roles can be suggested. The AH was abundant in anti-oxidant and immunoregulatory proteins as well as anti-angiogenic proteins, which may be involved in maintaining the avascular tissues. This is the first known report to extensively characterize and describe the human AH proteome and lays the foundation for future work regarding its function in homeostatic and pathologic states.

  8. Proteomic analysis of human aqueous humor using multidimensional protein identification technology

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Matthew R.; Price, Marianne O.; Price, Francis W.; Pardo, Jennifer C.; Grandin, Juan C.; You, Jinsam; Wang, Mu

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous humor (AH) supports avascular tissues in the anterior segment of the eye, maintains intraocular pressure, and potentially influences the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Nevertheless, the AH proteome is still poorly defined despite several previous efforts, which were hindered by interfering high abundance proteins, inadequate animal models, and limited proteomic technologies. To facilitate future investigations into AH function, the AH proteome was extensively characterized using an advanced proteomic approach. Samples from patients undergoing cataract surgery were pooled and depleted of interfering abundant proteins and thereby divided into two fractions: albumin-bound and albumin-depleted. Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) was utilized for each fraction; this incorporates strong cation exchange chromatography to reduce sample complexity before reversed-phase liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Twelve proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-bound fraction and 50 proteins had multi-peptide, high confidence identifications in the albumin-depleted fraction. Gene ontological analyses were performed to determine which cellular components and functions were enriched. Many proteins were previously identified in the AH and for several their potential role in the AH has been investigated; however, the majority of identified proteins were novel and only speculative roles can be suggested. The AH was abundant in anti-oxidant and immunoregulatory proteins as well as anti-angiogenic proteins, which may be involved in maintaining the avascular tissues. This is the first known report to extensively characterize and describe the human AH proteome and lays the foundation for future work regarding its function in homeostatic and pathologic states. PMID:20019884

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Lyme Disease: Global Protein Comparison of Three Strains of Borrelia burgdorferi

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Yang, Xiaohua; Luft, Benjamin J.; Dunn, John J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-04-01

    The Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne disease in the United States. It has been studied extensively to help understand its pathogenicity of infection and how it can persist in different mammalian hosts. We report the proteomic analysis of the archetype B. burgdorferi B31 strain and two other strains (ND40, and JD-1) having different Borrelia pathotypes using strong cation exchange fractionation of proteolytic peptides followed by high-resolution, reversed phase capillary liquid chromatography coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Protein identification was facilitated by the availability of the complete B31 genome sequence. A total of 665 Borrelia proteins were identified representing ~38 % coverage of the theoretical B31 proteome. A significant overlap was observed between the identified proteins in direct comparisons between any two strains (>72%), but distinct differences were observed among identified hypothetical and outer membrane proteins of the three strains. Such a concurrent proteomic overview of three Borrelia strains based upon only the B31 genome sequence is shown to provide significant insights into the presence or absence of specific proteins and a broad overall comparison among strains.

  10. Integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data identifies two biologically distinct subtypes of invasive lobular breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Michaut, Magali; Chin, Suet-Feung; Majewski, Ian; Severson, Tesa M.; Bismeijer, Tycho; de Koning, Leanne; Peeters, Justine K.; Schouten, Philip C.; Rueda, Oscar M.; Bosma, Astrid J.; Tarrant, Finbarr; Fan, Yue; He, Beilei; Xue, Zheng; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Kluin, Roelof J.C.; Heijmans, Jeroen; Snel, Mireille; Pereira, Bernard; Schlicker, Andreas; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Gaber, Alexander; O’Hurley, Gillian; Lehn, Sophie; Muris, Jettie J.F.; Wesseling, Jelle; Kay, Elaine; Sammut, Stephen John; Bardwell, Helen A.; Barbet, Aurélie S.; Bard, Floriane; Lecerf, Caroline; O’Connor, Darran P.; Vis, Daniël J.; Benes, Cyril H.; McDermott, Ultan; Garnett, Mathew J.; Simon, Iris M.; Jirström, Karin; Dubois, Thierry; Linn, Sabine C.; Gallagher, William M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Caldas, Carlos; Bernards, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is the second most frequently occurring histological breast cancer subtype after invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), accounting for around 10% of all breast cancers. The molecular processes that drive the development of ILC are still largely unknown. We have performed a comprehensive genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of a large ILC patient cohort and present here an integrated molecular portrait of ILC. Mutations in CDH1 and in the PI3K pathway are the most frequent molecular alterations in ILC. We identified two main subtypes of ILCs: (i) an immune related subtype with mRNA up-regulation of PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 and greater sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in representative cell line models; (ii) a hormone related subtype, associated with Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and gain of chromosomes 1q and 8q and loss of chromosome 11q. Using the somatic mutation rate and eIF4B protein level, we identified three groups with different clinical outcomes, including a group with extremely good prognosis. We provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular alterations driving ILC and have explored links with therapy response. This molecular characterization may help to tailor treatment of ILC through the application of specific targeted, chemo- and/or immune-therapies. PMID:26729235

  11. Excavating the surface-associated and secretory proteome of Mycobacterium leprae for identifying vaccines and diagnostic markers relevant immunodominant epitopes.

    PubMed

    Rana, Aarti; Thakur, Shweta; Bhardwaj, Nupur; Kumar, Devender; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-12-01

    For centuries, Mycobacterium leprae, etiological agent of leprosy, has been afflicting mankind regardless of extensive use of live-attenuated vaccines and antibiotics. Surface-associated and secretory proteins (SASPs) are attractive targets against bacteria. We have integrated biological knowledge with computational approaches and present a proteome-wide identification of SASPs. We also performed computational assignment of immunodominant epitopes as coordinates of prospective antigenic candidates in most important class of SASPs, the outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Exploiting the known protein sequence and structural characteristics shared by the SASPs from bacteria, 17 lipoproteins, 11 secretory and 19 novel OMPs (including 4 essential proteins) were identified in M. leprae As OMPs represent the most exposed antigens on the cell surface, their immunoinformatics analysis showed that the identified 19 OMPs harbor T-cell MHC class I epitopes and class II epitopes against HLA-DR alleles (54), while 15 OMPs present potential T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DQ alleles (6) and 7 OMPs possess T-cell class II epitopes against HLA-DP alleles (5) of humans. Additionally, 11 M. leprae OMPs were found to have B-cell epitopes and these may be considered as prime candidates for the development of new immunotherapeutics against M. leprae.

  12. Proteomic screen identifies IGFBP7 as a novel component of endothelial cell-specific Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    van Breevoort, Dorothee; van Agtmaal, Ellen L; Dragt, Bieuwke S; Gebbinck, Jacqueline Klein; Dienava-Verdoold, Ilze; Kragt, Astrid; Bierings, Ruben; Horrevoets, Anton J G; Valentijn, Karine M; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; Meijer, Alexander B; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-05-04

    Vascular endothelial cells contain unique storage organelles, designated Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), that deliver inflammatory and hemostatic mediators to the vascular lumen in response to agonists like thrombin and vasopressin. The main component of WPBs is von Willebrand factor (VWF), a multimeric glycoprotein crucial for platelet plug formation. In addition to VWF, several other components are known to be stored in WPBs, like osteoprotegerin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and angiopoetin-2 (Ang-2). Here, we used an unbiased proteomics approach to identify additional residents of WPBs. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified WPBs revealed the presence of several known components such as VWF, Ang-2, and P-selectin. Thirty-five novel candidate WPB residents were identified that included insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (IGFBP7), which has been proposed to regulate angiogenesis. Immunocytochemistry revealed that IGFBP7 is a bona fide WPB component. Cotransfection studies showed that IGFBP7 trafficked to pseudo-WPB in HEK293 cells. Using a series of deletion variants of VWF, we showed that targeting of IGFBP7 to pseudo-WPBs was dependent on the carboxy-terminal D4-C1-C2-C3-CK domains of VWF. IGFBP7 remained attached to ultralarge VWF strings released upon exocytosis of WPBs under flow. The presence of IGFBP7 in WPBs highlights the role of this subcellular compartment in regulation of angiogenesis.

  13. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takanori; Dohra, Hideo; Ito, Yumihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Marina; Kamiya, Shiori; Kato, Masaya; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Motohashi, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of ‘Micro-Tom’ fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared ‘Micro-Tom’ results with those from two other varieties, ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of ‘Micro-Tom’, and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared ‘Micro-Tom’ fruits with ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein) and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1) in the ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin) in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between ‘Micro-Tom’ and ‘Black’/‘White Beauty’. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast. PMID:26371478

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of mouse radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Christophe; Blachowicz, Agnieszka; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Finnon, Rosemary; Michaux, Arlette; Sarioglu, Hakan; Brown, Natalie; Manning, Grainne; Benotmane, M. Abderrafi; Tapio, Soile; Polanska, Joanna; Bouffler, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis of mouse radiation-induced AMLs using two primary AMLs, cell lines from these primaries, another cell line and its in vivo passage is reported. Compared to haematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSC), over 5000 transcriptome alterations were identified, 2600 present in all materials. 55 and 3 alterations were detected in the proteomes of the cell lines and primary/in vivo passage material respectively, with one common to all materials. In cell lines, approximately 50% of the transcriptome changes are related to adaptation to cell culture, and in the proteome this proportion was higher. An AML ‘signature’ of 17 genes/proteins commonly deregulated in primary AMLs and cell lines compared to HPSCs was identified and validated using human AML transcriptome data. This also distinguishes primary AMLs from cell lines and includes proteins such as Coronin 1, pontin/RUVBL1 and Myeloperoxidase commonly implicated in human AML. C-Myc was identified as having a key role in radiation leukaemogenesis. These data identify novel candidates relevant to mouse radiation AML pathogenesis, and confirm that pathways of leukaemogenesis in the mouse and human share substantial commonality. PMID:27250028

  15. Proteomic analysis of MOLT-4 cells treated by valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Vávrová, Jirina; Janovská, Sylva; Rezácová, Martina; Hernychová, Lenka; Tichá, Zuzana; Vokurková, Doris; Záskodová, Darina; Lukásová, Emilie

    2007-09-01

    The effect of valproic acid (VA) on protein expression in human T-lymphocytic leukemia cells MOLT-4 was studied. VA is an inhibitor of histonedeacetylases and has a potential use as antitumor agent in leukemia treatment. The authors in this work prove that 4 h long incubation with 2 mmol/l VA causes phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and its colocalization with 53BP1 in nuclear foci. Their co-localization is typical for DSB signaling machinery. These foci were detected in cells after 4 h exposure without increase of Annexin V positive apoptotic cells. Slight increase in apoptosis (Annexin V positivity) after 24 h is accompanied by more intensive increase in phosphorylation of H2A.X and also by formation of nuclear foci containing gammaH2A.X and 53BP1. Treatment of cells with 2 mmol/l VA resulted in induction of apoptosis affecting about 30% of cells after incubation for 72 h. The changes in protein expression were examined after cell incubation with 2 mmol/l VA for 4 h. Proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantified using image evaluation system. Those exhibiting significant VA-induced abundance alterations were identified by mass spectrometry. Changes in expression of 22 proteins were detected, of which 15 proteins were down-regulated. Proteomic analysis resulted in successful identification of three proteins involving alfa-tubulin 3, tubulin-specific chaperone and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein F. Expression of seven proteins was up-regulated, including heterogeneous nuclear ribonucloprotein A/B. Identified proteins are related to microtubular system and hnRNP family. Suppression of microtubular proteins and changes of balance among hnRNPs can contribute to proliferation arrest and apoptosis induction.

  16. Proteomic analysis of MG132-treated germinating pollen reveals expression signatures associated with proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Candida; Bracale, Marcella; Crinelli, Rita; Marconi, Valerio; Campomenosi, Paola; Marsoni, Milena; Scoccianti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of the proteasome has been previously found to effectively impair pollen germination and tube growth in vitro. However, the mediators of these effects at the molecular level are unknown. By performing 2DE proteomic analysis, 24 differentially expressed protein spots, representing 14 unique candidate proteins, were identified in the pollen of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) germinated in the presence of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. qPCR analysis revealed that 11 of these proteins are not up-regulated at the mRNA level, but are most likely stabilized by proteasome inhibition. These differentially expressed proteins are predicted to function in various pathways including energy and lipid metabolism, cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis/degradation and stress responses. In line with this evidence, the MG132-induced changes in the proteome were accompanied by an increase in ATP and ROS content and by an alteration in fatty acid composition.

  17. Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Abaitua, Fernando; Krause, Eberhard; Tate, Edward W.; O’Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions. PMID:26256475

  18. Clinicopathological Analysis and Multipronged Quantitative Proteomics Reveal Oxidative Stress and Cytoskeletal Proteins as Possible Markers for Severe Vivax Malaria.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Patel, Sandip K; Venkatesh, Apoorva; Bhave, Amruta; Kumar, Vipin; Singh, Vaidhvi; Chatterjee, Gangadhar; Shah, Veenita G; Sharma, Sarthak; Renu, Durairaj; Nafis, Naziya; Gandhe, Prajakta; Gogtay, Nithya; Thatte, Urmila; Sehgal, Kunal; Verma, Sumit; Karak, Avik; Khanra, Dibbendhu; Talukdar, Arunansu; Kochar, Sanjay K; S B, Vijeth; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Rojh, Dharmendra; Varma, Santosh G; Gandhi, Mayuri N; Srikanth, Rapole; Patankar, Swati; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-04-19

    In Plasmodium vivax malaria, mechanisms that trigger transition from uncomplicated to fatal severe infections are obscure. In this multi-disciplinary study we have performed a comprehensive analysis of clinicopathological parameters and serum proteome profiles of vivax malaria patients with different severity levels of infection to investigate pathogenesis of severe malaria and identify surrogate markers of severity. Clinicopathological analysis and proteomics profiling has provided evidences for the modulation of diverse physiological pathways including oxidative stress, cytoskeletal regulation, lipid metabolism and complement cascades in severe malaria. Strikingly, unlike severe falciparum malaria the blood coagulation cascade was not found to be affected adversely in acute P. vivax infection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive proteomics study, which identified some possible cues for severe P. vivax infection. Our results suggest that Superoxide dismutase, Vitronectin, Titin, Apolipoprotein E, Serum amyloid A, and Haptoglobin are potential predictive markers for malaria severity.

  19. Network-based proteomic analysis for postmenopausal osteoporosis in Caucasian females.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Liu, Yao-Zhong; Zeng, Yong; Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Zhu, Jia-Qiang; He, Hao; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Deng, Fei-Yan; Papasian, Christopher J; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Menopause is one of the crucial physiological events during the life of a woman. Transition of menopause status is accompanied by increased risks of various health problems such as osteoporosis. Peripheral blood monocytes can differentiate into osteoclasts and produce cytokines important for osteoclast activity. With quantitative proteomics LC-nano-ESI-MS(E) (where MS(E) is elevated-energy MS), we performed protein expression profiling of peripheral blood monocytes in 42 postmenopausal women with discordant bone mineral density (BMD) levels. Traditional comparative analysis showed proteins encoded by four genes (LOC654188, PPIA, TAGLN2, YWHAB) and three genes (LMNB1, ANXA2P2, ANXA2) were significantly down- and upregulated, respectively, in extremely low- versus high-BMD subjects. To study functionally orchestrating groups of detected proteins in the form of networks, we performed weighted gene coexpression network analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis showed that the module including the annexin gene family was most significantly correlated with low BMD, and the lipid-binding related GO terms were enriched in this identified module. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that two significantly enriched gene sets may be involved in postmenopausal BMD variation by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokines activities. To gain more insights into the proteomics data generated, we performed integrative analyses of the datasets available to us at the genome (DNA level), transcriptome (RNA level), and proteome levels jointly.

  20. Proteomic analysis of microsomes from lactating bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lifeng; Rawson, Pisana; McLauchlan, Danyl; Lehnert, Klaus; Snell, Russell; Jordan, T William

    2008-04-01

    Mammary gland has multiple metabolic potential including for large-scale synthesis of milk proteins, carbohydrate, and lipids including nutrient triacylglycerols. We have carried out a proteomic analysis of mammary tissue to discover proteins that affect lipid metabolism. Unfractionated microsomes from lactating bovine mammary tissue were analyzed using one-dimensional SDS-PAGE with RPLC-ESI-MS/MS. This approach gave 703 proteins including 160 predicted transmembrane proteins. Proteins were classified according to their subcellular localizations and biological functions. Over 50 proteins were associated with cellular uptake, metabolism, and secretion of lipids, including some enzymes that have been previously associated with breast cancer and potential therapeutic targets. This database develops a proteomic view of the metabolic potential of mammary gland that can be expected to contribute to a greater understanding of gene expression and tissue remodeling associated with lactation, and to further dissection of normal and pathological processes in mammary tissue.

  1. Proteome analysis of Pueraria mirifica tubers collected in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Jungsukcharoen, Jutarmas; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Cherdshewasart, Wichai; Sangvanich, Polkit

    2016-06-01

    Pueraria mirifica-derived tuberous powder has been long-term consumed in Thailand as female hormone-replacement traditional remedies. The protein profiles of tubers collected in different seasons were evaluated. Phenol extraction, 2D-PAGE, and mass spectrometry were employed for tuberous proteome analysis. Out of the 322 proteins detected, over 59% were functionally classified as being involved in metabolism. The rest proteins were involved in defense, protein synthesis, cell structure, transportation, stress, storage, and also unidentified function. The proteins were found to be differentially expressed with respect to harvest season. Importantly, chalcone isomerase, isoflavone synthase, cytochrome p450, UDP-glycosyltransferase, and isoflavone reductase, which are all involved in the biosynthesis pathway of bioactive isoflavonoids, were most abundantly expressed in the summer-collected tubers. This is the first report on the proteomic patterns in P. mirifica tubers in relevant with seasonal variation. The study enlights the understanding of variance isoflavonoid production in P. mirifica tubers.

  2. Analysis of proteome dynamics in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Price, John C.; Guan, Shenheng; Burlingame, Alma; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2010-01-01

    Advances in systems biology have allowed for global analyses of mRNA and protein expression, but large-scale studies of protein dynamics and turnover have not been conducted in vivo. Protein turnover is an important metabolic and regulatory mechanism in establishing proteome homeostasis, impacting many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we have used organism-wide isotopic labeling to measure the turnover rates of ~2,500 proteins in multiple mouse tissues, spanning four orders of magnitude. Through comparison of the brain with the liver and blood, we show that within the respective tissues, proteins performing similar functions often have similar turnover rates. Proteins in the brain have significantly slower turnover (average lifetime of 9.0 d) compared with those of the liver (3.0 d) and blood (3.5 d). Within some organelles (such as mitochondria), proteins have a narrow range of lifetimes, suggesting a synchronized turnover mechanism. Protein subunits within complexes of variable composition have a wide range of lifetimes, whereas those within well-defined complexes turn over in a coordinated manner. Together, the data represent the most comprehensive in vivo analysis of mammalian proteome turnover to date. The developed methodology can be adapted to assess in vivo proteome homeostasis in any model organism that will tolerate a labeled diet and may be particularly useful in the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases in vivo. PMID:20699386

  3. Whole proteome analysis of mouse lymph nodes in cutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Popova, Taissia G; Espina, Virginia; Zhou, Weidong; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance; Popov, Serguei G

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize a soluble proteome of popliteal lymph nodes during lymphadenitis induced by intradermal injection of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores in mice using tandem LC-MS/MS and reverse-phase protein microarray with antibodies specific to epitopes of phosphorylated proteins. More than 380 proteins were detected in the normal intra-nodal lymph, while the infectious process resulted in the profound changes in the protein abundances and appearance of 297 unique proteins. These proteins belong to an array of processes reflecting response to wounding, inflammation and perturbations of hemostasis, innate immune response, coagulation and fibrinolysis, regulation of body fluid levels and vascular disturbance among others. Comparison of lymph and serum revealed 83 common proteins. Also, using 71 antibodies specific to total and phosphorylated forms of proteins we carried initial characterization of circulating lymph phosphoproteome which brought additional information regarding signaling pathways operating in the lymphatics. The results demonstrate that the proteome of intra-nodal lymph serves as a sensitive sentinel of the processes occurring within the lymph nodes during infection. The acute innate response of the lymph nodes to anthrax is accompanied by cellular damage and inflammation with a large number of up- and down-regulated proteins many of which are distinct from those detected in serum. MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001342.

  4. Whole Proteome Analysis of Mouse Lymph Nodes in Cutaneous Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weidong; Mueller, Claudius; Liotta, Lance; Popov, Serguei G.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize a soluble proteome of popliteal lymph nodes during lymphadenitis induced by intradermal injection of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores in mice using tandem LC-MS/MS and reverse-phase protein microarray with antibodies specific to epitopes of phosphorylated proteins. More than 380 proteins were detected in the normal intra-nodal lymph, while the infectious process resulted in the profound changes in the protein abundances and appearance of 297 unique proteins. These proteins belong to an array of processes reflecting response to wounding, inflammation and perturbations of hemostasis, innate immune response, coagulation and fibrinolysis, regulation of body fluid levels and vascular disturbance among others. Comparison of lymph and serum revealed 83 common proteins. Also, using 71 antibodies specific to total and phosphorylated forms of proteins we carried initial characterization of circulating lymph phosphoproteome which brought additional information regarding signaling pathways operating in the lymphatics. The results demonstrate that the proteome of intra-nodal lymph serves as a sensitive sentinel of the processes occurring within the lymph nodes during infection. The acute innate response of the lymph nodes to anthrax is accompanied by cellular damage and inflammation with a large number of up- and down-regulated proteins many of which are distinct from those detected in serum. MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001342. PMID:25329596

  5. Proteome Analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi Response to Environmental Change

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Thomas E.; Luft, Benjamin J.; Yang, Xiaohua; Nicora, Carrie D.; Camp, David G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-11-02

    We examined global changes in protein expression in the B31 strain of Borrelia burgdorferi, in response to two environmental cues (pH and temperature) chosen for their reported similarity to those encountered at different stages of the organism’s life cycle. Multidimensional nano-liquid chromatographic separations coupled with tandem mass spectrometry were used to examine the array of proteins (i.e., the proteome) of B. burgdorferi for different pH and temperature culture conditions. Changes in pH and temperature elicited in vitro adaptations of this spirochete known to cause Lyme disease and led to alterations in protein expression that are associated with increased microbial pathogenesis. We identified 1031 proteins that represent 59% of the annotated genome of B. burgdorferi and elucidated a core proteome of 414 proteins that were present in all environmental conditions investigated. Observed changes in protein abundances indicated varied replicon usage, as well as proteome functional distributions between the in vitro cell culture conditions. Surprisingly, the pH and temperature conditions that mimicked B. burgdorferi residing in the gut of a fed tick showed a marked reduction in protein diversity. Additionally, the results provide us with leading candidates for exploring how B. burgdorferi adapts to and is able to survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions and lay a foundation for planned in situ studies of B. burgdorferi isolated from the tick midgut and infected animals.

  6. Statistical Analysis of Variation in the Human Plasma Proteome

    DOE PAGES

    Corzett, Todd H.; Fodor, Imola K.; Choi, Megan W.; ...

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the variation in the human plasma proteome is an essential prerequisite for disease-specific biomarker detection. We report here on the longitudinal and individual variation in human plasma characterized by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) using plasma samples from eleven healthy subjects collected three times over a two week period. Fixed-effects modeling was used to remove dye and gel variability. Mixed-effects modeling was then used to quantitate the sources of proteomic variation. The subject-to-subject variation represented the largest variance component, while the time-within-subject variation was comparable to the experimental variation found in a previous technical variability study where onemore » human plasma sample was processed eight times in parallel and each was then analyzed by 2-D DIGE in triplicate. Here, 21 protein spots had larger than 50% CV, suggesting that these proteins may not be appropriate as biomarkers and should be carefully scrutinized in future studies. Seventy-eight protein spots showing differential protein levels between different individuals or individual collections were identified by mass spectrometry and further characterized using hierarchical clustering. The results present a first step toward understanding the complexity of longitudinal and individual variation in the human plasma proteome, and provide a baseline for improved biomarker discovery.« less

  7. Proteomic analysis of endothelial cold-adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding how human cells in tissue culture adapt to hypothermia may aid in developing new clinical procedures for improved ischemic and hypothermic protection. Human coronary artery endothelial cells grown to confluence at 37°C and then transferred to 25°C become resistant over time to oxidative stress and injury induced by 0°C storage and rewarming. This protection correlates with an increase in intracellular glutathione at 25°C. To help understand the molecular basis of endothelial cold-adaptation, isolated proteins from cold-adapted (25°C/72 h) and pre-adapted cells were analyzed by quantitative proteomic methods and differentially expressed proteins were categorized using the DAVID Bioinformatics Resource. Results Cells adapted to 25°C expressed changes in the abundance of 219 unique proteins representing a broad range of categories such as translation, glycolysis, biosynthetic (anabolic) processes, NAD, cytoskeletal organization, RNA processing, oxidoreductase activity, response-to-stress and cell redox homeostasis. The number of proteins that decreased significantly with cold-adaptation exceeded the number that increased by 2:1. Almost half of the decreases were associated with protein metabolic processes and a third were related to anabolic processes including protein, DNA and fatty acid synthesis. Changes consistent with the suppression of cytoskeletal dynamics provided further evidence that cold-adapted cells are in an energy conserving state. Among the specific changes were increases in the abundance and activity of redox proteins glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which correlated with a decrease in oxidative stress, an increase in protein glutathionylation, and a recovery of reduced protein thiols during rewarming from 0°C. Increases in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase implicate a central role for the methionine-cysteine transulfuration pathway in increasing

  8. An integrated approach for comparative proteomic analysis of human bile reveals overexpressed cancer-associated proteins in malignant biliary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Natalija; Visentin, Rémy; Delhaye, Myriam; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Farina, Annarita

    2014-05-01

    Proteomics is a key tool in the identification of new bile biomarkers for differentiating malignant and nonmalignant biliary stenoses. Unfortunately, the complexity of bile and the presence of molecules interfering with protein analysis represent an obstacle for quantitative proteomic studies in bile samples. The simultaneous need to introduce purification steps and minimize the use of pre-fractionation methods inevitably leads to protein loss and limited quantifications. This dramatically reduces the chance of identifying new potential biomarkers. In the present study, we included differential centrifugation as a preliminary step in a quantitative proteomic workflow involving iTRAQ labeling, peptide fractionation by OFFGEL electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS, to compare protein expression in bile samples collected from patients with malignant or nonmalignant biliary stenoses. A total of 1267 proteins were identified, including a set of 322 newly described bile proteins, mainly belonging to high-density cellular fractions. The subsequent comparative analysis led to a 5-fold increase in the number of quantified proteins over previously published studies and highlighted 104 proteins overexpressed in malignant samples. Finally, immunoblot verifications performed on a cohort of 8 malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, n=4; cholangiocarcinoma, n=4) and 5 nonmalignant samples (chronic pancreatitis, n=3; biliary stones, n=2) confirmed the results of proteomic analysis for three proteins: olfactomedin-4, syntenin-2 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  9. Leaf proteome analysis of transgenic plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Renzone, Giovanni; Nardi, Luca; Pasquo, Alessandra; Franconi, Rosella; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2009-02-01

    The expression of exogenous antibodies in plant is an effective strategy to confer protection against viral infection or to produce molecules with pharmaceutical interest. However, the acceptance of the transgenic technology to obtain self-protecting plants depends on the assessment of their substantial equivalence compared to non-modified crops with an established history of safe use. In fact, the possibility exists that the introduction of transgenes in plants may alter expression of endogenous genes and/or normal production of metabolites. In this study, we investigated whether the expression in plant of recombinant antibodies directed against viral proteins may influence the host leaf proteome. Two transgenic plant models, generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation, were analyzed for this purpose, namely, Lycopersicon esculentum cv. MicroTom and Nicotiana benthamiana, expressing recombinant antibodies against cucumber mosaic virus and tomato spotted wilt virus, respectively. To obtain a significant representation of plant proteomes, optimized extraction procedures have been devised for each plant species. The proteome repertoire of antibody-expressing and control plants was compared by 2-DE associated to DIGE technology. Among the 2000 spots detected within the gels, about 10 resulted differentially expressed in each transgenic model and were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and muLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS procedures. Protein variations were restricted to a limited number of defined differences with an average ratio below 2.4. Most of the differentially expressed proteins were related to photosynthesis or defense function. The overall results suggest that the expression of recombinant antibodies in both systems does not significantly alter the leaf proteomic profile, contributing to assess the biosafety of resistant plants expressing antiviral antibodies.

  10. Plant proteomics update (2007-2008): Second-generation proteomic techniques, an appropriate experimental design, and data analysis to fulfill MIAPE standards, increase plant proteome coverage and expand biological knowledge.

    PubMed

    Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V; Maldonado, Ana M; Echevarría-Zomeño, Sira; Valledor, Luis; Castillejo, Mari A; Curto, Miguel; Valero, José; Sghaier, Besma; Donoso, Gabriel; Redondo, Inmaculada

    2009-04-13

    This review is the continuation of three previously published articles [Jorrin JV, Maldonado AM, Castillejo MA. Plant proteome analysis: a 2006 update. Proteomics 2007; 7: 2947-2962; Rossignol M, Peltier JB, Mock HP, Matros A, Maldonado AM, Jorrin JV. Plant proteome analysis: a 2004-2006 update. Proteomics 2006; 6: 5529-5548; Canovas FM, Dumas-Gaudot E, Recorbet G, Jorrin J, Mock HP, Rossignol M. Plant proteome analysis. Proteomics 2004; 4: 285-298] and aims to update the contribution of Proteomics to plant research between 2007 and September 2008 by reviewing most of the papers, which number approximately 250, that appeared in the Plant Proteomics field during that period. Most of the papers published deal with the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), and focus on profiling organs, tissues, cells or subcellular proteomes, and studying developmental processes and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses using a differential expression strategy. Although the platform based on 2-DE is still the most commonly used, the use of gel-free and second-generation Quantitative Proteomic techniques has increased. Proteomic data are beginning to be validated using complementary -omics or classical biochemical or cellular biology techniques. In addition, appropriate experimental design and statistical analysis are being carried out in accordance with the required Minimal Information about a Proteomic Experiment (MIAPE) standards. As a result, the coverage of the plant cell proteome and the plant biology knowledge is increasing. Compared to human and yeast systems, however, plant biology research has yet to exploit fully the potential of proteomics, in particular its applications to PTMs and Interactomics.

  11. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics as a tool to identify biological matrices in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Van Steendam, Katleen; De Ceuleneer, Marlies; Dhaenens, Maarten; Van Hoofstat, David; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    In forensic casework analysis, identification of the biological matrix and the species of a forensic trace, preferably without loss of DNA, is of major importance. The biological matrices that can be encountered in a forensic context are blood (human or non-human), saliva, semen, vaginal fluid, and to a lesser extent nasal secretions, feces, and urine. All these matrices were applied on swabs and digested with trypsin in order to obtain peptides. These peptides were injected on a mass spectrometer (ESI Q-TOF) resulting in the detection of several biomarkers that were used to build a decision tree for matrix identification. Saliva and blood were characterized by the presence of alpha-amylase 1 and hemoglobin, respectively. In vaginal fluid, cornulin, cornifin, and/or involucrin were found as biomarkers while semenogelin, prostate-specific antigen, and/or acid phosphatase were characteristic proteins for semen. Uromodulin or AMBP protein imply the presence of urine, while plunc protein is present in nasal secretions. Feces could be determined by the presence of immunoglobulins without hemoglobin. The biomarkers for the most frequently encountered biological matrices (saliva, blood, vaginal fluid, and semen) were validated in blind experiments and on real forensic samples. Additionally, by means of this proteomic approach, species identification was possible. This approach has the advantage that the analysis is performed on the first "washing" step of the chelex DNA extraction, a solution which is normally discarded, and that one single test is sufficient to determine the identity and the species of the biological matrix, while the conventional methods require cascade testing. This technique can be considered as a useful additional tool for biological matrix identification in forensic science and holds the promise of further automation.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Tardigrades: Towards a Better Understanding of Molecular Mechanisms by Anhydrobiotic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schokraie, Elham; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Warnken, Uwe; Mali, Brahim; Frohme, Marcus; Förster, Frank; Dandekar, Thomas; Hengherr, Steffen; Schill, Ralph O.; Schnölzer, Martina

    2010-01-01

    Background Tardigrades are small, multicellular invertebrates which are able to survive times of unfavourable environmental conditions using their well-known capability to undergo cryptobiosis at any stage of their life cycle. Milnesium tardigradum has become a powerful model system for the analysis of cryptobiosis. While some genetic information is already available for Milnesium tardigradum the proteome is still to be discovered. Principal Findings Here we present to the best of our knowledge the first comprehensive study of Milnesium tardigradum on the protein level. To establish a proteome reference map we developed optimized protocols for protein extraction from tardigrades in the active state and for separation of proteins by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Since only limited sequence information of M. tardigradum on the genome and gene expression level is available to date in public databases we initiated in parallel a tardigrade EST sequencing project to allow for protein identification by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. 271 out of 606 analyzed protein spots could be identified by searching against the publicly available NCBInr database as well as our newly established tardigrade protein database corresponding to 144 unique proteins. Another 150 spots could be identified in the tardigrade clustered EST database corresponding to 36 unique contigs and ESTs. Proteins with annotated function were further categorized in more detail by their molecular function, biological process and cellular component. For the proteins of unknown function more information could be obtained by performing a protein domain annotation analysis. Our results include proteins like protein member of different heat shock protein families and LEA group 3, which might play important roles in surviving extreme conditions. Conclusions The proteome reference map of Milnesium tardigradum provides the basis for further studies in order to identify and

  13. Role of salivary and candidal proteins in denture stomatitis: an exploratory proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Warren C; Schwartz-Baxter, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Barros, Silvana; Offenbacher, Steven; Bencharit, Sompop

    2014-07-29

    Denture stomatitis, inflammation and redness beneath a denture, affects nearly half of all denture wearers. Candidal organisms, the presence of a denture, saliva, and host immunity are the key etiological factors for the condition. The role of salivary proteins in denture stomatitis is not clear. In this study 30 edentulous subjects wearing a maxillary complete denture were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva from each subject was collected and pooled into two groups (n = 15 each), healthy and stomatitis (Newton classification II and III). Label-free multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics on two mass spectrometry platforms were used to determine peptide mass differences between control and stomatitis groups. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to determine the differential expression among the groups. The two proteomic platforms identified 97 and 176 proteins (ANOVA; p < 0.01) differentially expressed among the healthy, type 2 and 3 stomatitis groups. Three proteins including carbonic anhydrase 6, cystatin C, and cystatin SN were found to be the same as previous study. Salivary proteomic profiles of patients with denture stomatitis were found to be uniquely different from controls. Analysis of protein components suggests that certain salivary proteins may predispose some patients to denture stomatitis while others are believed to be involved in the reaction to fungal infection. Analysis of candidal proteins suggests that multiple species of candidal organisms play a role in denture stomatitis.

  14. SILAC-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rüetschi, Ulla; Stenson, Martin; Hasselblom, Sverker; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Hansson, Ulrika; Fagman, Henrik; Andersson, Per-Ola

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common lymphoma, is a heterogeneous disease where the outcome for patients with early relapse or refractory disease is very poor, even in the era of immunochemotherapy. In order to describe possible differences in global protein expression and network patterns, we performed a SILAC-based shotgun (LC-MS/MS) quantitative proteomic analysis in fresh-frozen tumor tissue from two groups of DLBCL patients with totally different clinical outcome: (i) early relapsed or refractory and (ii) long-term progression-free patients. We could identify over 3,500 proteins; more than 1,300 were quantified in all patients and 87 were significantly differentially expressed. By functional annotation analysis on the 66 proteins overexpressed in the progression-free patient group, we found an enrichment of proteins involved in the regulation and organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Also, five proteins from actin cytoskeleton regulation, applied in a supervised regression analysis, could discriminate the two patient groups. In conclusion, SILAC-based shotgun quantitative proteomic analysis appears to be a powerful tool to explore the proteome in DLBCL tumor tissue. Also, as progression-free patients had a higher expression of proteins involved in the actin cytoskeleton protein network, such a pattern indicates a functional role in the sustained response to immunochemotherapy. PMID:26060582

  15. Role of Salivary and Candidal Proteins in Denture Stomatitis; an exploratory proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Warren C.; Schwartz-Baxter, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Barros, Silvana; Offenbacher, Steven; Bencharit, Sompop

    2014-01-01

    Denture stomatitis, inflammation and redness beneath a denture, affects nearly half of all denture wearers. Candida organism, the presence of a denture, saliva, and host immunity are the key etiological factors for the condition. The role of salivary proteins in denture stomatitis is not clear. In this study 30 edentulous subjects wearing a maxillary complete denture were recruited. Unstimulated whole saliva from each subject was collected and pooled into two groups (n=15 each); healthy and stomatitis (Newton classification II and III). Label-free multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) proteomics on two mass spectrometry platforms were used to determine peptide mass differences between control and stomatitis groups. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to determine differential expression among the groups. The two proteomic platforms identified 97 and 176 proteins (ANOVA; p<0.01) differentially expressed among the healthy, type 2 and 3 stomatitis groups. Three proteins including carbonic anhydrase 6, cystatin C, and cystatin SN were found to be the same as previous study. Salivary proteomic profiles of patients with denture stomatitis were found to be uniquely different from controls. Analysis of protein components suggests that certain salivary proteins may predispose some patients to denture stomatitis while others are believed to be involved in the reaction to fungal infection. Analysis of candidal proteins suggest that multiple species of candidal organisms play a role in denture stomatitis. PMID:24947908

  16. In-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of de novo protein synthesis induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoan; Bowling, Heather; Hom, Nancy; Kirshenbaum, Kent; Klann, Eric; Chao, Moses V; Neubert, Thomas A

    2014-12-05

    Measuring the synthesis of new proteins in the context of a much greater number of pre-existing proteins can be difficult. To overcome this obstacle, bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can be combined with stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC) for comparative proteomic analysis of de novo protein synthesis (BONLAC). In the present study, we show that alkyne resin-based isolation of l-azidohomoalanine (AHA)-labeled proteins using azide/alkyne cycloaddition minimizes contamination from pre-existing proteins. Using this approach, we isolated and identified 7414 BONCAT-labeled proteins. The nascent proteome isolated by BONCAT was very similar to the steady-state proteome, although transcription factors were highly enriched by BONCAT. About 30% of the methionine residues were replaced by AHA in our BONCAT samples, which allowed for identification of methionine-containing peptides. There was no bias against low-methionine proteins by BONCAT at the proteome level. When we applied the BONLAC approach to screen for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced protein synthesis, 53 proteins were found to be significantly changed 2 h after BDNF stimulation. Our study demonstrated that the newly synthesized proteome, even after a short period of stimulation, can be efficiently isolated by BONCAT and analyzed to a depth that is similar to that of the steady-state proteome.

  17. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Massafra, Vittoria; Milona, Alexandra; Vos, Harmjan R; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; van Mil, Saskia W C

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing "light" lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing "heavy" lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential.

  18. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  19. Quantitative liver proteomics identifies FGF19 targets that couple metabolism and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Harmjan R.; Burgering, Boudewijn M. T.; van Mil, Saskia W. C.

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a gut-derived peptide hormone that is produced following activation of Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR). FGF19 is secreted and signals to the liver, where it contributes to the homeostasis of bile acid (BA), lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. FGF19 is a promising therapeutic target for the metabolic syndrome and cholestatic diseases, but enthusiasm for its use has been tempered by FGF19-mediated induction of proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. To inform future rational design of FGF19-variants, we have conducted temporal quantitative proteomic and gene expression analyses to identify FGF19-targets related to metabolism and proliferation. Mice were fasted for 16 hours, and injected with human FGF19 (1 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle. Liver protein extracts (containing “light” lysine) were mixed 1:1 with a spike-in protein extract from 13C6-lysine metabolically labelled mouse liver (containing “heavy” lysine) and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Our analyses provide a resource of FGF19 target proteins in the liver. 189 proteins were upregulated (≥ 1.5 folds) and 73 proteins were downregulated (≤ -1.5 folds) by FGF19. FGF19 treatment decreased the expression of proteins involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis, i.e., Fabp5, Scd1, and Acsl3 and increased the expression of Acox1, involved in FA oxidation. As expected, FGF19 increased the expression of proteins known to drive proliferation (i.e., Tgfbi, Vcam1, Anxa2 and Hdlbp). Importantly, many of the FGF19 targets (i.e., Pdk4, Apoa4, Fas and Stat3) have a dual function in both metabolism and cell proliferation. Therefore, our findings challenge the development of FGF19-variants that fully uncouple metabolic benefit from mitogenic potential. PMID:28178326

  20. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  1. A regularized Hotelling’s T2 test for pathway analysis in proteomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin S.; Paul, Debashis; Prentice, Ross L.; Wang, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies have identified proteins related to specific phenotypes. In addition to marginal association analysis for individual proteins, analyzing pathways (functionally related sets of proteins) may yield additional valuable insights. Identifying pathways that differ between phenotypes can be conceptualized as a multivariate hypothesis testing problem: whether the mean vector μ of a p-dimensional random vector X is μ0. Proteins within the same biological pathway may correlate with one another in a complicated way, and type I error rates can be inflated if such correlations are incorrectly assumed to be absent. The inflation tends to be more pronounced when the sample size is very small or there is a large amount of missingness in the data, as is frequently the case in proteomic discovery studies. To tackle these challenges, we propose a regularized Hotelling’s T2 (RHT) statistic together with a non-parametric testing procedure, which effectively controls the type I error rate and maintains good power in the presence of complex correlation structures and missing data patterns. We investigate asymptotic properties of the RHT statistic under pertinent assumptions and compare the test performance with four existing methods through simulation examples. We apply the RHT test to a hormone therapy proteomics data set, and identify several interesting biological pathways for which blood serum concentrations changed following hormone therapy initiation. PMID:23997374

  2. Bottom-up proteomic analysis of single HCT 116 colon carcinoma multicellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Peter; Sun, Liangliang; Liu, Xin; Dovichi, Norman J.; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Proteomic analysis of single multicellular spheroids has not been previously reported. As three-dimensional cell cultures are an increasingly popular model system for biological research, there is interest in obtaining proteomic profiles of these samples. We investigated the proteome of single HCT 116 multicellular spheroids using protocols optimized for small sample sizes. Methods Six biological replicates were analyzed via microscopy for size. Total protein content was assessed via the bicinchoninic acid assay (BCA assay). Five separate biological replicate spheroids were analyzed via mass spectrometry in technical duplicate. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) system coupled with an LTQ Orbitrap Velos was used for peptide separation, analysis, and identification. Results The average diameter of six replicate HCT 116 spheroids was 940 ± 30 μm and the average total protein amount was determined to be 39 ± 4 μg. At least 1300 protein groups were identified in each single LC-MS/MS run with ten percent of the material from single spheroid loaded. Database search results showed variation between spheroid protein group identifications. Pearson correlations show that the disparity in identifications is due to random variations in spectra and protocol. Conclusions We detected more than 1350 protein groups in each replicate HCT 116 spheroid. While some variation was detected between replicates, differences in the number of protein groups identified were determined to be the result of random variations in mass spectra acquisition. PMID:26212283

  3. Global proteomic analysis of protein acetylation affecting metabolic regulation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, Juhee; Kim, Sun Ju; Oh, Hye Ryeung; Nam, Doo Hyun; Lee, Sangkyu

    2016-02-01

    Daphnia (Daphnia pulex) is a small planktonic crustacean and a key constituent of aquatic ecosystems. It is generally used as a model organism to study environmental toxic problems. In the past decade, genomic and proteomic datasets of Daphnia have been developed. The proteomic dataset allows for the investigation of toxicological effects in the context of "Daphnia proteomics," resulting in greater insights for toxicological research. To exploit Daphnia for ecotoxicological research, information on the post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is necessary, as this is a critical regulator of biological processes. Acetylation of lysine (Kac) is a reversible and highly regulated PTM that is associated with diverse biological functions. However, a comprehensive description of Kac in Daphnia is not yet available. To understand the cellular distribution of lysine acetylation in Daphnia, we identified 98 acetylation sites in 65 proteins by immunoprecipitation using an anti-acetyllysine antibody and a liquid chromatography system supported by mass spectroscopy. We identified 28 acetylated sites related to metabolic proteins and six acetylated enzymes associated with the TCA cycle in Daphnia. From GO and KEGG enrichment analyses, we showed that Kac in D. pulex is highly enriched in proteins associated with metabolic processes. Our data provide the first global analysis of Kac in D. pulex and is an important resource for the functional analysis of Kac in this organism.

  4. Proteomic analysis of post translational modifications in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2016-02-16

    Cyanobacteria are a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria and the only prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Recently, cyanobacteria have attracted great interest due to their crucial roles in global carbon and nitrogen cycles and their ability to produce clean and renewable biofuels. To survive in various environmental conditions, cyanobacteria have developed a complex signal transduction network to sense environmental signals and implement adaptive changes. The post-translational modifications (PTMs) systems play important regulatory roles in the signaling networks of cyanobacteria. The systematic investigation of PTMs could contribute to the comprehensive description of protein species and to elucidate potential biological roles of each protein species in cyanobacteria. Although the proteomic studies of PTMs carried out in cyanobacteria were limited, these data have provided clues to elucidate their sophisticated sensing mechanisms that contribute to their evolutionary and ecological success. This review aims to summarize the current status of PTM studies and recent publications regarding PTM proteomics in cyanobacteria, and discuss the novel developments and applications for the analysis of PTMs in cyanobacteria. Challenges, opportunities and future perspectives in the proteomics studies of PTMs in cyanobacteria are also discussed.

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-04

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  6. Application of nano-LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS for proteomic analysis of microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Kasprzyk, Joanna; Stępień, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2017-03-01

    Activated platelets and platelet derived microvesicles (PMVs) emerged recently to be promising biomarkers. There is no universal procedure to carry out the proteomic analysis on microvesicles. In this study we proposed a nano-liquid chromatography (nano-LC) technique coupled off-line with a spectrometric measurement MALDI-TOF-MS/MS as a throughput and time-saving procedure. In this study we developed a simplified method to evaluate the protein composition of platelet organelles and PMVs. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was collected from healthy donors. PMVs were generated from washed and thrombin activated platelets. Activated platelets from every donor were used to compare the PMV proteome. Enzymatic digestion of protein lysate was carried out using Filter Aided Sample Preparation (FASP) method with trypsin as a proteolytic enzyme. Tryptic peptides derived from PMVs and activated platelets were analysed using nano-LC coupled off-line mode with a MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. PMV and platelet protein identification was performed using the Mascot engine for searching against the Swiss-Prot human database. The precision tolerance was 100ppm for peptide masses and 0.7Da for fragment ion masses. Individual peptide matches with a score above 28 were considered statistically significant. In total, 446 proteins were identified in PMVs and 513 proteins in activated platelets. Among them 190 were specific for activated platelets and 123 were PMV specific. Cellular component analysis of identified proteins revealed that PMVs contained relatively more extracellular proteins than activated platelets (9.6 vs. 6.0 %) and unique synaptic proteins (0.3%). A new simplified bottom-up method for PMV proteome analysis allowed eliminating the drawbacks of the previously used protocols. This approach can be used in PMV proteome identification.

  7. Proteomic analysis of rice anthers under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, Elham; Bazargani, Mitra Mohammadi; Sajise, Andres Godwin; Abdolahi, Shapour; Vispo, Naireen Aiza; Arceta, Marydee; Nejad, Ghasem Mohammadi; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2012-09-01

    Salinity is a major factor that limits rice production worldwide. Rice is considered generally to be sensitive to salt stress during the reproductive stage. To determine the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance at the reproductive stage, anther proteomic patterns for two contrasting rice genotypes IR64 (salt sensitive) and Cheriviruppu (salt tolerant) under salt stress were compared. Plants were grown in a greenhouse and salt stress (100 mM NaCl) was imposed at the booting stage. Anther samples were collected from control and salt-treated plants at the anthesis stage. The Na(+)/K(+) ratio in IR64 anthers under salt stress was >1.7 times greater than that under control conditions, whereas no significant change was observed in Cheriviruppu. We also observed an 83% reduction in IR64 pollen viability, whereas this reduction was only 23% in Cheriviruppu. Of 454 protein spots detected reproducibly on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, 38 showed significant changes in at least one genotype in response to stress. Using Mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF) analysis, we identified 18 protein spots that were involved in several processes that might increase plant adaptation to salt stress, such as carbohydrate/energy metabolism, anther wall remodelling and metabolism, and protein synthesis and assembly. Three isoforms of fructokinase-2 were upregulated only in Cheriviruppu under salt stress. This upregulation might result in increased starch content in pollen, which would support pollen growth and development under salt stress. The results also suggested that anther and pollen wall remodelling/metabolism proteins contribute to the tolerance of rice to salt stress.

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C.; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots. PMID:28248212

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Response to Zinc, Magnesium, and Calcium Deficiency in Specific Cell Types of Arabidopsis Roots.

    PubMed

    Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Mami; Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Kurata, Rie; Fukui, Risa; Mori, Izumi C; Ogata, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-12

    The proteome profiles of specific cell types have recently been investigated using techniques such as fluorescence activated cell sorting and laser capture microdissection. However, quantitative proteomic analysis of specific cell types has not yet been performed. In this study, to investigate the response of the proteome to zinc, magnesium, and calcium deficiency in specific cell types of Arabidopsis thaliana roots, we performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics using GFP-expressing protoplasts collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protoplasts were collected from the pGL2-GFPer and pMGP-GFPer marker lines for epidermis or inner cell lines (pericycle, endodermis, and cortex), respectively. To increase the number of proteins identified, iTRAQ-labeled peptides were separated into 24 fractions by OFFGFEL electrophoresis prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, 1039 and 737 proteins were identified and quantified in the epidermal and inner cell lines, respectively. Interestingly, the expression of many proteins was decreased in the epidermis by mineral deficiency, although a weaker effect was observed in inner cell lines such as the pericycle, endodermis, and cortex. Here, we report for the first time the quantitative proteomics of specific cell types in Arabidopsis roots.

  10. Recent insights into plant-virus interactions through proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2012-10-05

    Plant viruses represent a major threat for a wide range of host species causing severe losses in agricultural practices. The full comprehension of mechanisms underlying events of virus-host plant interaction is crucial to devise novel plant resistance strategies. Until now, functional genomics studies in plant-virus interaction have been limited mainly on transcriptomic analysis. Only recently are proteomic approaches starting to provide important contributions to this area of research. Classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) is still the most widely used platform in plant proteome analysis, although in the last years the application of quantitative "second generation" proteomic techniques (such as differential in gel electrophoresis, DIGE, and gel-free protein separation methods) are emerging as more powerful analytical approaches. Apparently simple, plant-virus interactions reveal a really complex pathophysiological context, in which resistance, defense and susceptibility, and direct virus-induced reactions interplay to trigger expression responses of hundreds of genes. Given that, this review is specifically focused on comparative proteome-based studies on pathogenesis of several viral genera, including some of the most important and widespread plant viruses of the genus Tobamovirus, Sobemovirus, Cucumovirus and Potyvirus. In all, this overview reveals a widespread repression of proteins associated with the photosynthetic apparatus, while energy metabolism/protein synthesis and turnover are typically up-regulated, indicating a major redirection of cell metabolism. Other common features include the modulation of metabolisms concerning sugars, cell wall, and reactive oxigen species as well as pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The fine-tuning between plant development and antiviral defense mechanisms determines new patterns of regulation of common metabolic pathways. By offering a 360-degree view of protein modulation

  11. [Proteomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate for diagnosis of pathologies of the respiratory system].

    PubMed

    Kononikhin, A S; Fedorchenko, K Yu; Ryabokon, A M; Starodubtseva, N L; Popov, I A; Zavialova, M G; Anaev, E C; Chuchalin, A G; Varfolomeev, S D; Nikolaev, E N

    2015-01-01

    Study of the proteomic composition of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), is a promising non-invasive method for the diagnosis of the respiratory tract diseases in patients. In this study the EBC proteomic composition of the 79 donors, including patients with different pathologies of the respiratory system has been investigated. Cytoskeletal keratins type II (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) and cytoskeletal keratins the type I (9, 10, 14, 15, 16) were invariant for all samples. Analyzing the frequency of occurrence of proteins in different groups of examined patients, several categories of protein have been recognized: found in all pathologies (Dermcidin, Alpha-1-microglobulin, SHROOM3), found in several pathologies (CSTA, LCN1, JUP, PIP, TXN), and specific for a single pathology (PRDX1, Annexin A1/A2). The EBC analysis by HPLC-MS/MS can be used to identify potential protein markers characteristic for pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (PRDX1) and pneumonia (Annexin A1/A2).

  12. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians.

  13. iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Initiation of Head Regeneration in Planarians

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaofang; Wang, Gaiping; Qin, Yanli; Zang, Xiayan; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Zhi; Xue, Deming; Dong, Zimei; Ma, Kexue; Chen, Guangwen; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica has amazing ability to regenerate a head from the anterior ends of the amputated stump with maintenance of the original anterior-posterior polarity. Although planarians present an attractive system for molecular investigation of regeneration and research has focused on clarifying the molecular mechanism of regeneration initiation in planarians at transcriptional level, but the initiation mechanism of planarian head regeneration (PHR) remains unclear at the protein level. Here, a global analysis of proteome dynamics during the early stage of PHR was performed using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy, and our data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002100. The results showed that 162 proteins were differentially expressed at 2 h and 6 h following amputation. Furthermore, the analysis of expression patterns and functional enrichment of the differentially expressed proteins showed that proteins involved in muscle contraction, oxidation reduction and protein synthesis were up-regulated in the initiation of PHR. Moreover, ingenuity pathway analysis showed that predominant signaling pathways such as ILK, calcium, EIF2 and mTOR signaling which were associated with cell migration, cell proliferation and protein synthesis were likely to be involved in the initiation of PHR. The results for the first time demonstrated that muscle contraction and ILK signaling might played important roles in the initiation of PHR at the global protein level. The findings of this research provide a molecular basis for further unraveling the mechanism of head regeneration initiation in planarians. PMID:26131905

  14. Proteomic and genetic approaches to identifying defence-related proteins in rice challenged with the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyun; Bricker, Terry M; Lefevre, Michael; Pinson, Shannon R M; Oard, James H

    2006-09-01

    SUMMARY Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice world-wide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. solani. Replicated two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments were conducted to detect proteins differentially expressed under inoculated and non-inoculated conditions. Tandem mass spectra analysis using electrospray ionization quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI Q-TOF MS) was carried out for protein identification with the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Seven proteins were increased after inoculation in both susceptible and resistant plants. Six of the seven proteins were identified with presumed antifungal, photosynthetic and proteolytic activities. An additional 14 proteins were detected in the response of the resistant line. Eleven of the 14 proteins were identified with presumed functions relating to antifungal activity, signal transduction, energy metabolism, photosynthesis, molecular chaperone, proteolysis and antioxidation. The induction of 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase was detected for the first time in resistant rice plants after pathogen challenge, suggesting a defensive role of this enzyme in rice against attack by R. solani. The chromosomal locations of four induced proteins were found to be in close physical proximity to genetic markers for sheath blight resistance in two genetic mapping populations. The proteomic and genetic results from this study indicate a complex response of rice to challenge by R. solani that involves simultaneous induction of proteins from multiple defence pathways.

  15. Isolation and Proteomics Analysis of Barley Centromeric Chromatin Using PICh.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zixian; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-06-03

    Identification of proteins that are directly or indirectly associated with a specific DNA sequence is often an important goal in molecular biology research. Proteomics of isolated chromatin fragments (PICh) is a technique used to isolate chromatin that contains homologous DNA sequence to a specific nucleic acid probe. All proteins directly and indirectly associated with the DNA sequences that hybridize to the probe are then identified by proteomics.1 We used the PICh technique to isolate chromatin associated with the centromeres of barley (Hordeum vulgare) by using a 2'-deoxy-2'fluoro-ribonucleotides (2'-F RNA) probe that is homologous to the AGGGAG satellite DNA specific to barley centromeres. Proteins associated with the barley centromeric chromatin were then isolated and identified by mass spectrometry. Both alpha-cenH3 and beta-cenH3, the two centromeric histone H3 variants associated with barley centromeres, were positively identified. Interestingly, several different H2A and H2B variants were recovered in the PIChed chromatin. The limitations and future potential of PICh in plant chromatin research are discussed.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  17. Proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under high gravity fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Trong Khoa; Chong, Poh Kuan; Gan, Chee Sian; Wright, Phillip C

    2006-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae KAY446 was utilized for ethanol production, with glucose concentrations ranging from 120 g/L (normal) to 300 g/L (high). Although grown in a high glucose environment, S. cerevisiae still retained the ability to produce ethanol with a high degree of glucose utilization. iTRAQ-mediated shotgun proteomics was applied to identify relative expression change of proteins under the different glucose conditions. A total of 413 proteins were identified from three replicate, independent LC-MS/MS runs. Unsurprisingly, many proteins in the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway showed significant changes in expression level. Twenty five proteins involved in amino acid metabolism decreased their expression, while the expressions of 12 heat-shock related proteins were also identified. Under high glucose conditions, ethanol was produced as a major product. However, the assimilation of glucose as well as a number of byproducts was also enhanced. Therefore, to optimize the ethanol production under very high gravity conditions, a number of pathways will need to be deactivated, while still maintaining the correct cellular redox or osmotic state. Proteomics is demonstrated here as a tool to aid in this forward metabolic engineering.

  18. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C.; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vlot, A. Corina; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR. To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR. To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  19. Proteome analysis of microtubule-associated proteins and their interacting partners from mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Kozielski, Frank; Riaz, Tahira; DeBonis, Salvatore; Koehler, Christian J; Kroening, Mario; Panse, Isabel; Strozynski, Margarita; Donaldson, Ian M; Thiede, Bernd

    2011-07-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for a variety of cellular processes. MTs are finely regulated by distinct classes of MT-associated proteins (MAPs), which themselves bind to and are regulated by a large number of additional proteins. We have carried out proteome analyses of tubulin-rich and tubulin-depleted MAPs and their interacting partners isolated from bovine brain. In total, 573 proteins were identified giving us unprecedented access to brain-specific MT-associated proteins from mammalian brain. Most of the standard MAPs were identified and at least 500 proteins have been reported as being associated with MTs. We identified protein complexes with a large number of subunits such as brain-specific motor/adaptor/cargo complexes for kinesins, dynein, and dynactin, and proteins of an RNA-transporting granule. About 25% of the identified proteins were also found in the synaptic vesicle proteome. Analysis of the MS/MS data revealed many posttranslational modifications, amino acid changes, and alternative splice variants, particularly in tau, a key protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Bioinformatic analysis of known protein-protein interactions of the identified proteins indicated that the number of MAPs and their associated proteins is larger than previously anticipated and that our database will be a useful resource to identify novel binding partners.

  20. Proteomic-based research strategy identified laminin subunit alpha 2 as a potential urinary-specific biomarker for the medullary sponge kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Antonia; Bruschi, Maurizio; Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Granata, Simona; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Antonucci, Nadia; Petretto, Andrea; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Gambaro, Giovanni; Lupo, Antonio; Zaza, Gianluigi

    2017-02-01

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) disease, a rare kidney malformation featuring recurrent renal stones and nephrocalcinosis, continues to be diagnosed using expensive and time-consuming clinical/instrumental tests (mainly urography). Currently, no molecular diagnostic biomarkers are available. To identify such we employed a proteomic-based research strategy utilizing urine from 22 patients with MSK and 22 patients affected by idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis (ICN) as controls. Notably, two patients with ICN presented cysts. In the discovery phase, the urine of 11 MSK and 10 controls, were randomly selected, processed, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Subsequently, several statistical algorithms were undertaken to select the most discriminative proteins between the two study groups. ELISA, performed on the entire patients' cohort, was used to validate the proteomic results. After an initial statistical analysis, 249 and 396 proteins were identified exclusive for ICN and MSK, respectively. A Volcano plot and ROC analysis, performed to restrict the number of MSK-associated proteins, indicated that 328 and 44 proteins, respectively, were specific for MSK. Interestingly, 119 proteins were found to differentiate patients with cysts (all patients with MSK and the two ICN with renal cysts) from ICN without cysts. Eventually, 16 proteins were found to be common to three statistical methods with laminin subunit alpha 2 (LAMA-2) reaching the higher rank by a Support Vector Machine, a binary classification/prediction scheme. ELISA for LAMA-2 validated proteomic results. Thus, using high-throughput technology, our study identified a candidate MSK biomarker possibly employable in future for the early diagnosis of this disease.

  1. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S.; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility. PMID:28248234

  2. Proteomics analysis of digestive juice from silkworm during Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Min; Wang, Simei; Zhu, Liyuan; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have analyzed the midgut transcriptome and proteome after challenge with Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), however little information is available on the digestive juice proteome after BmNPV challenge. This study investigated BmNPV infection-induced protein changes in the digestive juice of silkworms using shotgun proteomics and MS sequencing. From the digestive juice of normal third-day, fifth-instar silkworm larvae, 75 proteins were identified, 44 of which were unknown; from larvae 6 h after inoculation with BmNPV, 106 proteins were identified, of which 39 were unknown. After BmNPV challenge, more secreted proteins appeared that had antiviral and digestive features. GO annotation analysis clustered most proteins in the lumen into catalytic, binding, and metabolic processes. Numerous proteins were reported to have BmNPV interactions. Hsp70 protein cognate, lipase-1, and chlorophyllide A-binding protein precursor were upregulated significantly after BmNPV challenge. Levels of trypsin-like serine protease, beta-1,3-glucanase, catalase, and serine protease transcripts decreased or were not significantly change after BmNPV challenge. Taken together, these findings provided insights into the interaction between host and BmNPV and revealed potential functions of digestive juice after per os BmNPV infection.

  3. Sheep and goat saliva proteome analysis: a useful tool for ingestive behavior research?

    PubMed

    Lamy, E; da Costa, G; Santos, R; Capela E Silva, F; Potes, J; Pereira, A; Coelho, A V; Sales Baptista, E

    2009-10-19

    Sheep and goats differ in diet selection, which may reflect different abilities to deal with the ingestion of plant secondary metabolites. Although saliva provides a basis for immediate oral information via sensory cues and also a mechanism for detoxification, our understanding of the role of saliva in the pre-gastric control of the intake of herbivores is rudimentary. Salivary proteins have important biological functions, but despite their significance, their expression patterns in sheep and goats have been little studied. Protein separation techniques coupled to mass spectrometry based techniques have been used to obtain an extensive comprehension of human saliva protein composition but far fewer studies have been undertaken on animals' saliva. We used two-dimensional electrophoresis gel analysis to compare sheep and goats parotid saliva proteome. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were used to identify proteins. From a total of 260 sheep and 205 goat saliva protein spots, 117 and 106 were identified, respectively. A high proportion of serum proteins were found in both salivary protein profiles. Major differences between the two species were detected for proteins within the range of 25-35 kDa. This study presents the parotid saliva proteome of sheep and goat and highlights the potential of proteomics for investigation relating to intake behavior research.

  4. Proteomic analysis reveals overexpression of moesin and cytokeratin 17 proteins in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Yong; Jung, Woon Yong; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Han Kyeom; Kim, Aeree; Shin, Bong Kyung

    2012-03-01

    The study of tumor biomarkers was gradually facilitated by the adoption of proteomic strategies due to less invasiveness and higher sensitivity. Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide and its incidence has markedly increased in Korea. While the adoption of proteomic strategies facilitated the study of tumor biomarkers, to date, no common agreement has been derived from proteomic investigations regarding tumor markers of colorectal cancer. This study was designed to find molecules differentially expressed in colorectal cancer compared to non-tumor mucosa. Four colorectal adenocarcinoma and corresponding non-tumor tissue samples were analyzed to find previously unknown proteins via two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS spectrometry. Western blot assays and tissue microarray (TMA) immunohistochemistry were performed to validate the identified proteins. Among the twelve up-regulated and one down-regulated proteins identified, moesin, cytokeratin (KRT) 17 and carbonic anhydrase I were validated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemistry. On immunohistochemistry, both moesin and KRT17 demonstrated a tendency of increased expression as pT stage advanced. Both moesin and KRT17 were not expressed in normal colorectal epithelium. These two proteins may play a role in cancer invasion and/or metastasis in colorectal carcinoma, and could be candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of two pathogenic Tritrichomonas foetus genotypes: there is more to the proteome than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Leah J; Šlapeta, Jan; Padula, Matthew P; Druery, Dylan; Tsiotsioras, George; Coorssen, Jens R; Stack, Colin M

    2017-03-01

    Certain clinical isolates of Tritrichomonas foetus infect the urogenital tract of cattle while others infect the gastrointestinal tract of cats. Previous studies have identified subtle genetic differences between these isolates with the term "genotype" adopted to reflect host origin. The aim of this work was to seek evidence of host-specific adaptation and to clarify the relationship between T. foetus genotypes. To do this we characterised the proteomes of both genotypes using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) coupled with LC-MS/MS. Our comparative analysis of the data revealed that both genotypes exhibited largely similar proteoform profiles; however differentiation was possible with 24 spots identified as having a four-fold or greater change. Deeper analysis using 2DE zymography and protease-specific fluorogenic substrates revealed marked differences in cysteine protease (CP) expression profiles between the two genotypes. These variances in CP activities could also account for the pathogenic and histopathological differences previously observed between T. foetus genotypes in cross-infection studies. Our findings highlight the importance of CPs as major determinants of parasite virulence and provide a foundation for future host-parasite interaction studies, with direct implications for the development of vaccines or drugs targeting T. foetus.

  6. Comparison of the Cowpox Virus and Vaccinia Virus Mature Virion Proteome: Analysis of the Species- and Strain-Specific Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Doellinger, Joerg; Schaade, Lars; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) causes most zoonotic orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections in Europe and Northern as well as Central Asia. The virus has the broadest host range of OPV and is transmitted to humans from rodents and other wild or domestic animals. Increasing numbers of human CPXV infections in a population with declining immunity have raised concerns about the virus’ zoonotic potential. While there have been reports on the proteome of other human-pathogenic OPV, namely vaccinia virus (VACV) and monkeypox virus (MPXV), the protein composition of the CPXV mature virion (MV) is unknown. This study focused on the comparative analysis of the VACV and CPXV MV proteome by label-free single-run proteomics using nano liquid chromatography and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). The presented data reveal that the common VACV and CPXV MV proteome contains most of the known conserved and essential OPV proteins and is associated with cellular proteins known to be essential for viral replication. While the species-specific proteome could be linked mainly to less genetically-conserved gene products, the strain-specific protein abundance was found to be of high variance in proteins associated with entry, host-virus interaction and protein processing. PMID:26556597

  7. Analysis of the pancreatic low molecular weight proteome in an animal model of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lassout, Olivier; Pastor, Catherine M; Fétaud-Lapierre, Vanessa; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2010-09-03

    We used a peptidomic approach for the analysis of the low molecular weight proteome in rat pancreatic tissue extracts. The goal was to develop a method that allows identifying endogenous peptides produced in the pancreas in the course of acute pancreatitis. The workflow combines peptides enrichment by centrifugal ultrafiltration, fractionation by isoelectric focusing, and LC-MS/MS analysis without prior enzymatic digestion. The method was assessed on pancreatic extracts from 3 rats with caerulein-induced pancreatitis and 3 healthy controls. A qualitative analysis of the peptide patterns obtained from the different samples was performed to determine the main biological processes associated to the identified peptides. Comparison of peptidomic and immunoblot data for alpha-tubulin, beta-tubulin and coatomer gamma showed that the correlation between the number of identified peptides and the protein abundance was variable. Nevertheless, peptidomic analysis highlighted inflammatory and stress proteins, which peptide pattern was related to acute pancreatitis pathobiology. For these proteins, the higher number of peptides in pancreatitis samples reflected an increase in protein abundance. Moreover, for murinoglobulin-1 or carboxypeptidase B, peptide pattern could be related to protein function. These data suggest that peptidomic analysis is a complementary approach to proteomics for investigating pathobiological processes involved in acute pancreatitis.

  8. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle.

  9. Regional Differences of Proteins Expressing in Adipose Depots Isolated from Cows, Steers and Bulls as Identified by a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Hyoung; Jeong, Jin Young; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Mi Na; Kim, Seok-Ho; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Jeon, Young-Joo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Choi, Nag-Jin; Seo, Kang Seok; Cho, Young Sik; Kim, MinSeok S.; Ko, Sungho; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Youp; Chae, Jung-Il; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue in the loin muscle area of beef cattle as a marbling factor is directly associated with beef quality. To elucidate whether properties of proteins involved in depot specific adipose tissue were sex-dependent, we analyzed protein expression of intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) and omental adipose tissue (OMAT) from Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls of Korean native beef cattle by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based proteomic analysis, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. Two different adipose depots (i.e. intramuscular and omental) were collected from cows (n = 7), steers (n = 7), or bulls (n = 7). LC-MS/MS revealed a total of 55 and 35 proteins in IMAT and OMAT, respectively. Of the 55 proteins identified, 44, 40, and 42 proteins were confirmed to be differentially expressed in IMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, respectively. In OMAT of cows, steers, and bulls, 33, 33, and 22 were confirmed to be differentially expressed, respectively. Tropomyosin (TPM) 1, TPM 2, and TPM3 were subjected to verification by quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in IMAT and OMAT of Hanwoo cows, steers, and bulls as key factors closely associated with muscle development. Both mRNA levels and protein levels of TPM1, TPM2, and TPM3 in IMAT were lower in bulls compared to in cows or steers suggesting that they were positively correlated with marbling score and quality grade. Our results may aid the regulation of marbling development and improvement of meat quality grades in beef cattle. PMID:27165017

  10. Proteome sequencing goes deep

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alicia L.; Merrill, Anna E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry have transformed the scope and impact of protein characterization efforts. Identifying hundreds of proteins from rather simple biological matrices, such as yeast, was a daunting task just a few decades ago. Now, expression of more than half of the estimated ~20,000 human protein coding genes can be confirmed in record time and from minute sample quantities. Access to proteomic information at such unprecedented depths has been fueled by strides in every stage of the shotgun proteomics workflow – from sample processing to data analysis – and promises to revolutionize our understanding of the causes and consequences of proteome variation. PMID:25461719

  11. Label-free proteomics identifies Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers for spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease resulting from mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Recent breakthroughs in preclinical research have highlighted several potential novel therapies for SMA, increasing the need for robust and sensitive clinical trial platforms for evaluating their effectiveness in human patient cohorts. Given that most clinical trials for SMA are likely to involve young children, there is a need for validated molecular biomarkers to assist with monitoring disease progression and establishing the effectiveness of therapies being tested. Proteomics technologies have recently been highlighted as a potentially powerful tool for such biomarker discovery. Methods We utilized label-free proteomics to identify individual proteins in pathologically-affected skeletal muscle from SMA mice that report directly on disease status. Quantitative fluorescent western blotting was then used to assess whether protein biomarkers were robustly changed in muscle, skin and blood from another mouse model of SMA, as well as in a small cohort of human SMA patient muscle biopsies. Results By comparing the protein composition of skeletal muscle in SMA mice at a pre-symptomatic time-point with the muscle proteome at a late-symptomatic time-point we identified increased expression of both Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as robust indicators of disease progression in SMA mice. We report that these protein biomarkers were consistently modified in different mouse models of SMA, as well as across multiple skeletal muscles, and were also measurable in skin biopsies. Furthermore, Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin were measurable in muscle biopsy samples from human SMA patients. Conclusions We conclude that label-free proteomics technology provides a powerful platform for biomarker identification in SMA, revealing Calreticulin and GRP75/Mortalin as peripherally accessible protein biomarkers capable of reporting on disease progression in

  12. Extraction of intracellular protein from Glaciozyma antarctica for proteomics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizura, S. Nor; Farahayu, K.; Faizal, A. B. Mohd; Asmahani, A. A. S.; Amir, R.; Nazalan, N.; Diba, A. B. Farah; Muhammad, M. Nor; Munir, A. M. Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Two preparation methods of crude extracts of psychrophilic yeast Glaciozyma antarctica were compared in order to obtain a good recovery of intracellular proteins. Extraction with mechanical procedures using sonication was found to be more effective for obtaining good yield compare to alkaline treatment method. The procedure is simple, rapid, and produce better yield. A total of 52 proteins were identified by combining both extraction methods. Most of the proteins identified in this study involves in the metabolic process including glycolysis pathway, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruyate decarboxylation and also urea cyle. Several chaperons were identified including probable cpr1-cyclophilin (peptidylprolyl isomerase), macrolide-binding protein fkbp12 and heat shock proteins which were postulate to accelerate proper protein folding. Characteristic of the fundamental cellular processes inferred from the expressed-proteome highlight the evolutionary and functional complexity existing in this domain of life.

  13. Redox Proteomics of the Inflammatory Secretome Identifies a Common Set of Redoxins and Other Glutathionylated Proteins Released in Inflammation, Influenza Virus Infection and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Checconi, Paola; Salzano, Sonia; Bowler, Lucas; Mullen, Lisa; Mengozzi, Manuela; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Sgarbanti, Rossella; Panella, Simona; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH), resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX) 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM), profilin1 (PFN1) and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1). For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX), which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions. PMID:25985305

  14. Novel microwave-assisted digestion by trypsin-immobilized magnetic nanoparticles for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang; Yun, Dong; Qi, Dawei; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-03-01

    In this study, a novel microwave-assisted protein digestion method was developed using trypsin-immobilized magnetic nanoparticles (TIMNs). The magnetic nanoparticles worked as not only substrate for enzyme immobilization, but also excellent microwave irradiation absorber and, thus, improved the efficiency of microwave-assisted digestion greatly. Three standard proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, and cytochrome c, were used to optimize the conditions of this novel digestion method. With the optimized conditions, peptide fragments produced in very short time (only 15 s) could be identified successfully by MALDI-TOF-MS. When it was compared to the conventional in-solution digestion (12 h), equivalent or better digestion efficiency was observed. Even when protein quantity was as low as micrograms, this novel digestion method still could digest proteins successfully, while the same samples by conventional in-solution digestion failed. Moreover, with an external magnetic field, the enzyme could be removed easily and reused. It was verified that, after 4 replicate runs, the TIMNs still kept high activity. To further confirm the efficiency of this rapid digestion method for proteome analysis, it was applied to the protein extract of rat liver. Without any preparation and prefractionation processing, the entire proteome digested by TIMNs in 15 s went through LC-ESI-MS/MS direct analysis. The whole shotgun proteomic experiment was finished in only 1 h with the identification of 313 proteins ( p < 0.01). This new application of TIMNs in microwave-assisted protein digestion really opens a route for large-scale proteomic analysis.

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Cotton Fiber Development and Protein Extraction Method Comparison in Late Stage Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Hana; Pendarvis, Ken; Reddy, Joseph S.; Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Reddy, K. R.; Nanduri, Bindu; Peng, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    The distinct stages of cotton fiber development and maturation serve as a single-celled model for studying the molecular mechanisms of plant cell elongation, cell wall development and cellulose biosynthesis. However, this model system of plant cell development is compromised for proteomic studies due to a lack of an efficient protein extraction method during the later stages of fiber development, because of a recalcitrant cell wall and the presence of abundant phenolic compounds. Here, we compared the quality and quantities of proteins extracted from 25 dpa (days post anthesis) fiber with multiple protein extraction methods and present a comprehensive quantitative proteomic study of fiber development from 10 dpa to 25 dpa. Comparative analysis using a label-free quantification method revealed 287 differentially-expressed proteins in the 10 dpa to 25 dpa fiber developmental period. Proteins involved in cell wall metabolism and regulation, cytoskeleton development and carbohydrate metabolism among other functional categories in four fiber developmental stages were identified. Our studies provide protocols for protein extraction from maturing fiber tissues for mass spectrometry analysis and expand knowledge of the proteomic profile of cotton fiber development. PMID:28248216

  16. Systematic proteomic analysis of human hepotacellular carcinoma cells reveals molecular pathways and networks involved in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanyan; Shen, Huali; Yu, Hongxiu; Zhong, Fan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Jian; Li, Hong; Chen, Jie; Liu, Yinkun; Yang, Pengyuan

    2011-06-01

    Systematic proteomic studying of the mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis remains challenging. We performed comparative proteomic and pathway analysis of four human metastatic HCC cell lines to identify metastasis-associated proteins. These HCC cell lines had a similar genetic background but with an increasing potential of metastasis. Using a combination of two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a total of 125 proteins and their post-translational modification forms or isoforms were found to be differentially expressed in the cell lines. Among them, 29 were gradually up-regulated whereas 17 were down-regulated with increasing metastatic potential. Instead of a traditional single-gene readout, global bioinformatics analysis was carried out, which revealed that the glycolysis pathway was the most significantly enriched pathway. The heat shock proteins (HSPs) centered and NF-kappaB centered networks were also enriched in the result, which may imply the key function of inflaming on metastasis. Meanwhile, knockdown of HDGF, an up-regulated protein and a target of NF-kappaB, induced cell apoptosis in the metastatic HCC cells. This work provides a demonstration that a combination of bioinformatics and comparative proteomics can help in finding out potential biomarkers associated with HCC metastasis on the level of pathways.

  17. Proteomic analysis of male 4C germ cell proteins involved in mouse meiosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejiang; Zhang, Ping; Qi, Yujuan; Chen, Wen; Chen, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2011-01-01

    Male meiosis is a specialized type of cell division that gives rise to sperm. Errors in this process can result in the generation of aneuploid gametes, which are associated with birth defects and infertility in humans. Until now, there has been a lack of a large-scale identification of proteins involved in male meiosis in mammals. In this study, we report the high-confidence identification of 3625 proteins in mouse male germ cells with 4C DNA content undergoing meiosis I. Of these, 397 were found to be testis specific. Bioinformatics analysis of the proteome led to the identification of 28 proteins known to be essential for male meiosis in mice. We also found 172 proteins that had yeast orthologs known to be essential for meiosis. Chromosome distribution analysis of the proteome showed underrepresentation of the identified proteins on the X chromosome, which may be due to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Characterization of the proteome of 4C germ cells from mouse testis provides an inventory of proteins, which is useful for understanding meiosis and the mechanisms of male infertility.

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of methyl jasmonate-induced defense responses in different rice cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Nie, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhihui; Ye, Zhijian; Zou, Xiaotao; Zhang, Lianhui; Wang, Zhenzhong

    2014-05-01

    Jasmonate is an important endogenous chemical signal that plays a role in modulation of plant defense responses. To understand its mechanisms in regulation of rice resistance against the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, comparative phenotype and proteomic analyses were undertaken using two near-isogenic cultivars with different levels of disease resistance. Methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) treatment significantly enhanced the resistance against M. oryzae in both cultivars but the treated resistant cultivar maintained a higher level of resistance than the same treated susceptible cultivars. Proteomic analysis revealed 26 and 16 MeJA-modulated proteins in resistant and susceptible cultivars, respectively, and both cultivars shared a common set of 13 proteins. Cumulatively, a total of 29 unique MeJA-influenced proteins were identified with many of them known to be associated with plant defense response and ROS accumulation. Consistent with the findings of proteomic analysis, MeJA treatment increased ROS accumulation in both cultivars with the resistant cultivar showing higher levels of ROS production and cell membrane damage than the susceptible cultivar. Taken together, our data add a new insight into the mechanisms of overall MeJA-induced rice defense response and provide a molecular basis of using MeJA to enhance fungal disease resistance in resistant and susceptible rice cultivars.

  19. Data set for the proteomics analysis of the endomembrane system from the unicellular Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Doranda; Aït-Ammar, Nawel; Syan, Sylvie; Sachse, Martin; Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Guillén, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite agent of amebiasis, an infectious disease of the human intestine and liver. This parasite contact and kills human cells by an active process involving pathogenic factors. Cellular traffic and secretion activities are poorly characterized in E. histolytica. In this work, we took advantage of a wide proteomic analysis to search for principal components of the endomembrane system in E. histolytica. A total of 5683 peptides matching with 1531 proteins (FDR of 1%) were identified which corresponds to roughly 20% of the total amebic proteome. Bioinformatics investigations searching for domain homologies (Smart and InterProScan programs) and functional descriptions (KEGG and GO terms) allowed this data to be organized into distinct categories. This data represents the first in-depth proteomics analysis of subcellular compartments in E. histolytica and allows a detailed map of vesicle traffic components in an ancient single-cell organism that lacks a stereotypical ER and Golgi apparatus to be established. The data are related to [1].

  20. Gel-free shotgun proteomic analysis of human milk.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; Ferranti, Pasquale; Mamone, Gianfranco; Klouckova, Iveta; Mechref, Yehia; Novotny, Milos V; Addeo, Francesco

    2012-03-02

    The composition of milk has adapted during the evolution of the species to fulfill the specific nutritional needs of the offspring. Currently, it is widely recognized that milk benefits go beyond mere nutrition and serve as a source of a number of functional components to the newborn, particularly host defense effectors. However, the human milk proteome description is still incomplete, primarily because the detection of low-abundance proteins remains challenging. To overcome the limitations of the classical electrophoresis-based approach, previously separated milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) and whey protein fractions were analyzed by nanoflow-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). This shotgun strategy showed an as yet unmatched potential to profile low-abundance proteins in human milk. Proteins associated with 301 different gene products were identified, some of which could be clustered into subsets of protein isoforms, thus providing one of the largest protein inventories of human milk. The identified proteins, which were derived from multiple metabolic pathways, are involved in different physiological functions, such as membrane trafficking, cell signaling, fat metabolism and transport, metabolite delivery, protein synthesis/proteolysis or folding, and immunity-related actions. Nevertheless, it appears clear from this study that the overall picture of the human milk proteome is still incomplete, although several protein signatures of milk evolution are emerging.

  1. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  2. Global Proteomics Analysis of Protein Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xing-Jun; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    Lysine methylation is a common protein post-translational modification dynamically mediated by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and demethylases (PKDMs). Beyond histone proteins, lysine methylation on non-histone proteins play substantial roles in a variety of functions in cells, and is closely associated with diseases such as cancer. A large body of evidence indicates that the dysregulation of some PKMTs lead to tumorigenesis via their non-histone substrates. However, more studies on other PKMTs have made slow progress owing to the lack of the approaches for extensive screening of lysine methylation sites. Recently a series of publications to perform large-scale analysis of protein lysine methylation have emerged. In this unit, we introduce a protocol for the global analysis of protein lysine methylation in cells by means of immunoaffinity enrichment and mass spectrometry. PMID:27801517

  3. A de novo assembly of the newt transcriptome combined with proteomic validation identifies new protein families expressed during tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Notophthalmus viridescens, an urodelian amphibian, represents an excellent model organism to study regenerative processes, but mechanistic insights into molecular processes driving regeneration have been hindered by a paucity and poor annotation of coding nucleotide sequences. The enormous genome size and the lack of a closely related reference genome have so far prevented assembly of the urodelian genome. Results We describe the de novo assembly of the transcriptome of the newt Notophthalmus viridescens and its experimental validation. RNA pools covering embryonic and larval development, different stages of heart, appendage and lens regeneration, as well as a collection of different undamaged tissues were used to generate sequencing datasets on Sanger, Illumina and 454 platforms. Through a sequential de novo assembly strategy, hybrid datasets were converged into one comprehensive transcriptome comprising 120,922 non-redundant transcripts with a N50 of 975. From this, 38,384 putative transcripts were annotated and around 15,000 transcripts were experimentally validated as protein coding by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Bioinformatical analysis of coding transcripts identified 826 proteins specific for urodeles. Several newly identified proteins establish novel protein families based on the presence of new sequence motifs without counterparts in public databases, while others containing known protein domains extend already existing families and also constitute new ones. Conclusions We demonstrate that our multistep assembly approach allows de novo assembly of the newt transcriptome with an annotation grade comparable to well characterized organisms. Our data provide the groundwork for mechanistic experiments to answer the question whether urodeles utilize proprietary sets of genes for tissue regeneration. PMID:23425577

  4. Proteome analysis of the triton-insoluble erythrocyte membrane skeleton.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Harper, Sandra; Pesciotta, Esther N; Speicher, Kaye D; Chakrabarti, Abhijit; Speicher, David W

    2015-10-14

    Erythrocyte shape and membrane integrity is imparted by the membrane skeleton, which can be isolated as a Triton X-100 insoluble structure that retains the biconcave shape of intact erythrocytes, indicating isolation of essentially intact membrane skeletons. These erythrocyte "Triton Skeletons" have been studied morphologically and biochemically, but unbiased proteome analysis of this substructure of the membrane has not been reported. In this study, different extraction buffers and in-depth proteome analyses were used to more fully define the protein composition of this functionally critical macromolecular complex. As expected, the major, well-characterized membrane skeleton proteins and their associated membrane anchors were recovered in good yield. But surprisingly, a substantial number of additional proteins that are not considered in erythrocyte membrane skeleton models were recovered in high yields, including myosin-9, lipid raft proteins (stomatin, flotillin1 and 2), multiple chaperone proteins (HSPs, protein disulfide isomerase and calnexin), and several other proteins. These results show that the membrane skeleton is substantially more complex than previous biochemical studies indicated, and it apparently has localized regions with unique protein compositions and functions. This comprehensive catalog of the membrane skeleton should lead to new insights into erythrocyte membrane biology and pathogenic mutations that perturb membrane stability. Biological significance Current models of erythrocyte membranes describe fairly simple homogenous structures that are incomplete. Proteome analysis of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton shows that it is quite complex and includes a substantial number of proteins whose roles and locations in the membrane are not well defined. Further elucidation of interactions involving these proteins and definition of microdomains in the membrane that contain these proteins should yield novel insights into how the membrane skeleton

  5. Proteomic analysis of brush-border membrane vesicles isolated from purified proximal convoluted tubules

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Scott J.; Broeckling, Corey; Hess, Ann; Prenni, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    The renal proximal convoluted tubule is the primary site of water, electrolyte and nutrient reabsorption and of active secretion of selected molecules. Proteins in the apical brush-border membrane facilitate these functions and initiate some of the cellular responses to altered renal physiology. The current study uses two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to compare brush border membrane vesicles isolated from rat renal cortex (BBMVCTX) and from purified proximal convoluted tubules (BBMVPCT). Both proteomic data and Western blot analysis indicate that the BBMVCTX contain apical membrane proteins from cortical cells other than the proximal tubule. This heterogeneity was greatly reduced in the BBMVPCT. Proteomic analysis identified 193 proteins common to both samples, 21 proteins unique to BBMVCTX, and 57 proteins unique to BBMVPCT. Spectral counts were used to quantify relative differences in protein abundance. This analysis identified 42 and 50 proteins that are significantly enriched (p values ≤0.001) in the BBMVCTX and BBMVPCT, respectively. These data were validated by measurement of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase activity and by Western blot analysis. The combined results establish that BBMVPCT are primarily derived from the proximal convoluted tubule (S1 and S2 segments), whereas BBMVCTX include proteins from the proximal straight tubule (S3 segment). Analysis of functional annotations indicated that BBMVPCT are enriched in mitochondrial proteins and enzymes involved in glucose and organic acid metabolism. Thus the current study reports a detailed proteomic analysis of the brush-border membrane of the rat renal proximal convoluted tubule and provides a database for future hypothesis-driven research. PMID:20219825

  6. Liquid MALDI MS Analysis of Complex Peptide and Proteome Samples.

    PubMed

    Wiangnon, Kanjana; Cramer, Rainer

    2016-09-02

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) is well-known to be a powerful technique for the analysis of biological samples. By using glycerol-based liquid support matrices (LSMs) instead of conventional MALDI matrices the power of this technique can be extended further. In this study, we exploited LSMs for the identification of complex samples, that is, the Lactobacillus proteome and a bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. Liquid and solid MALDI samples were manually and robotically prepared by coupling a nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography (nanoHPLC) system to an automated MALDI sample spotting device. MS and MS/MS data were successfully acquired at the femtomole level using TOF/TOF as well as Q-TOF instrumentation and used for protein identification searching sequence databases. For the BSA digest analysis, liquid MALDI samples resulted in peptide mass fingerprints, which led to a higher confidence in protein identification compared with solid (crystalline) MALDI samples; however, postsource decay (PSD) MS/MS analysis of both the proteome of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 cells and BSA digest showed that further optimization of the formation and detection of peptide fragment ions is still needed for liquid MALDI samples, as the MS/MS ion search score was lower than that for the solid MALDI samples, reflecting the poorer quality of the liquid MALDI-PSD spectra, which can be attributed to the differences in PSD parameters and their optimization that is currently achievable.

  7. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH) families: GH11 (xylanases), GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases), and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases). Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs) families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome analyses could be

  8. Proteome Analysis of the Penicillin Producer Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Barreiro, Carlos; García-Estrada, Carlos; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms causing the production of high penicillin titers by industrial strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum as the result of strain improvement programs. Penicillin biosynthesis is an excellent model system for many other bioactive microbial metabolites. The recent publication of the P. chrysogenum genome has established the basis to understand the molecular processes underlying penicillin overproduction. We report here the proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 (the genome project reference strain) together with an in-depth study of the changes produced in three different strains of this filamentous fungus during industrial strain improvement. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, peptide mass fingerprinting, and tandem mass spectrometry were used for protein identification. Around 1000 spots were visualized by “blue silver” colloidal Coomassie staining in a non-linear pI range from 3 to 10 with high resolution, which allowed the identification of 950 proteins (549 different proteins and isoforms). Comparison among the cytosolic proteomes of the wild-type NRRL 1951, Wisconsin 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and AS-P-78 (a penicillin high producer) strains indicated that global metabolic reorganizations occurred during the strain improvement program. The main changes observed in the high producer strains were increases of cysteine biosynthesis (a penicillin precursor), enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway, and stress response proteins together with a reduction in virulence and in the biosynthesis of other secondary metabolites different from penicillin (pigments and isoflavonoids). In the wild-type strain, we identified enzymes to utilize cellulose, sorbitol, and other carbon sources that have been lost in the high penicillin producer strains. Changes in the levels of a few specific proteins correlated well with the improved penicillin

  9. Expanding Proteome Coverage with CHarge Ordered Parallel Ion aNalysis (CHOPIN) Combined with Broad Specificity Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The “deep” proteome has been accessible by mass spectrometry for some time. However, the number of proteins identified in cells of the same type has plateaued at ∼8000–10 000 without ID transfer from reference proteomes/data. Moreover, limited sequence coverage hampers the discrimination of protein isoforms when using trypsin as standard protease. Multienzyme approaches appear to improve sequence coverage and subsequent isoform discrimination. Here we expanded proteome and protein sequence coverage in MCF-7 breast cancer cells to an as yet unmatched depth by employing a workflow that addresses current limitations in deep proteome analysis in multiple stages: We used (i) gel-aided sample preparation (GASP) and combined trypsin/elastase digests to increase peptide orthogonality, (ii) concatenated high-pH prefractionation, and (iii) CHarge Ordered Parallel Ion aNalysis (CHOPIN), available on an Orbitrap Fusion (Lumos) mass spectrometer, to achieve 57% median protein sequence coverage in 13 728 protein groups (8949 Unigene IDs) in a single cell line. CHOPIN allows the use of both detectors in the Orbitrap on predefined precursor types that optimizes parallel ion processing, leading to the identification of a total of 179 549 unique peptides covering the deep proteome in unprecedented detail. PMID:28164708

  10. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  11. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  12. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2016-12-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  13. Proteomic analysis of cardiac response to thermal acclimation in the eurythermal goby fish Gillichthys mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Jayasundara, Nishad; Tomanek, Lars; Dowd, W Wesley; Somero, George N

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac function is thought to play a central role in determining thermal optima and tolerance limits in teleost fishes. Investigating proteomic responses to temperature in cardiac tissues may provide insights into mechanisms supporting the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Here, we utilized a global proteomic analysis to investigate changes in cardiac protein abundance in response to temperature acclimation (transfer from 13°C to 9, 19 and 26°C) in a eurythermal goby, Gillichthys mirabilis. Proteomic data revealed 122 differentially expressed proteins across acclimation groups, 37 of which were identified using tandem mass-spectrometry. These 37 proteins are involved in energy metabolism, mitochondrial regulation, iron homeostasis, cytoprotection against hypoxia, and cytoskeletal organization. Compared with the 9 and 26°C groups, proteins involved in energy metabolism increased in 19°C-acclimated fish, indicating an overall increase in the capacity for ATP production. Creatine kinase abundance increased in 9°C-acclimated fish, suggesting an important role for the phosphocreatine energy shuttle in cold-acclimated hearts. Both 9 and 26°C fish also increased abundance of hexosaminidase, a protein directly involved in post-hypoxia stress cytoprotection of cardiac tissues. Cytoskeletal restructuring appears to occur in all acclimation groups; however, the most prominent effect was detected in 26°C-acclimated fish, which exhibited significantly increased actin levels. Overall, proteomic analysis of cardiac tissue suggests that the capacity to adjust ATP-generating processes is crucial to the thermal plasticity of cardiac function. Furthermore, G. mirabilis may optimize cellular functions at temperatures near 19°C, which lies within the species' preferred temperature range.

  14. Quantitative analysis of cellular proteome alterations in human influenza A virus-infected mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vester, Diana; Rapp, Erdmann; Gade, Dörte; Genzel, Yvonne; Reichl, Udo

    2009-06-01

    Over the last years virus-host cell interactions were investigated in numerous studies. Viral strategies for evasion of innate immune response, inhibition of cellular protein synthesis and permission of viral RNA and protein production were disclosed. With quantitative proteome technology, comprehensive studies concerning the impact of viruses on the cellular machinery of their host cells at protein level are possible. Therefore, 2-D DIGE and nanoHPLC-nanoESI-MS/MS analysis were used to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the dynamic cellular proteome responses of two mammalian cell lines to human influenza A virus infection. A cell line used for vaccine production (MDCK) was compared with a human lung carcinoma cell line (A549) as a reference model. Analyzing 2-D gels of the proteomes of uninfected and influenza-infected host cells, 16 quantitatively altered protein spots (at least +/-1.7-fold change in relative abundance, p<0.001) were identified for both cell lines. Most significant changes were found for keratins, major components of the cytoskeleton system, and for Mx proteins, interferon-induced key components of the host cell defense. Time series analysis of infection processes allowed the identification of further proteins that are described to be involved in protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis events. Most likely, these proteins are required for supporting functions during influenza viral life cycle or host cell stress response. Quantitative proteome-wide profiling of virus infection can provide insights into complexity and dynamics of virus-host cell interactions and may accelerate antiviral research and support optimization of vaccine manufacturing processes.

  15. Cytoplasmic- and extracellular-proteome analysis of Diplodia seriata: a phytopathogenic fungus involved in grapevine decline

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The phytopathogenic fungus Diplodia seriata, whose genome remains unsequenced, produces severe infections in fruit trees (fruit blight) and grapevines. In this crop is recognized as one of the most prominent pathogens involved in grapevine trunk disease (or grapevine decline). This pathology can result in the death of adult plants and therefore it produces severe economical losses all around the world. To date no genes or proteins have been characterized in D. seriata that are involved in the pathogenicity process. In an effort to help identify potential gene products associated with pathogenicity and to gain a better understanding of the biology of D. seriata, we initiated a proteome-level study of the fungal mycelia and secretome. Results Intracellular and secreted proteins from D. seriata collected from liquid cultures were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. About 550 cytoplasmic proteins were reproducibly present in 3 independent extractions, being 53 identified by peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry. The secretome analysis showed 75 secreted proteins reproducibly present in 3 biological replicates, being 16 identified. Several of the proteins had been previously identified as virulence factors in other fungal strains, although their contribution to pathogenicity in D. seriata remained to be analyzed. When D. seriata was grown in a medium supplemented with carboxymethylcellulose, 3 proteins were up-regulated and 30 down-regulated. Within the up-regulated proteins, two were identified as alcohol dehydrogenase and mitochondrial peroxyrredoxin-1, suggesting that they could play a significant role in the pathogenicity process. As for the 30 down-regulated proteins, 9 were identified being several of them involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Conclusions This study is the first report on proteomics on D. seriata. The proteomic data obtained will be important to understand the pathogenicity process. In fact, several of

  16. Proteomics analysis of the endogenous, constitutive, leaf SUMOylome.

    PubMed

    Colignon, Bertrand; Delaive, Edouard; Dieu, Marc; Demazy, Catherine; Muhovski, Yordan; Wallon, Cindy; Raes, Martine; Mauro, Sergio

    2017-01-06

    SUMOylation is a post-translational modification which regulates a number of critical biological processes in, for example mammals, yeast and plants. In order to fully understand the functional effects of SUMOylation an essential first step is the identification of endogenous targets for SUMOylation. Here we report the results of using a recently developed proteomic approach based on the use of 3D gels to identify the endogenous SUMO targets in leaves of Solanum tuberosum. By using 3D gels we avoid the problem of co-migration of proteins, which is a major limitation of 2D gels, and we enable the use of the highly sensitive CyDye DIGE fluor saturation dyes. Using this new method we have identified 39 individual proteins as probable SUMO targets in leaves of Solanum tuberosum. The advantages of this method compared with other approaches are discussed, and possible future developments are outlined.

  17. Large-Scale Proteomic Analysis of the Human Spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Rappsilber, Juri; Ryder, Ursula; Lamond, Angus I.; Mann, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    In a previous proteomic study of the human spliceosome, we identified 42 spliceosome-associated factors, including 19 novel ones. Using enhanced mass spectrometric tools and improved databases, we now report identification of 311 proteins that copurify with splicing complexes assembled on two separate pre-mRNAs. All known essential human splicing factors were found, and 96 novel proteins were identified, of which 55 contain domains directly linking them to functions in splicing/RNA processing. We also detected 20 proteins related to transcription, which indicates a direct connection between this process and splicing. This investigation provides the most detailed inventory of human spliceosome-associated factors to date, and the data indicate a number of interesting links coordinating splicing with other steps in the gene expression pathway. PMID:12176931

  18. A Method for Microalgae Proteomics Analysis Based on Modified Filter-Aided Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Cao, Xupeng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Haowei; Xue, Song; Tian, Jing

    2017-04-11

    With the fast development of microalgal biofuel researches, the proteomics studies of microalgae increased quickly. A filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method is widely used proteomics sample preparation method since 2009. Here, a method of microalgae proteomics analysis based on modified filter-aided sample preparation (mFASP) was described to meet the characteristics of microalgae cells and eliminate the error caused by over-alkylation. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model, the prepared sample was tested by standard LC-MS/MS and compared with the previous reports. The results showed mFASP is suitable for most of occasions of microalgae proteomics studies.

  19. Proteomic analysis of protein adsorption capacity of different haemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Urbani, Andrea; Lupisella, Santina; Sirolli, Vittorio; Bucci, Sonia; Amoroso, Luigi; Pavone, Barbara; Pieroni, Luisa; Sacchetta, Paolo; Bonomini, Mario

    2012-04-01

    Protein-adsorptive properties are a key feature of membranes used for haemodialysis treatment. Protein adsorption is vital to the biocompatibility of a membrane material and influences membrane's performance. The object of the present study is to investigate membrane biocompatibility by correlating the adsorbed proteome repertoire with chemical feature of the membrane surfaces. Dialyzers composed of either cellulose triacetate (Sureflux 50 L, effective surface area 0.5 m(2); Nipro Corporation, Japan) or the polysulfone-based helixone (FX40, effective surface area 0.4 m(2); Fresenius Medical Care AG, Germany) materials were employed to develop an ex vivo apparatus to study protein adsorption. Adsorbed proteins were eluted by a strong chaotropic buffer condition and investigated by a proteomic approach. The profiling strategy was based on 2D-electrophoresis separation of desorbed protein coupled to MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis. The total protein adsorption was not significantly different between the two materials. An average of 179 protein spots was visualised for helixone membranes while a map of retained proteins of cellulose triacetate membranes was made up of 239 protein spots. The cellulose triacetate material showed a higher binding capacity for albumin and apolipoprotein. In fact, a number of different protein spots belonging to the gene transcript of albumin were visible in the cellulose triacetate map. In contrast, helixone bound only a small proportion of albumin, while proved to be particularly active in retaining protein associated with the coagulation cascade, such as the fibrinogen isoforms. Our data indicate that proteomic techniques are a useful approach for the investigation of proteins surface-adsorbed onto haemodialysis membranes, and may provide a molecular base for the interpretation of the efficacy and safety of anticoagulation treatment during renal replacement therapy.

  20. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of the Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) Leaves to Long Photoperiod Condition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Tian, Lei; Wang, Shunxi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Ping; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Haiping; Chen, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.), an important industrial material and food source, shows an astonishing environmental adaptation. A remarkable feature of its post-domestication adaptation from tropical to temperate environments is adaptation to a long photoperiod (LP). Many photoperiod-related genes have been identified in previous transcriptomics analysis, but proteomics shows less evidence for this mechanism of photoperiod response. In this study, we sampled newly expanded leaves of maize at the three- and six-leaf stages from an LP-sensitive introgression line H496, the donor CML288, LP-insensitive inbred line, and recurrent parent Huangzao4 (HZ4) grown under long days (15 h light and 9 h dark). To characterize the proteomic changes in response to LP, the iTRAQ-labeling method was used to determine the proteome profiles of plants exposed to LP. A total of 943 proteins differentially expressed at the three- and six-leaf stages in HZ4 and H496 were identified. Functional analysis was performed by which the proteins were classified into stress defense, signal transduction, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, energy production, and transport functional groups using the WEGO online tool. The enriched gene ontology categories among the identified proteins were identified statistically with the Cytoscape plugin ClueGO + Cluepedia. Twenty Gene Ontology terms showed the highest significance, including those associated with protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, splicesome, ribosome, glyoxylate, dicarboxylate metabolism, L-malate dehydrogenase activity, and RNA transport. In addition, for subcellular location, all proteins showed significant enrichment of the mitochondrial outer membrane. The sugars producted by photosynthesis in plants are also a pivotal metabolic output in the circadian regulation. The results permit the prediction of several crucial proteins to photoperiod response and provide a foundation for further study of the influence of LP treatments on

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